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Sample records for model simulations forced

  1. An Approach for Simulation of the Muscle Force Modeling It by Summation of Motor Unit Contraction Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rositsa Raikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle force is due to the cumulative effect of repetitively contracting motor units (MUs. To simulate the contribution of each MU to whole muscle force, an approach implemented in a novel computer program is proposed. The individual contraction of an MU (the twitch is modeled by a 6-parameter analytical function previously proposed; the force of one MU is a sum of its contractions due to an applied stimulation pattern, and the muscle force is the sum of the active MUs. The number of MUs, the number of slow, fast-fatigue-resistant, and fast-fatigable MUs, and their six parameters as well as a file with stimulation patterns for each MU are inputs for the developed software. Different muscles and different firing patterns can be simulated changing the input data. The functionality of the program is illustrated with a model consisting of 30 MUs of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The twitches of these MUs were experimentally measured and modeled. The forces of the MUs and of the whole muscle were simulated using different stimulation patterns that included different regular, irregular, synchronous, and asynchronous firing patterns of MUs. The size principle of MUs for recruitment and derecruitment was also demonstrated using different stimulation paradigms.

  2. A Heuristic Force Model for Haptic Simulation of Nasogastric Tube Insertion Using Fuzzy Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze; He, Xue-Jian; Chiang, Vico C L; Deng, Zhaohong; Qin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Nasogastric tube (NGT) placement is an essential clinical skill. The training is conventionally performed on rubber mannequins albeit practical limitations. Computer simulation with haptic feedback can potentially offer a more realistic and accessible training method. However, the complex interactions between the tube and the nasogastric passage make it difficult to model the haptic feedback during NGT placement. In this paper, a fuzzy-logic-based approach is proposed to directly transfer the experience of clinicians in NGT placement into the simulation system. Based on their perception of the varying tactile sensation and the conditions during NGT placement, the membership functions and fuzzy rules are defined to develop the force model. Forces created using the model are then combined with friction forces to drive the haptic device and render the insertion forces in real time. A prototype simulator is developed based on the proposed force model and the implementation details are presented. The usability of the prototype is also evaluated by clinical teachers. The proposed methodology has the potential for developing computerized NGT placement training methods for clinical education. It is also applicable for simulation systems involving complicated force interactions or computation-expensive models.

  3. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling

  4. Selecting a Dynamic Simulation Modeling Method for Health Care Delivery Research—Part 2: Report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Deborah A.; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Crown, William; Padula, William V.; Wong, Peter K.; Pasupathy, Kalyan S.; Higashi, Mitchell K.; Osgood, Nathaniel D.

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling c

  5. A Computer Simulation Modeling Approach to Estimating Utility in Several Air Force Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    AL-TR-1992-0006 AD-A252 322 /II" A COMPUTER SIMULATION MODELING A APPROACH TO ESTIMATING UTILITY IN R SEVERAL AIR FORCE SPECIALTIES M Brice M. Stone...I 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED IU 1Q::l.n1 Umrjh 1100 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS A Computer Simulation Modeling Approach...I DTIC TAB 0 Unannounced 0 justificatlon- By Distribut On . Availability Codes Avai an /r Dist Special v A COMPUTER SIMULATION MODELING APPROACH TO

  6. Pre-industrial to Present Day Chemistry Model Simulations: The Role of Different Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P. J.; Lamarque, J.; Kinnison, D. E.; Vitt, F.

    2011-12-01

    We will present the results from several CAM-Chem simulations that span 1850-2010. Simulations where one forcing is fixed at 1850 (or 1930) levels are compared against a "base" simulation, where all the forcings evolve through time. The "fixed" simulations respectively hold (1) methane, (2) all surface/aloft emissions, (3) only aerosol emissions, (4) sea surface temperatures/CO2 (i.e. climate) at their 1850 level, and (5) CFCs at their 1930 level. We will examine the sensitivity of the ozone budget and methane lifetime results under these various scenarios. In particular, we will discuss the potential role of complex interactions in defining the tropospheric ozone burden change. We will make use of those results as a basis for the understanding of the spread in fields from the ongoing Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP).

  7. Improved social force model based on exit selection for microscopic pedestrian simulation in subway station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勋; 李海鹰; 孟令云; 许心越; 陈旭

    2015-01-01

    An improved social force model based on exit selection is proposed to simulate pedestrians’ microscopic behaviors in subway station. The modification lies in considering three factors of spatial distance, occupant density and exit width. In addition, the problem of pedestrians selecting exit frequently is solved as follows: not changing to other exits in the affected area of one exit, using the probability of remaining preceding exit and invoking function of exit selection after several simulation steps. Pedestrians in subway station have some special characteristics, such as explicit destinations, different familiarities with subway station. Finally, Beijing Zoo Subway Station is taken as an example and the feasibility of the model results is verified through the comparison of the actual data and simulation data. The simulation results show that the improved model can depict the microscopic behaviors of pedestrians in subway station.

  8. Numerical simulation on forced convection heat transfer in porous media using Gibson-Ashby constitutive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. X.; Jia, P. Y.; Wang, Y. S.; Jiang, L.

    2010-03-01

    In this article, using Gibson-Ashby constitutive model, we suggest a new method for numerical investigation of forced convection heat transfer in porous foam metal, and try to consolidate the study for mechanical property and that for thermal characteristic. By available experimental data, we simulated to two cases, namely as the transfer in porous media for diameter is 0.6 mm and porosity is 0.402, and for diameter is 1.6 mm and porosity is 0.462. The result, from our constitutive model for single forced convection heat transfer, corresponds well with the experimental data. As for pressure drop prediction in porous is in good agreement with experiment, and the error is only 5% to 10%, but for transfer is less accurate, the error is about 20%, which is acceptable in practice. So it is done that constitutive model is used to simulate the transfer property.

  9. Cloud Radiative Forcing in Asian Monsoon Region Simulated by IPCC AR4 AMIP Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiandong; LIU Yimin; WU Guoxiong

    2009-01-01

    This study examines cloud radiative forcing (CRF) in the Asian monsoon region (0°-50°N,60°-150°E)simulated by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) AMIP models.During boreal winter,no model realistically reproduces the larger long-wave cloud radiative forcing (LWCF) over the Tibet Plateau (TP) and only a couple of models reasonably capture the larger short-wave CRF (SWCF) to the east of the TP.During boreal summer,there are larger biases for central location and intensity of simulated CRF in active convective regions.The CRF biases are closely related to the rainfall biases in the models.Quantitative analysis further indicates that the correlation between simulated CRF and observations are not high,and that the biases and diversity in SWCF are larger than that in LWCF.The annual cycle of simulated CRF over East Asia (0°-50°N,100°-145°E) is also examined.Though many models capture the basic annual cycle in tropics,strong LWCF and SWCF to the east of the TP beginning in early spring are underestimated by most models.As a whole,GFDL-CM2.1,MPI-ECHAM5,UKMO-HadGAM1,and MIROC3.2 (medres) perform well for CRF simulation in the Asian monsoon region,and the multi-model ensemble (MME) has improved results over the individual simulations. It is suggested that strengthening the physical parameterizations involved over the TP,and improving cumulus convection processes and model experiment design are crucial to CRF simulation in the Asian monsoon region.

  10. Charge-Spot Model for Electrostatic Forces in Simulation of Fine Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.; Johnson, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The charge-spot technique for modeling the static electric forces acting between charged fine particles entails treating electric charges on individual particles as small sets of discrete point charges, located near their surfaces. This is in contrast to existing models, which assume a single charge per particle. The charge-spot technique more accurately describes the forces, torques, and moments that act on triboelectrically charged particles, especially image-charge forces acting near conducting surfaces. The discrete element method (DEM) simulation uses a truncation range to limit the number of near-neighbor charge spots via a shifted and truncated potential Coulomb interaction. The model can be readily adapted to account for induced dipoles in uncharged particles (and thus dielectrophoretic forces) by allowing two charge spots of opposite signs to be created in response to an external electric field. To account for virtual overlap during contacts, the model can be set to automatically scale down the effective charge in proportion to the amount of virtual overlap of the charge spots. This can be accomplished by mimicking the behavior of two real overlapping spherical charge clouds, or with other approximate forms. The charge-spot method much more closely resembles real non-uniform surface charge distributions that result from tribocharging than simpler approaches, which just assign a single total charge to a particle. With the charge-spot model, a single particle may have a zero net charge, but still have both positive and negative charge spots, which could produce substantial forces on the particle when it is close to other charges, when it is in an external electric field, or when near a conducting surface. Since the charge-spot model can contain any number of charges per particle, can be used with only one or two charge spots per particle for simulating charging from solar wind bombardment, or with several charge spots for simulating triboelectric charging

  11. Simulator for virtual surgery using deformable organ models and force feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, N; Hattori, A; Ezumi, T; Uchiyama, A; Kumano, T; Ikemoto, A; Adachi, Y; Takatsu, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a real-time surgery planning system using virtual reality techniques. This system allows us to simulate incision of skin and organs which respond as elastic objects with surgical tools in virtual space. Inner structures such as blood vessels and lesions can be seen and manipulated in the simulation. In addition to these functions we attempted to add a feedback function that responds to the operator's hands. We developed a force feedback device to manipulate the elastic organ model based on pressure from the operator's fingers.

  12. An actuator line model simulation with optimal body force projection length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    In recent work (Martínez-Tossas et al. "Optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades", preprint), an optimal body force projection length-scale for an actuator line model has been obtained. This optimization is based on 2-D aerodynamics and is done by comparing an analytical solution of inviscid linearized flow over a Gaussian body force to the potential flow solution of flow over a Joukowski airfoil. The optimization provides a non-dimensional optimal scale ɛ / c for different Joukowski airfoils, where ɛ is the width of the Gaussian kernel and c is the chord. A Gaussian kernel with different widths in the chord and thickness directions can further reduce the error. The 2-D theory developed is extended by simulating a full scale rotor using the optimal body force projection length scales. Using these values, the tip losses are captured by the LES and thus, no additional explicit tip-loss correction is needed for the actuator line model. The simulation with the optimal values provides excellent agreement with Blade Element Momentum Theory. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant OISE-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  13. Polarizable Mean-Field Model of Water for Biological Simulations with Amber and Charmm force fields

    CERN Document Server

    Leontyev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although a great number of computational models of water are available today, the majority of current biological simulations are done with simple models, such as TIP3P and SPC, developed almost thirty years ago and only slightly modified since then. The reason is that the non-polarizable force fields that are mostly used to describe proteins and other biological molecules are incompatible with more sophisticated modern polarizable models of water. The issue is electronic polarizability: in liquid state, in protein, and in vacuum the water molecule is polarized differently, and therefore has different properties; thus the only way to describe all these different media with the same model is to use a polarizable water model. However, to be compatible with the force field of the rest of the system, e.g. a protein, the latter should be polarizable as well. Here we describe a novel model of water that is in effect polarizable, and yet compatible with the standard non-polarizable force fields such as AMBER, CHARMM,...

  14. Streamwise-body-force-model for rapid simulation combining internal and external flow fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Rong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A streamwise-body-force-model (SBFM is developed and applied in the overall flow simulation for the distributed propulsion system, combining internal and external flow fields. In view of axial stage effects, fan or compressor effects could be simplified as body forces along the streamline. These body forces which are functions of local parameters could be added as source terms in Navier-Stokes equations to replace solid boundary conditions of blades and hubs. The validation of SBFM with uniform inlet and distortion inlet of compressors shows that pressure performance characteristics agree well with experimental data. A three-dimensional simulation of the integration configuration, via a blended wing body aircraft with a distributed propulsion system using the SBFM, has been completed. Lift coefficient and drag coefficient agree well with wind tunnel test results. Results show that to reach the goal of rapid integrated simulation combining internal and external flow fields, the computational fluid dynamics method based on SBFM is reasonable.

  15. Empirical tight-binding force model for molecular-dynamics simulation of Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1989-04-01

    A scheme of molecular-dynamics simulation using the empirical tight-binding force model is proposed. The scheme allows the interatomic interactions involved in the molecular dynamics to be determined by first-principles total-energy and electronic-structure calculations without resorting to fitting experimental data. For a first application of the scheme we show that a very simple nearest-neighbor two-center empirical tight-binding force model is able to stabilize the diamond structure of Si within a reasonable temperature range. We also show that the scheme makes possible the quantitative calculation of the temperature dependence of various anharmonic effects such as lattice thermal expansion, temperature-dependent phonon linewidths, and phonon frequency shifts.

  16. Mathematical Model and Simulation of Cutting Force in Plunge Milling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Plunge milling is a high-speed machining way and the cutter is fed in the direction of the Z axis, which is used to remove excess material rapidly in roughing operations. In this paper, the orthogonal cutting theory was used to study the plunge milling of LY12 alloy. A mathematic model for cutting force in plunge milling was established, and the milling process was simulated by using Matlab. It is found that the single tooth cutting experimental result is unstable because of unsymmetrical single tooth in the milling process, which leads to the difference between the simulation and experimental results. The trend of multiple teeth cutting experimental result is similar to that of the simulation result; however, the peak values in the experimental result are different, which is caused by the error of cutter's position, and the error of peak value is less than 10%.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  18. Transient aerodynamic forces on a fighter model during simulated approach and landing with thrust reversers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, A. P.; Paulson, J. W., Jr.; Kemmerly, G. T.

    1988-01-01

    Previous wind tunnel tests of fighter configurations have shown that thrust reverser jets can induce large, unsteady aerodynamic forces and moments during operation in ground proximity. This is a concern for STOL configurations using partial reversing to spoil the thrust while keeping the engine output near military (MIL) power during landing approach. A novel test technique to simulate approach and landing was developed under a cooperative Northrop/NASA/USAF program. The NASA LaRC Vortex Research Facility was used for the experiments in which a 7-percent F-18 model was moved horizontally at speeds of up to 100 feet per second over a ramp simulating an aircraft to ground rate of closure similar to a no-flare STOL approach and landing. This paper presents an analysis of data showing the effect of reverser jet orientation and jet dynamic pressure ratio on the transient forces for different angles of attack, and flap and horizontal tail deflection. It was found, for reverser jets acting parallel to the plane of symmetry, that the jets interacted strongly with the ground, starting approximately half a span above the ground board. Unsteady rolling moment transients, large enough to cause the probable upset of an aircraft, and strong normal force and pitching moment transients were measured. For jets directed 40 degrees outboard, the transients were similar to the jet-off case, implying only minor interaction.

  19. The evolutionary forces maintaining a wild polymorphism of Littorina saxatilis: model selection by computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Figueroa, A; Cruz, F; Carvajal-Rodríguez, A; Rolán-Alvarez, E; Caballero, A

    2005-01-01

    Two rocky shore ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis from north-west Spain live at different shore levels and habitats and have developed an incomplete reproductive isolation through size assortative mating. The system is regarded as an example of sympatric ecological speciation. Several experiments have indicated that different evolutionary forces (migration, assortative mating and habitat-dependent selection) play a role in maintaining the polymorphism. However, an assessment of the combined contributions of these forces supporting the observed pattern in the wild is absent. A model selection procedure using computer simulations was used to investigate the contribution of the different evolutionary forces towards the maintenance of the polymorphism. The agreement between alternative models and experimental estimates for a number of parameters was quantified by a least square method. The results of the analysis show that the fittest evolutionary model for the observed polymorphism is characterized by a high gene flow, intermediate-high reproductive isolation between ecotypes, and a moderate to strong selection against the nonresident ecotypes on each shore level. In addition, a substantial number of additive loci contributing to the selected trait and a narrow hybrid definition with respect to the phenotype are scenarios that better explain the polymorphism, whereas the ecotype fitnesses at the mid-shore, the level of phenotypic plasticity, and environmental effects are not key parameters.

  20. A 3-D nonisothermal flow simulation and pulling force model for injection pultrusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ibrahim

    1998-12-01

    Injected Pultrusion (IP) is an efficient way of producing high quality, low cost, high volume and constant cross-section polymeric composites. This process has been developed recently, and the efforts to optimize it are still underway. This work is related to the development of a 3-D non-isothermal flow model for the IP processes. The governing equations for transport of mass, momentum and, energy are formulated by using a local volume averaging approach, and the Finite Element/Control Volume method is used to solve the system of equations numerically. The chemical species balance equation is solved in the Lagrangian frame of reference whereas the energy equation is solved using Galerkin, SU (Streamline Upwind), and SUPG (Streamline Upwind Petrov Galerkin) approaches. By varying degrees of freedom and the flow rates of the resin, it is shown that at high Peclet numbers the SUPG formulation performs better than the SU and the Galerkin methods in all cases. The 3-D model predictions for degree of cure and temperature are compared with a one dimensional analytical solution and the results are found satisfactory. Moreover, by varying the Brinkman Number, it is shown that the effect of viscous dissipation is insignificant. The 3-D flow simulations have been carried out for both thin and thick parts and the results are compared with the 2-D model. It is shown that for thick parts 2-D simulations render erroneous results. The effect of changing permeability on the flow fronts is also addressed. The effect of increasing taper angle on the model prediction is also investigated. A parametric study is conducted to isolate optimum conditions for both isothermal and non-isothermal cases using a straight rectangular die and a die with a tapered inlet. Finally, a simple pulling force model is developed and the pulling force required to pull the carbon-epoxy fiber resin system is estimated for dies of varying tapered inlet.

  1. Modeling of adhesion in tablet compression - I. atomic force microscopy and molecular simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. J.; Li, T.; Bateman, S. D.; Erck, R.; Morris, K. R.; Energy Technology; Purdue Univ.; Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

    2003-04-01

    Adhesion problems during tablet manufacturing have been observed to be dependent on many formulation and process factors including the run time on the tablet press. Consequently, problems due to sticking may only become apparent towards the end of the development process when a prolonged run on the tablet press is attempted for the first time. It would be beneficial to predict in a relative sense if a formulation or new chemical entity has the potential for adhesion problems early in the development process. It was hypothesized that favorable intermolecular interaction between the drug molecules and the punch face is the first step or criterion in the adhesion process. Therefore, the rank order of adhesion during tablet compression should follow the rank order of these energies of interaction. The adhesion phenomenon was investigated using molecular simulations and contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three model compounds were chosen from a family of profen compounds. Silicon nitride AFM tips were modified by coating a 20-nm iron layer on the surfaces by sputter coating. Profen flat surfaces were made by melting and recrystallization. The modified AFM probe and each profen surface were immersed in the corresponding profen saturated water during force measurements using AFM. The work of adhesion between iron and ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and flurbiprofen in vacuum were determined to be -184.1, -2469.3, -17.3 mJ {center_dot} m-2, respectively. The rank order of the work of adhesion between iron and profen compounds decreased in the order: ketoprofen > ibuprofen > flurbiprofen. The rank order of interaction between the drug molecules and the iron superlattice as predicted by molecular simulation using Cerius2 is in agreement with the AFM measurements. It has been demonstrated that Atomic Force Microscopy is a powerful tool in studying the adhesion phenomena between organic drug compounds and metal surface. The study has provided insight into the adhesion problems

  2. Analysing and combining atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by prescribed SST: northern extratropical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Maynard

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ECHAM 3.2 (T21, ECHAM 4 (T30 and LMD (version 6, grid-point resolution with 96 longitudes × 72 latitudes atmospheric general circulation models were integrated through the period 1961 to 1993 forced with the same observed Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs as compiled at the Hadley Centre. Three runs were made for each model starting from different initial conditions. The mid-latitude circulation pattern which maximises the covariance between the simulation and the observations, i.e. the most skilful mode, and the one which maximises the covariance amongst the runs, i.e. the most reproducible mode, is calculated as the leading mode of a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD analysis of observed and simulated Sea Level Pressure (SLP and geopotential height at 500 hPa (Z500 seasonal anomalies. A common response amongst the different models, having different resolution and parametrization should be considered as a more robust atmospheric response to SST than the same response obtained with only one model. A robust skilful mode is found mainly in December-February (DJF, and in June-August (JJA. In DJF, this mode is close to the SST-forced pattern found by Straus and Shukla (2000 over the North Pacific and North America with a wavy out-of-phase between the NE Pacific and the SE US on the one hand and the NE North America on the other. This pattern evolves in a NAO-like pattern over the North Atlantic and Europe (SLP and in a more N-S tripole on the Atlantic and European sector with an out-of-phase between the middle Europe on the one hand and the northern and southern parts on the other (Z500. There are almost no spatial shifts between either field around North America (just a slight eastward shift of the highest absolute heterogeneous correlations for SLP relative to the Z500 ones. The time evolution of the SST-forced mode is moderatly to strongly related to the ENSO/LNSO events but the spread amongst the ensemble of runs is not systematically related

  3. Analysing and combining atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by prescribed SST. Northern extra tropical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, V. [Universite' de Provence, UFR des sciences geographiques et de l' amenagement, Aix-en-Provence (France); Navarra, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Ward, M. N. [University of Oklahoma, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman OK (United States); Foland, C. K. [Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research, Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Friederichs, P. [Meteorologisches Institute des Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Maynard, K.; Polcher, J. [Paris Universite' Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris

    2001-08-01

    The ECHAM 3.2 (T21), ECHAM 4 (T30) and LMD (version 6, grid-point resolution with 96 longitudes x 72 latitudes) atmospheric general circulation models were integrated through the period 1961 to 1993 forced with the same observed Sa Surface Temperatures (SSTs) as compiled at the Hadley Centre. Three runs were made for each model starting from different initial conditions. The mid-latitude circulation pattern which maximises the covariance between the simulation and the observations, i.e. the most skilful mode, and the one which maximises the covariance amongst the runs, i.e. the most reproducible mode, is calculated as the leading mode of a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis of observed and simulated Sea Level Pressure (SLP) and geo potential height at 500 hPa (Z500) seasonal anomalies. A common response amongst the different models, having different resolution and parametrization should be considered as a more robust atmospheric response to SST than the sam response obtained with only one model A robust skilful mode is found mainly in December-February (DJF), and in June-August (JJA). In DJF, this mode is close to the SST-forced pattern found by Straus nd Shukla (2000) over the North Pacific and North America with a wavy out-of-phase between the NE Pacific and the SE US on the one hand and the NE North America on the other. This pattern evolves in a NAO-like pattern over the North Atlantic and Europe (SLP) and in a more N-S tripote on the Atlantic and European sector with an out-of-phase between the middle Europe on the one hand and the northern and southern parts on the other (Z500). There are almost no spatial shifts between either field around North America (just a slight eastward shift of the highest absolute heterogenous correlations for SLP relative to the Z500 ones). The time evolution of the SST-forced mode is moderately to strongly related to the ENSO/LNSO events but the spread amongst the ensemble of runs is not systematically related at all to

  4. A free energy-based surface tension force model for simulation of multiphase flows by level-set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, H. Z.; Chen, Z.; Shu, C.; Wang, Y.; Niu, X. D.; Shu, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a free energy-based surface tension force (FESF) model is presented for accurately resolving the surface tension force in numerical simulation of multiphase flows by the level set method. By using the analytical form of order parameter along the normal direction to the interface in the phase-field method and the free energy principle, FESF model offers an explicit and analytical formulation for the surface tension force. The only variable in this formulation is the normal distance to the interface, which can be substituted by the distance function solved by the level set method. On one hand, as compared to conventional continuum surface force (CSF) model in the level set method, FESF model introduces no regularized delta function, due to which it suffers less from numerical diffusions and performs better in mass conservation. On the other hand, as compared to the phase field surface tension force (PFSF) model, the evaluation of surface tension force in FESF model is based on an analytical approach rather than numerical approximations of spatial derivatives. Therefore, better numerical stability and higher accuracy can be expected. Various numerical examples are tested to validate the robustness of the proposed FESF model. It turns out that FESF model performs better than CSF model and PFSF model in terms of accuracy, stability, convergence speed and mass conservation. It is also shown in numerical tests that FESF model can effectively simulate problems with high density/viscosity ratio, high Reynolds number and severe topological interfacial changes.

  5. A simple and efficient quasi 3-dimensional viscoelastic model and software for simulation of tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a quasi-3-dimensional (Q3D) viscoelastic model and software tool for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) simulations. The model is based on a 2-dimensional array of standard linear solid (SLS) model elements. The well-known 1-dimensional SLS model is a textbook example in viscoelastic theory but is relatively new in AFM simulation. It is the simplest model that offers a qualitatively correct description of the most fundamental viscoelastic behaviors, namely stress relaxation and creep. However, this simple model does not reflect the correct curvature in the repulsive portion of the force curve, so its application in the quantitative interpretation of AFM experiments is relatively limited. In the proposed Q3D model the use of an array of SLS elements leads to force curves that have the typical upward curvature in the repulsive region, while still offering a very low computational cost. Furthermore, the use of a multidimensional model allows for the study of AFM tips having non-ideal geometries, which can be extremely useful in practice. Examples of typical force curves are provided for single- and multifrequency tapping-mode imaging, for both of which the force curves exhibit the expected features. Finally, a software tool to simulate amplitude and phase spectroscopy curves is provided, which can be easily modified to implement other controls schemes in order to aid in the interpretation of AFM experiments.

  6. Polarizable simulations with second order interaction model (POSSIM) force field: developing parameters for protein side-chain analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sa, Qina; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Kaminski, George A

    2013-05-30

    A previously introduced polarizable simulations with second-order interaction model (POSSIM) force field has been extended to include parameters for small molecules serving as models for peptide and protein side-chains. Parameters have been fitted to permit reproducing many-body energies, gas-phase dimerization energies, and geometries and liquid-phase heats of vaporization and densities. Quantum mechanical and experimental data have been used as the target for the fitting. The POSSIM framework combines accuracy of a polarizable force field and computational efficiency of the second-order approximation of the full-scale induced point dipole polarization formalism. The resulting parameters can be used for simulations of the parameterized molecules themselves or their analogues. In addition to this, these force field parameters are currently being used in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins.

  7. Internal and forced climate variability during the last millennium: a model-data comparison using ensemble simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goosse, Hugues; Renssen, Hans; Timmermann, Axel; Bradley, Raymond S.

    2005-07-01

    A three-dimensional climate model was used to perform 25 simulations over the last millennium, which are driven by the main natural and anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared to available reconstructions in order to evaluate the relative contribution of internal and forced variability during this period. At hemispheric and nearly hemispheric scale, the impact of the forcing is clear in all the simulations and knowing the forced response provides already a large amount of information about the behaviour of the climate system. Besides, at regional and local scales, the forcing has only a weak contribution to the simulated variability compared to internal variability. This result could be used to refine our conception of Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age (MWP and LIA). They were hemispheric-scale phenomena, since the temperature averaged over the Northern Hemisphere was, respectively generally higher/lower during those periods because of a stronger/weaker external forcing at that time. Nevertheless, at local-scale, the sign of the internal temperature variations determines to what extent the forced response will be actually visible or even masked by internal noise. Because of this role of internal variability, synchronous peak temperatures during the MWP or LIA between different locations are unlikely.

  8. The Application of Computer Musculoskeletal Modeling and Simulation to Investigate Compressive Tibiofemoral Force and Muscle Functions in Obese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to utilize musculoskeletal modelling and simulation to investigate the compressive tibiofemoral force and individual muscle function in obese children. We generated a 3D muscle-driven simulation of eight obese and eight normal-weight boys walking at their self-selected speed. The compressive tibiofemoral force and individual muscle contribution to the support and progression accelerations of center of mass (COM were computed for each participant based on the subject-specific model. The simulated results were verified by comparing them to the experimental kinematics and EMG data. We found a linear relationship between the average self-selected speed and the normalized peak compressive tibiofemoral force (R2=0.611. The activity of the quadriceps contributed the most to the peak compressive tibiofemoral force during the stance phase. Obese children and nonobese children use similar muscles to support and accelerate the body COM, but nonobese children had significantly greater contributions of individual muscles. The obese children may therefore adopt a compensation strategy to avoid increasing joint loads and muscle requirements during walking. The absolute compressive tibiofemoral force and muscle forces were still greater in obese children. The long-term biomechanical adaptations of the musculoskeletal system to accommodate the excess body weight during walking are a concern.

  9. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  10. Computer simulations reveal complex distribution of haemodynamic forces in a mouse retina model of angiogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, Miguel O; Jones, Martin; Nielsen, Jens H; Krüger, Timm; Nash, Rupert W; Groen, Derek; Hetherington, James; Gerhardt, Holger; Coveney, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    There is currently limited understanding of the role played by haemodynamic forces on the processes governing vascular development. One of many obstacles to be overcome is being able to measure those forces, at the required resolution level, on vessels only a few micrometres thick. In the current paper, we present an in silico method for the computation of the haemodynamic forces experienced by murine retinal vasculature (a widely used vascular development animal model) beyond what is measurable experimentally. Our results show that it is possible to reconstruct high-resolution three-dimensional geometrical models directly from samples of retinal vasculature and that the lattice-Boltzmann algorithm can be used to obtain accurate estimates of the haemodynamics in these domains. Our findings show that the flow patterns recovered are complex, that branches of predominant flow exist from early development stages, and that the pruning process tends to make the wall shear stress experienced by the capillaries incre...

  11. Simulation of Metal Flow During Friction Stir Welding Based on the Model of Interactive Force Between Tool and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Shi, Q. Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Horie, T.

    2014-04-01

    In this research, the three-dimensional flow of metal in friction stir welding (FSW) has been simulated based on computational fluid dynamics. Conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy were solved in three dimensions. The interactive force was imposed as boundary conditions on the tool/material boundary in the model. The strain rate- and temperature-dependent non-Newtonian viscosity was adopted for the calculation of metal flow. The distribution of temperature, velocity, and strain rate were simulated based on the above models. The simulated temperature distribution agreed well with the experimental results. The simulation results showed that the velocity on the pin was much higher than that on the shoulder. From the comparison between the simulation results and the experiments results, contours line, corresponding to strain rate = 4 s-1, reflected reasonably well the shape of stir zone, especially at the ground portion.

  12. Can an Atmospherically Forced Ocean Model Accurately Simulate Sea Surface Temperature During ENSO Events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and no date-specific assimilation of any data type. The ability of the model in simulating temporal variations of SST anomalies is discussed by...SST data and no date-specific assimilation of any datatype. The ability of the model in simulating temporal variations of SST anomalies is...directly provided by the originator. This clima - tology does not take the existence of ice into account (i.e. treats it as a data void). Thus, we

  13. Large-eddy simulations of forced isotropic turbulence with viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Pedro O.; Pinho, Fernando T.; da Silva, Carlos B.

