WorldWideScience

Sample records for model solution chemistry

  1. Modelling Detailed-Chemistry Effects on Turbulent Diffusion Flames using a Parallel Solution-Adaptive Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pradeep Kumar

    Capturing the effects of detailed-chemistry on turbulent combustion processes is a central challenge faced by the numerical combustion community. However, the inherent complexity and non-linear nature of both turbulence and chemistry require that combustion models rely heavily on engineering approximations to remain computationally tractable. This thesis proposes a computationally efficient algorithm for modelling detailed-chemistry effects in turbulent diffusion flames and numerically predicting the associated flame properties. The cornerstone of this combustion modelling tool is the use of parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) scheme with the recently proposed Flame Prolongation of Intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (FPI) tabulated-chemistry approach for modelling complex chemistry. The effect of turbulence on the mean chemistry is incorporated using a Presumed Conditional Moment (PCM) approach based on a beta-probability density function (PDF). The two-equation k-w turbulence model is used for modelling the effects of the unresolved turbulence on the mean flow field. The finite-rate of methane-air combustion is represented here by using the GRI-Mech 3.0 scheme. This detailed mechanism is used to build the FPI tables. A state of the art numerical scheme based on a parallel block-based solution-adaptive algorithm has been developed to solve the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes (FANS) and other governing partial-differential equations using a second-order accurate, fully-coupled finite-volume formulation on body-fitted, multi-block, quadrilateral/hexahedral mesh for two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow geometries, respectively. A standard fourth-order Runge-Kutta time-marching scheme is used for time-accurate temporal discretizations. Numerical predictions of three different diffusion flames configurations are considered in the present work: a laminar counter-flow flame; a laminar co-flow diffusion flame; and a Sydney bluff-body turbulent reacting flow

  2. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peiming; Wilson, Leslie L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Rosenqvist, Joergen; Anderko, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO 2 has been determined at 80 deg. C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl 2+ ) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH 2+ , Mo(OH) 2 + , and Mo(OH) 3 0 ) in addition to the Mo 3+ ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  3. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  4. Modeling the acid-base chemistry of organic solutes in Adirondack, New York, lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Lehtinen, Michael D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the large and diverse Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate four simple organic acid analog models in an effort to quantify the influence of naturally occurring organic acids on lake water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The organic acid analog models were calibrated to observations of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic anion (An-) concentrations from a reduced data set representing 1128 individual lake samples, expressed as 41 observations of mean pH, in intervals of 0.1 pH units from pH 3.9 to 7.0. Of the four organic analog approaches examined, including the Oliver et al. (1983) model, as well as monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic representations, the triprotic analog model yielded the best fit (r2 = 0.92) to the observed data. Moreover, the triprotic model was qualitatively consistent with observed patterns of change in organic solute charge density as a function of pH. A low calibrated value for the first H+ dissociation constant (pKal = 2.62) and the observation that organic anion concentrations were significant even at very low pH (acidic functional groups. Inclusion of organic acidity in model calculations resulted in good agreement between measured and predicted values of lake water pH and ANC. Assessments to project the response of surface waters to future changes in atmospheric deposition, through the use of acidification models, will need to include representations of organic acids in model structure to make accurate predictions of pH and ANC.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  6. Dense interstellar cloud chemistry: Basic issues and possible dynamical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Heere, K.R.; Tarafdar, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Standing at crossroad of enthusiasm and frustration, dense intertellar cloud chemistry has a squarely posed fundamental problem: Why do the grains appear to play at best a minor role in the chemistry? Grain surface chemistry creates considerable difficulties when the authors treat dense clouds as static objects and ignore the implications of the processes by which the clouds became dense in the first place. A new generation of models which treat chemical and dynamical evolutions concurrently are therefore presented as possible solution to the current frustrations. The proposed modeling philosophy and agenda could make the next decade quite exciting for interstellar chemistry

  7. Organoactinide chemistry: synthesis, structure, and solution dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis considers three aspects of organoactinide chemistry. In chapter one, a bidentate phosphine ligand was used to kinetically stabilize complexes of the type Cp 2 MX 2 . Ligand redistribution processes are present throughout the synthetic work, as has often been observed in uranium cyclopentadienyl chemistry. The effects of covalent M-L bonding on the solution and solid state properties of U(III) coordination complexes are considered. In particular, the nature of the more subtle interaction between the metal and the neutral ligand are examined. Using relative basicity data obtained in solution, and solid state structural data (and supplemented by gas phase photoelectron measurements), it is demonstrated that the more electron rich U(III) centers engage in significant U → L π-donation. Trivalent uranium is shown to be capable of acting either as a one- or two-electron reducing agent toward a wide variety of unsaturated organic and inorganic molecules, generating molecular classes unobtainable via traditional synthetic approaches, as well as offering an alternative synthetic approach to molecules accessible via metathesis reactions. Ligand redistribution processes are again observed, but given the information concerning ligand lability, this reactivity pattern is applied to the synthesis of pure materials inaccessible from redox chemistry. 214 refs., 33 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Stepwise adsorption of phenanthrene at the fly ash-water interface as affected by solution chemistry: experimental and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chunjiang; Huang, Guohe

    2012-11-20

    Fly ash (FA) is predominantly generated from coal-fired power plants. Contamination during disposal of FA can cause significant environmental problems. Knowledge about the interaction of FA and hydrophobic organic pollutants in the environment is very limited. This study investigated the adsorption of phenanthrene at the interface of FA and water. The performance of phenanthrene adsorption on FA and the effects of various aqueous chemistry conditions were evaluated. The adsorption isotherms exhibited an increasing trend in the adsorbed amounts of phenanthrene, while a stepwise pattern was apparent. A stepwise multisite Langmuir model was developed to simulate the stepwise adsorption process. The adsorption of phenanthrene onto FA was noted to be spontaneous at all temperatures. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption was an exothermic process. The adsorption capacity gradually decreased as pH increased from 4 to 8; however, this trend became less significant when pH was changed from 8 to 10. The binding affinity of phenanthrene to FA increased after the addition of humic acid (HA). The pH variation was also responsible for the changes of phenanthrene adsorption on FA in the presence of HA. High ionic strength corresponded to low mobility of phenanthrene in the FA-water system. Results of this study can help reveal the migration patterns of organic contaminants in the FA-water system and facilitate environmental risk assessment at FA disposal sites.

  9. Modelling the chemistry of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquette, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have assembled a kinetic model, based on elementary chemical reactions, that describes the chemical behaviour of iodine in aqueous solution as a function of time and various parameters such as pH, concentration and radiation field. The model is conceptually divided into six section: aqueous iodine chemistry, aqueous organic iodide chemistry, water radiolysis, radiolysis of iodine solutions, radiolysis of organic iodide solutions and mass transfer. The model indicates that, in the absence of a radiation field, the rate of production of volatile iodine species is controlled by the rate of oxidation of the iodide ion. The volatile iodine species are dominated by organic iodides if organic impurities are present. The single most important parameter controlling iodine volatility is the pH of the solution; high pH values tend to minimize iodine volatility. In the presence of a radiation field, the volatility of iodine is controlled by the radiation-induced oxidation of the iodide ion. Again, iodine volatility is dominated by organic iodides if organic impurities are present. High pH values minimize iodine volatility. A sensitivity analysis has been performed on some sections of the model to identify reactions to which the volatility of iodine is most sensitive. In the absence of a radiation field, the volatility is most sensitive, first, to the rate of oxidation of the iodide ion, and, second, to the rate of mass transfer of volatile species between the aqueous and the gaseous phases. This approach should be useful in identifying reactions for which accurate rate constants are required and in decreasing the complexity of the model. 37 refs

  10. Modeling and simulation of pit chemistry of 304 austenitic stainless steel under applied stress in sodium chloride solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuhui, E-mail: yhhuang@ecust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, MOE, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Tu, Shan-Tung; Xuan, Fu-Zhen [Key Laboratory of Pressure Systems and Safety, MOE, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A corrosion model was developed to simulate a stressed metal surface with a pit. ► The stress state in the pit bottom was coupled with the local corrosion environment. ► An analytical expression was established for current density of deformed pit surface. ► Local deformation had a strong effect on potential and species concentration in pits. -- Abstract: A mathematical model for simulating the active dissolution of a pit on stressed metal surface had been developed. Based on active dissolution mechanism, dissolution current density on the pit surface was assumed and extended through accounting for the thermal activation energy and the multiaxial stress state in pit bottom. The influence of applied tensile stress, pit radius and temperature was addressed. The distribution of solution potential and species concentration was predicted for different applied tensile stresses based on finite element calculations.

  11. Modelling electric discharge chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.; Wren, J.C.

    1991-07-01

    The chemistry occurring in a electric discharge was modelled to predict how it would be influenced by discharge conditions. The discharge was characterized by a calculated Boltzmann electron-energy distribution, from which rate constants for electron-molecule processes in air were determined. These rate constants were used in a chemical kinetics calculation that also included reactions between neutral molecules, ions, free radicals and electronically excited species. The model describes how the discharge chemistry was influenced by humidity, electric field, electron number density, and concentrations of key reagents identified in the study. The use of an electric discharge to destroy airborne contaminant molecules was appraised, the targeted contaminants being CF 2 Cl 2 , HCN, and SO 2 . The modelling results indicate that an electric discharge should be able to remove HCN and CF 2 Cl 2 effectively, especially if the discharge conditions have been optimized. Effective destruction is achieved with a moderate electric field (over 1 x 10 -15 V.cm 2 ), a substantial electron number density (over 1 x 10 12 cm -3 ), and the presence of H 2 0 in the process air. The residence time in the discharge was also shown to be important in contaminant destruction. An attempt was made to explain the results of the electric discharge abatement of SO 2 , a component of a simulated flue-gas mixture. Results from the model indicate that the discharge parameters that increase the concentration of hydroxyl radical also increase the rate of decomposition of SO 2 . An objective of the study was to explain the apparent enhancement of SO 2 destruction by the presence of a small amount of NO 2 . It was thought that a likely explanation would be the stabilization of HOSO 2 , an important intermediate in the oxidation of SO 2 by NO 2 . (49 figs., 14 tabs., 75 refs.)

  12. Physical chemistry of the interface between oxide and aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolivet, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The behavior and properties of small oxide particles in aqueous suspension are dominated by the physico-chemistry of their surface. It is electrostatically charged and strongly solvated. The origin of the surface charge is discussed through the MUSIC model [Hiemstra 1996], allowing to estimate the acid-base behavior of surface oxygen atoms. The stability of aqueous dispersions of particles is analysed following the DLVO model, with a special attention on the hydration layers allowing the peptization of flocs. Different adsorption mechanisms of metal cations are presented in terms of coordination chemistry (outer- and inner-sphere complexes) emphasizing the coordinating ability of the surface towards metal complexes in solution. The anion adsorption is also studied in relation with some interesting consequences on spinel iron oxide nano-particles. (author)

  13. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shushtarian, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of water and aqueous solutions is a branch of radiation chemistry dealing with chemical changes in water and aqueous solutions induced by high energy radiations. High energy radiations of interest in radiation chemistry are short-wave electromagnetic radiations (X- and γ-rays) and fast charged particles (α- and β-particles, electrons, deuterons and fission fragments). The energy of the particles and photons bringing about chemical reactions in the field of modern radiation chemistry is much higher than that of photons causing photochemical reactions

  14. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of cyanamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.1 M NH 2 CN (pH 2.4 and 5) were irradiated with γ rays (0.01--25 Mrad). The rate constants determined in competition experiments are: k(H + NH 2 CN) = 6.7 x 10 6 M -1 sec -1 , k(e/sub aq/ - + NH 2 CN) = 1.5 x 10 9 M -1 sec -1 , and k(OH + NH 2 CN) = 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 sec -1 . Radiation-chemical yields were determined for the decomposition of cyanamide molecules and the formation of several radiolytic products. The following compounds were identified in irradiated solutions: H 2 , CO 2 , NH 3 , urea, biuret, arginine, and a--N=N-- molecule assigned to methylaminoazoformamide. Possible reactions of secondary free radicals leading to the formation of radiolytic products were considered by taking into account the model of water radiolysis and the measured radiation yields

  15. Solutions to selected exercise problems in quantum chemistry and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162).......Suggested solutions to a number of problems from the collection "Exercise Problems in Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy", previously published on ResearchGate (DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.4024.8162)....

  16. Multiple solutions in the theory of direct current glow discharges: Effect of plasma chemistry and nonlocality, different plasma-producing gases, and 3D modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P. G. C.; Benilov, M. S. [Departamento de Física, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Município, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2013-10-15

    The work is aimed at advancing the multiple steady-state solutions that have been found recently in the theory of direct current (DC) glow discharges. It is shown that an account of detailed plasma chemistry and non-locality of electron transport and kinetic coefficients results in an increase of the number of multiple solutions but does not change their pattern. Multiple solutions are shown to exist for discharges in argon and helium provided that discharge pressure is high enough. This result indicates that self-organization in DC glow microdischarges can be observed not only in xenon, which has been the case until recently, but also in other plasma-producing gases; a conclusion that has been confirmed by recent experiments. Existence of secondary bifurcations can explain why patterns of spots grouped in concentric rings, observed in the experiment, possess in many cases higher number of spots in outer rings than in inner ones.

  17. Inorganic Chemistry Solutions to Semiconductor Nanocrystal Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Samuel R. [Ames Laboratory; Guo, Yijun [Ames Laboratory; Ruberu, T. Purnima A. [Ames Laboratory; Tavasoli, Elham [Ames Laboratory; Vela, Javier [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-15

    The optoelectronic and chemical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals heavily depend on their composition, size, shape and internal structure, surface functionality, etc. Available strategies to alter these properties through traditional colloidal syntheses and ligand exchange methods place a premium on specific reaction conditions and surfactant combinations. In this invited review, we apply a molecular-level understanding of chemical precursor reactivity to reliably control the morphology, composition and intimate architecture (core/shell vs. alloyed) of semiconductor nanocrystals. We also describe our work aimed at achieving highly selective, low-temperature photochemical methods for the synthesis of semiconductor–metal and semiconductor–metal oxide photocatalytic nanocomposites. In addition, we describe our work on surface modification of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots using new approaches and methods that bypass ligand exchange, retaining the nanocrystal's native ligands and original optical properties, as well as on spectroscopic methods of characterization useful in determining surface ligand organization and chemistry. Using recent examples from our group and collaborators, we demonstrate how these efforts have lead to faster, wider and more systematic application of semiconductor nanocrystal-based materials to biological imaging and tracking, and to photocatalysis of unconventional substrates. We believe techniques and methods borrowed from inorganic chemistry (including coordination, organometallic and solid state chemistry) have much to offer in reaching a better understanding of the synthesis, functionalization and real-life application of such exciting materials as semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots, rods, tetrapods, etc.).

  18. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  19. Solution Calorimetry Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizen, Deborah A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents two experiments: the first one measures the heat of an exothermic reaction by the reduction of permanganate by the ferris ion; the second one measures the heat of an endothermic process, the mixing of ethanol and cyclohexane. Lists tables to aid in the use of the solution calorimeter. (MVL)

  20. Molecular Twister: A Game for Exploring Solution Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer R. Masonjones

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available pH is an essential biological concept with critical importance at various scales, from the molecular level, dealing with blood buffers, homeostasis, and proton gradients, all the way up to the ecosystem level, with soil chemistry and acid rain. However, pH is also a concept that spawns student misconceptions and misunderstanding in terms of what is happening in a solution on the atomic level. The Molecular Twister game, created for a Florida Department of Education funded professional development workshop for Florida high school teachers hosted at the University of Tampa  (Science Math Masters, seeks to model pH in such a way that students can visually and kinesthetically learn the concept in a few minutes. In addition, the basic design of the game pieces allow for teaching extensions to include more complex acid-base reactions. Challenge questions are provided to allow teachers to bring relevancy to the game, using examples of acid-base chemistry pulled from cases in human health and the environment.

  1. Simplified Model for Reburning Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Hansen, Stine

    2010-01-01

    In solid fuel flames, reburn-type reactions are often important for the concentrations of NOx in the near-burner region. To be able to model the nitrogen chemistry in these flames, it is necessary to have an adequate model for volatile/NO interactions. Simple models consisting of global steps...... or based on partial-equilibrium assumptions have limited predictive capabilities. Reburning models based on systematic reduction of a detailed chemical kinetic model offer a high accuracy but rely on input estimates of combustion intermediates, including free radicals. In the present work, an analytically...

  2. Modeling chemistry in PWR fuel crud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PWR fuel crud arises from deposition of corrosion products in the coolant on clad surfaces in the core. These deposits form a porous layer through which water must pass to provide effective heat transfer from the clad surface. The usual heat transfer mechanism is by wick boiling in which water passing through the porous crud is converted to steam that escapes through steam chimneys in the deposit. This conversion of water into steam within the deposit means that dilute solutions in the bulk coolant become concentrated in the crud and this can lead to precipitation of species such as lithium borates, ZnO and Zn-silicates. Such precipitation processes may lead to problems such as crud induced power shifts (CIPS), formally known as axial off-set anomaly (AOA), or crud induced localised corrosion (CILC) of the clad, that has led to cladding failures. These precipitation processes also hinder heat transfer and can lead to hot spots on the clad surfaces that are potentially damaging. Questions such as what should be the plant limits on Zn, Si, B and Li to prevent such problems, and how should these be controlled during the cycle, are not easy to answer. With several new designs of PWR proposing high power density cores and therefore greater subcooled nucleate boiling, and with existing plants still up-rating their cores, these questions are likely to become more important in the future. It is therefore important to understand the relationship between coolant chemistry (Zn, Si, Li, B levels) and the chemistry within fuel crud. The bulk and crud chemistry are coupled along with the bulk and local heat transfer processes. This coupling of chemistry and heat transfer makes this a particularly difficult problem to investigate theoretically although the authors have previously achieved this using a number of one dimensional heat and mass transfer models. This paper discusses a new approach to this problem using finite element methods to solve the relevant coupled chemistry and

  3. Modeling nitrogen chemistry in combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Miller, James A.; Ruscic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    Understanding of the chemical processes that govern formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in combustion processes continues to be a challenge. Even though this area has been the subject of extensive research over the last four decades, there are still unresolved issues that may limit...... via NNH or N2O are discussed, along with the chemistry of NO removal processes such as reburning and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NO. Each subset of the mechanism is evaluated against experimental data and the accuracy of modeling predictions is discussed....

  4. Frontiers in Atmospheric Chemistry Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colette, Augustin; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Meleux, Frederik; Rouïl, Laurence

    2013-04-01

    The first pan-European kilometre-scale atmospheric chemistry simulation is introduced. The continental-scale air pollution episode of January 2009 is modelled with the CHIMERE offline chemistry-transport model with a massive grid of 2 million horizontal points, performed on 2000 CPU of a high performance computing system hosted by the Research and Technology Computing Center at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CCRT/CEA). Besides the technical challenge, which demonstrated the robustness of the selected air quality model, we discuss the added value in terms of air pollution modelling and decision support. The comparison with in-situ observations shows that model biases are significantly improved despite some spurious added spatial variability attributed to shortcomings in the emission downscaling process and coarse resolution of the meteorological fields. The increased spatial resolution is clearly beneficial for the detection of exceedances and exposure modelling. We reveal small scale air pollution patterns that highlight the contribution of city plumes to background air pollution levels. Up to a factor 5 underestimation of the fraction of population exposed to detrimental levels of pollution can be obtained with a coarse simulation if subgrid scale correction such as urban increments are ignored. This experiment opens new perspectives for environmental decision making. After two decades of efforts to reduce air pollutant emissions across Europe, the challenge is now to find the optimal trade-off between national and local air quality management strategies. While the first approach is based on sectoral strategies and energy policies, the later builds upon new alternatives such as urban development. The strategies, the decision pathways and the involvement of individual citizen differ, and a compromise based on cost and efficiency must be found. We illustrated how high performance computing in atmospheric science can contribute to this

  5. The pentavalent actinide solution chemistry in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topin, Sylvain; Aupiais, Jean

    2016-03-01

    With regard to environmental monitoring of certain nuclear facilities, pentavalent actinides, in particular neptunium and plutonium, play a key role, as the chief soluble, mobile forms of actinides. In the past five years, investigations carried out by hyphenating capillary electrophoresis to ICP-MS (CE-ICP-MS) have allowed a number of hitherto unknown thermodynamic data to be determined for Np(V) and Pu(V) interactions with the chief environmentally abundant anions. For the first time, data were provided for Pu(V) interactions with carbonate, sulfate, oxalate, chloride, and nitrate ions, allowing the Np(V)/Pu(V) analogy to be verified experimentally. Knowledge of Np(V) chemistry, especially in carbonate, and sulfate media, was also refined. These CE-ICP-MS studies, combined with some earlier findings, have brought about a renewal in the knowledge of An(V) chemistry in solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The radiation chemistry of aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    The radiation chemistry of cobalt-60 gamma-irradiated aqueous sodium terephthalate solutions has been studied. In aerated 4 x 10 -4 M sodium hydroxide solutions, the main products are hydroxyterephthalate (HTA) (G = 0.99 +- 0.01), carbonate (G = 1.31 +- 0.08), and peroxides (G = 2.84 +- 0.04). The HTA and carbonate species are both formed as a result of hydroxyl radical attack and account for approximately 90 per cent of hydroxyl radical reactions. Oxygen needs to be present for efficient conversion of the terephthalate-OH radical adduct to HTA and oxygenation increases G(HTA) above the aerated solution value. G(HTA) is unaffected by changes in terephthalate concentration between 1 x 10 -4 M and 1 x 10 -2 M in sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 10. Decreasing the solution pH does however affect G(HTA). In phosphate buffered solutions pH 6.85, G(HTA) is 0.93 +- 0.01 and lower values are obtained with further decrease in solution pH. The lowering of the G(HTA) value is attributed to recombination reactions between the terephthalate-OH radical products and reducing radical products. Experimental evidence supporting the recombination postulate was obtained from the measurement of a parallel decrease in the peroxide yield and the observation of a dose rate effect on G(HTA). Competition kinetic studies with the added solutes carbonate and bicarbonate gave the rate ratios k (OH + TA 2- ) : k(OH + CO 3 2- ) : k(OH + HCO 3 - ) = 1 : 0.105 : 0.0036

  7. Containment Sodium Chemistry Models in MELCOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Humphries, Larry L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Denman, Matthew R [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    To meet regulatory needs for sodium fast reactors’ future development, including licensing requirements, Sandia National Laboratories is modernizing MELCOR, a severe accident analysis computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Specifically, Sandia is modernizing MELCOR to include the capability to model sodium reactors. However, Sandia’s modernization effort primarily focuses on the containment response aspects of the sodium reactor accidents. Sandia began modernizing MELCOR in 2013 to allow a sodium coolant, rather than water, for conventional light water reactors. In the past three years, Sandia has been implementing the sodium chemistry containment models in CONTAIN-LMR, a legacy NRC code, into MELCOR. These chemistry models include spray fire, pool fire and atmosphere chemistry models. Only the first two chemistry models have been implemented though it is intended to implement all these models into MELCOR. A new package called “NAC” has been created to manage the sodium chemistry model more efficiently. In 2017 Sandia began validating the implemented models in MELCOR by simulating available experiments. The CONTAIN-LMR sodium models include sodium atmosphere chemistry and sodium-concrete interaction models. This paper presents sodium property models, the implemented models, implementation issues, and a path towards validation against existing experimental data.

  8. Modelling local chemistry in PWR steam generator crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of impurities in local regions of PWR Steam Generators (SG) has resulted in the accelerated corrosion of SG materials. The chemical conditions in crevices and sludge piles is dependent on thermal hydraulic and mass transfer processes as well as the physical chemistry of the concentrated solution itself. This paper discusses the different modelling approaches which can be used to describe the concentration process and the local chemistry in these regions. The limitations of each approach and the applicability of model results to field conditions are discussed in the paper. EPRI's program in this area, including past accomplishments and the models used in the MULTEQ code are described in the paper. (author)

  9. Predictive Modeling in Actinide Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    These are slides from a presentation on predictive modeling in actinide chemistry and catalysis. The following topics are covered in these slides: Structures, bonding, and reactivity (bonding can be quantified by optical probes and theory, and electronic structures and reaction mechanisms of actinide complexes); Magnetic resonance properties (transition metal catalysts with multi-nuclear centers, and NMR/EPR parameters); Moving to more complex systems (surface chemistry of nanomaterials, and interactions of ligands with nanoparticles); Path forward and conclusions.

  10. Chemistry Teachers' Knowledge and Application of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuhao; Chi, Shaohui; Hu, Kaiyan; Chen, Wenting

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' knowledge and application of model play an important role in students' development of modeling ability and scientific literacy. In this study, we investigated Chinese chemistry teachers' knowledge and application of models. Data were collected through test questionnaire and analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The result indicated…

  11. Modeling the atmospheric chemistry of TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael V.; Burns, Douglas S.; Chynwat, Veeradej; Moore, William; Plitz, Angela; Rottmann, Shawn; Hearn, John

    2009-05-01

    An atmospheric chemistry model that describes the behavior and disposition of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere was coupled with the transport and diffusion model, SCIPUFF. The atmospheric chemistry model was developed by reducing a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (keff) that is a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, and cloud cover. Empirically derived keff functions that describe the degradation of target toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) were derived by statistically analyzing data generated from the detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. To assess and identify areas to improve the developed atmospheric chemistry model, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to (1) quantify the sensitivity of the model output (TIC concentrations) with respect to changes in the input parameters and (2) improve, where necessary, the quality of the input data based on sensitivity results. The model predictions were evaluated against experimental data. Chamber data were used to remove the complexities of dispersion in the atmosphere.

  12. Modeling the chemistries of technical molecular plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, James J.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Brown, Daniel B.; Varambhia, Hemal N.; Doss, Natasha

    2008-10-01

    Plasma chemistries, especially for molecular gases, are complicated. With a limited amount of molecular data available, it is hard to model these plasmas accurately; just a couple of feedstock gases can lead to a minimal model containing perhaps dozens of gas-phase species. The possible gas-phase and surface reactions that can occur could be in the tens of thousands; less than a hundred are typically used in chemistry models. Understanding the importance of various species and reactions to a chemical model is vital. Here we present the progress on constructing a package (Quantemol-P)[1] to simplify and automate the process of building and analyzing plasma chemistries e.g. SF6/O2, CF4/O2 and O2/He. [1] J.J. Munro, J. Tennyson, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. A, accepted

  13. The introduction to the chemistry of second-sphere complexes of metals in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, V.E.; Isaev, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation data on the chemistry of second-sphere complexes of metal ions (alkali, alkaline earth, transition, rare earth and other metals) in solutions are generalized. Modern representations about the processes of their formation, investigation methods, thermodynamics, structure, the nature of forces to form them are described. Perspectives of the development of the chemistry of second-sphere complexes in solutions are given

  14. Stratospheric General Circulation with Chemistry Model (SGCCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Geller, Marvin A.; Kaye, Jack A.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    In the past two years constituent transport and chemistry experiments have been performed using both simple single constituent models and more complex reservoir species models. Winds for these experiments have been taken from the data assimilation effort, Stratospheric Data Analysis System (STRATAN).

  15. Role of solution chemistry in the retention and release of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upon increasing production and use of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs), concerns agitate over their potential impacts and risks to the environment, ecosystem, and human health. An improved understanding of the fate and transport including remobilization of GONPs in the subsurface environment enables us to better expedite the benign use of GONPs in a sustainable fashion but also evaluate their environmental impacts and health risks. In this study, the deposition and release of GONPs were systematically examined in water-saturated columns packed with either uncoated sand or iron oxide-coated sand (U-S and Fe-S, respectively) at environmentally relevant solution chemistry conditions (1–100 mM KCl and 0.1–10 mM CaCl2 at pH 7.0). Our results indicate that, in line with the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, increasing influent ionic strength (IS) resulted in the reduced mobility of GONPs; and the impact of monovalent K+ was less than divalent Ca2+ in weakening the mobility of GONPs in both U-S and Fe-S. The positively charged iron oxide coating on the sand surface strongly immobilized the negatively charged GONPs at pH 7.0, producing the hyperexponential retention profiles for GONPs particularly in the presence of CaCl2 due primarily to the synergistic effects between iron oxide coating and Ca2+ (e.g., aggravate physical straining). A stepwise decreasing in pore-water transient IS initiated detachment of GONPs that were previously retained in the

  16. Using advanced surface complexation models for modelling soil chemistry under forests: Solling forest, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonten, Luc T.C.; Groenenberg, Jan E.; Meesenburg, Henning; Vries, Wim de

    2011-01-01

    Various dynamic soil chemistry models have been developed to gain insight into impacts of atmospheric deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and other elements on soil and soil solution chemistry. Sorption parameters for anions and cations are generally calibrated for each site, which hampers extrapolation in space and time. On the other hand, recently developed surface complexation models (SCMs) have been successful in predicting ion sorption for static systems using generic parameter sets. This study reports the inclusion of an assemblage of these SCMs in the dynamic soil chemistry model SMARTml and applies this model to a spruce forest site in Solling Germany. Parameters for SCMs were taken from generic datasets and not calibrated. Nevertheless, modelling results for major elements matched observations well. Further, trace metals were included in the model, also using the existing framework of SCMs. The model predicted sorption for most trace elements well. - Highlights: → Surface complexation models can be well applied in field studies. → Soil chemistry under a forest site is adequately modelled using generic parameters. → The model is easily extended with extra elements within the existing framework. → Surface complexation models can show the linkages between major soil chemistry and trace element behaviour. - Surface complexation models with generic parameters make calibration of sorption superfluous in dynamic modelling of deposition impacts on soil chemistry under nature areas.

  17. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  18. Chemistry models in the Victoria code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimley, A.J. III

    1988-01-01

    The VICTORIA Computer code consists of the fission product release and chemistry models for the MELPROG severe accident analysis code. The chemistry models in VICTORIA are used to treat multi-phase interactions in four separate physical regions: fuel grains, gap/open porosity/clad, coolant/aerosols, and structure surfaces. The physical and chemical environment of each region is very different from the others and different models are required for each. The common thread in the modelling is the use of a chemical equilibrium assumption. The validity of this assumption along with a description of the various physical constraints applicable to each region will be discussed. The models that result from the assumptions and constraints will be presented along with samples of calculations in each region

  19. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of cyanamide. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Jovanovic, S.V.

    1978-09-01

    Oxygen-free aqueous solutions of 0.1 M NH/sub 2/CN (pH 2.4 and 5) were irradiated with ..gamma.. rays (0.01--25 Mrad). The rate constants determined in competition experiments are: k(H + NH/sub 2/CN) = 6.7 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/, k(e/sub aq//sup -/ + NH/sub 2/CN) = 1.5 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/, and k(OH + NH/sub 2/CN) = 8.5 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/. Radiation-chemical yields were determined for the decomposition of cyanamide molecules and the formation of several radiolytic products. The following compounds were identified in irradiated solutions: H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, NH/sub 3/, urea, biuret, arginine, and a--N=N-- molecule assigned to methylaminoazoformamide. Possible reactions of secondary free radicals leading to the formation of radiolytic products were considered by taking into account the model of water radiolysis and the measured radiation yields.

  20. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  1. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Propp, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    Modern methods of uranium solution mining are typically accompanied by gains and losses of mass through reagent consumption by rock-forming minerals, with subsequent formation of clay minerals, gypsum, carbonates, and iron oxyhydroxides. A systematic approach to alleviate such problems involves the application of leach solutions that are in equilibrium with the host-rock minerals but in disequilibrium with the ore-forming minerals. This partial equilibrium can be approximated by solution-composition adjustments within the systems K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O and Na 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O. Uranium ore containing 0.15 percent U 3 O 8 from the Gulf Mineral Resources Corporation's Mariano Lake mine, the Smith Lake district of the Grants mineral belt, was collected for investigation. Presented are a theoretical evaluation of leachate data and an experimental treatment of the ore, which contained mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, and quartz (with lesser amounts of micas, clay minerals, and organic carbonaceous material). Small-scale (less than or equal to 1 kg) column-leaching experiments were conducted to model the results of conventional leaching operations and to provide leachate solutions that could be compared with solutions calculated to be in equilibrium with the matrix minerals. Leach solutions employed include: 1) sulfuric acid, 2) sodium bicarbonate, and 3) sulfuric acid with 1.0 molal potassium chloride. The uranium concentrations in the sodium-bicarbonate leach solution and the acid-leach solution were about a gram per liter at the termination of the tests. However, the permeability of the ore in the acid leach was greatly reduced, owing to the formation of clay minerals. Uranium solubility in the leach column stabilized with the potassium-chloride solution was calculated from leachate compositions to be limited by the solubility of carnotite

  2. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V. [VNIIAES (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH{sub 25} value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH{sub 25} value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH{sub 25} maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  3. Water chemistry at RBMK plants: Problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamet, V.; Yurmanov, V.

    2002-01-01

    After around 15 years of operation RBMK-1000 units undergo a major refit, which includes safety system upgrading, fuel tube replacement, etc. The above upgrading has created problems for water chemistry. In particular, in late 80's in-core insertion time of the portion of control rods was reduced 10-fold thanks to a transfer from water to filming cooling of scram channels. Scram channels are cooled with inner surface water film cooling and nitrogen is injected into heads via special pipelines. Such cooling system modernization ensures fast insertion of absorber rods. The above upgrade intensified nitric acid radiolytic generation in water coolant and pH 25 value shift to acid conditions (up to 4.5). The results of corrosion tests in such conditions proved the necessity to improve water chemistry to ensure corrosion protection of scram/control rod and circuit components, especially those made out of aluminium alloy. Since 1990 the new revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard specified the new normal operational limit and action levels for possible temporary deviations of pH 25 value. RBMK plant specific measures were implemented at RBMK plants to meet the above requirements of the 1990 revision of the RBMK-1000 water chemistry standard. Clean-up systems of the above circuit were upgraded to ensure intensive absorption of nitric acid from water and pH 25 maintenance in a slightly acid area. (authors)

  4. Problems and solutions in quantum chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Charles S

    1988-01-01

    Unusually varied problems, with detailed solutions, cover quantum mechanics, wave mechanics, angular momentum, molecular spectroscopy, scattering theory, more. 280 problems, plus 139 supplementary exercises.

  5. Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Competencies in the Laboratory: A Cross-Grade Study in Solution Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, F. O.

    2016-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for chemistry teacher candidates is to demonstrate certain laboratory skills. This article aims to determine and discuss the competencies of pre-service chemistry teachers in a chemistry laboratory context working with solution chemistry content. The participants in this study consisted of a group of pre-service chemistry…

  6. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  7. Can a 'state of the art' chemistry transport model really simulate Anazonian tropospheric chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barkley, M.; Palmer, P.I.; Ganzeveld, L.N.

    2011-01-01

    We present an evaluation of a nested high-resolution Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-Chem chemistry transport model simulation of tropospheric chemistry over tropical South America. The model has been constrained with two isoprene emission inventories: (1) the canopy-scale Model of Emissions

  8. Soil solution chemistry and element fluxes in three European heathlands and their responses to warming and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.K.; Tietema, A.; Williams, D.

    2004-01-01

    Soil water chemistry and element budgets were studied at three northwestern European Calluna vulgaris heathland sites in Denmark (DK), The Netherlands (NL), and Wales (UK). Responses to experimental nighttime warming and early summer drought were followed during a two-year period. Soil solution...... chemistry measured below the organic soil layer and below the rooting zone and water fluxes estimated with hydrological models were combined to calculate element budgets. Remarkably high N leaching was observed at the NL heath with 18 and 6.4 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) of NO3-N and NH4-N leached from the control...

  9. Solutions, Unit 5: Colligative Properties of Solutions. A Computer-Enriched Module for Introductory Chemistry. Student's Guide and Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Morris

    Presented are the teacher's guide and student manual for one of a series of self-instructional, computer-based learning modules for an introductory, undergraduate chemistry course. The student manual for this unit on the colligative properties of solutions includes objectives, prerequisites, pretest, discussion, and 20 problem sets. Included in…

  10. Modelling neutral and plasma chemistry with DSMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful method for modelling chemically reacting flows. It is a statistical method which simulates the Boltzmann equation by interacting computational particles which represent a large number of a single species type. A statistical problem will occur when trace concentrations are required to be accurately modelled; the traditional strategy is to use more computational particles per cell or simply obtain lower statistics and thus have higher uncertainty for the trace concentrations. A new method, cell based chemistry (CBC), based on an integral balancing concept, allows all chemistry, including trace reactions, to be efficiently modelled in the framework of DSMC. This strategy first separates the collision phase from the reacting phase. Then a strategy is presented which conserves both the collision and reaction frequencies in a consistent manner. The illustrative problem is a chemically reacting glow discharge plasma; the ion concentrations typically are at a 0.1% mole fraction but dominant the physical mechanism of the system. Comparisons will be made to a chlorine plasma in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell with an inductive coil at approximately 20 mtorr system pressure

  11. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Botchev, M.A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    2000-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and vertical transport, which is based on diffusion, cloud-related vertical winds, and wet deposition. Its specific nature leads to full Jacobian matrices, ruling out standard implicit integration. We compare Strang operator splitting with two alternatives: source splitting and an (unsplit) Rosenbrock method with approximate matrix factorization, all having equal computational cost. The comparison is performed with real data. All methods are applied with half-hour time steps, and give good accuracies. Rosenbrock is the most accurate, and source splitting is more accurate than Strang splitting. Splitting errors concentrate in short-lived species sensitive to solar radiation and species with strong emissions and depositions. 30 refs

  12. Evaluation of the new EMAC-SWIFT chemistry climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Janice; Langematz, Ulrike; Wohltmann, Ingo; Rex, Markus

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the representation of atmospheric ozone chemistry in weather and climate models is essential for a realistic simulation of the atmospheric state. Including atmospheric ozone chemistry into climate simulations is usually done by prescribing a climatological ozone field, by including a fast linear ozone scheme into the model or by using a climate model with complex interactive chemistry. While prescribed climatological ozone fields are often not aligned with the modelled dynamics, a linear ozone scheme may not be applicable for a wide range of climatological conditions. Although interactive chemistry provides a realistic representation of atmospheric chemistry such model simulations are computationally very expensive and hence not suitable for ensemble simulations or simulations with multiple climate change scenarios. A new approach to represent atmospheric chemistry in climate models which can cope with non-linearities in ozone chemistry and is applicable to a wide range of climatic states is the Semi-empirical Weighted Iterative Fit Technique (SWIFT) that is driven by reanalysis data and has been validated against observational satellite data and runs of a full Chemistry and Transport Model. SWIFT has recently been implemented into the ECHAM/MESSy (EMAC) chemistry climate model that uses a modular approach to climate modelling where individual model components can be switched on and off. Here, we show first results of EMAC-SWIFT simulations and validate these against EMAC simulations using the complex interactive chemistry scheme MECCA, and against observations.

  13. Fluctuation theory of solutions applications in chemistry, chemical engineering, and biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    There are essentially two theories of solutions that can be considered exact: the McMillan-Mayer theory and Fluctuation Solution Theory (FST). The first is mostly limited to solutes at low concentrations, while FST has no such issue. It is an exact theory that can be applied to any stable solution regardless of the number of components and their concentrations, and the types of molecules and their sizes. Fluctuation Theory of Solutions: Applications in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, and Biophysics outlines the general concepts and theoretical basis of FST and provides a range of applications

  14. Halogen Chemistry in the CMAQ Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halogens (iodine and bromine) emitted from oceans alter atmospheric chemistry and influence atmospheric ozone mixing ratio. We previously incorporated a representation of detailed halogen chemistry and emissions of organic and inorganic halogen species into the hemispheric Commun...

  15. SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR ARDL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae-Marius JULA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available VAR type models can be used only for stationary time series. Causality analyses through econometric models need that series to have the same integrated order. Usually, when constraining the series to comply these restrictions (e.g. by differentiating, economic interpretation of the outcomes may become difficult. Recent solution for mitigating these problems is the use of ARDL (autoregressive distributed lag models. We present implementation in E-Views of these models and we test the impact of exchange rate on consumer price index.

  16. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  17. Contributions to the chemistry of highly concentrated electrolyte solutions. XXXIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedinakova, V.

    1974-01-01

    The formation of aquo- and acido-complexes of the Be 2+ ion in aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes was studied by densimetry. In all the systems studied, HClO 4 , HNO 3 , NaNO 3 , KOH, Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaCl 2 , the overall coordination number 4 was confirmed for the complex forms of the Be 2+ ion. If BeSO 4 is used as the differential addition in a solvent not forming complexes, dissociation of the sulfate proceeds under the formation of the aquo-complex [Be(H 2 O) 4 ] 2+ . If beryllium perchlorate is used, the Be 2+ ion remains in that form, in which it is added to the solution (i.e. the complex form [Be(H 2 O) 2 (ClO 4 ) 2 ]), in the whole concentration range of the applied isomolar series Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 -CaCl 2 , NaClO 4 -NaBr, and NaClO 4 -NaI. (author)

  18. Integrated modeling and characterization of local crack chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchik, J.A.; Burke, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The MULTEQ computer program has become an industry wide tool which can be used to calculate the chemical composition in a flow occluded region as the solution within concentrates due to a local boiling process. These results can be used to assess corrosion concerns in plant equipment such as steam generators. Corrosion modeling attempts to quantify corrosion assessments by accounting for the mass transport processes involved in the corrosion mechanism. MULTEQ has played an ever increasing role in defining the local chemistry for such corrosion models. This paper will outline how the integration of corrosion modeling with the analysis of corrosion films and deposits can lead to the development of a useful modeling tool, wherein MULTEQ is interactively linked to a diffusion and migration transport process. This would provide a capability to make detailed inferences of the local crack chemistry based on the analyses of the local corrosion films and deposits inside a crack and thus provide guidance for chemical fixes to avoid cracking. This methodology is demonstrated for a simple example of a cracked tube. This application points out the utility of coupling MULTEQ with a mass transport process and the feasibility of an option in a future version of MULTEQ that would permit relating film and deposit analyses to the local chemical environment. This would increase the amount of information obtained from removed tube analyses and laboratory testing that can contribute to an overall program for mitigating tubing and crevice corrosion

  19. Genetic Algorithm Approaches to Prebiobiotic Chemistry Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohn, Jason; Colombano, Silvano

    1997-01-01

    We model an artificial chemistry comprised of interacting polymers by specifying two initial conditions: a distribution of polymers and a fixed set of reversible catalytic reactions. A genetic algorithm is used to find a set of reactions that exhibit a desired dynamical behavior. Such a technique is useful because it allows an investigator to determine whether a specific pattern of dynamics can be produced, and if it can, the reaction network found can be then analyzed. We present our results in the context of studying simplified chemical dynamics in theorized protocells - hypothesized precursors of the first living organisms. Our results show that given a small sample of plausible protocell reaction dynamics, catalytic reaction sets can be found. We present cases where this is not possible and also analyze the evolved reaction sets.

  20. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sandip Patil; Kamal Tawfiq; Gang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using ...

  1. Modeling hot spring chemistries with applications to martian silica formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G.M.; Catling, D.C.; Crowley, J.K.; Kargel, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Many recent studies have implicated hydrothermal systems as the origin of martian minerals across a wide range of martian sites. Particular support for hydrothermal systems include silica (SiO2) deposits, in some cases >90% silica, in the Gusev Crater region, especially in the Columbia Hills and at Home Plate. We have developed a model called CHEMCHAU that can be used up to 100??C to simulate hot springs associated with hydrothermal systems. The model was partially derived from FREZCHEM, which is a colder temperature model parameterized for broad ranges of temperature (mineral assemblages. Using measured solution chemistries of Yellowstone hot springs and Icelandic hot springs, we simulate salts formed during the evaporation of two low pH cases (high and low temperatures) and a high temperature, alkaline (high pH) sodic water. Simulation of an acid-sulfate case leads to precipitation of Fe and Al minerals along with silica. Consistency with martian mineral assemblages suggests that hot, acidic sulfate solutions are plausibility progenitors of minerals in the past on Mars. In the alkaline pH (8.45) simulation, formation of silica at high temperatures (355K) led to precipitation of anhydrous minerals (CaSO4, Na2SO4) that was also the case for the high temperature (353K) low pH case where anhydrous minerals (NaCl, CaSO4) also precipitated. Thus we predict that secondary minerals associated with massive silica deposits are plausible indicators on Mars of precipitation environments and aqueous chemistry. Theoretical model calculations are in reasonable agreement with independent experimental silica concentrations, which strengthens the validity of the new CHEMCHAU model. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  2. Enhancing Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of Solution Chemistry with Conceptual Change Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of a constructivist-based pedagogy to enhance understanding of some features of solution chemistry. Pre-service science teacher trainees' prior knowledge about the dissolution of salts and sugar in water were elicited by the use of a simple diagnostic tool. The test revealed widespread alternative conceptions. These…

  3. Impacts of operating conditions and solution chemistry on osmotic membrane structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Mavis C.Y.

    2012-02-01

    Herein, we report on changes in the performance of a commercial cellulose triacetate (CTA) membrane, imparted by varied operating conditions and solution chemistries. Changes to feed and draw solution flow rate did not significantly alter the CTA membrane\\'s water permeability, salt permeability, or membrane structural parameter when operated with the membrane skin layer facing the draw solution (PRO-mode). However, water and salt permeability increased with increasing feed or draw solution temperature, while the membrane structural parameter decreased with increasing draw solution, possibly due to changes in polymer intermolecular interactions. High ionic strength draw solutions may de-swell the CTA membrane via charge neutralization, which resulted in lower water permeability, higher salt permeability, and lower structural parameter. This observed trend was further exacerbated by the presence of divalent cations which tends to swell the polymer to a greater extent. Finally, the calculated CTA membrane\\'s structural parameter was lower and less sensitive to external factors when operated in PRO-mode, but highly sensitive to the same factors when the skin layer faced the feed solution (FO-mode), presumably due to swelling/de-swelling of the saturated porous substructure by the draw solution. This is a first attempt aimed at systematically evaluating the changes in performance of the CTA membrane due to operating conditions and solution chemistry, shedding new insight into the possible advantages and disadvantages of this material in certain applications. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Application of modeling to local chemistry in PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchon, C.; Millett, P.J.; Ollar, P.

    1998-01-01

    Localized corrosion of the SG tubes and other components is due to the presence of an aggressive environment in local crevices and occluded regions. In crevices and on vertical and horizontal tube surfaces, corrosion products and particulate matter can accumulate in the form of porous deposits. The SG water contains impurities at extremely low levels (ppb). Low levels of non-volatile impurities, however, can be efficiently concentrated in crevices and sludge piles by a thermal hydraulic mechanism. The temperature gradient across the SG tube coupled with local flow starvation, produces local boiling in the sludge and crevices. Since mass transfer processes are inhibited in these geometries, the residual liquid becomes enriched in many of the species present in the SG water. The resulting concentrated solutions have been shown to be aggressive and can corrode the SG materials. This corrosion may occur under various conditions which result in different types of attack such as pitting, stress corrosion cracking, wastage and denting. A major goal of EPRI's research program has been the development of models of the concentration process and the resulting chemistry. An improved understanding should eventually allow utilities to reduce or eliminate the corrosion by the appropriate manipulation of the steam generator water chemistry and or crevice conditions. The application of these models to experimental data obtained for prototypical SG tube support crevices is described in this paper. The models adequately describe the key features of the experimental data allowing extrapolations to be made to plant conditions. (author)

  5. Effect of solution chemistry on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate onto mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuyang Y; Shiang Fu, Q; Gao, Dawen; Criddle, Craig S; Leckie, James O

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is an emergent contaminant of substantial environmental concerns, yet very limited information has been available on PFOS adsorption onto mineral surfaces. PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica was investigated by batch adsorption experiments under various solution compositions. Adsorption onto silica was only marginally affected by pH, ionic strength, and calcium concentration, likely due to the dominance of non-electrostatic interactions. In contrast, PFOS uptake by goethite increased significantly at high [H+] and [Ca2+], which was likely due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and positively charged goethite surface. The effect of pH was less significant at high ionic strength, likely due to electrical double layer compression. PFOS uptake was reduced at higher ionic strength for a strongly positively charged goethite surface (pH 3), while it increased for a weakly charged surface (pH 7 and 9), which could be attributed to the competition between PFOS-surface electrostatic attraction and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic repulsion. A conceptual model that captures PFOS-surface and PFOS-PFOS electrostatic interactions as well as non-electrostatic interaction was also formulated to understand the effect of solution chemistry on PFOS adsorption onto goethite and silica surfaces. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Mental Models of Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumay, Halil

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify prospective chemistry teachers' mental models of vapor pressure. The study involved 85 students in the Chemistry Teacher Training Department of a state university in Turkey. Participants' mental models of vapor pressure were explored using a concept test that involved qualitative comparison tasks.…

  7. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Popp, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    The tests described were undertaken to determine the extent to leach solution-rock interactions with uranium-bearing ore obtained from the Mariano Lake mine. Leach solutions of an acidic (H/sub 2/O/sub 4/-sulfuric acid) and basic (NaHCO/sub 3/-sodium bicarbonate) nature were tested, in addition to a leach solution containing potassium chloride and sulfuric acid (KCl/H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The latter solution was chosen in an attempt to equilibrate the aqueous phase with the rock-forming silicate minerals and minimize adverse effects such as clay formation, porosity loss, and lixiviant loss. 29 refs

  8. Identification of Chemistry Learning Problems Viewed From Conceptual Change Model

    OpenAIRE

    Redhana, I. W; Sudria, I. B. N; Hidayat, I; Merta, L. M

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at describing and explaining chemistry learning problems viewed from conceptual change model and misconceptions of students. The study was qualitative research of case study type conducted in one class of SMAN 1 Singaraja. Subjects of the study were a chemistry teacher and students. Data were obtained through classroom observation, interviews, and conception tests. The chemistry learning problems were grouped based on aspects of necessity, intelligibility, plausibility, and f...

  9. Kinetic model studies of atmospheric droplet chemistry: 2. Homogeneous transition metal chemistry in raindrops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Mandich, M. L.; Weschler, C. J.