    2016-12-01

    A new subgrid-scale (SGS) model developed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of dilute polymer solutions, described by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic constitutive equation closed with the Peterlin approximation, is presented. In this distortion similarity model (DSIM) the filtered conformation tensor evolution equation is based on the self-similarity of the polymer stretching terms, and on a global equilibrium of the trace of the conformation tensor, which is proportional to the elastic energy stored in the polymer molecules, while the SGS stresses are modelled with the classical Smagorinsky model. The DSIM closure is assessed in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of forced isotropic turbulence using classical a priori tests, and in a posteriori (LES) showing very good agreement with all the exact (filtered DNS) results. The DSIM model is simple to implement and computationally inexpensive and represents a major step forward in the numerical simulation of turbulent flows of Newtonian fluids with polymer additives.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Nanorobotics Modelling, Simulation, Setup Building and Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hui; Régnier, Stéphane; Sitti, Metin

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has been successfully used to perform nanorobotic manipulation operations on nanoscale entities such as particles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanocrystals, and DNA since 1990s. There have been many progress on modeling, imaging, teleoperated or automated control, human-machine interfacing, instrumentation, and applications of AFM based nanorobotic manipulation systems in literature. This book aims to include all of such state-of-the-art progress in an organized, structured, and detailed manner as a reference book and also potentially a textbook in nanorobotics and any other nanoscale dynamics, systems and controls related research and education. Clearly written and well-organized, this text introduces designs and prototypes of the nanorobotic systems in detail with innovative principles of three-dimensional manipulation force microscopy and parallel imaging/manipulation force microscopy.

  15. Forcing of a photochemical air quality model with atmospheric fields simulated by a regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available . Sophisticated numerical models are required to describe such complexity, and need to take into account all meteorological and emission changes, as well as apply relevant dispersion and chemistry to solving variation in pollutant concentration. The capacity...

  16. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Kaminski, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbones. New features were introduced into the fitting protocol, as compared to the previous generation of the polarizable force field for proteins. A reduced amount of quantum mechanical data was employed in fitting the electrostatic parameters. Transferability of the electrostatics between our recently developed NMA model and the protein backbone was confirmed. Binding energy and geometry for complexes of alanine dipeptide with a water molecule were estimated and found in a good agreement with high-level quantum mechanical results (for example, the intermolecular distances agreeing within ca. 0.06Å). Following the previously devised procedure, we calculated average errors in alanine di- and tetra-peptide conformational energies and backbone angles and found the agreement to be adequate (for example, the alanine tetrapeptide extended-globular conformational energy gap was calculated to be 3.09 kcal/mol quantim mechanically and 3.14 kcal/mol with the POSSIM force field). However, we have now also included simulation of a simple alpha-helix in both gas-phase and water as the ultimate test of the backbone conformational behavior. The resulting alanine and protein backbone force field is currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:21743799

  17. As Simple As Possible, but Not Simpler: Exploring the Fidelity of Coarse-Grained Protein Models for Simulated Force Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottler, Jörg; Plotkin, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical unfolding of a single domain of loop-truncated superoxide dismutase protein has been simulated via force spectroscopy techniques with both all-atom (AA) models and several coarse-grained models having different levels of resolution: A Gō model containing all heavy atoms in the protein (HA-Gō), the associative memory, water mediated, structure and energy model (AWSEM) which has 3 interaction sites per amino acid, and a Gō model containing only one interaction site per amino acid at the Cα position (Cα-Gō). To systematically compare results across models, the scales of time, energy, and force had to be suitably renormalized in each model. Surprisingly, the HA-Gō model gives the softest protein, exhibiting much smaller force peaks than all other models after the above renormalization. Clustering to render a structural taxonomy as the protein unfolds showed that the AA, HA-Gō, and Cα-Gō models exhibit a single pathway for early unfolding, which eventually bifurcates repeatedly to multiple branches only after the protein is about half-unfolded. The AWSEM model shows a single dominant unfolding pathway over the whole range of unfolding, in contrast to all other models. TM alignment, clustering analysis, and native contact maps show that the AWSEM pathway has however the most structural similarity to the AA model at high nativeness, but the least structural similarity to the AA model at low nativeness. In comparison to the AA model, the sequence of native contact breakage is best predicted by the HA-Gō model. All models consistently predict a similar unfolding mechanism for early force-induced unfolding events, but diverge in their predictions for late stage unfolding events when the protein is more significantly disordered. PMID:27898663

  18. Applying dynamic simulation modeling methods in health care delivery research-the SIMULATE checklist: report of the ISPOR simulation modeling emerging good practices task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Osgood, Nathaniel D; Padula, William V; Higashi, Mitchell K; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Crown, William

    2015-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are inherently complex, consisting of multiple tiers of interdependent subsystems and processes that are adaptive to changes in the environment and behave in a nonlinear fashion. Traditional health technology assessment and modeling methods often neglect the wider health system impacts that can be critical for achieving desired health system goals and are often of limited usefulness when applied to complex health systems. Researchers and health care decision makers can either underestimate or fail to consider the interactions among the people, processes, technology, and facility designs. Health care delivery system interventions need to incorporate the dynamics and complexities of the health care system context in which the intervention is delivered. This report provides an overview of common dynamic simulation modeling methods and examples of health care system interventions in which such methods could be useful. Three dynamic simulation modeling methods are presented to evaluate system interventions for health care delivery: system dynamics, discrete event simulation, and agent-based modeling. In contrast to conventional evaluations, a dynamic systems approach incorporates the complexity of the system and anticipates the upstream and downstream consequences of changes in complex health care delivery systems. This report assists researchers and decision makers in deciding whether these simulation methods are appropriate to address specific health system problems through an eight-point checklist referred to as the SIMULATE (System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence) tool. It is a primer for researchers and decision makers working in health care delivery and implementation sciences who face complex challenges in delivering effective and efficient care that can be addressed with system interventions. On reviewing this report, the readers should be able to identify whether these simulation modeling

  19. Numerical Simulation of a Grinding Process for the Spatial Work-pieces: Modeling of Grinding Forces and System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kiselev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a computation-experimental technique to determine model coefficients of grinding forces using a Nelder-Mead algorithm. As an error function, the paper offers a deviation measure of calculating and experimental grinding forces averaged for a single-pass of the grinding wheel. As an example of cutting forces model coefficients calculation for linear model, in which the grinding forces depend on uncut chip thickness is analyzed. The coefficients vary on abrasive grain geometric parameters and are determined applying the authors-developed method based on Nelder-Mead technique. The measured forces while plane grinding of test work-piece are used to determine the coefficients. Model coefficients are identified if compare the measured data with the results of modeling for grinding by tool with the uniformly distributed abrasive grains with the triangular shape of cutting edge.Grinding dynamics simulation applying the determined coefficients was carried out for the processing of cantilever plane work-piece as a test example. The work-piece was processed by grinding wheel transverse passages made at different distances from the fixation. A selfoscillating process accompanied by vibration of high level was observed for some selected technological parameters of grinding. The simulation has shown qualitative and quantitative compliance with the experiment. It was shown that the intensity of the self-oscillating process arising during the processing depends on the work-piece rigidity and cutting conditions. The results of modeling can be applied in practice in developing the technology process of grinding the spatial work-pieces.

  20. Assessing the relative importance of parameter and forcing uncertainty and their interactions in conceptual hydrological model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockler, E. M.; Chun, K. P.; Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Bruen, M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-11-01

    Predictions of river flow dynamics provide vital information for many aspects of water management including water resource planning, climate adaptation, and flood and drought assessments. Many of the subjective choices that modellers make including model and criteria selection can have a significant impact on the magnitude and distribution of the output uncertainty. Hydrological modellers are tasked with understanding and minimising the uncertainty surrounding streamflow predictions before communicating the overall uncertainty to decision makers. Parameter uncertainty in conceptual rainfall-runoff models has been widely investigated, and model structural uncertainty and forcing data have been receiving increasing attention. This study aimed to assess uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to forcing data and the identification of behavioural parameter sets in 31 Irish catchments. By combining stochastic rainfall ensembles and multiple parameter sets for three conceptual rainfall-runoff models, an analysis of variance model was used to decompose the total uncertainty in streamflow simulations into contributions from (i) forcing data, (ii) identification of model parameters and (iii) interactions between the two. The analysis illustrates that, for our subjective choices, hydrological model selection had a greater contribution to overall uncertainty, while performance criteria selection influenced the relative intra-annual uncertainties in streamflow predictions. Uncertainties in streamflow predictions due to the method of determining parameters were relatively lower for wetter catchments, and more evenly distributed throughout the year when the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency of logarithmic values of flow (lnNSE) was the evaluation criterion.

  1. Analysing and combining atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by prescribed SST. Tropical response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moron, V. [Universite' de Provence, UFR des sciences geographiques et de l' amenagement, Aix-en-Provence (France); Navarra, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Ward, M. N. [University of Oklahoma, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman OK (United States); Foland, C. K. [Hadley Center for Climate Prediction and Research, Meteorological Office, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Friederichs, P. [Meteorologisches Institute des Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Maynard, K.; Polcher, J. [Paris Universite' Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Paris

    2001-08-01

    The ECHAM 3.2 (T21), ECHAM (T30) and LMD (version 6, grid-point resolution with 96 longitudes x 72 latitudes) atmospheric general circulation models were integrated through the period 1961 to 1993 forces with the same observed Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) as compiled at the Hadley Centre. Three runs were made for each model starting from different initial conditions. The large-scale tropical inter-annual variability is analysed to give a picture of a skill of each model and of some sort of combination of the three models. To analyse the similarity of model response averaged over the same key regions, several widely-used indices are calculated: Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), large-scale wind shear indices of the boreal summer monsoon in Asia and West Africa and rainfall indices for NE Brazil, Sahel and India. Even for the indices where internal noise is large, some years are consistent amongst all the runs, suggesting inter-annual variability of the strength of SST forcing. Averaging the ensemble mean of the three models (the super-ensemble mean) yields improved skill. When each run is weighted according to its skill, taking three runs from different models instead of three runs of the same model improves the mean skill. There is also some indication that one run of a given model could be better than another, suggesting that persistent anomalies could change its sensitivity to SST. The index approach lacks flexibility to assess whether a model's response to SST has been geographically displaced. It can focus on the first mode in the global tropics, found through singular value decomposition analysis, which is clearly related to El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in all seasons. The Observed-Model and Model-Model analyses lead to almost the same patterns, suggesting that the dominant pattern of model response is also the most skilful mode. Seasonal modulation of both skill and spatial patterns (both model and observed) clearly exists with highest skill

  2. Borehole model for simulation transport geothermal heat with heat pipe system and with forced circulation of heat carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhard Richard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the call OPVaV-2008/2.2/01-SORO Operational Programme Research and Development - knowledge and technology transfer from research and development into practice (ITMS-26220220057, whose strategic goal is "Device to use low-potential geothermal heat without forced circulation of heat carrier deep in the well "in the Department of Energy laboratory techniques to construct a simulator of transport low potential of geothermal energy in comparative test-drilling in the laboratory. The article describes a device that was designed as a scale model of two deep boreholes each of which withdraws the earth's heat by heat transfer technology and heat carrier. Device using forced circulation of heat carrier will respond in the construction of equipment currently used to transport heat from deep borehole. As the heat carrier will be used CO2. Facilities without using forced circulation of heat carrier, the new technology, which will be used as heat carrier ammonia (NH3.

  3. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wefstaedt Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS- model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT- and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI- data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in

  4. Improved snowmelt simulations with a canopy model forced with photo-derived direct beam canopy transmissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Keith N.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Lehning, Michael; Gustafsson, David

    2012-10-01

    The predictive capacity of a physically based snow model to simulate point-scale, subcanopy snowmelt dynamics is evaluated in a mixed conifer forest, southern Sierra Nevada, California. Three model scenarios each providing varying levels of canopy structure detail were tested. Simulations of three water years initialized at locations of 24 ultrasonic snow depth sensors were evaluated against observations of snow water equivalent (SWE), snow disappearance date, and volumetric soil water content. When canopy model parameters canopy openness and effective leaf area index were obtained from satellite and literature-based sources, respectively, the model was unable to resolve the variable subcanopy snowmelt dynamics. When canopy parameters were obtained from hemispherical photos, the improvements were not statistically significant. However, when the model was modified to accept photo-derived time-varying direct beam canopy transmissivity, the error in the snow disappearance date was reduced by as much as one week and positive and negative biases in melt-season SWE and snow cover duration were significantly reduced. Errors in the timing of soil meltwater fluxes were reduced by 11 days on average. The optimum aggregated temporal model resolution of direct beam canopy transmissivity was determined to be 30 min; hourly averages performed no better than the bulk canopy scenarios and finer time steps did not increase overall model accuracy. The improvements illustrate the important contribution of direct shortwave radiation to subcanopy snowmelt and confirm the known nonlinear melt behavior of snow cover.

  5. Assessment of 3D-RANS models for the simulation of topographically forced shallow flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarzadeh Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the performance of Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulations to predict the flow structure developed by the presence of a sidewall obstacle in a uniform open-channel shallow flow is discussed. The tested geometry was selected due to its important role in several fluvial applications, such as the control of riverbank erosion and the creation of improved ecological conditions in river restoration applications. The results are compared against experimental laboratory velocity fields obtained after Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV measurements. It is shown that the length of reattachment of the separated shear layer generated by the obstacle is well predicted by a Reynolds Stress Model, while classical two-equation models show important limitations. All the performed RANS simulations are unable to properly predict the formation of a secondary gyre region, which develops immediately downstream the obstacle.

  6. Forced response of the East Asian summer rainfall over the past millennium: results from a coupled model simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Hongli; Ti, Ruyuan [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing (China); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology and IPRC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kuang, Xueyuan [Nanjing University, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing (China)

    2011-01-15

    The centennial-millennial variation of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) precipitation over the past 1000 years was investigated through the analysis of a millennium simulation of the coupled ECHO-G model. The model results indicate that the centennial-millennial variation of the EASM is essentially a forced response to the external radiative forcing (insolation, volcanic aerosol, and green house gases). The strength of the response depends on latitude; and the spatial structure of the centennial-millennial variation differs from the interannual variability that arises primarily from the internal feedback processes within the climate system. On millennial time scale, the extratropical and subtropical precipitation was generally strong during Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and weak during Little Ice Age (LIA). The tropical rainfall is insensitive to the effective solar radiation forcing (insolation plus radiative effect of volcanic aerosols) but significantly responds to the modern anthropogenic radiative forcing. On centennial time scale, the variation of the extratropical and subtropical rainfall also tends to follow the effective solar radiation forcing closely. The forced response features in-phase rainfall variability between the extratropics and subtropics, which is in contrast to the anti-correlation on the interannual time scale. Further, the behavior of the interannual-decadal variation in the extratropics is effectively modulated by change of the mean states on the millennial time scale, suggesting that the structure of the internal mode may vary with significant changes in the external forcing. These findings imply that on the millennial time scale, (a) the proxy data in the extratropical EA may more sensitively reflect the EASM rainfall variations, and (b) the Meiyu and the northern China rainfall provide a consistent measure for the EASM strength. (orig.)

  7. Simulation of Model Force-Loading with Changing Its Position in the Wind Tunnel Test Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When planning and implementing an aerodynamic experiment, model sizes and its position in the test section of the wind tunnel (WT play very important role. The paper focuses on the value variations of the aerodynamic characteristics of a model through changing its position in the WT test section and on the attenuation of the velocity field disturbance in front of the model. Flow around aerodynamic model profile in the open test section of the low-speed WT T-500 is simulated at BMSTU Department SM3. The problem is solved in a two-dimensional case using the ANSYS Fluent package. The mathematical model of flow is based on the Reynolds equations closed by the SST turbulence model. The paper also presents the results of the experiment. Experiments conducted in WT T-500 well correlate with the calculated data and show the optimal position in the middle of the test section when conducting the weighing and drainage experiments. Disturbance of tunnel dynamic pressure (velocity head and flow upwash around the model profile and circular cylinder in the WT test section is analyzed. It was found that flow upstream from the front stagnation point on the body weakly depends on the Reynolds number and obtained results can be used to assess the level of disturbances in the flow around a model by incompressible airflow.

  8. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Hauglustaine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation have been introduced in the LMDz-INCA global model. Both fine nitrate particles formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is −0.056 W m−2. This forcing has the same magnitude than the forcing associated with organic carbon particles and represents 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios and for the 2030, 2050 and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentrations of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and Northern America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of −0.234 W m−2 to a range of −0.070 to −0.130 W m−2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of −0.060 to −0.115 W m−2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative forcing calculations increases the

  9. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-10-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation are introduced into the LMDz-INCA (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, version 4 - INteraction with Chemistry and Aerosols, version 3) global model. An important aspect of this new model is that both fine nitrate particle formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing corresponds to 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing, representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050, and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentration of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia, which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and North America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in ammonium nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates, for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative

  10. GRACE-based validation of terrestrial water storage variations as simulated by 4 different hydrological models under WFDEI atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Stacke, Tobias; Güntner, Andreas; Dill, Robert; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission provides a unique way to monitor the terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations at large spatial scale (>300km) by measuring month-to-month changes of the Earth's gravity field. We apply TWS variations estimated from GRACE to assess the ability of four hydrological and land surface models to simulate the continental branch of the global water cycle. Based on four different validation metrics that focus on variability on sub-seasonal to inter-annual time scales, we demonstrate that for the 31 largest discharge basins worldwide all model runs agree with the observations to a very limited degree only, together with large spreads among the models themselves. In particular, we focus on selected basins with very different climatic conditions and discuss time series of individual water storage components such as surface water, soil moisture, and snow depth. Since we are applying a common atmospheric forcing data-set to all models considered, we conclude that the discrepancies found are not due to differences in the forcing, but are mainly related to the model structure and parametrization. By investigating the relative performance of these different models, we attempt to give directions for further development of global numerical models in the areas of large-scale hydrology and land-atmosphere interactions.

  11. Force sensor in simulated skin and neural model mimic tactile SAI afferent spiking response to ramp and hold stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Elmer K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The next generation of prosthetic limbs will restore sensory feedback to the nervous system by mimicking how skin mechanoreceptors, innervated by afferents, produce trains of action potentials in response to compressive stimuli. Prior work has addressed building sensors within skin substitutes for robotics, modeling skin mechanics and neural dynamics of mechanotransduction, and predicting response timing of action potentials for vibration. The effort here is unique because it accounts for skin elasticity by measuring force within simulated skin, utilizes few free model parameters for parsimony, and separates parameter fitting and model validation. Additionally, the ramp-and-hold, sustained stimuli used in this work capture the essential features of the everyday task of contacting and holding an object. Methods This systems integration effort computationally replicates the neural firing behavior for a slowly adapting type I (SAI afferent in its temporally varying response to both intensity and rate of indentation force by combining a physical force sensor, housed in a skin-like substrate, with a mathematical model of neuronal spiking, the leaky integrate-and-fire. Comparison experiments were then conducted using ramp-and-hold stimuli on both the spiking-sensor model and mouse SAI afferents. The model parameters were iteratively fit against recorded SAI interspike intervals (ISI before validating the model to assess its performance. Results Model-predicted spike firing compares favorably with that observed for single SAI afferents. As indentation magnitude increases (1.2, 1.3, to 1.4 mm, mean ISI decreases from 98.81 ± 24.73, 54.52 ± 6.94, to 41.11 ± 6.11 ms. Moreover, as rate of ramp-up increases, ISI during ramp-up decreases from 21.85 ± 5.33, 19.98 ± 3.10, to 15.42 ± 2.41 ms. Considering first spikes, the predicted latencies exhibited a decreasing trend as stimulus rate increased, as is

  12. Responses of the Tropical Pacific to Wind Forcing as Observed by Spaceborne Sensors and Simulated by an Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Qenqing; Atlas, Robert

    1996-01-01

    In this study, satellite observations, in situ measurements, and model simulations are combined to assess the oceanic response to surface wind forcing in the equatorial Pacific. The surface wind fields derived from observations by the spaceborne special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) and from the operational products of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are compared. When SSM/I winds are used to force a primitive-equation ocean general circulation model (OGCM), they produce 3 C more surface cooling than ECMWF winds for the eastern equatorial Pacific during the cool phase of an El Nino-Southern Oscillation event. The stronger cooling by SSM/I winds is in good agreement with measurements at the moored buoys and observations by the advanced very high resolution radiometer, indicating that SSM/I winds are superior to ECMWF winds in forcing the tropical ocean. In comparison with measurements from buoys, tide gauges, and the Geosat altimeter, the OGCM simulates the temporal variations of temperature, steric, and sea level changes with reasonable realism when forced with the satellite winds. There are discrepancies between model simulations and observations that are common to both wind forcing fields, one of which is the simulation of zonal currents; they could be attributed to model deficiencies. By examining model simulations under two winds, vertical heat advection and uplifting of the thermocline are found to be the dominant factors in the anomalous cooling of the ocean mixed layer.

  13. Simulations for EBS Task Force BMT 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, A. [Marintel Ky, Turku (Finland)

    2006-12-15

    The Aespoe HRL International Joint Committee has set up a Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS). Its long time objective is to develop effective tools for analysis of THM(C) behaviour of buffer and backfill. The idea of the Task Force is to offer a forum to develop the tools of the work groups. This BMT has two parts: BMT 1.1 and BMT 1.2 based on the performance of THM mock-up experiments on MX-80 bentonite by CEA and FEBEX bentonite by CIEMAT, respectively. Simulation results are presented here. These simulations are performed with Freefem++ software, which is a high-level programming language for solving partiel differential equations with finite element method. The mathematical model used is based on continuum thermodynamics. The simulations repeat the evolution of relevant THM variables of the experiments fairly well, but some modificatios of parameters is needed, especially in hydraulic behaviour. (orig.)

  14. Impact of Spin-up Forcing on Vegetation States Simulated by a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model Coupledwith a Land Surface Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang; ZENG Xiaodong; SONG Xiang; TIAN Dongxiao; SHAO Pu; ZHANG Dongling

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) coupled with a land surface model (LSM) is generally initialized using a spin-up process to derive a physically-consistent initial condition. Spin-up forcing, which is the atmospheric forcing used to drive the coupled model to equilibrium solutions in the spin-up process,varies across earlier studies. In the present study, the impact of the spin-up forcing in the initialization stage on the fractional coverages (FCs) of plant functional type (PFT) in the subsequent simulation stage are assessed in seven classic climate regions by a modified Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM). Results show that the impact of spin-up forcing is considerable in all regions except the tropical rainforest climate region (TR) and the wet temperate climate region (WM). In the tropical monsoon climate region (TM), the TR and TM transition region (TR-TM), the dry temperate climate region (DM), the highland climate region (H), and the boreal forest climate region (BF), where FCs are affected by climate non-negligibly, the discrepancies in initial FCs, which represent long-term cumulative response of vegetation to different climate anomalies, are large. Moreover, the large discrepancies in initial FCs usually decay slowly because there are trees or shrubs in the five regions. The intrinsic growth timescales of FCs for tree PFTs and shrub PFTs are long, and the variation of FCs of tree PFTs or shrub PFTs can affect that of grass PFTs.

  15. CFD Simulation of Effect of Interphase Forces and Turbulence Models on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows in Non-Industrial Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Zhentao; Zhao, Ruijie; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Junfeng

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-liquid two-phase flows in aluminum electrolysis cells using the Euler-Euler approach were presented. The attempt was made to assess the performance and applicability of different interphase forces (drag, lift, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion forces) and turbulence models (standard k- ɛ, renormalization group k- ɛ, standard k- ω, shear stress transport k- ω, and Reynolds stress models). Moreover, three different bubble-induced turbulence models have been also analyzed. The simulated electrolyte velocity profiles were discussed by comparing with each other and against published experimental data. Based on the results of the validation of different interphase forces and turbulence models, a set consisting of the dispersed standard k- ɛ model, Grace drag coefficient model, Simonin turbulent dispersion force model, and Sato et al.'s bubble-induced effective viscosity model was found to provide the best agreement with the experimental data. The prediction results showed that the contributions of the lift force and the wall lubrication force can be neglected for the present bubbly flows.

  16. CFD Simulation of Effect of Interphase Forces and Turbulence Models on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows in Non-Industrial Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Yang, Jianhong; Wang, Zhentao; Zhao, Ruijie; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Junfeng

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations of gas-liquid two-phase flows in aluminum electrolysis cells using the Euler-Euler approach were presented. The attempt was made to assess the performance and applicability of different interphase forces (drag, lift, wall lubrication, and turbulent dispersion forces) and turbulence models (standard k-ɛ, renormalization group k-ɛ, standard k-ω, shear stress transport k-ω, and Reynolds stress models). Moreover, three different bubble-induced turbulence models have been also analyzed. The simulated electrolyte velocity profiles were discussed by comparing with each other and against published experimental data. Based on the results of the validation of different interphase forces and turbulence models, a set consisting of the dispersed standard k-ɛ model, Grace drag coefficient model, Simonin turbulent dispersion force model, and Sato et al.'s bubble-induced effective viscosity model was found to provide the best agreement with the experimental data. The prediction results showed that the contributions of the lift force and the wall lubrication force can be neglected for the present bubbly flows.

  17. Simulation-Optimization Model for Water-Resources and Land-Subsidence Management, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.; Freckleton, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California has relied historically on ground water to meet its water-supply needs. However, the extraction of ground water has led to problems such as declining water levels and land subsidence. In response to these problems, EAFB has gained access to imported water and plans to inject this imported water into the ground-water system during the winter to help recharge the aquifers and control land subsidence. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with EAFB, has developed a simulation-optimization model to identify optimal management strategies for conjunctive use and for ground-water recharge. The simulation-optimization model is formulated as a mixed-integer, linear programming problem with a planning horizon of 5 years using monthly management periods. Two objectives are being tested: maximizing the minimum hydraulic heads and minimizing the cost of water supply and injection. The constraint set includes meeting water demand, maintaining simulated heads at or above year-2000 levels at key locations to control land subsidence, and setting limits on the supply of imported water and pumping capacities. Existing water-supply wells can be used for pumping or injection; therefore, zero-one integer variables are being used to ensure that a well cannot be used for pumping and injection simultaneously. The decision variables are the volume and timing of imported water (for consumption throughout the year and injection in the winter) and ground-water pumpage. The state variables are hydraulic heads. Preliminary results indicate that year-2000 heads cannot be maintained for either objective using the same constraint set (i.e., the formulations are infeasible); however, using relaxed head constraints (i.e., lower allowable heads), we identified optimal solutions that will help control adverse impacts. The optimal pumping/injection strategy that maximizes the minimum head resulted in very little subsidence (0.07 ft) with some

  18. Response of the middle atmosphere to anthropogenic and natural forcings in the CMIP5 simulations with the Max Planck Institute Earth system model

    KAUST Repository

    Schmidt, H.

    2013-03-06

    The ECHAM6 atmospheric general circulation model is the atmosphere component of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) that is used in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations. As ECHAM6 has its uppermost layer centered at 0.01 hPa in the upper mesosphere, these simulations offer the opportunity to study the middle atmosphere climate change and its relation to the troposphere on the basis of a very comprehensive set of state-of-the-art model simulations. The goals of this paper are (a) to introduce those new features of ECHAM6 particularly relevant for the middle atmosphere, including external forcing data, and (b) to evaluate the simulated middle atmosphere and describe the simulated response to natural and anthropogenic forcings. New features in ECHAM6 with respect to ECHAM5 include a new short-wave radiation scheme, the option to vary spectral irradiance independent of total solar irradiance, and a latitude-dependent gravity-wave source strength. The description of external forcing data focuses on solar irradiance and ozone. Stratospheric temperature trends simulated with the MPI-ESM for the last decades of the 20th century agree well with observations. The future projections depend strongly on the scenario. Under the high emission scenario RCP8.5, simulated temperatures are locally lower by more than 20 K than preindustrial values. Many of the simulated patterns of the responses to natural forcings as provided by solar variability, volcanic aerosols, and El Nino-Southern Oscillation, largely agree with the observations. 2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Modelforce field and software for fast polarizable calculations: Parameters for small model systems and free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, George A.; Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Liu, Aibing B.

    2009-01-01

    We are presenting POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) – a software package and a set of parameters designed for molecular simulations. The key feature of POSSIM is that the electrostatic polarization is taken into account using a previously introduced fast formalism. This permits cutting computational cost of using the explicit polarization by about an order of magnitude. In this article, parameters for water, methane, ethane, propane, butane, methanol and NMA are introduced. These molecules are viewed as model systems for protein simulations. We have achieved our goal of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol accuracy for gas-phase dimerization energies and no more than 2% deviations in liquid state heats of vaporization and densities. Moreover, free energies of hydration of the polarizable methane, ethane and methanol have been calculated using the statistical perturbation theory. These calculations are a model for calculating protein pKa shifts and ligand binding affinities. The free energies of hydration were found to be 2.12 kcal/mol, 1.80 kcal/mol and −4.95 kcal/mol for methane, ethane and methanol, respectively. The experimentally determined literature values are 1.91 kcal/mol, 1.83 kcal/mol and −5.11 kcal/mol. The POSSIM average error in these absolute free energies of hydration is only about 0.13 kcal/mol. Using the statistical perturbation theory with polarizable force fields is not widespread, and we believe that this work opens road to further development of the POSSIM force field and its applications for obtaining accurate energies in protein-related computer modeling. PMID:20209038

  20. Nano-scale simulative measuring model for tapping mode atomic force microscopy and analysis for measuring a nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zone-Ching; Chou, Ming-Ho

    2010-07-01

    This study proposes to construct a nano-scale simulative measuring model of Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM), compare with the edge effect of simulative and measurement results. It combines with the Morse potential and vibration theory to calculate the tip-sample atomic interaction force between probe and sample. Used Silicon atoms (Si) arrange the shape of the rectangular cantilever probe and the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample atomic model. The simulative measurements are compared with the results for the simulative measurements and experimental measurement. It is found that the scan rate and the probe tip's bevel angle are the two reasons to cause the surface error and edge effect of measuring the nano-scale ladder-shape standard sample by TM-AFM. And the bevel angle is about equal to the probe tip's bevel angle from the results of simulated and experimented on the vertical section of the sample edge. To compare with the edge effect between the simulation and experimental measurement, its error is small. It could be verified that the constructed simulative measuring model for TM-AFM in this article is reasonable.

  1. Approaching a realistic force balance in geodynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yadav, Rakesh K; Christensen, Ulrich R; Wolk, Scott J; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Earth sustains its magnetic field by a dynamo process driven by convection in the liquid outer core. Geodynamo simulations have been successful in reproducing many observed properties of the geomagnetic field. However, while theoretical considerations suggest that flow in the core is governed by a balance between Lorentz force, rotational force and buoyancy (called MAC balance for Magnetic, Archimedean, Coriolis) with only minute roles for viscous and inertial forces, dynamo simulations must employ viscosity values that are many orders of magnitude larger than in the core due to computational constraints. In typical geodynamo models viscous and inertial forces are not much smaller than the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force plays a sub-dominant role. This has led to conclusions that these simulations are viscously controlled and do not represent the physics of the geodynamo. Here we show by a direct analysis of the relevant forces that a MAC balance can be achieved when the viscosity is reduced to values cl...

  2. Simulation of the thermodynamics of folding and unfolding of the Trp-cage mini-protein TC5b using different combinations of force fields and solvation models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; John; ZengHui

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based on AMBER force fields(ff96 and ff03) and generalized Born models(igb1 and igb5) have been carried out in order to study folding/unfolding of the Trp-cage mini-protein TC5b.The thermodynamic properties of TC5b were found to be sensitive to the specific version of the solvation model and force field employed.When the ff96/igb5 combination was used,the predicted melting temperature from unfolding simulations was in good agreement with the experimental value of 315 K,but the folding simulation did not converge.The most stable thermodynamic profile in both folding and unfolding simulations was obtained when the ff03/igb5 combination was employed,and the predicted melting temperature was about 345 K,showing over-stabilization of the protein.Simulations using the igb1 version in combination with ff96 or ff03 were difficult to converge within the simulation time limit(50 ns).

  3. Molecular simulation of caloric properties of fluids modelled by force fields with intramolecular contributions: Application to heat capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William R.; Jirsák, Jan; Nezbeda, Ivo; Qi, Weikai

    2017-07-01

    The calculation of caloric properties such as heat capacity, Joule-Thomson coefficients, and the speed of sound by classical force-field-based molecular simulation methodology has received scant attention in the literature, particularly for systems composed of complex molecules whose force fields (FFs) are characterized by a combination of intramolecular and intermolecular terms. The calculation of a thermodynamic property for a system whose molecules are described by such a FF involves the calculation of the residual property prior to its addition to the corresponding ideal-gas property, the latter of which is separately calculated, either using thermochemical compilations or nowadays accurate quantum mechanical calculations. Although the simulation of a volumetric residual property proceeds by simply replacing the intermolecular FF in the rigid molecule case by the total (intramolecular plus intermolecular) FF, this is not the case for a caloric property. We describe the correct methodology required to perform such calculations and illustrate it in this paper for the case of the internal energy and the enthalpy and their corresponding molar heat capacities. We provide numerical results for cP, one of the most important caloric properties. We also consider approximations to the correct calculation procedure previously used in the literature and illustrate their consequences for the examples of the relatively simple molecule 2-propanol, CH3CH(OH)CH3, and for the more complex molecule monoethanolamine, HO(CH2)2NH2, an important fluid used in carbon capture.

  4. Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing on Major Stratus Cloud Regions in AMIP-type Simulations of CMIP3 and CMIP5 Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; LI Jian

    2013-01-01

    Cloud and its radiative effects are major sources of uncertainty that lead to simulation discrepancies in climate models.In this study,shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over major stratus regions is evaluated for Atmospheric Models Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-type simulations of models involved in the third and fifth phases of the Coupled Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5).Over stratus regions,large deviations in both climatological mean and seasonal cycle of SWCF are found among the models.An ambient field sorted by dynamic (vertical motion) and thermodynamic (inversion strength or stability) regimes is constructed and used to measure the response of SWCF to large-scale controls.In marine boundary layer regions,despite both CMIP3 and CMIP5 models being able to capture well the center and range of occurrence frequency for the ambient field,most of the models fail to simulate the dependence of SWCF on boundary layer inversion and the insensitivity of SWCF to vertical motion.For eastern China,there are large differences even in the simulated ambient fields.Moreover,almost no model can reproduce intense SWCF in rising motion and high stability regimes.It is also found that models with a finer grid resolution have no evident superiority than their lower resolution versions.The uncertainties relating to SWCF in state-of-the-art models may limit their performance in IPCC experiments.

  5. European climate in the late twenty-first century: regional simulations with two driving global models and two forcing scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, J. [Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2, PO Box 64, 00014, Helsinki (Finland); Rossby Centre, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, 60176, Norrkoeping (Sweden); Hansson, U.; Ullerstig, A.; Doescher, R.; Graham, L.P.; Jones, C.; Meier, H.E.M.; Samuelsson, P.; Willen, U. [Rossby Centre, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, 60176, Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    A basic analysis is presented for a series of regional climate change simulations that were conducted by the Swedish Rossby Centre and contribute to the PRUDENCE (Prediction of Regional scenarios and Uncertainties for Defining EuropeaN Climate change risks and Effects) project. For each of the two driving global models HadAM3H and ECHAM4/OPYC3, a 30-year control run and two 30-year scenario runs (based on the SRES A2 and B2 emission scenarios) were made with the regional model. In this way, four realizations of climate change from 1961-1990 to 2071-2100 were obtained. The simulated changes are larger for the A2 than the B2 scenario (although with few qualitative differences) and in most cases in the ECHAM4/OPYC3-driven (RE) than in the HadAM3H-driven (RH) regional simulations. In all the scenario runs, the warming in northern Europe is largest in winter or late autumn. In central and southern Europe, the warming peaks in summer when it locally reaches 10 C in the RE-A2 simulation and 6-7 C in the RH-A2 and RE-B2 simulations. The four simulations agree on a general increase in precipitation in northern Europe especially in winter and on a general decrease in precipitation in southern and central Europe in summer, but the magnitude and the geographical patterns of the change differ markedly between RH and RE. This reflects very different changes in the atmospheric circulation during the winter half-year, which also lead to quite different simulated changes in windiness. All four simulations show a large increase in the lowest minimum temperatures in northern, central and eastern Europe, most likely due to reduced snow cover. Extreme daily precipitation increases even in most of those areas where the mean annual precipitation decreases. (orig.)

  6. Obliquity and Precession in the Quaternary: Analyzing Climate Responses Using Single-Forcing GCM Simulations and Bayesian Model-Proxy Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, M. P.; Jackson, C. S.; Broccoli, A. J.; Lea, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detection and attribution approach to interpret the forcings and feedbacks that shaped Quaternary climate stemming from known variations in Earth's obliquity, precession, greenhouse gases, and ice sheet extent. Because future climate changes will be driven largely by only one forcing, CO2, it is important to better separate and understand the individual contributions of different forcings in producing past recorded changes. We use idealized equilibrium GCM simulations to fingerprint the annual mean and seasonal responses to individual changes in obliquity, precession, CO2, and ice sheets. These idealized "fingerprint" simulations are scaled by time series of past forcings and summed together to create a time-varying linear reconstruction of past climate that can be compared against proxy records. A multiple linear regression is conducted using Bayesian inference between the components of the linear reconstruction and long proxy time series, such as temperature from deuterium in Antarctic ice cores, to determine whether the modeled response to each forcing needs to be stronger or weaker to better match the data. This methodology offers a simple framework for exploring uncertainties affecting the interpretation of long time series of Quaternary climate variability and a way to use proxy data to test climate response processes relevant to future climate change.

  7. A Methodology for Model Comparison Using the Theater Simulation of Airbase Resources and All Mobile Tactical Air Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    constant. He then observed the two dependent variables, man-hour usage and sortie production, and analyzed the output of the two models to determine...USEABILITY ASSESSMENT SIMULAION mo LannMODELUSEAI~fl Ems of Database Development.... .... .. - Availabilty of Debugging Tools O R ........ !Ease of...goal of flying combat aircraft missions. The factors chosen should represent the major capabilities of the logistics operation, i.e. fuel , munitions

  8. VOF simulations of the contact angle dynamics during the drop spreading: Standard models and a new wetting force model

    OpenAIRE

    Malgarinos, I.; Nikolopoulos, N.; Marengo, M.; Antonini, C.; Gavaises, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study,a novel numerical implementation for the adhesion of liquid droplets impacting normally on solid dry surfaces is presented. The advantage of this new approach, compared to the majority of existing models, is that the dynamic contact angle forming during the surface wetting process is not inserted as a boundary condition, but is derived implicitly by the induced fluid flow characteristics (interface shape) and the adhesion physics of the gas-liquid-surface interfa...

  9. DYNAMIC MODEL OF CROP GROWTH SYSTEM AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF CROP GROWTH PROCESS UNDER THE MULTI-ENVIRONMENT EXTERNAL FORCE ACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李自珍; 王万雄; 徐彩琳

    2003-01-01

    According to the biomechanic theory and method, the dynamic mechanism of crop growth under the external force action of multi-environment factors (light, temperature, soil and nutrients etc.) was comprehensively explored. Continuous-time Markov (CTM) approach was adopted to build the dynamic model of the crop growth system and the simulated numerical method. The growth rate responses to the variation of the external force and the change of biomass saturation value were studied. The crop grew in the semiarid area was taken as an example to carry out the numerical simulation analysis, therefore the results provide the quantity basis for the field management. Comparing the dynamic model with the other plant growth model, the superiority of the former is that it displays multi-dimension of resource utilization by means of combining macroscopic with microcosmic and reveals the process of resource transition. The simulation method of crop growth system is advanced and manipulated. A real simulation result is well identical with field observational results.

  10. Approaching a realistic force balance in geodynamo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh K; Gastine, Thomas; Christensen, Ulrich R; Wolk, Scott J; Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2016-10-25

    Earth sustains its magnetic field by a dynamo process driven by convection in the liquid outer core. Geodynamo simulations have been successful in reproducing many observed properties of the geomagnetic field. However, although theoretical considerations suggest that flow in the core is governed by a balance between Lorentz force, rotational force, and buoyancy (called MAC balance for Magnetic, Archimedean, Coriolis) with only minute roles for viscous and inertial forces, dynamo simulations must use viscosity values that are many orders of magnitude larger than in the core, due to computational constraints. In typical geodynamo models, viscous and inertial forces are not much smaller than the Coriolis force, and the Lorentz force plays a subdominant role; this has led to conclusions that these simulations are viscously controlled and do not represent the physics of the geodynamo. Here we show, by a direct analysis of the relevant forces, that a MAC balance can be achieved when the viscosity is reduced to values close to the current practical limit. Lorentz force, buoyancy, and the uncompensated (by pressure) part of the Coriolis force are of very similar strength, whereas viscous and inertial forces are smaller by a factor of at least 20 in the bulk of the fluid volume. Compared with nonmagnetic convection at otherwise identical parameters, the dynamo flow is of larger scale and is less invariant parallel to the rotation axis (less geostrophic), and convection transports twice as much heat, all of which is expected when the Lorentz force strongly influences the convection properties.

  11. Assessing the performance characteristics and clinical forces in simulated shape memory bone staple surgical procedure: The significance of SMA material model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeb, A F; Dhakal, B; Owusu-Danquah, J S

    2015-07-01

    This work is focused on the detailed computer simulation of the key stages involved in a shape memory alloy (SMA) osteosynthesis bone stapling procedure. To this end, a recently developed three-dimensional constitutive SMA material model was characterized from test data of three simple uniaxial-isothermal-tension experiments for powder metallurgically processed nickel-rich NiTi (PM/NiTi-P) material. The calibrated model was subsequently used under the complex, thermomechanical loading conditions involved in the surgical procedure using the body-temperature-activated PM/NiTi-P bone staple. Our aim here is to assess the immediate and post-surgical performance characteristics of the stapling operation using the material model. From this study: (1) it was found that adequate compressive forces were developed by the PM/NiTi-P bone staple, with the tendency of this force to even increase under sustained thermal loading due to the intrinsic "inverse relaxation phenomena" in the SMA material, (2) the simulation results correlated well with those from experimental measurements, (3) the body-temperature-activated PM/NiTi-P staple was proved to be clinically viable, providing a stable clamping force needed for speedy coaptation of the fractured bones, and (4) these realistic assessments crucially depend on the use of suitable and comprehensive SMA material models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Examining the influence of meteorological simulations forced by different initial and boundary conditions in volcanic ash dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulena, Gabriela C.; Allende, David G.; Puliafito, Salvador E.; Lakkis, Susan G.; Cremades, Pablo G.; Ulke, Ana G.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the combination of the FALL3D ash dispersion model with the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) meteorological model in the southern cone of South America under two initial and boundary conditions was evaluated. ERA-Interim and NCEP-GFS datasets were used as dynamic conditions by WRF to simulate meteorological fields for FALL3D. As a study case, we used the eruption of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex occurred in Chile in June 2011. The simulated meteorological results were compared with the horizontal wind direction, meridional and zonal wind components, air and dew point temperatures of 7 radio sounding stations using a set of error indicators. In addition, the ash mass load simulated by FALL3D for a day of maximum dispersion of volcanic ash was evaluated using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, on which the Prata algorithm was applied. As well as this, the WRF-dominant physical processes with both dynamic conditions were analyzed for that same date. Meteorological results indicated that the simulation performed with WRF and NCEP-GFS shows the lowest errors at levels between 925 and 300 hPa. Ash dispersion simulated with FALL3D and WRF in both dynamic conditions shows a different perfomance, which from the synoptic and dynamic viewpoint can be explained for the result of wind intensity and geopotential height. Moreover, WRF intiliazed with NCEP-GFS and FALL3D has a higher degree of concordance with the MODIS image. Based on the analysis and results, it was concluded that for the southern cone of South America, 1) it was not trivial for the simulation of volcanic ash dispersion to use one dynamic condition or another in WRF; 2) in that sense, meteorological variables that influenced the differences in volcanic ash dispersion were horizontal wind intensity and direction and geopotential heights; 3) the system generated from the combination of the WRF model initialized with NCEP-GFS and the FALL3D dispersion

  13. Study on Improved Social Force Model for Crowd Simulation%一种面向人群仿真的改进型社会力模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鹏; 刘箴

    2012-01-01

    在人群仿真领域,社会力模型的应用和改进研究仍是一个热点问题。在Helbing社会力模型的基础上,引入人群介体之间的排斥力和转向力,改进了人群在正常状态下的行走行为模型。对恐慌人群,提出了期望速度、人群密度、恐慌值的计算方法,拟定一些约束条件来改善动画显示效果。在微机上使用Direct3D实现了人群行为动画,实验结果表明,改进的模型能够较好地模拟人群行为。%In the field of human crowd simulation, the research on the applications and the modification of social force model is still a hot topic. Based on Helbing's social force model, the crowd's psychology repulsive force and direction changing force were introduced respectively, and the model of crowd walking behavior was improved for normal situation. The computation method of expected velocity, crowd density and panic magnitude was set up for a panic crowd. A few constraint conditions were proposed for improving the animation effect. The crowd behavior animation was realized by Direct3d on PC. The experiment shows that the modified model can closely simulate crowd behavior.

  14. Validation of Multibody Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II Parachute Simulation with Interacting Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.; Hotchko, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    A capability to simulate trajectories of multiple interacting rigid bodies has been developed, tested and validated. This capability uses the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2). The standard version of POST 2 allows trajectory simulation of multiple bodies without force interaction. In the current implementation, the force interaction between the parachute and the suspended bodies has been modeled using flexible lines, allowing accurate trajectory simulation of the individual bodies in flight. The POST 2 multibody capability is intended to be general purpose and applicable to any parachute entry trajectory simulation. This research paper explains the motivation for multibody parachute simulation, discusses implementation methods, and presents validation of this capability.

  15. Simulating central forces in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirregabiria, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    We describe the easy to customize and extend open source Java program Central force workbench that can be used in the classroom to simulate the motion of a particle (or a two-body system) under central forces. It may be useful to illustrate problems in which the analytical solution is not available as well as to help students to grasp a more intuitive understanding of the main features of this kind of problem and to realize the exceptional nature of the particular case of Newtonian (and harmonic) forces. We also include some suggestions on how to use the program as a pedagogical tool.

  16. NiTi Alloy Negator Springs for Long-Stroke Constant-Force Shape Memory Actuators: Modeling, Simulation and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaggiari, Andrea; Dragoni, Eugenio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    This work aims at the experimental characterization and modeling validation of shape memory alloy (SMA) Negator springs. According to the classic engineering books on springs, a Negator spring is a spiral spring made of strip of metal wound on the flat with an inherent curvature such that, in repose, each coil wraps tightly on its inner neighbor. The main feature of a Negator springs is the nearly constant force displacement behavior in the unwinding of the strip. Moreover the stroke is very long, theoretically infinite, as it depends only on the length of the initial strip. A Negator spring made in SMA is built and experimentally tested to demonstrate the feasibility of this actuator. The shape memory Negator spring behavior can be modeled with an analytical procedure, which is in good agreement with the experimental test and can be used for design purposes. In both cases, the material is modeled as elastic in austenitic range, while an exponential continuum law is used to describe the martensitic behavior. The experimental results confirms the applicability of this kind of geometry to the shape memory alloy actuators, and the analytical model is confirmed to be a powerful design tool to dimension and predict the spring behavior both in martensitic and austenitic range.

  17. SAFT-γ force field for the simulation of molecular fluids: 2. Coarse-grained models of greenhouse gases, refrigerants, and long alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Carlos; Lafitte, Thomas; Adjiman, Claire S; Galindo, Amparo; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2013-03-07

    In the first paper of this series [C. Avendaño, T. Lafitte, A. Galindo, C. S. Adjiman, G. Jackson, and E. A. Müller, J. Phys. Chem. B2011, 115, 11154] we introduced the SAFT-γ force field for molecular simulation of fluids. In our approach, a molecular-based equation of state (EoS) is used to obtain coarse-grained (CG) intermolecular potentials that can then be employed in molecular simulation over a wide range of thermodynamic conditions of the fluid. The macroscopic experimental data for the vapor-liquid equilibria (saturated liquid density and vapor pressure) of a given system are represented with the SAFT-VR Mie EoS and used to estimate effective intermolecular parameters that provide a good description of the thermodynamic properties by exploring a wide parameter space for models based on the Mie (generalized Lennard-Jones) potential. This methodology was first used to develop a simple single-segment CG Mie model of carbon dioxide (CO2) which allows for a reliable representation of the fluid-phase equilibria (for which the model was parametrized), as well as an accurate prediction of other properties such as the enthalpy of vaporization, interfacial tension, supercritical density, and second-derivative thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity, isothermal compressibility, heat capacity, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound). In our current paper, the methodology is further applied and extended to develop effective SAFT-γ CG Mie force fields for some important greenhouse gases including carbon tetrafluoride (CF4) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), modeled as simple spherical molecules, and for long linear alkanes including n-decane (n-C10H22) and n-eicosane (n-C20H42), modeled as homonuclear chains of spherical Mie segments. We also apply the SAFT-γ methodology to obtain a CG homonuclear two-segment Mie intermolecular potential for the more challenging polar and asymmetric compound 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), a novel replacement

  18. Long-term ice sheet-climate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcaino, Miren [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); University of California, Department of Geography, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Maier-Reimer, Ernst [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Groeger, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Schurgers, Guy [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Lund University, Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund (Sweden); Winguth, Arne M.E. [Center for Climatic Research, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Madison (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Several multi-century and multi-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate change scenarios in order to study the long-term evolution of sea level and the impact of ice sheet changes on the climate system. The core of the ESM is a coupled coarse-resolution Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Ocean biogeochemistry, land vegetation and ice sheets are included as components of the ESM. The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) decays in all simulations, while the Antarctic ice sheet contributes negatively to sea level rise, due to enhanced storage of water caused by larger snowfall rates. Freshwater flux increases from Greenland are one order of magnitude smaller than total freshwater flux increases into the North Atlantic basin (the sum of the contribution from changes in precipitation, evaporation, run-off and Greenland meltwater) and do not play an important role in changes in the strength of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (NAMOC). The regional climate change associated with weakening/collapse of the NAMOC drastically reduces the decay rate of the GrIS. The dynamical changes due to GrIS topography modification driven by mass balance changes act first as a negative feedback for the decay of the ice sheet, but accelerate the decay at a later stage. The increase of surface temperature due to reduced topographic heights causes a strong acceleration of the decay of the ice sheet in the long term. Other feedbacks between ice sheet and atmosphere are not important for the mass balance of the GrIS until it is reduced to 3/4 of the original size. From then, the reduction in the albedo of Greenland strongly accelerates the decay of the ice sheet. (orig.)

  19. Solar irradiance reduction to counteract radiative forcing from a quadrupling of CO2: climate responses simulated by four earth system models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compare the response of four state-of-the-art Earth system models to climate engineering under scenario G1 of two model intercomparison projects: GeoMIP (Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project and IMPLICC (EU project "Implications and risks of engineering solar radiation to limit climate change". In G1, the radiative forcing from an instantaneous quadrupling of the CO2 concentration, starting from the preindustrial level, is balanced by a reduction of the solar constant. Model responses to the two counteracting forcings in G1 are compared to the preindustrial climate in terms of global means and regional patterns and their robustness. While the global mean surface air temperature in G1 remains almost unchanged compared to the control simulation, the meridional temperature gradient is reduced in all models. Another robust response is the global reduction of precipitation with strong effects in particular over North and South America and northern Eurasia. In comparison to the climate response to a quadrupling of CO2 alone, the temperature responses are small in experiment G1. Precipitation responses are, however, in many regions of comparable magnitude but globally of opposite sign.

  20. Multi-Model Simulations of Aerosol and Ozone Radiative Forcing Due to Anthropogenic Emission Changes During the Period 1990-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Gunnar; Aas, Wenche; Ribu, Cherian; Collins, William; Faluvegi, Gregory S.; Flanner, Mark; Forster, Piers; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Klimont, Zbigniew; Lund, Marianne T.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the geographical distribution of emissions of substances that alter the atmospheric energy balance has changed due to economic growth and air pollution regulations. Here, we show the resulting changes to aerosol and ozone abundances and their radiative forcing using recently updated emission data for the period 1990-2015, as simulated by seven global atmospheric composition models. The models broadly reproduce large-scale changes in surface aerosol and ozone based on observations (e.g. 1 to 3 percent per year in aerosols over the USA and Europe). The global mean radiative forcing due to ozone and aerosol changes over the 1990-2015 period increased by 0.17 plus or minus 0.08 watts per square meter, with approximately one-third due to ozone. This increase is more strongly positive than that reported in IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report). The main reasons for the increased positive radiative forcing of aerosols over this period are the substantial reduction of global mean SO2 emissions, which is stronger in the new emission inventory compared to that used in the IPCC analysis, and higher black carbon emissions.

  1. Multi-Model Simulations of Aerosol and Ozone Radiative Forcing Due to Anthropogenic Emission Changes During the Period 1990-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Gunnar; Aas, Wenche; Ribu, Cherian; Collins, William; Faluvegi, Gregory S.; Flanner, Mark; Forster, Piers; Hodnebrog, Oivind; Klimont, Zbigniew; Lund, Marianne T.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the geographical distribution of emissions of substances that alter the atmospheric energy balance has changed due to economic growth and air pollution regulations. Here, we show the resulting changes to aerosol and ozone abundances and their radiative forcing using recently updated emission data for the period 1990-2015, as simulated by seven global atmospheric composition models. The models broadly reproduce large-scale changes in surface aerosol and ozone based on observations (e.g. 1 to 3 percent per year in aerosols over the USA and Europe). The global mean radiative forcing due to ozone and aerosol changes over the 1990-2015 period increased by 0.17 plus or minus 0.08 watts per square meter, with approximately one-third due to ozone. This increase is more strongly positive than that reported in IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report). The main reasons for the increased positive radiative forcing of aerosols over this period are the substantial reduction of global mean SO2 emissions, which is stronger in the new emission inventory compared to that used in the IPCC analysis, and higher black carbon emissions.

  2. Multi-model simulations of aerosol and ozone radiative forcing due to anthropogenic emission changes during the period 1990-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Gunnar; Aas, Wenche; Cherian, Ribu; Collins, William; Faluvegi, Greg; Flanner, Mark; Forster, Piers; Hodnebrog, Øivind; Klimont, Zbigniew; Lund, Marianne T.; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Olivié, Dirk; Prather, Michael; Quaas, Johannes; Samset, Bjørn H.; Schnell, Jordan L.; Schulz, Michael; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsyro, Svetlana

    2017-02-01

    Over the past few decades, the geographical distribution of emissions of substances that alter the atmospheric energy balance has changed due to economic growth and air pollution regulations. Here, we show the resulting changes to aerosol and ozone abundances and their radiative forcing using recently updated emission data for the period 1990-2015, as simulated by seven global atmospheric composition models. The models broadly reproduce large-scale changes in surface aerosol and ozone based on observations (e.g. -1 to -3 % yr-1 in aerosols over the USA and Europe). The global mean radiative forcing due to ozone and aerosol changes over the 1990-2015 period increased by +0.17 ± 0.08 W m-2, with approximately one-third due to ozone. This increase is more strongly positive than that reported in IPCC AR5. The main reasons for the increased positive radiative forcing of aerosols over this period are the substantial reduction of global mean SO2 emissions, which is stronger in the new emission inventory compared to that used in the IPCC analysis, and higher black carbon emissions.

  3. Optimized molecular force field for sulfur hexafluoride simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivet, Aurelio; Vega, Lourdes F

    2007-04-14

    An optimized molecular force field for sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) simulations is presented in this work. The new force field for SF6 contains two parts: a Lennard-Jones potential that deals with F-F intermolecular interactions and the second term dealing with the intramolecular forces. In this second part the flexibility of the molecule is explicitly considered by 6 harmonic stretch terms, modeling the S-F chemical bonds, and 12 harmonic bending terms, modeling the F-S-F angular deformations. The parameters of the new force field have been obtained by a multivariable optimization procedure, whose main feature is the simultaneous fitting of all force field parameters, using as reference data several equilibrium properties (vapor pressure, saturated liquid density, and surface tension) and shear viscosity. The new force field clearly improves the description of the phase envelope and the rest of the properties as compared to previous simulations for a rigid model for the same molecule [A. Olivet et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 194508 (2005)]. Results for the optimized force field concerning the vapor-liquid coexistence curve, several thermodynamics states at the homogeneous gas and liquid region, and transport coefficients of SF6 are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  4. An analytical drilling force model and GPU-accelerated haptics-based simulation framework of the pilot drilling procedure for micro-implants surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Lu, Wen Feng; Wong, Yoke San; Foong, Kelvin Weng Chiong

    2012-12-01

    The placement of micro-implants is a common but relatively new surgical procedure in clinical dentistry. This paper presents a haptics-based simulation framework for the pilot drilling of micro-implants surgery to train orthodontists to successfully perform this essential procedure by tactile sensation, without damaging tooth roots. A voxel-based approach was employed to model the inhomogeneous oral tissues. A preprocessing pipeline was designed to reduce imaging noise, smooth segmentation results and construct an anatomically correct oral model from patient-specific data. In order to provide a physically based haptic feedback, an analytical drilling force model based on metal cutting principles was developed and adapted for the voxel-based approach. To improve the real-time response, the parallel computing power of Graphics Processing Units is exploited through extra efforts for data structure design, algorithms parallelization, and graphic memory utilization. A prototype system has been developed based on the proposed framework. Preliminary results show that, by using this framework, proper drilling force can be rendered at different tissue layers with reduced cycle time, while the visual display has also been enhanced.

  5. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing from contrails and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The radiative forcing from aviation-induced cloudiness is investigated by using the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) in the present (2006) and the future (through 2050). Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing in 2050 can reach 87 mW m-2, an increase by a factor of 7 from 2006, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. This is due to non-uniform regional increase in air traffic and different sensitivities for contrail radiative forcing in different regions. CAM5 simulations indicate that negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds in 2050 can be as large as -160 mW m-2, an increase by a factor of 4 from 2006. As a result, the net 2050 radiative forcing of contrail cirrus and aviation aerosols may have a cooling effect on the planet. Aviation sulfate aerosols emitted at cruise altitude can be transported down to the lower troposphere, increasing the aerosol concentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistence of low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible net forcing globally in 2006 and 2050 in this model study. Uncertainties in the methodology and the modeling are significant and discussed in detail. Nevertheless, the projected percentage increase in contrail radiative forcing is important for future aviation impacts. In addition, the role of aviation aerosols in the cloud nucleation processes can greatly influence on the simulated radiative forcing from aircraft-induced cloudiness and even change its sign. Future research to confirm these results is necessary.

  6. Modeling traction forces in collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Basan, Markus; Hayes, Ryan L.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is an important process in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We have developed a particle-based simulation for collective cell migration that describes flow patterns and finger formation at the tissue edge observed in wound healing experiments. We can apply methods for calculating intercellular stress to our simulation model, and have thereby provided evidence for the validity of a stress reconstitution method from traction forces used in experiments. To accurately capture experimentally measured traction forces and stresses in the tissue, which are mostly tensile, we have to include intracellular acto-myosin contraction into our simulation. We can then reproduce the experimentally observed behavior of cells moving around a circular obstacle, and suggest underlying mechanisms for cell-cell alignment and generation of traction force patterns.

  7. Modeling the Forced Extension of Nicked DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaeff, Alexander; Craig, Stephen; Beratan, David

    2007-03-01

    The design and study of DNA-based nanodevices has been a topic of considerable interest in the last decade. While the applications of classical continuous DNA structures have been thoroughly studied, nicked DNA structures, i.e., ones that contains breaks (``nicks'') in one or both DNA backbone chains, have received much less attention. Recently, Kersey et al. (JACS, 2004) reported the force spectroscopy of long DNA chains with periodic nicks, self-assembled from short DNA oligomers. We attempt to model the experimental force-extension profiles in a series of steered molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated all-atom model of a basic unit of the long self-assembled chain, a 16bp-long DNA segment with a nick in the middle of one strand, is extended by applying either a constant force or a moving harmonic potential to the DNA ends. The computed force-extension profiles are compared to those for a non-nicked DNA; the dynamics of structural changes in the nicked DNA during the forced extension is discussed. A theoretical framework is established to link the extension and rupture in the simulated basic unit to the corresponding events in the long self-assembled chain.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip-substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip-sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement.