    1986-04-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that dissolved transition metal ions (TMI) are capable of catalyzing oxidations in atmospheric water droplets, at least in certain circumstances. Wide variations in the importance of TMI chemistry are expected in these systems because concentrations of transition metals in water droplets range over at least 4 orders of magnitude. In the present work we perform an extensive series of model calculations for TMI chemistry in raindrops. The specific TMI discussed are iron, manganese, and copper. The present treatment is restricted to homogeneous processes, that is, those involving dissolved molecules and ions. Results are presented for studies at pH 3 and pH 4, for both daytime and nighttime conditions. Among the results are the following: (1) At pH 3 and pH 4, Fe(III) is present largely as photosensitive hydroxide complexes. Our model results indicate that under atmospheric conditions the photolysis of these complexes is the primary daytime source of reactive free radicals within the droplets, even at quite low TMI concentrations. (2) TMI complex photolysis is not, of course, operative at night. At those times the presence of TMI continues to control the concentration of free radicals in raindrops through "Fenton type" reactions with hydrogen peroxide, for example, Fe(II) + H2O2 → Fe(III) + OH + OH-. (3) The oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by H2O2 is the most important daytime sulfite oxidation process in raindrops, but S(IV) oxidation catalyzed by Mn(II) can be significant under certain conditions, particularly at night or in the winter months. (4) Solution nitrogen chemistry is relatively unaffected by TMI. Its most important daytime chemical process is the (rather inefficient) photodissociation of the nitrate ion, a process which generates ozone (and hence HOx radicals). (5) Organic chemistry in atmospheric water droplets is very sensitive to the presence of hydroxyl radicals. Since OH· production is strongly influenced by catalysis

  10. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  11. Coupled Atmospheric Chemistry Schemes for Modeling Regional and Global Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, E.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric chemistry models require chemical reaction mechanisms to simulate the production of air pollution. GACM (Global Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism) is intended for use in global scale atmospheric chemistry models to provide chemical boundary conditions for regional scale simulations by models such as CMAQ. GACM includes additional chemistry for marine environments while reducing its treatment of the chemistry needed for highly polluted urban regions. This keeps GACM's size small enough to allow it to be used efficiently in global models. GACM's chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) is highly compatible with the VOC chemistry in RACM2 allowing a global model with GACM to provide VOC boundary conditions to a regional scale model with RACM2 with reduced error. The GACM-RACM2 system of mechanisms should yield more accurate forecasts by regional air quality models such as CMAQ. Chemical box models coupled with the regional and global atmospheric chemistry mechanisms (RACM2 & GACM) will be used to make simulations of tropospheric ozone, nitric oxides, and volatile organic compounds that are produced in regional and global domains. The simulations will focus on the Los Angeles' South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) where the Pacific Ocean meets a highly polluted urban area. These two mechanisms will be compared on the basis of simulated ozone concentrations over this marine-urban region. Simulations made with the more established RACM2 will be compared with simulations made with the newer GACM. In addition WRF-Chem will be used to simulate how RACM2 will produce regional simulations of tropospheric ozone and NOx, which can be further, analyzed for air quality impacts. Both the regional and global model in WRF-Chem will be used to predict how the concentrations of ozone and nitrogen oxides change over land and ocean. The air quality model simulation results will be applied to EPA's BenMAP-CE (Environmental Benefits Mapping & Analysis Program-Community Edition

  12. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  13. Constructing a coherent problem model to facilitate algebra problem solving in a chemistry context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Ngu, Bing; Seeshing Yeung, Alexander; Phan, Huy P.

    2015-04-01

    An experiment using a sample of 11th graders compared text editing and worked examples approaches in learning to solve dilution and molarity algebra word problems in a chemistry context. Text editing requires students to assess the structure of a word problem by specifying whether the problem text contains sufficient, missing, or irrelevant information for reaching a solution. Worked examples direct students to follow steps toward the solution, and its emphasis is on computation instead of the formation of a coherent problem model. Text editing yielded higher scores in a transfer test (which shared the same solution procedure as in the acquisition problems but differed in contexts), but not a similar test (which resembled acquisition problems in terms of both solution procedure and context). Results provide some theoretical support and practical implications for using text editing to develop a coherent problem model to facilitate problem-solving skills in chemistry.

  14. Chemistry education based on concepts represented by mental models

    OpenAIRE

    Gibin, Gustavo Bizarria; Ferreira, Luiz Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The current legislation determines that the chemist must have a solid comprehension about chemical concepts. Literature presents the concept of mental model, which is determinant to the learning of phenomena and concepts. This paper presents some mental models that students of the Chemistry course at UFSCar have about chemical concepts. A lot of incoherence was observed in student's mental models, which is an evidence that there are problems in the learning of chemistry education.

  15. Instructional Model and Thinking Skill in Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langkudi, H. H.

    2018-02-01

    Chemistry course are considered a difficult lesson for students as evidenced by low learning outcomes on daily tests, mid-semester tests as well as final semester tests. This research intended to investigate the effect of instructional model, thinking skill and the interaction of these variables on students’ achievement in chemistry. Experimental method was applying used 2 x 2 factorial design. The results showed that the use of instructional model with thinking skill influences student’s learning outcomes, so that the chemistry teacher is recommended to pay attention to the learning model, and adjusted to the student’s skill thinking on the chemistry material being taught. The conclusion of this research is that discovery model is suitable for students who have formal thinking skill and conventional model is fit for the students that have concrete thinking skill.

  16. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Patil

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using an implicit, finite-difference scheme to obtain the colloid release coefficient. It was found that the hydrodynamic force and electrostatic force overcame the capillary force under the experimental conditions of this research and consequently, colloids were released. For the colloid release, solution chemistry played a key role by controlling the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system. Colloid release exponentially decreased with the increase of solution ionic strength and increased with the increase of solution pH. Colloid release was finally found to be correlated to the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system, i.e., the greater the repulsive electrostatic force, the more colloids released.

  17. COLLOID RELEASE AND TRANSPORT IN AGRICULTURAL SOIL AS IMPACTED BY SOLUTION CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloid release from the agricultural soil under unsaturated conditions was controlled by the hydrodynamic force, capillary force and electrostatic force that were determined by the solution chemistry in terms of solution ionic strength and pH. In this research, colloid release from the agricultural soil was investigated using an intact soil column collected from an agricultural site in Gadsden County of Florida. Colloid release was monitored and the colloid release curve was simulated using an implicit, finite-difference scheme to obtain the colloid release coefficient. It was found that the hydrodynamic force and electrostatic force overcame the capillary force under the experimental conditions of this research and consequently, colloids were released. For the colloid release, solution chemistry played a key role by controlling the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system. Colloid release exponentially decreased with the increase of solution ionic strength and increased with the increase of solution pH. Colloid release was finally found to be correlated to the colloid repulsive electrostatic force within the pore system, i.e., the greater the repulsive electrostatic force, the more colloids released.

  18. Np(V) transport in clayey porous medium: study of solution chemistry, sorption and flow coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Christine

    1997-01-01

    To assess the safety of radioactive waste disposal, the behaviour of radionuclides in porous media has to be known. The solute transport is controlled by hydrodynamics, physicochemical interactions and aqueous chemistry. When each main term is known independently, their coupling can be predicted. The aim is to study the migration of Np(V). Experiments are carried out on chromatography columns packed with a mixture of sand and Fo-Ca-7 clay. Column hydrodynamics is characterised with RTD measurements and is modelled thanks to a cell network model. Sorption properties of the clay are determined thanks to sodium/calcium and sodium/caesium exchange experiments. The sorption is modelled with ion exchange on three sites. The Na + /H + , Na + /Ca 2+ and Na + /Cs + exchange constants have been determined. Transport experiments of Np(V) have been carried out in IM Na + bicarbonate/carbonate media and is interpreted with H + /NpO 2+ /Na + cationic exchanges on the third site of the clay, and NpO 2 CO 3- , NpO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 3- and NpO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 5- formation. This mechanism has been validated by varying pH and carbonate concentration. An anion exchange site of low exchange capacity has been found through 14 C experiments. A selective elimination of goethite contained in Fo-Ca-7 shows that this iron oxide is not responsible for the anions retention. As expected, temperature influence on calcium and neptunium migration is quite small. It is used to estimate entropy and enthalpy changes for the corresponding ionic exchange reactions. (author) [fr

  19. Thole's interacting polarizability model in computational chemistry practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, AH; vanDuijnen, PT; Zijlstra, RWJ; Swart, M

    Thole's interacting polarizability model to calculate molecular polarizabilities from interacting atomic polarizabilities is reviewed and its major applications in computational chemistry are illustrated. The applications include prediction of molecular polarizabilities, use in classical expressions

  20. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  1. Modeling emissions for three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Volker; Arndt, Jan A; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Denier Van Der Gon, Hugo; Kranenburg, Richard; Kuenen, Jeroen; Neumann, Daniel; Pouliot, George; Quante, Markus

    2018-01-24

    Poor air quality is still a threat for human health in many parts of the world. In order to assess measures for emission reductions and improved air quality, three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry transport modeling systems are used in numerous research institutions and public authorities. These models need accurate emission data in appropriate spatial and temporal resolution as input. This paper reviews the most widely used emission inventories on global and regional scale and looks into the methods used to make the inventory data model ready. Shortcomings of using standard temporal profiles for each emission sector are discussed and new methods to improve the spatio-temporal distribution of the emissions are presented. These methods are often neither top-down nor bottom-up approaches but can be seen as hybrid methods that use detailed information about the emission process to derive spatially varying temporal emission profiles. These profiles are subsequently used to distribute bulk emissions like national totals on appropriate grids. The wide area of natural emissions is also summarized and the calculation methods are described. Almost all types of natural emissions depend on meteorological information, which is why they are highly variable in time and space and frequently calculated within the chemistry transport models themselves. The paper closes with an outlook for new ways to improve model ready emission data, for example by using external databases about road traffic flow or satellite data to determine actual land use or leaf area. In a world where emission patterns change rapidly, it seems appropriate to use new types of statistical and observational data to create detailed emission data sets and keep emission inventories up-to-date. Emission data is probably the most important input for chemistry transport model (CTM) systems. It needs to be provided in high temporal and spatial resolution and on a grid that is in agreement with the CTM grid. Simple

  2. Stable-isotope and solute-chemistry approaches to flow characterization in a forested tropical watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Martha A.; Shanley, James B.; Murphy, Sheila F.; Willenbring, Jane K; Occhi, Marcie; González, Grizelle

    2015-01-01

    subsurface watershed flowpaths, and better understanding of shallow hillslope and deeper groundwater processes in the watershed will require sub-weekly data and detailed transit time modeling. A combined isotopic and solute chemistry approach can guide further studies to a more comprehensive model of the hydrology, and inform decisions for managing water supply with future changes in climate and land use.

  3. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez G, H.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description about the development and activities executed in chemistry, in the Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, during the last years is presented. The plans and feasibility of nuclear techniques in Colombia are also described

  4. The chemistry of high temperature phosphate solutions in relation to steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, D.; Lewis, G.G.; Wetton, E.A.M.

    1978-01-01

    The problems associated with the use of phosphate for chemical treatment of the P.W.R. secondary circuit have prompted renewed interest in the physical chemistry of these solutions. Solubility and phase studies have been carried out at 250, 300 and 350 0 C with solutions having sodium to phosphate ratios from 1.0 to above 3.0. A solid phase of ratio about 2.8 exists in equilibrium with a wide range of saturated solution compositions at each temperature. Invariant points at which three phases are in equilibrium have been identified and at the two higher temperatures a region of liquid-liquid immiscibility occurs. Phase diagrams have been constructed for each temperature from which it is possible to predict the compositional changes occurring during the isothermal evaporation process. The corrosivity of these phosphate solutions to a range of steel alloys is being studied, the results reported in the present work, however, are confined to mild steel in the temperature and phosphate composition ranges of the phase studies. The corrosion of mild steel is generally considerably less than in sodium hydroxide solutions of equivalent concentration. The dependence of corrosion rate on sodium and phosphate concentrations in not readily explicable in terms of the solubility and phase studies and it is thought that the solubility of iron in the phosphate solutions is an important rate-determining factor since several complex compounds containing sodium, phosphorus and ferrous iron are present in the corrosion films. (author)

  5. Influence of solution chemistry on the deposition and detachment kinetics of RNA on silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yun; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping; Li, Qingyun

    2011-02-01

    The deposition kinetics of RNA extracted from both virus and bacteria on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) solutions under a wide range of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). To better understand the RNA deposition mechanisms, QCM-D data were complemented by diffusion coefficients and zeta potentials of RNA as a function of examined solution chemistry conditions. Favorable deposition of RNA on poly-l-lysine-coated (positively charged) silica surfaces was governed by the convective-diffusive transport of RNA to the surfaces. The deposition kinetics of RNA on bare silica surfaces were controlled by classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interactions. The presence of divalent cations (Ca(2+)) in solutions greatly enhanced the deposition kinetics of RNA on silica surfaces. Solution pH also affected the deposition behavior of RNA on silica surfaces. Release experiments showed that detachment of RNA from silica surfaces was significant in NaCl solutions, whereas, the deposited RNA on silica surfaces in CaCl(2) solutions was more likely to be irreversible. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media under various solution chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yu; Gao Bin; Morales, Verónica L.; Tian Yuan; Wu Lei; Gao Jie; Bai Wei; Yang Liuyan

    2012-01-01

    Because of its wide applications, nanosized titanium dioxide may become a potential environmental risk to soil and groundwater system. It is therefore important to improve current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of titanium oxides nanoparticles (TONPs). In this work, the effect of solution chemistry (i.e., pH, ionic strength, and natural organic matter (NOM) concentration) on the deposition and transport of TONPs in saturated porous media was examined in detail. Laboratory columns packed with acid-cleaned quartz sand were used in the experiment as porous media. Transport experiments were conducted with various chemistry combinations, including four ionic strengths, three pH levels, and two NOM concentrations. The results showed that TONP mobility increased with increasing solution pH, but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. It is also found that the presence of NOM in the system enhanced the mobility of TONPs in the saturated porous media. The Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) theory was used to justify the mobility trends observed in the experimental data. Predictions from the theory agreed excellently with the experimental data.

  7. Chemistry in high temperature aqueous solutions application to the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.

    1990-01-01

    The power industry utilizes water (aqueous solutions) for two main functions: as a medium for heat transfer and transport and as a thermodynamic working fluid. These functions are performed in systems fabricated from a wide variety of materials, over a wide range of thermal and hydraulic conditions, and at medium temperatures and densities which determine the significant chemical properties. The major chemical interest is in the concentrated solutions derived from the dilute working fluid at selected sites defined by the physical arrangement and temperature and in their consequential effects on heat transfer and corrosion. Examples of these sites for typical fossil fired and nuclear steam generating equipment are described, as well as the extent and limit of the concentration process. The history of steam power plant water chemistry is discussed from the point of view of the chemical processes involved. The period covered is from the 1920s to the present state of the art, which is a major application of the subject of this symposium--chemistry in high temperature aqueous solution

  8. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Tropospheric Chemistry Model Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Grenfell, J. Lee; Rind, David; Price, Colin; Grewe, Volker; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A tropospheric chemistry module has been developed for use within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to study interactions between chemistry and climate change. The model uses a simplified chemistry scheme based on CO-NOx-CH4 chemistry, and also includes a parameterization for emissions of isoprene, the most important non-methane hydrocarbon. The model reproduces present day annual cycles and mean distributions of key trace gases fairly well, based on extensive comparisons with available observations. Examining the simulated change between present day and pre-industrial conditions, we find that the model has a similar response to that seen in other simulations. It shows a 45% increase in the global tropospheric ozone burden, within the 25% - 57% range seen in other studies. Annual average zonal mean ozone increases by more than 125% at Northern Hemisphere middle latitudes near the surface. Comparison of model runs that allow the calculated ozone to interact with the GCM's radiation and meteorology with those that do not shows only minor differences for ozone. The common usage of ozone fields that are not calculated interactively seems to be adequate to simulate both the present day and the pre-industrial ozone distributions. However, use of coupled chemistry does alter the change in tropospheric oxidation capacity, enlarging the overall decrease in OH concentrations from the pre-industrial to the present by about 10% (-5.3% global annual average in uncoupled mode, -5.9% in coupled mode). This indicates that there may be systematic biases in the simulation of the pre-industrial to present day decrease in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere (though a 10% difference is well within the total uncertainty). Global annual average radiative forcing from pre-industrial to present day ozone change is 0.32 W/sq m. The forcing seems to be increased by about 10% when the chemistry is coupled to the GCM. Forcing values greater

  9. Assessment of a sequential extraction protocol by examining solution chemistry and mineralogical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Nicolas; Pauwels, Hélène; Noël, Hervé; Bourrat, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    séquentielles et spéciation des éléments trace métalliques dans les sols naturels. Analyse critique. 7, 179-189. Das, A. K., Chakraborty, R., Cervera, M. L., and Delaguardia, M. (1995). Metal speciation in solid matrices. Talanta, 42. Gomez Ariza, J. L., Giraldez, I., Sanchez-Rodas, D., and Morales, E. (2000). Selectivity assessment of a sequential extraction procedure for metal mobility characterization using model phases. Talanta, 52, 545-554. Hickey, M. G., and Kittrick, J. A. (1984). Chemical partitioning of cadmium, copper, nickel and zinc in soils and sediments containing high-levels of heavy metals. Journal of Environmental Quality, 13, 372-376. La Force, M. J., Fendorf, S., Li, G. C., and Rosenzweig, R. F. (1999). Redistribution of trace elements from contaminated sediments of Lake Coeur d'Alene during oxygenation. Journal of Environmental Quality, 28, 1195-1200. Quevauviller, P., Rauret, G., Muntau, H., Ure, A. M., Rubio, R., Lopezsanchez, J. F., Fiedler, H. D., and Griepink, B. (1994). Evaluation of a sequential extraction procedure for the determination of extractable trace-metal contents in sediments. Fresenius Journal of Analytical Chemistry, 349. Rauret, G. (1998). Extraction procedures for the determination of heavy metals in contaminated soil and sediment. Talanta, 46(3), 449-455. Sterckeman, T., Douay, F., Baize, D., Fourrier, H., Proix, N., and Schvartz, C. (2004). Factors affecting trace element concentrations in soils developed on recent marine deposits from northern France. Applied Geochemistry, 19. Tack, F. M. G., and Verloo, M. G. (1995). Chemical speciation and fraéctination in soil and sediment heavy-metal analysis - a review. International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, 59, 225-238. Tessier, A., Campbell, P. G. C., and Bisson, M. (1979). Sequential extraction procedure for the speciation of particulate trace-metals. Analytical Chemistry, 51. Van Oort, F., Jongmans, A. G., Lamy, I., Baize, D., and Chevallier, P. (2008

  10. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  11. Modelling of the local chemistry in stagnant areas in the PWR primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Rick; Fruzzetti, Keith; Ahluwalia, Al; Summe, Alex; Dame, Cecile; Schmitt, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    MRP-236 demonstrated a correlation between stagnant or low flow conditions and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel components in the PWR primary system. Of the approximately 140 SCC events documented (affecting 15 different components), 83% involved stagnant or low flow conditions that were likely to be associated with chemical environments different from the well mixed bulk coolant. The chemistry in such locations is typically not monitored, and sampling is difficult or impossible. Actions to improve chemistry in regions of low or no coolant flow, such as flushing, cycling of components and imposition of more stringent make up water chemistry controls affect both operational costs and outage schedules. Similarly, design changes to improve flow in affected areas are costly or impracticable. Improving the understanding of the factors controlling chemistry in such areas and development of the capability to predict typical and worst case conditions will allow an informed assessment of procedural actions and/or design changes to improve local chemistry and thereby reduce SCC susceptibility. A project was undertaken to develop a model to predict local chemistry conditions in stagnant locations. The model comprises the iterative application of the EPRI MULTEQ solution chemistry equilibrium code and standard thermodynamic relationships to predict local chemistry conditions considered likely to have been present at the surfaces of components when SCC was initiated. The starting chemistry conditions are based on PWR primary system chemistry from different plant maneuvers (e.g., startup and shutdown conditions). The model was applied to three example components where SCC has occurred in the field. The selected components were: control rod drive mechanism canopy seals; valve drain lines; and reactor vessel o-ring leak-off lines. This paper provides a summary of the model and predicted local chemistry conditions that develop for the three example component as a

  12. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  13. Model for diffusion and porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite. Experimental arrangements and preliminary results of the porewater chemistry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the progress of the experimental research on the porewater chemistry in bentonite. The research is part of the project Microstructural and chemical parameters of bentonite as determinants of waste isolation efficiency within the Nuclear Fission Safety Program organized by The Commission of the European Communities. The study was started by a literature overview on the properties of bentonite, porewater-sampling methods and obtained results. On the basis of the literature study, porewater extraction by squeezing seemed the most promising method for further development. The apparatus developed in this study consists of a pressing apparatus, which is used to create the necessary long-term compression, and of the compaction cell where porewater is separated from bentonite and collected in a syringe. The constant log-term force is maintained by a strong spring. An experimental study of solution-bentonite interactions was initiated. The parameters varied are the bentonite density, bentonite-water ratio, composition of the solutions, and the composition of bentonite. The report presents the experimental arrangements, the preliminary results for studying the evolution of water chemistry and the results of pre-modelling. (orig.) (27 refs.)

  14. Soil-solution chemistry in a low-elevation spruce-fir ecosystem, Howland, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ivan J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Son, Yowhan

    1995-01-01

    Soil solutions were collected monthly by tension and zero-tension lysimeters in a low-elevation red spruce stand in east-central Maine from May 1987 through December 1992. Soil solutions collected by Oa tension lysimeters had higher concentrations of most constituents than the Oa zero-tension lysimeters. In Oa horizon soil solutions growing season concentrations for SO4, Ca, and Mg averaged 57, 43, and 30 μmol L−1 in tension lysimeters, and 43, 28, and 19 μmol L−1 in zero-tension lysimeters, respectively. Because tension lysimeters remove water held by the soil at tensions up to 10 kPa, solutions are assumed to have more time to react with the soil compared to freely draining solutions collected by zero-tension lysimeters. Solutions collected in the Bs horizon by both types of collectors were similar which was attributed to the frequency of time periods when the water table was above the Bs lysimeters. Concentrations of SO4 and NO3 at this site were lower than concentrations reported for most other eastern U.S. spruce-fir sites, but base cation concentrations fell in the same range. Aluminum concentrations in this study were also lower than reported for other sites in the eastern U.S. and Ca/Al ratios did not suggest inhibition of Ca uptake by roots. Concentrations of SO4, Ca, K, and Cl decreased significantly in both the Oa and Bs horizons over the 56-month sampling period, which could reflect decreasing deposition rates for sulfur and base cations, climatic influences, or natural variation. A longer record of measured fluxes will be needed to adequately define temporal trends in solution chemistry and their causes.

  15. High fidelity chemistry and radiation modeling for oxy -- combustion scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Sater, Hassan A.

    To account for the thermal and chemical effects associated with the high CO2 concentrations in an oxy-combustion atmosphere, several refined gas-phase chemistry and radiative property models have been formulated for laminar to highly turbulent systems. This thesis examines the accuracies of several chemistry and radiative property models employed in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of laminar to transitional oxy-methane diffusion flames by comparing their predictions against experimental data. Literature review about chemistry and radiation modeling in oxy-combustion atmospheres considered turbulent systems where the predictions are impacted by the interplay and accuracies of the turbulence, radiation and chemistry models. Thus, by considering a laminar system we minimize the impact of turbulence and the uncertainties associated with turbulence models. In the first section of this thesis, an assessment and validation of gray and non-gray formulations of a recently proposed weighted-sum-of-gray gas model in oxy-combustion scenarios was undertaken. Predictions of gas, wall temperatures and flame lengths were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The temperature and flame length predictions were not sensitive to the radiative property model employed. However, there were significant variations between the gray and non-gray model radiant fraction predictions with the variations in general increasing with decrease in Reynolds numbers possibly attributed to shorter flames and steeper temperature gradients. The results of this section confirm that non-gray model predictions of radiative heat fluxes are more accurate than gray model predictions especially at steeper temperature gradients. In the second section, the accuracies of three gas-phase chemistry models were assessed by comparing their predictions against experimental measurements of temperature, species concentrations and flame lengths. The chemistry was modeled employing the Eddy

  16. Recent studies of uranium and plutonium chemistry in alkaline radioactive waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, William D.; Wilmarth, William R.; Hobbs, David T.; Edwards, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Solubility studies of uranium and plutonium in a caustic, radioactive Savannah River Site tank waste solution revealed the existence of uranium supersaturation in the as-received sample. Comparison of the results to predictions generated from previously published models for solubility in these waste types revealed that the U model poorly predicts solubility while Pu model predictions are quite consistent with experimental observations. Separate studies using simulated Savannah River Site evaporator feed solution revealed that the known formation of sodium aluminosilicate solids in waste evaporators can promote rapid precipitation of uranium from supersaturated solutions

  17. Uncertainty and error in complex plasma chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Miles M.

    2015-06-01

    Chemistry models that include dozens of species and hundreds to thousands of reactions are common in low-temperature plasma physics. The rate constants used in such models are uncertain, because they are obtained from some combination of experiments and approximate theories. Since the predictions of these models are a function of the rate constants, these predictions must also be uncertain. However, systematic investigations of the influence of uncertain rate constants on model predictions are rare to non-existent. In this work we examine a particular chemistry model, for helium-oxygen plasmas. This chemistry is of topical interest because of its relevance to biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas. We trace the primary sources for every rate constant in the model, and hence associate an error bar (or equivalently, an uncertainty) with each. We then use a Monte Carlo procedure to quantify the uncertainty in predicted plasma species densities caused by the uncertainty in the rate constants. Under the conditions investigated, the range of uncertainty in most species densities is a factor of two to five. However, the uncertainty can vary strongly for different species, over time, and with other plasma conditions. There are extreme (pathological) cases where the uncertainty is more than a factor of ten. One should therefore be cautious in drawing any conclusion from plasma chemistry modelling, without first ensuring that the conclusion in question survives an examination of the related uncertainty.

  18. Modeling Studies on Microbial Effects on Groundwater Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikatsu Tochigi; Hideki Yoshikawa; Mikazu Yui

    2007-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a model to predict microbial effects on the performance of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. As a first step, the effects of microbes on groundwater chemistry have been evaluated with the numerical code 'MINT', using data collected from the borehole HDB-6 in the Horonobe underground research laboratory (URL) in Japan. The MINT code models biochemistry and geochemical equilibrium, with consideration of transport of solute and microbial activity. The MINT code simulates the activities of six major groups of microbes, classified by their metabolism as 'aerobic', 'denitrifying', 'manganese reducing', 'iron reducing', 'sulfate reducing' and 'methanogenic'. The specific activity of each of these groups will depend on the redox potential (Eh) of the groundwater. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the consequences of changes in groundwater composition on the effects of microbial activity. This indicates that the activities of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and methanogens are relatively high. The concentration of dissolved methane produced by such microbial activity is seen to be influenced by sulfate concentration. Based on the observed data from Horonobe URL, the concentration in oxygen is relatively high and the activity of denitrifying bacteria is the highest of the major six groups of microbes. This can, however, be attributable to chemical / microbial contamination of the groundwater during sampling. The modeling results indicate that the concentration of dissolved oxygen and nitrate ion should be quickly reduced by microbial metabolism, reducing the redox potential to a level low enough for active methano-genesis to commence. Such assessment can be important to evaluate the reliability of sampling and measurement techniques for sensitive geochemical parameters in general - and microbiology in particular. (authors)

  19. Machine learning of atmospheric chemistry. Applications to a global chemistry transport model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. J.; Keller, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is central to many environmental issues such as air pollution, climate change, and stratospheric ozone loss. Chemistry Transport Models (CTM) are a central tool for understanding these issues, whether for research or for forecasting. These models split the atmosphere in a large number of grid-boxes and consider the emission of compounds into these boxes and their subsequent transport, deposition, and chemical processing. The chemistry is represented through a series of simultaneous ordinary differential equations, one for each compound. Given the difference in life-times between the chemical compounds (mili-seconds for O(1D) to years for CH4) these equations are numerically stiff and solving them consists of a significant fraction of the computational burden of a CTM.We have investigated a machine learning approach to solving the differential equations instead of solving them numerically. From an annual simulation of the GEOS-Chem model we have produced a training dataset consisting of the concentration of compounds before and after the differential equations are solved, together with some key physical parameters for every grid-box and time-step. From this dataset we have trained a machine learning algorithm (random regression forest) to be able to predict the concentration of the compounds after the integration step based on the concentrations and physical state at the beginning of the time step. We have then included this algorithm back into the GEOS-Chem model, bypassing the need to integrate the chemistry.This machine learning approach shows many of the characteristics of the full simulation and has the potential to be substantially faster. There are a wide range of application for such an approach - generating boundary conditions, for use in air quality forecasts, chemical data assimilation systems, centennial scale climate simulations etc. We discuss our approches' speed and accuracy, and highlight some potential future directions for

  20. Spray Combustion Modeling with VOF and Finite-Rate Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Liaw, Paul; Wang, Ten-See

    1996-01-01

    A spray atomization and combustion model is developed based on the volume-of-fluid (VOF) transport equation with finite-rate chemistry model. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation laws are modeled by continuum surface force mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed range flows. The objectives of the present study are: (1) to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid (VOF) cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm to deal with multiphase (gas-liquid) free surface flow problems; (2) to implement the developed unified algorithm in a general purpose computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), with droplet dynamics and finite-rate chemistry models; and (3) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems of jet breakup/spray atomization and combustion. Modeling multiphase fluid flows poses a significant challenge because a required boundary must be applied to a transient, irregular surface that is discontinuous, and the flow regimes considered can range from incompressible to highspeed compressible flows. The flow-process modeling is further complicated by surface tension, interfacial heat and mass transfer, spray formation and turbulence, and their interactions. The major contribution of the present method is to combine the novel feature of the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method and the Eulerian/Lagrangian method into a unified algorithm for efficient noniterative, time-accurate calculations of multiphase free surface flows valid at all speeds. The proposed method reformulated the VOF equation to strongly couple two distinct phases (liquid and gas), and tracks droplets on a Lagrangian frame when spray model is required, using a unified predictor-corrector technique to account for the non-linear linkages through the convective contributions of VOF. The discontinuities within the

  1. On the use of mass-conserving wind fields in chemistry-transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bregman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method has been developed that provides mass-conserving wind fields for global chemistry-transport models. In previous global Eulerian modeling studies a mass-imbalance was found between the model mass transport and the surface pressure tendencies. Several methods have been suggested to correct for this imbalance, but so far no satisfactory solution has been found. Our new method solves these problems by using the wind fields in a spherical harmonical form (divergence and vorticity by mimicing the physics of the weather forecast model as closely as possible. A 3-D chemistry-transport model was used to show that the calculated ozone fields with the new processing method agree remarkably better with ozone observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In addition, the calculated age of air in the lower stratosphere show better agreement with observations, although the air remains still too young in the extra-tropical stratosphere.

  2. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (colloids as a function of cell type, natural organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Actinides in Hanford Tank Waste Simulants: Chemistry of Selected Species in Oxidizing Alkaline Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Laszak, Ivan; Borkowski, Marian; Hancock, Melissa; Rao, Linfeng; Reed, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    To enhance removal of selected troublesome nonradioactive matrix elements (P, Cr, Al, S) from the sludges in radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford site, various chemical washing procedures have been evaluated. It is intended that leaching should leave the actinides in the residual sludge phase for direct vitrification. Oxidative treatment with strongly alkaline solutions has emerged as the best approach to accomplishing this feat. However, because the most important actinide ions in the sludge can exist in multiple oxidation states, it is conceivable that changes in actinide oxidation state speciation could interfere with hopes and plans for actinide insolubility. In this presentation, we discuss both the impact of oxidative alkaline leachants on actinide oxidation state speciation and the chemistry of oxidized actinide species in the solution phase. Actinide oxidation does occur during leaching, but the solubility behavior is complex. Mixed ligand complexes may dominate solution phase speciation of actinides under some circumstances. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Offices of Science and Waste Management, Environmental Management Science Program under Contract DEAC03- 76SF0098 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Contract W-31-109- ENG-38 at Argonne National Laboratory

  4. Modelling porewater chemistry in hydrated Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.R.

    1987-01-01

    Extensive employment of concrete is foreseen in radioactive waste repositories. A prerequisite for modelling the interactions between concrete and formation waters is characterization of the concrete system. Available experimental data from high pressure squeezing of cement pore-water indicate that, besides the high pH due to alkali hydroxide dissolution, cement composition itself influences the solubility determining solid phases. A model which simulates the hydration of Portland cement assuming complete hydration of the main clinker minerals is presented. The model also includes parameters describing the reactions between the cement and blending agents. Comparison with measured pore-water data generally gives a consistent picture and, as expected, the model gives correct predictions for pure Portland cements. For blended cements, the required additional parameters can, to some extent, be derived from pore-water analysis. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  5. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Berkvens (Patrick); M.A. Botchev; J.G. Verwer (Jan); M.C. Krol; W. Peters

    2000-01-01

    textabstractFor the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived

  6. Solving Vertical Transport and Chemistry in Air Pollution Models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, Mikhail A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  7. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  8. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, M.A.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.; Verwer, J.G.; Chock, David P.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Brick, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  9. Tuning colloidal quantum dot band edge positions through solution-phase surface chemistry modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Daniel M.; Vörös, Márton; Brawand, Nicholas P.; McNichols, Brett W.; Miller, Elisa M.; Gu, Jing; Nozik, Arthur J.; Sellinger, Alan; Galli, Giulia; Beard, Matthew C.

    2017-05-01

    Band edge positions of semiconductors determine their functionality in many optoelectronic applications such as photovoltaics, photoelectrochemical cells and light emitting diodes. Here we show that band edge positions of lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots (QDs), can be tuned over 2.0 eV through surface chemistry modification. We achieved this remarkable control through the development of simple, robust and scalable solution-phase ligand exchange methods, which completely replace native ligands with functionalized cinnamate ligands, allowing for well-defined, highly tunable chemical systems. By combining experiments and ab initio simulations, we establish clear relationships between QD surface chemistry and the band edge positions of ligand/QD hybrid systems. We find that in addition to ligand dipole, inter-QD ligand shell inter-digitization contributes to the band edge shifts. We expect that our established relationships and principles can help guide future optimization of functional organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures for diverse optoelectronic applications.

  10. A coordination chemistry approach for modeling trace element adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, A.C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The traditional distribution coefficient, Kd, is highly dependent on the water chemistry and the surface properties of the geological system being studied and is therefore quite inappropriate for use in predictive models. Adsorption, one of the many processes included in Kd values, is described here using a coordination chemistry approach. The concept of adsorption of cationic trace elements by solid hydrous oxides can be applied to natural solids. The adsorption process is thus understood in terms of a classical complexation leading to the formation of surface (heterogeneous) ligands. Applications of this concept to some freshwater, estuarine and marine environments are discussed. (author)

  11. An Overview of Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will include my personal research experience and an overview of atmospheric chemistry and air quality modeling to the participants of the NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP 2017). The presentation will also provide examples on ways to apply airborne observations for chemical transport (CTM) and air quality (AQ) model evaluation. CTM and AQ models are important tools in understanding tropospheric-stratospheric composition, atmospheric chemistry processes, meteorology, and air quality. This presentation will focus on how NASA scientist currently apply CTM and AQ models to better understand these topics. Finally, the importance of airborne observation in evaluating these topics and how in situ and remote sensing observations can be used to evaluate and improve CTM and AQ model predictions will be highlighted.

  12. Chemical solution deposited lanthanum zirconium oxide thin films: Synthesis and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.S., E-mail: sean.chen@cantab.net [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kumar, R.V.; Glowacki, B.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Pyrochlore lanthanum zirconium oxide (LZO) thin films textured along <4 0 0> are synthesized using lanthanum acetate hydrate, zirconium propoxide, propionic acid, acetic acid glacial, and methanol as precursors. The materials growth and chemistry are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The formation of inkjet printed LZO films on Ni-5%W tape is found to be based on the decomposition of the LZO precursor solution. In the annealing process, Zr metal-oxides bonds are first eliminated between 150 and 250 deg. C, while carboxylates from precursors remain in LZO after the annealing carried out at 900 {sup o}C for an hour. Annealed LZO films have dense and smooth structure that are composed of nanoparticles sizing 10-15 nm and some pinholes sizing 25-35 nm accounted for less than 0.1% of the area are observed.

  13. Influence of solution chemistry on the boron content in inorganic calcite grown in artificial seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Harper, Dustin T.; Penman, Donald E.; Zachos, James C.; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2017-12-01

    The ratio of boron to calcium (B/Ca) in marine biogenic carbonates has been proposed as a proxy for properties of seawater carbonate chemistry. Applying this proxy to planktic foraminifera residing in the surface seawater largely in equilibrium with the atmosphere may provide a valuable handle on past atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, precise controls on B/Ca in planktic foraminifera remain enigmatic because it has been shown to depend on multiple physicochemical seawater properties. To help establish a firm inorganic basis for interpreting the B/Ca records, we examined the effect of a suite of chemical parameters ([Ca2+], pH, [DIC], salinity and [PO43-]) on B/Ca in inorganic calcite precipitated in artificial seawater. These parameters were primarily varied individually while keeping all others constant, but we also tested the influence of pH and [DIC] at a constant calcite precipitation rate (R) by concurrent [Ca2+] adjustments. In the simple [Ca2+], pH and [DIC] experiments, both R and B/Ca increased with these parameters. In the pH-[Ca2+] and [DIC]-[Ca2+] experiments at constant R, on the other hand, B/Ca was invariant at different pH and decreased with [DIC], respectively. These patterns agree with the behavior of solution [BTotal/DIC] ratio such that, at a fixed [BTotal], it is independent of pH but decreases with [DIC]. Based on these results, R and [BTotal/DIC] ratio appear to be the primary controls on B/Ca in inorganic calcite, suggesting that both B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 are possibly involved in B incorporation. Moreover, B/Ca modestly increased with salinity and [PO43-]. Inorganic calcite precipitated at higher R and in the presence of oxyanions such as SO42- and PO43- in growth solutions often undergoes surface roughening due to formation of crystallographic defects, vacancies and, occasionally, amorphous/hydrous CaCO3. These non-lattice sites may provide additional space for B, particularly B(OH)3. Consequently, besides the macroscopic influence of

  14. Pseudoclassical fermionic model and classical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailagic, A.

    1981-08-01

    We study classical limit of fermionic fields seen as Grassmann variables and deduce the proper quantization prescription using Dirac's method for constrained systems and investigate quantum meaning of classical solutions for the Thirring model. (author)

  15. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  16. Calibration of a Chemistry Test Using the Rasch Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Coromoto Martín Guaregua

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Rasch model was used to calibrate a general chemistry test for the purpose of analyzing the advantages and information the model provides. The sample was composed of 219 college freshmen. Of the 12 questions used, good fit was achieved in 10. The evaluation shows that although there are items of variable difficulty, there are gaps on the scale; in order to make the test complete, it will be necessary to design new items to fill in these gaps.

  17. Analyzing Students' Understanding of Models and Modeling Referring to the Disciplines Biology, Chemistry, and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Reinisch, Bianca; Krüger, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    In this study, secondary school students' (N?=?617; grades 7 to 10) understanding of models and modeling was assessed using tasks which explicitly refer to the scientific disciplines of biology, chemistry, and physics and, as a control, to no scientific discipline. The students' responses are interpreted as their biology-, chemistry-, and…

  18. The quantum Rabi model: solution and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Qiongtao; Zhong, Honghua; Lee, Chaohong; Batchelor, Murray T

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent developments on various aspects of the quantum Rabi model. Particular emphasis is given on the exact analytic solution obtained in terms of confluent Heun functions. The analytic solutions for various generalisations of the quantum Rabi model are also discussed. Results are also reviewed on the level statistics and the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model. The article concludes with an introductory overview of several experimental realisations of the quantum Rabi model. An outlook towards future developments is also given. (topical review)

  19. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On-site production of a dialysis bath from dry salts. Results of solute concentration control by routine clinical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beige, Joachim; Lutter, Steffen; Martus, Peter

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND.: Dialysis bath production, at least in Europe, is currently based on pre-produced aqueous solutions of dialysis salts (concentrate), which are re-handled by dialysis machines to deliver the final dialysate concentrations. Because of the logistics of aqueous solution creation, a large amount of transportation capacity is needed. Therefore, we changed this process to use pre-produced dry salt containers and to undertake in-clinic dissolution of salts and concentration production. Because no preclinical control for solute concentrations is available so far using this new process, we employed routine clinical chemistry analytics. METHODS.: We report the controls of solute concentrations created by these methods for 746 samples of concentrates and 151 dissolution processes. For analysis, absolute and relative deviations from prescriptions and associations between the solute concentrations and the density controls of the concentrates were computed. RESULTS.: A total of 98% of all the concentrates were found to be within a 10% margin of error from the prescriptions. The mean relative deviation of the solute concentrations from the prescriptions was -0.635 ± 3.83%. Among particular solutes, sodium had the highest maximum deviation of 26 mmol/L from the prescription. Calcium and magnesium (small concentration solutes) exhibited small systematic errors of 1.37 and 1.22%, respectively. Other solute concentrations showed random errors only and no associations with the mean relative deviations of all the solutes within a production batch or with the density controls. CONCLUSIONS.: Single solute concentration control by routine clinical chemistry after dry salt production of concentrates is a valuable additional tool for monitoring clinical risk with dialysate concentrates. The analytical random error of clinical chemistry exceeds the weight tolerance of production; therefore, such analytics cannot be used for precision production and control of dry salt containers.

  1. Challenges in modelling the reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, S T; Goumans, T P M; Herbst, E; Jones, A P; Slater, B

    2014-09-21

    Studies aiming to understand the physicochemical properties of interstellar dust and the chemical reactions that occur on and in it have traditionally been the preserve of astronomical observation and experimental attempts to mimic astronomically relevant conditions in the laboratory. Increasingly, computational modelling in its various guises is establishing a complementary third pillar of support to this endeavour by providing detailed insights into the complexities of interstellar dust chemistry. Inherently, the basis of computational modelling is to be found in the details (e.g. atomic structure/composition, reaction barriers) that are difficult to probe accurately from observation and experiment. This bottom-up atom-based theoretical approach, often itself based on deeper quantum mechanical principles, although extremely powerful, also has limitations when systems become too large or complex. In this Perspective, after first providing a general background to the current state of observational-based knowledge, we introduce a number of computational modelling methods with reference to recent state-of-the-art studies, in order to highlight the capabilities of such approaches in this field. Specifically, we first outline the use of computational chemistry methods for dust nucleation, structure, and individual reactions on bare and icy dust surfaces. Later, we review kinetic modelling of networks of reactions relevant to dust chemistry and how to take into account quantum tunnelling effects in the low temperature reactions in the interstellar medium. Finally, we point to the future challenges that need to be overcome for computational modelling to provide even more detailed and encompassing perspectives on the nature and reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

  2. "Clicking" Gene Therapeutics: A Successful Union of Chemistry and Biomedicine for New Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Kira; Ray, Roslyn; Taskova, Maria

    2018-01-01

    cells. One approach that holds much promise is the utilization of "click chemistry" to conjugate receptor or cell specific targeting molecules directly to the effector oligonucleotides. We discuss here the applications of the breakthrough technology of CuAAC click chemistry and the immense potential...... in utilizing "click chemistry" in the development of new age targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics....

  3. Applied Integer Programming Modeling and Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Der-San; Dang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    An accessible treatment of the modeling and solution of integer programming problems, featuring modern applications and software In order to fully comprehend the algorithms associated with integer programming, it is important to understand not only how algorithms work, but also why they work. Applied Integer Programming features a unique emphasis on this point, focusing on problem modeling and solution using commercial software. Taking an application-oriented approach, this book addresses the art and science of mathematical modeling related to the mixed integer programming (MIP) framework and

  4. Identification of Copper(II) Complexes in Aqueous Solution by Electron Spin Resonance: An Undergraduate Coordination Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment which examines, through electron spin resonance spectroscopy, complex species formed by cupric and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate ions in aqueous solutions. The experiment is illustrative of several aspects of inorganic and coordination chemistry, including the identification of species…

  5. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  6. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  7. Modelling stratospheric chemistry in a global three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummukainen, M. [Finnish Meteorological Inst., Sodankylae (Finland). Sodankylae Observatory

    1995-12-31

    Numerical modelling of atmospheric chemistry aims to increase the understanding of the characteristics, the behavior and the evolution of atmospheric composition. These topics are of utmost importance in the study of climate change. The multitude of gases and particulates making up the atmosphere and the complicated interactions between them affect radiation transfer, atmospheric dynamics, and the impacts of anthropogenic and natural emissions. Chemical processes are fundamental factors in global warming, ozone depletion and atmospheric pollution problems in general. Much of the prevailing work on modelling stratospheric chemistry has so far been done with 1- and 2-dimensional models. Carrying an extensive chemistry parameterisation in a model with high spatial and temporal resolution is computationally heavy. Today, computers are becoming powerful enough to allow going over to 3-dimensional models. In order to concentrate on the chemistry, many Chemical Transport Models (CTM) are still run off-line, i.e. with precalculated and archived meteorology and radiation. In chemistry simulations, the archived values drive the model forward in time, without interacting with the chemical evolution. This is an approach that has been adopted in stratospheric chemistry modelling studies at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. In collaboration with the University of Oslo, a development project was initiated in 1993 to prepare a stratospheric chemistry parameterisation, fit for global 3-dimensional modelling. This article presents the parameterisation approach. Selected results are shown from basic photochemical simulations

  8. The chemistry of positronium. Part IV: Quests on the inhibition of positronium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplatre, G.; Maddock, A.G.; Abbe, J.C.; Haessler, A.

    1977-01-01

    The inhibition of positronium in aqueous solutions of Cl - and NO 3 - alone or mixed is discussed. An attempt is made to fit the experimental results using test functions, in terms of the spur model and of the kinetic theory of hot atoms

  9. Dissolution of beidellite in acidic solutions: Ion exchange reactions and effect of crystal chemistry on smectite reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Valentin; Tertre, Emmanuel; Regnault, Olivier; Descostes, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dissolution rate of beidellite, a dioctahedral smectite with tetrahedral charge that is a common swelling clay mineral in surface and subsurface natural environments, was studied in acidic solutions at 25 °C under far from equilibrium conditions. A rates with stirred and non-stirred particles. The aqueous Al/Si ratio measured at the outlet of the reactor was followed as a function of time and compared to solid stoichiometry values to assess the mechanisms occurring at the solid/solution interface. The reversible adsorption of Al3+ in the smectite interlayer space was evidenced for pH > 1.1, and the presence of an amorphous Si-enriched layer can be reasonably assumed in some cases from the interpretation of the aqueous concentrations and the characterization of the solid phase (X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy). Beidellite dissolution rates normalized to the sample mass (mol g-1 s-1) were obtained from Si and Al concentrations under steady state dissolution conditions. Calculated rates were compared with those previously reported for montmorillonite in several publications. The beidellite dissolution rates are, on average, ten times lower than those of montmorillonite. This implies that the smectite crystal chemistry (i.e., amount of Al3+ versus Mg2+ or Fe3+ substitution in the structure) has a strong effect on its stability and should be considered in reactive transport models in which the dissolution properties of smectites are taken into account.

  10. MIANN models in medicinal, physical and organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Munteanu, Cristian R; Pazos, Alejandro; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    Reducing costs in terms of time, animal sacrifice, and material resources with computational methods has become a promising goal in Medicinal, Biological, Physical and Organic Chemistry. There are many computational techniques that can be used in this sense. In any case, almost all these methods focus on few fundamental aspects including: type (1) methods to quantify the molecular structure, type (2) methods to link the structure with the biological activity, and others. In particular, MARCH-INSIDE (MI), acronym for Markov Chain Invariants for Networks Simulation and Design, is a well-known method for QSAR analysis useful in step (1). In addition, the bio-inspired Artificial-Intelligence (AI) algorithms called Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are among the most powerful type (2) methods. We can combine MI with ANNs in order to seek QSAR models, a strategy which is called herein MIANN (MI & ANN models). One of the first applications of the MIANN strategy was in the development of new QSAR models for drug discovery. MIANN strategy has been expanded to the QSAR study of proteins, protein-drug interactions, and protein-protein interaction networks. In this paper, we review for the first time many interesting aspects of the MIANN strategy including theoretical basis, implementation in web servers, and examples of applications in Medicinal and Biological chemistry. We also report new applications of the MIANN strategy in Medicinal chemistry and the first examples in Physical and Organic Chemistry, as well. In so doing, we developed new MIANN models for several self-assembly physicochemical properties of surfactants and large reaction networks in organic synthesis. In some of the new examples we also present experimental results which were not published up to date.

  11. The global change research center atmospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Jr., Francis Perry [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This work outlines the development of a new model of the chemistry of the natural atmosphere. The model is 2.5-dimensional, having spatial coordinates height, latitude, and, the half-dimension, land and ocean. The model spans both the troposphere and stratosphere, although the troposphere is emphasized and the stratosphere is simple and incomplete. The chemistry in the model includes the Ox, HOx, NOx, and methane cycles in a highly modular fashion which allows model users great flexibility in selecting simulation parameters. A detailed modeled sensitivity analysis is also presented. A key aspect of the model is its inclusion of clouds. The model uses current understanding of the distribution and optical thickness of clouds to determine the true radiation distribution in the atmosphere. As a result, detailed studies of the radiative effects of clouds on the distribution of both oxidant concentrations and trace gas removal are possible. This work presents a beginning of this study with model results and discussion of cloud effects on the hydroxyl radical.