  9. Statistical framework for evaluation of climate model simulations by use of climate proxy data from the last millennium – Part 3: Practical considerations, relaxed assumptions, and using tree-ring data to address the amplitude of solar forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical issues arise when applying a statistical framework for unbiased ranking of alternative forced climate model simulations by comparison with climate observations from instrumental and proxy data (Part 1 in this series. Given a set of model and observational data, several decisions need to be made; e.g. concerning the region that each proxy series represents, the weighting of different regions, and the time resolution to use in the analysis. Objective selection criteria cannot be made here, but we argue to study how sensitive the results are to the choices made. The framework is improved by the relaxation of two assumptions; to allow autocorrelation in the statistical model for simulated climate variability, and to enable direct comparison of alternative simulations to test if any of them fit the observations significantly better. The extended framework is applied to a set of simulations driven with forcings for the pre-industrial period 1000–1849 CE and fifteen tree-ring based temperature proxy series. Simulations run with only one external forcing (land-use, volcanic, small-amplitude solar, or large-amplitude solar, do not significantly capture the variability in the tree-ring data – although the simulation with volcanic forcing does so for some experiment settings. When all forcings are combined (using either the small- or large-amplitude solar forcing including also orbital, greenhouse-gas and non-volcanic aerosol forcing, and additionally used to produce small simulation ensembles starting from slightly different initial ocean conditions, the resulting simulations are highly capable of capturing some observed variability. Nevertheless, for some choices in the experiment design, they are not significantly closer to the observations than when unforced simulations are used, due to highly variable results between regions. It is also not possible to tell whether the small-amplitude or large-amplitude solar forcing causes the multiple-forcing

  10. Simulations of EBS task force BMT 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, A. (Marintel Ky, Turku (Finland))

    2007-08-15

    The Aespoe HRL International Joint Committee has set up a Task Force on Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS). Its long time objective is to develop effective tools for analysis of THM(C) behaviour of buffer and backfill. The idea of the Task Force is to offer a forum to develop the tools of the work groups. Bench Mark Test (BMT) 1.3 was a small-scale heating test with no external water supply. The experiment was conducted by Technical University of Catalonia. It was a thermal-hydraulic-mechanical test, although only temperature was measured continuously. Simulation results are presented here. These simulations were performed with Freefem++ software, which is a high-level programming language for solving partial differential equations with finite element method. The mathematical model used is based on continuum thermodynamics. With the model improvements for BMT 1.3, also BMT 1.2 was recalculated. (orig.)

  11. On the Load-Unload (L-U) and Force-Release (F-R) Algorithms for Simulating Brittle Fracture Processes via Lattice Models

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2011-11-11

    General summaries on the load-unload and force-release methods indicate that the two methods are efficient for different-charactered quasi-static failures; therefore, it is important to choose the right one for different applications. Then we take, as an example, the case where the release of the ruptured element\\'s internal force is infinitely slower than the relaxation of the lattice system and analyze why the force-release method works better than the load-unload method in this particular case. Different trial deformation fields are used by them to track the next equilibrium state. Force-release method ensures that the deformation throughout the whole failure process coincides exactly with the controlled-displacement boundary conditions and we utilize the \\'left modulus\\' concept to prove that this method satisfies the energetic evolution in the force-displacement diagram; both of which are not satisfied by the load-unload method. To illustrate that the force-release method is not just another form of the load-unload method, a tensile test on a specifically designed system is analyzed to further compare the above two methods, showing that their predicted sequences of elemental failures can be different. In closing, we simulate the uniaxial tensile test on a beam lattice system by the load-unload and force-release methods and exploit the details of the resulting fracture processes. © The Author(s), 2011.

  12. Northern Hemisphere millennial-scale ice discharges as a response to oceanic forcing simulated with a hybrid ice-sheet/ice-shelf model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Solas, J.; Montoya, M.; Robinson, A. J.; Banderas-Carreño, R.; Ritz, C.; Ganopolski, A.

    2012-04-01

    Marine and continental records and ice core data have revealed the existence of pronounced millennial time-scale climate variability during the last glacial cycle. Greenland ice core records show abrupt transitions known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events within decades from cold (stadial) to relatively warm (interstadial) conditions, followed by slow cooling that lasts several centuries and more rapid cooling through stadial conditions. Two types of explanation have been suggested: periodic external forcing and internal oscillations in the climate system, for which ocean circulation is the main candidate. On the other hand, six periods of extreme cooling registered in the Northern Hemisphere, known as Heinrich events, have been found to be coeval with increased deposition of ice-rafted debris, which is interpreted as enhanced discharge of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean. Recently, the coupled effects between ocean circulation and ice-sheets dynamics have been suggested to play a major role in triggering Heinrich events. This interpretation of Heinrich events responding to changes in the oceanic patterns (or at least not being purely internal and spontaneous manifestations of ice sheets), allows the possibility to provide an explicit relationship between DO events and the periodic iceberg surges. Here this hypothesis is reassessed within a more realistic modeling framework by forcing a 3D state-of-the-art ice-sheet model with the output of abrupt climate change simulations carried out with a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity. These show the main expected characteristics of such events: an abrupt warming of the North Atlantic and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) intensification followed by a progressive cooling and AMOC reduction, as well as a more drastic fall into a stadial condition. Interestingly, stadial periods are characterized by the occurrence of subsurface oceanic warming of up to 3 K in regions where deep water

  13. Effects of orbital forcing on atmosphere and ocean heat transports in Holocene and Eemian climate simulations with a comprehensive Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fischer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orbital forcing does not only exert direct insolation effects, but also alters climate indirectly through feedback mechanisms that modify atmosphere and ocean dynamics and meridional heat and moisture transfers. We investigate the regional effects of these changes by detailed analysis of atmosphere and ocean circulation and heat transports in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-biosphere general circulation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH/MPI-OM. We perform long term quasi equilibrium simulations under pre-industrial, mid-Holocene (6000 years before present – yBP, and Eemian (125 000 yBP orbital boundary conditions. Compared to pre-industrial climate, Eemian and Holocene temperatures show generally warmer conditions at higher and cooler conditions at lower latitudes. Changes in sea-ice cover, ocean heat transports, and atmospheric circulation patterns lead to pronounced regional heterogeneity. Over Europe, the warming is most pronounced over the north-eastern part in accordance with recent reconstructions for the Holocene. We attribute this warming to enhanced ocean circulation in the Nordic Seas and enhanced ocean-atmosphere heat flux over the Barents Shelf in conduction with retreat of sea ice and intensified winter storm tracks over northern Europe.

  14. A Highly Resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of a Wind Turbine using an Actuator Line Model with Optimal Body Force Projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-09-01

    When representing the blade aerodynamics with rotating actuator lines, the computed forces have to be projected back to the CFD flow field as a volumetric body force. That has been done in the past with a geometrically simple uniform three-dimensional Gaussian at each point along the blade. We argue that the body force can be shaped in a way that better predicts the blade local flow field, the blade load distribution, and the formation of the tip/root vortices. In previous work, we have determined the optimal scales of circular and elliptical Gaussian kernels that best reproduce the local flow field in two-dimensions. In this work we extend the analysis and applications by considering the full three-dimensional blade to test our hypothesis in a highly resolved Large Eddy Simulation.

  15. Influence of grid resolution and meteorological forcing on simulated European air quality: A sensitivity study with the modeling system COSMO-MUSCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Ralf; Schröder, Wolfram; Schrödner, Roland; Renner, Eberhard

    2012-06-01

    Model evaluation studies are essential for determining model performance as well as assessing model deficiencies, and are the focus of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The chemistry-transport model system COSMO-MUSCAT participates in this initiative. In this paper the robustness and variability of the model results against changes in the model setup are analyzed. Special focus is given to the formation of secondary particulate matter and the ability to reproduce unusually high levels of PM10 in Central Europe caused by long-range transported smoke of fires in western Russia. Seven different model configurations are investigated in this study. The COSMO-MUSCAT results are evaluated in comparison with ground-based measurements in Central Europe. The analysis is performed for two selected periods in April/May 2006 and October 2006 which are characterized by elevated concentrations of PM. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the results is studied against the used grid resolution and the meteorological forcing. Here, COSMO-MUSCAT is applied with different horizontal grid sizes and, alternatively, forced by reanalysis data with finer resolution. The use of finer grid resolutions in COSMO-MUSCAT has direct consequences on the meteorological forcing as well as on the calculated emission and deposition rates. The presented results suggest a large impact of the meteorological effects on the PM concentrations. The more accurate spatial appointment of the emissions and deposition fluxes seems to be of little consequence compared to the meteorological forcing.

  16. Simulation of seasonal cloud forcing anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    One useful way to classify clouds is according to the processes that generate them. There are three main cloud-formation agencies: deep convection; surface evaporation; large-scale lifting in the absence of conditional instability. Although traditionally clouds have been viewed as influencing the atmospheric general circulation primarily through the release of latent heat, the atmospheric science literature contains abundant evidence that, in reality, clouds influence the general circulation through four more or less equally important effects: interactions with the solar and terrestrial radiation fields; condensation and evaporation; precipitation; small-scale circulations within the atmosphere. The most advanced of the current generation of GCMs include parameterizations of all four effects. Until recently there has been lingering skepticism, in the general circulation modeling community, that the radiative effects of clouds significantly influence the atmospheric general circulation. GCMs have provided the proof that the radiative effects of clouds are important for the general circulation of the atmosphere. An important concept in analysis of the effects of clouds on climate is the cloud radiative forcing (CRF), which is defined as the difference between the radiative flux which actually occurs in the presence of clouds, and that which would occur if the clouds were removed but the atmospheric state were otherwise unchanged. We also use the term CRF to denote warming or cooling tendencies due to cloud-radiation interactions. Cloud feedback is the change in CRF that accompanies a climate change. The present study concentrates on the planetary CRF and its response to external forcing, i.e. seasonal change.

  17. Measurement of cricoid pressure force during simulated Sellick's manoeuvre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkiewicz, Paweł; Zawadka, Mateusz; Kosińska, Anna; Walczak-Wieteska, Paulina; Majerowicz, Kalina

    2017-09-27

    Cricoid pressure is a standard anaesthetic procedure used to reduce the risk of aspiration of gastric contents during the induction of general anaesthesia. However, for several years its validity has been questioned. There still remains the question of whether we perform it correctly. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the theoretical knowledge of Sellick's manoeuvre, as well an assessment of practical skill related with it when simulated on a model of the upper airway. The study was performed on a cohort of anaesthetists and anaesthetic nurses working in various hospitals in the Warsaw area. Measurements were taken on an upper airway model placed on an electronic kitchen scale. Participants were asked to perform Sellick's manoeuvre in the way they do it in their clinical practice. The test was done twice. Both the position and pressures applied on the model were documented. Knowledge concerning current recommendations of cricoid force was noted. 206 subjects participated in the study. Only 49% (n = 101) properly identified cricoid cartilage during their application of Sellick's manoeuvre. Application of the correct pressure on the model of the airway was noted in 16.5% (n = 34) during the first attempt and in 20.4% (n = 42) during the second attempt. The median force applied during simulated Sellick's manoeuvrewas 36 N (IQR: 26-55) in the first attempt, and 38 (IQR 25-55) in the second attempt. Sellick's manoeuvre was performed incorrectly in many cases. Half of the participants of our study applied the pressure in the wrong place while the majority of them used an inappropriate amount of force. Thus, the application of cricoid pressure in patients should be preceded with simulation training.

  18. Simulation and Experimental Research on Cutting Force of Turning Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Qingchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly establishes a two-dimensional model about the YG8 carbide tool turning TC4 titanium alloy on the basis of ABAQUS. The cutting force of the simulation model was verified by the turning experiment, and the relationships of cutting force with cutting speed, feed rate and rake angle of cutting edge in the model were studied. A prediction model of main cutting force related to cutting speed, feed rate and rake angle was obtained by central composite experiment. Studies have shown that the difference between the cutting force acquired by simulation and by experiment was less than 10%; in a certain range, the cutting force increased with the feed rate, the cutting force decreased with the increase of cutting speed and rake angle, and the influence of feed rate to cutting force was most significant.

  19. Simulation modeling and arena

    CERN Document Server

    Rossetti, Manuel D

    2015-01-01

    Emphasizes a hands-on approach to learning statistical analysis and model building through the use of comprehensive examples, problems sets, and software applications With a unique blend of theory and applications, Simulation Modeling and Arena®, Second Edition integrates coverage of statistical analysis and model building to emphasize the importance of both topics in simulation. Featuring introductory coverage on how simulation works and why it matters, the Second Edition expands coverage on static simulation and the applications of spreadsheets to perform simulation. The new edition als

  20. Molecular simulations of primary alkanolamines using an extendable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simond, Mickaël R; Ballerat-Busserolles, Karine; Coxam, Jean-Yves; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2012-12-07

    A classical force field is proposed for the molecular simulation of primary alkanolamines containing a NH(2)-C-C-OH backbone. A method is devised to take into account the polar (H-bonding) environment of the alkanolamines by calculating electrostatic charges in the presence of explicit solvent molecules. The force field does not use a universal set of charges, but is rather constructed by following a general method for obtaining specific charges for the different alkanolamines. The model is parameterized on the two simplest primary alkanolamines and then validated by calculating thermodynamic properties of five other molecules. Experimental liquid densities and enthalpies of vaporization are also reported in order to complete existing literature data. The predicted ability of the force field is evaluated by comparing the simulation results with experimental densities and enthalpies of vaporization. Densities are predicted with an uncertainty of 1.5 % and enthalpies of vaporization with an uncertainty of 1 kJ mol(-1). A decomposition of the interaction energy into electrostatic and repulsive-dispersive interactions and an analysis of hydrogen-bond statistics lead to a complex picture. Some terms of these interactions are related to the molecular structure in a clear way, others are not. The results provide insights into the structure-property relations that contribute to a better description of the thermodynamic properties of alkanolamines.

  1. Modelling Fluidelastic Instability Forces in Tube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. Burns

    Historically, heat exchangers have been among the most failure prone components in nuclear power plants. Most of these failures are due to tube failures as a result of corrosion, fatigue and fretting wear. Fatigue and fretting wear are a result of flow induced vibration through turbulent buffeting and fluidelastic instability mechanisms. Fluidelastic instability is by far the most important and complex mechanism. This research deals with modelling fluidelastic instability and the resulting tube response. The proposed time domain model uses the concept of a flow cell (Hassan & Hayder [16]) to represent the complex flow field inside a shell and tube heat exchanger and accounts for temporal variations in the flow separation points as a result of tube motion. The fluidelastic forces are determined by predicting the attachment lengths. The predicted forces are used to simulate the response of a single flexible tube inside a shell and tube heat exchanger. It was found that accounting for temporal variations in the separation points predicted lower critical flow velocities, than that of fixed attachment and separation points. Once unstable a phase lag is predicted between the fluidelastic forces and tube response. It was determined that the predicted critical flow velocities agreed well with available experimental data. The developed model represents an important step towards a realistic fluidelastic instability model which can be used to design the new generation nuclear steam generators.

  2. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce: A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio V. Guzman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years.

  3. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever-tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip-surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years.

  4. Force feedback coupling with dynamics for physical simulation of product assembly and operation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Duan, Guifang; Fu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Most existing force feedback methods are still difficult to meet the requirements of real-time force calculation in virtual assembly and operation with complex objects. In addition, there is often an assumption that the controlled objects are completely free and the target object is only completely fixed or free, thus, the dynamics of the kinematic chain where the controlled objects are located are neglected during the physical simulation of the product manipulation with force feedback interaction. This paper proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation based on statistically learned contact force prediction model and the coupling of force feedback and dynamics. In the proposed method, based on hidden Markov model (HMM) and local weighting learning (LWL), contact force prediction model is constructed, which can estimate the contact force in real time during interaction. Based on computational load balance model, the computing resources are dynamically assigned and the dynamics integral step is optimized. In addition, smoothing process is performed to the force feedback on the synchronization points. Consequently, we can solve the coupling and synchronization problems of high-frequency feedback force servo, low-frequency dynamics solver servo and scene rendering servo, and realize highly stable and accurate force feedback in the physical simulation of product assembly and operation manipulation. This research proposes a physical simulation method of product assembly and operation manipulation.

  5. Artificial force fields for multi-agent simulations of maritime traffic and risk estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, F.; Ligteringen, H.; Van Gulijk, C.; Ale, B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A probabilistic risk model is designed to estimate probabilities of collisions for shipping accidents in busy waterways. We propose a method based on multi-agent simulation that uses an artificial force field to model ship maneuvers. The artificial force field is calibrated by AIS data (Automatic Id

  6. Fundamentals of force feedback and application to a surgery simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Heiko; Chantier, Benjamin B A; Cakmak, Hueseyin K; Trantakis, Christos; Kuehnapfel, Uwe G

    2003-01-01

    Force feedback increases the effectiveness of virtual-reality surgery training systems. An overview of the fundamentals of applying force feedback is presented. An impedance control technique and data processing methods for stability preservation are illustrated. A flexible interface for general force-feedback applications has been developed. This interface is capable of controlling several different force-feedback hardware systems, including the SensAble PHANTOM, the Laparoscopic Impulse Engines from Immersion, and the VS-One virtual endoscopic surgery trainer. The findings are evaluated using the main simulation system, KISMET, and the modeling tools KISMO and VESUV. Within the scope of a cooperative project called HapticIO (funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research [BMBF]), new haptic devices have been designed for virtual neuroendoscopy and laparoscopy. The concept and implementations presented in this paper have been found to be flexible, stable and suitable for universal use. The impedance method, combined with the open-loop feed-forward control technique, is well suited and appropriate for the task.

  7. Protein high-force pulling simulations yield low-force results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Lichter

    Full Text Available All-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are used to pull with extremely large constant force (750-3000 pN on three small proteins. The introduction of a nondimensional timescale permits direct comparison of unfolding across all forces. A crossover force of approximately 1100 pN divides unfolding dynamics into two regimes. At higher forces, residues sequentially unfold from the pulling end while maintaining the remainder of the protein force-free. Measurements of hydrodynamic viscous stresses are made easy by the high speeds of unfolding. Using an exact low-Reynolds-number scaling, these measurements can be extrapolated to provide, for the first time, an estimate of the hydrodynamic force on low-force unfolding. Below 1100 pN, but surprisingly still at extremely large applied force, intermediate states and cooperative unfoldings as seen at much lower forces are observed. The force-insensitive persistence of these structures indicates that decomposition into unfolded fragments requires a large fluctuation. This finding suggests how proteins are constructed to resist transient high force. The progression of [Formula: see text] helix and [Formula: see text] sheet unfolding is also found to be insensitive to force. The force-insensitivity of key aspects of unfolding opens the possibility that numerical simulations can be accelerated by high applied force while still maintaining critical features of unfolding.

  8. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution.

  9. Radiative Forcing in the ACCMIP Historical and Future Climate Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Drew Todd; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M.; Jiao, C.; Chin, M.; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, L.; Mahowald, N.; hide

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model IntercomparisonProject (ACCMIP) was to characterize the short-lived drivers of preindustrial to 2100climate change in the current generation of climate models. Here we evaluate historicaland 5 future radiative forcing in the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of whichalso participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5).The models generally reproduce present-day climatological total aerosol opticaldepth (AOD) relatively well. components to this total, however, and most appear to underestimate AOD over East10 Asia. The models generally capture 1980-2000 AOD trends fairly well, though theyunderpredict AOD increases over the YellowEastern Sea. They appear to strongly underestimate absorbing AOD, especially in East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, SouthAmerica and Southern Hemisphere Africa.We examined both the conventional direct radiative forcing at the tropopause (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (adjusted forcing AF, including direct andindirect effects). The models calculated all aerosol all-sky 1850 to 2000 global meanannual average RF ranges from 0.06 to 0.49 W m(sup -2), with a mean of 0.26 W m(sup -2) and a median of 0.27 W m(sup -2. Adjusting for missing aerosol components in some modelsbrings the range to 0.12 to 0.62W m(sup -2), with a mean of 0.39W m(sup -2). Screen20ing the models based on their ability to capture spatial patterns and magnitudes ofAOD and AOD trends yields a quality-controlled mean of 0.42W m(sup -2) and range of0.33 to 0.50 W m(sup -2) (accounting for missing components). The CMIP5 subset of ACCMIPmodels spans 0.06 to 0.49W m(sup -2), suggesting some CMIP5 simulations likelyhave too little aerosol RF. A substantial, but not well quantified, contribution to histori25cal aerosol RF may come from climate feedbacks (35 to 58). The mean aerosol AF during this period is 1.12W m(sup -2) (median value 1.16W m(sup -2), range 0.72 to1.44W m

  10. Aerosol forcing in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) simulations by HadGEM2-ES and the role of ammonium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouin, Nicolas; Rae, Jamie; Jones, Andy; Johnson, Colin; Haywood, Jim; Boucher, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    The latest Hadley Centre climate model, HadGEM2-ES, includes Earth system components such as interactive chemistry and eight species of tropospheric aerosols. It has been run for the period 1860-2100 in support of the fifth phase of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Anthropogenic aerosol emissions peak between 1980 and 2020, resulting in a present-day all-sky top of the atmosphere aerosol forcing of -1.6 and -1.4 W m-2 with and without ammonium nitrate aerosols, respectively, for the sum of direct and first indirect aerosol forcings. Aerosol forcing becomes significantly weaker in the 21st century, being weaker than -0.5 W m-2 in 2100 without nitrate. However, nitrate aerosols become the dominant species in Europe and Asia and decelerate the decrease in global mean aerosol forcing. Considering nitrate aerosols makes aerosol radiative forcing 2-4 times stronger by 2100 depending on the representative concentration pathway, although this impact is lessened when changes in the oxidation properties of the atmosphere are accounted for. Anthropogenic aerosol residence times increase in the future in spite of increased precipitation, as cloud cover and aerosol-cloud interactions decrease in tropical and midlatitude regions. Deposition of fossil fuel black carbon onto snow and ice surfaces peaks during the 20th century in the Arctic and Europe but keeps increasing in the Himalayas until the middle of the 21st century. Results presented here confirm the importance of aerosols in influencing the Earth's climate, albeit with a reduced impact in the future, and suggest that nitrate aerosols will partially replace sulphate aerosols to become an important anthropogenic species in the remainder of the 21st century.

  11. Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A primary goal of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP was to characterize the short-lived drivers of preindustrial to 2100 climate change in the current generation of climate models. Here we evaluate historical and future radiative forcing in the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5.

    The models generally reproduce present-day climatological total aerosol optical depth (AOD relatively well. They have quite different contributions from various aerosol components to this total, however, and most appear to underestimate AOD over East Asia. The models generally capture 1980–2000 AOD trends fairly well, though they underpredict AOD increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They appear to strongly underestimate absorbing AOD, especially in East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, South America and Southern Hemisphere Africa.

    We examined both the conventional direct radiative forcing at the tropopause (RF and the forcing including rapid adjustments (adjusted forcing; AF, including direct and indirect effects. The models' calculated all aerosol all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average RF ranges from −0.06 to −0.49 W m−2, with a mean of −0.26 W m−2 and a median of −0.27 W m−2. Adjusting for missing aerosol components in some models brings the range to −0.12 to −0.62 W m−2, with a mean of −0.39 W m−2. Screening the models based on their ability to capture spatial patterns and magnitudes of AOD and AOD trends yields a quality-controlled mean of −0.42 W m−2 and range of −0.33 to −0.50 W m−2 (accounting for missing components. The CMIP5 subset of ACCMIP models spans −0.06 to −0.49 W m−2, suggesting some CMIP5 simulations likely have too little aerosol RF. A substantial, but not

  12. Modeling meteorological forcing of snowcover in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrom, Robert Ake

    2000-11-01

    The architectural properties of a forest are known to modify significantly meteorological forcing of snowcover. Current numerical snow models utilize a wide range of vegetation representations that limit their application to particular biomes or for basic research on specialized problems. Most do not explicitly represent the combined effects of the canopy on processes of mass and energy transfer beneath the canopy. This project develops forest canopy sub-models that estimate the below-canopy solar and longwave irradiance, wind speed, and accumulation of precipitation, based on meteorological measurements above the canopy and parameters of forest architecture. The wind and solar radiation sub-model predictions were independently compared with meteorological observations at deciduous and coniferous sites in the snowbelt region of northern Michigan. The solar radiation and wind models required adjustments to match sub-canopy measurements. The primary experiment compared the simulations and measurements of snow depth for eight modified versions of the Utah Energy Balance (UEB) snow model during the 1998-99 snowcover season at the two forest sites and a near-by open site. Independent inclusion of each sub-model and a new stability scheme in the UEB model revealed significant sensitivity of modeled snow depth to stability and each of the four processes estimated by the sub-models. The original UEB model uses a simple forest canopy parameterization that does not consider precipitation interception. Comparison of the original and modified UEB models significantly improved simulations of snow depth at the open and coniferous sites, but performance was slightly worse for a leafless deciduous site. Unlike the modified model, the analysis suggests that the original model produces inconsistent results, which reduces its potential for application to different biomes. Results suggest that opposing processes of energy and mass exchange tend to moderate meteorological forcing

  13. Simulations of the bichromatic force in multilevel systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aldridge, L; Eyler, E E

    2016-01-01

    Coherent optical bichromatic forces have been shown to be effective tools for rapidly slowing and cooling simple atomic systems. While previous estimates suggest that these forces may also be effective for rapidly decelerating molecules or complex atoms, a quantitative treatment for multilevel systems has been lacking. We describe detailed numerical modeling of bichromatic forces by direct numerical solution for the time-dependent density matrix in the rotating-wave approximation. We describe both the general phenomenology of an arbitrary few-level system and the specific requirements for slowing and cooling on a many-level transition in calcium monofluoride (CaF), one of the molecules of greatest current experimental interest. We show that it should be possible to decelerate a cryogenic buffer-gas-cooled beam of CaF nearly to rest without a repumping laser and within a longitudinal distance of about 1 cm. We also compare a full 16-level simulation for the CaF B$\\leftrightarrow$X system with a simplified nume...

  14. Quantum mechanical force fields for condensed phase molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2017-09-01

    Molecular simulations are powerful tools for providing atomic-level details into complex chemical and physical processes that occur in the condensed phase. For strongly interacting systems where quantum many-body effects are known to play an important role, density-functional methods are often used to provide the model with the potential energy used to drive dynamics. These methods, however, suffer from two major drawbacks. First, they are often too computationally intensive to practically apply to large systems over long time scales, limiting their scope of application. Second, there remain challenges for these models to obtain the necessary level of accuracy for weak non-bonded interactions to obtain quantitative accuracy for a wide range of condensed phase properties. Quantum mechanical force fields (QMFFs) provide a potential solution to both of these limitations. In this review, we address recent advances in the development of QMFFs for condensed phase simulations. In particular, we examine the development of QMFF models using both approximate and ab initio density-functional models, the treatment of short-ranged non-bonded and long-ranged electrostatic interactions, and stability issues in molecular dynamics calculations. Example calculations are provided for crystalline systems, liquid water, and ionic liquids. We conclude with a perspective for emerging challenges and future research directions.

  15. Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, J; Bauer, S; Baum, E; Cairns, B; Canuto, V; Chandler, M; Cheng, Y; Cohen, A; Faluvegi, G; Fleming, E; Friend, A; Genio, A D; Hall, T; Jackman, C; Jonas, J; Kelley, M; Kharecha, P; Kiang, N Y; Koch, D; Labow, G; Lacis, A; Lerner, J; Lo, K; Menon, S; Miller, R; Nazarenko, L; Novakov, T; Oinas, V; Perlwitz, J; Rind, D; Romanou, A; Ruedy, R; Russell, G; Sato, M; Schmidt, G A; Schmunk, R; Shindell, D; Stone, P; Streets, D; Sun, S; Tausnev, N; Thresher, D; Unger, N; Yao, M; Zhang, S; Perlwitz, Ja.; Perlwitz, Ju.

    2006-01-01

    We carry out climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE driven by ten measured or estimated climate forcings. An ensemble of climate model runs is carried out for each forcing acting individually and for all forcing mechanisms acting together. We compare side-by-side simulated climate change for each forcing, all forcings, observations, unforced variability among model ensemble members, and, if available, observed variability. Discrepancies between observations and simulations with all forcings are due to model deficiencies, inaccurate or incomplete forcings, and imperfect observations. Although there are notable discrepancies between model and observations, the fidelity is sufficient to encourage use of the model for simulations of future climate change. By using a fixed well-documented model and accurately defining the 1880-2003 forcings, we aim to provide a benchmark against which the effect of improvements in the model, climate forcings, and observations can be tested. Principal model deficiencies...

  16. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, V. S. [Fermilab

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  17. Theory Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-23

    Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

  18. ENSO forcing of the Northern Hemisphere climate in a large ensemble of model simulations based on a very long SST record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herceg Bulic, Ivana [University of Zagreb, Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical Institute, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Brankovic, Cedo [Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2007-02-15

    explanation for such a result could be offered. An appreciable linear component in model response over the NAE was also found. The model results over the NAE region agree reasonably well with observational studies. An additional analysis of the remote atmospheric response to very weak ENSO forcing (defined from the interval between 0.5{sigma} and 1.0{sigma} of the interannual variance) was also carried out. A discernible model response in the Northern Hemisphere to such a weak SST forcing was found. (orig.)

  19. Simulation modeling of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwein, L B; Cohen, S M

    1992-03-01

    A discrete-time simulation model of carcinogenesis is described mathematically using recursive relationships between time-varying model variables. The dynamics of cellular behavior is represented within a biological framework that encompasses two irreversible and heritable genetic changes. Empirical data and biological supposition dealing with both control and experimental animal groups are used together to establish values for model input variables. The estimation of these variables is integral to the simulation process as described in step-by-step detail. Hepatocarcinogenesis in male F344 rats provides the basis for seven modeling scenarios which illustrate the complexity of relationships among cell proliferation, genotoxicity, and tumor risk.

  20. Final Report of the Simulation Optimization Task Force

    CERN Document Server

    Rimoldi, A; Dell'Acqua, A; Froidevaux, D; Gianotti, F; Guyot, C; Hinchliffe, I; Jakobs, K; Marshall, Z; Nisati, A; Quarrie, D; Unal, G; Young, C

    2009-01-01

    This is the final report of the ATLAS Simulation Optimization Task Force, established in June of 2007. This note justifies the selected Geant4 version, physics list, and range cuts to be used by the default ATLAS simulation for initial data taking and beyond. The current status of several projects, including detector description, simulation validation, studies of additional Geant4 parameters, and cavern background, are reported.

  1. Improving Social Force Pedestrian Simulation Model Based on Finite Element Theory%基于有限元理论的行人流社会力仿真模型改进研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕊; 张哲宁; 杨静

    2013-01-01

    The social force microscopic pedes-trian simulation model can capture pedestrians’ real movement conditions, however its accuracy and computational efficiency suffers when ap-plied to simulate pedestrian’s movement in the crowded condition. This paper improves the so-cial force model and its solution algorithm based on the finite element theory. Finally, the paper validates its feasibility by applying the model to simulate bi-directional pedestrian flow in a chan-nel.%社会力微观行人仿真模型能够体现行人真实运动情况,但其在模拟拥挤状态下的行人运动时存在失真及运算效率低的问题。为此引入有限元分析方法,从模型和算法两方面对社会力模型进行改进,提出基于有限元理论的方法与求解步骤。最后应用该方法对通道内双向行人交通流进行仿真模拟,验证其可行性。

  2. Simulations of Cyclone Sidr in the Bay of Bengal with a High-Resolution Model: Sensitivity to Large-Scale Boundary Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Done, James; Dudhia, Jimy; Niyogi, Dev

    2011-01-01

    The predictability of Cyclone Sidr in the Bay of Bengal was explored in terms of track and intensity using the Advanced Research Hurricane Weather Research Forecast (AHW) model. This constitutes the first application of the AHW over an area that lies outside the region of the North Atlantic for which this model was developed and tested. Several experiments were conducted to understand the possible contributing factors that affected Sidr s intensity and track simulation by varying the initial start time and domain size. Results show that Sidr s track was strongly controlled by the synoptic flow at the 500-hPa level, seen especially due to the strong mid-latitude westerly over north-central India. A 96-h forecast produced westerly winds over north-central India at the 500-hPa level that were notably weaker; this likely caused the modeled cyclone track to drift from the observed actual track. Reducing the model domain size reduced model error in the synoptic-scale winds at 500 hPa and produced an improved cyclone track. Specifically, the cyclone track appeared to be sensitive to the upstream synoptic flow, and was, therefore, sensitive to the location of the western boundary of the domain. However, cyclone intensity remained largely unaffected by this synoptic wind error at the 500-hPa level. Comparison of the high resolution, moving nested domain with a single coarser resolution domain showed little difference in tracks, but resulted in significantly different intensities. Experiments on the domain size with regard to the total precipitation simulated by the model showed that precipitation patterns and 10-m surface winds were also different. This was mainly due to the mid-latitude westerly flow across the west side of the model domain. The analysis also suggested that the total precipitation pattern and track was unchanged when the domain was extended toward the east, north, and south. Furthermore, this highlights our conclusion that Sidr was influenced from the west

  3. Simulation of salinity variability and the related freshwater flux forcing in the tropical Pacific: An evaluation using the Beijing normal university earth system model (BNU-ESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Hai; Zhang, Rong-Hua; Lin, Pengfei; Wang, Lanning

    2015-11-01

    The climatology and interannual variability of sea surface salinity (SSS) and freshwater flux (FWF) in the equatorial Pacific are analyzed and evaluated using simulations from the Beijing Normal University Earth System Model (BNU-ESM). The simulated annual climatology and interannual variations of SSS, FWF, mixed layer depth (MLD), and buoyancy flux agree with those observed in the equatorial Pacific. The relationships among the interannual anomaly fields simulated by BNU-ESM are analyzed to illustrate the climate feedbacks induced by FWF in the tropical Pacific. The largest interannual variations of SSS and FWF are located in the western-central equatorial Pacific. A positive FWF feedback effect on sea surface temperature (SST) in the equatorial Pacific is identified. As a response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the interannual variation of FWF induces ocean processes which, in turn, enhance ENSO. During El Niño, a positive FWF anomaly in the western-central Pacific (an indication of increased precipitation rates) acts to enhance a negative salinity anomaly and a negative surface ocean density anomaly, leading to stable stratification in the upper ocean. Hence, the vertical mixing and entrainment of subsurface water into the mixed layer are reduced, and the associated El Niño is enhanced. Related to this positive feedback, the simulated FWF bias is clearly reflected in SSS and SST simulations, with a positive FWF perturbation into the ocean corresponding to a low SSS and a small surface ocean density in the western-central equatorial Pacific warm pool.

  4. Switched Dynamical Latent Force Models for Modelling Transcriptional Regulation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Lopera, Andrés F

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop statistical approaches for transcription networks, statistical community has proposed several methods to infer activity levels of proteins, from time-series measurements of targets' expression levels. A few number of approaches have been proposed in order to outperform the representation of fast switching time instants, but computational overheads are significant due to complex inference algorithms. Using the theory related to latent force models (LFM), the development of this project provide a switched dynamical hybrid model based on Gaussian processes (GPs). To deal with discontinuities in dynamical systems (or latent driving force), an extension of the single input motif approach is introduced, that switches between different protein concentrations, and different dynamical systems. This creates a versatile representation for transcription networks that can capture discrete changes and non-linearities in the dynamics. The proposed method is evaluated on both simulated data and real data,...

  5. Modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, E.; Vogt, W.G.; Mickle, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    This conference includes papers on the uses of supercomputers, multiprocessors, artificial intelligence and expert systems in various energy applications. Topics considered include knowledge-based expert systems for power engineering, a solar air conditioning laboratory computer system, multivariable control systems, the impact of power system disturbances on computer systems, simulating shared-memory parallel computers, real-time image processing with multiprocessors, and network modeling and simulation of greenhouse solar systems.

  6. Validation of simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Muniza; Pedersen, Stig Andur

    2012-01-01

    In philosophy of science, the interest for computational models and simulations has increased heavily during the past decades. Different positions regarding the validity of models have emerged but the views have not succeeded in capturing the diversity of validation methods. The wide variety...... of models has been somewhat narrow-minded reducing the notion of validation to establishment of truth. This article puts forward the diversity in applications of simulation models that demands a corresponding diversity in the notion of validation....... of models with regards to their purpose, character, field of application and time dimension inherently calls for a similar diversity in validation approaches. A classification of models in terms of the mentioned elements is presented and used to shed light on possible types of validation leading...

  7. Mathematical Model of Gravitational and Electrostatic Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Krouglov, Alexei

    2006-01-01

    Author presents mathematical model for acting-on-a-distance attractive and repulsive forces based on propagation of energy waves that produces Newton expression for gravitational and Coulomb expression for electrostatic forces. Model uses mathematical observation that difference between two inverse exponential functions of the distance asymptotically converges to function proportional to reciprocal of distance squared.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  9. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  10. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  11. A Model to Predict Rolling Force of Finishing Stands with RBF Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In view of intrinsic imperfection of traditional models of rolling force, in order to improve the prediction accuracy of rolling force, a new method combining radial basis function (RBF) neural networks with traditional models to predict rolling force was proposed. The off-line simulation indicates that the predicted results are much more accurate than that with traditional models.

  12. Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Instantaneous Cutting Forces for Corner Radius End Mills%圆弧铣刀瞬态切削力建模与数值仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘战强; 王启东; 汤爱民; 王社权

    2012-01-01

    提出圆弧铣刀(R刀)几何模型描述方法,建立基于机械力学的圆弧铣刀切削力预报模型.该模型分别考虑前刀面剪切效应与后刀面犁切效应,通过计算微元切削刃空间位置角和不同轴向高度处的切入、切出角方法获取瞬时切削区域,应用空间解析几何三维坐标变换原理实现微元切削力从局部坐标系向刀具整体坐标系下转换,借助科学计算软件Matlab实现数值仿真.模型中切削力系数由42CrM04切削试验的切削力数据拟合得出.两组试验结果与仿真结果的对比,验证预报模型的有效性.%The geometrical characteristics of corner radius end milling cutter was presented in this paper. A new model for instantaneous cutting force for comer radius end mills was then developed. The shearing effect of rake face and ploughing effect of relief face on cutting force were investigated respectively. The cutting area was obtained through the calculation of element cutting edge angular position in the global coordinate system and entrance angle as well as exiting angle at different axial altitude. The element cutting force in local coordinate system was transformed to global coordinate system by applying the theory of space analytical geometry. The cutting force parameters in the developed model were obtained from fitting the 42CrMo4 cutting test data. The numerical simulation of instantaneous cutting forces for corner radius end mills were implemented in commercially available mathematical software MatLAB. The proposed force model had been validated through the comparison between experimental results and simulation results.

  13. The Simulation of the Brush Stroke Based on Force Feedback Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel simulation method of the brush stroke is proposed by applying force feedback technology to the virtual painting process. The relationship between force and the brush deformation is analyzed, and the spring-mass model is applied to construct the brush model, which can realistically simulate the brush morphological changes according to the force exerted on it. According to the deformation of the brush model at a sampling point, the brush footprint between the brush and the paper is calculated in real time. Then, the brush stroke is obtained by superimposing brush footprints along sampling points, and the dynamic painting of the brush stroke is implemented. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the virtual painting system based on the force feedback technology. In this system, users can implement the painting in real time with a Phantom Desktop haptic device, which can effectively enhance reality to users.

  14. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 September 2016 – 21 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and...release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 Air Force Research Laboratory Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation Daniel W. Crews In-Space...unlimited. PA#16490 Overview • Motivation and Background • What is a Collisionless Shock Wave? • Features of the Collisionless Shock • The Shock Simulation

  15. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... history term. For general valve geometries there are no simple solution to either of these terms. During development and design of such switching valves, it is therefore, common practice to use simple models to describe the opposing fluid forces, neglecting all but the viscous term which is determined...... based on shearing areas and venting channels. For fast acting valves the opposing fluid force may retard the valve performance significantly, if appropriate measures are not taken during the valve design. Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are available to simulate the total fluid...

  16. EU Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) Task Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Becoulet

    2007-01-01

    @@ At the end of 2003, the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) structure set-up a long-term European task force (TF) in charge of "co-ordinating the development of a coherent set of validated simulation tools for the purpose of benchmarking on existing tokamak experiments, with the ultimate aim of providing a comprehensive simulation package for ITER plasmas" [http://www.efda-taskforce-itm.org/].

  17. Jamming transitions in force-based models for pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Tordeux, Antoine; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Force-based models describe pedestrian dynamics in analogy to classical mechanics by a system of second order ordinary differential equations. By investigating the linear stability of two main classes of forces, parameter regions with unstable homogeneous states are identified. In this unstable regime it is then checked whether phase transitions or stop-and-go waves occur. Results based on numerical simulations show, however, that the investigated models lead to unrealistic behavior in form of backwards moving pedestrians and overlapping. This is one reason why stop-and-go waves have not been observed in these models. The unrealistic behavior is not related to the numerical treatment of the dynamic equations but rather indicates an intrinsic problem of this model class. Identifying the underlying generic problems gives indications how to define models that do not show such unrealistic behavior. As an example we introduce a new force-based model which produces realistic jam dynamics without the appearance of u...

  18. Learning scheme to predict atomic forces and accelerate materials simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botu, V.; Ramprasad, R.

    2015-09-01

    The behavior of an atom in a molecule, liquid, or solid is governed by the force it experiences. If the dependence of this vectorial force on the atomic chemical environment can be learned efficiently with high fidelity from benchmark reference results—using "big-data" techniques, i.e., without resorting to actual functional forms—then this capability can be harnessed to enormously speed up in silico materials simulations. The present contribution provides several examples of how such a force field for Al can be used to go far beyond the length-scale and time-scale regimes presently accessible using quantum-mechanical methods. It is argued that pathways are available to systematically and continuously improve the predictive capability of such a learned force field in an adaptive manner, and that this concept can be generalized to include multiple elements.

  19. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  20. Investigation of force approximations in tethered cells simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Simulations of tethered cells in viscous sub-layers are frequently performed using the Stokes drag force, but without taking into account contributions from surface corrections, lift forces, buoyancy, the Basset force, the cells finite inertia, or added mass. In this work, we investigate to which extent such contributions influence, under a variety of hydrodynamic conditions, the force at the anchor point of a tethered cell and the survival probability of a bacterium that is attached to a host by either a slip or a catch bond via a tether with a few different biomechanical properties. We show that a consequence of not including some of these contributions is that the force to which a bond is exposed can be significantly underestimated; in general by ~32-46 %, where the influence of the surface corrections dominate (the parallel and normal correction coefficients contribute with ~5-8 or 23-26 %, respectively). The Basset force is a major contributor, up to 20 %, for larger cells and shear rates. The lift force...

  1. Three Dimensional Numerical Simulation for the Driving Force of Weld Solidification Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibo DONG; Yanhong WEI; Renpei LIU; Zujue DONG

    2005-01-01

    The double ellipsoidal model of heat source is used to analyze the thermal distributions with a three dimensional finite element method (FEM). In the mechanical model, solidification effects are treated by a dynamic element rebirth scheme. The driving force is obtained in the cracking susceptible temperature range. Moreover, this paper presents the effect of solidification shrinkage, external restraint, weld start locations and material properties on the driving force. The comparison between the simulated driving force and the experimental measurements of the material resistance predicts the susceptibility of weld metal solidification cracking.

  2. The spectral simulations of axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Gang; Sun, Sineng

    2015-01-01

    A pseudo-spectral method with an absorbing outer boundary is used to solve a set of the time-dependent force-free equations. In the method, both electric and magnetic fields are expanded in terms of the vector spherical harmonic (VSH) functions in spherical geometry and the divergencelessness of magnetic field is analytically enforced by a projection method. Our simulations show that the Deutsch vacuum solution and the Michel monopole solution can be well reproduced by our pseudo-spectral code. Further the method is used to present the time-dependent simulation of the force-free pulsar magnetosphere for an aligned rotator. The simulations show that the current sheet in the equatorial plane can be resolved well, and the obtained spin-down luminosity in the steady state is in good agreement with the value given by Spitkovsky (2006).

  3. New Cutting Force Modeling Approach for Flat End Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new mechanistic cutting force model for flat end milling using the instantaneous cutting force coefficients is proposed. An in-depth analysis shows that the total cutting forces can be separated into two terms: a nominal component independent of the runout and a perturbation component induced by the runout. The instantaneous value of the nominal component is used to calibrate the cutting force coefficients. With the help of the perturbation component and the cutting force coeffcients obtained above, the cutter runout is identified.Based on simulation and experimental results, the validity of the identification approach is demonstrated. The advantage of the proposed method lies in that the calibration performed with data of one cutting test under a specific regime can be applied for a great range of cutting conditions.

  4. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  5. Simulation of a mass-spring model for global deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong CUI; Aiguo SONG; Juan WU

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses a largely open problem in haptic simulation and rendering:contact force and deformation modeling for haptic simulation of a discrete globe mass-spring model,especially for global deforma-tion.The mass-spring system is composed of nodes connected with radially distributed springs.We tackle the problem using the theory of virtual work,and relations between the virtual force and nodal displacements are analyzed to obtain elastic deformations.The global deformation is controlled by the total nodal deformations based on a force equation at each node.The simulation results verify the efficiency of the contact force and deformation model with reasonable realism.

  6. Which forcing data errors matter most when modeling seasonal snowpacks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, M. S.; Lundquist, J. D.; Clark, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    High quality forcing data are critical when modeling seasonal snowpacks and snowmelt, but their quality is often compromised due to measurement errors or deficiencies in gridded data products (e.g., spatio-temporal interpolation, empirical parameterizations, or numerical weather model outputs). To assess the relative impact of errors in different meteorological forcings, many studies have conducted sensitivity analyses where errors (e.g., bias) are imposed on one forcing at a time and changes in model output are compared. Although straightforward, this approach only considers simplistic error structures and cannot quantify interactions in different meteorological forcing errors (i.e., it assumes a linear system). Here we employ the Sobol' method of global sensitivity analysis, which allows us to test how co-existing errors in six meteorological forcings (i.e., air temperature, precipitation, wind speed, humidity, incoming shortwave and longwave radiation) impact specific modeled snow variables (i.e., peak snow water equivalent, snowmelt rates, and snow disappearance timing). Using the Sobol' framework across a large number of realizations (>100000 simulations annually at each site), we test how (1) the type (e.g., bias vs. random errors), (2) distribution (e.g., uniform vs. normal), and (3) magnitude (e.g., instrument uncertainty vs. field uncertainty) of forcing errors impact key outputs from a physically based snow model (the Utah Energy Balance). We also assess the role of climate by conducting the analysis at sites in maritime, intermountain, continental, and tundra snow zones. For all outputs considered, results show that (1) biases in forcing data are more important than random errors, (2) the choice of error distribution can enhance the importance of specific forcings, and (3) the level of uncertainty considered dictates the relative importance of forcings. While the relative importance of forcings varied with snow variable and climate, the results broadly

  7. Active-Reserve Force Cost Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    of either the Department of Defense or the sponsoring organization. Acknowledgments Thank you to Daniel L. Cuda and Michael C. Frieders for performing...policy, 4 Ronald E. Porten, Daniel L. Cuda , and Arthur C. Yengling, “DoD Force & Infrastructure Categories: A FYDP-Based Conceptual Model of...Daniel L. Cuda , and Arthur C. Yengling. “DoD Force & Infrastructure Categories: A FYDP-Based Conceptual Model of Department of Defense Programs and

  8. Forced and internal variability in temperature simulations and reconstructions of the Common Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Donado, Laura; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Garcia-Bustamante, Elena; Smerdon, Jason S.; Luterbacher, Juerg; Raible, Christoph C.

    2016-04-01

    The relatively short ranges of external forcing variability within the CE represent a challenge in as much as the consistency between simulations and reconstructions can be affected by the large uncertainties in their respective responses to the external forcings. One of the core questions within this work relates therefore the extent to which a straight response to the external forcing can be identified during the period under study and whether this signal is common to simulated and reconstructed temperature. This study is based on an exhaustive compilation, analysis and intercomparison of the available hemispherical and global temperature reconstructions as well as a complete ensemble of simulations including both PMIP3/CMIP5 and non-PMIP3 model experiments. In addition, the various external forcing configurations applied to the models are characterized and a Total External Forcing, including all the individual forcing contributors, is developed for each experiment. Based on the linear relationship found at multidecadal and longer timescales during the last millennium between the temperature and the total external forcing, a quantitative metric of the ratio of response, the so-called Last Millennium Transient Climate Response (LMTCR), is obtained and compared for simulations and reconstructions. Within the LMTCR context, a significant quantitative consistency between the simulations and reconstructions is addressed. This work also offers a discussion about the impact that a range of generally accepted methodological approaches might have on the reconstructed ensemble uncertainties and their influences on model-data comparison exercises. A segregation among the various existing spatial targets within the NH, based on the different level of temperatura variability observed in the series, suggests a lower level of model-data consistency during the MCA than previously reported.

  9. Modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuEun; Gozen, B Arda; Ozdoganlar, O Burak

    2012-04-05

    Prediction and control of bone drilling forces are critical to the success of many orthopaedic operations. Uncontrolled and large forces can cause drill-bit breakage, drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a mechanistic model for prediction of thrust forces and torques experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the radially varying drill-bit geometry and cutting conditions analytically, while capturing the material and friction properties empirically through a specific energy formulation. The forces from the chisel edge are modeled by considering the indentation process that occurs in the vicinity of the drill-bit axis. A procedure is outlined to calibrate the specific energies, where only a small number of calibration experiments are required for a wide range of drilling conditions and drill-bit geometry. The calibration parameters for the cortical portions of bovine tibia are identified through drilling tests. Subsequently, a series of validation tests are conducted under different feed rates and spindle speeds. The thrust forces and torques were observed to vary considerably between bones from different animals. The forces from the model were seen to match well with those from the experimentation within the inherent variations from the bone characteristics. The model can be used to select favorable drilling conditions, to assist in robotic surgeries, and to design optimal orthopaedic drill bits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computer Simulations of Contact Forces for Airbags with Different Folding Patterns During Deployment Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King H. Yang

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit finite element method was used to study the neck load and the contact force between an occupant and an airbag during an out-of-position frontal automobile crash. Two different folding patterns and two different mounting angles of the airbag were simulated. For the four cases simulated, the occupant’s neck axial force ranged from 156 to 376% of the data obtained from in-position sled tests using the Hybrid III dummy. The neck shear force ranged from 87 to 229% and the neck flexion moment ranged from 68 to 127% of in-position experimental results. In both 300 mounting angle simulations, the neck axial forces were higher than that of the two simulations with 00 mounting angles, but the trend for the neck shear force was the opposite. Although the kinematics of the model appear reasonable, the numbers generated by the model must be reviewed with great caution because the model has not been fully validated.

  11. Temperature response to external forcing in simulations and reconstructions of the last millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fernández-Donado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of natural climate variability and its driving factors is crucial to assess future climate change. Therefore, comparing proxy-based climate reconstructions with forcing factors as well as comparing these with paleoclimate model simulations is key to gain insights into the relative roles of internal versus forced variability. A review of the state of modeling of the last millennium climate previous to the CMIP5-PMIP3 coordinated effort is presented and compared to the available temperature reconstructions. Simulations and reconstructions broadly agree on reproducing the major temperature changes and suggest an overall linear response to external forcing on multidecadal or longer timescales. Internal variability is found to have an important influence at hemispheric and global scales. The spatial distribution of simulated temperature changes during the transition of the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age disagrees with that found in the reconstructions, thus advocating for internal variability as a possible major player in shaping temperature changes through the millennium.

    A paleo transient climate response (PTCR is defined to provide a quantitative framework for analysing the consistency between simulated and reconstructed climate. Beyond an overall agreement between simulated and reconstructed PTCR ranges, this analysis is able to single out specific discrepancies between some reconstructions and the ensemble of simulations. The disagreement is found in the cases where the reconstructions show reduced covariability with external forcings or when they present high rates of temperature change.

  12. Computing Average Passive Forces in Sarcomeres in Length-Ramp Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schappacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Leonard, Timothy; Desch, Gertrud; Herzog, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Passive forces in sarcomeres are mainly related to the giant protein titin. Titin's extensible region consists of spring-like elements acting in series. In skeletal muscles these elements are the PEVK segment, two distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) domain regions (proximal and distal), and a N2A portion. While distal Ig domains are thought to form inextensible end filaments in intact sarcomeres, proximal Ig domains unfold in a force- and time-dependent manner. In length-ramp experiments of single titin strands, sequential unfolding of Ig domains leads to a typical saw-tooth pattern in force-elongation curves which can be simulated by Monte Carlo simulations. In sarcomeres, where more than a thousand titin strands are arranged in parallel, numerous Monte Carlo simulations are required to estimate the resultant force of all titin filaments based on the non-uniform titin elongations. To simplify calculations, the stochastic model of passive forces is often replaced by linear or non-linear deterministic and phenomenological functions. However, new theories of muscle contraction are based on the hypothesized binding of titin to the actin filament upon activation, and thereby on a prominent role of the structural properties of titin. Therefore, these theories necessitate a detailed analysis of titin forces in length-ramp experiments. In our study we present a simple and efficient alternative to Monte Carlo simulations. Based on a structural titin model, we calculate the exact probability distributions of unfolded Ig domains under length-ramp conditions needed for rigorous analysis of expected forces, distribution of unfolding forces, etc. Due to the generality of our model, the approach is applicable to a wide range of stochastic protein unfolding problems.

  13. Fabric Force Sensors for the Clinical Breast Examination Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Shlomi; Rasske, Kristen; Stopfer, Lauren; Kurzynski, Clair; Abbott, Tim; Platner, Megan; Towles, Joseph; Pugh, Carla M

    2016-01-01

    Sensor enabled simulators may help in training and assessing clinical skill. Their are imitations on the locations current sensors can be placed without interfering with the clinical examination. In this study novel fabric force sensors were developed and tested. These sensors are soft and flexible and undetectable when placed in different locations in the simulator. Five sensors were added to our current sensor enabled breast simulator. Eight participants performed the clinical breast examination on the simulator and documented their findings. There was a significant relationship for both clinical breast examination time (r(6) = 0.99, p sensors and the new fabric sensors. In addition the senors were not noticed by the participants. These new sensors provide new methods to measure and assess clinical skill and performance.

  14. Numerical simulation of negative Magnus force on a rotating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Masaya; Tsubokura, Makoto; Oshima, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Flow characteristics and fluid force on a sphere rotating along with axis perpendicular to mean air flow were investigated using Large Eddy Simulation at two different Reynolds numbers of 10,000 and 200,000. As a result of simulation, opposite flow characteristics around the sphere and displacement of the separation point were visualized depending on the Reynolds number even though the sphere rotates at the same rotation speed according to the Reynolds number. When Reynolds number is 10,000, flow characteristics agree with the flow field explained in the Magnus effect. However sphere rotates at the same rotation speed while increasing Reynolds number to 200,000, separation point moves in opposite direction and wake appears in the different direction. The reason of the negative Magnus force was discussed in terms of the boundary layer transition on the surface.

  15. Wake modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.;

    , have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...... and trailed vorticity, has been approached by a simple semi-empirical model essentially based on an eddy viscosity philosophy. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the DWM approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power- and load aspects can be treated simultaneously...... methodology has been implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and example simulations of wake situations, from the small Tjæreborg wind farm, have been performed showing satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements...

  16. Factors governing the form of the relation between muscle force and the EMG: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Rymer, William Zev

    2004-11-01

    The dependence of the form of the EMG-force relation on key motoneuron and muscle properties was explored using a simulation approach. Surface EMG signals and isometric forces were simulated using existing motoneuron pool, muscle force, and surface EMG models, based primarily on reported properties of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in humans. Our simulation results indicate that the relation between electrical and mechanical properties of the individual motor unit level plays the dominant role in determining the overall EMG amplitude-force relation of the muscle, while the underlying motor unit firing rate strategy appears to be a less important factor. However, different motor unit firing rate strategies result in substantially different relations between counts of the numbers of motoneuron discharges and the isometric force. Our simulation results also show that EMG amplitude (estimated as the average rectified value) increases as a result of synchronous discharges of different motor units within the pool, but the magnitude of this increase is determined primarily by the action potential duration of the synchronized motor units. Furthermore, when the EMG effects are normalized to their maximum levels, motor unit synchrony does not exert significant effects on the form of the EMG-force relation, provided that the synchrony level is held similar at different excitation levels.

  17. Forced versus coupled dynamics in Earth system modelling and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Knopf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We compare coupled nonlinear climate models and their simplified forced counterparts with respect to predictability and phase space topology. Various types of uncertainty plague climate change simulation, which is, in turn, a crucial element of Earth System modelling. Since the currently preferred strategy for simulating the climate system, or the Earth System at large, is the coupling of sub-system modules (representing, e.g. atmosphere, oceans, global vegetation, this paper explicitly addresses the errors and indeterminacies generated by the coupling procedure. The focus is on a comparison of forced dynamics as opposed to fully, i.e. intrinsically, coupled dynamics. The former represents a particular type of simulation, where the time behaviour of one complex systems component is prescribed by data or some other external information source. Such a simplifying technique is often employed in Earth System models in order to save computing resources, in particular when massive model inter-comparisons need to be carried out. Our contribution to the debate is based on the investigation of two representative model examples, namely (i a low-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean simulator, and (ii a replica-like simulator embracing corresponding components.Whereas in general the forced version (ii is able to mimic its fully coupled counterpart (i, we show in this paper that for a considerable fraction of parameter- and state-space, the two approaches qualitatively differ. Here we take up a phenomenon concerning the predictability of coupled versus forced models that was reported earlier in this journal: the observation that the time series of the forced version display artificial predictive skill. We present an explanation in terms of nonlinear dynamical theory. In particular we observe an intermittent version of artificial predictive skill, which we call on-off synchronization, and trace it back to the appearance of unstable periodic orbits. We also

  18. Modeling Robot Flexibility for Endpoint Force Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    SIDM 19. KE9Y WORDS fCntknu. OnPVOO&O 0401 It 00041000111O ed 0000#uF 6P 1111411 amA.w) robot force control * robot control / robot dynamics flexible...no. 3, pp. 62-75. [2] Eppinger, S.D. and Seering, W.P. On Dynamic Models of Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on...W.P. Understanding Bandwidth Limitations in Robot Force Control . In Proceedings of International Conference on Robotics and Automation. IEEE, April 1987

  19. Statistical framework for evaluation of climate model simulations by use of climate proxy data from the last millennium – Part 2: A pseudo-proxy study addressing the amplitude of solar forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hind

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The statistical framework of Part 1 (Sundberg et al., 2012, for comparing ensemble simulation surface temperature output with temperature proxy and instrumental records, is implemented in a pseudo-proxy experiment. A set of previously published millennial forced simulations (Max Planck Institute – COSMOS, including both "low" and "high" solar radiative forcing histories together with other important forcings, was used to define "true" target temperatures as well as pseudo-proxy and pseudo-instrumental series. In a global land-only experiment, using annual mean temperatures at a 30-yr time resolution with realistic proxy noise levels, it was found that the low and high solar full-forcing simulations could be distinguished. In an additional experiment, where pseudo-proxies were created to reflect a current set of proxy locations and noise levels, the low and high solar forcing simulations could only be distinguished when the latter served as targets. To improve detectability of the low solar simulations, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in local temperature proxies was more efficient than increasing the spatial coverage of the proxy network. The experiences gained here will be of guidance when these methods are applied to real proxy and instrumental data, for example when the aim is to distinguish which of the alternative solar forcing histories is most compatible with the observed/reconstructed climate.

  20. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  1. Contact force models for multibody dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This book analyzes several compliant contact force models within the context of multibody dynamics, while also revisiting the main issues associated with fundamental contact mechanics. In particular, it presents various contact force models, from linear to nonlinear, from purely elastic to dissipative, and describes their parameters. Addressing the different numerical methods and algorithms for contact problems in multibody systems, the book describes the gross motion of multibody systems by using a two-dimensional formulation based on the absolute coordinates and employs different contact models to represent contact-impact events. Results for selected planar multibody mechanical systems are presented and utilized to discuss the main assumptions and procedures adopted throughout this work. The material provided here indicates that the prediction of the dynamic behavior of mechanical systems involving contact-impact strongly depends on the choice of contact force model. In short, the book provides a comprehens...