  12. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  13. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  14. Effects of solution chemistry and aging time on prion protein adsorption and replication of soil-bound prions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E Saunders

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Prion interactions with soil may play an important role in the transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD and scrapie. Prions are known to bind to a wide range of soil surfaces, but the effects of adsorption solution chemistry and long-term soil binding on prion fate and transmission risk are unknown. We investigated HY TME prion protein (PrP(Sc adsorption to soil minerals in aqueous solutions of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and deionized water using western blotting. The replication efficiency of bound prions following adsorption in these solutions was also evaluated by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Aging studies investigated PrP(Sc desorption and replication efficiency up to one year following adsorption in PBS or DI water. Results indicate that adsorption solution chemistry can affect subsequent prion replication or desorption ability, especially after incubation periods of 30 d or longer. Observed effects were minor over the short-term (7 d or less. Results of long-term aging experiments demonstrate that unbound prions or prions bound to a diverse range of soil surfaces can readily replicate after one year. Our results suggest that while prion-soil interactions can vary with solution chemistry, prions bound to soil could remain a risk for transmitting prion diseases after months in the environment.

  15. A review of the radiation chemistry of iodine compounds in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, R.M.

    1977-06-01

    Large amounts of radioactive iodine are formed in the fission of uranium in nuclear reactors. Some of this may be released to the coolant from the fuel either by diffusion through the canning material, or following the failure of a fuel pin. The iodine, which is released mainly as I 2 and methyl iodide, is transported with the coolant and, in direct cycle water cooled reactors, some is carried over with the steam to the turbines, where contamination may build up in the vicinity of steam leaks. Any assessment of the mechanism of the transport of iodine requires a knowledge of the relative amounts of the various oxidation states present, and must consider not only the thermal behaviour of iodine in water, but also the radiation chemical effects. A review is presented of the radiation chemistry of inorganic iodine compounds and methyl iodide in aqueous solutions. A number of unstable intermediates have been identified including species with iodide in valency states II, IV, VI and VIII. A considerable number of discrepancies exist in the literature data, and requirements for further work are identified. (author)

  16. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry.

  17. Scientific Approach and Inquiry Learning Model in the Topic of Buffer Solution: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, I. A.; Ashadi, A.; Indriyanti, N. Y.

    2017-09-01

    Many concepts in buffer solution cause student’s misconception. Understanding science concepts should apply the scientific approach. One of learning models which is suitable with this approach is inquiry. Content analysis was used to determine textbook compatibility with scientific approach and inquiry learning model in the concept of buffer solution. By using scientific indicator tools (SIT) and Inquiry indicator tools (IIT), we analyzed three chemistry textbooks grade 11 of senior high school labeled as P, Q, and R. We described how textbook compatibility with scientific approach and inquiry learning model in the concept of buffer solution. The results show that textbook P and Q were very poor and book R was sufficient because the textbook still in procedural level. Chemistry textbooks used at school are needed to be improved in term of scientific approach and inquiry learning model. The result of these analyses might be of interest in order to write future potential textbooks.

  18. Effect of solution chemistry on arsenic sorption by Fe- and Al-based drinking-water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Rachana; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Makris, Konstantinos C; Datta, Rupali

    2010-02-01

    Drinking-water treatment residual (WTR) have been proposed as a low-cost alternative sorbent for arsenic (As) - contaminated aquatic and soil systems. However, limited information exists regarding the effect of solution chemistry on As sorption by WTR. A batch incubation study was carried out to investigate the effect of solution pH (3-9) on As(V) sorption by Al- and Fe-based WTR as a function of solid: solution ratio (SSR) and initial As concentration. The effect of competing ligands (phosphate-P(V) and sulfate), and complexing metal (calcium) on As(V) sorption envelopes at the optimum SSR (200gL(-1)) was also evaluated. At 200gL(-1) SSR, maximum As(V) sorption ( approximately 100%) exhibited by the Fe-WTR was limited at the pH range of 3-7, whereas, the Al-WTR demonstrated approximately 100% As(V) sorption in the entire pH range. The negative pH effect on As(V) sorption became more pronounced with increasing initial As concentrations and decreasing SSR. Sorption of As(V) by surfaces of both WTR decreased in the presence of P(V), exhibiting strong pH dependence. Only for the Fe-WTR, increased dissolved iron concentrations at pH>7 supported a Fe-hydroxide reductive dissolution mechanism to account for the enhanced As sorption at alkaline pH. Addition of sulfate did not influence As(V) sorption by both WTR. A cooperative effect of calcium on As(V) sorption was observed at alkaline pH due to the formation of a calcium-arsenate phase. The constant capacitance model provided reasonable fits to the sorption envelope data for both single ion and binary ion (As and P) systems, but it was unable to explain the enhanced As sorption by the Fe-WTR at pH>7.

  19. Smooth solutions for the dyadic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbato, David; Morandin, Francesco; Romito, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We consider the dyadic model, which is a toy model to test issues of well-posedness and blow-up for the Navier–Stokes and Euler equations. We prove well-posedness of positive solutions of the viscous problem in the relevant scaling range which corresponds to Navier–Stokes. Likewise we prove well-posedness for the inviscid problem (in a suitable regularity class) when the parameter corresponds to the strongest transport effect of the nonlinearity

  20. Parameterization and evaluation of sulfate adsorption in a dynamic soil chemistry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Liisa; Alveteg, Mattias; Warfvinge, Per

    2003-01-01

    Including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the SAFE model. - Sulfate adsorption was implemented in the dynamic, multi-layer soil chemistry model SAFE. The process is modeled by an isotherm in which sulfate adsorption is considered to be fully reversible and dependent on sulfate concentration as well as pH in soil solution. The isotherm was parameterized by a site-specific series of simple batch experiments at different pH (3.8-5.0) and sulfate concentration (10-260 μmol l -1 ) levels. Application of the model to the Lake Gaardsjoen roof covered site shows that including sulfate adsorption improves the dynamic behavior of the model and sulfate adsorption and desorption delay acidification and recovery of the soil. The modeled adsorbed pool of sulfate at the site reached a maximum level of 700 mmol/m 2 in the late 1980s, well in line with experimental data

  1. Current Status of Post-combustor Trace Chemistry Modeling and Simulation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of the current effort at NASA GRC is to evaluate, develop, and apply methodologies suitable for modeling intra-engine trace chemical changes over post combustor flow path relevant to the pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. At the present time, the focus is the high pressure turbine environment. At first, the trace chemistry model of CNEWT were implemented into GLENN-HT as well as NCC. Then, CNEWT, CGLENN-HT, and NCC were applied to the trace species evolution in a cascade of Cambridge University's No. 2 rotor and in a turbine vane passage. In general, the results from these different codes provide similar features. However, the details of some of the quantities of interest can be sensitive to the differences of these codes. This report summaries the implementation effort and presents the comparison of the No. 2 rotor results obtained from these different codes. The comparison of the turbine vane passage results is reported elsewhere. In addition to the implementation of trace chemistry model into existing CFD codes, several pre/post-processing tools that can handle the manipulations of the geometry, the unstructured and structured grids as well as the CFD solutions also have been enhanced and seamlessly tied with NCC, CGLENN-HT, and CNEWT. Thus, a complete CFD package consisting of pre/post-processing tools and flow solvers suitable for post-combustor intra-engine trace chemistry study is assembled.

  2. Can global chemistry-climate models reproduce air quality extremes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, J.; Prather, M. J.; Holmes, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    We identify and characterize extreme ozone pollution episodes over the USA and EU through a novel analysis of ten years (2000-2010) of surface ozone measurements. An optimal interpolation scheme is developed to create grid-cell averaged values of surface ozone that can be compared with gridded model simulations. In addition, it also allows a comparison of two non-coincident observational networks in the EU. The scheme incorporates techniques borrowed from inverse distance weighting and Kriging. It uses all representative observational site data while still recognizing the heterogeneity of surface ozone. Individual, grid-cell level events are identified as an exceedance of historical percentile (10 worst days in a year, 97.3 percentile). A clustering algorithm is then used to construct the ozone episodes from the individual events. We then test the skill of the high-resolution (100 km) two-year (2005-2006) hindcast from the UCI global chemistry transport model in reproducing the events/episodes identified in the observations using the same identification criteria. Although the UCI CTM has substantial biases in surface ozone, we find that it has considerable skill in reproducing both individual grid-cell level extreme events and their connectedness in space and time with an overall skill of 24% (32%) for the US (EU). The grid-cell level extreme ozone events in both the observations and UCI CTM are found to occur mostly (~75%) in coherent, multi-day, connected episodes covering areas greater than 1000 x 1000 square km. In addition the UCI CTM has greater skill in reproducing these larger episodes. We conclude that even at relatively coarse resolution, global chemistry-climate models can be used to project major synoptic pollution episodes driven by large-scale climate and chemistry changes even with their known biases.

  3. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chem- istry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chem...

  4. Coarse-Grained Modeling of Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alan R.; May, Sylvio

    2014-03-01

    Ionic mixtures, such as electrolyte and polyelectrolyte solutions, have attracted much attention recently for their rich and challenging combination of electrostatic and non-electrostatic interparticle forces and their practical importance, from battery technologies to biological systems. Hydration of ions in aqueous solutions is known to entail ion-specific effects, including variable solubility of organic molecules, as manifested in the classic Hofmeister series for salting-in and salting-out of proteins. The physical mechanism by which the solvent (water) mediates effective interactions between ions, however, is still poorly understood. Starting from a microscopic model of a polyelectrolyte solution, we apply a perturbation theory to derive a coarse-grained model of ions interacting through both long-range electrostatic and short-range solvent-induced pair potentials. Taking these effective interactions as input to molecular dynamics simulations, we calculate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous ionic solutions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  5. Use of pulse radiolysis for the study of the chemistry of aqueous ozone and ozonide solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Knud; Holcman, Jerzy; Bjergbakke, Erling

    1986-01-01

    The chemistry of aqeous ozone, O3, and ozonide, O3−, is of great interest from a technological, environmental and scientific point of view. The literature about their aqueous chemistry is extensive, the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. The ozonide anion is a free radical...... of a detailed mechanism. We have investigated the reaction mechanisms using pulse radiolysis in combination with a high pressure cell, rapid mixing and numerical simulation of the experiments. This study makes it possible to give a detailed description of the reaction mechanisms in terms of uni- and bimolecular...... reactions and provides kinetic data sufficient for computer simulations of aqueous O3/O3− chemistry....

  6. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  7. Chemistry resolved kinetic flow modeling of TATB based explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Peter; Fried, Laurence E.; William, Howard; Levesque, George; Souers, P. Clark

    2012-03-01

    Detonation waves in insensitive, TATB-based explosives are believed to have multiple time scale regimes. The initial burn rate of such explosives has a sub-microsecond time scale. However, significant late-time slow release in energy is believed to occur due to diffusion limited growth of carbon. In the intermediate time scale concentrations of product species likely change from being in equilibrium to being kinetic rate controlled. We use the thermo-chemical code CHEETAH linked to an ALE hydrodynamics code to model detonations. We term our model chemistry resolved kinetic flow, since CHEETAH tracks the time dependent concentrations of individual species in the detonation wave and calculates EOS values based on the concentrations. We present here two variants of our new rate model and comparison with hot, ambient, and cold experimental data for PBX 9502.

  8. Complex chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Gon; Kim, Jae Sang; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Boo Yeon

    2006-06-01

    This book introduces complex chemistry with ten chapters, which include development of complex chemistry on history coordination theory and Warner's coordination theory and new development of complex chemistry, nomenclature on complex with conception and define, chemical formula on coordination compound, symbol of stereochemistry, stereo structure and isomerism, electron structure and bond theory on complex, structure of complex like NMR and XAFS, balance and reaction on solution, an organo-metallic chemistry, biology inorganic chemistry, material chemistry of complex, design of complex and calculation chemistry.

  9. Modeling the Relationship between High School Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy and Metacognitive Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the relationship between students' chemistry self-efficacy beliefs and metacognitive awareness was investigated utilizing a path model. There were 268 chemistry high school students (59% 10th grade and 41% 11th grade) participated in the study. The students took two-hour chemistry course in the 9th and 10th grade and three-hour…

  10. Uncertainty estimation and ensemble forecast with a chemistry-transport model - Application to air-quality modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallet, Vivien

    2005-01-01

    The thesis deals with the evaluation of a chemistry-transport model, not primarily with classical comparisons to observations, but through the estimation of its a priori uncertainties due to input data, model formulation and numerical approximations. These three uncertainty sources are studied respectively on the basis of Monte Carlos simulations, multi-models simulations and numerical schemes inter-comparisons. A high uncertainty is found, in output ozone concentrations. In order to overtake the limitations due to the uncertainty, a solution is ensemble forecast. Through combinations of several models (up to forty-eight models) on the basis of past observations, the forecast can be significantly improved. The achievement of this work has also led to develop the innovative modelling-system Polyphemus. (author) [fr

  11. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  12. Meteorological implementation issues in chemistry and transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Strahan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Offline chemistry and transport models (CTMs are versatile tools for studying composition and climate issues requiring multi-decadal simulations. They are computationally fast compared to coupled chemistry climate models, making them well-suited for integrating sensitivity experiments necessary for understanding model performance and interpreting results. The archived meteorological fields used by CTMs can be implemented with lower horizontal or vertical resolution than the original meteorological fields in order to shorten integration time, but the effects of these shortcuts on transport processes must be understood if the CTM is to have credibility. In this paper we present a series of sensitivity experiments on a CTM using the Lin and Rood advection scheme, each differing from another by a single feature of the wind field implementation. Transport effects arising from changes in resolution and model lid height are evaluated using process-oriented diagnostics that intercompare CH4, O3, and age tracer carried in the simulations. Some of the diagnostics used are derived from observations and are shown as a reality check for the model. Processes evaluated include tropical ascent, tropical-midlatitude exchange, poleward circulation in the upper stratosphere, and the development of the Antarctic vortex. We find that faithful representation of stratospheric transport in this CTM is possible with a full mesosphere, ~1 km resolution in the lower stratosphere, and relatively low vertical resolution (>4 km spacing in the middle stratosphere and above, but lowering the lid from the upper to lower mesosphere leads to less realistic constituent distributions in the upper stratosphere. Ultimately, this affects the polar lower stratosphere, but the effects are greater for the Antarctic than the Arctic. The fidelity of lower stratospheric transport requires realistic tropical and high latitude mixing barriers which are produced at 2°×2.5°, but not lower

  13. Evaluation of the ACCESS - chemistry-climate model for the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kane A.; Morgenstern, Olaf; Karoly, David J.; Klekociuk, Andrew R.; French, W. John; Abraham, N. Luke; Schofield, Robyn

    2016-02-01

    explicitly simulate a supercooled ternary solution may also explain the lack of depletion at lower altitudes. Analysis of the simulated Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index compares well with ERA-Interim data, an important metric for correct representation of Australian climate. Accompanying these modulations of the SAM, 50 hPa zonal wind differences between 2001-2010 and 1979-1998 show increasing zonal wind strength southward of 60° S during December for both the model simulations and ERA-Interim data. These model diagnostics show that the model reasonably captures the stratospheric ozone-driven chemistry-climate interactions important for Australian climate and weather while highlighting areas for future model development.

  14. Solute-specific patterns and drivers of urban stream chemistry revealed by long-term monitoring in Baltimore, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, A. J.; Woytowitz, E.; Majcher, E.; Rosi, E. J.; Groffman, P.

    2017-12-01

    Urban streams receive a myriad of chemical inputs from the surrounding landscape due to altered lithology (asphalt, concrete), leaky sewage infrastructure, and other human activities (road salt, fertilizer, industrial wastes, wastewater effluent), potentially leading to multiple chemical stressors occurring simultaneously. To evaluate potential drivers of water chemistry change, we used approximately 20 years of weekly water chemistry monitoring data from streams in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES) to quantify trends of annual loads and flow-weighted concentrations for multiple solutes of interest, including nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chloride (Cl-), and sulfate (SO42-) and subsequently examined various gray and green infrastructure characteristics at the watershed scale. For example, we quantified annual volume and duration of reported sanitary sewer overflows (SSO) and cumulative storage volume and area of various best management practices (BMPs). Site- and solute-specific trends differed, but across our monitoring network we found evidence for decreasing annual export for multiple solutes. Additionally, we found that changes in gray- and green-infrastructure characteristics were related to changes in water quality at our most downstream (most urban) monitoring site. For example, annual NO3- loads increased with longer cumulative SSO duration, whereas annual PO43- and TP loads decreased with a cumulative BMP area in the watershed. Further, we used same long-term water chemistry data and multivariate analyses to investigate whether urban streams have unique water chemistry fingerprints representing the multiple chemical stressors at a given site, which could provide insight into sources and impacts of water-quality impairment. These analyses and results illustrate the major role gray and green infrastructure play in influencing water quality in urban environments, and illustrate that focusing on a variety of

  15. Evaluation of the Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, K. A.; Morgenstern, O.; Karoly, D. J.; Klekociuk, A. R.; French, W. J. R.; Abraham, N. L.; Schofield, R.

    2015-07-01

    Chemistry climate models are important tools for addressing interactions of composition and climate in the Earth System. In particular, they are used for assessing the combined roles of greenhouse gases and ozone in Southern Hemisphere climate and weather. Here we present an evaluation of the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator-Chemistry Climate Model, focusing on the Southern Hemisphere and the Australian region. This model is used for the Australian contribution to the international Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which is soliciting hindcast, future projection and sensitivity simulations. The model simulates global total column ozone (TCO) distributions accurately, with a slight delay in the onset and recovery of springtime Antarctic ozone depletion, and consistently higher ozone values. However, October averaged Antarctic TCO from 1960 to 2010 show a similar amount of depletion compared to observations. A significant innovation is the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles of ozone and temperature with ozonesonde data from Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica from 38 to 90° S. Excess ozone concentrations (up to 26.4 % at Davis during winter) and stratospheric cold biases (up to 10.1 K at the South Pole) outside the period of perturbed springtime ozone depletion are seen during all seasons compared to ozonesondes. A disparity in the vertical location of ozone depletion is seen: centered around 100 hPa in ozonesonde data compared to above 50 hPa in the model. Analysis of vertical chlorine monoxide profiles indicates that colder Antarctic stratospheric temperatures (possibly due to reduced mid-latitude heat flux) are artificially enhancing polar stratospheric cloud formation at high altitudes. The models inability to explicitly simulated supercooled ternary solution may also explain the lack of depletion at lower altitudes. The simulated Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index compares well with ERA-Interim data. Accompanying these

  16. Implementation of an Online Chemistry Model to a Large Eddy Simulation Model (PALM-4U0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauder, M.; Khan, B.; Forkel, R.; Banzhaf, S.; Russo, E. E.; Sühring, M.; Kanani-Sühring, F.; Raasch, S.; Ketelsen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models permit to resolve relevant scales of turbulent motion, so that these models can capture the inherent unsteadiness of atmospheric turbulence. However, LES models are so far hardly applied for urban air quality studies, in particular chemical transformation of pollutants. In this context, BMBF (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung) funded a joint project, MOSAIK (Modellbasierte Stadtplanung und Anwendung im Klimawandel / Model-based city planning and application in climate change) with the main goal to develop a new highly efficient urban climate model (UCM) that also includes atmospheric chemical processes. The state-of-the-art LES model PALM; Maronga et al, 2015, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, doi:10.5194/gmd-8-2515-2015), has been used as a core model for the new UCM named as PALM-4U. For the gas phase chemistry, a fully coupled 'online' chemistry model has been implemented into PALM. The latest version of the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP) Version 2.3, has been utilized for the numerical integration of chemical species. Due to the high computational demands of the LES model, compromises in the description of chemical processes are required. Therefore, a reduced chemistry mechanism, which includes only major pollutants namely O3, NO, NO2, CO, a highly simplified VOC chemistry and a small number of products have been implemented. This work shows preliminary results of the advection, and chemical transformation of atmospheric pollutants. Non-cyclic boundaries have been used for inflow and outflow in east-west directions while periodic boundary conditions have been implemented to the south-north lateral boundaries. For practical applications, our approach is to go beyond the simulation of single street canyons to chemical transformation, advection and deposition of air pollutants in the larger urban canopy. Tests of chemistry schemes and initial studies of chemistry-turbulence, transport and transformations are presented.

  17. Flowfield and Radiation Analysis of Missile Exhaust Plumes Using a Turbulent-Chemistry Interaction Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calhoon, W. H; Kenzakowski, D. C

    2000-01-01

    ... components and missile defense systems. Current engineering level models neglect turbulent-chemistry interactions and typically underpredict the intensity of plume afterburning and afterburning burnout...

  18. Probing flame chemistry with MBMS, theory, and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westmoreland, P.R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective is to establish kinetics of combustion and molecular-weight growth in C{sub 3} hydrocarbon flames as part of an ongoing study of flame chemistry. Specific reactions being studied are (1) the growth reactions of C{sub 3}H{sub 5} and C{sub 3}H{sub 3} with themselves and with unsaturated hydrocarbons and (2) the oxidation reactions of O and OH with C{sub 3}`s. This approach combines molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS) experiments on low-pressure flat flames; theoretical predictions of rate constants by thermochemical kinetics, Bimolecular Quantum-RRK, RRKM, and master-equation theory; and whole-flame modeling using full mechanisms of elementary reactions.

  19. Modeling aluminum-silicon chemistries and application to Australian acidic playa lakes as analogues for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G.M.; Crowley, J.K.; Thomson, B.J.; Kargel, J.S.; Bridges, N.T.; Hook, S.J.; Baldridge, A.; Brown, A.J.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza, Filho C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Mars missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major relevant findings are the presence in Meridiani Planum sediments of the mineral jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt) and related minerals that require formation from an acid-salt brine and oxidizing environment. Similar mineralogies have been observed in acidic saline lake sediments in Western Australia (WA), and these lakes have been proposed as analogues for acidic sedimentary environments on Mars. The prior version of the equilibrium chemical thermodynamic FREZCHEM model lacked Al and Si chemistries that are needed to appropriately model acidic aqueous geochemistries on Earth and Mars. The objectives of this work were to (1) add Al and Si chemistries to the FREZCHEM model, (2) extend these chemistries to low temperatures (mineral precipitation behavior of acidic Australian lakes and hypothetical Martian brines. FREZCHEM is an equilibrium chemical thermodynamic model parameterized for concentrated electrolyte solutions using the Pitzer approach for the temperature range from mineral parameterizations were based on experimental data. Aluminum hydroxide and silicon mineral parameterizations were based on Gibbs free energy and enthalpy data. New aluminum and silicon parameterizations added 12 new aluminum/silicon minerals to this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO4-NO3-OH-HCO3-CO3-CO2-O2-CH4-Si-H2O system that now contain 95 solid phases. There were similarities, differences, and uncertainties between Australian acidic, saline playa lakes and waters that likely led to the Burns formation salt accumulations on Mars. Both systems are similar in that they are dominated by (1) acidic, saline ground waters and sediments, (2) Ca and/or Mg sulfates, and (3) iron precipitates such as jarosite and hematite. Differences include: (1) the dominance of NaCl in many WA lakes, versus the dominance of Fe-Mg-Ca-SO4 in Meridiani Planum, (2) excessively low K

  20. Ion binding by humic and fulvic acids: A computational procedure based on functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.; Mathuthu, A.

    1988-04-01

    Ion binding equilibria for humic and fulvic acids are examined from the point of view of functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions. A detailed explanation of the potentiometric properties of synthetic polyelectrolytes and ion-exchange gels is presented first to provide the basis for a parallel consideration of the potentiometric properties exhibited by humic and fulvic acids. The treatment is then extended to account for functional site heterogeneity. Sample results are presented for analysis of the ion-binding reactions of a standard soil fulvic acid (Armadale Horizons Bh) with this approach to test its capability for anticipation of metal ion removal from solution. The ultimate refined model is shown to be adaptable, after appropriate consideration of the heterogeneity and polyelectrolyte factors, to programming already available for the consideration of ion binding by inorganics in natural waters. (orig.)

  1. Models of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar cloud cores with a stochastic approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantcheva, T.; Herbst, E.

    2004-08-01

    We present a gas-grain model of homogeneous cold cloud cores with time-independent physical conditions. In the model, the gas-phase chemistry is treated via rate equations while the diffusive granular chemistry is treated stochastically. The two phases are coupled through accretion and evaporation. A small network of surface reactions accounts for the surface production of the stable molecules water, formaldehyde, methanol, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane. The calculations are run for a time of 107 years at three different temperatures: 10 K, 15 K, and 20 K. The results are compared with those produced in a totally deterministic gas-grain model that utilizes the rate equation method for both the gas-phase and surface chemistry. The results of the different models are in agreement for the abundances of the gaseous species except for later times when the surface chemistry begins to affect the gas. The agreement for the surface species, however, is somewhat mixed. The average abundances of highly reactive surface species can be orders of magnitude larger in the stochastic-deterministic model than in the purely deterministic one. For non-reactive species, the results of the models can disagree strongly at early times, but agree to well within an order of magnitude at later times for most molecules. Strong exceptions occur for CO and H2CO at 10 K, and for CO2 at 20 K. The agreement seems to be best at a temperature of 15 K. As opposed to the use of the normal rate equation method of surface chemistry, the modified rate method is in significantly better agreement with the stochastic-deterministic approach. Comparison with observations of molecular ices in dense clouds shows mixed agreement.

  2. Structure and chemistry of model catalysts in ultrahigh vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joshua D.

    The study of catalysis is a key area of focus not only in the industrial sector but also in the nature and biological systems. The market for catalysis is a multi-billion dollar industry. Many of the materials and products we use on a daily basis are formed through a catalytic process. The quest to understanding and improving catalytic mechanisms is ongoing. Many model catalysts use transition metals as a support for chemical reactions to take place due to their selectivity and activity. Palladium, gold, and copper metals are studied in this work and show the ability to be catalytically reactive. It is important to understand the characteristics and properties of these surfaces. A well-known example of catalysis is the conversion of carbon monoxide (CO), a very harmful gas to carbon dioxide (CO2) which is less harmful. This reaction is mainly seen in the automotive industry. This reaction is investigated in this work on a Au(111) single crystal, which is normally inert but becomes reactivity with the adsorption of oxygen on the surface. Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) is used to understand some of the chemistry and effects with and without the addition of H2O. The oxidation of CO is shown to be enhanced by the addition of water, but warrants further analysis too fully understand the different mechanisms and reaction pathways existing. The field of nano-electronics is rapidly growing as technology continues to challenge scientists to create innovative ideas. The trend to produce smaller electronic products is increasing as consumer demands persist. It has been shown previously that 1,4-phenlyene diisocyanobenzene (1,4-PDI) on Au(111) react to form one-dimensional oligomer chains comprising alternating gold and 1,4-PDI units on the Au(111) surface. A similar compound 1,3-phenlyene diisocyanobenzene (1,3-PDI) was studied in order to investigate whether the oligomerization found for 1,4-PDI is a general phenomenon and to ultimately explore the effect of

  3. Modeling and management of pit lake water chemistry 1: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castendyk, D.N.; Eary, L.E.; Balistrieri, L.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of pit lake literature in the context of pit lake predictions. • Review of approaches used to predict pit wall-rock runoff and leachate. • Review of approaches used to generate a pit lake water balance. • Review of approaches used to generate a hydrodynamic prediction. • Review of approaches used to generate a geochemical prediction of a future pit lake. - Abstract: Pit lakes are permanent hydrologic/landscape features that can result from open pit mining for metals, coal, uranium, diamonds, oil sands, and aggregates. Risks associated with pit lakes include local and regional impacts to water quality and related impacts to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Stakeholders rely on predictive models of water chemistry to prepare for and manage these risks. This paper is the first of a two part series on the modeling and management of pit lakes. Herein, we review approaches that have been used to quantify wall-rock runoff geochemistry, wall-rock leachate geochemistry, pit lake water balance, pit lake limnology (i.e. extent of vertical mixing), and pit lake water quality, and conclude with guidance on the application of models within the mine life cycle. The purpose of this paper is to better prepare stakeholders, including future modelers, mine managers, consultants, permitting agencies, land management agencies, regulators, research scientists, academics, and other interested parties, for the challenges of predicting and managing future pit lakes in un-mined areas

  4. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA a

  5. Greener "Solutions" for the Organic Chemistry Teaching Lab: Exploring the Advantages of Alternative Reaction Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.; Rogers, Courtney E.; Goodwin, Thomas E.; Spessard, Gary O.

    2009-01-01

    A major approach for implementing green chemistry is the discovery and development of synthetic strategies that reduce the quantity of solvent needed, eliminate it altogether, or rely on new reaction media. An increasing number of examples have demonstrated that greener reaction solvents or media can enhance performance as well as reduce hazard.…

  6. Transport and retention of biochar nanoparticles in a paddy soil under environmentally-relevant solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Dengjun; Yang, Fan; Xu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Nan; Cao, Xinde

    2017-11-01

    Land application of biochar has been increasingly recommended as a powerful strategy for carbon sequestration and soil remediation. However, the biochar particles, especially those in the nanoscale range, may migrate or carry the inherent contaminants along the soil profile, posing a potential risk to the groundwater. This study investigated the transport and retention of wood chip-derived biochar nanoparticles (NPs) in water-saturated columns packed with a paddy soil. The environmentally-relevant soil solution chemistry including ionic strength (0.10-50 mM), electrolyte type (NaCl and CaCl 2 ), and natural organic matter (0-10 mg L -1 humic acid) were tested to elucidate their effects on the biochar NPs transport. Higher mobility of biochar NPs was observed in the soil at lower ionic strengths, with CaCl 2 electrolyte being more effective than NaCl in decreasing biochar NPs transport. The retained biochar NPs in NaCl was re-entrained (∼57.7%) upon lowering transient pore-water ionic strength, indicating that biochar NPs were reversibly retained in the secondary minimum. In contrast, negligible re-entrainment of biochar NPs occurred in CaCl 2 due to the primary minimum and/or particle aggregation. Humic acid increased the mobility of biochar NPs, likely due to enhanced electrosteric repulsive interactions. The transport behaviors of biochar NPs can be well interpreted by a two-site kinetic retention model that assumes reversible retention for one site, and irreversible retention for the other site. Our findings indicated that the transport of wood chip biochar NPs is significant in the paddy soil, highlighting the importance of understanding the mobility of biochar NPs in natural soils for accurately assessing their environmental impacts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Land-use and fire drive temporal patterns of soil solution chemistry and nutrient fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potthast, Karin; Meyer, Stefanie; Crecelius, Anna C; Schubert, Ulrich S; Tischer, Alexander; Michalzik, Beate

    2017-12-15

    Land-use type and ecosystem disturbances are important drivers for element cycling and bear the potential to modulate soil processes and hence ecosystem functions. To better understand the effect of such drivers on the magnitude and temporal patterns of organic matter (OM) and associated nutrient fluxes in soils, continuous flux monitoring is indispensable but insufficiently studied yet. We conducted a field study to elucidate the impact of land-use and surface fires on OM and nutrient fluxes with soil solution regarding seasonal and temporal patterns analyzing short (Linear mixed model analyses exhibited that mean annual DOM and POM fluxes did not differ between the two land-use types, but were subjected to strong seasonal patterns. Fire disturbance significantly lowered the annual soil solution pH in both land-uses and increased water fluxes, while DOC fluxes remained unaffected. A positive response of POC and S to fire was limited to short-term effects, while amplified particulate and dissolved nitrogen fluxes were observed in the longer run and co-ocurred with accelerated Ca and Mg fluxes. In summary, surface fires generated stronger effects on element fluxes than the land-use. Fire-induced increases in POM fluxes suggest that the particulate fraction represent a major pathway of OM translocation into the subsoil and beyond. With regard to ecosystem functions, pasture ecosystems were less prone to the risk of nutrient losses following fire events than the forest. In pastures, fire-induced base cation export may accelerate soil acidification, consequently exhausting soil buffer systems and thus may reduce the resilience to acidic depositions and disturbances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemistry and Climate in Asia - An Earth System Modeling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Emmons, L. K.; Massie, S. T.; Pfister, G.; Romero Lankao, P.; Lamarque, J.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Asia is one of the most highly populated and economically dynamic regions in the world, with much of the population located in growing mega-cities. It is a region with significant emissions of greenhouse gases, aerosols and other pollutants, which pose high health risks to urban populations. Emissions of these aerosols and gases increased drastically over the last decade due to economic growth and urbanization and are expected to rise further in the near future. As such, the continent plays a role in influencing climate change via its effluent of aerosols and gaseous pollutants. Asia is also susceptible to adverse climate change through interactions between aerosols and clouds, which potentially can have serious implications for freshwater resources. We are developing an integrated inter-disciplinary program to focus on Asia, its climate, air quality, and impact on humans that will include connections with hydrology, ecosystems, extreme weather events, and human health. The primary goal of this project is to create a team to identify key scientific questions and establish networks of specialists to create a plan for future studies to address these questions. A second goal is to establish research facilities and a framework for investigating chemistry and climate over Asia. These facilities include producing high resolution Earth System Model simulations that have been evaluated with meteorological and chemical measurements, producing high-resolution emission inventories, analyzing satellite data, and analyzing the vulnerability of humans to air quality and extreme natural events. In this presentation we will describe in more detail these activities and discuss a future workshop on the impact of chemistry in climate on air quality and human health.

  9. Alteration of non-metallic barriers and evolution of solution chemistry in salt formations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Becker, D.; Hagemann, S.; Meyer, Th.; Noseck, U.; Rubel, A.; Mauke, R.; Wollrath, J.

    2005-01-01

    Different Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) materials considered in Germany for the sealing of repositories in salt formations are presented. Their long term behaviour in terms of interactions with salt solutions is discussed and evaluated. The discussed EBS materials are crushed salt, self sealing salt backfill, bentonite and salt concrete. Whereas the knowledge concerning the geochemical, geomechanical, hydrological and thermal behavior of crushed salt and salt concrete is well advanced further research is needed for other EBS materials. The self healing salt backfill has also been investigated in depth recently. In order to fully qualify this material large scale in situ experiments are still needed. The present knowledge on compacted bentonites in a salt environment is not yet sufficient for reliable predictions of the long-term performance in salt formations. The sealing concept of the low- and intermediate-level Radioactive Waste Repository Morsleben (ERAM) in a former rock salt and potash mine is presented. This concept is based on cementitious materials, i.e. salt concrete. The geochemical stability of different salt concretes in contact with brines expected in ERAM is addressed. It is shown how the results from leaching experiments and geochemical modelling are used in the safety analyses and how the chemical boundary conditions prevailing in the EBS influence the development of the permeability of the sealing system and thus control the radionuclide release. As a result of modelling the behaviour of the seals in the safety assessment it is shown, that the seals are corroded within a time span of about 20 000 years. The influence of the uncertainty in the model parameters on the safety of the repository was assessed by a variation of the initial permeability of the seal. The maximum dose rate resulting from the radionuclide release from ERAM is nearly independent of the variation of the initial permeability within four orders of magnitude. (authors)

  10. GAS-GRAIN MODELS FOR INTERSTELLAR ANION CHEMISTRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C n H – (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n H 2 ∼>10 5 cm –3 ). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C 6 H – anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C 6 O, C 7 O, HC 6 O, and HC 7 O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment.

  11. Gas-Grain Models for Interstellar Anion Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C(sub n) H(-) (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n(sub H2) approx > / cubic cm). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C6H(-) anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C6O, C7O, HC6O, and HC7O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment

  12. Effects of different representations of transport in the new EMAC-SWIFT chemistry climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Janice; Langematz, Ulrike; Wohltmann, Ingo; Kreyling, Daniel; Rex, Markus

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the representation of atmospheric ozone chemistry in weather and climate models is essential for a realistic simulation of the atmospheric state. Interactively coupled chemistry climate models (CCMs) provide a means to realistically simulate the interaction between atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. The calculation of chemistry in CCMs, however, is computationally expensive which renders the use of complex chemistry models not suitable for ensemble simulations or simulations with multiple climate change scenarios. In these simulations ozone is therefore usually prescribed as a climatological field or included by incorporating a fast linear ozone scheme into the model. While prescribed climatological ozone fields are often not aligned with the modelled dynamics, a linear ozone scheme may not be applicable for a wide range of climatological conditions. An alternative approach to represent atmospheric chemistry in climate models which can cope with non-linearities in ozone chemistry and is applicable to a wide range of climatic states is the Semi-empirical Weighted Iterative Fit Technique (SWIFT) that is driven by reanalysis data and has been validated against observational satellite data and runs of a full Chemistry and Transport Model. SWIFT has been implemented into the ECHAM/MESSy (EMAC) chemistry climate model that uses a modular approach to climate modelling where individual model components can be switched on and off. When using SWIFT in EMAC, there are several possibilities to represent the effect of transport inside the polar vortex: the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of EMAC and a transport parameterisation that can be useful when using SWIFT in models not having transport of their own. Here, we present results of equivalent simulations with different handling of transport, compare with EMAC simulations with full interactive chemistry and evaluate the results with observations.

  13. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous ..... Clay (0.40). Analytical solution. Numerical solution. Figure 3. Comparison of concentration distribution for sinu- soidal velocity pattern for boundary condition c0. 2 1 ю sec wt р. Ю.

  14. Traveling Wave Solutions in a Reaction-Diffusion Epidemic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Wenbin; Guo, Zhengguang; Wang, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the traveling wave solutions in a reaction-diffusion epidemic model. The existence of the wave solutions is derived through monotone iteration of a pair of classical upper and lower solutions. The traveling wave solutions are shown to be unique and strictly monotonic. Furthermore, we determine the critical minimal wave speed.

  15. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  16. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes

  17. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  18. Modeling the plasma chemistry of stratospheric Blue Jet streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Holger; Notholt, Justus

    2014-05-01

    Stratospheric Blue Jets (SBJs) are upward propagating discharges in the altitude range 15-40 km above thunderstorms. The currently most accepted theory associates SBJs to the development of the streamer zone of a leader. The streamers emitted from the leader can travel for a few tens of kilometers predominantly in the vertical direction (Raizer et al., 2007). The strong electric fields at the streamer tips cause ionisation, dissociation, and excitation, and give rise to chemical perturbations. While in recent years the effects of electric discharges occurring in the mesosphere (sprites) have been investigated in a number of model studies, there are only a few studies on the impact of SBJs. However, chemical perturbations due to SBJs are of interest as they might influence the stratospheric ozone layer. We present results of detailed plasma chemistry simulations of SBJ streamers for both day-time and night-time conditions. Any effects of the subsequent leader are not considered. The model accounts for more than 500 reactions and calculates the evolution of the 88 species under the influence of the breakdown electric fields at the streamer tip. As the SBJ dynamics is outside the scope of this study, the streamer parameters are prescribed. For this purpose, electric field parameters based on Raizer et al. (2007) are used. The model is applied to the typical SBJ altitude range 15-40 km. The simulations indicate that SBJ streamers cause significant chemical perturbations. In particular, the liberation of atomic oxygen during the discharge leads to a formation of ozone. At the same time, reactive nitrogen and hydrogen radicals are produced which will cause catalytic ozone destruction. Reference: Raizer et al. (2007), J. Atmos. Solar-Terr. Phys., 69 (8), 925-938.

  19. XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The collection contains materials of plenary, sectional and poster sessions, presented at the XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Theoretical questions and new experimental methods of chemistry of solutions, structure and dynamics of molecular and ion-molecular systems in solution and at the phase boundary; modern aspects of applied chemistry of solutions are discussed [ru

  20. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes.

  1. Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the chemistry-climate-model EMAC via the submodel PSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Kirner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The submodel PSC of the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry model (EMAC has been developed to simulate the main types of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC. The parameterisation of the supercooled ternary solutions (STS, type 1b PSC in the submodel is based on Carslaw et al. (1995b, the thermodynamic approach to simulate ice particles (type 2 PSC on Marti and Mauersberger (1993. For the formation of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles (type 1a PSC two different parameterisations exist. The first is based on an instantaneous thermodynamic approach from Hanson and Mauersberger (1988, the second is new implemented and considers the growth of the NAT particles with the aid of a surface growth factor based on Carslaw et al. (2002. It is possible to choose one of this NAT parameterisation in the submodel. This publication explains the background of the submodel PSC and the use of the submodel with the goal of simulating realistic PSC in EMAC.

  2. Radiation chemistry connection with the positronium formation in aqueous solution of triton X-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Ganguly, B.N.

    1996-01-01

    Positronium formation bears its connection to radiation chemical phenomenon. This has been demonstrated here to probe the micelle formation and further structural changes in Triton X-100 surfactant solution. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  3. Developing computational model-based diagnostics to analyse clinical chemistry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, D.B. van; Bochove, K. van; Ommen, B. van; Freidig, A.P.; Someren, E.P. van; Greef, J. van der; Graaf, A.A. de

    2010-01-01

    This article provides methodological and technical considerations to researchers starting to develop computational model-based diagnostics using clinical chemistry data.These models are of increasing importance, since novel metabolomics and proteomics measuring technologies are able to produce large

  4. An Open Environment to Support the Development of Computational Chemistry Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Bernardo Palacios; Ruiz, Irene Luque; Gómez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present an open software environment devoted to support the investigations in computational chemistry. The software, named CoChiSE (Computational Chimica Software Environment) is fully developed in Java using Eclipse as IDE; in this way, the system is integrated by different perspectives oriented to solve different aspects of the computational chemistry research. CoChiSE is able to manage large chemical databases, maintaining information about molecules and properties as well; this information can be exported and imported to/from the most popular standard file formats. The system also allows the user to perform the calculation of different type of isomorphism and molecular similarity. Besides, CoChiSE incorporates a perspective in charge of the calculation of molecular descriptors, considering more than four hundred descriptors of different categories. All the information and system perspectives are integrated in the same environment, so a huge amount of information is managed by the user. The characteristics of the developed system permit the easy integration of either user, proprietary and free software.

  5. Coordination chemistry and antisolvent strategy to rare-earth solid solution colloidal spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng Chao; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2012-11-21

    We have devised in this work a general synthetic strategy for preparation of single- and multicomponent rare-earth coordination polymer colloidal spheres (RE-CPCSs). This strategy is based on an integration of coordination chemistry and antisolvent effect for synchronized precipitation. Highly monodisperse RE-CPCSs with homogeneous mixing of RE elements, which are not readily attainable by any existing methods, have been successfully prepared for the first time. In addition, the type and molar ratio of these colloidal spheres can be adjusted easily in accordance to the variety and dosage of precursor salts. The molar ratio of RE elements in as-prepared colloidal spheres shows a linear relationship to that of starting reactants. Furthermore, the RE-based core/shell colloidal spheres can be facilely prepared by introducing other metal salts (beyond lanthanide elements) owing to their different coordination chemistry and precipitation behavior. By adjusting concentrations of the ionic activators, luminescent properties can be tuned accordingly. Moreover, the RE-CPCSs can be transformed to monodisperse lanthanide oxide spheres via simple heat treatment. We believe that the present synthetic strategy provides a viable route to prepare other lanthanide-containing colloidal spheres that have enormous potential for future applications as optoelectronic devices, catalysts, gas sensors, and solar cells.

  6. Adapting authentic science practices into contexts for learning: The case of models and modelling in pre-university chemistry education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, G.T.; Pilot, A.

    2013-01-01

    This research study explores the potential benefits of using authentic modelling practices as contexts for learning in chemistry education. An authentic modelling practice is characterized as professionals sharing common purposes, working to a similar type of modelling procedure, while applying

  7. Stochastic dynamics modeling solute transport in porous media modeling solute transport in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Kulasiri, Don

    2002-01-01

    Most of the natural and biological phenomena such as solute transport in porous media exhibit variability which can not be modeled by using deterministic approaches. There is evidence in natural phenomena to suggest that some of the observations can not be explained by using the models which give deterministic solutions. Stochastic processes have a rich repository of objects which can be used to express the randomness inherent in the system and the evolution of the system over time. The attractiveness of the stochastic differential equations (SDE) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE) come from the fact that we can integrate the variability of the system along with the scientific knowledge pertaining to the system. One of the aims of this book is to explaim some useufl concepts in stochastic dynamics so that the scientists and engineers with a background in undergraduate differential calculus could appreciate the applicability and appropriateness of these developments in mathematics. The ideas ...

  8. Periodic Solutions for a Delayed Population Model on Time Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Kejun Zhuang; Zhaohui Wen

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a delayed single population model on time scales. With the assistance of coincidence degree theory, sufficient conditions for existence of periodic solutions are obtained. Furthermore, the better estimations for bounds of periodic solutions are established.

  9. The global chemistry transport model TM5: description and evaluation of the tropospheric chemistry version 3.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Huijnen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric chemistry version of the global chemistry transport model TM5 (Tracer Model 5, version TM5-chem-v3.0. A full description is given concerning the photochemical mechanism, the interaction with aerosol, the treatment of the stratosphere, the wet and dry deposition parameterizations, and the applied emissions. We evaluate the model against a suite of ground-based, satellite, and aircraft measurements of components critical for understanding global photochemistry for the year 2006.

    The model exhibits a realistic oxidative capacity at a global scale. The methane lifetime is ~8.9 years with an associated lifetime of methyl chloroform of 5.86 years, which is similar to that derived using an optimized hydroxyl radical field.

    The seasonal cycle in observed carbon monoxide (CO is well simulated at different regions across the globe. In the Northern Hemisphere CO concentrations are underestimated by about 20 ppbv in spring and 10 ppbv in summer, which is related to missing chemistry and underestimated emissions from higher hydrocarbons, as well as to uncertainties in the seasonal variation of CO emissions. The model also captures the spatial and seasonal variation in formaldehyde tropospheric columns as observed by SCIAMACHY. Positive model biases over the Amazon and eastern United States point to uncertainties in the isoprene emissions as well as its chemical breakdown.

    Simulated tropospheric nitrogen dioxide columns correspond well to observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument in terms of its seasonal and spatial variability (with a global spatial correlation coefficient of 0.89, but TM5 fields are lower by 25–40%. This is consistent with earlier studies pointing to a high bias of 0–30% in the OMI retrievals, but uncertainties in the emission inventories have probably also contributed to the discrepancy.

    TM5 tropospheric

  10. The radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of sodium 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchill, C.E.; Smith, D.M.; Charlton, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The 60 Co γ-radiolysis of aqueous solutions of sodium 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate has been studied in acidic, unbuffered, and alkaline conditions and with addition of N 2 O and 2-propanol. Mechanisms are proposed to account for the yields of H 2 O 2 and hydroxylated anthraquinone sulfonates. In neutral solution, in the absence of O 2 , the OH and e - adducts undergo preferential cross termination. Reduction of the OH adduct leads to dehydration and regeneration of the quinone. (author)

  11. Source and fate of inorganic solutes in the Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA: I. Low-flow discharge and major solute chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Susong, David D.; Ball, James W.; Holloway, JoAnn M.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) is an important natural resource and habitat for fisheries and wildlife. However, the Gibbon River differs from most other mountain rivers because its chemistry is affected by several geothermal sources including Norris Geyser Basin, Chocolate Pots, Gibbon Geyser Basin, Beryl Spring, and Terrace Spring. Norris Geyser Basin is one of the most dynamic geothermal areas in YNP, and the water discharging from Norris is much more acidic (pH 3) than other geothermal basins in the upper-Madison drainage (Gibbon and Firehole Rivers). Water samples and discharge data were obtained from the Gibbon River and its major tributaries near Norris Geyser Basin under the low-flow conditions of September 2006. Surface inflows from Norris Geyser Basin were sampled to identify point sources and to quantify solute loading to the Gibbon River. The source and fate of the major solutes (Ca, Mg, Na, K, SiO2, Cl, F, HCO3, SO4, NO3, and NH4) in the Gibbon River were determined in this study and these results may provide an important link in understanding the health of the ecosystem and the behavior of many trace solutes. Norris Geyser Basin is the primary source of Na, K, Cl, SO4, and N loads (35–58%) in the Gibbon River. The largest source of HCO3 and F is in the lower Gibbon River reach. Most of the Ca and Mg originate in the Gibbon River upstream from Norris Geyser Basin. All the major solutes behave conservatively except for NH4, which decreased substantially downstream from Gibbon Geyser Basin, and SiO2, small amounts of which precipitated on mixing of thermal drainage with the river. As much as 9–14% of the river discharge at the gage is from thermal flows during this period.

  12. Classical and Weak Solutions for Two Models in Mathematical Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyulov, Tihomir B.; Valkov, Radoslav L.

    2011-12-01

    We study two mathematical models, arising in financial mathematics. These models are one-dimensional analogues of the famous Black-Scholes equation on finite interval. The main difficulty is the degeneration at the both ends of the space interval. First, classical solutions are studied. Positivity and convexity properties of the solutions are discussed. Variational formulation in weighted Sobolev spaces is introduced and existence and uniqueness of the weak solution is proved. Maximum principle for weak solution is discussed.

  13. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 1: Model description and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. CAFE integrates all key processes, including turbulent diffusion, emission, deposition and chemistry, throughout the forest canopy and mixed layer. CAFE utilizes the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and is the first model of its kind to incorporate a suite of reactions for the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, providing a more comprehensive description of the oxidative chemistry occurring within and above the forest. We use CAFE to simulate a young Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada, CA. Utilizing meteorological constraints from the BEARPEX-2007 field campaign, we assess the sensitivity of modeled fluxes to parameterizations of diffusion, laminar sublayer resistance and radiation extinction. To characterize the general chemical environment of this forest, we also present modeled mixing ratio profiles of biogenic hydrocarbons, hydrogen oxides and reactive nitrogen. The vertical profiles of these species demonstrate a range of structures and gradients that reflect the interplay of physical and chemical processes within the forest canopy, which can influence net exchange.

  14. Ant-mediated effects on spruce litter decomposition, solution chemistry, and microbial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, B.; Schramm, Andreas; Kalbitz, K.

    2006-01-01

    and %N were not affected by ants or honeydew. Our results suggest that ants have a distinct and immediate effect on solution composition and microbial activity in the litter layer indicating accelerated litter decay whereas the effect of honeydew was insignificant. Keywords: Ants; Decomposition; Formica...