  2. A Force Structure Design Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    199) WRITE(20,*)’ MODEL FAR10 /ALL/’ WRITE(20, 159) 159 FORMAT(’*------------- LOOP--------------- WRITE(20,*) ’SOLVE FAR10 USING RMIP MINIMIZING...SOLVE FARIO USING RMIP MINIMIZING MAXDEV OPTION X:4:0:1 DISPLAY X.L OPTION FAR:4:O:1; DISPLAY FAR OPTION R:4:0:1 OPTION R1:4:Q:1 OPTION R2:4:0:1...LOOP ------------------------ 102 SOLVE FAR10 USING RMIP MINIMIZING MAXDEV 103 OPTION X:4:0:1 104 DISPLAY X.L 105 OPTION FAR

  3. Experimental static aerodynamic forces and moments at high subsonic speeds on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, William J; King, Thomas, Jr

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was made at high subsonic speeds in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the static aerodynamic forces and moments on a missile model during simulated launching from the midsemispan location of a 45 degree sweptback wing-fuselage-pylon combination. The results indicated significant variations in all the aerodynamic components with changes in chordwise location of the missile. Increasing the angle of attack caused increases in the induced effects on the missile model because of the wing-fuselage-pylon combination. Increasing the Mach number had little effect on the variations of the missile aerodynamic characteristics with angle of attack except that nonlinearities were incurred at smaller angles of attack for the higher Mach numbers. The effects of finite wing thickness on the missile characteristics, at zero angle of attack, increase with increasing Mach number. The effects of the pylon on the missile characteristics were to causeincreases in the rolling-moment variation with angle of attack and a negative displacement of the pitching-moment curves at zero angle of attack. The effects of skewing the missile in the lateral direction relative to and sideslipping the missile with the wing-fuselage-pylon combination were to cause additional increments in side force at zero angle of attack. For the missile yawing moments the effects of changes in skew or sideslip angles were qualitatively as would be expected from consideration of the isolated missile characteristics, although there existed differences in theyawing-moment magnitudes.

  4. Sensitivity of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea coastal and thermohaline circulations simulated by the 1/12°-resolution ocean model NEMO-MED12 to the spatial and temporal resolution of atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Béranger, Karine; Drobinski, Philippe

    The northwestern Mediterranean (NWM) Sea is prone to intense weather events, associated with high winds, that are characterized by strong shallow jets and a high spatial and temporal variability. The ocean response in this area is very sensitive to the atmospheric conditions, particularly in the Gulf of Lions coastal zone. The ocean response to strong winds is here investigated using the NEMO-MED12 eddy-resolving model, driven by four atmospheric forcings differing in spatial resolution (20 km, 6.7 km) and temporal resolution (daily or 3 h) and produced with the non-hydrostratic mesoscale WRF model. The noticeable effects of the higher-frequency forcing are (i) to reduce the shelf dense-water formation and the deep offshore convection in winter due to the explicit simulation of the diurnal cycle that warms and stratifies the ocean upper layers and (ii) to increase the vertical velocity in the upwelling cells. The higher spatial resolution allows, in particular, the production of stronger winds and the accurate reproduction of the near-surface sub-mesoscale eddies in the coastal areas, in agreement with observations.

  5. TOOL FORCE MODEL FOR DIAMOND TURNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongxiang; Sun Tao; Li Dan; Dong Shen

    2004-01-01

    A new tool force model to be presented is based upon process geometry and the characteristics of the force system,in which the forces acting on the tool rake face,the cutting edge rounding and the clearance face have been considered,and the size effect is accountable for the new model.It is desired that the model can be well applicable to conventional diamond turning and the model may be employed as a tool in the design of diamond tools.This approach is quite different from traditional investigations primarily based on empirical studies.As the depth of cut becomes the same order as the rounded cutting edge radius,sliding along the clearance face due to elastic recovery of workpiece material and plowing due to the rounded cutting edge may become important in micro-machining,the forces acting on the cutting edge rounding and the clearance face can not be neglected.For this reason,it is very important to understand the influence of some parameters on tool forces and develop a model of the relationship between them.

  6. Accelerated SPECT Monte Carlo Simulation Using Multiple Projection Sampling and Convolution-Based Forced Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaoying; King, Michael A.; Brill, Aaron B.; Stabin, Michael G.; Farncombe, Troy H.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) is a well-utilized tool for simulating photon transport in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) due to its ability to accurately model physical processes of photon transport. As a consequence of this accuracy, it suffers from a relatively low detection efficiency and long computation time. One technique used to improve the speed of MC modeling is the effective and well-established variance reduction technique (VRT) known as forced detection (FD). With this method, photons are followed as they traverse the object under study but are then forced to travel in the direction of the detector surface, whereby they are detected at a single detector location. Another method, called convolution-based forced detection (CFD), is based on the fundamental idea of FD with the exception that detected photons are detected at multiple detector locations and determined with a distance-dependent blurring kernel. In order to further increase the speed of MC, a method named multiple projection convolution-based forced detection (MP-CFD) is presented. Rather than forcing photons to hit a single detector, the MP-CFD method follows the photon transport through the object but then, at each scatter site, forces the photon to interact with a number of detectors at a variety of angles surrounding the object. This way, it is possible to simulate all the projection images of a SPECT simulation in parallel, rather than as independent projections. The result of this is vastly improved simulation time as much of the computation load of simulating photon transport through the object is done only once for all projection angles. The results of the proposed MP-CFD method agrees well with the experimental data in measurements of point spread function (PSF), producing a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.99 compared to experimental data. The speed of MP-CFD is shown to be about 60 times faster than a regular forced detection MC program with similar results. PMID:20811587

  7. Model parameters for simulation of physiological lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Coarse grain simulation of proteins in their physiological membrane environment can offer insight across timescales, but requires a comprehensive force field. Parameters are explored for multicomponent bilayers composed of unsaturated lipids DOPC and DOPE, mixed‐chain saturation POPC and POPE, and anionic lipids found in bacteria: POPG and cardiolipin. A nonbond representation obtained from multiscale force matching is adapted for these lipids and combined with an improved bonding description of cholesterol. Equilibrating the area per lipid yields robust bilayer simulations and properties for common lipid mixtures with the exception of pure DOPE, which has a known tendency to form nonlamellar phase. The models maintain consistency with an existing lipid–protein interaction model, making the force field of general utility for studying membrane proteins in physiologically representative bilayers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864972

  8. Delay modeling in logic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acken, J. M.; Goldstein, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    As digital integrated circuit size and complexity increases, the need for accurate and efficient computer simulation increases. Logic simulators such as SALOGS (SAndia LOGic Simulator), which utilize transition states in addition to the normal stable states, provide more accurate analysis than is possible with traditional logic simulators. Furthermore, the computational complexity of this analysis is far lower than that of circuit simulation such as SPICE. An eight-value logic simulation environment allows the use of accurate delay models that incorporate both element response and transition times. Thus, timing simulation with an accuracy approaching that of circuit simulation can be accomplished with an efficiency comparable to that of logic simulation. 4 figures.

  9. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  10. A piecewise-integration method for simulating the influence of external forcing on climate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhifu Zhang; Chongjian Qiu; Chenghai Wang

    2008-01-01

    Climate drift occurs in most general circulation models (GCMs) as a result of incomplete physical and numerical representation of the complex climate system,which may cause large uncertainty in sensitivity experiments evaluating climate response to changes in external forcing.To solve this problem,we propose a piecewise-integration method to reduce the systematic error in climate sensitivity studies.The observations are firstly assimilated into a numerical model by using the dynamic relaxation technique to relax to the current state of atmosphere,and then the assimilated fields are continuously used to reinitialize the simulation to reduce the error of climate simulation.When the numerical model is integrated with changed external forcing,the results can be split into two parts,background and perturbation fields,and the background is the state before the external forcing is changed.The piecewise-integration method is used to continuously reinitialize the model with the assimilated field,instead of the background.Therefore,the simulation error of the model with the external forcing can be reduced.In this way,the accuracy of climate sensitivity experiments is greatly improved.Tests with a simple low-order spectral model show that this approach can significantly reduce the uncertainty of climate sensitivity experiments.

  11. Drilling forces model for lunar regolith exploration and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ding, Xilun

    2017-02-01

    China's Chang'e lunar exploration project aims to sample and return lunar regolith samples at a minimum penetration depth of 2 m in 2017. Unlike such tasks on the Earth, automated drilling and sampling missions on the Moon are more complicated. Therefore, a delicately designed drill tool is required to minimize operational cost and enhance reliability. Penetration force and rotational torque are two critical parameters in designing the drill tool. In this paper, a novel numerical model for predicting penetration force and rotational torque in the drilling of lunar regolith is proposed. The model is based on quasi-static Mohr-Coulomb soil mechanics and explicitly describes the interaction between drill tool and lunar regolith. Geometric features of drill tool, mechanical properties of lunar regolith, and drilling parameters are taken into consideration in the model. Consequently, a drilling test bed was developed, and experimental penetration force and rotational torque were obtained in penetrating a lunar regolith simulant with different drilling parameters. Finally, theoretical and experimental results were compared to validate the proposed model. Experimental results indicated that the numerical model had good accuracy and was effective in predicting the penetration force and rotational torque in drilling the lunar regolith simulant.

  12. Force probe simulations of a reversibly rebinding system: Impact of pulling device stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschonek, Stefan; Diezemann, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the parameter dependence of force probe molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. Using a well studied calix[4]arene catenane dimer as a model system, we systematically vary the pulling velocity and the stiffness of the applied external potential. This allows us to investigate how the results of pulling simulations operating in the constant velocity mode (force-ramp mode) depend on the details of the simulation setup. The system studied has the further advantage of showing reversible rebinding meaning that we can monitor the opening and the rebinding transition. Many models designed to extract kinetic information from rupture force distributions work in the limit of soft springs and all quantities are found to depend solely on the so-called loading rate, the product of spring stiffness and pulling velocity. This approximation is known to break down when stiff springs are used, a situation often encountered in molecular simulations. We find that while some quantities only depend on the loading rate, others show an explicit dependence on the spring constant used in the FPMD simulation. In particular, the force versus extension curves show an almost stiffness independent rupture force but the force jump after the rupture transition does depend roughly linearly on the value of the stiffness. The kinetic rates determined from the rupture force distributions show a dependence on the stiffness that can be understood in terms of the corresponding dependence of the characteristic forces alone. These dependencies can be understood qualitatively in terms of a harmonic model for the molecular free energy landscape. It appears that the pulling velocities employed are so large that the crossover from activated dynamics to diffusive dynamics takes place on the time scale of our simulations. We determine the effective distance of the free energy minima of the closed and the open configurations of the system from the barrier via an analysis of the

  13. Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5. The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980–2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects. The models' all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range −0.26 W m−2; −0.06 to −0.49 W m−2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of −0.42 W m−2; −0.33 to −0.50 W m−2, including adjustment for missing aerosol components in some models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to −58% to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is −1.17 W m−2; −0.71 to −1.44 W m−2. Thus adjustments, including clouds, typically cause greater forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global aerosol RF

  14. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Giordani

    Full Text Available A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer

  15. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-07

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. 'ground truth') in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity-one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast. In

  16. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. ‘ground truth’) in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity—one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast

  17. Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shindell, D. T.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M.; Jiao, C.; Chin, M.; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, L.; Mahowald, N.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, A. J.; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, R.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, X.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, J. -H.; Lo, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) -0.26Wm-2-2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of -0.42Wm-2-2models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to -58 %) to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is -1.17Wm-2-2forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global

  18. Dynamics modeling and simulation of flexible airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities of these lighter-than-air vehicles. The focus of this thesis is a theoretical framework that integrates the flight dynamics, structural dynamics, aerostatics and aerodynamics of flexible airships. The study begins with a dynamics model based on a rigid-body assumption. A comprehensive computation of aerodynamic effects is presented, where the aerodynamic forces and moments are categorized into various terms based on different physical effects. A series of prediction approaches for different aerodynamic effects are unified and applied to airships. The numerical results of aerodynamic derivatives and the simulated responses to control surface deflection inputs are verified by comparing to existing wind-tunnel and flight test data. With the validated aerodynamics and rigid-body modeling, the equations of motion of an elastic airship are derived by the Lagrangian formulation. The airship is modeled as a free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam and the bending deformations are represented by shape functions chosen as the free-free normal modes. In order to capture the coupling between the aerodynamic forces and the structural elasticity, local velocity on the deformed vehicle is used in the computation of aerodynamic forces. Finally, with the inertial, gravity, aerostatic and control forces incorporated, the dynamics model of a flexible airship is represented by a single set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The proposed model is implemented as a dynamics simulation program to analyze the dynamics characteristics of the Skyship-500 airship. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the influence of structural deformation on the aerodynamic forces and the dynamics behavior of the airship. The nonlinear equations of motion are linearized numerically for the purpose of frequency domain analysis and for aeroelastic stability analysis. The results from the latter for the

  19. A cutting force model for micromilling applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    In micro milling the maximum uncut chip thickness is often smaller than the cutting edge radius. This paper introduces a new cutting force model for ball nose micro milling that is capable of taking into account the effect of the edge radius.......In micro milling the maximum uncut chip thickness is often smaller than the cutting edge radius. This paper introduces a new cutting force model for ball nose micro milling that is capable of taking into account the effect of the edge radius....

  20. Dissolution study of active pharmaceutical ingredients using molecular dynamics simulations with classical force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Maximilian; Elts, Ekaterina; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten; Briesen, Heiko

    2014-11-01

    The CHARMM, general Amber and OPLS force fields are evaluated for their suitability in simulating the molecular dynamics of the dissolution of the hydrophobic, small-molecule active pharmaceutical ingredients aspirin, ibuprofen, and paracetamol in aqueous media. The force fields are evaluated by comparison with quantum chemical simulations or experimental references on the basis of the following capabilities: accurately representing intra- and intermolecular interactions, appropriately reproducing crystal lattice parameters, adequately describing thermodynamic properties, and the qualitative description of the dissolution behavior. To make this approach easily accessible for evaluating the dissolution properties of novel drug candidates in the early stage of drug development, the force field parameter files are generated using online resources such as the SWISS PARAM servers, and the software packages ACPYPE and Maestro. All force fields are found to reproduce the intermolecular interactions with a reasonable degree of accuracy, with the general Amber and CHARMM force fields showing the best agreement with quantum mechanical calculations. A stable crystal bulk structure is obtained for all model substances, except for ibuprofen, where the reproductions of the lattice parameters and observed crystal stability are considerably poor for all force fields. The heat of solution used to evaluate the solid-to-solution phase transitions is found to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental data for all combinations tested, with the results being quantitatively optimum for the general Amber and CHARMM force fields. For aspirin and paracetamol, stable crystal-water interfaces were obtained. The (100), (110), (011) and (001) interfaces of aspirin or paracetamol and water were simulated for each force field for 30 ns. Although generally expected as a rare event, in some of the simulations, dissolution is observed at 310 K and ambient pressure conditions.

  1. Simulation of bidirectional pedestrian flow in transfer station corridor based on multi forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪梅; 纪翔峰; 黄凰; 杨晓光

    2014-01-01

    A good understanding of pedestrian movement in the transfer corridor is vital for the planning and design of the station, especially for efficiency and safety.A multi-force vector grid model was presented to simulate the movement of bidirectional pedestrian flow based on cellular automata and forces between pedestrians. The model improves rule-based characteristics of cellular automata, details forces between pedestrians and solves pedestrian collisions by a several-step updating method to simulate pedestrian movements. Two general scenarios in corridor were simulated. One is bidirectional pedestrian flow simulation with isolation facility, and the other is bidirectional pedestrian flow simulation without isolation facility, where there exists disturbance in the middle. Through simulation, some facts can be seen that pedestrians in the case with isolation facility have the largest speed and pedestrians in the case without isolation facility have the smallest speed; pedestrians in the case of unidirectional flow have the largest volume and pedestrians in the case of without isolation facility have the smallest volume.

  2. Forces between permanent magnets: experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel I.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes a very simple, low-cost experimental setup designed for measuring the force between permanent magnets. The experiment consists of placing one of the magnets on a balance, attaching the other magnet to a vertical height gauge, aligning carefully both magnets and measuring the load on the balance as a function of the gauge reading. A theoretical model is proposed to compute the force, assuming uniform magnetisation and based on laws and techniques accessible to undergraduate students. A comparison between the model and the experimental results is made, and good agreement is found at all distances investigated. In particular, it is also found that the force behaves as r -4 at large distances, as expected.

  3. Preparations, models, and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an outline for a typology of the different forms that scientific objects can take in the life sciences. The first section discusses preparations (or specimens)--a form of scientific object that accompanied the development of modern biology in different guises from the seventeenth century to the present: as anatomical-morphological specimens, as microscopic cuts, and as biochemical preparations. In the second section, the characteristics of models in biology are discussed. They became prominent from the end of the nineteenth century onwards. Some remarks on the role of simulations--characterising the life sciences of the turn from the twentieth to the twenty-first century--conclude the paper.

  4. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SUCCINONITRITE DENDRITIC GROWTH IN A FORCED FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method is performed to describe solidifica-tion process of pure material in a free or forced flow. The evolution of the interface is showed, and the effects of mesh grid and flow velocity on succinonitrite shape are studied. These results indicate that crystal grows into an equiaxial dendrite in a free flow and into an asymmetrical dendritic in a forced flow. With increasing flow velo-city, the upstream dendritic arm tip grows faster and the downstream arm grows slower. However, the evolution of the perpendicular tip has no significant change. In addition, mesh grid has no influence on dendritic growth shape when mesh grid is above 300×300.

  6. Guided crowd dynamics via modified social force model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Dong, Hairong; Wang, Qianling; Chen, Yao; Hu, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Pedestrian dynamics is of great theoretical significance for strategy design of emergency evacuation. Modification of pedestrian dynamics based on the social force model is presented to better reflect pedestrians' behavioral characteristics in emergency. Specifically, the modified model can be used for guided crowd dynamics in large-scale public places such as subway stations and stadiums. This guided crowd model is validated by explicitly comparing its density-speed and density-flow diagrams with fundamental diagrams. Some social phenomena such as gathering, balance and conflicts are clearly observed in simulation, which further illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed modeling method. Also, time delay for pedestrians with time-dependent desired velocities is observed and explained using the established model in this paper. Furthermore, this guided crowd model is applied to the simulation system of Beijing South Railway Station for predictive evacuation experiments.

  7. CHARMM-GUI Martini Maker for Coarse-Grained Simulations with the Martini Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yifei; Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Cheng, Xi; Lee, Jumin; Marrink, Siewert J; Im, Wonpil

    2015-09-08

    Coarse-grained simulations are widely used to study large biological systems. Nonetheless, building such simulation systems becomes nontrivial, especially when membranes with various lipid types are involved. Taking advantage of the frameworks in all-atom CHARMM-GUI modules, we have developed CHARMM-GUI Martini Maker for building solution, micelle, bilayer, and vesicle systems as well as systems with randomly distributed lipids using the Martini force field. Martini Maker supports 82 lipid types and different flavors of the Martini force field, including polar and nonpolar Martini, Dry Martini, and ElNeDyn (an elastic network model for proteins). The qualities of the systems generated by Martini Maker are validated by simulations of various examples involving proteins and lipids. We expect Martini Maker to be a useful tool for modeling large, complicated biomolecular systems in a user-friendly way.

  8. On Oscillations in the Social Force Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kretz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Social Force Model is one of the most prominent models of pedestrian dynamics. As such naturally much discussion and criticism has spawned around it, some of which concerns the existence of oscillations in the movement of pedestrians. This contribution is investigating under which circumstances, parameter choices, and model variants oscillations do occur and how this can be prevented. It is shown that oscillations can be excluded if the model parameters fulfill certain relations. The fact that with some parameter choices oscillations occur and with some not is exploited to verify a specific computer implementation of the model.

  9. Parametrization of a Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Si Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaro, Giovanni; Monti, Susanna; Sementa, Luca; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2017-08-08

    A novel computational approach, based on classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations (RMD) and quantum chemistry (QC) global energy optimizations, is proposed for modeling large Si nanoparticles. The force field parameters, which can describe bond breaking and formation, are derived by reproducing energetic and structural properties of a set of Si clusters increasing in size. These reference models are obtained through a new protocol based on a joint high temperature RMD/low temperature Basin Hopping QC search. The different procedures of estimating optimal force field parameters and their performance are discussed in detail.

  10. Modeling of movement-induced and flow-induced fluid forces in fast switching valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Schmidt, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    Fast switching fluid power valves set strict requirements on performance, size and energy efficiency and simulation models are therefore needed to obtain good designs of such components. The valve moving member is subject to fluid forces depending on the valve flow rate and movement of the valve...... valve design. Simulated results of the total fluid force are presented showing the movement-induced fluid force to be significant for a reference application. The model form established is useful for valve designers during development and for accurate operation simulation....... member itself. These fluid forces may be accurately simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, but such models suffer from being computationally expensive and is not suited for optimization routines. In this paper, a computationally inexpensive method for modeling the fluid forces...

  11. Numerical modelling of iceberg calving force responsible for glacial earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Yastrebov, Vladislav; Castelnau, Olivier; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eleonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Glacial earthquakes is a class of seismic events of magnitude up to 5, occurring primarily in Greenland, in the margins of large marine-terminated glaciers with near-grounded termini. They are caused by calving of cubic-kilometer scale unstable icebergs which penetrate the full-glacier thickness and, driven by the buoyancy forces, capsize against the calving front. These phenomena produce seismic energy including surface waves with dominant energy between 10-150 s of period whose seismogenic source is compatible with the contact force exerted on the terminus by the iceberg while it capsizes. A reverse motion and posterior rebound of the terminus have also been measured and associated with the fluctuation of this contact force. Using a finite element model of iceberg and glacier terminus coupled with simplified fluid-structure interaction model, we simulate calving and capsize of icebergs. Contact and frictional forces are measured on the terminus and compared with laboratory experiments. We also study the influence of geometric factors on the force history, amplitude and duration at the laboratory and field scales. We show first insights into the force and the generated seismic waves exploring different scenarios for iceberg capsizing.

  12. Modeling capillary forces for large displacements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrangeli, M.; Arutinov, G.; Smits, E.C.P.; Lambert, P.

    2014-01-01

    Originally applied to the accurate, passive positioning of submillimetric devices, recent works proved capillary self-alignment as effective also for larger components and relatively large initial offsets. In this paper, we describe an analytic quasi-static model of 1D capillary restoring forces tha

  13. Simulation of the climatic effects of natural forcings during the pre-industrial era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN ChongHua; YAN XiaoDong; SHI ZhengGuo; WANG ZhaoMin

    2007-01-01

    The MPM-2, an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, is employed to study the climate system response to natural forcings during the pre-industrial era (1000-1800 AD), with a special focus on the surface air temperature (SAT) evolution. Solar radiation and volcanism are the primary natural forcings during this period. In the MPM-2, the solar radiation forcing determines the long-term trend of the climate system change, and the volcanic forcing intensifies (weakens) this trend. Ultimately, the combination of solar and volcanic forcings dominates the long-term changes of the climate system.These results are in good agreement with other model data or temperature reconstructions. Natural forcings can well explain the Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Medieval Warm Period (MWP). At the large regional scale, the SAT response to natural forcings is almost coincident with that of the Northern Hemisphere. Based on MPM-2 model results, it is concluded that the global climate gradually became cold during the pre-industrial era. However, MPM-2 model results substantially correlate with reconstructed solar and volcanic forcings. Namely, to some great extent, these results strongly rely on the forcing series data we choose. Therefore, in order to accurately simulate the secular variation of the historical climate, it is very important to reconstruct well the solar radiation change and volcanic rorcing data are well reconstructed for the past 10000 years, at least for the past 2000 years, in addition to the model improvements. The sensitivity study on the abrupt solar radiation change indicates that the increased solar radiation not only strengthens the nonlinear response of SAT, but intensifies the global hydrological cycle. At the same time, the biosphere is also affected obviously.

  14. A Comparison of Classical Force-Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lubricants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Ewen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of their complex nanoscale behavior under a wide range of external conditions is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD simulations can be used to yield unique insights into the atomic-scale structure and friction of lubricants and additives; however, the accuracy of the results depend on the chosen force-field. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of an accurate, all-atom force-field is critical in order to; (i accurately predict important properties of long-chain, linear molecules; and (ii reproduce experimental friction behavior of multi-component tribological systems. In particular, we focus on n-hexadecane, an important model lubricant with a wide range of industrial applications. Moreover, simulating conditions common in tribological systems, i.e., high temperatures and pressures (HTHP, allows the limits of the selected force-fields to be tested. In the first section, a large number of united-atom and all-atom force-fields are benchmarked in terms of their density and viscosity prediction accuracy of n-hexadecane using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulations at ambient and HTHP conditions. Whilst united-atom force-fields accurately reproduce experimental density, the viscosity is significantly under-predicted compared to all-atom force-fields and experiments. Moreover, some all-tom force-fields yield elevated melting points, leading to significant overestimation of both the density and viscosity. In the second section, the most accurate united-atom and all-atom force-field are compared in confined NEMD simulations which probe the structure and friction of stearic acid adsorbed on iron oxide and separated by a thin layer of n-hexadecane. The united-atom force-field provides an accurate representation of the structure of the confined stearic acid film; however, friction coefficients are

  15. Study on Simulation of Machining Errors Caused by Cutting Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xiaodong; ZHANG Liu; LIN Zhaoxu

    2006-01-01

    Machining errors caused by cutting force are studied in this paper, and an algorithm to simulate errors is putted forward. In the method, continuous machining process is separated into many machining moments. The deformation of work-piece and cutter at every moment is calculated by finite element method. The machined work-piece is gained by Boolean operation between deformed work-piece and cutter. By analyzing data of final work-piece, machining errors are predicted. The method is proved true by experiment.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Hydraulic Engine Mounts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanzhong; Marshall McNea

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic engine mounts are widely used in automotive powertrains for vibration isolation.A lumped mechanical parameter model is a traditional approach to model and simulate such mounts.This paper presents a dynamical model of a passive hydraulic engine mount with a double-chamber,an inertia track,a decoupler,and a plunger.The model is developed based on analogy between electrical systems and mechanical-hydraulic systems.The model is established to capture both low and high frequency dynatmic behaviors of the hydraulic mount.The model will be further used to find the approximate pulse responses of the mounts in terms of the force transmission and top chamber pressure.The close form solution from the simplifiod linear model may provide some insight into the highly nonlinear behavior of the mounts.Based on the model,computer simulation has been carried out to study dynamic performance of the hydraulic mount.

  17. Improved Generalized Force Model considering the Comfortable Driving Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Jie Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved generalized force model (IGFM that considers the driver’s comfortable driving behavior. Through theoretical analysis, we propose the calculation methods of comfortable driving distance and velocity. Then the stability condition of the model is obtained by the linear stability analysis. The problems of the unrealistic acceleration of the leading car existing in the previous models were solved. Furthermore, the simulation results show that IGFM can predict correct delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density, and it can exactly describe the driver’s behavior under an urgent case, where no collision occurs. The dynamic properties of IGFM also indicate that stability has improved compared to the generalized force model.

  18. Advances in RNA molecular dynamics: a simulator's guide to RNA force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangaveti, Sweta; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; Chen, Alan A

    2017-03-01

    Molecular simulations have become an essential tool for biochemical research. When they work properly, they are able to provide invaluable interpretations of experimental results and ultimately provide novel, experimentally testable predictions. Unfortunately, not all simulation models are created equal, and with inaccurate models it becomes unclear what is a bona fide prediction versus a simulation artifact. RNA models are still in their infancy compared to the many robust protein models that are widely in use, and for that reason the number of RNA force field revisions in recent years has been rapidly increasing. As there is no universally accepted 'best' RNA force field at the current time, RNA simulators must decide which one is most suited to their purposes, cognizant of its essential assumptions and their inherent strengths and weaknesses. Hopefully, armed with a better understanding of what goes inside the simulation 'black box,' RNA biochemists can devise novel experiments and provide crucial thermodynamic and structural data that will guide the development and testing of improved RNA models. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1396. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1396 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Mixed dummy model with neck muscle force activation simulation%能够模拟颈部肌肉主动力的混合假人模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凡; 胡伟; 粟思橙; 曹迎春

    2015-01-01

    A mixed ifnite element (FE) dummy model was developed with precise neck muscle geometry as wel as active and passive muscle behavior to investigate neck injury mechanism with muscle activation in front colision which is important to the design of occupant safety. The model was based on the 50th Hybrid III dummy with the head and neck replaced by a wel-validated biomechanical model. The data of volunteer troley colision experiments with a deceleration of 15g, conducted by US Navy Biomechanics Laboratory, was used for model validation. The results show that the model has a good bioifdelity, according to the outputs of head linear acceleration, angular acceleration and rotational angles of head and neck compared to the volunteer tests. Therefore, the model can be used to investigate the head-neck injury biomechanics in vehicle frontal impact considering the activation behavior of neck muscle system.%构建了具有颈部肌肉精确几何结构和主被动响应的混合假人有限元(FE)模型,以便研究前碰撞形式下,肌肉作用下的颈部损伤机理,这对于汽车乘员保护安全性设计很重要。用已建立并验证的50百分位男性有限元头颈部生物力学模型,来替换50百分位男性Hybrid Ⅲ假人原有头颈部;采用美国海军生物力学实验室15g前碰撞志愿者台车实验数据,对该模型进行验证。结果表明:模型输出的头部质心线加速度、角加速度、头部转动角度、以及颈部转动角度,均能较好地拟合实验通道曲线。因此,该模型可用于车辆交通事故中人体头颈部损伤生物力学研究。

  20. Modeling Forces on the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Drake, Russel; Morgan, Michael; Peters, Todd; Riddle, Chris; Rollins, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Presents five models of the human body as a mechanical system which can be used in introductory physics courses: human arms as levers, humans falling from small heights, a model of the human back, collisions during football, and the rotating gymnast. Gives ideas for discussions and activities, including Interactive Physics (TM) simulations. (WRM)

  1. Estimation of muscle forces in gait using a simulation of the electromyographic activity and numerical optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait patterns. However, a complete distribution of muscle forces throughout the gait cycle is a current challenge for many researchers. Two techniques are often used to estimate muscle forces: inverse dynamics with static optimization and computer muscle control that uses forward dynamics to minimize tracking. The first method often involves limitations due to changing muscle dynamics and possible signal artefacts that depend on day-to-day variation in the position of electromyographic (EMG) electrodes. Nevertheless, in clinical gait analysis, the method of inverse dynamics is a fundamental and commonly used computational procedure to calculate the force and torque reactions at various body joints. Our aim was to develop a generic musculoskeletal model that could be able to be applied in the clinical setting. The musculoskeletal model of the lower limb presents a simulation for the EMG data to address the common limitations of these techniques. This model presents a new point of view from the inverse dynamics used on clinical gait analysis, including the EMG information, and shows a similar performance to another model available in the OpenSim software. The main problem of these methods to achieve a correct muscle coordination is the lack of complete EMG data for all muscles modelled. We present a technique that simulates the EMG activity and presents a good correlation with the muscle forces throughout the gait cycle. Also, this method showed great similarities whit the real EMG data recorded from the subjects doing the same movement.