  15. Assessment of the Effects Exerted by Acid and Alkaline Solutions on Bone: Is Chemistry the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasi, Alberto; Camici, Arianna; Porta, Davide; Cucca, Lucia; Merli, Daniele; Milanese, Chiara; Profumo, Antonella; Rassifi, Nabila; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of corpses with extremely acid or basic liquids is sometimes performed in criminal contexts. A thorough characterization by chemical analysis may provide further help to macroscopic and microscopic analysis; 63 porcine bone samples were treated with solutions at different pH (1-14) for immersion periods up to 70 days, as well as in extremely acidic sulfuric acid solutions (9 M/18 M) and extremely basic sodium hydroxide. Inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES)/plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that only the sulfuric acid solution 18 M was able to completely dissolve the sample. In addition, chemical analysis allowed to recognize the contact between bone and substances. Hydrated calcium sulfate arose from extreme pH. The possibility of detecting the presence of human material within the residual solution was demonstrated, especially with FT-IR, ICP-OES, and EDX. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. Modular coupling of transport and chemistry: theory and model applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.

    1994-06-01

    For the description of complex processes in the near-field of a radioactive waste repository, the coupling of transport and chemistry is necessary. A reason for the relatively minor use of coupled codes in this area is the high amount of computer time and storage capacity necessary for calculations by conventional codes, and lack of available data. The simple application of the sequentially coupled code MCOTAC, which couples one-dimensional advective, dispersive and diffusive transport with chemical equilibrium complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions in a porous medium, shows some promising features with respect to applicability to relevant problems. Transport, described by a random walk of multi-species particles, and chemical equilibrium calculations are solved separately, coupled only by an exchange term to ensure mass conservation. The modular-structured code was applied to three problems: a) incongruent dissolution of hydrated silicate gels, b) dissolution of portlandite and c) calcite dissolution and hypothetical dolomite precipitation. This allows for a comparison with other codes and their applications. The incongruent dissolution of cement phases, important for degradation of cementitious materials in a repository, can be included in the model without the problems which occur with a directly coupled code. The handling of a sharp multi-mineral front system showed a much faster calculation time compared to a directly coupled code application. Altogether, the results are in good agreement with other code calculations. Hence, the chosen modular concept of MCOTAC is more open to an easy extension of the code to include additional processes like sorption, kinetically controlled processes, transport in two or three spatial dimensions, and adaptation to new developments in computing (hardware and software), an important factor for applicability. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  17. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  18. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  19. Optimisation-Based Solution Methods for Set Partitioning Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel

    The scheduling of crew, i.e. the construction of work schedules for crew members, is often not a trivial task, but a complex puzzle. The task is complicated by rules, restrictions, and preferences. Therefore, manual solutions as well as solutions from standard software packages are not always su......_cient with respect to solution quality and solution time. Enhancement of the overall solution quality as well as the solution time can be of vital importance to many organisations. The _elds of operations research and mathematical optimisation deal with mathematical modelling of di_cult scheduling problems (among...... other topics). The _elds also deal with the development of sophisticated solution methods for these mathematical models. This thesis describes the set partitioning model which has been widely used for modelling crew scheduling problems. Integer properties for the set partitioning model are shown...

  20. Moving towards industrialization - the strategy behind the science and engineering of pyro-chemistry in Nexia solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, R.G.; Fairhall, G.A.; Farrant, D.

    2007-01-01

    Pyro-chemistry is a recognized dry separation process used for the partitioning of actinides from lanthanides and fission products to enable the recycle of actinides in a process that does not produce any aqueous waste streams. It is generally based upon electrochemical techniques using a molten chloride salt at temperatures commonly between 450 and 850 C degrees. Recently the technology has undergone a renaissance generating a drive to move forward. Nexia Solutions has been undertaking pyrochemical research and development since the mid 1990's for potential deployment in Advanced Fuel Cycles for spent nuclear fuel and legacy waste management in the UK. The main focus of the programme has been the provision of a strong fundamental science programme to underpin industrialization, which has been borne from Nexia Solutions' experience in supporting operations in fuel manufacture, power generation and reprocessing plant. Nexia Solutions proposes to focus on the following themes: -) direct electrochemical reduction of oxides in order to produce a metallic feedstock, -) electrorefining to separate specific elements, -) product processing to produce actinides in an appropriate form to recycle, -) salt clean-up and recycle, and -) waste forms for fission products and other waste streams, for example cladding. Nexia Solutions also proposes an industrial programme to be deliberately focused on 3 areas: 1) molten salts dynamics rig, development and deployment at pilot scale, 2) direct electrochemical reduction of oxides, and 3) scale-up. In order to take the overall programme forward, Nexia Solutions aims to utilize its state of the art facilities situated at Sellafield. (A.C.)

  1. Crystal-chemistry insight into the photocatalytic activity of BiOCl x Br1- x nanoplate solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huan-Yan; Han, Xu; Tan, Qu; Wu, Ke-Jia; Qi, Shu-Yan

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a facile alcoholysis method was developed to synthesize BiOCl x Br1- x nanoplates at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In this route, strong acid or alkaline environment was absolutely avoided to realize the high exposure of {001} crystal facets. The regular changes in XRD peaks and cell parameters as a function of the Br content strongly declared that the obtained BiOCl x Br1- x products belonged to a group of solid solutions. The 2D nanosheets with in-plane wrinkles were clearly observed in TEM images. Interestingly, as the Br content increased, band gaps of BiOCl x Br1- x solid solutions gradually decreased. The photocatalytic degradation of RhB under simulated sunlight irradiation indicated that BiOCl0.5Br0.5 had the best photocatalytic activity. From the viewpoint of crystal chemistry, the photocatalytic activity of BiOCl x Br1- x solid solutions was closely related with the exposure amount of {001} facets, interlayer spacing of (001) plane and energy-level position of valence band.

  2. Modeling of iodine radiation chemistry in the presence of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    2002-01-01

    A kinetic-based model was developed that simulates the radiation chemistry of iodine in the presence of organic compounds. The model's mechanistic description of iodine chemistry and generic semi-mechanistic reactions for various classes of organics, provided a reasonable representation of experimental results. The majority of the model and experimental results of iodine volatilization rates were in agreement within an order of magnitude

  3. Dense ionization and subsequent non-homogeneous radical-mediated chemistry of femtosecond laser-induced low density plasma in aqueous solutions: synthesis of colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmouaddine, Hakim; Shi, Minghan; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Meesat, Ridthee; Sanche, Léon; Houde, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    The "cold" low density plasma channels generated by the filamentation of powerful femtosecond laser pulses in aqueous solutions constitute a source of dense ionization. Here, we probed the radiation-assisted chemistry of water triggered by laser ionization via the radical-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles in gold chloride aqueous solutions. We showed that the formation of colloidal gold originates from the reduction of trivalent ionic gold initially present in solution by the reactive radicals (e.g. hydrated electrons) produced upon the photolysis of water. We analyzed both the reaction kinetics of the laser-induced hydrated electrons and the growth kinetics of the gold nanoparticles. Introduction of radical scavengers into the solutions and different initial concentrations of gold chloride provided information about the radical-mediated chemistry. The dense ionization results in the second order cross-recombination of the photolysis primary byproducts. Competition with recombination imposes the non-homogeneous interaction of reactive radicals with solute present in irradiated aqueous solutions. Such a laser-induced non-homogeneous chemistry suggests similarities with the radiation chemistry of water exposed to conventional densely ionizing radiation (high dose rate, high linear energy transfer).

  4. Theoretical modelling of actinide spectra in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilo, Cecile

    2009-01-01

    The framework of this PhD is the interpretation of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion experiments performed on solvated U 4+ , NpO 2 + and PuO 2 2+ , which all have a f 2 configuration. Unexpectedly the two actinyl ions have a much higher relaxivity than U 4+ ,. One possible explanation is that the electronic relaxation rate is faster for Uranium(IV) than for the actinyl ions. We address this problem by exploring the electronic spectrum of the three compounds in gas phase and in solution with a two-step SOCI (Spin-Orbit Configuration-Interaction) method. The influence of electron correlation (treated in the first step) and spin-orbit relaxation effects (considered in the second step) has been discussed thoroughly. Solvent effects have been investigated as well. Another issue that has been questioned is the accuracy of Density Functional Theory for the study of actinide species. This matter has been discussed by comparing its performance to wave-function based correlated methods. The chemical problem chosen was the water exchange in [UO 2 2+ (H 2 O) 5 ]. We looked at the associative and at the dissociative mechanisms using a model with one additional water in the second hydration sphere. The last part of the thesis dealt with the spectroscopy of coordinated Uranyl(V). Absorption spectrum of Uranyl(V) with various ligands has been recorded. The first sharp absorption bands in the Near-Infrared region were assigned to the Uranium centered 5f-5f transitions, but uncertainties remained for the assignment of transitions observed in the Visible region. We computed the spectra of naked UO 2 + and [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 5- to elucidate the spectral changes induced by the carbonate ligands. (author) [fr

  5. Implementation of marine halogen chemistry into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Sarwar, G.

    2017-12-01

    In two recent studies (Sarwar et al, 2015 and Gantt et al., 2017), the impact of marine halogen (bromine and iodine) chemistry on air quality has been evaluated using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. We found that marine halogen chemistry not only has the expected effect of reducing marine boundary layer ozone concentrations, but also reduces ozone in the free troposphere and inland from the coast. In Sarwar et al. (2015), the impact of the halogen chemistry without and with photochemical reactions of higher iodine oxides over the Northern Hemisphere was examined using the coarse horizontal grids of a hemispheric domain. Halogen chemistry without and with the photochemical reactions of higher iodine oxides reduces ozone over seawater by 15% and 48%, respectively. Using the results of the chemistry without the photochemical reactions of higher iodine oxides, we developed a simple first order ozone loss rate and implemented it into the public version of CMAQv52. In Gantt et al. (2017), the impact of the simple first order loss rate as well as the full halogen chemistry without photochemical reactions of higher iodine oxides over the continental United States was examined using finer horizontal grids of the regional domain and boundary conditions from the hemispheric domain with and without marine halogen chemistry. The boundary conditions obtained with the halogen chemistry as well as the simple halogen chemistry reduces ozone along the coast where CMAQ typically overpredicts the concentrations. Development of halogen chemistry in CMAQ has continued with the implementation of several heterogeneous reactions of bromine and iodine species, revised reactions of higher iodine oxides, and a refined marine halogen emissions inventory. Our latest version of halogen chemistry with photochemical reactions of higher iodine oxides reduces ozone by 23% over the seawater. This presentation will discuss the previous and ongoing implementation of revised halogen

  6. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  7. Radiation chemistry of salicylic and methyl substituted salicylic acids: Models for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceutical compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Turks, Maris; Cooper, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivatives are components of many medications and moieties found in numerous pharmaceutical compounds. They have been used as models for various pharmaceutical compounds in pharmacological studies, for the treatment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and, reactions with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, the radiation chemistry of benzoic acid, salicylic acid and four methyl substituted salicylic acids (MSA) is reported. The absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical reaction with benzoic and salicylic acids as well as 3-methyl-, 4-methyl-, 5-methyl-, and 6-methyl-salicylic acid were determined (5.86±0.54)×10 9 , (1.07±0.07)×10 10 , (7.48±0.17)×10 9 , (7.31±0.29)×10 9 , (5.47±0.25)×10 9 , (6.94±0.10)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The hydrated electron reaction rate constants were measured (3.02±0.10)×10 9 , (8.98±0.27)×10 9 , (5.39±0.21)×10 9 , (4.33±0.17)×10 9 , (4.72±0.15)×10 9 , (1.42±0.02)×10 9 (M −1 s −1 ), respectively. The transient absorption spectra for the six model compounds were examined and their role as model compounds for the radiation chemistry of pharmaceuticals investigated. - Highlights: • Free radical chemistry of salicylic and 4 methyl salicylic acids is investigated. • The transient absorptions spectra for model compounds are measured. • Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for hydroxyl radical are determined. • Solvated electron reaction rate constants are calculated. • The use of salicylic acids as models for pharmaceuticals is explored

  8. The Extrapolar SWIFT model (version 1.0): fast stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2018-03-01

    The Extrapolar SWIFT model is a fast ozone chemistry scheme for interactive calculation of the extrapolar stratospheric ozone layer in coupled general circulation models (GCMs). In contrast to the widely used prescribed ozone, the SWIFT ozone layer interacts with the model dynamics and can respond to atmospheric variability or climatological trends.The Extrapolar SWIFT model employs a repro-modelling approach, in which algebraic functions are used to approximate the numerical output of a full stratospheric chemistry and transport model (ATLAS). The full model solves a coupled chemical differential equation system with 55 initial and boundary conditions (mixing ratio of various chemical species and atmospheric parameters). Hence the rate of change of ozone over 24 h is a function of 55 variables. Using covariances between these variables, we can find linear combinations in order to reduce the parameter space to the following nine basic variables: latitude, pressure altitude, temperature, overhead ozone column and the mixing ratio of ozone and of the ozone-depleting families (Cly, Bry, NOy and HOy). We will show that these nine variables are sufficient to characterize the rate of change of ozone. An automated procedure fits a polynomial function of fourth degree to the rate of change of ozone obtained from several simulations with the ATLAS model. One polynomial function is determined per month, which yields the rate of change of ozone over 24 h. A key aspect for the robustness of the Extrapolar SWIFT model is to include a wide range of stratospheric variability in the numerical output of the ATLAS model, also covering atmospheric states that will occur in a future climate (e.g. temperature and meridional circulation changes or reduction of stratospheric chlorine loading).For validation purposes, the Extrapolar SWIFT model has been integrated into the ATLAS model, replacing the full stratospheric chemistry scheme. Simulations with SWIFT in ATLAS have proven that the

  9. Coordination chemistry and solution structure of Fe(II)-peplomycin. Two possible coordination geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Lehmann, Teresa

    2012-06-01

    The solution structure of Fe(II)-peplomycin was determined from NMR data collected for this molecule. As found previously for Fe(II)- and Co(II)-bound bleomycin; the coordination sphere of the metal is composed of the primary and secondary amines in β-aminoalanine, the pyrimidine and imidazole rings in the pyrimidinylpropionamide, and β-hydroxyhistidine moieties, respectively, the amine nitrogen in β-hydroxyhistidine, and either the carbamoyl group in mannose or a solvent molecule. The two most discussed coordination geometries for the aforementioned ligands in metallo-bleomycins have been tested against the NMR data generated for Fe(II)-peplomycin. The interpretation of the experimental evidence obtained through molecular dynamics indicates that both geometries are equally likely in solution for this compound in the absence of DNA, but arguments are offered to explain why one of these geometries is preferred in the presence of DNA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Physico-chemistry of adsorption of copper, nickel and cobalt on lignite from ammoniacal solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper deals with a process developed for lignite adsorption that can be used to prevent the hard scale formation during distillation of NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/, recover Cu, Ni and Cr from dilute solutions, Cu and NH/sub 3/ from waste effluent containing SO/sub 4/ radicals, separate Cu (NH/sub 3/)/sub 4//sup +2/ and AsO/sub 4//sup -3/ from ammonial solutions and recover Cu, Ni and Co from ore pulps. In additions to the study of the adsorptions of M, NH/sub 3/ and CO/sub 2/ on lignite with caustic soda) was also investigated. Changes of the functional groups of humic acid its salt, before and after the adsorption, were examined by infrared adsorption analysis. (author)

  11. The radiation chemistry of some transition metal acetylacetonates in aqueous - alcoholic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalecinska, E.

    1991-01-01

    The yields of decomposition of transition metal acetylacetonates (I) in gamma irradiated methanol and/or aqueous methanolic solutions as well as the corresponding rate constants of electron scavenging by pulse radiolysis method have been determined. It has been shown that the scavenging of primary radiolysis products by acetylacetone ligand and further transportation of electron to the central atom in (I) play an important role in the decomposition mechanism. (author) 11 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrogen cyanide in the megarad dose range. [. gamma. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Borovicanin, M.

    1976-04-01

    The radiolytic behavior of HCN was studied in dilute (0.1 M) oxygen-free solutions at their natural pH and at pH 2.4. The solutions were exposed to high doses of /sup 60/Co gamma rays (up to 16 Mrad) causing large decompositions (up to 90 percent). The decomposition yield, G(-HCN), and the radiation-chemical yields of formation of NH/sub 3/, HCHO, H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and of seven amino acids were determined. Also, the total yields of nitrogen in nitrogen-containing nonvolatile compounds, G(N), were measured. The irradiated solutions exhibited positive biuret reaction and the absorbancies depend on both the dose and the initial pH. Histidine, aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, alanine, and glycine were found in irradiated samples. Glycine was found to be the most abundant among the radiolytically produced amino acids; strong acid hydrolysis increases its yield by one or two orders of magnitude in samples irradiated initially at pH 2.4 as well as at their natural pH. The release of amino acids on hydrolysis and the positive biuret reaction suggest the presence of peptidic material in irradiated samples both at acid and neutral pH's. To account for these findings the formation of polymers (or their segments) having a peptidic structure was taken into consideration. The polymerization reactions were assumed to be initiated by the free radicals which were produced by HCN reactions with H, OH, ad e/sub aq/-species. It is concluded that the radiolysis of dilute aqueous solutions of HCN offers significant information on the eventual role of ionizing radiation in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media.

  13. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of hydrogen cyanide in the megarad dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Borovicanin, M.

    1976-01-01

    The radiolytic behavior of HCN was studied in dilute (0.1 M) oxygen-free solutions at their natural pH and at pH 2.4. The solutions were exposed to high doses of 60 Co gamma rays (up to 16 Mrad) causing large decompositions (up to 90 percent). The decomposition yield, G(-HCN), and the radiation-chemical yields of formation of NH 3 , HCHO, H 2 , CO 2 , and of seven amino acids were determined. Also, the total yields of nitrogen in nitrogen-containing nonvolatile compounds, G(N), were measured. The irradiated solutions exhibited positive biuret reaction and the absorbancies depend on both the dose and the initial pH. Histidine, aspartic acid, threonine, serine, glutamic acid, alanine, and glycine were found in irradiated samples. Glycine was found to be the most abundant among the radiolytically produced amino acids; strong acid hydrolysis increases its yield by one or two orders of magnitude in samples irradiated initially at pH 2.4 as well as at their natural pH. The release of amino acids on hydrolysis and the positive biuret reaction suggest the presence of peptidic material in irradiated samples both at acid and neutral pH's. To account for these findings the formation of polymers (or their segments) having a peptidic structure was taken into consideration. The polymerization reactions were assumed to be initiated by the free radicals which were produced by HCN reactions with H, OH, ad e/sub aq/-species. It is concluded that the radiolysis of dilute aqueous solutions of HCN offers significant information on the eventual role of ionizing radiation in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media

  14. Aspects of the structure and solution chemistry of some technetium-tripolyphosphate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Several distinctly different complexes of Tc(III) and Tc(IV) with the ligand tripolyphosphate were prepared and studied electrochemically. In acidic solution, a transient Tc(III) species was observed, the electrochemical behavior of which proves that it is not monomeric in Tc and strongly suggests that it is a dimer. This material is radically different in its polarographic behavior from the Tc(III) complex resulting from the controlled potential electrolysis of TcO 4 - at a mercury pool cathode in the same electrolyte. The latter, air sensitive, complex can be reversibly oxidized to a Tc(IV) complex which is stable towards further oxidation but which undergoes hydrolysis in both acidic and alkaline media. The rate law for the hydrolysis in basic solution is: rate = 582 I mol -1 min -1 [Tc(IV)][OH - ]. The hydrolytic reaction in acidic solution is accelerated by hydrogen ion, indicating that a mechanism different from that in basic media is involved. Tc(IV) tripolyphosphate complexes prepared by ligand exchange reactions of TcBr 6 2- were shown by polarography to be different from the complexes prepared electrochemically. The gel permeation chromatographic behavior of one ligand substitution product showed it to be polymeric with a limiting tripolyphosphate to technetium ratio of 1:1

  15. Vanadium(V) complexes in enzyme systems: aqueous chemistry, inhibition and molecular modeling in inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S; Tracey, A S

    2001-05-01

    Vanadate in aqueous solution is known to influence a number of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Such effects are well known to carry over to living systems where numerous responses to the influence of vanadium have been well-documented; perhaps the most studied being the insulin-mimetic effect. Studies of the aqueous chemistry of vanadate provide an insight into the mechanisms by which vanadate affects enzyme systems and suggests methods for the elucidation of specific types of responses. Studies of the corresponding enzymes provide complementary information that suggests model vanadate systems be studied and provides clues as to functional groups that might be utilized in the development of selective enzyme inhibition. The insulin-mimetic effect is thought by many workers to originate in the effectiveness of vanadium as an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity. One, or more PTPases regulate the phosphotyrosine levels of the insulin receptor kinase domain. Appropriate ligands allow modification of the reactivity and function of vanadate. For instance, although the complex, ((CH(3))(2)NO)(2)V(O)OH, is not quite as good an inhibitor of PTPase activity as is vanadate, it is much more effective in cell cultures for increasing glucose transport and glycogen synthesis. Studies of the chemistry of this complex provide an explanation of the efficacy of this compound as a PTPase inhibitor that is supported by computer modeling studies. Computer calculations using X-ray data of known PTPases as a basis for homology modeling then suggests functionality that needs to be addressed in developing selective PTPase inhibitors.

  16. Periodic solutions of nonautonomous differential systems modeling obesity population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, Abraham J.; Gonzalez-Parra, Gilberto; Jodar, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the periodic behaviour of the solutions of a nonautonomous model for obesity population. The mathematical model represented by a nonautonomous system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is used to model the dynamics of obese populations. Numerical simulations suggest periodic behaviour of subpopulations solutions. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a periodic positive solution are obtained using a continuation theorem based on coincidence degree theory.

  17. Periodic solutions of nonautonomous differential systems modeling obesity population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, Abraham J. [Departamento de Matematicas y Estadistica, Universidad de Cordoba Monteria (Colombia)], E-mail: aarenas@sinu.unicordoba.edu.co; Gonzalez-Parra, Gilberto [Departamento de Calculo, Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: gcarlos@ula.ve; Jodar, Lucas [Instituto de Matematica Multidisciplinar, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia Edificio 8G, 2o, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: ljodar@imm.upv.es

    2009-10-30

    In this paper we study the periodic behaviour of the solutions of a nonautonomous model for obesity population. The mathematical model represented by a nonautonomous system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations is used to model the dynamics of obese populations. Numerical simulations suggest periodic behaviour of subpopulations solutions. Sufficient conditions which guarantee the existence of a periodic positive solution are obtained using a continuation theorem based on coincidence degree theory.

  18. Integrating Character Education Model With Spiral System In Chemistry Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartutik; Rusdarti; Sumaryanto; Supartono

    2017-04-01

    Integrating character education is the responsibility of all subject teachers including chemistry teacher. The integration of character education is just administrative requirements so that the character changes are not measurable. The research objective 1) describing the actual conditions giving character education, 2) mapping the character integration of chemistry syllabus with a spiral system, and 3) producing syllabus and guide system integrating character education in chemistry lessons. Of the eighteen value character, each character is mapped to the material chemistry value concepts of class X and repeated the system in class XI and class XII. Spiral system integration means integrating the character values of chemistry subjects in steps from class X to XII repeatedly at different depth levels. Besides developing the syllabus, also made the integration of characters in a learning guide. This research was designed with research and development [3] with the scope of 20 chemistry teachers in Semarang. The focus of the activities is the existence of the current character study, mapping the character values in the syllabus, and assessment of the integration guides of character education. The validity test of Syllabus and Lesson Plans by experts in FGD. The data were taken with questionnaire and interviews, then processed by descriptive analysis. The result shows 1) The factual condition, in general, the teachers designed learning one-time face-to-face with the integration of more than four characters so that behaviour changes and depth of character is poorly controlled, 2) Mapping each character values focused in the syllabus. Meaning, on one or two basic competence in four or five times, face to face, enough integrated with the value of one character. In this way, there are more noticeable changes in students behaviour. Guidance is needed to facilitate the integration of character education for teachers integrating systems. Product syllabus and guidelines

  19. Travelling wave solutions to nonlinear physical models by means of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    On the other hand, considerable attention has been given to problem of finding spe- cial types of analytic solutions to understand biological, physical and chemical phenomena modelled by NPDEs. Among the possible solutions, certain solutions may depend only on a single combination of variables such as travelling wave ...

  20. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CPN-1 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T.

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP N-1 model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied

  1. Water and Aqueous Solutions: Simple Non-Speculative Model Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Jirsák, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 44 (2011), s. 19689-19703 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720802; GA AV ČR IAA200760905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : molecular modeling of water * separation * perturbation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  2. Modeling Chemical Processes in Seawater Aquaria to Illustrate Concepts in Undergraduate Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grguric, Gordan

    2000-04-01

    A recently introduced course at Richard Stockton College focuses on modeling chemical processes in seawater aquaria and illustrates to the students chemical principles such as mass and charge balance in solution, acid-base equilibria, and chemical kinetics. This paper describes three exercises from the course, which can be used in a variety of undergraduate chemistry curricula. They are (i) determining the salts and their amounts needed to prepare a given volume of artificial seawater, (ii) modeling aqueous carbonate equilibria, to calculate pH and alkalinity shifts through additions of chemicals, and (iii) modeling chemical kinetics involved in aqueous ozone-bromine reactions, to predict the type and extent of disinfection by-products. The approaches and items for discussion are described for each exercise. The exercises can be used independently of each other, as applications of chemical principles that are being discussed. Several practical examples using empirical data from large aquarium facilities are given to demonstrate how the models can be used.

  3. Strontium Titanate Buffer Layers on Cu/33%Ni Substrates using a Novel Solution Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallewatta, Pallewatta G A P; Yue, Zhao; Hui, Tian

    2013-01-01

    SrTiO3 is a widely studied perovskite material due to its advantages as a buffer template which can be simply applied between a metal substrate tape and a superconducting layer in 2G high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. In this study, heteroepitaxial SrTiO3 thin films were deposited...... on textured Cu/33%Ni substrates using dip-coating in a precursor solution followed by drying and annealing under controlled oxygen partial pressures. The control of the ambient atmosphere during annealing is an important experimental issue in order to achieve thin films with high quality surface texture. We...

  4. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  5. Corrosion resistance, chemistry, and mechanical aspects of Nitinol surfaces formed in hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalovskay, Svetlana A.; Anderegg, James W.; Undisz, Andreas; Rettenmayr, Markus; Rondelli, Gianni C.

    2012-06-12

    Ti oxides formed naturally on Nitinol surfaces are only a few nanometers thick. To increase their thickness, heat treatments are explored. The resulting surfaces exhibit poor resistance to pitting corrosion. As an alternative approach to accelerate surface oxidation and grow thicker oxides, the exposure of Nitinol to strong oxidizing H2O2 aqueous solutions (3 and 30%) for various periods of time was used. Using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger spectroscopy, it was found that the surface layers with variable Ti (6–15 at %) and Ni (5–13 at %) contents and the thickness up to 100 nm without Ni-enriched interfaces could be formed. The response of the surface oxides to stress in superelastic regime of deformations depended on oxide thickness. In the corrosion studies performed in both strained and strain-free states using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarizations, the surfaces treated in H2O2 showed no pitting in corrosive solution that was assigned to higher chemical homogeneity of the surfaces free of secondary phases and inclusions that assist better biocompatibility of Nitinol medical devices. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 100B: 1490–1499, 2012

  6. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile in the megarad dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Shushtarian, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A study was made of the radiolytic behavior of dilute, neutral, oxygen-free aqueous solutions of CH 3 CN and C 2 H 5 CN. Small-molecular products were identified as RCHO, NH 3 , CO 2 , and H 2 . The decomposition of nitrile is followed by high yields of formation of the nonvolatile nitrogen-containing compounds, G(N). The γ-irradiated solutions exhibit a positive biuret reaction. Several amino acids were identified among radiolytic products, and glycine and alanine were found to be the most abundant for CH 3 CN and C 2 H 5 CH, respectively. Their yields increased after strong acid hydrolysis of the irradiated samples. The free radicals formed by reactions of RCN with H, OH, and e/sub aq/- were found to be important for the phenomena observed. It is suggested that the positive biuret reaction, ir spectra, and the release of amino acids on acid hydrolysis provide some evidence on the formation of peptidic materials and might be of interest for the evaluation of the role that ionizing radiation might have played in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media

  7. Radiation chemistry of aqueous solutions of acetonitrile and propionitrile in the megarad dose range. [. gamma. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draganic, Z.D.; Draganic, I.G.; Shushtarian, M.J.

    1976-04-01

    A study was made of the radiolytic behavior of dilute, neutral, oxygen-free aqueous solutions of CH/sub 3/CN and C/sub 2/H/sub 5/CN. Small-molecular products were identified as RCHO, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/. The decomposition of nitrile is followed by high yields of formation of the nonvolatile nitrogen-containing compounds, G(N). The ..gamma..-irradiated solutions exhibit a positive biuret reaction. Several amino acids were identified among radiolytic products, and glycine and alanine were found to be the most abundant for CH/sub 3/CN and C/sub 2/H/sub 5/CH, respectively. Their yields increased after strong acid hydrolysis of the irradiated samples. The free radicals formed by reactions of RCN with H, OH, and e/sub aq/- were found to be important for the phenomena observed. It is suggested that the positive biuret reaction, ir spectra, and the release of amino acids on acid hydrolysis provide some evidence on the formation of peptidic materials and might be of interest for the evaluation of the role that ionizing radiation might have played in prebiotic chemical evolution in aqueous media.

  8. Multi-cut solutions in Chern-Simons matrix models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takeshi; Sugiyama, Kento

    2018-04-01

    We elaborate the Chern-Simons (CS) matrix models at large N. The saddle point equations of these matrix models have a curious structure which cannot be seen in the ordinary one matrix models. Thanks to this structure, an infinite number of multi-cut solutions exist in the CS matrix models. Particularly we exactly derive the two-cut solutions at finite 't Hooft coupling in the pure CS matrix model. In the ABJM matrix model, we argue that some of multi-cut solutions might be interpreted as a condensation of the D2-brane instantons.

  9. Antimicrobial activities of CuO films deposited on Cu foils by solution chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekthammathat, Nuengruethai [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Titipun, E-mail: ttpthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongtem, Somchai, E-mail: schthongtem@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Monoclinic CuO thin films on Cu foils were successfully synthesized by a simple wet chemical method in alkaline solution with the pH of 13 at room temperature for different lengths of time. The as-synthesized thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Formation mechanism of the phase and morphologies was also discussed according to the experimental results. In this research, assemblies of pure CuO nanospindles with different orientations containing in the thin film synthesized for 2 weeks with 400 nm and 413 nm violet emissions showed better antimicrobial activity against S. aureus than E. coli.

  10. Meltwater chemistry and solute export from a Greenland ice sheet catchment, Watson River, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Jacob C.; Knudsen, N. Tvis; Hasholt, Bent

    2014-01-01

    –2010 for the Watson River sector of the GrIS that drains into the fjord Kangerlussuaq. The hydrochemistry is dominated by Ca2+ and HCO3− with a relatively high molar K+/Na+ ratio of 0.6 ± 0.1, typical for meltwaters draining a gneissic lithology. Low molar Ca2+/Na+ and Mg2+/Na+ ratios indicate that weathering....... However, when normalized by discharge the denudation rates are comparable to other Arctic sites. When extrapolating the results from the Watson River catchment to the entire Greenland for 2007–2010, the solute export from Greenland meltwater varied between 7.1 × 106 and 7.8 × 106 tons, whilst the major...

  11. Antimicrobial activities of CuO films deposited on Cu foils by solution chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekthammathat, Nuengruethai; Thongtem, Titipun; Thongtem, Somchai

    2013-07-01

    Monoclinic CuO thin films on Cu foils were successfully synthesized by a simple wet chemical method in alkaline solution with the pH of 13 at room temperature for different lengths of time. The as-synthesized thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Formation mechanism of the phase and morphologies was also discussed according to the experimental results. In this research, assemblies of pure CuO nanospindles with different orientations containing in the thin film synthesized for 2 weeks with 400 nm and 413 nm violet emissions showed better antimicrobial activity against S. aureus than E. coli.

  12. Ethics in Chemistry: Business Models, Risk Management and Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD thesis analyses the topic of ‘Ethics in Chemistry’ by addressing the question of the extent to which activities undertaken in the past decades by chemical industry, universities in chemistry education and the international community in regulating chemical substances took into account ethical approaches. Building on a sociological approach, the area of ‘Chemistry’ is considered as an example of a Large Technological System (LTS), which is believed to be a social ...

  13. Online coupled regional meteorology chemistry models in Europe : Current status and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baklanov, A.; Schlünzen, K.; Suppan, P.; Baldasano, J.; Brunner, D.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Carmichael, G.; Douros, J.; Flemming, J.; Forkel, R.; Galmarini, S.; Gauss, M.; Grell, G.; Hirtl, M.; Joffre, S.; Jorba, O.; Kaas, E.; Kaasik, M.; Kallos, G.; Kong, X.; Korsholm, U.; Kurganskiy, A.; Kushta, J.; Lohmann, U.; Mahura, A.; Manders-Groot, A.; Maurizi, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Rao, S.T.; Savage, N.; Seigneur, C.; Sokhi, R.S.; Solazzo, E.; Solomos, S.; Sørensen, B.; Tsegas, G.; Vignati, E.; Vogel, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Online coupled mesoscale meteorology atmospheric chemistry models have undergone a rapid evolution in recent years. Although mainly developed by the air quality modelling community, these models are also of interest for numerical weather prediction and regional climate modelling as they can consider

  14. Model for gas phase chemistry in interstellar clouds: I. The basic model, library of chemical reactions, and chemistry among C, N, and O compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Huntress, W.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A time-dependent gas phase chemical model of the chemistry in interstellar clouds is presented which uses a comprehensive library consisting of over 1400 reactions for 137 species. Specified constant density, temperature, and radiation field intensity are used to generate the evolution with time of these species for 10 7 years in four model clouds to simulate the outer and inner components of zeta Oph and of Orion. No a priori assumptions are made concerning production and loss mechanisms, and the algorithm decides which are the major processes from an extensive list of potential production and loss mechanisms for each species. The C, N, and O families of chemical species are discussed in detail with particular emphasis on production and loss processes, and on the interrelationships among the chemistries of these families. A number of diagrams are used to illustrate the chemistry in interstellar clouds resulting from the models. The utility of the model is that it allows for easy testing of schemes for the chemistry and chemical evolution in interstellar clouds

  15. Use of chemistry software to teach and assess model-based reaction and equation knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pyatt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the challenges students face when learning chemical reactions in a first-year chemistry course and the effectiveness of a curriculum and software implementation that was used to teach and assess student understanding of chemical reactions and equations. This study took place over a two year period in a public suburban high-school, in southwestern USA. Two advanced placement (AP chemistry classes participated, referred to here as study group A (year 1, N = 14; and study group B (year 2, N = 21. The curriculum for a first-year chemistry course (group A was revised to include instruction on reaction-types. The second year of the study involved the creation and implementation of a software solution which promoted mastery learning of reaction-types. Students in both groups benefited from the reaction-type curriculum and achieved proficiency in chemical reactions and equations.  The findings suggest there was an added learning benefit to using the reaction-type software solution. This study also found that reaction knowledge was a moderate to strong predictor of chemistry achievement. Based on regression analysis, reaction knowledge significantly predicted chemistry achievement for both groups.

  16. Investigation on chemistry of model compounds of technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Hartmann, E.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarized experimental and theoretical results concerning the chemical structures and the biodistribution of hydrophilic technetium chelates with hydroxycarboxylic and aminopolycarboxylic acids, thiol compounds and aliphatic and aromatic nitrogen compounds as ligands. Methods which are suitable for synthesizing and characterizing defined chelates of Tc(V), Tc(IV) and Tc(III) have been developed for crystlline substances and species in solution, respectively. For certain types of technetium chelates three dimensional structure models were calculated from atomic parameters. The electron energies and electron distribution of Tc(V) thiol compounds were calculated by quantum chemical methods in order to interprete physical properties of these substances. Biodistribution studies revealed relationships between the osteotropic behaviour and the structure of phosphorous and non-phosphorous technetium chelates and between the kidney uptake and ligand exchange ability of Tc(V) hydroxycarboxylates. Important parameters for the production of technetium-99m kits have been elaborated and used for the optimization of radiopharmaceuticals (bone-, kidney and hepatobiliaer agents). (author)

  17. Understanding the defect chemistry of alkali metal strontium silicate solid solutions: insights from experiment and theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bayliss, Ryan D.

    2014-09-24

    © the Partner Organisations 2014. Recent reports of remarkably high oxide ion conduction in a new family of strontium silicates have been challenged. It has recently been demonstrated that, in the nominally potassium substituted strontium germanium silicate material, the dominant charge carrier was not the oxygen ion, and furthermore that the material was not single phase (R. D. Bayliss et. al., Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/c4ee00734d). In this work we re-investigate the sodium-doped strontium silicate material that was reported to exhibit the highest oxide ion conductivity in the solid solution, nominally Sr0.55Na0.45SiO2.775. The results show lower levels of total conductivity than previously reported and sub-micron elemental mapping demonstrates, in a similar manner to that reported for the Sr0.8K0.2Si0.5Ge0.5O2.9 composition, an inhomogeneous chemical distribution correlating with a multiphase material. It is also shown that the conductivity is not related to protonic mobility. A density functional theory computational approach provides a theoretical justification for these new results, related to the high energetic costs associated with oxygen vacancy formation. This journal is

  18. Chemistry and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broerse, J.J.; Barendsen, G.W.; Kal, H.B.; Kogel, A.J. van der

    1983-01-01

    This book contains the extended abstracts of the contributions of the poster workshop sessions on chemistry and physics of the 7th international congress of radiation research. They cover the following main topics: primary processes in radiation physics and chemistry, general chemistry in radiation chemistry, DNA and model systems in radiation chemistry, molecules of biological interest in radiation chemistry, techniques in radiation chemistry, hot atom chemistry. refs.; figs.; tabs

  19. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  20. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  1. Liquid-state physical chemistry fundamentals, modeling, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de With, Gijsbertus

    2013-01-01

    For many processes and applications in science and technology a basic knowledge of liquids and solutions is a must. Gaining a better understanding of the behavior and properties of pure liquids and solutions will help to improve many processes and to advance research in many different areas. This book provides a comprehensive, self-contained and integrated survey of this topic and is a must-have for many chemists, chemical engineers and material scientists, ranging from newcomers in the field to more experienced researchers. The author offers a clear, well-structured didactic approach and provides an overview of the most important types of liquids and solutions. Special topics include chemical reactions, surfaces and phase transitions. Suitable both for introductory as well as intermediate level as more advanced parts are clearly marked. Includes also problems and solutions.

  2. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  3. Non-OH Chemistry in Oxidation Flow Reactors for the Study of Atmospheric Chemistry Systematically Examined by Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to relative humidity (RH) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportional to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. Under pathological OFR conditions of low RH and/or high OHRext, the importance of non-OH reactants is enhanced because OH is suppressed. Some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, and photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may also play a significant role in the degradation of some aromatics under pathological conditions. Working under low O2 with the OFR185 mode allows OH to completely dominate over O3 reactions even for the biogenic species most reactive with O3. Non-tropospheric VOC photolysis may have been a problem in some laboratory and source studies, but can be avoided or lessened in future studies by diluting source emissions and working at lower precursor concentrations in lab studies, and by

  4. Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO 2 , DMS and H 2 SO 4 species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed

  5. Climate effects of anthropogenic sulfate: Simulations from a coupled chemistry/climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Walton, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    In this paper, we use a more comprehensive approach by coupling a climate model with a 3-D global chemistry model to investigate the forcing by anthropogenic aerosol sulfate. The chemistry model treats the global-scale transport, transformation, and removal of SO{sub 2}, DMS and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species in the atmosphere. The mass concentration of anthropogenic sulfate from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning is calculated in the chemistry model and provided to the climate model where it affects the shortwave radiation. We also investigate the effect, with cloud nucleation parameterized in terms of local aerosol number, sulfate mass concentration and updraft velocity. Our simulations indicate that anthropogenic sulfate may result in important increases in reflected solar radiation, which would mask locally the radiative forcing from increased greenhouse gases. Uncertainties in these results will be discussed.

  6. Modelling uptake and toxicity of nickel in solution to Enchytraeus crypticus with biotic ligand model theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, E.; Qiu, Hao; van Gestel, C.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Protons and other cations may inhibit metal uptake and alleviate metal toxicity in aquatic organisms, but less is known about these interactions in soil organisms. The present study investigated the influence of solution chemistry on uptake and toxicity of Ni in Enchytraeus crypticus after 14 days

  7. Solutions of ward's modified chiral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannidou, T.; Zakrzewski, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the adaptation of Uhlenbeck's method of solving the chiral model in 2 Euclidean dimensions to Ward's modified chiral model in (2+1) dimensions. We show that the method reduces the problem of solving the second-order partial differential equations for the chiral field to solving a sequence of first-order partial differential equations for time dependent projector valued fields

  8. Host-guest chemistry of cyclodextrin carbamates and cellulose derivatives in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Jia, Xiangxiang; Du, Jiaojiao; Xiao, Longqiang; Li, Feifei; Liao, Liqiong; Liu, Lijian

    2013-10-15

    Supramolecular polymer micelles were prepared on basis of the inclusion complexation between cyclodextrin carbamates and cellulose derivatives in aqueous media. Cyclodextrin carbamates were synthesized by microwave-assisted method from cyclodextrin and urea. The urea modified cyclodextrin shows the higher yield than the physical mixture of urea/cyclodextrin in the micellization with cellulose derivatives. The supramolecular structure of the core-shell micelles was demonstrated by (1)H NMR spectra, TEM images, and fluorescence spectra. The drug release behavior of the supramolecular polymer micelles was evaluated using prednisone acetate as a model drug. The drug loaded micelles showed steady and long time drug release behavior. With these properties, the supramolecular polymer micelles are attractive as drug carriers for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modelling environmental dynamics. Advances in goematic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paegelow, Martin [Toulouse-2 Univ., 31 (France). GEODE UMR 5602 CNRS; Camacho Olmedo, Maria Teresa (eds.) [Granada Univ (Spain). Dpto. de Analisis Geografico Regional y Geografia Fisica

    2008-07-01

    Modelling environmental dynamics is critical to understanding and predicting the evolution of the environment in response to the large number of influences including urbanisation, climate change and deforestation. Simulation and modelling provide support for decision making in environmental management. The first chapter introduces terminology and provides an overview of methodological modelling approaches which may be applied to environmental and complex dynamics. Based on this introduction this book illustrates various models applied to a large variety of themes: deforestation in tropical regions, fire risk, natural reforestation in European mountains, agriculture, biodiversity, urbanism, climate change and land management for decision support, etc. These case studies, provided by a large international spectrum of researchers and presented in a uniform structure, focus particularly on methods and model validation so that this book is not only aimed at researchers and graduates but also at professionals. (orig.)

  10. The WITCH Model. Structure, Baseline, Solutions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosetti, V.; Massetti, E.; Tavoni, M.

    2007-07-01

    WITCH - World Induced Technical Change Hybrid - is a regionally disaggregated hard link hybrid global model with a neoclassical optimal growth structure (top down) and an energy input detail (bottom up). The model endogenously accounts for technological change, both through learning curves affecting prices of new vintages of capital and through R and D investments. The model features the main economic and environmental policies in each world region as the outcome of a dynamic game. WITCH belongs to the class of Integrated Assessment Models as it possesses a climate module that feeds climate changes back into the economy. In this paper we provide a thorough discussion of the model structure and baseline projections. We report detailed information on the evolution of energy demand, technology and CO2 emissions. Finally, we explicitly quantifiy the role of free riding in determining the emissions scenarios. (auth)

  11. Effects of '"Environmental Chemistry" Elective Course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry Model on Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Artun, Hüseyin; Küçük, Zeynel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of "environmental chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) conceptions of environmental chemistry concepts/issues, attitudes toward chemistry, and technological pedagogical content knowledge…

  12. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  13. Combustion chemistry of alcohols: Experimental and modeled structure of a premixed 2-methylbutanol flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lucassen, Arnas

    2014-06-14

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of 2-methylbutanol combustion chemistry in low-pressure premixed flames. This chemistry is of particular interest to study because this compound is potentially a lignocellulosic-based, next-generation biofuel. The detailed chemical structure of a stoichiometric low-pressure (25 Torr) flame was determined using flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry. A total of 55 species were identified and subsequently quantitative mole fraction profiles as function of distance from the burner surface were determined. In an independent effort, a detailed flame chemistry model for 2-methylbutanol was assembled based on recent knowledge gained from combustion chemistry studies for butanol isomers ([Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 159 (6) (2012) 2028-2055]) and iso-pentanol (3-methylbutanol) [Sarathy et al. Combust. Flame 160 (12) (2013) 2712-2728]. Experimentally determined and modeled mole fraction profiles were compared to demonstrate the model\\'s capabilities. Examples of individual mole fraction profiles are discussed together with the most significant fuel consumption pathways to highlight the combustion chemistry of 2-methylbutanol. Discrepancies between experimental and modeling results are used to suggest areas where improvement of the kinetic model would be needed. © 2014.

  14. Regularity of solutions of a phase field model

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Phase field models are widely-used for modelling phase transition processes such as solidification, freezing or CO2 sequestration. In this paper, a phase field model proposed by G. Caginalp is considered. The existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved in the case of nonsmooth initial data. Continuity of solutions with respect to time is established. In particular, it is shown that the governing initial boundary value problem can be considered as a dynamical system. © 2013 International Press.

  15. RETENTION OF HUMIC ACID FROM WATER BY NANOFILTRATION MEMBRANE AND INFLUENCE OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY ON MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zazouli, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi, M. Gholami, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Younesian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to investigate the rejection efficiency of salt and hydrophobic fraction of natural organic matter, to study the flux decline behavior with a spiral wound nanofiltration membrane, and also to survey the influence of water chemistry on membrane performance. Experiments were conducted using a cross flow pilot-scale membrane unit with a full circulation mode. Humic acid was used as hydrophobic organic matter and NaCl as background electrolyte. Results showed that flux reduction increased with increasing ionic strength and humic acid concentration, and with lower pH. The rejection efficiency of organic and salt decreased with the decrease in pH and increase in ionic strength, because of osmotic pressure increase, leading to permeate flux decline and decrease in salt rejection. In addition, the improved salt rejection was likely due to Donnan exclusion by humic material close to membrane surfaces. The average rejection efficiency of humic acid and salt ranged between 91.2%-95.25% and 63.6%-80%, respectively. Dissolved organic carbon concentration was less than 0.57mg/L in permeate for all experiments. With increasing organic concentration, the charge of the membrane surface has become more negative due to the adsorption of organic foulants on the membrane surface, and thus increased the electrostatic repulsion. However, the increasing surface charge had the potential to result in a larger molecular weight cut-off of a fouled membrane due to membrane swelling which can lead to lower rejection solutes. Therefore, results of this study indicated that membrane fouling may significantly affect the rejection of organic and ion solute.

  16. CO2 conversion by plasma technology: insights from modeling the plasma chemistry and plasma reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, A.; Berthelot, A.; Heijkers, S.; Kolev, St.; Snoeckx, R.; Sun, S.; Trenchev, G.; Van Laer, K.; Wang, W.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of plasma technology for CO2 conversion. To improve this application, a good insight into the underlying mechanisms is of great importance. This can be obtained from modeling the detailed plasma chemistry in order to understand the chemical reaction pathways leading to CO2 conversion (either in pure form or mixed with another gas). Moreover, in practice, several plasma reactor types are being investigated for CO2 conversion, so in addition it is essential to be able to model these reactor geometries so that their design can be improved, and the most energy efficient CO2 conversion can be achieved. Modeling the detailed plasma chemistry of CO2 conversion in complex reactors is, however, very time-consuming. This problem can be overcome by using a combination of two different types of model: 0D chemical reaction kinetics models are very suitable for describing the detailed plasma chemistry, while the characteristic features of different reactor geometries can be studied by 2D or 3D fluid models. In the first instance the latter can be developed in argon or helium with a simple chemistry to limit the calculation time; however, the ultimate aim is to implement the more complex CO2 chemistry in these models. In the present paper, examples will be given of both the 0D plasma chemistry models and the 2D and 3D fluid models for the most common plasma reactors used for CO2 conversion in order to emphasize the complementarity of both approaches. Furthermore, based on the modeling insights, the paper discusses the possibilities and limitations of plasma-based CO2 conversion in different types of plasma reactors, as well as what is needed to make further progress in this field.

  17. Modelling with the master equation solution methods and applications in social and natural sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the theory and practical applications of the Master equation approach, which provides a powerful general framework for model building in a variety of disciplines. The aim of the book is to not only highlight different mathematical solution methods, but also reveal their potential by means of practical examples. Part I of the book, which can be used as a toolbox, introduces selected statistical fundamentals and solution methods for the Master equation. In Part II and Part III, the Master equation approach is applied to important applications in the natural and social sciences. The case studies presented mainly hail from the social sciences, including urban and regional dynamics, population dynamics, dynamic decision theory, opinion formation and traffic dynamics; however, some applications from physics and chemistry are treated as well, underlining the interdisciplinary modelling potential of the Master equation approach. Drawing upon the author’s extensive teaching and research experience...

  18. Global Solution of Atmospheric Circulation Models with Humidity Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation models are deduced from the very complex atmospheric circulation models based on the actual background and meteorological data. The models are able to show features of atmospheric circulation and are easy to be studied. It is proved that existence of global solutions to atmospheric circulation models with the use of the $T$-weakly continuous operator.

  19. Impact of solution chemistry on the properties and bactericidal activity of silver nanoparticles decorated on superabsorbent cryogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Siew-Leng; Krantz, William B; Hu, Xiao; Fane, Anthony G; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and various electrolytes commonly found in environmental aqueous matrices on the physicochemical properties and bactericidal efficacy of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are immobilized on cryogels (or PSA/AgNP cryogel). The AgNPs in the PSA/AgNP cryogel that were exposed to different media underwent morphological transformation in terms of particle size and structure. In addition, the presence of DOM and electrolytes increased the release of dissolved Ag. The biological uptake of Ag species (determined as the total Ag in exposed cells) increased in the presence of DOM, but decreased in the presence of electrolytes. The presence of electrolytes did not result in any significant reduction in the bactericidal activity. Although an initial increase of the DOM to 2.5 mg-C L(-1) attenuated the bactericidal efficacy of the immobilized AgNPs, an increase in the DOM concentration beyond 5 mg-C L(-1) enhanced the bactericidal efficacy. This study found that the bactericidal activity of the immobilized AgNPs is less sensitive to the solution chemistry relative to the free AgNPs. This suggests that immobilizing the AgNPs in a supporting material is a good strategy to preserve their efficacy for disinfection in various aqueous matrices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytic solution of a five-direction radiation transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test certain spatial and angular dependent Monte Carlo biasing techniques, a one-dimensional, one energy, two-media, five-direction radiation transport model has been devised for which an analytic solution exists. Although this solution is too long to be conveniently expressed in an explicit form, it can be easily evaluated on the smallest of computers. This solution is discussed in this paper. 1 ref

  1. Prediction of the effects of soil-based countermeasures on soil solution chemistry of soils contaminated with radiocesium using the hydrogeochemical code PHREEQC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormann, Volker; Kirchner, Gerald

    2002-04-22

    For agriculturally used areas, which are contaminated by the debris from a nuclear accident, the use of chemical amendmends (e.g. potassium chloride and lime) is among the most common soil-based countermeasures. These countermeasures are intended to reduce the plant uptake of radionuclides (mainly 137Cs and 90Sr) by competitive inhibition by chemically similar ions. So far, the impacts of countermeasures on soil solution composition - and thus, their effectiveness - have almost exclusively been established experimentally, since they depend on mineral composition and chemical characteristics of the soil affected. In this study, which focuses on caesium contamination, the well-established code PHREEQC was used as a geochemical model to calculate the changes in the ionic compositions of soil solutions, which result from the application of potassium or ammonium in batch equilibrium experiments. The simple ion exchange model used by PHREEQC was improved by taking into account selective sorption of Cs+, NH4+ and K+ by clay minerals. Calculations were performed with three different initial soil solution compositions, corresponding to particular soil types (loam, sand, peat). For loamy and sandy soils, our calculational results agree well with experimental data reported by Nisbet (Effectiveness of soil-based countermeasures six months and one year after contamination of five diverse soil types with caesium-134 and strontium-90. Contract Report NRPB-M546, National Radiation Protection Board, Chilton, 1995.). For peat, discrepancies were found indicating that for organic soils a reliable set of exchange constants of the relevant cations still has to be determined experimentally. For cesium, however, these discrepancies almost disappeared if selective sites were assumed to be inaccessible. Additionally, results of sensitivity analyses are presented by which the influence of the main soil parameters on Cs+ concentrations in solution after soil treatment has been systematically

  2. porewater chemistry experiment at Mont Terri rock laboratory. Reactive transport modelling including bacterial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Wersin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An in-situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment, was run for a period of five years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO 2 of the pore water, but because of unexpected microbially- induced redox reactions, the objective was then changed to elucidate the biogeochemical processes happening in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO 2 and pH in the low permeability clay formation. The biologically perturbed chemical evolution of the PC experiment was simulated with reactive transport models. The aim of this modelling exercise was to develop a 'minimal-' model able to reproduce the chemical evolution of the PC experiment, i.e. the chemical evolution of solute inorganic and organic compounds (organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon etc...) that are coupled with each other through the simultaneous occurrence of biological transformation of solute or solid compounds, in-diffusion and out-diffusion of solute species and precipitation/dissolution of minerals (in the borehole and in the formation). An accurate description of the initial chemical conditions in the surrounding formation together with simplified kinetics rule mimicking the different phases of bacterial activities allowed reproducing the evolution of all main measured parameters (e.g. pH, TOC). Analyses from the overcoring and these simulations evidence the high buffer capacity of Opalinus clay regarding chemical perturbations due to bacterial activity. This pH buffering capacity is mainly attributed to the carbonate system as well as to the clay surfaces reactivity. Glycerol leaching from the pH-electrode might be the primary organic source responsible for

  3. Solutions manual to accompany finite mathematics models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Carla C

    2015-01-01

    A solutions manual to accompany Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications In order to emphasize the main concepts of each chapter, Finite Mathematics: Models and Applications features plentiful pedagogical elements throughout such as special exercises, end notes, hints, select solutions, biographies of key mathematicians, boxed key principles, a glossary of important terms and topics, and an overview of use of technology. The book encourages the modeling of linear programs and their solutions and uses common computer software programs such as LINDO. In addition to extensive chapters on pr

  4. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  5. Bioinorganic Chemistry Modeled with the TPSSh Density Functional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the TPSSh density functional has been benchmarked against a test set of experimental structures and bond energies for 80 transition-metal-containing diatomics. It is found that the TPSSh functional gives structures of the same quality as other commonly used hybrid and nonhybrid...... functionals such as B3LYP and BP86. TPSSh gives a slope of 0.99 upon linear fitting to experimental bond energies, whereas B3LYP and BP86, representing 20% and 0% exact exchange, respectively, give linear fits with slopes of 0.91 and 1.07. Thus, TPSSh eliminates the large systematic component of the error...... promising density functional for use and further development within the field of bioinorganic chemistry....

  6. Anisotropic static solutions in modelling highly compact bodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Einstein field equations for static anisotropic spheres are solved and exact interior solutions obtained. This paper extends earlier treatments to include anisotropic models which accommodate a wider variety of physically viable energy densities. Two classes of solutions are possible. The first class contains the limiting case ...

  7. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Abstract. In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous semi-infinite porous medium. The dispersion coefficient is assumed to be initial dispersion and velocity is assumed to be temporally dependent with initial seepage velocity. Also ...

  8. General chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yeong Sik; Lee, Dong Seop; Ryu, Haung Ryong; Jang, Cheol Hyeon; Choi, Bong Jong; Choi, Sang Won

    1993-07-01

    The book concentrates on the latest general chemistry, which is divided int twenty-three chapters. It deals with basic conception and stoichiometry, nature of gas, structure of atoms, quantum mechanics, symbol and structure of an electron of ion and molecule, chemical thermodynamics, nature of solid, change of state and liquid, properties of solution, chemical equilibrium, solution and acid-base, equilibrium of aqueous solution, electrochemistry, chemical reaction speed, molecule spectroscopy, hydrogen, oxygen and water, metallic atom; 1A, IIA, IIIA, carbon and atom IVA, nonmetal atom and an inert gas, transition metals, lanthanons, and actinoids, nuclear properties and radioactivity, biochemistry and environment chemistry.

  9. Modeling solutions to Tanzania's physician workforce challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Goodell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a great need for physicians in Tanzania. In 2012, there were approximately 0.31 physicians per 10,000 individuals nationwide, with a lower ratio in the rural areas, where the majority of the population resides. In response, universities across Tanzania have greatly increased the enrollment of medical students. Yet evidence suggests high attrition of medical graduates to other professions and emigration from rural areas where they are most needed. Objective: To estimate the future number of physicians practicing in Tanzania and the potential impact of interventions to improve retention, we built a model that tracks medical students from enrollment through clinical practice, from 1990 to 2025. Design: We designed a Markov process with 92 potential states capturing the movement of 25,000 medical students and physicians from medical training through employment. Work possibilities included clinical practice (divided into rural or urban, public or private, non-clinical work, and emigration. We populated and calibrated the model using a national 2005/2006 physician mapping survey, as well as graduation records, graduate tracking surveys, and other available data. Results: The model projects massive losses to clinical practice between 2016 and 2025, especially in rural areas. Approximately 56% of all medical school students enrolled between 2011 and 2020 will not be practicing medicine in Tanzania in 2025. Even with these losses, the model forecasts an increase in the physician-to-population ratio to 1.4 per 10,000 by 2025. Increasing the absorption of recent graduates into the public sector and/or developing a rural training track would ameliorate physician attrition in the most underserved areas. Conclusions: Tanzania is making significant investments in the training of physicians. Without linking these doctors to employment and ensuring their retention, the majority of this investment in medical education will be jeopardized.

  10. An Integrated Visualization and Basic Molecular Modeling Laboratory for First-Year Undergraduate Medicinal Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D model visualization and basic molecular modeling laboratory suitable for first-year undergraduates studying introductory medicinal chemistry is presented. The 2 h practical is embedded within a series of lectures on drug design, target-drug interactions, enzymes, receptors, nucleic acids, and basic pharmacokinetics. Serving as a teaching aid…

  11. Development and Validation of a Path Analytic Model of Students' Performance in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anamuah-Mensah, Jophus; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reported the development and validation of an integrated model of performance on chemical concept-volumetric analysis. Model was tested on 265 chemistry students in eight schools.Results indicated that for subjects using algorithms without understanding, performance on volumetric analysis problems was not influenced by proportional reasoning…

  12. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  13. Redox Models in Chemistry Textbooks for the Upper Secondary School: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterlund, Lise-Lotte; Berg, Anders; Ekborg, Margareta

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated how chemistry textbooks use models of redox reactions in different subject areas, how they change models between and within the topics, and how they deal with specific learning difficulties identified in the literature. The textbooks examined were published for use in the natural science programme in Swedish upper secondary…

  14. On the comparison of numerical methods for the integration of kinetic equations in atmospheric chemistry and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Rick D.; Ford, Gregory D.

    The integration of systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that arise in atmospheric photochemistry is of significant concern to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry modelers. As a consequence of the stiff nature of these ODE systems, their solution requires a large fraction of the total computational effort in three-dimensional chemical model simulations. Several integration techniques have been proposed and utilized over the years in an attempt to provide computationally efficient, yet accurate, solutions to chemical kinetics ODES. In this work, we present a comparison of some of these techniques and argue that valid comparisons of ODE solvers must take into account the trade-off between solution accuracy and computational efficiency. Misleading comparison results can be obtained by neglecting the fact that any ODE solution method can be made faster or slower by manipulation of the appropriate error tolerances or time steps. Comparisons among ODE solution techniques should therefore attempt to identify which technique can provide the most accurate solution with the least computational effort over the entire range of behavior of each technique. We present here a procedure by which ODE solver comparisons can achieve this goal. Using this methodology, we compare a variety of integration techniques, including methods proposed by Hesstvedt et al. (1978, Int. J. Chem. Kinet.10, 971-994), Gong and Cho (1993, Atmospheric Environment27A, 2147-2160), Young and Boris (1977, J. phys. Chem.81, 2424-2427) and Hindmarsh (1983, In Scientific Computing (edited by Stepleman R. S. et al.), pp. 55-64. North-Holland, Amsterdam). We find that Gear-type solvers such as the Livermore Solver for ordinary differential equations (LSODE) and the sparse-matrix version of LSODE (LSODES) provide the most accurate solution of our test problems with the least computational effort.

  15. Implementation of a PETN failure model using ARIA's general chemistry framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Michael L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We previously developed a PETN thermal decomposition model that accurately predicts thermal ignition and detonator failure [1]. This model was originally developed for CALORE [2] and required several complex user subroutines. Recently, a simplified version of the PETN decomposition model was implemented into ARIA [3] using a general chemistry framework without need for user subroutines. Detonator failure was also predicted with this new model using ENCORE. The model was simplified by 1) basing the model on moles rather than mass, 2) simplifying the thermal conductivity model, and 3) implementing ARIA’s new phase change model. This memo briefly describes the model, implementation, and validation.

  16. Modeling Human Serum Albumin Tertiary Structure to Teach Upper-Division Chemistry Students Bioinformatics and Homology Modeling Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Dus?an; Zlatovic´, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A homology modeling laboratory experiment has been developed for an introductory molecular modeling course for upper-division undergraduate chemistry students. With this experiment, students gain practical experience in homology model preparation and assessment as well as in protein visualization using the educational version of PyMOL…

  17. Green Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, Melanie

    2011-05-15

    Green chemistry is the science of chemistry used in a way that will not use or create hazardous substances. Dr. Rui Resendes is working in this field at GreenCentre Canada, an offshoot of PARTEQ Innovations in Kingston, Ontario. GreenCentre's preliminary findings suggest their licensed product {sup S}witchable Solutions{sup ,} featuring 3 classes of solvents and a surfactant, may be useful in bitumen oil sands extraction.

  18. Removal of triazine-based pollutants from water by carbon nanotubes: Impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of organic pollutants by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment or removal of pollutants during water purification require deep understanding of the impacts of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is an integral part of environmental systems and plays a key role affecting the behavior of organic pollutants. In this study, the effects of solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) and the presence of DOM on the removal of atrazine and lamotrigine by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated. The solubility of atrazine slightly decreased (∼5%) in the presence of DOM, whereas that of lamotrigine was significantly enhanced (by up to ∼70%). Simultaneous introduction of DOM and pollutant resulted in suppression of removal of both atrazine and lamotrigine, which was attributed to DOM-pollutant competition or blockage of adsorption sites by DOM. However the decrease in removal of lamotrigine was also a result of its complexation with DOM. Pre-introduction of DOM significantly reduced pollutant adsorption by the SWCNTs, whereas introduction of DOM after the pollutant resulted in the release of adsorbed atrazine and lamotrigine from the SWCNTs. These data imply that DOM exhibits higher affinity for the adsorption sites than the triazine-based pollutants. In the absence of DOM atrazine was a more effective competitor than lamotrigine for adsorption sites in SWCNTs. However, competition between pollutants in the presence of DOM revealed lamotrigine as the better competitor. Our findings help unravel the complex DOM-organic pollutant-CNT system and will aid in CNT-implementation in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of humic acid and solution chemistry on the aggregation and dispersion of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G.; Gomez-Flores, A.; Choi, S.; Han, Y., , Dr; Kim, H.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of humic acid, ionic strength and ionic species on the aggregation and dispersion of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CB-NPs) was systemically investigated in aqueous media. The experimental conditions of stability tests were selected to the changes in the solution chemistry (0.1-10 mM NaCl and 0.01-1 mM CaCl2) and in the presence/absence of humic acid (1 and 5 mg L-1) in an aquatic environment. The CB-NPs suspension was more rapidly settled in NaCl solution than in CaCl2. Specifically, in the case of NaCl, the aggregation rate of CB-NPs increased with ionic strength. Contrary, CB-NPs dispersed in CaCl2 were insensitive to the aggregation as the ionic strength increased; that was because specific adsorption of the divalent cation Ca2+ occurred since the zeta potential of the CB-NPs is reversed to a positive charge with increasing of the ionic strength. It was confirmed that humic acid greatly influences the stability of the CB-NPs. In particular, the dispersion of CB-NPs was improved in the whole range of ionic strengths of NaCl as well as of CaCl2. To support the results, the interaction energy between CB-NPs was calculated for each condition by using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and modified-DLVO theories. In the presence of humic acid, the improved stability of CB-NPs is attributed to the steric repulsive force.This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2015R1D1A3A01020766), the Ministry of Education (MOE) and National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) through the Human Resource Training Project for Regional Innovation (2015H1C1A1035930) and Korea Energy and Mineral Resources Engineering Program (KEMREP).

  20. Modeling Complex Chemical Systems: Problems and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas in complex gas mixtures are at the heart of numerous contemporary technologies. They typically contain dozens to hundreds of species, involved in hundreds to thousands of reactions. Chemists and physicists have always been interested in what are now called chemical reduction techniques (CRT's). The idea of such CRT's is that they reduce the number of species that need to be considered explicitly without compromising the validity of the model. This is usually achieved on the basis of an analysis of the reaction time scales of the system under study, which identifies species that are in partial equilibrium after a given time span. The first such CRT that has been widely used in plasma physics was developed in the 1960's and resulted in the concept of effective ionization and recombination rates. It was later generalized to systems in which multiple levels are effected by transport. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in tools for chemical reduction and reaction pathway analysis. An example of the latter is the PumpKin tool. Another trend is that techniques that have previously been developed in other fields of science are adapted as to be able to handle the plasma state of matter. Examples are the Intrinsic Low Dimension Manifold (ILDM) method and its derivatives, which originate from combustion engineering, and the general-purpose Principle Component Analysis (PCA) technique. In this contribution we will provide an overview of the most common reduction techniques, then critically assess the pros and cons of the methods that have gained most popularity in recent years. Examples will be provided for plasmas in argon and carbon dioxide.

  1. Chemistry, Life, the Universe, and Everything: A New Approach to General Chemistry, and a Model for Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie; Klymkowsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The history of general chemistry is one of almost constant calls for reform, yet over the past 60 years little of substance has changed. Those reforms that have been implemented are almost entirely concerned with how the course is taught, rather than what is to be learned. Here we briefly discuss the history of the general chemistry curriculum and…

  2. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  3. Effects of simulated acid rain on soil and soil solution chemistry in a monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qingyan; Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-05-01

    Acid rain is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. In this study, a laboratory leaching column experiment with acid forest soil was set up to investigate the responses of soil and soil solution chemistry to simulated acid rain (SAR). Five pH levels of SAR were set: 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5 (as a control, CK). The results showed that soil acidification would occur when the pH of SAR was ≤3.5. The concentrations of NO₃(-)and Ca(2+) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR fell 3.5. The concentration of SO₄(2-) in the soil increased significantly when the pH of SAR was acidity of SAR. The releases of soluble Al and Fe were SAR pH dependent, and their net exports under pH 2.5 treatment were 19.6 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than that under CK. The net export of DOC was reduced by 12-29% under SAR treatments as compared to CK. Our results indicate the chemical constituents in the soil are more sensitive to SAR than those in the soil solution, and the effects of SAR on soil solution chemistry depend not only on the intensity of SAR but also on the duration of SAR addition. The soil and soil solution chemistry in this region may not be affected by current precipitation (pH≈4.5) in short term, but the soil and soil leachate chemistry may change dramatically if the pH of precipitation were below 3.5 and 3.0, respectively.

  4. Application of a coupled ecosystem-chemical equilibrium model, DayCent-Chem, to stream and soil chemistry in a Rocky Mountain watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, M.D.; Baron, Jill S.; Ojima, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species have the potential to acidify terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, but nitrate and ammonium are also critical nutrients for plant and microbial productivity. Both the ecological response and the hydrochemical response to atmospheric deposition are of interest to regulatory and land management agencies. We developed a non-spatial biogeochemical model to simulate soil and surface water chemistry by linking the daily version of the CENTURY ecosystem model (DayCent) with a low temperature aqueous geochemical model, PHREEQC. The coupled model, DayCent-Chem, simulates the daily dynamics of plant production, soil organic matter, cation exchange, mineral weathering, elution, stream discharge, and solute concentrations in soil water and stream flow. By aerially weighting the contributions of separate bedrock/talus and tundra simulations, the model was able to replicate the measured seasonal and annual stream chemistry for most solutes for Andrews Creek in Loch Vale watershed, Rocky Mountain National Park. Simulated soil chemistry, net primary production, live biomass, and soil organic matter for forest and tundra matched well with measurements. This model is appropriate for accurately describing ecosystem and surface water chemical response to atmospheric deposition and climate change. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Model of Titan-like Chemistry to Connect Experiments and Cassini Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Alexander W.; Sciamma-O’Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid; Mazur, Eric

    2018-02-01

    A numerical model is presented for interpreting the chemical pathways that lead to the experimental mass spectra acquired in the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) laboratory experiments and for comparing the electron density and temperature of the THS plasma to observations made at Titan by the Cassini spacecraft. The THS plasma is a pulsed glow-discharge experiment designed to simulate the reaction of N2/CH4-dominated gas in Titan's upper atmosphere. The transient, one-dimensional model of THS chemistry tracks the evolution of more than 120 species in the direction of the plasma flow. As the minor species C2H2 and C2H4 are added to the N2/CH4-based mixture, the model correctly predicts the emergence of reaction products with up to five carbon atoms in relative abundances that agree well with measured mass spectra. Chemical growth in Titan's upper atmosphere transpires through ion–neutral and neutral–neutral chemistry, and the main reactions involving a series of known atmospheric species are retrieved from the calculation. The model indicates that the electron density and chemistry are steady during more than 99% of the 300 μs long discharge pulse. The model also suggests that the THS ionization fraction and electron temperature are comparable to those measured in Titan's upper atmosphere. These findings reaffirm that the THS plasma is a controlled analog environment for studying the first and intermediate steps of chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  6. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  7. Solutions of matrix models in the DIII generator ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Roussel, Harold

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we solve two matrix models, using standard and new techniques. The two models are represented by special form of antisymmetric matrices and are classified in the DIII generator ensemble. It is shown that, in the double scaling limit, their free energy has the same behavior as previous models describing oriented and unoriented surfaces. We also found an additional solution for the first model.

  8. A Model for Nitrogen Chemistry in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Pulverized Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Hansen, Stine; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a model for the nitrogen chemistry in the oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The model is a chemical reaction engineering type of model with a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry, together with a simplified description of the mixing of flows......, heating and devolatilization of particles, and gas–solid reactions. The model is validated by comparison with entrained flow reactor results from the present work and from the literature on pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 and air, covering the effects of fuel, mixing conditions, temperature......, stoichiometry, and inlet NO level. In general, the model provides a satisfactory description of NO formation in air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal, but under some conditions, it underestimates the impact on NO of replacing N2 with CO2. According to the model, differences in the NO yield between the oxy...

  9. Designing a Scalable Fault Tolerance Model for High Performance Computational Chemistry: A Case Study with Coupled Cluster Perturbative Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Hubertus J J; Vishnu, Abhinav; de Jong, Wibe A

    2011-01-11

    In the past couple of decades, the massive computational power provided by the most modern supercomputers has resulted in simulation of higher-order computational chemistry methods, previously considered intractable. As the system sizes continue to increase, the computational chemistry domain continues to escalate this trend using parallel computing with programming models such as Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) programming models such as Global Arrays. The ever increasing scale of these supercomputers comes at a cost of reduced Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF), currently on the order of days and projected to be on the order of hours for upcoming extreme scale systems. While traditional disk-based check pointing methods are ubiquitous for storing intermediate solutions, they suffer from high overhead of writing and recovering from checkpoints. In practice, checkpointing itself often brings the system down. Clearly, methods beyond checkpointing are imperative to handling the aggravating issue of reducing MTBF. In this paper, we address this challenge by designing and implementing an efficient fault tolerant version of the Coupled Cluster (CC) method with NWChem, using in-memory data redundancy. We present the challenges associated with our design, including an efficient data storage model, maintenance of at least one consistent data copy, and the recovery process. Our performance evaluation without faults shows that the current design exhibits a small overhead. In the presence of a simulated fault, the proposed design incurs negligible overhead in comparison to the state of the art implementation without faults.

  10. Solution chemistry effects on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of alloy 2090 (Al-Li-Cu) and alloy 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, James P.; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1989-01-01

    The SCC initiation behavior of alloys 2090 and 2024 is examined in various NaCl-based environments. The pre-exposure and bulk/local solution chemistry effects discovered by Holroyd et al. (1986) are investigated, with emphasis on the effect of bulk solution chemistries and atmospheric CO2 on the occluded cell environment and the role of the occluded environment in the crack initiation and early-stage propagation processes. It was found that constant immersion in NaCl does not promote SCC in alloy 2090 or alloy 2024. Upon removal from NaCl, SCC is quickly facilitated, but only in the presence of atmospheric CO2. The need for CO2 is attributed to an increase in carbonate concentrations, eventually allowing passivation of blunted fissures by precipitation of Li2CO3. It is inferred that any effects due to aging are small in magnitude, relative to the effects of subtle changes in the bulk/local solution chemistries.

  11. Online-coupled meteorology and chemistry models: history, current status, and outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation feedbacks are important processes occurring in the atmosphere. Accurately simulating those feedbacks requires fully-coupled meteorology, climate, and chemistry models and presents significant challenges in terms of both scientific understanding and computational demand. This paper reviews the history and current status of the development and application of online-coupled meteorology and chemistry models, with a focus on five representative models developed in the US including GATOR-GCMOM, WRF/Chem, CAM3, MIRAGE, and Caltech unified GCM. These models represent the current status and/or the state-of-the science treatments of online-coupled models worldwide. Their major model features, typical applications, and physical/chemical treatments are compared with a focus on model treatments of aerosol and cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions. Aerosol feedbacks to planetary boundary layer meteorology and aerosol indirect effects are illustrated with case studies for some of these models. Future research needs for model development, improvement, application, as well as major challenges for online-coupled models are discussed.

  12. An asymptotic solution to a passive biped walker model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudaev, Sergey A.; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a simple model of a passive dynamic biped robot walker with point feet and legs without knee. The model is a switched system, which includes an inverted double pendulum. Robot’s gait and its stability depend on parameters such as the slope of the ramp, the length of robot’s legs, and the mass distribution along the legs. We present an asymptotic solution of the model. The first correction to the zero order approximation is shown to agree with the numerical solution for a limited parameter range.

  13. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY FOR ASTROPHYSICISTS: A SELF-CONSISTENT FORMALISM AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ARBITRARY C/O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min; Lyons, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a self-consistent formalism for computing and understanding the atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets from the viewpoint of an astrophysicist. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, we demonstrate that the van’t Hoff equation (which describes the equilibrium constant), Arrhenius equation (which describes the rate coefficients), and procedures associated with the Gibbs free energy (minimization, rescaling) have a common physical and mathematical origin. We address an ambiguity associated with the equilibrium constant, which is used to relate the forward and reverse rate coefficients, and restate its two definitions. By necessity, one of the equilibrium constants must be dimensionless and equate to an exponential function involving the Gibbs free energy, while the other is a ratio of rate coefficients and must therefore possess physical units. We demonstrate that the Arrhenius equation takes on a functional form that is more general than previously stated without recourse to tagging on ad hoc functional forms. Finally, we derive analytical models of chemical systems, in equilibrium, with carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. We include acetylene and are able to reproduce several key trends, versus temperature and carbon-to-oxygen ratio, published in the literature. The rich variety of behavior that mixing ratios exhibit as a function of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is merely the outcome of stoichiometric book-keeping and not the direct consequence of temperature or pressure variations

  14. Thermodynamic Models from Fluctuation Solution Theory Analysis of Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen; Peters, Günther H.j.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuation solution theory (FST) is employed to analyze results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid mixtures. The objective is to generate parameters for macroscopic GE-models, here the modified Margules model. We present a strategy for choosing the number of parameters included...

  15. Modeling of CO2 absorber using an AMP solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Jostein; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: An explicit model for carbon dioxide (CO2) solubility in an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) has been proposed and an expression for the heat of absorption of CO2 has been developed as a function of loading and temperature. A rate-based steady-state model for CO2...

  16. A GROOVE Solution for the BPMN to BPEL Model Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, M.J.; Zimakova, M.V.

    In this paper we present a solution of a model transformation between two standard languages for business process modeling BPMN and BPEL, using the GROOVE tool set. GROOVE is a tool for graph transformations that uses directed, edge labelled simple graphs and the SPO approach [Ren04]. Given a graph

  17. Large time periodic solutions to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chunhua

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we deal with the time periodic problem to coupled chemotaxis-fluid models. We prove the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the full chemotaxis-Navier-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=2, and the existence of large time periodic strong solutions for the chemotaxis-Stokes system in spatial dimension N=3. On the basis of these, the regularity of the solutions can be further improved. More precisely speaking, if the time periodic source g and the potential force \

  18. A Mesoscopic Model for Protein-Protein Interactions in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Mikael; Jönsson, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Protein self-association may be detrimental in biological systems, but can be utilized in a controlled fashion for protein crystallization. It is hence of considerable interest to understand how factors like solution conditions prevent or promote aggregation. Here we present a computational model describing interactions between protein molecules in solution. The calculations are based on a molecular description capturing the detailed structure of the protein molecule using x-ray or nuclear ma...

  19. Jacobian elliptic wave solutions in an anharmonic molecular crystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, C.G.R.; Lee, B.S.; Koo, W.K.

    1997-07-01

    Explicit Jacobian elliptic wave solutions are found in the anharmonic molecular crystal model for both the continuum limit and discrete modes. This class of wave solutions include the famous pulse-like and kink-like solitary modes. We would also like to report on the existence of some highly discrete staggered solitary wave modes not found in the continuum limit. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  20. Why has the bohr-sommerfeld model of the atom been ignoredby general chemistry textbooks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Mansoor; Cardellini, Liberato

    2011-12-01

    Bohr's model of the atom is considered to be important by general chemistry textbooks. A major shortcoming of this model was that it could not explain the spectra of atoms containing more than one electron. In order to increase the explanatory power of the model, Sommerfeld hypothesized the existence of elliptical orbits. This study has the following objectives: 1) Formulation of criteria based on a history and philosophy of science framework; and 2) Evaluation of university-level general chemistry textbooks based on the criteria, published in Italy and U.S.A. Presentation of a textbook was considered to be "satisfactory" if it included a description of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model along with diagrams of the elliptical orbits. Of the 28 textbooks published in Italy that were analyzed, only five were classified as "satisfactory". Of the 46 textbooks published in U.S.A., only three were classified as "satisfactory". This study has the following educational implications: a) Sommerfeld's innovation (auxiliary hypothesis) by introducing elliptical orbits, helped to restore the viability of Bohr's model; b) Bohr-Sommerfeld's model went no further than the alkali metals, which led scientists to look for other models; c) This clearly shows that scientific models are tentative in nature; d) Textbook authors and chemistry teachers do not consider the tentative nature of scientific knowledge to be important; e) Inclusion of the Bohr-Sommerfeld model in textbooks can help our students to understand how science progresses.

  1. Modeling Chemistry for Effective Chemical Education: An Interview with Ronald J. Gillespie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2010-01-01

    Ronald J. Gillespie, the inventor of the Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) model, relates how his career as researcher in Christopher Ingold's laboratories started. Gillespie developed a passion for chemistry and chemical education, searching for more appropriate and interesting ways to transmit the essential knowledge and enthusiasm…

  2. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  3. Implementation of Argument-Driven Inquiry as an Instructional Model in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadayifci, Hakki; Yalcin-Celik, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI) as an instructional model in a general chemistry laboratory course. The study was conducted over the course of ten experimental sessions with 125 pre-service science teachers. The participants' level of reflective thinking about the ADI activities, changes in their science…

  4. The Effects of a Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction on Students' Performance and Attitudes towards Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Eunice Eyitayo

    2017-01-01

    This study establishes the effects of a flipped classroom model of instruction on academic performance and attitudes of 66 first-year secondary school students towards chemistry. A pre-test and post-test experimental design was employed to assign students randomly into either the experimental or control group. In order to assess the suitability of…

  5. Performance of European chemistry transport models as function of horizontal resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.; Cuvelier, C.; Hendriks, C.; Bessagnet, B.; Baldasano, J.M.; Colette, A.; Thunis, P.; Karam, D.; Fagerli, H.; Graff, A.; Kranenburg, R.; Nyiri, A.; Pay, M.T.; Rouïl, L.; Schulz, M.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.; Terrenoire, E.; Wind, P.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution causes adverse effects on human health as well as ecosystems and crop yield and also has an impact on climate change trough short-lived climate forcers. To design mitigation strategies for air pollution, 3D Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) have been developed to support the decision

  6. An evaluation of the Cray T3D programming paradigms in atmospheric chemistry/transport models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Blom (Joke); C. Keßler (Carsten); J.G. Verwer (Jan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we compare the different programming paradigms available on the Cray T3D for the implementation of a 3D prototype of an Atmospheric Chemistry/Transport Model. We discuss the amount of work needed to convert existing codes to the T3D and the portability of the resulting

  7. Assessment of model chemistries for hydrofluoropolyethers: A DFT/M08-HX benchmark study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Franca E S C Viegas, Luis Pedro

    2017-01-01

    reproduce the energetic rankings and thermal weight factors of the simplest examples of those two classes calculated with M08-HX/triple-zeta//M08-HX/double-zeta benchmark model chemistries. Between the tested methodologies, M08-HX/aug-pcseg-2//M08-HX/pcseg-1 was found to be the most appropriate, exhibiting...

  8. The Chemistry of Conscious States-Toward a Unified Model of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 2. The Chemistry of Conscious States – Toward a Unified Model of the Brain and the Mind ... Author Affiliations. Upinder Bhalla1. National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR Centre, Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  9. The Impact of Incorporating Chemistry to Numerical Weather Prediction Models: An Ensemble-Based Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. A.; Arellano, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    Data assimilation has emerged as an integral part of numerical weather prediction (NWP). More recently, atmospheric chemistry processes have been incorporated into NWP models to provide forecasts and guidance on air quality. There is, however, a unique opportunity within this coupled system to investigate the additional benefit of constraining model dynamics and physics due to chemistry. Several studies have reported the strong interaction between chemistry and meteorology through radiation, transport, emission, and cloud processes. To examine its importance to NWP, we conduct an ensemble-based sensitivity analysis of meteorological fields to the chemical and aerosol fields within the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) framework. In particular, we examine the sensitivity of the forecasts of surface temperature and related dynamical fields to the initial conditions of dust and aerosol concentrations in the model over the continental United States within the summer 2008 time period. We use an ensemble of meteorological and chemical/aerosol predictions within WRF-Chem/DART to calculate the sensitivities. This approach is similar to recent ensemble-based sensitivity studies in NWP. The use of an ensemble prediction is appealing because the analysis does not require the adjoint of the model, which to a certain extent becomes a limitation due to the rapidly evolving models and the increasing number of different observations. Here, we introduce this approach as applied to atmospheric chemistry. We also show our initial results of the calculated sensitivities from joint assimilation experiments using a combination of conventional meteorological observations from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, retrievals of aerosol optical depth from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and retrievals of carbon monoxide from NASA's Measurements of Pollution in the

  10. Meso-scale modeling of air pollution transport/chemistry/deposition and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Toshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Transport/chemistry/deposition model for atmospheric trace chemical species is now regarded as an important tool for an understanding of the effects of various human activities, such as fuel combustion and deforestation, on human health, eco-system, and climate and for planning of appropriate control of emission sources. Several 'comprehensive' models have been proposed such as RADM (Chang, et al., 1987), STEM-II (Carmichael, et al., 1986), and CMAQ (Community Multi-scale Air Quality model, e.g., EPA website, 2003); the 'comprehensive' models include not only gas/aerosol phase chemistry but also aqueous phase chemistry in cloud/rain water in addition to the processes of advection, diffusion, wet deposition (mass transfer between aqueous and gas/aerosol phases), and dry deposition. The target of the development of the 'comprehensive' model will be that the model can correctly reproduce mass balance of various chemical species in the atmosphere with keeping adequate accuracy for calculated concentration distributions of chemical species. For the purpose, one of the important problems is a reliable wet deposition modeling, and here, we introduce two types of methods of 'cloud-resolving' and 'non-cloud-resolving' modeling for the wet deposition of pollutants. (author)

  11. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment ozone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, A.T.J.; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A

  12. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment zone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J.de; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A comparison of GOME O3

  13. Implementation and evaluation of pH-dependent cloud chemistry and wetdeposition in the chemical transport model REM-Calgrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banzhaf, S.; Schaap, M.; Kerschbaumer, A.; Reimer, E.; Stern, R.; Swaluw, E. van der; Builtjes, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Chemistry Transport Model REM-Calgrid (RCG) has been improved by implementing an enhanced description of aqueous-phase chemistry and wet deposition processes including droplet pH. A sensitivity study on cloud and rain droplet pH has been performed to investigate its impact on model sulphate

  14. A molecular-thermodynamic model for polyelectrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y. [Thermodynamics Research Laboratory, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Prausnitz, J.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte solutions are modeled as freely tangent-jointed, charged hard-sphere chains and corresponding counterions in a continuum medium with permitivity {var_epsilon}. By adopting the sticky-point model, the Helmholtz function for polyelectrolyte solutions is derived through the r-particle cavity-correlation function (CCF) for chains of sticky, charged hard spheres. The r-CCF is approximated by a product of effective nearest-neighbor two-particle CCFs; these are determined from the hypernetted-chain and mean-spherical closures (HNC/MSA) inside and outside the hard core, respectively, for the integral equation theory for electrolytes. The colligative properties are given as explicit functions of a scaling parameter {Gamma} that can be estimated by a simple iteration procedure. Osmotic pressures, osmotic coefficients, and activity coefficients are calculated for model solutions with various chain lengths. They are in good agreement with molecular simulation and experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. The Use of Molecular Modeling Programs in Medicinal Chemistry Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Marc W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of a molecular modeling computer program (Alchemy II) in a pharmaceutical education program. Provided are the hardware requirements and basic program features as well as several examples of how this program and its features have been applied in the classroom. (GLR)

  16. Ensemble-based data assimilation schemes for atmospheric chemistry models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbu, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The atmosphere is a complex system which includes physical, chemical and biological processes. Many of these processes affecting the atmosphere are subject to various interactions and can be highly nonlinear. This complexity makes it necessary to apply computer models in order to understand the

  17. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Peng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D, O(3P, and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O and external OH reactivity (OHRext, as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D, O(3P, and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define “riskier OFR conditions” as those with either low H2O (< 0.1 % or high OHRext ( ≥  100 s−1 in OFR185 and > 200 s−1 in OFR254. We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm may play a significant (> 20 % role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have

  18. Global solution for a chemotactic haptotactic model of cancer invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youshan; Wang, Mingjun

    2008-10-01

    This paper deals with a mathematical model of cancer invasion of tissue recently proposed by Chaplain and Lolas. The model consists of a reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equation (PDE) describing the evolution of tumour cell density, a reaction-diffusion PDE governing the evolution of the proteolytic enzyme concentration and an ordinary differential equation modelling the proteolysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition to random motion, the tumour cells are directed not only by haptotaxis (cellular locomotion directed in response to a concentration gradient of adhesive molecules along the ECM) but also by chemotaxis (cellular locomotion directed in response to a concentration gradient of the diffusible proteolytic enzyme). In one space dimension, the global existence and uniqueness of a classical solution to this combined chemotactic-haptotactic model is proved for any chemotactic coefficient χ > 0. In two and three space dimensions, the global existence is proved for small χ/μ (where μ is the logistic growth rate of the tumour cells). The fundamental point of proof is to raise the regularity of a solution from L1 to Lp (p > 1). Furthermore, the existence of blow-up solutions to a sub-model in two space dimensions for large χ shows, to some extent, that the condition that χ/μ is small is necessary for the global existence of a solution to the full model.

  19. Modeling of the chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with high initial NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2017-10-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) are increasingly employed in atmospheric chemistry research because of their high efficiency of OH radical production from low-pressure Hg lamp emissions at both 185 and 254 nm (OFR185) or 254 nm only (OFR254). OFRs have been thought to be limited to studying low-NO chemistry (in which peroxy radicals (RO2) react preferentially with HO2) because NO is very rapidly oxidized by the high concentrations of O3, HO2, and OH in OFRs. However, many groups are performing experiments by aging combustion exhaust with high NO levels or adding NO in the hopes of simulating high-NO chemistry (in which RO2 + NO dominates). This work systematically explores the chemistry in OFRs with high initial NO. Using box modeling, we investigate the interconversion of N-containing species and the uncertainties due to kinetic parameters. Simple initial injection of NO in OFR185 can result in more RO2 reacted with NO than with HO2 and minor non-tropospheric photolysis, but only under a very narrow set of conditions (high water mixing ratio, low UV intensity, low external OH reactivity (OHRext), and initial NO concentration (NOin) of tens to hundreds of ppb) that account for a very small fraction of the input parameter space. These conditions are generally far away from experimental conditions of published OFR studies with high initial NO. In particular, studies of aerosol formation from vehicle emissions in OFRs often used OHRext and NOin several orders of magnitude higher. Due to extremely high OHRext and NOin, some studies may have resulted in substantial non-tropospheric photolysis, strong delay to RO2 chemistry due to peroxynitrate formation, VOC reactions with NO3 dominating over those with OH, and faster reactions of OH-aromatic adducts with NO2 than those with O2, all of which are irrelevant to ambient VOC photooxidation chemistry. Some of the negative effects are the worst for alkene and aromatic precursors. To avoid undesired chemistry, vehicle emissions

  20. Geochemical modelling of groundwater chemistry in the Tono area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.

    2003-03-01

    This report summarizes the research result about geochemical modelling of the groundwater during H14 financial year. JNC-TGC have built the geochemical conceptual models of groundwater by using the chemical data of the groundwater of the Mizunami group and Toki granite. Although this models are extremely useful as interpretive tools, they lack the quantitative basis necessary to evaluate coupled processes of fluid-flow and water-rock interaction driving the chemical evolution of groundwater systems. In this research, the following three items have been considered for the purpose of construction of the geochemical model which can express the chemical reaction in groundwater correctly. Evaluation of the quality of the previous analytical data in the Tono region. Grasp of the chemical character of groundwaters. Consideration about the influence between Eh, pH and CO 2 (g) parameter, and which the change has. Evaluation of the quality of the previous analytical data are important because deficiencies in sampling technique, sample-preservation procedures or analytical method may adversely affect the overall quality of groundwater chemical and isotopic analysis. In addition, the effects of borehole drilling and logging, hydraulic testing inappropriate sampling strategies or inadequate sampling tools may perturb groundwater compositions to such an extent that they are unrepresentative of in-situ conditions. The quality of water analysis is indicated by its charge balance. The charge balance of many of the analysis lies within the strictly acceptable range of 0±5%, but charge imbalances exceeding these limits are calculated for many other samples. These reasons are examined in the following. Analytical errors (e.q., of alkalinity). Errors arising from the use of IC values that are unrepresentative because CO 2 was gained by or lost from the sample during storage and (or) analysis. Errors arising from the invalid assumption that non-carbonate contributions to the

  1. The numerical modelling of MHD astrophysical flows with chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, I.; Chernykh, I.; Protasov, V.

    2017-10-01

    The new code for numerical simulation of magnetic hydrodynamical astrophysical flows with consideration of chemical reactions is given in the paper. At the heart of the code – the new original low-dissipation numerical method based on a combination of operator splitting approach and piecewise-parabolic method on the local stencil. The chemodynamics of the hydrogen while the turbulent formation of molecular clouds is modeled.

  2. Multivariate Calibration and Model Integrity for Wood Chemistry Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Chengfeng; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Qingzheng; Via, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    This research addressed a rapid method to monitor hardwood chemical composition by applying Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, with particular interest in model performance for interpretation and prediction. Partial least squares (PLS) and principal components regression (PCR) were chosen as the primary models for comparison. Standard laboratory chemistry methods were employed on a mixed genus/species hardwood sample set to collect the original data. PLS was found to provide bet...

  3. Thermodynamic modelling of bentonite-groundwater interaction and implications for near field chemistry in a repository for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.; Wersin, P.; Sierro, N.

    1992-11-01

    Predictions of near field geochemistry are made using a thermodynamic model for bentonite/ground interaction. This model is a refinement and extension of the model developed by the senior author. It is based on recent experiments performed at high solid/water ratio and adapted to the Swedish type of HLW repository design. Thus, from the obtained experimental results on solution composition, the model includes chemical reactions resulting from both the impurities and the main clay fraction within the bentonite. Ion exchange reactions are treated both with and without the contribution of edge sites. Due to its thermodynamic basis, the model exhibits prediction capability over a wide range of conditions in terms of solid/water ratio. The modelling of repository conditions implies, due to the lack of experimental information, simplifications with regard to thermodynamic properties of the bentonite. This mainly involves the non-consideration of the temperature effects and of the acid/base properties of the solid. Nevertheless, our results yield insight into important processes affecting porewater chemistry. Thus, the model suggests that proton exchange reactions may exert a strong control on calcite dissolution within highly compacted bentonite. Estimations of chemical changes over time in the bentonite were done in the basis of a mixing tank model. These results indicate transformation of Na-bentonite to Ca-bentonite over time. The extent of this process, however, critically depends on the amount of carbonate present in the bentonite. (authors) (34 refs.)

  4. Kinetic models in spin chemistry. 1. The hyperfine interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, M.; Pedersen, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetic models for quantum systems are quite popular due to their simplicity, although they are difficult to justify. We show that the transformation from quantum to kinetic description can be done exactly for the hyperfine interaction of one nuclei with arbitrary spin; more spins are described...... with a very good approximation. The crucial points are: to represents the quantum coherent oscillations by first order rate constants, and to determine the number of kinetic channels corresponding to a given interaction. We consider a radical pair system with spin selective reactions and calculate the spin...

  5. Physical chemistry and modelling of the sintering of actinide oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechelle, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This report gives a synthesis of the work I have carried out or to which I have numerically contributed to from 1996 up to 2012 in the Department of Plutonium Uranium and minor Actinides in Cadarache CEA Center. Their main goal is the study and the modeling of the sintering process of nuclear fuels which is the unifying thread of this document. Both in order to take into account the physical and chemical features of the actinide bearing oxide material and in order to combine the different transport phenomena leading to sintering, a sub-granular scale model is under development. Extension to a varying chemical composition as well as exchanges with the gaseous phase are foreseen. A simulation on a larger scale (pellet scale) is ongoing in the framework of a PhD thesis. Validation means have been tested with (U,Pu)O 2 material on the scale of the pellet (Small Angle Neutron Diffusion), on the scale of powder granules (X-Ray High Resolution Micro-Tomography) and with CeO 2 at the 'Institut de Chimie Separative' in Marcoule on a single crystal scale (Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope). The required microstructure homogeneity for nuclear fuels has led to a campaign of experimental studies about the role of Cr 2 O 3 as a sintering aid. Whole of these studies improve our understanding of fuel sintering and hence leads to an improved mastering of this process. (author) [fr

  6. Role of solution chemistry on the trapping of radionuclide Th(IV) using titanate nanotubes as an efficient adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guodong Sheng; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei; Baowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes (TNTs) have attracted great interest in multidisciplinary study since their discovery. The adsorption of thorium [Th(IV)] onto TNTs in the absence and presence of humic acid (HA)/fulvic acid (FA) was studied by batch technique. The influence of pH from 2.0 to 10.0, ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.1 mol L -1 NaClO 4 , and coexisting electrolyte cations (Li + , Na + , K + ) and anions (ClO 4 - , NO 3 - , Cl - ) on the adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs was tested. The adsorption isotherms of Th(IV) was determined at pH 3.0 and analyzed with Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs increases steeply with increasing pH from 2.0 to 4.0. Generally, HA/FA was showed to enhance Th(IV) adsorption onto TNTs at low pH values, but to reduce Th(IV) adsorption onto TNTs at high pH values. The adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs was also dependent on coexisting electrolyte ions in aqueous solution under our experimental conditions. The adsorption of Th(IV) onto TNTs is exothermic and spontaneous. The findings indicating that TNTs can be used as a promising candidate for the enrichment and solidification of Th(IV) or its analogue actinides from large volume solution in real work. (author)

  7. Metal transport across biomembranes: emerging models for a distinct chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, José M; Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2012-04-20

    Transition metals are essential components of important biomolecules, and their homeostasis is central to many life processes. Transmembrane transporters are key elements controlling the distribution of metals in various compartments. However, due to their chemical properties, transition elements require transporters with different structural-functional characteristics from those of alkali and alkali earth ions. Emerging structural information and functional studies have revealed distinctive features of metal transport. Among these are the relevance of multifaceted events involving metal transfer among participating proteins, the importance of coordination geometry at transmembrane transport sites, and the presence of the largely irreversible steps associated with vectorial transport. Here, we discuss how these characteristics shape novel transition metal ion transport models.

  8. Theoretical chemistry periodicities in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Periodicities in Chemistry and Biology, Volume 4 covers the aspects of theoretical chemistry. The book discusses the stably rotating patterns of reaction and diffusion; the chemistry of inorganic systems exhibiting nonmonotonic behavior; and population cycles. The text also describes the mathematical modeling of excitable media in neurobiology and chemistry; oscillating enzyme reactions; and oscillatory properties and excitability of the heart cell membrane. Selected topics from the theory of physico-chemical instabilities are also encompassed. Chemists, mechanical engin

  9. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  10. Stability of subsystem solutions in agent-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2018-01-01

    The fact that relatively simple entities, such as particles or neurons, or even ants or bees or humans, give rise to fascinatingly complex behaviour when interacting in large numbers is the hallmark of complex systems science. Agent-based models are frequently employed for modelling and obtaining a predictive understanding of complex systems. Since the sheer number of equations that describe the behaviour of an entire agent-based model often makes it impossible to solve such models exactly, Monte Carlo simulation methods must be used for the analysis. However, unlike pairwise interactions among particles that typically govern solid-state physics systems, interactions among agents that describe systems in biology, sociology or the humanities often involve group interactions, and they also involve a larger number of possible states even for the most simplified description of reality. This begets the question: when can we be certain that an observed simulation outcome of an agent-based model is actually stable and valid in the large system-size limit? The latter is key for the correct determination of phase transitions between different stable solutions, and for the understanding of the underlying microscopic processes that led to these phase transitions. We show that a satisfactory answer can only be obtained by means of a complete stability analysis of subsystem solutions. A subsystem solution can be formed by any subset of all possible agent states. The winner between two subsystem solutions can be determined by the average moving direction of the invasion front that separates them, yet it is crucial that the competing subsystem solutions are characterised by a proper composition and spatiotemporal structure before the competition starts. We use the spatial public goods game with diverse tolerance as an example, but the approach has relevance for a wide variety of agent-based models.

  11. ADVAN-style analytical solutions for common pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    The analytical solutions to compartmental pharmacokinetic models are well known, but have not been presented in a form that easily allows for complex dosing regimen and changes in covariate/parameter values that may occur at discrete times within and/or between dosing intervals. Laplace transforms were used to derive ADVAN-style analytical solutions for 1, 2, and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic linear models of intravenous and first-order absorption drug administration. The equations calculate the change in drug amounts in each compartment of the model over a time interval (t; t = t2 - t1) accounting for any dose or covariate events acting in the time interval. The equations were coded in the R language and used to simulate the time-course of drug amounts in each compartment of the systems. The equations were validated against commercial software [NONMEM (Beal, Sheiner, Boeckmann, & Bauer, 2009)] output to assess their capability to handle both complex dosage regimens and the effect of changes in covariate/parameter values that may occur at discrete times within or between dosing intervals. For all tested pharmacokinetic models, the time-course of drug amounts using the ADVAN-style analytical solutions were identical to NONMEM outputs to at least four significant figures, confirming the validity of the presented equations. To our knowledge, this paper presents the ADVAN-style equations for common pharmacokinetic models in the literature for the first time. The presented ADVAN-style equations overcome obstacles to implementing the classical analytical solutions in software, and have speed advantages over solutions using differential equation solvers. The equations presented in this paper fill a gap in the pharmacokinetic literature, and it is expected that these equations will facilitate the investigation of useful open-source software for modelling pharmacokinetic data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer modelling of the plasma chemistry and plasma-based growth mechanisms for nanostructured materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review paper, an overview is given of different modelling efforts for plasmas used for the formation and growth of nanostructured materials. This includes both the plasma chemistry, providing information on the precursors for nanostructure formation, as well as the growth processes itself. We limit ourselves to carbon (and silicon) nanostructures. Examples of the plasma modelling comprise nanoparticle formation in silane and hydrocarbon plasmas, as well as the plasma chemistry giving rise to carbon nanostructure formation, such as (ultra)nanocrystalline diamond ((U)NCD) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The second part of the paper deals with the simulation of the (plasma-based) growth mechanisms of the same carbon nanostructures, i.e. (U)NCD and CNTs, both by mechanistic modelling and detailed atomistic simulations.