  2. Notes on modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    These notes present a high-level overview of how modeling and simulation are carried out by practitioners. The discussion is of a general nature; no specific techniques are examined but the activities associated with all modeling and simulation approaches are briefly addressed. There is also a discussion of validation and verification and, at the end, a section on why modeling and simulation are useful.

  3. Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)]|[Columbia Univ. Earth Inst., New York, NY (United States); Sato, M.; Kharecha, P.; Nazarenko, L.; Aleinov, I.; Bauer, S.; Chandler, M.; Faluvegi, G.; Jonas, J.; Lerner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Unger, N.; Zhang, S. [Columbia Univ. Earth Inst., New York, NY (United States); Ruedy, R.; Lo, K.; Cheng, Y.; Oinas, V.; Schmunk, R.; Tausnev, N.; Yao, M. [Sigma Space Partners LLC, New York, NY (United States); Lacis, A.; Schmidt, G.A.; Del Genio, A.; Rind, D.; Romanou, A.; Shindell, D. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)]|[Columbia Univ., Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New York, NY (United States); Miller, R.; Hall, T. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)]|[Columbia Univ., Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, New York, NY (United States); Russell, G.; Canuto, V.; Kiang, N.Y. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Baum, E.; Cohen, A. [Clean Air Task Force, Boston, MA (United States); Cairns, B.; Perlwitz, J. [Columbia Univ., Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, New York, NY (United States); Fleming, E.; Jackman, C.; Labow, G. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Friend, A.; Kelley, M. [Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Koch, D. [Columbia Univ. Earth Inst., New York, NY (United States)]|[Yale Univ., Dept. of Geology, New Haven, CT (United States); Menon, S.; Novakov, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Stone, P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Sun, S. [NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)]|[Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Streets, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Thresher, D. [Columbia Univ., Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We carry out climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE driven by ten measured or estimated climate forcings. An ensemble of climate model runs is carried out for each forcing acting individually and for all forcing mechanisms acting together. We compare side-by-side simulated climate change for each forcing, all forcings, observations, unforced variability among model ensemble members, and, if available, observed variability. Discrepancies between observations and simulations with all forcings are due to model deficiencies, inaccurate or incomplete forcings, and imperfect observations. Although there are notable discrepancies between model and observations, the fidelity is sufficient to encourage use of the model for simulations of future climate change. By using a fixed well-documented model and accurately defining the 1880-2003 forcings, we aim to provide a benchmark against which the effect of improvements in the model, climate forcings, and observations can be tested. Principal model deficiencies include unrealistically weak tropical El Nino-like variability and a poor distribution of sea ice, with too much sea ice in the Northern Hemisphere and too little in the Southern Hemisphere. Greatest uncertainties in the forcings are the temporal and spatial variations of anthropogenic aerosols and their indirect effects on clouds. (orig.)

  4. Climate forcing reconstructions for use in PMIP simulations of the last millennium (v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of climate over the Last Millennium (850–1850 CE have been incorporated into the third phase of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3. The drivers of climate over this period are chiefly orbital, solar, volcanic, changes in land use/land cover and some variation in greenhouse gas levels. While some of these effects can be easily defined, the reconstructions of solar, volcanic and land use-related forcing are more uncertain. We describe here the approach taken in defining the scenarios used in PMIP3, document the forcing reconstructions and discuss likely implications.

  5. Hemodynamic forces in a model left ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenichini, Federico; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2016-12-01

    Intraventricular pressure gradients were clinically demonstrated to represent one useful indicator of the left ventricle (LV) function during the development of heart failure. We analyze the fluid dynamics inside a model LV to improve the understanding of the development of hemodynamic forces (i.e., mean pressure gradient) in normal conditions and their modification in the presence of alterations of LV tissue motion. To this aim, the problem is solved numerically and the global force exchanged between blood flow and LV boundaries is computed by volume integration. We also introduce a simplified analytical model, based on global conservation laws, to estimate hemodynamic forces from the knowledge of LV tissue information commonly available in cardiac imaging. Numerical results show that the normal intraventricular gradients feature a deep brief suction at early diastolic filling and a persistent thrust during systolic ejection. In presence of abnormalities of the wall motion, the loss of time synchrony is more relevant than the loss of spatial uniformity in modifying the normal pressure gradient spatiotemporal pattern. The main findings are reproduced in the integral model, which represents a possible easy approach for integrating fluid dynamics evaluations in the clinical examination.

  6. Numerical simulation of acoustofluidic manipulation by radiation forces and acoustic streaming for complex particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Philipp; Leibacher, Ivo; Baasch, Thierry; Dual, Jurg

    2015-11-21

    The numerical prediction of acoustofluidic particle motion is of great help for the design, the analysis, and the physical understanding of acoustofluidic devices as it allows for a simple and direct comparison with experimental observations. However, such a numerical setup requires detailed modeling of the acoustofluidic device with all its components and thorough understanding of the acoustofluidic forces inducing the particle motion. In this work, we present a 3D trajectory simulation setup that covers the full spectrum, comprising a time-harmonic device model, an acoustic streaming model of the fluid cavity, a radiation force simulation, and the calculation of the hydrodynamic drag. In order to make quantitatively accurate predictions of the device vibration and the acoustic field, we include the viscous boundary layer damping. Using a semi-analytical method based on Nyborg's calculations, the boundary-driven acoustic streaming is derived directly from the device simulation and takes into account cavity wall vibrations which have often been neglected in the literature. The acoustic radiation forces and the hydrodynamic drag are calculated numerically to handle particles of arbitrary shape, structure, and size. In this way, complex 3D particle translation and rotation inside experimental microdevices can be predicted. We simulate the rotation of a microfiber in an amplitude-modulated 2D field and analyze the results with respect to experimental observations. For a quantitative verification, the motion of an alumina microdisk is compared to a simple experiment. Demonstrating the potential of the simulation setup, we compute the trajectory of a red blood cell inside a realistic microdevice under the simultaneous effects of acoustic streaming and radiation forces.

  7. Evaluating uncertainty in simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, M.D.; Beckman, R.J.; Morrison, J.D.; Upton, S.C.

    1998-12-01

    The authors discussed some directions for research and development of methods for assessing simulation variability, input uncertainty, and structural model uncertainty. Variance-based measures of importance for input and simulation variables arise naturally when using the quadratic loss function of the difference between the full model prediction y and the restricted prediction {tilde y}. The concluded that generic methods for assessing structural model uncertainty do not now exist. However, methods to analyze structural uncertainty for particular classes of models, like discrete event simulation models, may be attainable.

  8. Simulation Model of a Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation model of a controller that enables an active-stall wind turbine to ride through transient faults. The simulated wind turbine is connected to a simple model of a power system. Certain fault scenarios are specified and the turbine shall be able to sustain operation...... in case of such faults. The design of the controller is described and its performance assessed by simulations. The control strategies are explained and the behaviour of the turbine discussed....

  9. Simulation Model of a Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation model of a controller that enables an active-stall wind turbine to ride through transient faults. The simulated wind turbine is connected to a simple model of a power system. Certain fault scenarios are specified and the turbine shall be able to sustain operation...

  10. Simulation of Wave Forces on A Semi-Circular Breakwater Using Multilayer Feed Forward Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐杰; 陶建华

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to study the wave forces on a semi-circular breakwater. The process of establishing the network model for a specific physical problem is presented. Networks with double implicit layers have been studied by numerical experiments. 117 sets of experimental data are used to train and test the ANN. According to the results of ANN simulation, this method is proved to have good precision compared with experimental and numerical results.

  11. Forcing variables in simulation of transpiration of water stressed plants determined by principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durigon, Angelica; Lier, Quirijn de Jong van; Metselaar, Klaas

    2016-10-01

    To date, measuring plant transpiration at canopy scale is laborious and its estimation by numerical modelling can be used to assess high time frequency data. When using the model by Jacobs (1994) to simulate transpiration of water stressed plants it needs to be reparametrized. We compare the importance of model variables affecting simulated transpiration of water stressed plants. A systematic literature review was performed to recover existing parameterizations to be tested in the model. Data from a field experiment with common bean under full and deficit irrigation were used to correlate estimations to forcing variables applying principal component analysis. New parameterizations resulted in a moderate reduction of prediction errors and in an increase in model performance. Ags model was sensitive to changes in the mesophyll conductance and leaf angle distribution parameterizations, allowing model improvement. Simulated transpiration could be separated in temporal components. Daily, afternoon depression and long-term components for the fully irrigated treatment were more related to atmospheric forcing variables (specific humidity deficit between stomata and air, relative air humidity and canopy temperature). Daily and afternoon depression components for the deficit-irrigated treatment were related to both atmospheric and soil dryness, and long-term component was related to soil dryness.

  12. Stochastic effects in a seasonally forced epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhnova, G.; Nunes, A.

    2010-10-01

    The interplay of seasonality, the system’s nonlinearities and intrinsic stochasticity, is studied for a seasonally forced susceptible-exposed-infective-recovered stochastic model. The model is explored in the parameter region that corresponds to childhood infectious diseases such as measles. The power spectrum of the stochastic fluctuations around the attractors of the deterministic system that describes the model in the thermodynamic limit is computed analytically and validated by stochastic simulations for large system sizes. Size effects are studied through additional simulations. Other effects such as switching between coexisting attractors induced by stochasticity often mentioned in the literature as playing an important role in the dynamics of childhood infectious diseases are also investigated. The main conclusion is that stochastic amplification, rather than these effects, is the key ingredient to understand the observed incidence patterns.

  13. Stochastic effects in a seasonally forced epidemic model

    CERN Document Server

    Rozhnova, Ganna

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of seasonality, the system's nonlinearities and intrinsic stochasticity is studied for a seasonally forced susceptible-exposed-infective-recovered stochastic model. The model is explored in the parameter region that corresponds to childhood infectious diseases such as measles. The power spectrum of the stochastic fluctuations around the attractors of the deterministic system that describes the model in the thermodynamic limit is computed analytically and validated by stochastic simulations for large system sizes. Size effects are studied through additional simulations. Other effects such as switching between coexisting attractors induced by stochasticity often mentioned in the literature as playing an important role in the dynamics of childhood infectious diseases are also investigated. The main conclusion is that stochastic amplification, rather than these effects, is the key ingredient to understand the observed incidence patterns.

  14. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  15. Linear Latent Force Models using Gaussian Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Álvarez, Mauricio A; Lawrence, Neil D

    2011-01-01

    Purely data driven approaches for machine learning present difficulties when data is scarce relative to the complexity of the model or when the model is forced to extrapolate. On the other hand, purely mechanistic approaches need to identify and specify all the interactions in the problem at hand (which may not be feasible) and still leave the issue of how to parameterize the system. In this paper, we present a hybrid approach using Gaussian processes and differential equations to combine data driven modelling with a physical model of the system. We show how different, physically-inspired, kernel functions can be developed through sensible, simple, mechanistic assumptions about the underlying system. The versatility of our approach is illustrated with three case studies from motion capture, computational biology and geostatistics.

  16. Active contour model based on force field analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhi-qiang; HAN Chong-zhao

    2006-01-01

    The traditional snake initial contour should be close to the true boundary of an object of interest in an image;otherwise,an incorrect result will be obtained.Next,active contours have difficulties progressing into boundary concavities.Moreover,the traditional snake as well as almost all of its improved methods can be easily obtained from the local minimum because snake models are nonconvex.An active contour model based on force field analysis (FFA),namely,FFA snake model,is presented in this paper.Based on analyzing force distribution rules of the distance potential force field,a standard is introduced here to distinguish the false one from contour points.The result is not considered as the final solution when the snake energy is minimal.Furthermore,estimation and calculation should be made according to the established standard;only then can the result be considered final.Thus,the snake is prevented from running into the local minimum.The simulation results show that the FFA snake model has a large capture range and can move a snake into the boundary concavities,and that it is able to obtain the object of interest's contour precisely.Compared with the gradient vector flow snake,this new model has a low computational cost.

  17. A predictive bone drilling force model for haptic rendering with experimental validation using fresh cadaveric bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanping; Chen, Huajiang; Yu, Dedong; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Bone drilling simulators with virtual and haptic feedback provide a safe, cost-effective and repeatable alternative to traditional surgical training methods. To develop such a simulator, accurate haptic rendering based on a force model is required to feedback bone drilling forces based on user input. Current predictive bone drilling force models based on bovine bones with various drilling conditions and parameters are not representative of the bone drilling process in bone surgery. The objective of this study was to provide a bone drilling force model for haptic rendering based on calibration and validation experiments in fresh cadaveric bones with different bone densities. Using a commonly used drill bit geometry (2 mm diameter), feed rates (20-60 mm/min) and spindle speeds (4000-6000 rpm) in orthognathic surgeries, the bone drilling forces of specimens from two groups were measured and the calibration coefficients of the specific normal and frictional pressures were determined. The comparison of the predicted forces and the measured forces from validation experiments with a large range of feed rates and spindle speeds demonstrates that the proposed bone drilling forces can predict the trends and average forces well. The presented bone drilling force model can be used for haptic rendering in surgical simulators.

  18. IVOA Recommendation: Simulation Data Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lemson, Gerard; Cervino, Miguel; Gheller, Claudio; Gray, Norman; LePetit, Franck; Louys, Mireille; Ooghe, Benjamin; Wagner, Rick; Wozniak, Herve

    2014-01-01

    In this document and the accompanying documents we describe a data model (Simulation Data Model) describing numerical computer simulations of astrophysical systems. The primary goal of this standard is to support discovery of simulations by describing those aspects of them that scientists might wish to query on, i.e. it is a model for meta-data describing simulations. This document does not propose a protocol for using this model. IVOA protocols are being developed and are supposed to use the model, either in its original form or in a form derived from the model proposed here, but more suited to the particular protocol. The SimDM has been developed in the IVOA Theory Interest Group with assistance of representatives of relevant working groups, in particular DM and Semantics.

  19. Design and simulation of superconducting Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography (LFEIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Boyang; Fu, Lin; Geng, Jianzhao; Zhang, Xiuchang; Zhang, Heng; Dong, Qihuan; Li, Chao; Li, Jing; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography (LFEIT) is a hybrid diagnostic scanner with strong capability for biological imaging, particularly in cancer and haemorrhages detection. This paper presents the design and simulation of a novel combination: a superconducting magnet together with LFEIT system. Superconducting magnets can generate magnetic field with high intensity and homogeneity, which could significantly enhance the imaging performance. The modelling of superconducting magnets was carried out using Finite Element Method (FEM) package, COMSOL Multiphysics, which was based on Partial Differential Equation (PDE) model with H-formulation coupling B-dependent critical current density and bulk approximation. The mathematical model for LFEIT system was built based on the theory of magneto-acoustic effect. The magnetic field properties from magnet design were imported into the LFEIT model. The basic imaging of electrical signal was developed using MATLAB codes. The LFEIT model simulated two samples located in three different magnetic fields with varying magnetic strength and homogeneity.

  20. Implementation of force distribution analysis for molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifert Christian

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The way mechanical stress is distributed inside and propagated by proteins and other biopolymers largely defines their function. Yet, determining the network of interactions propagating internal strain remains a challenge for both, experiment and theory. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, we developed force distribution analysis (FDA, a method that allows visualizing strain propagation in macromolecules. Results To be immediately applicable to a wide range of systems, FDA was implemented as an extension to Gromacs, a commonly used package for molecular simulations. The FDA code comes with an easy-to-use command line interface and can directly be applied to every system built using Gromacs. We provide an additional R-package providing functions for advanced statistical analysis and presentation of the FDA data. Conclusions Using FDA, we were able to explain the origin of mechanical robustness in immunoglobulin domains and silk fibers. By elucidating propagation of internal strain upon ligand binding, we previously also successfully revealed the functionality of a stiff allosteric protein. FDA thus has the potential to be a valuable tool in the investigation and rational design of mechanical properties in proteins and nano-materials.

  1. Intra-Articular Knee Contact Force Estimation During Walking Using Force-Reaction Elements and Subject-Specific Joint Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yihwan; Phan, Cong-Bo; Koo, Seungbum

    2016-02-01

    Joint contact forces measured with instrumented knee implants have not only revealed general patterns of joint loading but also showed individual variations that could be due to differences in anatomy and joint kinematics. Musculoskeletal human models for dynamic simulation have been utilized to understand body kinetics including joint moments, muscle tension, and knee contact forces. The objectives of this study were to develop a knee contact model which can predict knee contact forces using an inverse dynamics-based optimization solver and to investigate the effect of joint constraints on knee contact force prediction. A knee contact model was developed to include 32 reaction force elements on the surface of a tibial insert of a total knee replacement (TKR), which was embedded in a full-body musculoskeletal model. Various external measurements including motion data and external force data during walking trials of a subject with an instrumented knee implant were provided from the Sixth Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads. Knee contact forces in the medial and lateral portions of the instrumented knee implant were also provided for the same walking trials. A knee contact model with a hinge joint and normal alignment could predict knee contact forces with root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 165 N and 288 N for the medial and lateral portions of the knee, respectively, and coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.70 and -0.63. When the degrees-of-freedom (DOF) of the knee and locations of leg markers were adjusted to account for the valgus lower-limb alignment of the subject, RMSE values improved to 144 N and 179 N, and R2 values improved to 0.77 and 0.37, respectively. The proposed knee contact model with subject-specific joint model could predict in vivo knee contact forces with reasonable accuracy. This model may contribute to the development and improvement of knee arthroplasty.

  2. Embedded atom approach for gold–silicon system from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations using the force matching method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A NASSOUR

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, an empirical embedded atom method (EAM) potential for gold–silicon (Au–Si) is developed by fitting to ab initio force (the ‘force matching’ method) and experimental data. The force database is generated within ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). The database includes liquid phase at various temperatures. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are performed to examine structural, coordination numbers, structure factors and dynamic properties of Au$_{81}$Si$_{19}$ alloy, with the interaction described via EAM model. The results are in good agreement with AIMD simulations and experimental data.

  3. Hydroacoustic forcing function modeling using DNS database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, I.; Gershfield, J. L.; Na, Y.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    A wall pressure frequency spectrum model (Blake 1971 ) has been evaluated using databases from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer (Na & Moin 1996). Good agreement is found for moderate to strong adverse pressure gradient flows in the absence of separation. In the separated flow region, the model underpredicts the directly calculated spectra by an order of magnitude. The discrepancy is attributed to the violation of the model assumptions in that part of the flow domain. DNS computed coherence length scales and the normalized wall pressure cross-spectra are compared with experimental data. The DNS results are consistent with experimental observations.

  4. Driving-forces model on individual behavior in scenarios considering moving threat agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Zhuang, Jun; Shen, Shifei; Wang, Jia

    2017-09-01

    The individual behavior model is a contributory factor to improve the accuracy of agent-based simulation in different scenarios. However, few studies have considered moving threat agents, which often occur in terrorist attacks caused by attackers with close-range weapons (e.g., sword, stick). At the same time, many existing behavior models lack validation from cases or experiments. This paper builds a new individual behavior model based on seven behavioral hypotheses. The driving-forces model is an extension of the classical social force model considering scenarios including moving threat agents. An experiment was conducted to validate the key components of the model. Then the model is compared with an advanced Elliptical Specification II social force model, by calculating the fitting errors between the simulated and experimental trajectories, and being applied to simulate a specific circumstance. Our results show that the driving-forces model reduced the fitting error by an average of 33.9% and the standard deviation by an average of 44.5%, which indicates the accuracy and stability of the model in the studied situation. The new driving-forces model could be used to simulate individual behavior when analyzing the risk of specific scenarios using agent-based simulation methods, such as risk analysis of close-range terrorist attacks in public places.

  5. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s-1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  6. Design and simulation of superconducting Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography (LFEIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Boyang, E-mail: bs506@cam.ac.uk; Fu, Lin, E-mail: lf359@cam.ac.uk; Geng, Jianzhao, E-mail: jg717@cam.ac.uk; Zhang, Xiuchang, E-mail: xz326@cam.ac.uk; Zhang, Heng, E-mail: hz301@cam.ac.uk; Dong, Qihuan, E-mail: qd210@cam.ac.uk; Li, Chao, E-mail: cl644@cam.ac.uk; Li, Jing, E-mail: jl908@cam.ac.uk; Coombs, T.A., E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.uk

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Design of superconducting magnets using Halbach Array configuration. • Combination of superconducting magnets together with Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography (LFEIT) system. • Simulation of superconducting LFEIT system based on the theory of magneto-acoustic effect. - Abstract: Lorentz Force Electrical Impedance Tomography (LFEIT) is a hybrid diagnostic scanner with strong capability for biological imaging, particularly in cancer and haemorrhages detection. This paper presents the design and simulation of a novel combination: a superconducting magnet together with LFEIT system. Superconducting magnets can generate magnetic field with high intensity and homogeneity, which could significantly enhance the imaging performance. The modelling of superconducting magnets was carried out using Finite Element Method (FEM) package, COMSOL Multiphysics, which was based on Partial Differential Equation (PDE) model with H-formulation coupling B-dependent critical current density and bulk approximation. The mathematical model for LFEIT system was built based on the theory of magneto-acoustic effect. The magnetic field properties from magnet design were imported into the LFEIT model. The basic imaging of electrical signal was developed using MATLAB codes. The LFEIT model simulated two samples located in three different magnetic fields with varying magnetic strength and homogeneity.

  7. Structures and orientation-dependent interaction forces of titania nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, George; Antony, S. Joseph; Hammond, Robert B.; Ahmed, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    Engineering nanowires to develop new products and processes is highly topical due to their ability to provide highly enhanced physical, chemical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In this work, using molecular dynamics simulations, we report fundamental information, about the structural and thermodynamic properties of individual anatase titania (TiO2) nanowires with cross-sectional diameters between 2 and 6 nm, and aspect ratio (length to diameter) of 6:1 at temperatures ranging from 300 to 3000 K. Estimates of the melting transition temperature of the nanowires are between 2000 and 2500 K. The melting transition temperature predicted from the radial distribution functions (RDFs) shows strong agreement with those predicted from the total energy profiles. Overall, the transition temperature is in reasonable agreement with melting points predicted from experiments and simulations reported in the literature for spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes. Hence, the melting transition temperature of TiO2 nanowires modelled here can be considered as shape independent. Furthermore, for the first time based on MD simulations, interaction forces between two nanowires are reported at ambient temperature (300 K) for different orientations: parallel, perpendicular and end-to-end. It is observed that end-to-end orientations manifested the strongest attraction forces, while the parallel and perpendicular orientations displayed weaker attractions. The results reported here could form a foundation in future multiscale modelling studies of the structured titania nanowire assemblies, depending on the inter-wire interaction forces.

  8. Modeling and Simulation with INS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen D.; And Others

    INS, the Integrated Network Simulation language, puts simulation modeling into a network framework and automatically performs such programming activities as placing the problem into a next event structure, coding events, collecting statistics, monitoring status, and formatting reports. To do this, INS provides a set of symbols (nodes and branches)…

  9. Simulation modeling of estuarine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed of Galveston Bay, Texas ecosystem. Secondary productivity measured by harvestable species (such as shrimp and fish) is evaluated in terms of man-related and controllable factors, such as quantity and quality of inlet fresh-water and pollutants. This simulation model used information from an existing physical parameters model as well as pertinent biological measurements obtained by conventional sampling techniques. Predicted results from the model compared favorably with those from comparable investigations. In addition, this paper will discuss remotely sensed and conventional measurements in the framework of prospective models that may be used to study estuarine processes and ecosystem productivity.

  10. Force modeling for incisions into various tissues with MRF haptic master

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyunghwa; Kim, Soomin; Park, Young-Dai; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-03-01

    This study proposes a new model to predict the reaction force that occurs in incisions during robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The reaction force is fed back to the manipulator by a magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) haptic master, which is featured by a bi-directional clutch actuator. The reaction force feedback provides similar sensations to laparotomy that cannot be provided by a conventional master for surgery. This advantage shortens the training period for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery and can improve the accuracy of operations. The reaction force modeling of incisions can be utilized in a surgical simulator that provides a virtual reaction force. In this work, in order to model the reaction force during incisions, the energy aspect of the incision process is adopted and analyzed. Each mode of the incision process is classified by the tendency of the energy change, and modeled for realistic real-time application. The reaction force model uses actual reaction force information with three types of actual tissues: hard tissue, medium tissue, and soft tissue. This modeled force is realized by the MRF haptic master through an algorithm based on the position and velocity of a scalpel using two different control methods: an open-loop algorithm and a closed-loop algorithm. The reaction forces obtained from the proposed model are compared with a desired force in time domain.

  11. Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, Peter S.; Murphree, Tom; Frederickson, Paul A.; Guest, Arlene A.

    2012-01-01

    MOVES Research & Education Systems Seminar: Presentation; Session 4: Collaborative NWDC/NPS M&S Research; Moderator: Curtis Blais; Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects; speakers: Peter Guest, Paul Frederickson & Tom Murphree Environmental Effects Group

  12. Optimal tracking of a sEMG based force model for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potluri, Chandrasekhar; Anugolu, Madhavi; Yihun, Yimesker; Jensen, Alex; Chiu, Steve; Schoen, Marco P; Naidu, D Subbaram

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a surface electromyographic (sEMG)-based, optimal control strategy for a prosthetic hand. System Identification (SI) is used to obtain the dynamic relation between the sEMG and the corresponding skeletal muscle force. The input sEMG signal is preprocessed using a Half-Gaussian filter and fed to a fusion-based Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) skeletal muscle force model. This MISO system model provides the estimated finger forces to be produced as input to the prosthetic hand. Optimal tracking method has been applied to track the estimated force profile of the Fusion based sEMG-force model. The simulation results show good agreement between reference force profile and the actual force.

  13. Simulating a toy model of electrodynamics in (1 + 1) dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Boozer, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    We show how to simulate a toy model of electrodynamics in (1+1) dimensions and describe several numerical experiments. The toy model is much simpler than ordinary electrodynamics, but shares many of the same physical features. For example, there are analogs to the electric and magnetic fields, and these fields generate forces between charged particles and support freely propagating radiation. Unlike electrodynamics, however, the toy model is not Lorentz invariant, gives an attractive force be...

  14. Volcanic forcing improves Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model scaling performance

    CERN Document Server

    Vyushin, D; Havlin, S; Bunde, A; Brenner, S; Vyushin, Dmitry; Zhidkov, Igor; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Brenner, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Recent Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) simulations of the twentieth century climate, which account for anthropogenic and natural forcings, make it possible to study the origin of long-term temperature correlations found in the observed records. We study ensemble experiments performed with the NCAR PCM for 10 different historical scenarios, including no forcings, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol, ozone, solar, volcanic forcing and various combinations, such as it natural, anthropogenic and all forcings. We compare the scaling exponents characterizing the long-term correlations of the observed and simulated model data for 16 representative land stations and 16 sites in the Atlantic Ocean for these scenarios. We find that inclusion of volcanic forcing in the AOGCM considerably improves the PCM scaling behavior. The scenarios containing volcanic forcing are able to reproduce quite well the observed scaling exponents for the land with exponents around 0.65 independent of the station dista...

  15. TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, Mark David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a four-phase process used to describe the strategy in developing modeling and simulation software for the Transient Reactor Test Facility. The four phases of this research and development task are identified as (1) full core transient calculations with feedback, (2) experiment modeling, (3) full core plus experiment simulation and (4) quality assurance. The document describes the four phases, the relationship between these research phases, and anticipated needs within each phase.

  16. Ion size effect on colloidal forces within the primitive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Wu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ion size on the mean force between a pair of isolated charged particles in an electrolyte solution is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations within the framework of the primitive model where both colloidal particles and small ions are represented by charged hard spheres and the solvent is treated as a dielectric continuum. It is found that the short-ranged attraction between like-charged macroions diminishes as the diameter of the intermediating divalent counterions and coions increases and the maximum attractive force is approximately a linear function of the counterion diameter. This size effect contradicts the prediction of the Asakura-Oosawa theory suggesting that an increase in the excluded volume of small ions would lead to a stronger depletion between colloidal particles. Interestingly, the simulation results indicate that both the hard-sphere collision and the electrostatic contributions to the mean force are insensitive to the size disparity of colloidal particles with the same average diameter.

  17. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Allison, E-mail: apayne@ucair.med.utah.edu [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Bever, Josh de [Department of Computer Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Farrer, Alexis [Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Coats, Brittany [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Parker, Dennis L. [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Christensen, Douglas A. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  18. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow around a forced moving circular cylinder on cut cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fixed and forced moving circular cylinders in turbulent flows are studied by using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and two-equation based Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence models. The Cartesian cut cell approach is adopted to track the body surface across a stationary background grid covering the whole computational domain. A cell-centered finite volume method of second-order accuracy in both time and space is developed to solve the flow field in fluid cells, which is also modified accordingly in cut cells and merged cells. In order to compare different turbulence models, the current flow past a fixed circular cylinder at a mode- rate Reynolds number,Re=3 900, is tested first. The model is also applied to the simulation of a forced oscillating circular cylinder in the turbulent flow, and the influences of different oscillation amplitudes, frequencies and free stream velocities are discussed. The numerical results indicate that the present numerical model based on the Cartesian cut cell approach is capable of solving the turbu- lent flow around a body undergoing motions, which is a foundation for the possible future study on wake induced oscillation and vor- tex induced vibration.