  13. A general method for the inclusion of radiation chemistry in astrochemical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingledecker, Christopher N; Herbst, Eric

    2018-02-21

    In this paper, we propose a general formalism that allows for the estimation of radiolysis decomposition pathways and rate coefficients suitable for use in astrochemical models, with a focus on solid phase chemistry. Such a theory can help increase the connection between laboratory astrophysics experiments and astrochemical models by providing a means for modelers to incorporate radiation chemistry into chemical networks. The general method proposed here is targeted particularly at the majority of species now included in chemical networks for which little radiochemical data exist; however, the method can also be used as a starting point for considering better studied species. We here apply our theory to the irradiation of H 2 O ice and compare the results with previous experimental data.

  14. Pole solution in six dimensions as a dimensional reduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Shoichi

    2002-01-01

    A solution with the pole configuration in six dimensions is analyzed. It is a dimensional reduction model of Randall-Sundrum type. The soliton configuration is induced by the bulk Higgs mechanism. The boundary condition is systematically solved up to the 6th order. The Riemann curvature is finite everywhere.

  15. LED-based Photometric Stereo: Modeling, Calibration and Numerical Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durix, Bastien; Wu, Tao

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a thorough study of photometric stereo under nearby point light source illumination, from modeling to numerical solution, through calibration. In the classical formulation of photometric stereo, the luminous fluxes are assumed to be directional, which is very difficult to achieve in pr...

  16. Approximate Solutions of Interactive Dynamic Influence Diagrams Using Model Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Doshi, Prashant; Qiongyu, Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Interactive dynamic influence diagrams (I-DIDs) offer a transparent and semantically clear representation for the sequential decision-making problem over multiple time steps in the presence of other interacting agents. Solving I-DIDs exactly involves knowing the solutions of possible models...

  17. Stationary solutions of multicomponent chiral and gauge models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, D.V.; Chudnovsky, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The authors examine stationary solutions of completely integrable systems in (x, t) dimensions having infinitely many components. Among the cases under investigation are: (1) the infinite-component non-linear Schroedinger equation; (2) infinite component CPsup(Ω) or SU(N) sigma-models; (3) general gauge and chiral completely integrable systems. (Auth.)

  18. Interpolation solution of the single-impurity Anderson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemsky, A.L.

    1990-10-01

    The dynamical properties of the single-impurity Anderson model (SIAM) is studied using a novel Irreducible Green's Function method (IGF). The new solution for one-particle GF interpolating between the strong and weak correlation limits is obtained. The unified concept of relevant mean-field renormalizations is indispensable for strong correlation limit. (author). 21 refs

  19. Analysis and modeling of alkali halide aqueous solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Kang, Jeong Won

    2016-01-01

    on calculations for various electrolyte properties of alkali halide aqueous solutions such as mean ionic activity coefficients, osmotic coefficients, and salt solubilities. The model covers highly nonideal electrolyte systems such as lithium chloride, lithium bromide and lithium iodide, that is, systems...

  20. Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery : Modeling and Analytical Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashoori, E.

    2012-01-01

    Foam increases sweep in miscible- and immiscible-gas enhanced oil recovery by decreasing the mobility of gas enormously. This thesis is concerned with the simulations and analytical solutions for foam flow for the purpose of modeling foam EOR in a reservoir. For the ultimate goal of upscaling our

  1. The GEOS Chemistry Climate Model: Implications of Climate Feedbacks on Ozone Depletion and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.; Pawson, Steven; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randy; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rodriquez, Jose; Strahan, Susan; Oman, Luke; Waugh, Darryn

    2008-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) has been developed by combining the atmospheric chemistry and transport modules developed over the years at Goddard and the GEOS general circulation model, also developed at Goddard. The first version of the model was used in the CCMVal intercomparison exercises that contributed to the 2006 WMO/UNEP Ozone Assessment. The second version incorporates the updated version of the GCM (GEOS 5) and will be used for the next round of CCMVal evaluations and the 2010 Ozone Assessment. The third version, now under development, incorporates the combined stratosphere and troposphere chemistry package developed under the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). We will show comparison to past observations that indicate that we represent the ozone trends over the past 30 years. We will also show the basic temperature, composition, and dynamical structure of the simulations. We will further show projections into the future. We will show results from an ensemble of transient and time-slice simulations, including simulations with fixed 1960 chlorine, simulations with a best guess scenario (Al), and simulations with extremely high chlorine loadings. We will discuss planned extensions of the model to include emission-based boundary conditions for both anthropogenic and biogenic compounds.

  2. Small-scale engagement model with arrivals: analytical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.

    1977-04-01

    This report presents an analytical model of small-scale battles. The specific impetus for this effort was provided by a need to characterize hypothetical battles between guards at a nuclear facility and their potential adversaries. The solution procedure can be used to find measures of a number of critical parameters; for example, the win probabilities and the expected duration of the battle. Numerical solutions are obtainable if the total number of individual combatants on the opposing sides is less than 10. For smaller force size battles, with one or two combatants on each side, symbolic solutions can be found. The symbolic solutions express the output parameters abstractly in terms of symbolic representations of the input parameters while the numerical solutions are expressed as numerical values. The input parameters are derived from the probability distributions of the attrition and arrival processes. The solution procedure reduces to solving sets of linear equations that have been constructed from the input parameters. The approach presented in this report does not address the problems associated with measuring the inputs. Rather, this report attempts to establish a relatively simple structure within which small-scale battles can be studied

  3. Analytic solution of the Starobinsky model for inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos [Universidad Austral de Chile, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Valdivia (Chile); Durban University of Technology, Institute of Systems Science, Durban (South Africa)

    2017-07-15

    We prove that the field equations of the Starobinsky model for inflation in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric constitute an integrable system. The analytical solution in terms of a Painleve series for the Starobinsky model is presented for the case of zero and nonzero spatial curvature. In both cases the leading-order term describes the radiation era provided by the corresponding higher-order theory. (orig.)

  4. Comprehensive mechanisms for combustion chemistry: Experiment, modeling, and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, F.L.; Yetter, R.A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program is an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work are conducted in large diameter flow reactors, at pressures from one to twenty atmospheres, temperatures from 550 K to 1200 K, and with observed reaction times from 10{sup {minus}2} to 5 seconds. Gas sampling of stable reactant, intermediate, and product species concentrations provides not only substantial definition of the phenomenology of reaction mechanisms, but a significantly constrained set of kinetic information with negligible diffusive coupling. Analytical techniques used for detecting hydrocarbons and carbon oxides include gas chromatography (GC), and gas infrared (NDIR) and FTIR methods are utilized for continuous on-line sample detection of light absorption measurements of OH have also been performed in an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR), and a variable pressure flow (VPFR) reactor is presently being instrumented to perform optical measurements of radicals and highly reactive molecular intermediates. The numerical aspects of the work utilize zero and one-dimensional pre-mixed, detailed kinetic studies, including path, elemental gradient sensitivity, and feature sensitivity analyses. The program emphasizes the use of hierarchical mechanistic construction to understand and develop detailed kinetic mechanisms. Numerical studies are utilized for guiding experimental parameter selections, for interpreting observations, for extending the predictive range of mechanism constructs, and to study the effects of diffusive transport coupling on reaction behavior in flames. Modeling using well defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H{sub 2}/oxidant systems.

  5. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Naik, V.; Plummer, D.; Josse, B.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Strode, S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of time slice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting composition changes and the associated radiative forcing. In this overview paper, we introduce the ACCMIP activity, the various simulations performed (with a requested set of 14) and the associated model output. The 16 ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions are responsible for a significant range across models, mostly in the case of ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to- model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results. However, models that are clear outliers are different enough from the other models to significantly affect their simulation of atmospheric chemistry.

  6. A new 2D climate model with chemistry and self consistent eddy-parameterization. The impact of airplane NO{sub x} on the chemistry of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gepraegs, R.; Schmitz, G.; Peters, D. [Institut fuer Atmosphaerenphysik, Kuehlungsborn (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A 2D version of the ECHAM T21 climate model has been developed. The new model includes an efficient spectral transport scheme with implicit diffusion. Furthermore, photodissociation and chemistry of the NCAR 2D model have been incorporated. A self consistent parametrization scheme is used for eddy heat- and momentum flux in the troposphere. It is based on the heat flux parametrization of Branscome and mixing-length formulation for quasi-geostrophic vorticity. Above 150 hPa the mixing-coefficient K{sub yy} is prescribed. Some of the model results are discussed, concerning especially the impact of aircraft NO{sub x} emission on the model chemistry. (author) 6 refs.

  7. The 1-way on-line coupled atmospheric chemistry model system MECO(n – Part 1: Description of the limited-area atmospheric chemistry model COSMO/MESSy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical weather prediction model of the Consortium for Small Scale Modelling (COSMO, maintained by the German weather service (DWD, is connected with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy. This effort is undertaken in preparation of a new, limited-area atmospheric chemistry model. Limited-area models require lateral boundary conditions for all prognostic variables. Therefore the quality of a regional chemistry model is expected to improve, if boundary conditions for the chemical constituents are provided by the driving model in consistence with the meteorological boundary conditions. The new developed model is as consistent as possible, with respect to atmospheric chemistry and related processes, with a previously developed global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model: the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model. The combined system constitutes a new research tool, bridging the global to the meso-γ scale for atmospheric chemistry research. MESSy provides the infrastructure and includes, among others, the process and diagnostic submodels for atmospheric chemistry simulations. Furthermore, MESSy is highly flexible allowing model setups with tailor made complexity, depending on the scientific question. Here, the connection of the MESSy infrastructure to the COSMO model is documented and also the code changes required for the generalisation of regular MESSy submodels. Moreover, previously published prototype submodels for simplified tracer studies are generalised to be plugged-in and used in the global and the limited-area model. They are used to evaluate the TRACER interface implementation in the new COSMO/MESSy model system and the tracer transport characteristics, an important prerequisite for future atmospheric chemistry applications. A supplementary document with further details on the technical implementation of the MESSy interface into COSMO with a complete list of modifications to the COSMO code is provided.

  8. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  9. Numerical solution of dynamic equilibrium models under Poisson uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf; Trimborn, Timo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple and powerful numerical algorithm to compute the transition process in continuous-time dynamic equilibrium models with rare events. In this paper we transform the dynamic system of stochastic differential equations into a system of functional differential equations...... of the retarded type. We apply the Waveform Relaxation algorithm, i.e., we provide a guess of the policy function and solve the resulting system of (deterministic) ordinary differential equations by standard techniques. For parametric restrictions, analytical solutions to the stochastic growth model and a novel...... solution to Lucas' endogenous growth model under Poisson uncertainty are used to compute the exact numerical error. We show how (potential) catastrophic events such as rare natural disasters substantially affect the economic decisions of households....

  10. Travelling Wave Solutions in Multigroup Age-Structured Epidemic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrot, Arnaut; Magal, Pierre; Ruan, Shigui

    2010-01-01

    Age-structured epidemic models have been used to describe either the age of individuals or the age of infection of certain diseases and to determine how these characteristics affect the outcomes and consequences of epidemiological processes. Most results on age-structured epidemic models focus on the existence, uniqueness, and convergence to disease equilibria of solutions. In this paper we investigate the existence of travelling wave solutions in a deterministic age-structured model describing the circulation of a disease within a population of multigroups. Individuals of each group are able to move with a random walk which is modelled by the classical Fickian diffusion and are classified into two subclasses, susceptible and infective. A susceptible individual in a given group can be crisscross infected by direct contact with infective individuals of possibly any group. This process of transmission can depend upon the age of the disease of infected individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide sufficient conditions that ensure the existence of travelling wave solutions for the age-structured epidemic model. The case of two population groups is numerically investigated which applies to the crisscross transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and some sexual transmission diseases.

  11. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  12. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. III. Gaseous C-H-O-N Chemistry with Nine Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present novel, analytical, equilibrium-chemistry formulae for the abundances of molecules in hot exoplanetary atmospheres that include the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen networks. Our hydrogen-dominated solutions involve acetylene (C2H2), ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ethylene (C2H4), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), methane (CH4), molecular nitrogen (N2), and water (H2O). By considering only the gas phase, we prove that the mixing ratio of carbon monoxide is governed by a decic equation (polynomial equation of 10 degrees). We validate our solutions against numerical calculations of equilibrium chemistry that perform Gibbs free energy minimization and demonstrate that they are accurate at the ˜ 1 % level for temperatures from 500 to 3000 K. In hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, the ratio of abundances of HCN to CH4 is nearly constant across a wide range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios, which makes it a robust diagnostic of the metallicity in the gas phase. Our validated formulae allow for the convenient benchmarking of chemical kinetics codes and provide an efficient way of enforcing chemical equilibrium in atmospheric retrieval calculations.

  13. Mesoscale modeling of solute precipitation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ke, Huibin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes the low length scale effort during FY 2014 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution in reactor pressure vessels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation-induced defect accumulation and irradiation-enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering-scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. Atomic-scale efforts that supply information for the mesoscale capabilities are also included.

  14. Ruthenium speciation in model nuclear fuel process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, Anne L.; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A.; Wright, Des; Owens, Ivan F.; Charnock, John M.; Hennig, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Ru speciation is being investigated systematically from models of high level waste solutions right through to the calcination process and the vitrified glass product. The characterisation of these species is complicated due to the fact that a wide range of ruthenium nitrosyl/nitrite/nitrate complexes can be present in nitric acid waste solutions. The general formula for these complexes is RuNO(NO 3 ) x (NO 2 ) y (OH) z (H 2 O) 5-x-y-z +3-x-y-z . A range of different techniques has been used for the characterisation of these species in solution, including electron absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, multi-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. (authors)

  15. Aespoe HRL - Geoscientific evaluation 1997/4. Results from pre-investigation and detailed site characterization. Comparison of predictions and observations. Hydrogeology, groundwater chemistry and transport of solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhen, I.; Gustafson, Gunnar; Wikberg, P.

    1997-06-01

    The pre-investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory were started in 1986 and involved extensive field measurements, aimed at characterizing the rock formations with regard to geology, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and rock mechanics. Prior to the excavation in 1990 predictions were made for the excavation phase concerning: geology, ground water flow and chemistry, transport of solutes and mechanical stability. This report presents a comparison between these predictions and the observations made during the excavation. Also, investigation methods for the 700-2874 m sections of the tunnel are evaluated

  16. Novel chemistry of alpha-tosyloxy ketones: applications to the solution- and solid-phase synthesis of privileged heterocycle and enediyne libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaou, K C; Montagnon, T; Ulven, T

    2002-01-01

    New synthetic technologies for the preparation and elaboration of alpha-tosyloxy ketones in solution- and on solid-phase are described. Both olefins and ketones serve as precursors to these relatively stable chemical entities: olefins via a novel one-pot epoxidation, arylsulfonic acid displacement......-tosyloxy ketones are engaged by "hard" versus "soft" nucleophiles. The accessibility and site-selectivity of the chemistry demonstrated herein offer the promise of an expanded use for this moiety in solid-phase library construction, in particular, and in the field of organic synthesis, in general....

  17. Finite-Difference Solution for Laminar or Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Axisymmetric Bodies with Ideal Gas, CF4, or Equilibrium Air Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Millman, Daniel R.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code was developed that uses an implicit finite-difference technique to solve nonsimilar, axisymmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The code can treat ideal gases, air in chemical equilibrium, and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4), which is a useful gas for hypersonic blunt-body simulations. This is the only known boundary layer code that can treat CF4. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated that accurate solutions are obtained. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing calculations with wind tunnel experiments and for making calculations about flight vehicles where equilibrium air chemistry assumptions are valid.

  18. Data mining with SPSS modeler theory, exercises and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Wendler, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Introducing the IBM SPSS Modeler, this book guides readers through data mining processes and presents relevant statistical methods. There is a special focus on step-by-step tutorials and well-documented examples that help demystify complex mathematical algorithms and computer programs. The variety of exercises and solutions as well as an accompanying website with data sets and SPSS Modeler streams are particularly valuable. While intended for students, the simplicity of the Modeler makes the book useful for anyone wishing to learn about basic and more advanced data mining, and put this knowledge into practice.

  19. A simple one-step chemistry model for partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Tarrazo, Eduardo [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, Antonio L. [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes 28911 (Spain); Linan, Amable [ETSI Aeronauticos, Pl. Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Williams, Forman A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    This work explores the applicability of one-step irreversible Arrhenius kinetics with unity reaction order to the numerical description of partially premixed hydrocarbon combustion. Computations of planar premixed flames are used in the selection of the three model parameters: the heat of reaction q, the activation temperature T{sub a}, and the preexponential factor B. It is seen that changes in q with equivalence ratio f need to be introduced in fuel-rich combustion to describe the effect of partial fuel oxidation on the amount of heat released, leading to a universal linear variation q(f) for f>1 for all hydrocarbons. The model also employs a variable activation temperature T{sub a}(f) to mimic changes in the underlying chemistry in rich and very lean flames. The resulting chemistry description is able to reproduce propagation velocities of diluted and undiluted flames accurately over the whole flammability limit. Furthermore, computations of methane-air counterflow diffusion flames are used to test the proposed chemistry under nonpremixed conditions. The model not only predicts the critical strain rate at extinction accurately but also gives near-extinction flames with oxygen leakage, thereby overcoming known predictive limitations of one-step Arrhenius kinetics. (author)

  20. The Titan Haze Simulation Experiment: Latest Laboratory Results and Dedicated Plasma Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Raymond, Alexander; Mazur, Eric; Salama, Farid

    2017-10-01

    Here, we present the latest results on the gas- and solid phase analyses in the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation chamber. The THS is a unique experimental platform that allows us to simulate Titan’s complex atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature (200 K) by cooling down N2-CH4-based mixtures in a supersonic expansion before inducing the chemistry by plasma. Because of the accelerated gas flow in the expansion, the residence time of the gas in the active plasma region is less than 3 µs. This results in a truncated chemistry that enables us to control how far in the chain of chemical reactions chemistry processes[1], by adding, in the initial gas mixture, heavier molecules that have been detected as trace elements on Titan.We discuss the results of recent Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy[2] and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy studies of THS Titan tholins produced in different gas mixtures (with and without acetylene and benzene). Both studies have shown the presence of nitrogen chemistry, and differences in the level and nature of the nitrogen incorporation depending on the initial gas mixture. A comparison of THS MIR spectra to VIMS data has shown that the THS aerosols produced in simpler mixtures, i.e., that contain more nitrogen and where the N-incorporation is in isocyanide-type molecules instead of nitriles, are more representative of Titan’s aerosols.In addition, a new model has been developed to simulate the plasma chemistry in the THS. Electron impact and chemical kinetics equations for more than 120 species are followed. The calculated mass spectra[3] are in good agreement with the experimental THS mass spectra[1], confirming that the short residence time in the plasma cavity limits the growth of larger species and results in a truncated chemistry, a main feature of the THS.References:[1] Sciamma-O'Brien E. et al., Icarus, 243, 325 (2014)[2] Sciamma-O'Brien E. et al., Icarus

  1. Polymer Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  2. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Furthermore, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area, and for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has a great potential to affect the RBS activity in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  3. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, E.; Peleg, M.; Pedersen, D. U.; Matveev, V.; Pour Biazar, A.; Luria, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br- present in the Dead Sea water. Furthermore, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br). The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area, and for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has a great potential to affect the RBS activity in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  4. Predicting Complex Organic Mixture Atmospheric Chemistry Using Computer-Generated Reaction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. T.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Mazurek, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    New measurement and chemical characterization technologies now offer unprecedented capabilities for detecting and describing atmospheric organic matter at the molecular level. As a result, very detailed and extensive chemical inventories are produced routinely in atmospheric field measurements of organic compounds found in the vapor and condensed phases (particles, cloud and fog droplets). Hundreds of organic compounds can constitute the complex chemical mixtures observed for these types of samples, exhibiting a wide spectrum of physical properties such as molecular weight, polarity, pH, and chemical reactivity. The central challenge is describing chemically the complex organic aerosol mixture in a useable fashion that can be linked to predictive models. However, the great compositional complexity of organic aerosols engenders a need for the modeling of the reaction chemistry of these compounds in atmospheric chemical models. On a mechanistic level, atmospheric reactions of organic compounds can involve a network of a very large number of chemical species and reactions. Deriving such large molecular kinetic models by hand is a tedious and time-consuming process. However, such models are usually built upon a few basic chemical principles tempered with the model builder's observations, experience, and intuition that can be summarized as a set of rules. This suggests that given an algorithmic framework, computers (information technology) may be used to apply these chemical principles and rules, thereby building a kinetic model. The framework for this model building process has been developed by means of graph theory. A molecule, which is a set of atoms connected by bonds, may be conceptualized as a set of vertices connected by edges, or to be more precise, a graph. The bond breaking and forming for a reaction can be represented compactly in the form of a matrix operator formally called the "reaction matrix". The addition of the reaction matrix operator to the reduced

  5. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  6. Solution-focused therapy. Counseling model for busy family physicians.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, G.; Ganshorn, K.; Danilkewich, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family doctors in busy office practices with a model for counseling compatible with patient-centred medicine, including the techniques, strategies, and questions necessary for implementation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The MEDLINE database was searched from 1984 to 1999 using the terms psychotherapy in family practice, brief therapy in family practice, solution-focused therapy, and brief psychotherapy. A total of 170 relevant articles were identified; 75 abstracts were retriev...

  7. a New Model of the Chemistry of Ionizing Radiation in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Herbst, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Cosmic rays are a form of high energy radiation found throughout the galaxy that can cause significant physio-chemical changes in solids, such as interstellar dust grain ice-mantles. These particles consist mostly of protons and can initiate a solid-state irradiation chemistry of significant astrochemical interest. In order to better understand the chemical effects of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation, we have written a new Monte Carlo model, CIRIS: the Chemistry of Ionizing Radiation in Solids, which is, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful program of its kind to follow the damage and subsequent chemistry of an irradiated material over time. In our code, two distinct regimes are considered. One is dominated by the atomic physics of track calculations in which both the irradiating proton and the subsequently generated secondary electrons are followed on a collision by collision basis. The other regime occurs after the ion-target collision, in which mobile species are free to randomly hop throughout the bulk of the ice and react via a diffusive mechanism. Here, we will present an initial test of our code in which we have successfully modeled previous experimental work. In these simulations, we are able to reproduce the measured abundances and predict the approximate ice thickness used in that study.

  8. Numerical solution of a model for a superconductor field problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsop, L.E.; Goodman, A.S.; Gustavson, F.G.; Miranker, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    A model of a magnetic field problem occurring in connection with Josephson junction devices is derived, and numerical solutions are obtained. The model is of mathematical interest, because the magnetic vector potential satisfies inhomogeneous Helmholtz equations in part of the region, i.e., the superconductors, and the Laplace equation elsewhere. Moreover, the inhomogeneities are the guage constants for the potential, which are different for each superconductor, and their magnitudes are proportional to the currents flowing in the superconductors. These constants are directly related to the self and mutual inductances of the superconducting elements in the device. The numerical solution is obtained by the iterative use of a fast Poisson solver. Chebyshev acceleration is used to reduce the number of iterations required to obtain a solution. A typical problem involves solving 100,000 simultaneous equations, which the algorithm used with this model does in 20 iterations, requiring three minutes of CPU time on an IBM VM/370/168. Excellent agreement is obtained between calculated and observed values for the inductances

  9. Do organic surface films on sea salt aerosols influence atmospheric chemistry? ─ a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic material from the ocean's surface can be incorporated into sea salt aerosol particles often producing a surface film on the aerosol. Such an organic coating can reduce the mass transfer between the gas phase and the aerosol phase influencing sea salt chemistry in the marine atmosphere. To investigate these effects and their importance for the marine boundary layer (MBL we used the one-dimensional numerical model MISTRA. We considered the uncertainties regarding the magnitude of uptake reduction, the concentrations of organic compounds in sea salt aerosols and the oxidation rate of the organics to analyse the possible influence of organic surfactants on gas and liquid phase chemistry with a special focus on halogen chemistry. By assuming destruction rates for the organic coating based on laboratory measurements we get a rapid destruction of the organic monolayer within the first meters of the MBL. Larger organic initial concentrations lead to a longer lifetime of the coating but lead also to an unrealistically strong decrease of O3 concentrations as the organic film is destroyed by reaction with O3. The lifetime of the film is increased by assuming smaller reactive uptake coefficients for O3 or by assuming that a part of the organic surfactants react with OH. With regard to tropospheric chemistry we found that gas phase concentrations for chlorine and bromine species decreased due to the decreased mass transfer between gas phase and aerosol phase. Aqueous phase chlorine concentrations also decreased but aqueous phase bromine concentrations increased. Differences for gas phase concentrations are in general smaller than for liquid phase concentrations. The effect on gas phase NO2 or NO is very small (reduction less than 5% whereas liquid phase NO2 concentrations increased in some cases by nearly 100%. We list suggestions for further laboratory studies which are needed for improved model studies.

  10. Asymptotically exact solution of a local copper-oxide model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Yu Lu.

    1994-03-01

    We present an asymptotically exact solution of a local copper-oxide model abstracted from the multi-band models. The phase diagram is obtained through the renormalization-group analysis of the partition function. In the strong coupling regime, we find an exactly solved line, which crosses the quantum critical point of the mixed valence regime separating two different Fermi-liquid (FL) phases. At this critical point, a many-particle resonance is formed near the chemical potential, and a marginal-FL spectrum can be derived for the spin and charge susceptibilities. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig

  11. Exact solutions for the spin tune for model storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Mane, S R

    2002-01-01

    We present exact analytical expressions for the spin tune for arbitrary values of the orbital action for several storage ring models. The models we treat contain Siberian Snakes, the use of which is essential to preserve the polarization of beams in high-energy proton storage rings. Our solutions contain some novel features. We also prove a previously conjectured claim about the behavior of spin tuneshifts in rings with multiple Snakes. The conjecture is based on numerical simulations, but our proof is analytical, and also nonperturbative.

  12. Bessel collocation approach for approximate solutions of Hantavirus infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suayip Yuzbasi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a collocation method is introduced to find the approximate solutions of Hantavirus infection model which is a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The method is based on the Bessel functions of the first kind, matrix operations and collocation points. This method converts Hantavirus infection model into a matrix equation in terms of the Bessel functions of first kind, matrix operations and collocation points. The matrix equation corresponds to a system of nonlinear equations with the unknown Bessel coefficients. The reliability and efficiency of the suggested scheme are demonstrated by numerical applications and all numerical calculations have been done by using a program written in Maple.

  13. Asymptotic solutions of diffusion models for risk reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a family of diffusion models for risk reserves which account for the investment income earned and for the inflation experienced on claim amounts. After we defined the process of the conditional probability of ruin over finite time and imposed the appropriate boundary conditions, classical results from the theory of diffusion processes turn the stochastic differential equation to a special class of initial and boundary value problems defined by a linear diffusion equation. Armed with asymptotic analysis and perturbation theory, we obtain the asymptotic solutions of the diffusion models (possibly degenerate governing the conditional probability of ruin over a finite time in terms of interest rate.

  14. Spectroscopic properties of vitamin E models in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L. B. A.; Colherinhas, G.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the first absorption band and the 13C and 17O magnetic shieldings of vitamin E models in chloroform and in water using the S-MC/QM methodology in combination with the TD-DFT and GIAO approaches. The results show that the solvent effects on these spectroscopic properties are small but a proper description of the solvent shift for 17O magnetic shielding of the hydroxyl group in water requires the use of explicit solute-solvent hydrogen bonds. In addition, the effect of the replacement of hydrogen atoms by methyl groups in the vitamin E models only affects magnetic shieldings.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Climate-Chemistry Connections: Recent Developments and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jöckel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current state and development of different numerical model classes that are used to simulate the global atmospheric system, particularly Earth’s climate and climate-chemistry connections. The focus is on Chemistry-Climate Models. In general, these serve to examine dynamical and chemical processes in the Earth atmosphere, their feedback, and interaction with climate. Such models have been established as helpful tools in addition to analyses of observational data. Definitions of the global model classes are given and their capabilities as well as weaknesses are discussed. Examples of scientific studies indicate how numerical exercises contribute to an improved understanding of atmospheric behavior. There, the focus is on synergistic investigations combining observations and model results. The possible future developments and challenges are presented, not only from the scientific point of view but also regarding the computer technology and respective consequences for numerical modeling of atmospheric processes. In the future, a stronger cross-linkage of subject-specific scientists is necessary, to tackle the looming challenges. It should link the specialist discipline and applied computer science.

  16. Cloud processing of gases and aerosols in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model: Impacts of extended chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouds and fogs can significantly impact the concentration and distribution of atmospheric gases and aerosols through chemistry, scavenging, and transport. This presentation summarizes the representation of cloud processes in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling ...

  17. Microfluidic model experiments on the injectability of monoclonal antibody solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchene, Charles; Filipe, Vasco; Nakach, Mostafa; Huille, Sylvain; Lindner, Anke

    2017-11-01

    Autoinjection devices that allow patients to self-administer medicine are becoming used more frequently; however, this advance comes with an increased need for precision in the injection process. The rare occurrence of protein aggregates in solutions of monoclonal antibodies constitutes a threat to the reliability of such devices. Here we study the flow of protein solutions containing aggregates in microfluidic model systems, mimicking injection devices, to gain fundamental understanding of the catastrophic clogging of constrictions of given size. We form aggregates by mechanically shaking or heating antibody solutions and then inject these solutions into microfluidic channels with varying types of constrictions. Geometrical clogging occurs when aggregates reach the size of the constriction and can in some cases be undone by increasing the applied pressure. We perform systematic experiments varying the relative aggregate size and the flow rate or applied pressure. The mechanical deformation of aggregates during their passage through constrictions is investigated to gain a better understanding of the clogging and unclogging mechanisms.

  18. A comparison of amorphous calcium carbonate crystallization in aqueous solutions of MgCl2 and MgSO4: implications for paleo-ocean chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Zhao, Yanyang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Zuozhen; Yan, Huaxiao; Sun, Bin; Meng, Ruirui; Zhuang, Dingxiang; Li, Dan; Liu, Binwei

    2018-04-01

    Based on the terminology of "aragonite seas" and "calcite seas", whether different Mg sources could affect the mineralogy of carbonate sediments at the same Mg/Ca ratio was explored, which was expected to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. In this work, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was prepared by direct precipitation in anhydrous ethanol and used as a precursor to study crystallization processes in MgSO4 and MgCl2 solutions having different concentrations at 60 °C (reaction times 240 and 2880 min). Based on the morphology of the aragonite crystals, as well as mineral saturation indices and kinetic analysis of geochemical processes, it was found that these crystals formed with a spherulitic texture in 4 steps. First, ACC crystallized into columnar Mg calcite by nearly oriented attachment. Second, the Mg calcite changed from columnar shapes into smooth dumbbell forms. Third, the Mg calcite transformed into rough dumbbell or cauliflower-shaped aragonite forms by local dissolution and precipitation. Finally, the aragonite transformed further into spherulitic radial and irregular aggregate forms. The increase in Ca2+ in the MgSO4 solutions compared with the MgCl2 solutions indicates the fast dissolution and slow precipitation of ACC in the former solutions. The phase transition was more complete in the 0.005 M MgCl2 solution, whereas Mg calcite crystallized from the 0.005 M MgSO4 solution, indicating that Mg calcite could be formed more easily in an MgSO4 solution. Based on these findings, aragonite and Mg calcite relative to ACC could be used to provide a qualitative assessment of the chemistry of the paleo-ocean. Therefore, calcite seas relative to high-Mg calcite could reflect a low concentration MgSO4 paleo-ocean, while aragonite seas could be related to an MgCl2 or high concentration of MgSO4 paleo-ocean.

  19. The nature of aqueous solutions: insights into multiple facets of chemistry and biochemistry from freezing-point depressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2010-05-25

    Contrary to current widely held beliefs, many concentrated aqueous solutions of electrolytes and nonelectrolytes behave ideally. For both, the same simple equation yields mole fractions of water that are equal to the theoretical activities of water. No empirical activity coefficients or ad hoc parameters are needed. Thermodynamic hydration numbers and the number of particles produced per mole of solute are found by searching freezing-point depression measurements, as if asking the water, "How much available water solvent is left and how many solute particles are there?" The results answer questions currently under debate: Do solutes alter the nature of water outside their immediate surroundings? What is the number of ion pairs formed by various electrolytes and what affects extents of their formation? What are some factors that cause precipitation of proteins, latexes, and so forth from aqueous solutions upon addition of other solutes (Hofmeister series)? Which nonelectrolytes form aggregates in water and what are the implications? Why do different solutes affect viscosity differently? How do ion-selective channels in cell membranes function at the molecular level?

  20. Development of solute transport models in YMPYRÄ framework to simulate solute migration in military shooting and training areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsta, L.; Karvonen, T.

    2017-12-01

    There are currently 25 shooting and training areas in Finland managed by The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF), where military activities can cause contamination of open waters and groundwater reservoirs. In the YMPYRÄ project, a computer software framework is being developed that combines existing open environmental data and proprietary information collected by FDF with computational models to investigate current and prevent future environmental problems. A data centric philosophy is followed in the development of the system, i.e. the models are updated and extended to handle available data from different areas. The results generated by the models are summarized as easily understandable flow and risk maps that can be opened in GIS programs and used in environmental assessments by experts. Substances investigated with the system include explosives and metals such as lead, and both surface and groundwater dominated areas can be simulated. The YMPYRÄ framework is composed of a three dimensional soil and groundwater flow model, several solute transport models and an uncertainty assessment system. Solute transport models in the framework include particle based, stream tube and finite volume based approaches. The models can be used to simulate solute dissolution from source area, transport in the unsaturated layers to groundwater and finally migration in groundwater to water extraction wells and springs. The models can be used to simulate advection, dispersion, equilibrium adsorption on soil particles, solubility and dissolution from solute phase and dendritic solute decay chains. Correct numerical solutions were confirmed by comparing results to analytical 1D and 2D solutions and by comparing the numerical solutions to each other. The particle based and stream tube type solute transport models were useful as they could complement the traditional finite volume based approach which in certain circumstances produced numerical dispersion due to piecewise solution of the

  1. An exploratory study of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students' application of Lewis's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sumudu R.

    This exploratory study was based on the assumption that proficiency in chemistry must not be determined exclusively on students' declarative and procedural knowledge, but it should be also described as the ability to use variety of reasoning strategies that enrich and diversify procedural methods. The study furthermore assumed that the ability to describe the structure of a molecule using Lewis's model and use it to predict its geometry as well as some of its properties is indicative of proficiency in the essential concepts of covalent bonding and molecule structure. The study therefore inquired into the reasoning methods and procedural techniques of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students when solving problems, which require them to use Lewis's model. The research design included an original survey, designed by the researcher for this study, and two types of interviews, with students and course instructors. The purpose of the survey was two-fold. First and foremost, the survey provided a base for the student interview selection, and second it served as the foundation for the inquiry into the strategies the student use when solving survey problems. Twenty two students were interviewed over the course of the study. The interview with six instructors allowed to identify expected prior knowledge and skills, which the students should have acquired upon completion of the Chemistry I course. The data, including videos, audios, and photographs of the artifacts produced by students during the interviews, were organized and analyzed manually and using QSR NVivo 10. The research found and described the differences between proficient and non-proficient students' reasoning and procedural strategies when using Lewis's model to describe the structure of a molecule. One of the findings clearly showed that the proficient students used a variety of cues to reason, whereas other students used one memorized cue, or an algorithm, which often led to incorrect representations in

  2. Modeling aluminum-silicon chemistries and application to Australian acidic playa lakes as analogues for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G. M.; Crowley, J. K.; Thomson, B. J.; Kargel, J. S.; Bridges, N. T.; Hook, S. J.; Baldridge, A.; Brown, A. J.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza Filho, C. R.

    2009-06-01

    Recent Mars missions have stimulated considerable thinking about the surficial geochemical evolution of Mars. Among the major relevant findings are the presence in Meridiani Planum sediments of the mineral jarosite (a ferric sulfate salt) and related minerals that require formation from an acid-salt brine and oxidizing environment. Similar mineralogies have been observed in acidic saline lake sediments in Western Australia (WA), and these lakes have been proposed as analogues for acidic sedimentary environments on Mars. The prior version of the equilibrium chemical thermodynamic FREZCHEM model lacked Al and Si chemistries that are needed to appropriately model acidic aqueous geochemistries on Earth and Mars. The objectives of this work were to (1) add Al and Si chemistries to the FREZCHEM model, (2) extend these chemistries to low temperatures (enthalpy data. New aluminum and silicon parameterizations added 12 new aluminum/silicon minerals to this Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-Si-H 2O system that now contain 95 solid phases. There were similarities, differences, and uncertainties between Australian acidic, saline playa lakes and waters that likely led to the Burns formation salt accumulations on Mars. Both systems are similar in that they are dominated by (1) acidic, saline ground waters and sediments, (2) Ca and/or Mg sulfates, and (3) iron precipitates such as jarosite and hematite. Differences include: (1) the dominance of NaCl in many WA lakes, versus the dominance of Fe-Mg-Ca-SO 4 in Meridiani Planum, (2) excessively low K + concentrations in Meridiani Planum due to jarosite precipitation, (3) higher acid production in the presence of high iron concentrations in Meridiani Planum, and probably lower rates of acid neutralization and hence, higher acidities on Mars owing to colder temperatures, and (4) lateral salt patterns in WA lakes. The WA playa lakes display significant lateral variations in mineralogy and water

  3. Transition towards Sustainable Solutions: Product, Service, Technology, and Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Nasiri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the horse industry can be considered as an important industry in European countries and has a major role in agricultural industry throughout the world. Although today the diversity of the horse-related companies provides new markets and business opportunities, there are also some sustainable issues which needs to be addressed. Therefore, this study contributes to this research gap by reviewing the concept of sustainability and existing approaches to find sustainable solutions for companies. These sustainable approaches can be applied to products, services and technologies as well as business models, such as the product-service-system (PSS, circular economy (CE and industrial symbiosis (IS. Although there seems to be a growing understanding of sustainable approaches and their role in sustainable development, there is a lack of research at the empirical level regarding the types of sustainability approaches (i.e., technologies, services, products and business models that evolve in specific industries. The empirical data in this research have been collected from a cross-section of Finnish horse industry operators to determine how willing companies are to exploit approaches to sustainable solutions, as well as what the existing sustainable solutions are in this industry. The response rate of this study is approximately 24 percent, including 139 received valid responses among the sample of 580 operators.

  4. On-site production of a dialysis bath from dry salts. Results of solute concentration control by routine clinical chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Beige, Joachim; Lutter, Steffen; Martus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Dialysis bath production, at least in Europe, is currently based on pre-produced aqueous solutions of dialysis salts (concentrate), which are re-handled by dialysis machines to deliver the final dialysate concentrations. Because of the logistics of aqueous solution creation, a large amount of transportation capacity is needed. Therefore, we changed this process to use pre-produced dry salt containers and to undertake in-clinic dissolution of salts and concentration production. Bec...

  5. Time-dependent solution for axisymmetric flow over a blunt body with ideal gas, CF4, or equilibrium air chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, H. H., II; Spall, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    A time-asymptotic method has been used to obtain steady-flow solutions for axisymmetric inviscid flow over several blunt bodies including spheres, paraboloids, ellipsoids, and spherically blunted cones. Comparisons with experimental data and results of other computational methods have demonstrated that accurate solutions can be obtained using this approach. The method should prove useful as an analysis tool for comparing with experimental data and for making engineering calculations for blunt reentry vehicles.

  6. Solid-state and solution-state coordination chemistry of lanthanide(III) complexes with (pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yan; Goff, George S; Scott, Brian L; Janicke, Michael T; Runde, Wolfgang

    2013-03-18

    As a precursor of carboxyl-functionalized task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) for f-element separations, (pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid (L) can be deprotonated as a functionalized pyrazolate anion to coordinate with hard metal cations. However, the coordination chemistry of L with f-elements remains unexplored. We reacted L with lanthanides in aqueous solution at pH = 5 and synthesized four lanthanide complexes of general formula [Ln(L)3(H2O)2]·nH2O (1, Ln = La, n = 2; 2, Ln = Ce, n = 2; 3, Ln = Pr, n = 2; 4, Ln = Nd, n = 1). All complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealing one-dimensional chain formations. Two distinct crystallographic structures are governed by the different coordination modes of carboxylate groups in L: terminal bidentate and bridging tridentate (1-3); terminal bidentate, bridging bidentate, and tridentate coordination in 4. Comparison of the solid state UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra with solution state UV-vis-NIR spectra suggests a different species in solution and solid state. The different coordination in solid state and solution was verified by distinctive (13)C NMR signals of the carboxylate groups in the solid state NMR.

  7. A Two-Zone Multigrid Model for SI Engine Combustion Simulation Using Detailed Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Wen Ge

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient multigrid (MG model was implemented for spark-ignited (SI engine combustion modeling using detailed chemistry. The model is designed to be coupled with a level-set-G-equation model for flame propagation (GAMUT combustion model for highly efficient engine simulation. The model was explored for a gasoline direct-injection SI engine with knocking combustion. The numerical results using the MG model were compared with the results of the original GAMUT combustion model. A simpler one-zone MG model was found to be unable to reproduce the results of the original GAMUT model. However, a two-zone MG model, which treats the burned and unburned regions separately, was found to provide much better accuracy and efficiency than the one-zone MG model. Without loss in accuracy, an order of magnitude speedup was achieved in terms of CPU and wall times. To reproduce the results of the original GAMUT combustion model, either a low searching level or a procedure to exclude high-temperature computational cells from the grouping should be applied to the unburned region, which was found to be more sensitive to the combustion model details.

  8. Role of Organic Solutes in the Chemistry Of Acid-Impacted Bog Waters of the Western Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    HrušKa, Jakub; Johnson, Chris E.; KráM, Pavel

    1996-04-01

    In many regions, naturally occurring organic acid anions can effectively buffer mineral acid inputs from atmospheric deposition, moderating their effect on surface water pH. We studied the effect of chronically high inputs of acid rain on the chemistry of three brown-water streams in the western Czech Republic. The dissolved organic acids in the streams were similar in character to those of other systems in Europe and North America. The site densities (the carboxyl group content per mass of C) were similar to values reported from Fenno-Scandia, and the relationship between the apparent pKa and pH conformed to those from two North American studies. Sulfate and organic acid anions (OA-) were the dominant anions in all three streams, yet despite high dissolved organic carbon and total organic acid concentrations, OA - comprised only 21-32% of total anion charge. This pattern was due to very high sulfate concentrations and, in two of the streams, a low degree of dissociation of the organic acids, probably the results of high long-term inputs of strong acids. Stream water pH was highly correlated to sulfate concentration, but uncorrelated with OA-, suggesting that free acidity is controlled by strong mineral acids rather than organic acids. Thus future reductions in strong acid inputs should result in increased pH and a return to organic control over acid-base chemistry.

  9. Class-modelling in food analytical chemistry: Development, sampling, optimisation and validation issues - A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Paolo

    2017-08-22

    Qualitative data modelling is a fundamental branch of pattern recognition, with many applications in analytical chemistry, and embraces two main families: discriminant and class-modelling methods. The first strategy is appropriate when at least two classes are meaningfully defined in the problem under study, while the second strategy is the right choice when the focus is on a single class. For this reason, class-modelling methods are also referred to as one-class classifiers. Although, in the food analytical field, most of the issues would be properly addressed by class-modelling strategies, the use of such techniques is rather limited and, in many cases, discriminant methods are forcedly used for one-class problems, introducing a bias in the outcomes. Key aspects related to the development, optimisation and validation of suitable class models for the characterisation of food products are critically analysed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Causes and impacts of changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation in a chemistry-climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Hella

    2011-05-13

    The stratospheric meridional circulation is projected to be subject to changes due to enhanced greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere. This study aims to diagnose and explain long-term changes in the stratospheric meridional circulation using the chemistry-climate model E39CA. The diagnosed strengthening of the circulation is found to be driven by increases in tropical sea surface temperatures which lead to a strengthening and upward shift of the subtropical jets. This enables enhanced vertical propagation of large scale waves into the lower stratosphere, and therefore stronger local wave forcing of the meridional circulation in the tropical lower stratosphere. The impact of changes in transport on the ozone layer is analysed using a newly developed method that allows the separation of the effects of transport and chemistry changes on ozone. It is found that future changes of mean stratospheric ozone concentrations are largely determined by changes in chemistry, while changes in transport of ozone play a minor role. (orig.)

  11. A New Definition of Models and Modeling in Chemistry's Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, José A.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of new chemical compounds makes it the most productive science. Unfortunately chemistry education practice has not been driven to any great extent by research findings, philosophical positions or advances in new ways of approaching knowledge. The changes that have occurred in textbooks during the past three decades do not show any…

  12. Diagnostic tools for evaluating quasi-horizontal transport in global-scale chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huikyo; Youn, Daeok; Patten, Kenneth O.; Olsen, Seth C.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2012-10-01

    The upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) plays an important role in climate and atmospheric chemistry. Despite its importance on the point of causing deep intrusions of tropics originated air into the midlatitudes, the quasi-horizontal transport process in the UTLS, represented by global chemistry-transport models (CTMs) or chemistry-climate models (CCMs), cannot easily be diagnosed with conventional analyses on isobaric surfaces. We use improved diagnostic tools to better evaluate CTMs and CCMs relative to satellite observations in the region of UTLS. Using the Hellinger distance, vertical profiles of probability density functions (PDFs) of chemical tracers simulated by the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers 3.1 (MOZART-3.1) are quantitatively compared with satellite data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument in the tropopause relative altitude coordinate to characterize features of tracer distributions near the tropopause. Overall, the comparison of PDFs between MLS and MOZART-3.1 did not satisfy the same population assumption. Conditional PDFs are used to understand the meteorological differences between global climate models and the real atmosphere and the conditional PDFs between MOZART-3.1 and MLS showed better agreement compared to the original PDFs. The low static stability during high tropopause heights at midlatitudes suggests that the variation of tropopause height is related to transport processes from the tropics to midlatitudes. MOZART-3.1 with the GEOS4 GCM winds reproduces episodes of the tropical air intrusions. However, our diagnostic analyses show that the GEOS4 GCM did not properly reproduce the high tropopause cases at midlatitudes especially in spring.

  13. ELVIS: Multi-Electrolyte Aqueous Activity Model for Geothermal Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingerl, F. F.; Wagner, T.; Driesner, T.; Kulik, D. A.; Kosakowski, G.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature, pressure, and fluid salinities render geochemical modeling of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems a demanding task. Accurate prediction of fluid-mineral equilibria strongly depends on the availability of thermodynamic data and activity models. Typically, the Pitzer activity model is applied for geothermal fluids. A drawback of this model is the large number of parameters required to account for temperature and pressure dependencies, which significantly reduces computational efficiency of reactive transport simulations. In addition, most available parameterizations are valid only at vapor-saturated conditions. As an alternative we implemented the EUNIQUAC local composition model [2] that needs substantially fewer fitting parameters. However, the current EUNIQUAC model design does not include provision for high temperature (>150°C) applications and lacks a formulation for pressure dependence. Therefore, its application to geothermal conditions requires a re-formulation and re-fitting of the model. We developed a new tool termed GEMSFIT that allows generic fitting of activity models (for aqueous electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions) and equations of state implemented in our geochemical equilibrium solver GEM-Selektor (http://gems.web.psi.ch). GEMSFIT combines a PostgreSQL database for storing and managing the datasets of experimental measurements and interaction parameters, the parallelized genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB° for the parameter fitting, and an interface to the numerical kernel of GEM-Selektor to access activity models and perform chemical equilibrium calculations. Benchmarking of the partly re-parameterized EUNIQUAC model against Pitzer revealed that the former is less accurate, which can result in incorrect predictions of mineral precipitation/dissolution. Consequently, we modified the EUNIQUAC model and concurrently introduced a pressure dependence to be able to fit experimental data over wide ranges of

  14. DEM Solutions Develops Answers to Modeling Lunar Dust and Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Carol Anne; Calle, Carlos; LaRoche, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    With the proposed return to the Moon, scientists like NASA-KSC's Dr. Calle are concerned for a number of reasons. We will be staying longer on the planet's surface, future missions may include dust-raising activities, such as excavation and handling of lunar soil and rock, and we will be sending robotic instruments to do much of the work for us. Understanding more about the chemical and physical properties of lunar dust, how dust particles interact with each other and with equipment surfaces and the role of static electricity build-up on dust particles in the low-humidity lunar environment is imperative to the development of technologies for removing and preventing dust accumulation, and successfully handling lunar regolith. Dr. Calle is currently working on the problems of the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces, particularly to those of Mars and the Moon, and is heavily involved in developing instrumentation for future planetary missions. With this end in view, the NASA Kennedy Space Center's Innovative Partnerships Program Office partnered with OEM Solutions, Inc. OEM Solutions is a global leader in particle dynamics simulation software, providing custom solutions for use in tackling tough design and process problems related to bulk solids handling. Customers in industries such as pharmaceutical, chemical, mineral, and materials processing as well as oil and gas production, agricultural and construction, and geo-technical engineering use OEM Solutions' EDEM(TradeMark) software to improve the design and operation of their equipment while reducing development costs, time-to-market and operational risk. EDEM is the world's first general-purpose computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool to use state-of-the-art discrete element modeling technology for the simulation and analysis of particle handling and manufacturing operations. With EDEM you'can quickly and easily create a parameterized model of your granular solids

  15. Ground-water solute transport modeling using a three-dimensional scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crider, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Scaled models are used extensively in current hydraulic research on sediment transport and solute dispersion in free surface flows (rivers, estuaries), but are neglected in current ground-water model research. Thus, an investigation was conducted to test the efficacy of a three-dimensional scaled model of solute transport in ground water. No previous results from such a model have been reported. Experiments performed on uniform scaled models indicated that some historical problems (e.g., construction and scaling difficulties; disproportionate capillary rise in model) were partly overcome by using simple model materials (sand, cement and water), by restricting model application to selective classes of problems, and by physically controlling the effect of the model capillary zone. Results from these tests were compared with mathematical models. Model scaling laws were derived for ground-water solute transport and used to build a three-dimensional scaled model of a ground-water tritium plume in a prototype aquifer on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Model results compared favorably with field data and with a numerical model. Scaled models are recommended as a useful additional tool for prediction of ground-water solute transport

  16. Circumstellar chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassgold, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Circumstellar chemistry has a special role in astrochemistry because the astrophysical conditions in the circumstellar envelopes of red giants are frequently well known and clear tests of chemical models are feasible. Recent advances in astronomical observations now offer opportunities to test relevant theories of molecule formation, especially in carbon-rich environments. Many new molecules have recently been discovered using radio and infrared techniques and high spatial resolution maps obtained with large telescopes and interferometers indicate where complex molecules are being formed in these envelopes. A large body of observational data can be understood in terms of the photochemical model, which embraces relevant elements of equilibrium chemistry, photodissociation, and ion-molecule chemistry of the photo-products. A critical review of the photochemical model will be presented together with new results on the synthesis of hydrocarbon molecules and silicon and sulfur compounds

  17. Hydroxyl and Hydroperoxy Radical Chemistry during the MCMA-2006 Field Campaign: Measurement and Model Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusanter, S.; Vimal, D.; Stevens, P. S.; Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.

    2007-12-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) field campaign, held in March 2006, was a unique opportunity to collect data in one of the most polluted megacities in the world. Such environments exhibit a complex oxidation chemistry involving a strong coupling between odd hydrogen radicals (HOX=OH+HO2) and nitrogen oxides species (NOX=NO+NO2). High levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and NOX control the HOX budget and lead to elevated tropospheric ozone formation. The HOX-NOX coupling can be investigated by comparing measured and model-predicted HOx concentrations. Atmospheric HOX concentrations were measured by the Indiana University laser-induced fluorescence instrument and data were collected at the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo between 14 and 31 March. Measured hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations are comparable to that measured in less polluted urban environments and suggest that the OH concentrations are highly buffered under high NOX conditions. In contrast, hydroperoxy radical (HO2) concentrations are more sensitive to the NOX levels and are highly variable between different urban sites. Enhanced levels of OH and HO2 radicals were observed on several days between 9h30-11h00 AM and suggest an additional HOX source for the morning hours and/or a fast HOX cycling under the high NOX conditions of the MCMA. A preliminary investigation of the HOX chemistry occurring in the MCMA urban atmosphere was performed using a photochemical box model based on the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (RACM). Model comparisons will be presented and the agreement between measured and predicted HOX concentrations will be discussed.

  18. Validation of a Grid Independent Spray Model and Fuel Chemistry Mechanism for Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yoshikawa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Spray and combustion submodels used in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code, KIVACHEMKIN, were validated for Low Temperature Combustion (LTC in a diesel engine by comparing measured and model predicted fuel spray penetrations, and in-cylinder distributions of OH and soot. The conditions considered were long ignition delay, early and late fuel injection cases. It was found that use of a grid independent spray model, called the GASJET model, with an improved n-heptane chemistry mechanism can well predict the heat release rate, not only of the main combustion stage, but also of the cool flame stage. Additionally, the GASJET model appropriately predicts the distributions of OH and soot in the cylinder even when the resolution of the computational mesh is decreased by half, which significantly reduces the required computational time.

  19. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-06-27

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injectingcarbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoidingatmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide and consequent global warming.One of the key questions regarding the feasibility of this technology isthe potential rate of leakage out of the primary storage formation. Weseek exact solutions in a model of gas flow driven by a combination ofbuoyancy, viscous and capillary forces. Different combinations of theseforces and characteristic length scales of the processes lead todifferent time scaling and different types of solutions. In the case of athin, tight seal, where the impact of gravity is negligible relative tocapillary and viscous forces, a Ryzhik-type solution implies square-rootof time scaling of plume propagation velocity. In the general case, a gasplume has two stable zones, which can be described by travelling-wavesolutions. The theoretical maximum of the velocity of plume migrationprovides a conservative estimate for the time of vertical migration.Although the top of the plume has low gas saturation, it propagates witha velocity close to the theoretical maximum. The bottom of the plumeflows significantly more slowly at a higher gas saturation. Due to localheterogeneities, the plume can break into parts. Individual plumes alsocan coalesce and from larger plumes. The analytical results are appliedto studying carbon dioxide flow caused by leaks from deep geologicalformations used for CO2 storage. The results are also applicable formodeling flow of natural gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or formodeling of secondary hydrocarbon migration.

  20. Modelling Studies With a Coupled Canopy Atmospheric Chemistry Emission Model on Trace Gas Exchange and Gas Phase Chemistry in a Norway Spruce Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, R.; Klemm, O.; Graus, M.; Rappengl{Ü}Ck, B.; Stockwell, W. R.; Grabmer, W.; Held, A.; Hansel, A.; Steinbrecher, R.

    2006-12-01

    Within the joint project BEWA2000 modelling studies were performed in combination with field campaigns in a Norway spruce forest at the Waldstein site in NE Bavaria. Although located in a comparatively remote region the Waldstein site is still affected by a certain background of anthropogenic pollution which can influence BVOC degradation and product formation. The role of chemical degradation of biogenic volatile organic compounds and the effect of dynamical processes on BVOC and product mixing ratios within and above forest canopies have been investigated by applying the one-dimensional canopy-chemistry model CACHE. The simulations with CACHE permit the interpretation of observed features of the diurnal cycles of ozone and VOC mixing ratios by investigating the effect of turbulent exchange, chemical formation and degradation, emission, and deposition during the course of the day. For the conditions given at the Waldstein site chemical BVOC degradation within the canopy was found to reduce the BVOC fluxes into the atmosphere by 10 - 15 % as compared to the emission fluxes on branch basis. Furthermore, the simulations show that BVOC degradation by the NO3 can occur in the lower part of the canopy also during daytime and that this effect is strongly influenced by the presence of advected NOx and local NO emissions from the soil. The simulation results emphasize the role of deposition for the concentrations of BVOC oxidation products and indicate that further research is still necessary concerning the emission and deposition of aldehydes and ketones.

  1. Mathematical Model of Suspension Filtration and Its Analytical Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normahmad Ravshanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The work develops advanced mathematical model and computing algorithm to analyze, predict and identify the basic parameters of filter units and their variation ranges. Numerical analytic solution of liquid ionized mixtures filtration was got on their basis. Computing experiments results are presented in graphics form. Calculation results analysis enables to determine the optimum performance of filter units, used for liquid ionized mixtures filtration, food preparation, drug production and water purification. Selection of the most suitable parameters contributes to the improvement of economic and technological efficiency of production and filter units working efficiency.

  2. Nonzero solutions of nonlinear integral equations modeling infectious disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.R. (Indiana Univ., South Bend); Leggett, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Sufficient conditions to insure the existence of periodic solutions to the nonlinear integral equation, x(t) = ..integral../sup t//sub t-tau/f(s,x(s))ds, are given in terms of simple product and product integral inequalities. The equation can be interpreted as a model for the spread of infectious diseases (e.g., gonorrhea or any of the rhinovirus viruses) if x(t) is the proportion of infectives at time t and f(t,x(t)) is the proportion of new infectives per unit time.

  3. Optimization of Grignard Addition to Esters: Kinetic and Mechanistic Study of Model Phthalide using Flow Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael J.; Born, Stephen; Neuenschwander, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of sequential addition of a distinct Grignard species onto a lactone is studied by flow chemistry. The experimental data are shown to be consistent with a kinetic model based on four reaction steps, reaction of ester to magnesium hemiacetal, rearrangement to ketone (forward...... and backward) and reaction of ketone to tertiary alcohol upon quenching. The experimental derived reaction mechanism is supported by ab initio molecular computations, and the predicted activation energy is in good agreement with the experimental observations. The Grignard reaction follows a substrate...

  4. Survival of Lactobacillus plantarum in model solutions and fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualkaekul, Sawaminee; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris

    2011-03-30

    The aim of the work was to study the survival of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 in model solutions and develop a mathematical model describing its dependence on pH, citric acid and ascorbic acid. A Central Composite Design (CCD) was developed studying each of the three factors at five levels within the following ranges, i.e., pH (3.0-4.2), citric acid (6-40 g/L), and ascorbic acid (100-1000 mg/L). In total, 17 experimental runs were carried out. The initial cell concentration in the model solutions was approximately 1 × 10(8)CFU/mL; the solutions were stored at 4°C for 6 weeks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the stepwise regression demonstrated that a second order polynomial model fits well the data. The results demonstrated that high pH and citric acid concentration enhanced cell survival; one the other hand, ascorbic acid did not have an effect. Cell survival during storage was also investigated in various types of juices, including orange, grapefruit, blackcurrant, pineapple, pomegranate, cranberry and lemon juice. The model predicted well the cell survival in orange, blackcurrant and pineapple, however it failed to predict cell survival in grapefruit and pomegranate, indicating the influence of additional factors, besides pH and citric acid, on cell survival. Very good cell survival (less than 0.4 log decrease) was observed after 6 weeks of storage in orange, blackcurrant and pineapple juice, all of which had a pH of about 3.8. Cell survival in cranberry and pomegranate decreased very quickly, whereas in the case of lemon juice, the cell concentration decreased approximately 1.1 logs after 6 weeks of storage, albeit the fact that lemon juice had the lowest pH (pH~2.5) among all the juices tested. Taking into account the results from the compositional analysis of the juices and the model, it was deduced that in certain juices, other compounds seemed to protect the cells during storage; these were likely to be proteins and dietary fibre In contrast, in

  5. Multivariate Calibration and Model Integrity for Wood Chemistry Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengfeng Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research addressed a rapid method to monitor hardwood chemical composition by applying Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, with particular interest in model performance for interpretation and prediction. Partial least squares (PLS and principal components regression (PCR were chosen as the primary models for comparison. Standard laboratory chemistry methods were employed on a mixed genus/species hardwood sample set to collect the original data. PLS was found to provide better predictive capability while PCR exhibited a more precise estimate of loading peaks and suggests that PCR is better for model interpretation of key underlying functional groups. Specifically, when PCR was utilized, an error in peak loading of ±15 cm−1 from the true mean was quantified. Application of the first derivative appeared to assist in improving both PCR and PLS loading precision. Research results identified the wavenumbers important in the prediction of extractives, lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose and further demonstrated the utility in FT-IR for rapid monitoring of wood chemistry.

  6. A model study of the plasma chemistry of stratospheric Blue Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Holger; Notholt, Justus

    2015-04-01

    Stratospheric Blue Jets (BJs) are upward propagating discharges in the altitude range 15-40 km above thunderstorms. They appear as conical bodies of blue light originating at the top of thunderclouds and proceed upward with velocities of the order of 100 km/s. Electric discharges in the atmosphere are known to have chemical effects. Of particular interest is the liberation of atomic oxygen and the formation of reactive nitrogen radicals. We have used a numerical plasma chemistry model in order to simulate the chemical processes in stratospheric BJs. It was applied to BJ streamers in the altitude range 18-38 km. The model results show that there is a production of ozone from atomic oxygen liberated at the streamer tips. At the same time, significant amounts of nitric oxide are produced. Compared to earlier plasma chemistry simulations of BJ streamers, the production of NO and O3 is by orders of magnitude larger. Additionally, the chemical processes in the leader part of a BJ have been simulated for the first time. In the leader channel, driven by high-temperature reactions, the concentration of N2O and NO increases by several orders of magnitude, and there is a significant depletion of ozone. The model results might gain importance by the fact that the chemical perturbations in BJs are largest at altitudes of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  7. Advanced techniques in reliability model representation and solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    The current tendency of flight control system designs is towards increased integration of applications and increased distribution of computational elements. The reliability analysis of such systems is difficult because subsystem interactions are increasingly interdependent. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have been working for several years to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques to address these problems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG) is a software tool that uses as input a graphical object-oriented block diagram of the system. RMG uses a failure-effects algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. The ASSURE software tool is a parallel processing program that uses the semi-Markov unreliability range evaluator (SURE) solution technique and the abstract semi-Markov specification interface to the SURE tool (ASSIST) modeling language. A failure modes-effects simulation is used by ASSURE. These tools were used to analyze a significant portion of a complex flight control system. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that distributed fault-tolerant system architectures can now be analyzed.

  8. Solution chemistry of element 105. Pt. III. Hydrolysis and complex formation of Nb, Ta, Db and Pa in HF and HBr solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershina, V.; Bastug, T.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the electronic structure of MF 6 - and MBr 6 - complexes of Nb, Ta, Pa and element 105, Db, formed in HF and HBr solutions have been performed using the Dirac-Slater Discrete Variational method. On the basis of results of these calculations, relative values of the free energy change of reactions of complex formation have been determined. The order of the complex formation for both acids is shown to be Pa >> Nb > Db > Ta. Such a sequence is defined by a predominant electrostatic energy of the metal-ligand interaction. The hydrolysis of compounds, as a reverse process, proved to change as Ta > Db > Nb >> Pa. Using the theory of metal extraction by anion exchange, the following trend in the extraction of the anionic species from both the HF and HBr aqueous solutions has been predicted: Pa >> Nb ≥ Db > Ta. The strength of the ML 6 - complexes is shown to decrease from MF 6 , to MCl 6 and further to MBr 6 - which is reflected by shifting the complex formation process to the area of higher acid concentrations. (orig.)

  9. Water and complex organic chemistry in the cold dark cloud Barnard 5: Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, Eva; Charnley, Steven B.; Taquet, Vianney; Persson, Carina M.

    2015-08-01

    Studies of complex organic molecule (COM) formation have traditionally been focused on hot cores in regions of massive star formation, where chemistry is driven by the elevated temperatures - evaporating ices and allowing for endothermic reactions in the gas-phase. As more sensitive instruments have become available, the types of objects known to harbour COMs like acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), methyl formate (CH3OCHO), and ketene (CH2CO) have expanded to include low mass protostars and, recently, even pre-stellar cores. We here report on the first in a new category of objects harbouring COMs: the cold dark cloud Barnard 5 where non-thermal ice desorption induce complex organic chemistry entirely unrelated to local star-formation.Methanol, which only forms efficiently on the surfaces of dust grains, provide evidence of efficient non-thermal desorption of ices in the form of prominent emission peaks offset from protostellar activity and high density tracers in cold molecular clouds. A study with Herschel targeting such methanol emission peaks resulted in the first ever detection of gas-phase water offset from protostellar activity in a dark cloud, at the so called methanol hotspot in Barnard 5.To model the effect a transient injection of ices into the gas-phase has on the chemistry of a cold, dark cloud we have included gas-grain interactions in an existing gas-phase chemical model and connected it to a chemical reaction network updated and expanded to include the formation and destruction paths of the most common COMs. Results from this model will be presented.Ground-based follow-up studies toward the methanol hotspot in B5 have resulted in the detection of a number of COMs, including CH2CO, CH3CHO, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, as well as deuterated methanol (CH2DOH). Observations have also confirmed that COM emission is extended and not localised to a core structure. The implications of these observational and theoretical studies of B5 will be discussed

  10. Hydrated and Solvated Tin(II) Ions in Solution and the Solid State, and a Coordination Chemistry Overview of the d10s2Metal Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingmar; D'Angelo, Paola; Lundberg, Daniel

    2016-12-19

    The coordination chemistry of d 10 s 2 metal ions is strongly affected by an (at least partially) occupied d 10 s 2 metal ion-ligand atom antibonding orbital, which may cause a void in the coordination sphere due to repulsion between the electrons in the antibonding orbital on the metal ion and those on the ligands. The character of the formed d 10 s 2 metal ion-ligand atom bond plays an important role in the electron density in the antibonding orbital and thereby also in the coordination chemistry. The hydrated tin(II) ion, [Sn(H 2 O) 3 ] 2+ , and the trihydroxidostannate ion, [Sn(OH) 3 ] - , have very different mean Sn-O bond lengths (2.21 and 2.08 Å, respectively) and O-Sn-O angles (ca. 78 and 90°, respectively) both in the solid state and in solution. On increasing the covalency of the tin(II)-ligand bonds, the repulsion decreases and higher coordination numbers are obtained, as seen in the dimethylsulfoxide- and N,N-dimethylthioformamide-solvated tin(II) ions, both of which are five-coordinate with square-pyramidal structures. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Expertise in soccer teams: A thematic inquiry into the role of shared mental models within team chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Gershgoren, Lael; Basevitch, Itay; Filho, Edson; Gershgoren, Aaron; Brill, Yaron S.; Schinke, Robert J.; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of the current study was to establish a conceptual framework of team chemistry components in sport with an emphasis on Shared Mental Models (SMM).\\ud Method. Elite soccer coaches (n = 6) and players (n = 3) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. An inductive thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Results. Four themes related to team chemistry components were identified: (1) members' characteristics (i.e., demographic data, on-field characteris...

  12. Fast Proton Titration Scheme for Multiscale Modeling of Protein Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; Lund, Mikael; da Silva, Fernando Luís Barroso

    2010-10-12

    Proton exchange between titratable amino acid residues and the surrounding solution gives rise to exciting electric processes in proteins. We present a proton titration scheme for studying acid-base equilibria in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations where salt is treated at the Debye-Hückel level. The method, rooted in the Kirkwood model of impenetrable spheres, is applied on the three milk proteins α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin, for which we investigate the net-charge, molecular dipole moment, and charge capacitance. Over a wide range of pH and salt conditions, excellent agreement is found with more elaborate simulations where salt is explicitly included. The implicit salt scheme is orders of magnitude faster than the explicit analog and allows for transparent interpretation of physical mechanisms. It is shown how the method can be expanded to multiscale modeling of aqueous salt solutions of many biomolecules with nonstatic charge distributions. Important examples are protein-protein aggregation, protein-polyelectrolyte complexation, and protein-membrane association.

  13. Tropospheric O3 distribution over the Indian Ocean during spring 1995 evaluated with a chemistry-climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J. de; Zachariasse, M.; Roelofs, G.J.H.; Velthoven, P. van; Dickerson, R.R.; Rhoads, K.P.; Oltmans, S.J.; Lelieveld, J.

    1999-01-01

    An analysis of tropospheric O 3 over the Indian Ocean during spring 1995 is presented based on O 3 soundings and results from the chemistry-general circulation model ECHAM (European Centre Hamburg Model). The ECHAM model is nudged towards actual meteorology using ECMWF analyses, to enable a

  14. Comparison of the modeling solutions with the hydrogen discharge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    With the availability of experimental values for H 2 vibrational population distributions up to v=8 and measured distributions up to v=5 with simultaneous measurements of the H - concentration, it has become possible to test some features of the full-spectrum model of H - generation. The application of the code developed by Gorse et al. to these discharges by the groups at both Bari and at the Ecole Polytechnique has extended the vibrational distribution calculation to include also the H - concentration. Comparing the vibrational population calculated by these two groups at the higher levels, where the onset of H - production occurs, one finds populations for the υ=5 level that are a factor of eight to ten larger than the experimental values. Since these workers have omitted the role of the H 3 + ions known to be present in the discharge, the inclusion of the appropriate S-V process should increase the population discrepancies another factor of two or three. This excess population poses something of a dilemma: Since the Bari code simultaneously reproduces the observed H - concentration but overestimates the vibrational population by a large factor, the standard model of vibrational excitation followed by dissociative attachment is open to question. If measured rather than calculated distributions were used in the H - calculation, the calculated H - concentration would presumably be an order-of-magnitude smaller than the observed value. The measured population distributions taken against the background of the modelling solutions would seem to imply alternate sources of H - production other than dissociative attachment. To examine this problem, we have generated new modelling solutions for comparison with the data of Eenshuistra et al

  15. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux...

  16. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2-4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute...... concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped...

  17. The New Color of Chemistry: Green Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal GERÇEK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green chemistry which is the new application of chemistry rules provides solutions to problems that mankind is faced with climate changes, sustainable agriculture, energy, toxics, depletion of natural sources e.g. designing new chemicals and processes that production and utilization of hazardous matters. So, it is the indispensible tool for sustainable development. Current and future chemists should consider the human health and ecological issues in their professional life. In order to provide a solution for this requirement, green chemistry rules and under standings should be primarily taken in the university curriculum and at all educational levels.

  18. Chemistry of soil solutions under different kinds of vegetation in the vicinity of a thermal power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Sanjurjo, M.J.; Alvarez, E.; Vega, V.F.; Garcia Rodeja, E. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    1998-12-01

    The paper discusses the influence of atmospheric deposition on the chemical characteristics of soil solutions in a small catchment area in NW Spain. The soils, were sampled from seven sites supporting different forms of vegetation (deciduous and pine forest and heath). Soil solutions were extracted, by the column displacement method, from soil samples collected monthly from March 1992 until November 1993. The most common ions in all horizons were Cl{sup -} and Na{sup +} due to marine influence. In the surface horizons (0-10 cm), relatively high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (150-380 {mu}mol) and Zn (similar to 2 {mu} mol) were obtained, with good correlation between the two ions. These results, along with the prevalence of inorganic forms of Al(50-90% of total Al), were related to the effects of acidic deposition in the catchment area.

  19. Impact of an Alkaline Solution on the Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Sorption Properties of a Typic Rhodudult Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Almeida Calábria

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The preferred option for disposal of short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive wastes is a near surface disposal facility in which soil is one of the barriers that avoid radionuclide migration outside the controlled area. For construction of that kind of facility, concrete is widely used, and its interaction with water induces its degradation, resulting in a high pH solution. The alkaline solution may affect the near-field environment of radioactive waste repositories, including the soil, promoting mineralogical alterations that result in significant changes in key properties of materials, compromising their performance as safety components. In this study, a sample of a Brazilian Typic Rhodudult soil, previously investigated concerning its performance for Cs sorption, was subjected to interaction with the alkaline solution for 24 h and for 7, 14, and 28 days in order to evaluate the impact on its chemical, mineralogical, and sorption properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electron microprobe analysis were performed before and after each alteration period. Results indicated dissolution of minerals, such as kaolinite and quartz, associated with incorporation of K and Ca from the alkaline solution, likely resulting in the formation of hydrated calcium silicate phases (CSH, which are expected to be worse sorbents for alkaline elements (e.g., Cs than the original minerals. The Kd values for Cs in the altered samples also decreased according to the alteration period, demonstrating that alkaline interaction effectively modifies the soil sorption properties for Cs.

  20. At the crossroad of photochemistry and radiation chemistry: formation of hydroxyl radicals in diluted aqueous solutions exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanová, Kateřina; Precek, Martin; Múčka, Viliam; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Čuba, Václav

    2017-11-08

    Formation yields of ˙OH radicals were precisely determined in aqueous solutions of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid and ferrous sulfate (i.e., Fricke dosimeter) exposed to 253.7 nm radiation delivered from a continuous source. Quantum yield of ˙OH radicals was determined as ∼0.08, i.e., roughly one out of twelve photons, efficiently absorbed in UV-illuminated solutions, produced one ˙OH radical. Energetically, a water molecule should undergo a correlated action of at least two 4.9 eV photons delivering enough energy for direct H-OH dissociation (5.0-5.4 eV). We suggest a mechanism based on an interaction of two water molecules, both in long-living triplet states. An intermolecular transfer of excitation energy provided a sufficient amount of energy for the dissociation of one water molecule into ˙OH and H˙ radicals. In an aqueous solution of phospholipids, quantum yields of hydroperoxides formed under these irradiation conditions decreased with total effectively absorbed energy (i.e. a dose), similar to the radiation chemical yields obtained during an exposure to ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays from radionuclide sources. Under 253.7 nm irradiation, one ˙OH radical causes a peroxidation of 34 phospholipid molecules. This implicates chain mechanism of the reaction.

  1. Colloidal stability of gold nanorod solution upon exposure to excised human skin: Effect of surface chemistry and protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Nouf N; Al-Qaoud, Khaled M; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Khalil, Enam A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the colloidal stability of gold nanorods (with positive, negative and neutral surface charge) in solution upon contact with excised human skin. UV-vis absorption, plasmon peak broadening index (PPBI%) and transmission electron microscope analysis were used to follow nanoparticles aggregation in solution. Our results show that positively charged gold nanorods aggregate extensively upon exposure to excised human skin compared to negatively and neutrally charged gold nanorods. Skin-induced aggregation of cationic gold nanorods was linked to the adsorption of proteins released from the dermis layer to the surface of gold nanorods. Protein adsorption significantly screen nanorod's effective surface charge and induce their aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the presence of polyethylene glycol polymer on the surface of cationic gold nanorods minimize this aggregation significantly by providing steric repulsion (non-electrostatic stabilization mechanism). This work highlights the importance of evaluating the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution upon contact with skin, which is a "usually overlooked" parameter when studying the nanoparticle-skin interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coupling dynamics and chemistry in the air pollution modelling of street canyons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bloss, William James

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants emitted from vehicles in street canyons may be reactive, undergoing mixing and chemical processing before escaping into the overlying atmosphere. The deterioration of air quality in street canyons occurs due to combined effects of proximate emission sources, dynamical processes (reduced dispersion) and chemical processes (evolution of reactive primary and formation of secondary pollutants). The coupling between dynamics and chemistry plays a major role in determining street canyon air quality, and numerical model approaches to represent this coupling are reviewed in this article. Dynamical processes can be represented by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The choice of CFD approach (mainly the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models) depends on the computational cost, the accuracy required and hence the application. Simplified parameterisations of the overall integrated effect of dynamics in street canyons provide capability to handle relatively complex chemistry in practical applications. Chemical processes are represented by a chemical mechanism, which describes mathematically the chemical removal and formation of primary and secondary species. Coupling between these aspects needs to accommodate transport, dispersion and chemical reactions for reactive pollutants, especially fast chemical reactions with time scales comparable to or shorter than those of typical turbulent eddies inside the street canyon. Different approaches to dynamical and chemical coupling have varying strengths, costs and levels of accuracy, which must be considered in their use for provision of reference information concerning urban canopy air pollution to stakeholders considering traffic and urban planning policies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  4. Effect of Non-Stoichiometric Solution Chemistry on Improving the Performance of Wide-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Mengjin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Donghoe [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Zhen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Reid, Obadiah G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yue [University of Toledo; Song, Zhaoning [University of Toledo; Zhao, Dewei [University of Toledo; Wang, Changlei [University of Toledo; Li, Liwei [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Meng, Yuan [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Guo, Ted [ENN Energy Research Institute; ENN Solar Energy Co., Ltd.; Yan, Yanfa [University of Toledo

    2017-10-18

    A high-efficiency wide-bandgap (WBG) perovskite solar cell is critical for developing perovskite-related (e.g., all-perovskite, perovskite/Si, or perovskite/Cu(In,Ga)Se2) tandem devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of non-stoichiometric precursor chemistry with excess methylammonium halides (MAX; X = I, Br, or Cl) for preparing high-quality ~1.75-eV FA0.83Cs0.17Pb(I0.6Br0.4)3 perovskite solar cells. Among various methylammonium halides, using excess MABr in the non-stoichiometric precursor exhibits the strongest effect on improving perovskite crystallographic properties and device characteristics without affecting the perovskite composition. In contrast, using excess MAI significantly reduces the bandgap of perovskite due to the replacement of Br with I. Using 40% excess MABr, we demonstrate a single-junction WBG perovskite solar cell with stabilized efficiency of 16.4%. We further demonstrate a 20.3%-efficient 4-terminal tandem device by using a 14.7%-efficient semi-transparent WBG perovskite top cell and an 18.6%-efficient unfiltered (5.6%-efficient filtered) Si bottom cell.

  5. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  6. Thermodynamic modelling and aqueous chemistry in the CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Hearne, J.A.; Knights, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical properties of the CaO-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -H 2 O system are important for understanding and predicting the long term behaviour of Portland cements. Solids of known average composition in this system have been synthesised by the co-hydrolysis of mixed alkoxides. The solids have been equilibrated with water at 25 0 C and the composition of the aqueous phase characterised. A thermodynamic model for the system has been developed by extending an earlier model to include aluminium compounds. The model accounts for most of the experimental data and predicts that the main influence of aluminium is to form a hydrogarnet solid solution of general composition C 3 AH 6-2x S x . The model can be used to predict the chemistry of hydrated cements. (author)

  7. The Effects of a Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction on Students' Performance and Attitudes Towards Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Eunice Eyitayo

    2017-02-01

    This study establishes the effects of a flipped classroom model of instruction on academic performance and attitudes of 66 first-year secondary school students towards chemistry. A pre-test and post-test experimental design was employed to assign students randomly into either the experimental or control group. In order to assess the suitability of using flipped model of instruction, students were divided in two groups. For the first group called the experimental group, a "flipped classroom" was used in which the students were given video lessons and reading materials, before the class to be revised at home. On the other hand, the second group followed traditional methodology, and it was used as control. The rate of reaction knowledge test and the chemistry attitude scale were administered. In addition, the researcher documented classroom observations, experiences, thoughts and insights regarding the intervention in a journal on a daily basis in order to enrich the data. Students were interviewed at the end of the research in order to enrich the qualitative data also. Findings from this study reveal that the flipped instruction model facilitates a shift in students' conceptual understanding of the rate of chemical reaction significantly more than the control condition. Positive significant differences were found on all assessments with the flipped class students performing higher on average. Students in the flipped classroom model condition benefited by preparing for the lesson before the classes and had the opportunity to interact with peers and the teacher during the learning processes in the classroom. The findings support the notion that teachers should be trained or retrained on how to incorporate the flipped classroom model into their teaching and learning processes because it encourages students to be directly involved and active in the learning.

  8. Nonlinear regression and ARIMA models for precipitation chemistry in East Central Florida from 1978 to 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, David M.; Madsen, Brooks C.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of precipitation in East Central Florida has occurred since 1978 at a sampling site located on the University of Central Florida (UCF) campus. Monthly volume-weighted average (VWA) concentration for several major analytes that are present in precipitation samples was calculated from samples collected daily. Monthly VWA concentration and wet deposition of H + , NH 4 + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , NO 3 - , Cl - and SO 4 2- were evaluated by a nonlinear regression (NLR) model that considered 10-year data (from 1978 to 1987) and 20-year data (from 1978 to 1997). Little change in the NLR parameter estimates was indicated among the 10-year and 20-year evaluations except for general decreases in the predicted trends from the 10-year to the 20-year fits. Box-Jenkins autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models with linear trend were considered as an alternative to the NLR models for these data. The NLR and ARIMA model forecasts for 1998 were compared to the actual 1998 data. For monthly VWA concentration values, the two models gave similar results. For the wet deposition values, the ARIMA models performed considerably better. - Autoregressive integrated moving average models of precipitation data are an improvement over nonlinear models for the prediction of precipitation chemistry composition

  9. Development of solution-gated graphene transistor model for biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Yusof, Rubiyah; Rahmani, Rasoul; Hosseinpour, Hoda; Ahmadi, Mohammad T.

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive properties of graphene, characterized by its high carrier mobility and biocompatibility, have stimulated extreme scientific interest as a promising nanomaterial for future nanoelectronic applications. In particular, graphene-based transistors have been developed rapidly and are considered as an option for DNA sensing applications. Recent findings in the field of DNA biosensors have led to a renewed interest in the identification of genetic risk factors associated with complex human diseases for diagnosis of cancers or hereditary diseases. In this paper, an analytical model of graphene-based solution gated field effect transistors (SGFET) is proposed to constitute an important step towards development of DNA biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by this fact, a novel strategy for a DNA sensor model with capability of single-nucleotide polymorphism detection is proposed and extensively explained. First of all, graphene-based DNA sensor model is optimized using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Based on the sensing mechanism of DNA sensors, detective parameters ( I ds and V gmin) are suggested to facilitate the decision making process. Finally, the behaviour of graphene-based SGFET is predicted in the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphism with an accuracy of more than 98% which guarantees the reliability of the optimized model for any application of the graphene-based DNA sensor. It is expected to achieve the rapid, quick and economical detection of DNA hybridization which could speed up the realization of the next generation of the homecare sensor system.

  10. Modelling the urban air quality in Hamburg with the new city-scale chemistry transport model CityChem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Ramacher, Martin; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Air quality modelling plays an important role by providing guidelines for efficient air pollution abatement measures. Currently, most urban dispersion models treat air pollutants as passive tracer substances or use highly simplified chemistry when simulating air pollutant concentrations on the city-scale. The newly developed urban chemistry-transport model CityChem has the capability of modelling the photochemical transformation of multiple pollutants along with atmospheric diffusion to produce pollutant concentration fields for the entire city on a horizontal resolution of 100 m or even finer and a vertical resolution of 24 layers up to 4000 m height. CityChem is based on the Eulerian urban dispersion model EPISODE of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). CityChem treats the complex photochemistry in cities using detailed EMEP chemistry on an Eulerian 3-D grid, while using simple photo-stationary equilibrium on a much higher resolution grid (receptor grid), i.e. close to industrial point sources and traffic sources. The CityChem model takes into account that long-range transport contributes to urban pollutant concentrations. This is done by using 3-D boundary concentrations for the city domain derived from chemistry-transport simulations with the regional air quality model CMAQ. For the study of the air quality in Hamburg, CityChem was set-up with a main grid of 30×30 grid cells of 1×1 km2 each and a receptor grid of 300×300 grid cells of 100×100 m2. The CityChem model was driven with meteorological data generated by the prognostic meteorology component of the Australian chemistry-transport model TAPM. Bottom-up inventories of emissions from traffic, industry, households were based on data of the municipality of Hamburg. Shipping emissions for the port of Hamburg were taken from the Clean North Sea Shipping project. Episodes with elevated ozone (O3) were of specific interest for this study, as these are associated with exceedances of the World

  11. Principles of quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    George, David V

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Quantum Chemistry focuses on the application of quantum mechanics in physical models and experiments of chemical systems.This book describes chemical bonding and its two specific problems - bonding in complexes and in conjugated organic molecules. The very basic theory of spectroscopy is also considered. Other topics include the early development of quantum theory; particle-in-a-box; general formulation of the theory of quantum mechanics; and treatment of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. The examples of solutions of Schroedinger equations; approximation methods in quantum c

  12. Modeling of meteorology, chemistry and aerosol for the 2017 Utah Winter Fine Particle Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeen, S. A.; Angevine, W. M.; McDonald, B.; Ahmadov, R.; Franchin, A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Womack, C.; Brown, S. S.; Moravek, A.; Murphy, J. G.; Trainer, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Utah Winter Fine Particle Study (UWFPS-17) field project took place during January and February of 2017 within the populated region of the Great Salt Lake, Utah. The study focused on understanding the meteorology and chemistry associated with high particulate matter (PM) levels often observed near Salt Lake City during stable wintertime conditions. Detailed composition and meteorological observations were taken from the NOAA Twin-Otter aircraft and several surface sites during the study period, and extremely high aerosol conditions were encountered for two cold-pool episodes occurring in the last 2 weeks of January. A clear understanding of the photochemical and aerosol processes leading to these high PM events is still lacking. Here we present high spatiotemporal resolution simulations of meteorology, PM and chemistry over Utah from January 13 to February 1, 2017 using the WRF/Chem photochemical model. Correctly characterizing the meteorology is difficult due to the complex terrain and shallow inversion layers. We discuss the approach and limitations of the simulated meteorology, and evaluate low-level pollutant mixing using vertical profiles from missed airport approaches by the NOAA Twin-Otter performed routinely during each flight. Full photochemical simulations are calculated using NOx, ammonia and VOC emissions from the U.S. EPA NEI-2011 emissions inventory. Comparisons of the observed vertical column amounts of NOx, ammonia, aerosol nitrate and ammonium with model results shows the inventory estimates for ammonia emissions are low by a factor of four and NOx emissions are low by nearly a factor of two. The partitioning of both nitrate and NH3 between gas and particle phase depends strongly on the NH3 and NOx emissions to the model and calculated NOx to nitrate conversion rates. These rates are underestimated by gas-phase chemistry alone, even though surface snow albedo increases photolysis rates by nearly a factor of two. Several additional conversion

  13. Final report on LDRD project: A phenomenological model for multicomponent transport with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHEN,KEN S.; EVANS,GREGORY H.; LARSON,RICHARD S.; NOBLE,DAVID R.; HOUF,WILLIAM G.

    2000-01-01

    A phenomenological model was developed for multicomponent transport of charged species with simultaneous electrochemical reactions in concentrated solutions, and was applied to model processes in a thermal battery cell. A new general framework was formulated and implemented in GOMA (a multidimensional, multiphysics, finite-element computer code developed and being enhanced at Sandia) for modeling multidimensional, multicomponent transport of neutral and charged species in concentrated solutions. The new framework utilizes the Stefan-Maxwell equations that describe multicomponent diffusion of interacting species using composition-insensitive binary diffusion coefficients. The new GOMA capability for modeling multicomponent transport of neutral species was verified and validated using the model problem of ternary gaseous diffusion in a Stefan tube. The new GOMA-based thermal battery computer model was verified using an idealized battery cell in which concentration gradients are absent; the full model was verified by comparing with that of Bernardi and Newman (1987) and validated using limited thermal battery discharge-performance data from the open literature (Dunning 1981) and from Sandia (Guidotti 1996). Moreover, a new Liquid Chemkin Software Package was developed, which allows the user to handle manly aspects of liquid-phase kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport (particularly in terms of computing properties). Lastly, a Lattice-Boltzmann-based capability was developed for modeling pore- or micro-scale phenomena involving convection, diffusion, and simplified chemistry; this capability was demonstrated by modeling phenomena in the cathode region of a thermal battery cell.

  14. A potential model for sodium chloride solutions based on the TIP4P/2005 water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, A. L.; Portillo, M. A.; Chamorro, V. C.; Espinosa, J. R.; Abascal, J. L. F.; Vega, C.

    2017-09-01

    Despite considerable efforts over more than two decades, our knowledge of the interactions in electrolyte solutions is not yet satisfactory. Not even one of the most simple and important aqueous solutions, NaCl(aq), escapes this assertion. A requisite for the development of a force field for any water solution is the availability of a good model for water. Despite the fact that TIP4P/2005 seems to fulfill the requirement, little work has been devoted to build a force field based on TIP4P/2005. In this work, we try to fill this gap for NaCl(aq). After unsuccessful attempts to produce accurate predictions for a wide range of properties using unity ionic charges, we decided to follow recent suggestions indicating that the charges should be scaled in the ionic solution. In this way, we have been able to develop a satisfactory non-polarizable force field for NaCl(aq). We evaluate a number of thermodynamic properties of the solution (equation of state, maximum in density, enthalpies of solution, activity coefficients, radial distribution functions, solubility, surface tension, diffusion coefficients, and viscosity). Overall the results for the solution are very good. An important achievement of our model is that it also accounts for the dynamical properties of the solution, a test for which the force fields so far proposed failed. The same is true for the solubility and for the maximum in density where the model describes the experimental results almost quantitatively. The price to pay is that the model is not so good at describing NaCl in the solid phase, although the results for several properties (density and melting temperature) are still acceptable. We conclude that the scaling of the charges improves the overall description of NaCl aqueous solutions when the polarization is not included.

  15. Deconstructing Constructivism: Modeling Causal Relationships Among Constructivist Learning Environment Factors and Student Outcomes in Introductory Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komperda, Regis

    The purpose of this dissertation is to test a model of relationships among factors characterizing aspects of a student-centered constructivist learning environment and student outcomes of satisfaction and academic achievement in introductory undergraduate chemistry courses. Constructivism was chosen as the theoretical foundation for this research because of its widespread use in chemical education research and practice. In a constructivist learning environment the role of the teacher shifts from delivering content towards facilitating active student engagement in activities that encourage individual knowledge construction through discussion and application of content. Constructivist approaches to teaching introductory chemistry courses have been adopted by some instructors as a way to improve student outcomes, but little research has been done on the causal relationships among particular aspects of the learning environment and student outcomes. This makes it difficult for classroom teachers to know which aspects of a constructivist teaching approach are critical to adopt and which may be modified to better suit a particular learning environment while still improving student outcomes. To investigate a model of these relationships, a survey designed to measure student perceptions of three factors characterizing a constructivist learning environment in online courses was adapted for use in face-to-face chemistry courses. These three factors, teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence, were measured using a slightly modified version of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) instrument. The student outcomes investigated in this research were satisfaction and academic achievement, as measured by standardized American Chemical Society (ACS) exam scores and course grades. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to statistically model relationships among the three presence factors and student outcome variables for 391 students enrolled in six sections of a

  16. Numerical Solution of a Model Equation of Price Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogorova, T.; Vulkov, L.

    2009-10-01

    The paper [2] is devoted to the effect of reconciling the classical Black-Sholes theory of option pricing and hedging with various phenomena observed in the markets such as the influence of trading and hedging on the dynamics of an asset. Here we will discuss the numerical solution of initial boundary-value problems to a model equation of the theory. The lack of regularity in the solution as a result from Dirac delta coefficient reduces the accuracy in the numerical computations. First, we apply the finite volume method to discretize the differential problem. Second, we implement a technique of local regularization introduced by A-K. Tornberg and B. Engquist [7] for handling this equation. We derived the numerical regularization process into two steps: the Dirac delta function is regularized and then the regularized differential equation is discretized by difference schemes. Using the discrete maximum principle a priori bounds are obtained for the difference equations that imply stability and convergence of difference schemes for the problem under consideration. Numerical experiments are discussed.

  17. At the crossroad of photochemistry and radiation chemistry: formation of hydroxyl radicals in diluted aqueous solutions exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanová, K.; Přeček, Martin; Múčka, V.; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Čuba, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 43 (2017), s. 29402-29408 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606; GA ČR GA17-06479S; GA ČR GA13-28721S Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : UV photolysis * water * aqueous solutions * quantum yields * OH radicals Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  18. Evaluation of a regional chemistry transport model using a newly developed regional OMI NO2 retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, G.; Lam, Y. F.; Cheung, H. M.; Hartl, A.; Fung, J. C. H.; Chan, P. W.; Wenig, M. O.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate a high-resolution chemistry transport model (CTM) (3 km x 3 km spatial resolution) with the new Hong Kong (HK) NO2 retrieval developed for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on-board the Aura satellite. The three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry was modelled in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China by the Models-3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modelling system from October 2006 to January 2007. In the HK NO2 retrieval, tropospheric air mass factors (AMF) were recalculated using high-resolution ancillary parameters of surface reflectance, NO2 profile shapes and aerosol profiles of which the latter two were taken from the CMAQ simulation. We also tested four different aerosol parametrizations. Ground level measurements by the PRD Regional Air Quality Monitoring (RAQM) network were used as additional independent measurements. The HK NO2 retrieval increases the NO2 vertical column densities (VCD) by (+31 ± 38) %, when compared to NASA's standard product (SP2), and reduces the mean bias (MB) between satellite and ground measurements by 26 percentage points from -41 to -15 %. The correlation coefficient r is low for both satellite datasets (r = 0.35) due to the high spatial variability of NO2 concentrations. The correlation between CMAQ and the RAQM network is low (r ≈ 0.3) and the model underestimates the NO2 concentrations in the north-western model domain (Foshan and Guangzhou). We compared the CMAQ NO2 time series of the two main plumes with our regional OMI NO2 product. The model overestimates the NO2 VCDs by about 15 % in Hong Kong and Shenzhen, while the correlation coefficient is satisfactory (r = 0.56). In Foshan and Guangzhou, the correlation is low (r = 0.37) and the model underestimates the VCDs strongly (MB = -40 %). In addition, we estimated that the OMI VCDs are also underestimated by about 10 to 20 % in Foshan and Guangzhou because of the influence of the model parameters on the AMF. In this study

  19. On determining important aspects of mathematical models: Application to problems in physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1987-01-01

    The use of parametric and functional gradient sensitivity analysis techniques is considered for models described by partial differential equations. By interchanging appropriate dependent and independent variables, questions of inverse sensitivity may be addressed to gain insight into the inversion of observational data for parameter and function identification in mathematical models. It may be argued that the presence of a subset of dominantly strong coupled dependent variables will result in the overall system sensitivity behavior collapsing into a simple set of scaling and self similarity relations amongst elements of the entire matrix of sensitivity coefficients. These general tools are generic in nature, but herein their application to problems arising in selected areas of physics and chemistry is presented.

  20. Implementation of the anaerobic digestion model (ADM1) in the PHREEQC chemistry engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Neyret, Christophe; Fourest, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion is state-of-the-art technology to treat sludge and effluents from various industries. Modelling and optimisation of digestion operations can be advantageously performed using the anaerobic digestion model (ADM1) from the International Water Association. The ADM1, however, lacks a proper physico-chemical framework, which makes it difficult to consider wastewater of complex ionic composition and supersaturation phenomena. In this work, we present a direct implementation of the ADM1 within the PHREEQC chemistry engine. This makes it possible to handle ionic strength effects and ion-pairing. Thus, multiple mineral precipitation phenomena can be handled while resolving the ADM1. All these features can be accessed with very little programming effort, while retaining the full power and flexibility of PHREEQC. The distributed PHREEQC code can be easily interfaced with process simulation software for future plant-wide simulation of both wastewater and sludge treatment.

  1. Intermolecular Forces in Introductory Chemistry Studied by Gas Chromatography, Computer Models, and Viscometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedvik, Jonathan C.; McManaman, Charity; Anderson, Janet S.; Carroll, Mary K.

    1998-07-01

    An experiment on intermolecular forces for first-term introductory college chemistry is presented. The experiment integrates traditional viscometry-based measurements with modern chromatographic analysis and use of computer-based molecular models. Students performing gas chromatographic (GC) analyses of mixtures of n-alkanes and samples that simulate crime scene evidence discover that liquid mixtures can be separated rapidly into their components based upon intermolecular forces. Each group of students is given a liquid sample that simulates one collected at an arson scene, and the group is required to determine the identity of the accelerant. Students also examine computer models to better visualize how molecular structure affects intermolecular forces: London forces, dipole-dipole interactions, and hydrogen bonding. The relative viscosities of organic liquids are also measured to relate physical properties to intermolecular forces.

  2. AECL research programs in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, I.H.; Eastwood, T.A.; Smith, D.R.; Stewart, R.B.; Tomlinson, M.; Torgerson, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    Fundamental or underlying research in chemistry is being done in AECL laboratories to further the understanding of processes involved in current nuclear energy systems and maintain an awareness of progress at the frontiers of chemical research so that new advances can be turned to advantage in future AECL endeavours. The report introduces the current research topics and describes them briefly under the following headings: radiation chemistry, isotope separation, high temperature solution chemistry, fuel reprocessing chemistry, and analytical chemistry. (auth)

  3. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeussen J.C.L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313 indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems.

  4. Uncertainties in modelling heterogeneous chemistry and Arctic ozone depletion in the winter 2009/2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Wohltmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric chemistry and denitrification are simulated for the Arctic winter 2009/2010 with the Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model ATLAS. A number of sensitivity runs is used to explore the impact of uncertainties in chlorine activation and denitrification on the model results. In particular, the efficiency of chlorine activation on different types of liquid aerosol versus activation on nitric acid trihydrate clouds is examined. Additionally, the impact of changes in reaction rate coefficients, in the particle number density of polar stratospheric clouds, in supersaturation, temperature or the extent of denitrification is investigated. Results are compared to satellite measurements of MLS and ACE-FTS and to in-situ measurements onboard the Geophysica aircraft during the RECONCILE measurement campaign. It is shown that even large changes in the underlying assumptions have only a small impact on the modelled ozone loss, even though they can cause considerable differences in chemical evolution of other species and in denitrification. Differences in column ozone between the sensitivity runs stay below 10% at the end of the winter. Chlorine activation on liquid aerosols alone is able to explain the observed magnitude and morphology of the mixing ratios of active chlorine, reservoir gases and ozone. This is even true for binary aerosols (no uptake of HNO3 from the gas-phase allowed in the model. Differences in chlorine activation between sensitivity runs are within 30%. Current estimates of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT number density and supersaturation imply that, at least for this winter, NAT clouds play a relatively small role compared to liquid clouds in chlorine activation. The change between different reaction rate coefficients for liquid or solid clouds has only a minor impact on ozone loss and chlorine activation in our sensitivity runs.

  5. Multidecadal Changes in the UTLS Ozone from the MERRA-2 Reanalysis and the GMI Chemistry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargan, Krzysztof; Orbe, Clara; Pawson, Steven; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Oman, Luke; Olsen, Mark; Coy, Lawrence; Knowland, Emma

    2018-01-01

    Long-term changes of ozone in the UTLS (Upper Troposphere / Lower Stratosphere) reflect the response to decreases in the stratospheric concentrations of ozone-depleting substances as well as changes in the stratospheric circulation induced by climate change. To date, studies of UTLS ozone changes and variability have relied mainly on satellite and in-situ observations as well as chemistry-climate model simulations. By comparison, the potential of reanalysis ozone data remains relatively untapped. This is despite evidence from recent studies, including detailed analyses conducted under SPARC (Scalable Processor Architecture) Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP), that demonstrate that stratospheric ozone fields from modern atmospheric reanalyses exhibit good agreement with independent data while delineating issues related to inhomogeneities in the assimilated observations. In this presentation, we will explore the possibility of inferring long-term geographically and vertically resolved behavior of the lower stratospheric (LS) ozone from NASA's MERRA-2 (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications -2) reanalysis after accounting for the few known discontinuities and gaps in its assimilated input data. This work builds upon previous studies that have documented excellent agreement between MERRA-2 ozone and ozonesonde observations in the LS. Of particular importance is a relatively good vertical resolution of MERRA-2 allowing precise separation of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone contents. We also compare the MERRA-2 LS ozone results with the recently completed 37-year simulation produced using Goddard Earth Observing System in "replay"� mode coupled with the GMI (Global Modeling Initiative) chemistry mechanism. Replay mode dynamically constrains the model with the MERRA-2 reanalysis winds, temperature, and pressure. We will emphasize the areas of agreement of the reanalysis and replay and interpret differences between them in the context

  6. The radiation induced chemistry of uranyl cation in aqueous carbonate –bicarbonate solutions as followed by NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-05-01

    Alpha radiation induced formation of hydrogen peroxide in carbonate ?bicarbonate media was followed by 13C NMR using dissolved [233UO2(13CO3)3]4- as the alpha source (Dalpha= 12.1 Gy/hr). Between the pH region between 5.9 and 11.6 hydrogen peroxide causes a varied speciation of the uranyl carbonates that is a function of the uranium, carbonate and the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is shown that the speciation of the peroxy carbonates (or other species) formed in solution by titration with hydrogen peroxide are common to those formed by hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis. The radiolysis experiment was carried out above pH = 9.96 to minimize the loss of 13CO2 over a 2800 hr period. Radiolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide was followed by formation of a uranyl peroxy carbonate complex and complex formation accelerated for about 1200 hours. Complex formation was observed to terminate at a concentration between 1x10-4 and 5x10-4 M. It is assumed that either a steady state H2O2 production rate was established in solution or that some limiting feature of the experiment was responsible for slowing the yield of product.

  7. Source and fate of inorganic solutes in the Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA. II. Trace element chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Susong, David D.; Ball, James W.; Taylor, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    The Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park receives inflows from several geothermal areas, and consequently the concentrations of many trace elements are elevated compared to rivers in non-geothermal watersheds. Water samples and discharge measurements were obtained from the Gibbon River and its major tributaries near Norris Geyser Basin under the low-flow conditions of September 2006 allowing for the identification of solute sources and their downstream fate. Norris Geyser Basin, and in particular Tantalus Creek, is the largest source of many trace elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Br, Cs, Hg, Li, Sb, Tl, W, and REEs) to the Gibbon River. The Chocolate Pots area is a major source of Fe and Mn, and the lower Gibbon River near Terrace Spring is the major source of Be and Mo. Some of the elevated trace elements are aquatic health concerns (As, Sb, and Hg) and knowing their fate is important. Most solutes in the Gibbon River, including As and Sb, behave conservatively or are minimally attenuated over 29 km of fluvial transport. Some small attenuation of Al, Fe, Hg, and REEs occurs but primarily there is a transformation from the dissolved state to suspended particles, with most of these elements still being transported to the Madison River. Dissolved Hg and REEs loads decrease where the particulate Fe increases, suggesting sorption onto suspended particulate material. Attenuation from the water column is substantial for Mn, with little formation of Mn as suspended particulates.

  8. Oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX47 fuel subjected to water radiolysis: Solution chemistry and surface characterization by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegou, C., E-mail: christophe.jegou@cea.f [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Caraballo, R.; De Bonfils, J.; Broudic, V.; Peuget, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Vercouter, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Saclay Reasearch Center, B.P. 11, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Roudil, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Marcoule Reasearch Center, B.P. 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms of oxidizing dissolution of spent MOX fuel (MIMAS TU2 (registered) ) subjected to water radiolysis were investigated experimentally by leaching spent MOX47 fuel samples in pure water at 25 deg. C under different oxidizing conditions (with and without external gamma irradiation); the leached surfaces were characterized by Raman spectroscopy. The highly oxidizing conditions resulting from external gamma irradiation significantly increased the concentration of plutonium (Pu(V)) and uranium (U(VI)) compared with a benchmark experiment (without external irradiation). The oxidation behavior of the plutonium-enriched aggregates differed significantly from that of the UO{sub 2} matrix after several months of leaching in water under gamma irradiation. The plutonium in the aggregates appears to limit fuel oxidation. The only secondary phases formed and identified to date by Raman spectroscopy are uranium peroxides that generally precipitate on the surface of the UO{sub 2} grains. Concerning the behavior of plutonium, solution analysis results appear to be compatible with a conventional explanation based on an equilibrium with a Pu(OH){sub 4(am)} phase. The fission product release - considered as a general indicator of matrix alteration - from MOX47 fuel also increases under external gamma irradiation and a change in the leaching mode is observed. Diffusive leaching was clearly identified, coinciding with the rapid onset of steady-state actinide concentrations in the bulk solution.

  9. Modeling atmospheric mineral aerosol chemistry to predict heterogeneous photooxidation of SO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zechen; Jang, Myoseon; Park, Jiyeon

    2017-08-01

    The photocatalytic ability of airborne mineral dust particles is known to heterogeneously promote SO2 oxidation, but prediction of this phenomenon is not fully taken into account by current models. In this study, the Atmospheric Mineral Aerosol Reaction (AMAR) model was developed to capture the influence of air-suspended mineral dust particles on sulfate formation in various environments. In the model, SO2 oxidation proceeds in three phases including the gas phase, the inorganic-salted aqueous phase (non-dust phase), and the dust phase. Dust chemistry is described as the absorption-desorption kinetics of SO2 and NOx (partitioning between the gas phase and the multilayer coated dust). The reaction of absorbed SO2 on dust particles occurs via two major paths: autoxidation of SO2 in open air and photocatalytic mechanisms under UV light. The kinetic mechanism of autoxidation was first leveraged using controlled indoor chamber data in the presence of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles without UV light, and then extended to photochemistry. With UV light, SO2 photooxidation was promoted by surface oxidants (OH radicals) that are generated via the photocatalysis of semiconducting metal oxides (electron-hole theory) of ATD particles. This photocatalytic rate constant was derived from the integration of the combinational product of the dust absorbance spectrum and wave-dependent actinic flux for the full range of wavelengths of the light source. The predicted concentrations of sulfate and nitrate using the AMAR model agreed well with outdoor chamber data that were produced under natural sunlight. For seven consecutive hours of photooxidation of SO2 in an outdoor chamber, dust chemistry at the low NOx level was attributed to 55 % of total sulfate (56 ppb SO2, 290 µg m-3 ATD, and NOx less than 5 ppb). At high NOx ( > 50 ppb of NOx with low hydrocarbons), sulfate formation was also greatly promoted by dust chemistry, but it was suppressed by the competition between NO2 and SO2

  10. Modeling atmospheric mineral aerosol chemistry to predict heterogeneous photooxidation of SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The photocatalytic ability of airborne mineral dust particles is known to heterogeneously promote SO2 oxidation, but prediction of this phenomenon is not fully taken into account by current models. In this study, the Atmospheric Mineral Aerosol Reaction (AMAR model was developed to capture the influence of air-suspended mineral dust particles on sulfate formation in various environments. In the model, SO2 oxidation proceeds in three phases including the gas phase, the inorganic-salted aqueous phase (non-dust phase, and the dust phase. Dust chemistry is described as the absorption–desorption kinetics of SO2 and NOx (partitioning between the gas phase and the multilayer coated dust. The reaction of absorbed SO2 on dust particles occurs via two major paths: autoxidation of SO2 in open air and photocatalytic mechanisms under UV light. The kinetic mechanism of autoxidation was first leveraged using controlled indoor chamber data in the presence of Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles without UV light, and then extended to photochemistry. With UV light, SO2 photooxidation was promoted by surface oxidants (OH radicals that are generated via the photocatalysis of semiconducting metal oxides (electron–hole theory of ATD particles. This photocatalytic rate constant was derived from the integration of the combinational product of the dust absorbance spectrum and wave-dependent actinic flux for the full range of wavelengths of the light source. The predicted concentrations of sulfate and nitrate using the AMAR model agreed well with outdoor chamber data that were produced under natural sunlight. For seven consecutive hours of photooxidation of SO2 in an outdoor chamber, dust chemistry at the low NOx level was attributed to 55 % of total sulfate (56 ppb SO2, 290 µg m−3 ATD, and NOx less than 5 ppb. At high NOx ( >  50 ppb of NOx with low hydrocarbons, sulfate formation was also greatly promoted by dust chemistry, but it was suppressed by

  11. ICON-ART-ISO: Water isotopologues implemented in the chemistry- transport model ICON-ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Johannes; Ruhnke, Roland; Reinert, Daniel; Pfahl, Stephan

    2017-04-01

    Stable isotopes of water can help to understand processes that have influenced the distribution of water in the atmosphere. Isotope enabled models, capable of simulating the distribution of HDO and H218O, can be a very useful tool for understanding these processes and the distribution of isotope ratios which are observed. We present ICON-ART-ISO, the implementation of water isotopes into the chemistry-transport model ICON-ART. The core of this global model is the ICOsahedral Non-hydrostatic (ICON) modelling framework (Zaengl et al, 2015 (Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.)), a joint development of the German Weather Service (DWD) and the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. The model system ICON-ART (Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases, Rieger et al, 2015 (GMD)) is a two-way coupled extension to ICON, which allows to study the influence of aerosols, trace gases and their chemistry on the atmosphere. We set up ICON-ART-ISO within this framework, profitting from the model infrastructure. We follow the implementation of COSMOiso (Pfahl et al., 2012 (ACP)), the isotope-enabled version of the COSMO model, the predecessor of ICON. In order to include the isotopes in the model, the water cycle is doubled diagnostically for each isotope. By the choice of physical parameters, these modelled isotopes are set to HDO and H218O, but the simulation of a purely diagnostic H2O is also possible. Fractionation, i.e. the change of the isotope ratio changes during phase changes, is considered in evaporation, grid-scale precipitation and convection. For the source of evaporation, a constant isotope ratio is currently used. To consider grid scale precipitation, the processes in the two-moment microphysical scheme by Seifert and Beheng, 2005 (Meteorol. Atmos. Phys.) are diagnostically applied to the isotopes. For convection, the Tiedtke-Bechtold scheme (Bechtold et al., 2013 (JAS)) is used. We present the current status of the model system. All processes have been implemented and we show first

  12. Curriculum vitae of the LOTOS–EUROS (v2.0 chemistry transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. M. Manders

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and application of chemistry transport models has a long tradition. Within the Netherlands the LOTOS–EUROS model has been developed by a consortium of institutes, after combining its independently developed predecessors in 2005. Recently, version 2.0 of the model was released as an open-source version. This paper presents the curriculum vitae of the model system, describing the model's history, model philosophy, basic features and a validation with EMEP stations for the new benchmark year 2012, and presents cases with the model's most recent and key developments. By setting the model developments in context and providing an outlook for directions for further development, the paper goes beyond the common model description.With an origin in ozone and sulfur modelling for the models LOTOS and EUROS, the application areas were gradually extended with persistent organic pollutants, reactive nitrogen, and primary and secondary particulate matter. After the combination of the models to LOTOS–EUROS in 2005, the model was further developed to include new source parametrizations (e.g. road resuspension, desert dust, wildfires, applied for operational smog forecasts in the Netherlands and Europe, and has been used for emission scenarios, source apportionment, and long-term hindcast and climate change scenarios. LOTOS–EUROS has been a front-runner in data assimilation of ground-based and satellite observations and has participated in many model intercomparison studies. The model is no longer confined to applications over Europe but is also applied to other regions of the world, e.g. China. The increasing interaction with emission experts has also contributed to the improvement of the model's performance. The philosophy for model development has always been to use knowledge that is state of the art and proven, to keep a good balance in the level of detail of process description and accuracy of input and output, and to keep a good record

  13. Classical solutions for the super symmetric Grassmannian sigma models in two dimensions, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Sasaki, R.

    1983-11-01

    Classical solutions of the supersymmetric Grassmannian sigma models in two euclidean dimensions are investigated. In the equations of motion of the supersymmetric model we interpret the classical fermion solutions as ordinary c-number fields. A quite general class of solutions is constructed explicitly and elementarily in an analogous way with the pure bosonic Grassmannian sigma models and the linearized supersymmetric Dirac equations. (author)

  14. Nonperturbative Time Dependent Solution of a Simple Ionization Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Costin, Rodica D.; Lebowitz, Joel L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a non-perturbative solution of the Schrödinger equation {iψ_t(t,x)=-ψ_{xx}(t,x)-2(1 +α sinω t) δ(x)ψ(t,x)} , written in units in which \\hbar=2m=1, describing the ionization of a model atom by a parametric oscillating potential. This model has been studied extensively by many authors, including us. It has surprisingly many features in common with those observed in the ionization of real atoms and emission by solids, subjected to microwave or laser radiation. Here we use new mathematical methods to go beyond previous investigations and to provide a complete and rigorous analysis of this system. We obtain the Borel-resummed transseries (multi-instanton expansion) valid for all values of α, ω, t for the wave function, ionization probability, and energy distribution of the emitted electrons, the latter not studied previously for this model. We show that for large t and small α the energy distribution has sharp peaks at energies which are multiples of ω, corresponding to photon capture. We obtain small α expansions that converge for all t, unlike those of standard perturbation theory. We expect that our analysis will serve as a basis for treating more realistic systems revealing a form of universality in different emission processes.

  15. a Procedural Solution to Model Roman Masonry Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, V.; Saleri, R.; Stefani, C.; Nony, N.; De Luca, L.

    2013-07-01

    The paper will describe a new approach based on the development of a procedural modelling methodology for archaeological data representation. This is a custom-designed solution based on the recognition of the rules belonging to the construction methods used in roman times. We have conceived a tool for 3D reconstruction of masonry structures starting from photogrammetric surveying. Our protocol considers different steps. Firstly we have focused on the classification of opus based on the basic interconnections that can lead to a descriptive system used for their unequivocal identification and design. Secondly, we have chosen an automatic, accurate, flexible and open-source photogrammetric pipeline named Pastis Apero Micmac - PAM, developed by IGN (Paris). We have employed it to generate ortho-images from non-oriented images, using a user-friendly interface implemented by CNRS Marseille (France). Thirdly, the masonry elements are created in parametric and interactive way, and finally they are adapted to the photogrammetric data. The presented application, currently under construction, is developed with an open source programming language called Processing, useful for visual, animated or static, 2D or 3D, interactive creations. Using this computer language, a Java environment has been developed. Therefore, even if the procedural modelling reveals an accuracy level inferior to the one obtained by manual modelling (brick by brick), this method can be useful when taking into account the static evaluation on buildings (requiring quantitative aspects) and metric measures for restoration purposes.

  16. Numerical solution of High-kappa model of superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamikhova, R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We present formulation and finite element approximations of High-kappa model of superconductivity which is valid in the high {kappa}, high magnetic field setting and accounts for applied magnetic field and current. Major part of this work deals with steady-state and dynamic computational experiments which illustrate our theoretical results numerically. In our experiments we use Galerkin discretization in space along with Backward-Euler and Crank-Nicolson schemes in time. We show that for moderate values of {kappa}, steady states of the model system, computed using the High-kappa model, are virtually identical with results computed using the full Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equations. We illustrate numerically optimal rates of convergence in space and time for the L{sup 2} and H{sup 1} norms of the error in the High-kappa solution. Finally, our numerical approximations demonstrate some well-known experimentally observed properties of high-temperature superconductors, such as appearance of vortices, effects of increasing the applied magnetic field and the sample size, and the effect of applied constant current.

  17. Thermodynamic Modeling of Surface Tension of Aqueous Electrolyte Solution by Competitive Adsorption Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Javad Kamali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic modeling of surface tension of different electrolyte systems in presence of gas phase is studied. Using the solid-liquid equilibrium, Langmuir gas-solid adsorption, and ENRTL activity coefficient model, the surface tension of electrolyte solutions is calculated. The new model has two adjustable parameters which could be determined by fitting the experimental surface tension of binary aqueous electrolyte solution in single temperature. Then the values of surface tension for other temperatures in binary and ternary system of aqueous electrolyte solution are predicted. The average absolute deviations for calculation of surface tension of binary and mixed electrolyte systems by new model are 1.98 and 1.70%, respectively.

  18. Physical Property Modeling of Concentrated Cesium Eluate Solutions, Part I - Derivation of Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.S.; Pierce, R. A.; Edwards, T. B.; Calloway, T. B.

    2005-09-15

    Major analytes projected to be present in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant cesium ion-exchange eluate solutions were identified from the available analytical data collected during radioactive bench-scale runs, and a test matrix of cesium eluate solutions was designed within the bounding concentrations of those analytes. A computer model simulating the semi-batch evaporation of cesium eluate solutions was run in conjunction with a multi-electrolyte aqueous system database to calculate the physical properties of each test matrix solution concentrated to the target endpoints of 80% and 100% saturation. The calculated physical properties were analyzed statistically and fitted into mathematical expressions for the bulk solubility, density, viscosity, heat capacity and volume reduction factor as a function of temperature and concentration of each major analyte in the eluate feed. The R{sup 2} of the resulting physical property models ranged from 0.89 to 0.99.

  19. The impact of new cathode materials relative to baseline performance of microbial fuel cells all with the same architecture and solution chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wulin

    2017-04-21

    Differences in microbial fuel cell (MFC) architectures, materials, and solution chemistries, have previously hindered direct comparisons of improvements in power production due to new cathode materials. However, one common reactor design has now been used in many different laboratories around the world under similar operating conditions based on using: a graphite fiber brush anode, a platinum cathode catalyst, a single-chamber cube-shaped (4-cm) MFC with a 3-cm diameter anolyte chamber, 50 mM phosphate buffer, and an acetate fuel. Analysis of several publications over 10 years from a single laboratory showed that even under such identical operational conditions, maximum power densities varied by 15%, with an average of 1.36 ± 0.20 W m–2 (n=24), normalized to cathode projected area (34 W m–3 liquid volume). In other laboratories, maximum power was significantly less, with an average of 1.03 ± 0.46 W m–2 (n=11), despite identical conditions. One likely reason for the differences in power is cathode age. Power production with Pt catalyst cathodes significantly declined after one month of operation or more to 0.87 ± 0.31 W m–2 (n=18) based on studies where cathode aging was examined, while in many studies the age of the cathode was not reported. Using these studies as a performance baseline, we review the claims of improvements in power generation due to new anode or cathode materials, or changes in solution conductivities and substrates.

  20. Modelling Difficulties and Their Overcoming Strategies in the Solution of a Modelling Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Ayse Tekin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to reveal the elementary mathematics student teachers' difficulties encountered in the solution of a modelling problem, the strategies to overcome those difficulties and whether the strategies worked or not. Nineteen student teachers solved the modelling problem in their four or five-person groups, and the video records…

  1. New analytical solutions for nonlinear physical models of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-18

    expansion method is implemented to find exact solutions of ... and can be used as an alternative for finding exact solutions of nonlinear equations in mathematical physics. A ... engineering, such as, solid mechanics, plasma physics,.

  2. Effects of water chemistry and fluid dynamics on wall thinning behavior. Part 1. Development of FAC model focused on water chemistry and composition of material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Domae, Masafumi; Ohta, Joji; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Inada, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC), which is one of the important subjects at fossil and nuclear power plans, is caused by the accelerated dissolution of protective oxide film due to the turbulent flow. The influence factors on FAC such as water chemistry, material, and fluid dynamics are closely related to the oxide property so that the risk of FAC can be reduced by the suitable control of water chemistry. There are some FAC models and evaluation codes of FAC rate. Some of them are used in wall thinning management of nuclear power plant in some country. Nevertheless, these FAC codes include many empirical parameters so that some uncertainty to evaluate the synergistic effectiveness of factors are the controversial point for the application of FAC code to wall thinning management in Japanese nuclear power plant. In this study, a FAC model that can evaluate the effect of temperature, NH3 concentration, chromium content, and dissolved oxygen concentration on FAC rate was developed by considering the diffusion of dissolved species. The critical dissolved oxygen concentration, which can inhibit FAC, was also calculated by this model. (author)

  3. Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) version 2.51

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jockel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Kunze, M.; Kirner, O.; Brenninkmeijer, C.A.M.; Brinkop, S.; Cai, D.S.; Dyroff, C.; Eckstein, J.; Frank, F.; Garny, H.; Gottschald, K.D.; Graf, P.; Grewe, V.; Kerkweg, A.; Kern, B.; Matthes, S; Mertens, M; Meul, S.; Neumaier, M.; Nützel, M; Oberländer-Hayn, S; Ruhnke, R.; Runde, T.; Sander, R.; Scharffe, D; Zahn, A.

    2016-01-01

    Three types of reference simulations, as recommended by the Chemistry–Climate Model Initiative (CCMI), have been performed with version 2.51 of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts – Hamburg (ECHAM)/Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model: hindcast

  4. A regression model using sediment chemistry for the evaluation of marine environmental impacts associated with salmon aquaculture cage wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.L.; Haya, K.; Paon, L.A.; Moffatt, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop an approach for modelling changes of sediment chemistry related to the accumulation of aquaculture waste. Metal composition of sediment Al, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, and Zn; organic carbon and 2 =0.945 compared to R 2 =0.653 for the regression model using unadjusted EMP for assessing the environmental conditions

  5. Associating Animations with Concrete Models to Enhance Students' Comprehension of Different Visual Representations in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Hajri, Sheikha H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to explore the impact of associating animations with concrete models on eleventh-grade students' comprehension of different visual representations in organic chemistry. The study used a post-test control group quasi-experimental design. The experimental group (N = 28) used concrete models, submicroscopic…

  6. Learning from Multiple Classifier Systems: Perspectives for Improving Decision Making of QSAR Models in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-The, Hai; Nam, Nguyen-Hai; Nga, Doan-Viet; Hai, Dang Thanh; Dieguez-Santana, Karel; Marrero-Poncee, Yovani; Castillo-Garit, Juan A; Casanola-Martin, Gerardo M; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong

    2018-02-09

    Quantitative Structure - Activity Relationship (QSAR) modeling has been widely used in medicinal chemistry and computational toxicology for many years. Today, as the amount of chemicals is increasing dramatically, QSAR methods have become pivotal for the purpose of handling the data, identifying a decision, and gathering useful information from data processing. The advances in this field have paved a way for numerous alternative approaches that require deep mathematics in order to enhance the learning capability of QSAR models. One of these directions is the use of Multiple Classifier Systems (MCSs) that potentially provide a means to exploit the advantages of manifold learning through decomposition frameworks, while improving generalization and predictive performance. In this paper, we presented MCS as a next generation of QSAR modeling techniques and discuss the chance to mining the vast number of models already published in the literature. We systematically revisited the theoretical frameworks of MCS as well as current advances in MCS application for QSAR practice. Furthermore, we illustrated our idea by describing ensemble approaches on modeling histone deacetylase (HDACs) inhibitors. We expect that our analysis would contribute to a better understanding about MCS application and its future perspectives for improving the decision making of QSAR models. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Self-similar solution for coupled thermal electromagnetic model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation into the existence and uniqueness solution of self-similar solution for the coupled Maxwell and Pennes Bio-heat equations have been done. Criteria for existence and uniqueness of self-similar solution are revealed in the consequent theorems. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ...

  8. Towards the virtual artery: a multiscale model for vascular physiology at the physics-chemistry-biology interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Alfons G; Alowayyed, Saad; Lorenz, Eric; Melnikova, Natalia; Mountrakis, Lampros; van Rooij, Britt; Svitenkov, Andrew; Závodszky, Gábor; Zun, Pavel

    2016-11-13

    This discussion paper introduces the concept of the Virtual Artery as a multiscale model for arterial physiology and pathologies at the physics-chemistry-biology (PCB) interface. The cellular level is identified as the mesoscopic level, and we argue that by coupling cell-based models with other relevant models on the macro- and microscale, a versatile model of arterial health and disease can be composed. We review the necessary ingredients, both models of arteries at many different scales, as well as generic methods to compose multiscale models. Next, we discuss how this can be combined into the virtual artery. Finally, we argue that the concept of models at the PCB interface could or perhaps should become a powerful paradigm, not only as in our case for studying physiology, but also for many other systems that have such PCB interfaces.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling: Applications in materials science and chemistry and advances in scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Kumara Narasimha

    2007-03-01

    building blocks in organic chemistry---indicate that MOGAs produce High-quality semiempirical methods that (1) are stable to small perturbations, (2) yield accurate configuration energies on untested and critical excited states, and (3) yield ab initio quality excited-state dynamics. The proposed method enables simulations of more complex systems to realistic, multi-picosecond timescales, well beyond previous attempts or expectation of human experts, and 2--3 orders-of-magnitude reduction in computational cost. While the two applications use simple evolutionary operators, in order to tackle more complex systems, their scalability and limitations have to be investigated. The second part of the thesis addresses some of the challenges involved with a successful design of genetic algorithms and genetic programming for multiscale modeling. The first issue addressed is the scalability of genetic programming, where facetwise models are built to assess the population size required by GP to ensure adequate supply of raw building blocks and also to ensure accurate decision-making between competing building blocks. This study also presents a design of competent genetic programming, where traditional fixed recombination operators are replaced by building and sampling probabilistic models of promising candidate programs. The proposed scalable GP, called extended compact GP (eCGP), combines the ideas from extended compact genetic algorithm (eCGA) and probabilistic incremental program evolution (PIPE) and adaptively identifies, propagates and exchanges important subsolutions of a search problem. Results show that eCGP scales cubically with problem size on both GP-easy and GP-hard problems. Finally, facetwise models are developed to explore limitations of scalability of MOGAs, where the scalability of multiobjective algorithms in reliably maintaining Pareto-optimal solutions is addressed. The results show that even when the building blocks are accurately identified, massive multimodality

  10. Simulations of physics and chemistry of polar stratospheric clouds with a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, J.

    2005-04-20

    A polar stratospheric cloud submodel has been developed and incorporated in a general circulation model including atmospheric chemistry (ECHAM5/MESSy). The formation and sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles can thus be simulated as well as heterogeneous chemical reactions that take place on the PSC particles. For solid PSC particle sedimentation, the need for a tailor-made algorithm has been elucidated. A sedimentation scheme based on first order approximations of vertical mixing ratio profiles has been developed. It produces relatively little numerical diffusion and can deal well with divergent or convergent sedimentation velocity fields. For the determination of solid PSC particle sizes, an efficient algorithm has been adapted. It assumes a monodisperse radii distribution and thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas phase and the solid particle phase. This scheme, though relatively simple, is shown to produce particle number densities and radii within the observed range. The combined effects of the representations of sedimentation and solid PSC particles on vertical H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3} redistribution are investigated in a series of tests. The formation of solid PSC particles, especially of those consisting of nitric acid trihydrate, has been discussed extensively in recent years. Three particle formation schemes in accordance with the most widely used approaches have been identified and implemented. For the evaluation of PSC occurrence a new data set with unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage was available. A quantitative method for the comparison of simulation results and observations is developed and applied. It reveals that the relative PSC sighting frequency can be reproduced well with the PSC submodel whereas the detailed modelling of PSC events is beyond the scope of coarse global scale models. In addition to the development and evaluation of new PSC submodel components, parts of existing simulation programs have been

  11. Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous tissues. Part II: Mixed-hybrid finite element solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakpoor, K.; Kaasschieter, E.F.; Huyghe, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory [J.M. Huyghe and J.D. Janssen, Int. J. Engng. Sci. 35 (1997) 793-802; K. Malakpoor, E.F. Kaasschieter and J.M. Huyghe, Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous

  12. Structure of turbulent non-premixed flames modeled with two-step chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Mahalingam, S.; Puri, I. K.; Vervisch, L.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent diffusion flames modeled with finite-rate, two-step chemistry, A + B yields I, A + I yields P, were carried out. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flame structure reveals the complex nature of the penetration of various reactive species across two reaction zones in mixture fraction space. Due to this two zone structure, these flames were found to be robust, resisting extinction over the parameter ranges investigated. As in single-step computations, mixture fraction dissipation rate and the mixture fraction were found to be statistically correlated. Simulations involving unequal molecular diffusivities suggest that the small scale mixing process and, hence, the turbulent flame structure is sensitive to the Schmidt number.

  13. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  14. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel; Persson, Ingmar

    2012-09-17

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen-donor solvents water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and N,N'-dimethylpropyleneurea (DMPU) has been studied in solution by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and DMSO-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions, vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O═V-O(perp) bond angle is ca. 98°. In the DMPU-solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space-demanding properties of the DMPU molecule leave no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group, which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O═V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 107°, and the mean V═O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and DMSO-solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in the cis position with a mean V═O bond distance of 1.6 Å and a O═V═O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen-donor ligands.

  15. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso) and N,N′-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu) has been studied in solution by EXAFS and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O=V-Operp bond angle is ca. 98°. In the dmpu solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space demanding properties of the dmpu molecule leaving no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O=V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 106°, and the mean V=O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in cis position with mean V=O bond distances of 1.6 Å and a O=V=O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen donor ligands. PMID:22950803

  16. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  17. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  18. Interactive chemistry in the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique general circulation model: model description and impact analysis of biogenic hydrocarbons on tropospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Folberth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a description and evaluation of LMDz-INCA, a global three-dimensional chemistry-climate model, pertaining to its recently developed NMHC version. In this substantially extended version of the model a comprehensive representation of the photochemistry of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and volatile organic compounds (VOC from biogenic, anthropogenic, and biomass-burning sources has been included. The tropospheric annual mean methane (9.2 years and methylchloroform (5.5 years chemical lifetimes are well within the range of previous modelling studies and are in excellent agreement with estimates established by means of global observations. The model provides a reasonable simulation of the horizontal and vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of CO and key non-methane VOC, such as acetone, methanol, and formaldehyde as compared to observational data from several ground stations and aircraft campaigns. LMDz-INCA in the NMHC version reproduces tropospheric ozone concentrations fairly well throughout most of the troposphere. The model is applied in several sensitivity studies of the biosphere-atmosphere photochemical feedback. The impact of surface emissions of isoprene, acetone, and methanol is studied. These experiments show a substantial impact of isoprene on tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide concentrations revealing an increase in surface O3 and CO levels of up to 30 ppbv and 60 ppbv, respectively. Isoprene also appears to significantly impact the global OH distribution resulting in a decrease of the global mean tropospheric OH concentration by approximately 0.7×105 molecules cm-3 or roughly 8% and an increase in the global mean tropospheric methane lifetime by approximately seven months. A global mean ozone net radiative forcing due to the isoprene induced increase in the tropospheric ozone burden of 0.09 W m-2 is found. The key role of isoprene photooxidation in the global tropospheric redistribution of NOx is demonstrated. LMDz

  19. Computational modeling of chemical reactions and interstitial growth and remodeling involving charged solutes and solid-bound molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Nims, Robert J; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Mechanobiological processes are rooted in mechanics and chemistry, and such processes may be modeled in a framework that couples their governing equations starting from fundamental principles. In many biological applications, the reactants and products of chemical reactions may be electrically charged, and these charge effects may produce driving forces and constraints that significantly influence outcomes. In this study, a novel formulation and computational implementation are presented for modeling chemical reactions in biological tissues that involve charged solutes and solid-bound molecules within a deformable porous hydrated solid matrix, coupling mechanics with chemistry while accounting for electric charges. The deposition or removal of solid-bound molecules contributes to the growth and remodeling of the solid matrix; in particular, volumetric growth may be driven by Donnan osmotic swelling, resulting from charged molecular species fixed to the solid matrix. This formulation incorporates the state of strain as a state variable in the production rate of chemical reactions, explicitly tying chemistry with mechanics for the purpose of modeling mechanobiology. To achieve these objectives, this treatment identifies the specific theoretical and computational challenges faced in modeling complex systems of interacting neutral and charged constituents while accommodating any number of simultaneous reactions where reactants and products may be modeled explicitly or implicitly. Several finite element verification problems are shown to agree with closed-form analytical solutions. An illustrative tissue engineering analysis demonstrates tissue growth and swelling resulting from the deposition of chondroitin sulfate, a charged solid-bound molecular species. This implementation is released in the open-source program FEBio ( www.febio.org ). The availability of this framework may be particularly beneficial to optimizing tissue engineering culture systems by examining the

  20. Improving Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure through Broad-Based Use of Computer Models in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Several articles suggest how to incorporate computer models into the organic chemistry laboratory, but relatively few papers discuss how to incorporate these models broadly into the organic chemistry lecture. Previous research has suggested that "manipulating" physical or computer models enhances student understanding; this study…

  1. Biosorption of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions and ANN modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Soma; Mondal, Abhijit; Bar, Nirjhar; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The use of sustainable, green and biodegradable natural wastes for Cr(VI) detoxification from the contaminated wastewater is considered as a challenging issue. The present research is aimed to assess the effectiveness of seven different natural biomaterials, such as jackfruit leaf, mango leaf, onion peel, garlic peel, bamboo leaf, acid treated rubber leaf and coconut shell powder, for Cr(VI) eradication from aqueous solution by biosorption process. Characterizations were conducted using SEM, BET and FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of operating parameters, viz., pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, adsorbent dosages, contact time and temperature on metal removal efficiency, were studied. The biosorption mechanism was described by the pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm model. The biosorption process was exothermic, spontaneous and chemical (except garlic peel) in nature. The sequence of adsorption capacity was mango leaf > jackfruit leaf > acid treated rubber leaf > onion peel > bamboo leaf > garlic peel > coconut shell with maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity of 35.7 mg g -1 for mango leaf. The treated effluent can be reused. Desorption study suggested effective reuse of the adsorbents up to three cycles, and safe disposal method of the used adsorbents suggested biodegradability and sustainability of the process by reapplication of the spent adsorbent and ultimately leading towards zero wastages. The performances of the adsorbents were verified with wastewater from electroplating industry. The scale-up study reported for industrial applications. ANN modelling using multilayer perception with gradient descent (GD) and Levenberg-Marquart (LM) algorithm had been successfully used for prediction of Cr(VI) removal efficiency. The study explores the undiscovered potential of the natural waste materials for sustainable existence of small and medium sector industries, especially in the third world countries by protecting the environment by eco-innovation.

  2. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project "Suborbital Launcher for Testing" (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  3. Atmospheric impact of the 1783–1784 Laki eruption: Part I Chemistry modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from the first chemistry-transport model study of the impact of the 1783–1784 Laki fissure eruption (Iceland: 64°N, 17°W upon atmospheric composition are presented. The eruption released an estimated 61 Tg(S as SO2 into the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model has a high resolution tropopause region, and detailed sulphur chemistry. The simulated SO2 plume spreads over much of the Northern Hemisphere, polewards of ~40°N. About 70% of the SO2 gas is directly deposited to the surface before it can be oxidised to sulphuric acid aerosol. The main SO2 oxidants, OH and H2O2, are depleted by up to 40% zonally, and the lifetime of SO2 consequently increases. Zonally averaged tropospheric SO2 concentrations over the first three months of the eruption exceed 20 ppbv, and sulphuric acid aerosol reaches ~2 ppbv. These compare to modelled pre-industrial/present-day values of 0.1/0.5 ppbv SO2 and 0.1/1.0 ppbv sulphate. A total sulphuric acid aerosol yield of 17–22 Tg(S is produced. The mean aerosol lifetime is 6–10 days, and the peak aerosol loading of the atmosphere is 1.4–1.7 Tg(S (equivalent to 5.9–7.1 Tg of hydrated sulphuric acid aerosol. These compare to modelled pre-industrial/present-day sulphate burdens of 0.28/0.81 Tg(S, and lifetimes of 6/5 days, respectively. Due to the relatively short atmospheric residence times of both SO2 and sulphate, the aerosol loading approximately mirrors the temporal evolution of emissions associated with the eruption. The model produces a reason-able simulation of the acid deposition found in Greenland ice cores. These results appear to be relatively insensitive to the vertical profile of emissions assumed, although if more of the emissions reached higher levels (>12 km, this would give longer lifetimes and larger aerosol yields. Introducing the emissions in episodes generates similar results to using monthly mean emissions, because the atmospheric lifetimes are similar to the repose periods

  4. Beauty in chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Though hard going for the general reader and highly personal in its selectivity, Elegant Solutions: Ten Beautiful Experiments in Chemistry provides reflections of a thoughtful author that will delight chemists

  5. Net Influence of an Internally Generated Guasi-biennial Oscillation on Modelled Stratospheric Climate and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke David; Newman, Paul A.; Song, InSun

    2013-01-01

    A Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM) simulation with strong tropical non-orographic gravity wave drag (GWD) is compared to an otherwise identical simulation with near-zero tropical non-orographic GWD. The GEOSCCM generates a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) zonal wind signal in response to a tropical peak in GWD that resembles the zonal and climatological mean precipitation field. The modelled QBO has a frequency and amplitude that closely resembles observations. As expected, the modelled QBO improves the simulation of tropical zonal winds and enhances tropical and subtropical stratospheric variability. Also, inclusion of the QBO slows the meridional overturning circulation, resulting in a generally older stratospheric mean age of air. Slowing of the overturning circulation, changes in stratospheric temperature and enhanced subtropical mixing all affect the annual mean distributions of ozone, methane and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, the modelled QBO enhances polar stratospheric variability in winter. Because tropical zonal winds are easterly in the simulation without a QBO, there is a relative increase in tropical zonal winds in the simulation with a QBO. Extratropical differences between the simulations with and without a QBO thus reflect the westerly shift in tropical zonal winds: a relative strengthening of the polar stratospheric jet, polar stratospheric cooling and a weak reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  6. A modeling study of secondary organic aerosol formation from sesquiterpenes using the STOCHEM global chemistry and transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A. H.; Jenkin, M. E.; Foulds, A.; Derwent, R. G.; Percival, C. J.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2017-04-01

    Sesquiterpenes are one of the precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which can be an important global sources of organic aerosol (OA). Updating the chemistry scheme in the global chemistry transport model by incorporating an oxidation mechanism for β-caryophyllene (representing all sesquiterpenes), adding global sesquiterpene emissions of 29 Tg/yr, and revising global monoterpene emissions up to 162 Tg/yr [Guenther et al., 2012] led to an increase of SOA burden by 95% and SOA production rate by 106% relative to the base case described in Utembe et al. [2011]. Including the emissions of sesquiterpenes resulted in increase of SOA burden of 0.11 Tg and SOA production rate of 12.9 Tg/yr relative to the base case. The highest concentrations of sesquiterpene-derived SOA (by up to 1.2 μg/m3) were found over central Africa and South America, the regions having high levels of biogenic emissions with significant biomass burning. In the updated model simulation, the multigeneration oxidation products from sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes transported above the boundary layer and condensed to the aerosol phase at higher altitude led to an increase of OA by up to 30% over the tropics and northern midlatitude to higher altitude. The model evaluation showed an underestimation of model OA mostly for the campaigns dominated by regional anthropogenic pollution. The increase of SOA production from sesquiterpenes reduced the discrepancies between modeled and observed OA concentrations over the remote and rural areas. The increase of SOA concentrations by up to 200% from preindustrial to present scenarios was found over the tropical oceans.

  7. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    dioxide and calcite; dissolution of sodium chloride, gypsum, and composite volcanic glass; and precipitation of composite clay and quartz represented changes in water as it disappeared from the playa. This modeling provided an understanding of the water-soil geochemical environment, which was then used to evaluate the potential mobility of residual radionuclides into the playa soils by water. Because there is no information on the chemical forms of anthropogenic radionuclides in Frenchman Flat playa soil, it was assumed that soil radionuclides go into solution when the playa is inundated. In mobility modeling, a select group of radionuclides were allowed to sorb onto, or exchange with, playa soil minerals to evaluate the likelihood that the radionuclides would be removed from water during playa inundation. Radionuclide mobility modeling suggested that there would be minimal sorption or exchange of several important radionuclides (uranium, cesium, and technetium) with playa minerals such that they may be mobile in water when the playa is inundated and could infiltrate into the subsurface. Mobility modeling also showed that plutonium may be much less mobile because of sorption onto calcite, but the amount of reactive surface area of playa soil calcite is highly uncertain. Plutonium is also known to sorb onto colloidal particles suspended in water, suspended colloidal particles will move with the water, providing a mechanism to redistribute plutonium when Frenchman Flat playa is inundated. Water chemistry, stable isotopes, and geochemical modeling showed that residual radionuclides in Frenchman Flat playa soils could be mobilized in water when the playa is inundated with precipitation. Also, there is potential for these radionuclides to infiltrate into the subsurface with water. As a result of the information obtained both during this study and the conclusions drawn from it, additional data collection, investigation, and modeling are recommended. Specifically: sampling the

  8. Cosmological solutions in multidimensional model with multiple exponential potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivashchuk, Vladimir D.; Melnikov, Vitaly N.; Selivanov, Alexey B.

    2003-01-01

    A family of cosmological solutions with (n+1) Ricci-flat spaces in the theory with several scalar fields and multiple exponential potential is obtained when coupling vectors in exponents obey certain relations. Two subclasses of solutions with power-law and exponential behaviour of scale factors are singled out. It is proved that power-law solutions may take place only when coupling vectors are linearly independent and exponential dependence occurs for linearly dependent set of coupling vectors. A subfamily of solutions with accelerated expansion is singled out. A generalized isotropization behaviours of certain classes of general solutions are found. In quantum case exact solutions to Wheeler-DeWitt equation are obtained and special 'ground state' wave functions are considered. (author)

  9. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalska-Szostko, B., E-mail: kalska@uwb.edu.pl; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  10. Stability of core–shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stability of the core–shell nanowires in environmental solutions were tested. • The most and the least aggressive solutions were determined. • The influence of different solutions on magnetic nanowires core was found out. - Abstract: This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core–shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods

  11. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D -hat (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D -hat (t f ) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D -hat (t f ) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of runs. Individual runs are

  12. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique et Systèmes Complexes, ISMANS, 44 Av. Bartholdi, 72000 Le Mans (France); Balian, Roger [Institut de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M., E-mail: T.M.Nieuwenhuizen@uva.nl [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum–classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie–Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix D{sup -hat} (t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin–pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although D{sup -hat} (t{sub f}) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of

  13. SU-F-R-10: Selecting the Optimal Solution for Multi-Objective Radiomics Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z; Folkert, M; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an evidential reasoning approach for selecting the optimal solution from a Pareto solution set obtained by a multi-objective radiomics model for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Methods: In the multi-objective radiomics model, both sensitivity and specificity are considered as the objective functions simultaneously. A Pareto solution set with many feasible solutions will be resulted from the multi-objective optimization. In this work, an optimal solution Selection methodology for Multi-Objective radiomics Learning model using the Evidential Reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed to select the optimal solution from the Pareto solution set. The proposed SMOLER method used the evidential reasoning approach to calculate the utility of each solution based on pre-set optimal solution selection rules. The solution with the highest utility was chosen as the optimal solution. In SMOLER, an optimal learning model coupled with clonal selection algorithm was used to optimize model parameters. In this study, PET, CT image features and clinical parameters were utilized for predicting distant failure in lung SBRT. Results: Total 126 solution sets were generated by adjusting predictive model parameters. Each Pareto set contains 100 feasible solutions. The solution selected by SMOLER within each Pareto set was compared to the manually selected optimal solution. Five-cross-validation was used to evaluate the optimal solution selection accuracy of SMOLER. The selection accuracies for five folds were 80.00%, 69.23%, 84.00%, 84.00%, 80.00%, respectively. Conclusion: An optimal solution selection methodology for multi-objective radiomics learning model using the evidential reasoning approach (SMOLER) was proposed. Experimental results show that the optimal solution can be found in approximately 80% cases.

  14. Robust and efficient solution procedures for association models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2006-01-01

    Equations of state that incorporate the Wertheim association expression are more difficult to apply than conventional pressure explicit equations, because the association term is implicit and requires solution for an internal set of composition variables. In this work, we analyze the convergence ...... behavior of different solution methods and demonstrate how a simple and efficient, yet globally convergent, procedure for the solution of the equation of state can be formulated....

  15. Exact and Numerical Solutions of a Spatially-Distributed Mathematical Model for Fluid and Solute Transport in Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Cherniha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mathematical model for solute and fluid transport induced by the osmotic pressure of glucose and albumin with the dependence of several parameters on the hydrostatic pressure is described. In particular, the fractional space available for macromolecules (albumin was used as a typical example and fractional fluid void volume were assumed to be different functions of hydrostatic pressure. In order to find non-uniform steady-state solutions analytically, some mathematical restrictions on the model parameters were applied. Exact formulae (involving hypergeometric functions for the density of fluid flux from blood to tissue and the fluid flux across tissues were constructed. In order to justify the applicability of the analytical results obtained, a wide range of numerical simulations were performed. It was found that the analytical formulae can describe with good approximation the fluid and solute transport (especially the rate of ultrafiltration for a wide range of values of the model parameters.

  16. Green chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, P.

    2006-01-01

    The depletion of world fossil fuel reserves and the involvement of greenhouse gases in the global warming has led to change the industrial and energy policies of most developed countries. The goal is now to reserve petroleum to the uses where it cannot be substituted, to implement renewable raw materials obtained from plants cultivation, and to consider the biodegradability of molecules and of manufactured objects by integrating the lifetime concept in their expected cycle of use. The green chemistry includes the design, development and elaboration of chemical products and processes with the aim of reducing or eliminating the use and generation of harmful compounds for the health and the environment, by adapting the present day operation modes of the chemical industry to the larger framework of the sustainable development. In addition to biofuels, this book reviews the applications of green chemistry in the different industrial processes in concern. Part 1 presents the diversity of the molecules coming from renewable carbon, in particular lignocellulose and the biotechnological processes. Part 2 is devoted to materials and treats of the overall available technological solutions. Part 3 focusses on functional molecules and chemical intermediates, in particular in sugar- and fats-chemistry. Part 4 treats of biofuels under the aspects of their production and use in today's technologies. The last part deals with the global approaches at the environmental and agricultural levels. (J.S.)

  17. Structure-based library design: molecular modelling merges with combinatorial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, H J; Stahl, M

    2000-06-01

    Recent advances in both computational and experimental techniques now allow a very fruitful interplay of computational and combinatorial chemistry in the structure-based design of combinatorial libraries.

  18. Performance of Versions 1,2 and 3 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Duncan, Bryan N.

    2008-01-01

    Version 1 of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOS CCM) was used in the first CCMVa1 model evaluation and forms the basis for several studies of links between ozone and the circulation. That version of the CCM was based on the GEOS-4 GCM. Versions 2 and 3 of the GEOS CCM are based on the GEOS-5 GCM, which retains the "Lin-Rood" dynamical core but has a totally different set of physical parameterizatiOns to GEOS-4. In Version 2 of the GEOS CCM the Goddard stratospheric chemistry module is retained. Difference between Versions 1 and 2 thus reflect the physics changes of the underlying GCMs. Several comparisons between these two models are made, several of which reveal improvements in Version 2 (including a more realistic representation of the interannual variability of the Antarctic vortex). In Version 3 of the GEOS CCM, the stratospheric chemistry mechanism is replaced by the "GMI COMBO" code that includes tropospheric chemistry and different computational approaches. An advantage of this model version. is the reduction of high ozone biases that prevail at low chlorine loadings in Versions 1 and 2. This poster will compare and contrast various aspects of the three model versions that are relevant for understanding interactions between ozone and climate.

  19. An Evaluation of Ozone Dry Deposition in Global Scale Chemistry Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardacre, C.; Wild, O.; Emberson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric oxidants to the Earth's surface or vegetation is important as both a major removal pathway governing their atmospheric abundance and as a key input of oxidants and nutrients to sensitive vegetation surfaces. By linking the atmosphere and biosphere, dry deposition processes contribute to wider climate and Earth system feedbacks which need to be adequately quantified for a full understanding of Earth system responses. In addition, they have immediate policy-relevant implications for air quality, ecosystem health and crop productivity that need to be assessed on local, regional and global scales. In this study we use results from the recent Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) model intercomparison to explore how dry deposition of ozone varies across 15 current atmospheric chemistry and transport models. While most models take a similar, resistances-based approach to parameterising dry deposition, there are substantial differences across the models in the magnitude and variability of the annual and monthly ozone deposition fluxes which contribute to the differences in modelled surface ozone and in the global tropospheric ozone budget. We find that the range in global ozone deposition flux over the HTAP model ensemble spans about 30% with deposition to ocean, grass land and tropical forests being particularly variable. Further, we compare modelled dry deposition of ozone to measurements made at a variety of locations in Europe and North America, noting differences of up to a factor of two but no clear systematic bias over the sites examined. We extend this analysis by running sensitivity studies to determine the importance of key parameters in the ozone dry deposition process, including soil moisture and leaf area index. This study provides an important first step towards quantifying the uncertainty in ozone dry deposition and permitting a more thorough, observation-based evaluation of this important process.

  20. Air traffic simulation in chemistry-climate model EMAC 2.41: AirTraf 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Grewe, Volker; Jöckel, Patrick; Linke, Florian; Schaefer, Martin; Sasaki, Daisuke

    2016-09-01

    Mobility is becoming more and more important to society and hence air transportation is expected to grow further over the next decades. Reducing anthropogenic climate impact from aviation emissions and building a climate-friendly air transportation system are required for a sustainable development of commercial aviation. A climate optimized routing, which avoids climate-sensitive regions by re-routing horizontally and vertically, is an important measure for climate impact reduction. The idea includes a number of different routing strategies (routing options) and shows a great potential for the reduction. To evaluate this, the impact of not only CO2 but also non-CO2 emissions must be considered. CO2 is a long-lived gas, while non-CO2 emissions are short-lived and are inhomogeneously distributed. This study introduces AirTraf (version 1.0) that performs global air traffic simulations, including effects of local weather conditions on the emissions. AirTraf was developed as a new submodel of the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. Air traffic information comprises Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA Revision 3.9) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) engine performance data. Fuel use and emissions are calculated by the total energy model based on the BADA methodology and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) fuel flow method. The flight trajectory optimization is performed by a genetic algorithm (GA) with respect to a selected routing option. In the model development phase, benchmark tests were performed for the great circle and flight time routing options. The first test showed that the great circle calculations were accurate to -0.004 %, compared to those calculated by the Movable Type script. The second test showed that the optimal solution found by the algorithm sufficiently converged to the theoretical true-optimal solution. The difference in flight time between the two solutions is less than 0.01 %. The dependence of