  19. Stochastic modeling analysis and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Barry L

    1995-01-01

    A coherent introduction to the techniques for modeling dynamic stochastic systems, this volume also offers a guide to the mathematical, numerical, and simulation tools of systems analysis. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate-level industrial engineers and management science majors, it proposes modeling systems in terms of their simulation, regardless of whether simulation is employed for analysis. Beginning with a view of the conditions that permit a mathematical-numerical analysis, the text explores Poisson and renewal processes, Markov chains in discrete and continuous time, se

  20. Analysis and Modeling of the Arctic Oscillation Using a Simple Barotropic Model with Baroclinic Eddy Forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H. L.

    2003-06-01

    In this study, a numerical simulation of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) is conducted using a simple barotropic model that considers the barotropic-baroclinic interactions as the external forcing. The model is referred to as a barotropic S model since the external forcing is obtained statistically from the long-term historical data, solving an inverse problem. The barotropic S model has been integrated for 51 years under a perpetual January condition and the dominant empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes in the model have been analyzed. The results are compared with the EOF analysis of the barotropic component of the real atmosphere based on the daily NCEP-NCAR reanalysis for 50 yr from 1950 to 1999.According to the result, the first EOF of the model atmosphere appears to be the AO similar to the observation. The annular structure of the AO and the two centers of action at Pacific and Atlantic are simulated nicely by the barotropic S model. Therefore, the atmospheric low-frequency variabilities have been captured satisfactorily even by the simple barotropic model.The EOF analysis is further conducted to the external forcing of the barotropic S model. The structure of the dominant forcing shows the characteristics of synoptic-scale disturbances of zonal wavenumber 6 along the Pacific storm track. The forcing is induced by the barotropic-baroclinic interactions associated with baroclinic instability.The result suggests that the AO can be understood as the natural variability of the barotropic component of the atmosphere induced by the inherent barotropic dynamics, which is forced by the barotropic-baroclinic interactions. The fluctuating upscale energy cascade from planetary waves and synoptic disturbances to the zonal motion plays the key role for the excitation of the AO.

  1. Model reduction for circuit simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hinze, Michael; Maten, E Jan W Ter

    2011-01-01

    Simulation based on mathematical models plays a major role in computer aided design of integrated circuits (ICs). Decreasing structure sizes, increasing packing densities and driving frequencies require the use of refined mathematical models, and to take into account secondary, parasitic effects. This leads to very high dimensional problems which nowadays require simulation times too large for the short time-to-market demands in industry. Modern Model Order Reduction (MOR) techniques present a way out of this dilemma in providing surrogate models which keep the main characteristics of the devi

  2. Numerical simulation of the dynamic flow behavior in a bubble column: a study of closures for turbulence and interface forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the bubbly flow in two square cross-sectioned bubble columns were conducted with the commercial CFD package CFX-4.4. The effect of the model constant used in the sub-grid scale (SGS) model, CS, as well as the interfacial closures for the drag, lift and virtual mass forces

  3. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations with the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field on Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Steffen; Bucher, Denis; Eastman, Peter; Pande, Vijay; McCammon, J Andrew

    2013-11-12

    The accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method has recently been shown to enhance the sampling of biomolecules in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, often by several orders of magnitude. Here, we describe an implementation of the aMD method for the OpenMM application layer that takes full advantage of graphics processing units (GPUs) computing. The aMD method is shown to work in combination with the AMOEBA polarizable force field (AMOEBA-aMD), allowing the simulation of long time-scale events with a polarizable force field. Benchmarks are provided to show that the AMOEBA-aMD method is efficiently implemented and produces accurate results in its standard parametrization. For the BPTI protein, we demonstrate that the protein structure described with AMOEBA remains stable even on the extended time scales accessed at high levels of accelerations. For the DNA repair metalloenzyme endonuclease IV, we show that the use of the AMOEBA force field is a significant improvement over fixed charged models for describing the enzyme active-site. The new AMOEBA-aMD method is publicly available (http://wiki.simtk.org/openmm/VirtualRepository) and promises to be interesting for studying complex systems that can benefit from both the use of a polarizable force field and enhanced sampling.

  4. An examination of possible quadriceps force at the time of anterior cruciate ligament injury during landing: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Boros, Rhonda L; Hashemi, Javad

    2011-05-17

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common and traumatic injury. Although, identifying the mechanism of ACL injury has received considerable research attention, there are still many unanswered questions. One proposed mechanism asserts that the ACL is injured due to an aggressive quadriceps muscle contraction. However, recently it has been questioned if the magnitude of quadriceps force needed to tear the ACL is physiologically realistic under the conditions where injury occurs during landing (e.g. near full knee extension and within 50ms after impact). To answer this question, a simple simulation model was developed to examine the upper bounds of quadriceps force that can be developed under these conditions. The model included force-length, and force-velocity properties as well as activation dynamics. Model parameters were chosen to provide a high estimate for possible quadriceps force in a young healthy man. The effects of varying quadriceps pre-activation levels were also examined. When using realistic pre-activation levels, the simulated quadriceps force was less than half of what has been shown to cause ACL injury. Even when using maximum pre-activation, the quadriceps force still did not reach close to the level shown to cause injury. Therefore, we conclude that quadriceps force alone seems to be an unlikely mechanism for ACL injury.

  5. Calendar effect on phase study in paleoclimate transient simulation with orbital forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guang-Shan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, SKLLQG, Institute of Earth Environment, Xi' an (China); University of Wisconsin, Center for Climate Research, Madison, WI (United States); Kutzbach, J.E.; Gallimore, R.; Liu, Zhengyu [University of Wisconsin, Center for Climate Research, Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Several studies have shown that the use of different calendars in paleoclimate simulations can cause artificial phase shifts on insolation forcing and climatic responses. However, these important calendar corrections are still often neglected. In this paper, the phase shifts at the precession band is quantitatively assessed by converting the model data of the transient GCM climate simulation of Kutzbach et al. (Clim Dyn 30:567-579, 2008) from the ''fixed-day'' calendar to the ''fixed-angular'' calendar with a new and efficient approach. We find that insolation has a big phase shift in September-October-November (SON) when the vernal equinox (VE) is fixed to March 21. At high latitude, the phase bias is up to 60 (about 3650 years). The insolation phase bias in SON in Southern Hemisphere (SH) is especially important because it can influence the timing of the SH summer monsoon response due to the large heat capacity of ocean. The calendar correction has minor effect ({+-}2 ) on the phase relationships between forcing and precipitation responses of the six global summer monsoons studied in Kutzbach et al. (2008). After correcting the calendar effect, especial on SH ocean temperature, the new phase wheel results are more similar for both hemispheres. The results suggest that the calendar effect should be corrected before discussing the dynamics between orbital forcing and climatic responses in phase studies of transient simulations. (orig.)

  6. Communication: Multiple atomistic force fields in a single enhanced sampling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France); Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2015-07-14

    The main concerns of biomolecular dynamics simulations are the convergence of the conformational sampling and the dependence of the results on the force fields. While the first issue can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling techniques such as simulated tempering or replica exchange molecular dynamics, repeating these simulations with different force fields is very time consuming. Here, we propose an automatic method that includes different force fields into a single advanced sampling simulation. Conformational sampling using three all-atom force fields is enhanced by simulated tempering and by formulating the weight parameters of the simulated tempering method in terms of the energy fluctuations, the system is able to perform random walk in both temperature and force field spaces. The method is first demonstrated on a 1D system and then validated by the folding of the 10-residue chignolin peptide in explicit water.

  7. A hierarchical Bayesian framework for force field selection in molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S; Angelikopoulos, P; Papadimitriou, C; Moser, R; Koumoutsakos, P

    2016-02-13

    We present a hierarchical Bayesian framework for the selection of force fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The framework associates the variability of the optimal parameters of the MD potentials under different environmental conditions with the corresponding variability in experimental data. The high computational cost associated with the hierarchical Bayesian framework is reduced by orders of magnitude through a parallelized Transitional Markov Chain Monte Carlo method combined with the Laplace Asymptotic Approximation. The suitability of the hierarchical approach is demonstrated by performing MD simulations with prescribed parameters to obtain data for transport coefficients under different conditions, which are then used to infer and evaluate the parameters of the MD model. We demonstrate the selection of MD models based on experimental data and verify that the hierarchical model can accurately quantify the uncertainty across experiments; improve the posterior probability density function estimation of the parameters, thus, improve predictions on future experiments; identify the most plausible force field to describe the underlying structure of a given dataset. The framework and associated software are applicable to a wide range of nanoscale simulations associated with experimental data with a hierarchical structure.

  8. Control of shortwave radiation parameterization on tropical climate SST-forced simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crétat, Julien; Masson, Sébastien; Berthet, Sarah; Samson, Guillaume; Terray, Pascal; Dudhia, Jimy; Pinsard, Françoise; Hourdin, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    SST-forced tropical-channel simulations are used to quantify the control of shortwave (SW) parameterization on the mean tropical climate compared to other major model settings (convection, boundary layer turbulence, vertical and horizontal resolutions), and to pinpoint the physical mechanisms whereby this control manifests. Analyses focus on the spatial distribution and magnitude of the net SW radiation budget at the surface (SWnet_SFC), latent heat fluxes, and rainfall at the annual timescale. The model skill and sensitivity to the tested settings are quantified relative to observations and using an ensemble approach. Persistent biases include overestimated SWnet_SFC and too intense hydrological cycle. However, model skill is mainly controlled by SW parameterization, especially the magnitude of SWnet_SFC and rainfall and both the spatial distribution and magnitude of latent heat fluxes over ocean. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of continental rainfall (SWnet_SFC) is mainly influenced by convection parameterization and horizontal resolution (boundary layer parameterization and orography). Physical understanding of the control of SW parameterization is addressed by analyzing the thermal structure of the atmosphere and conducting sensitivity experiments to O3 absorption and SW scattering coefficient. SW parameterization shapes the stability of the atmosphere in two different ways according to whether surface is coupled to atmosphere or not, while O3 absorption has minor effects in our simulations. Over SST-prescribed regions, increasing the amount of SW absorption warms the atmosphere only because surface temperatures are fixed, resulting in increased atmospheric stability. Over land-atmosphere coupled regions, increasing SW absorption warms both atmospheric and surface temperatures, leading to a shift towards a warmer state and a more intense hydrological cycle. This turns in reversal model behavior between land and sea points, with the SW scheme that

  9. Lubrication forces in dense granular flow with interstitial fluid: A simulation study with Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Oleh; Ertas, Deniz; Halsey, Thomas; Zhou, Fuping

    2007-03-01

    Using three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations, we study steady gravity-driven flows of frictional inelastic spheres of diameter d and density ρg down an incline, interacting through two-body lubrication forces in addition to granular contact forces. Scaling arguments suggest that, in 3D, these forces constitute the dominant perturbation of an interstitial fluid for small Reynolds number Re and low fluid densityρ. Two important parameters that characterize the strength of the lubrication forces are fluid viscosity and grain roughness. We observe that incline flows with lubrication forces exhibit a packing density that decreases with increasing distance from the surface. As the incline angle is increased, this results in a severely dilated basal layer that looks like ``hydroplaning'' similar to that observed in geological subaqueous debris flows. This is surprising since the model explicitly disallows any buildup of fluid pressure in the base of the flow, and suggests that hydroplaning might have other contributing factors besides this traditional explanation. The local packing density is still determined by the dimensionless strain rate I≡γ1ptd√ρg/p , where p is the average normal stress, obeying a ``dilatancy law'' similar to dry granular flows.

  10. A VRLA battery simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoe, P.E.; Anbuky, A.H. [Invensys Energy Systems NZ Limited, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2004-05-01

    A valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery simulation model is an invaluable tool for the standby power system engineer. The obvious use for such a model is to allow the assessment of battery performance. This may involve determining the influence of cells suffering from state of health (SOH) degradation on the performance of the entire string, or the running of test scenarios to ascertain the most suitable battery size for the application. In addition, it enables the engineer to assess the performance of the overall power system. This includes, for example, running test scenarios to determine the benefits of various load shedding schemes. It also allows the assessment of other power system components, either for determining their requirements and/or vulnerabilities. Finally, a VRLA battery simulation model is vital as a stand alone tool for educational purposes. Despite the fundamentals of the VRLA battery having been established for over 100 years, its operating behaviour is often poorly understood. An accurate simulation model enables the engineer to gain a better understanding of VRLA battery behaviour. A system level multipurpose VRLA battery simulation model is presented. It allows an arbitrary battery (capacity, SOH, number of cells and number of strings) to be simulated under arbitrary operating conditions (discharge rate, ambient temperature, end voltage, charge rate and initial state of charge). The model accurately reflects the VRLA battery discharge and recharge behaviour. This includes the complex start of discharge region known as the coup de fouet. (author)

  11. Hybrid simulations: combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J

    2011-06-14

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. In this work we introduce a straightforward scheme to perform hybrid simulations, making use of virtual sites to couple the two levels of resolution. With the help of these virtual sites interactions between molecules at different levels of resolution, i.e. between CG and atomistic molecules, are treated the same way as the pure CG-CG interactions. To test our method, we combine the Gromos atomistic force field with a number of coarse-grained potentials, obtained through several approaches that are designed to obtain CG potentials based on an existing atomistic model, namely iterative Boltzmann inversion, force matching, and a potential of mean force subtraction procedure (SB). We also explore the use of the MARTINI force field for the CG potential. A simple system, consisting of atomistic butane molecules dissolved in CG butane, is used to study the performance of our hybrid scheme. Based on the potentials of mean force for atomistic butane in CG solvent, and the properties of 1:1 mixtures of atomistic and CG butane which should exhibit ideal mixing behavior, we conclude that the MARTINI and SB potentials are particularly suited to be combined with the atomistic force field. The MARTINI potential is subsequently used to perform hybrid simulations of atomistic dialanine peptides in both CG butane and water. Compared to a fully atomistic description of the system, the hybrid description gives similar results provided that the dielectric screening of water is accounted for. Within the field of biomolecules, our method appears ideally suited to study e.g. protein-ligand binding, where the active site and ligand are modeled in atomistic detail and the rest of the protein

  12. Force 2025 and Beyond Strategic Force Design Analytic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    list and start and end times of each task. Table 1 shows the basic data needed for our example model in the AMD unit and mission space. Table 1... basically two parts; an objective (or functional) hierarchy linking the overall objective through sub-objectives (or tasks) to attributes (or required...used with any popular algebraic modeling and solver software, including packages such as pyomo in Python or lpSolve in R using the lp_solve solver

  13. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Boehmite Evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fankhänel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boehmite nanoparticles show great potential in improving mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymers. In order to predict the properties of nanocomposites, knowledge about the material parameters of the constituent phases, including the boehmite particles, is crucial. In this study, the mechanical behavior of boehmite is investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Method (MDFEM simulations. Young’s modulus of the perfect crystalline boehmite nanoparticles is derived from numerical AFM simulations. Results of AFM experiments on boehmite nanoparticles deviate significantly. Possible causes are identified by experiments on complementary types of boehmite, that is, geological and hydrothermally synthesized samples, and further simulations of imperfect crystals and combined boehmite/epoxy models. Under certain circumstances, the mechanical behavior of boehmite was found to be dominated by inelastic effects that are discussed in detail in the present work. The studies are substantiated with accompanying X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SEA SURFACE DIRECTIONAL WAVE SPECTRA UNDER TYPHOON WIND FORCING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Numercial simulation of sea surface directional wave spectra under typhoon wind forcing in the South China Sea (SCS) was carreid out using the WAVEWATCH-III wave model. The simulation was run for 210 h until the Typhoon Damrey (2005) approached Vietnam. The simulated data were compared with buoy observations, which were obtained in the northwest sea area of Hainan Island. The results show that the significant wave height, wave direction, wave length and frequency spetra agree well with buoy observations. The spatial characteristics of the signifciant wave height, mean wave period, mean wave length, wave age and directional spectra depend on the relative position from the typhoon center. Also, the misalignment between local wind and wave directions were investigated.

  16. Modelling and Simulation: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McAleer (Michael); F. Chan (Felix); L. Oxley (Les)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe papers in this special issue of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation cover the following topics: improving judgmental adjustment of model-based forecasts, whether forecast updates are progressive, on a constrained mixture vector autoregressive model, whether all estimators are bor

  17. General introduction to simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation can be defined as a representation of real life systems to gain insight into their functions and to investigate the effects of alternative conditions or actions on the modeled system. Models are a simplification of a system. Most often, it is best to use experiments and field...

  18. Modelling, simulating and optimizing Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    of the boiler has been developed and simulations carried out by means of the Matlab integration routines. The model is prepared as a dynamic model consisting of both ordinary differential equations and algebraic equations, together formulated as a Differential-Algebraic- Equation system. Being able to operate...

  19. Influence of lubrication forces in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitri, Rohit; Peters, Frank; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Accurate numerical representation of particle-laden flows is important for fundamental understanding and optimizing the complex processes such as proppant transport in fracking. Liquid-solid flows are fundamentally different from gas-solid flows because of lower density ratios (solid to fluid) and non-negligible lubrication forces. In this interface resolved model, fluid-solid coupling is achieved by incorporating the no-slip boundary condition implicitly at particle's surfaces by means of an efficient second order ghost-cell immersed boundary method. A fixed Eulerian grid is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the particle-particle interactions are implemented using the soft sphere collision and sub-grid scale lubrication model. Due to the range of influence of lubrication force on a smaller scale than the grid size, it is important to implement the lubrication model accurately. In this work, different implementations of the lubrication model on particle dynamics are studied for various flow conditions. The effect of a particle surface roughness on lubrication force and the particle transport is also investigated. This study is aimed at developing a validated methodology to incorporate lubrication models in direct numerical simulation of particle laden flows. This research is supported from Grant 13CSER014 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  20. Accurate Force Field Development for Modeling Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBay, Kateri H; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Hughes, Thomas F; Wu, Chuanjie; Reichman, David R; Friesner, Richard A

    2012-11-13

    The modeling of the conformational properties of conjugated polymers entails a unique challenge for classical force fields. Conjugation imposes strong constraints upon bond rotation. Planar configurations are favored, but the concomitantly shortened bond lengths result in moieties being brought into closer proximity than usual. The ensuing steric repulsions are particularly severe in the presence of side chains, straining angles, and stretching bonds to a degree infrequently found in nonconjugated systems. We herein demonstrate the resulting inaccuracies by comparing the LMP2-calculated inter-ring torsion potentials for a series of substituted stilbenes and bithiophenes to those calculated using standard classical force fields. We then implement adjustments to the OPLS-2005 force field in order to improve its ability to model such systems. Finally, we show the impact of these changes on the dihedral angle distributions, persistence lengths, and conjugation length distributions observed during molecular dynamics simulations of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) and poly 3-hexylthiophene (P3HT), two of the most widely used conjugated polymers.

  1. Relaxation of a simulated lipid bilayer vesicle compressed by an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Ben M.; Bertrand, Martine; Joós, Béla

    2016-11-01

    Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we study the relaxation of bilayer vesicles, uniaxially compressed by an atomic force microscope cantilever. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force dependence. Force-compression curves are very similar to recent experiments wherein giant unilamellar vesicles were compressed in a nearly identical manner.

  2. Validating empirical force fields for molecular-level simulation of cellulose dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The calculations presented here, which include dynamics simulations using analytical force fields and first principles studies, indicate that the COMPASS force field is preferred over the Dreiding and Universal force fields for studying dissolution of large cellulose structures. The validity of thes...

  3. How sensitive are nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of proteins to changes in the force field?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villa, Alessandra; Fan, Hao; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Mark, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular dynamics simulations to variations in the force field has been examined in relation to a set of 36 structures corresponding to 31 proteins simulated by using different versions of the GROMOS force field. The three parameter sets used (43a1, 53a5, and 53a6) differ signifi

  4. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pérez, E.; Serra-Crespo,P.; Hamad, S.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations o

  5. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Pérez, E.; Serra-Crespo,P.; Hamad, S.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations

  6. The Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss During Simulated Dives in Canadian Forces Hyperbaric Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric facilities Sharon M...2012-084 October 2012 The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric ...transferred into the dive chamber of a hyperbaric facility. The mechanism is audible and sufficiently high in level in adjacent areas to warrant the

  7. The effect of aircraft control forces on pilot performance during instrument landings in a flight simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D J; McNair, P J; Marshall, R N

    2001-07-01

    Pilots may have difficulty controlling aircraft at both high and low force levels due to larger variability in force production at these force levels. The aim of this study was to measure the force variability and landing performance of pilots during an instrument landing in a flight simulator. There were 12 pilots who were tested while performing 5 instrument landings in a flight simulator, each of which required different control force inputs. Pilots can produce the least force when pushing the control column to the right, therefore the force levels for the landings were set relative to each pilot's maximum aileron-right force. The force levels for the landings were 90%, 60%, and 30% of maximal aileron-right force, normal force, and 25% of normal force. Variables recorded included electromyographic activity (EMG), aircraft control forces, aircraft attitude, perceived exertion and deviation from glide slope and heading. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for differences between landings. Pilots were least accurate in landing performance during the landing at 90% of maximal force (p < 0.05). There was also a trend toward decreased landing performance during the landing at 25% of normal force. Pilots were more variable in force production during the landings at 60% and 90% of maximal force (p < 0.05). Pilots are less accurate at performing instrument landings when control forces are high due to the increased variability of force production. The increase in variability at high force levels is most likely associated with motor unit recruitment, rather than rate coding. Aircraft designers need to consider the reduction in pilot performance at high force levels, as well as pilot strength limits when specifying new standards.

  8. Simulation of the spatial distribution of mineral dust and its direct radiative forcing over Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Alizadeh Choobari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct radiative forcing by mineral dust is important as it significantly affects the climate system by scattering and absorbing short-wave and long-wave radiation. The multi-angle imaging spectro radiometer (MISR and cloud–aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarisation (CALIOP aerosol data are used to observe mineral dust distribution over Australia. In addition, the weather research and forecasting with chemistry (WRF/Chem model is used to estimate direct radiative forcing by dust. At the surface, the model domain clear-sky short-wave and long-wave direct radiative forcing by dust averaged for a 6-month period (austral spring and summer was estimated to be −0.67 W m−2 and 0.13 W m−2, respectively. The long-wave warming effect of dust therefore offsets 19.4% of its short-wave cooling effect. However, over Lake Eyre Basin where coarse particles are more abundant, the long-wave warming effect of dust offsets 60.9% of the short-wave cooling effect. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA, clear-sky short-wave and long-wave direct radiative forcing was estimated to be −0.26 W m−2 and −0.01 W m−2, respectively. This leads to a net negative direct radiative forcing of dust at the TOA, indicating cooling of the atmosphere by an increase in outgoing radiation. Short-wave and long-wave direct radiative forcing by dust is shown to have a diurnal variation due to changes in solar zenith angle and in the intensity of infrared radiation. Atmospheric heating due to absorption of short-wave radiation was simulated, while the interaction of dust with long-wave radiation was associated with atmospheric cooling. The net effect was cooling of the atmosphere near the surface (below 0.2 km, with warming of the atmosphere at higher altitudes.

  9. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  10. PORTER S FIVE FORCES MODEL SCOTT MORTON S FIVE FORCES MODEL BAKOS TREACY MODEL ANALYZES STRATEGIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Gamayanto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wollongong City Council (WCC is one of the most progressive and innovative local government organizations in Australia. Wollongong City Council use Information Technology to gain the competitive advantage and to face a global economy in the future. Porter's Five Force model is one of the models that can be using at Wollongong City Council because porter's five Forces model has strength in relationship between buyer and suppliers (Bargaining power of suppliers and bargaining power of buyers. Other model such as Scott Morton's Five Forces model has strength to analyze the social impact factor, so to gain competitive advantage in the future and have a good IT/IS strategic planning; this model can be use also. Bakos & Treacy model almost the same as Porter's model but Bakos & Treacy model can also be applying into Wollongong City Council to improve the capability in Transforming organization, efficiency, and effectiveness.

  11. Reducing biases in regional climate downscaling by applying Bayesian model averaging on large-scale forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hongwei [APEC Climate Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology, Honolulu, HI (United States); University of Hawaii at Manoa, International Pacific Research Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Wang, Bin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, LASG, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2012-11-15

    Reduction of uncertainty in large-scale lateral-boundary forcing in regional climate modeling is a critical issue for improving the performance of regional climate downscaling. Numerical simulations of 1998 East Asian summer monsoon were conducted using the Weather Research and Forecast model forced by four different reanalysis datasets, their equal-weight ensemble, and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) ensemble means. Large discrepancies were found among experiments forced by the four individual reanalysis datasets mainly due to the uncertainties in the moisture field of large-scale forcing over ocean. We used satellite water-vapor-path data as observed truth-and-training data to determine the posterior probability (weight) for each forcing dataset using the BMA method. The experiment forced by the equal-weight ensemble reduced the circulation biases significantly but reduced the precipitation biases only moderately. However, the experiment forced by the BMA ensemble outperformed not only the experiments forced by individual reanalysis datasets but also the equal-weight ensemble experiment in simulating the seasonal mean circulation and precipitation. These results suggest that the BMA ensemble method is an effective method for reducing the uncertainties in lateral-boundary forcing and improving model performance in regional climate downscaling. (orig.)

  12. Stochastic models: theory and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2008-03-01

    Many problems in applied science and engineering involve physical phenomena that behave randomly in time and/or space. Examples are diverse and include turbulent flow over an aircraft wing, Earth climatology, material microstructure, and the financial markets. Mathematical models for these random phenomena are referred to as stochastic processes and/or random fields, and Monte Carlo simulation is the only general-purpose tool for solving problems of this type. The use of Monte Carlo simulation requires methods and algorithms to generate samples of the appropriate stochastic model; these samples then become inputs and/or boundary conditions to established deterministic simulation codes. While numerous algorithms and tools currently exist to generate samples of simple random variables and vectors, no cohesive simulation tool yet exists for generating samples of stochastic processes and/or random fields. There are two objectives of this report. First, we provide some theoretical background on stochastic processes and random fields that can be used to model phenomena that are random in space and/or time. Second, we provide simple algorithms that can be used to generate independent samples of general stochastic models. The theory and simulation of random variables and vectors is also reviewed for completeness.

  13. Long-wave forcing for regional atmospheric modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, H. von; Langenberg, H.; Feser, F. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    1999-07-01

    A new method, named 'spectral nudging', of linking a regional model to the driving large-scale model simulated or analyzed by a global model is proposed and tested. Spectral nudging is based on the idea that regional-scale climate statistics are conditioned by the interplay between continental-scale atmospheric conditions and such regional features as marginal seas and mountain ranges. Following this 'downscaling' idea, the regional model is forced to satisfy not only boundary conditions, possibly in a boundary sponge region, but also large-scale flow conditions inside the integration area. We demonstrate that spectral nudging succeeds in keeping the simulated state close to the driving state at large scales, while generating smaller-scale features. We also show that the standard boundary forcing technique in current use allows the regional model to develop internal states conflicting with the large-scale state. It is concluded that spectral nudging may be seen as a suboptimal and indirect data assimilation technique. (orig.) [German] Eine neue Methode, genannt 'spektrales nudging', ein Regionalmodell an das durch ein Globalmodell simulierte grossskalige Antriebsfeld zu koppeln, wird vorgestellt und getestet. Das spektrale nudging basiert auf der Annahme, dass regionale Klimastatistik durch die Wechselwirkung zwischen dem kontinental-skaligen atmosphaerischen Zustand und regionalen Gegebenheiten, wie kleinere Seen und Gebirgszuege, bestimmt wird. Demnach muss das Regionalmodell nicht nur die Randbedingungen erfuellen, sondern auch die grossskaligen Zustaende innerhalb des Integrationsgebietes wiedergeben koennen. Wir zeigen, dass durch das spektrale nudging der grossskalige modellierte Zustand nahe an dem des Antriebsfeldes liegt, ohne die Modellierung regionaler Phaenomene zu beeintraechtigen. Ausserdem zeigen wir, dass das Regionalmodell durch die zur Zeit benutzte Antriebstechnik ueber den Modellrand interne Felder produzieren kann

  14. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  15. Computational Modeling of Simulation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Mexico , March 1979. 14. Kinney, G. F.,.::. IeiN, .hoce 1h Ir, McMillan, p. 57, 1962. 15. Courant and Friedrichs, ,U: r. on moca an.: Jho...AD 79 275 NEW MEXICO UNIV ALBUGUERGUE ERIC H WANG CIVIL ENGINE-ETC F/6 18/3 COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS.(U) JUN 80 6 LEIGH, W CHOWN, B...COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS00 0G. Leigh W. Chown B. Harrison Eric H. Wang Civil Engineering Research Facility University of New Mexico

  16. SIMULATION OF COLLECTIVE RISK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Pacáková

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on providing brief theoretical definitions of the basic terms and methods of modeling and simulations of insurance risks in non-life insurance by means of mathematical and statistical methods using statistical software. While risk assessment of insurance company in connection with its solvency is a rather complex and comprehensible problem, its solution starts with statistical modeling of number and amount of individual claims. Successful solution of these fundamental problems enables solving of curtail problems of insurance such as modeling and simulation of collective risk, premium an reinsurance premium calculation, estimation of probabiliy of ruin etc. The article also presents some essential ideas underlying Monte Carlo methods and their applications to modeling of insurance risk. Solving problem is to find the probability distribution of the collective risk in non-life insurance portfolio. Simulation of the compound distribution function of the aggregate claim amount can be carried out, if the distibution functions of the claim number process and the claim size are assumed given. The Monte Carlo simulation is suitable method to confirm the results of other methods and for treatments of catastrophic claims, when small collectives are studied. Analysis of insurance risks using risk theory is important part of the project Solvency II. Risk theory is analysis of stochastic features of non-life insurance process. The field of application of risk theory has grown rapidly. There is a need to develop the theory into form suitable for practical purposes and demostrate their application. Modern computer simulation techniques open up a wide field of practical applications for risk theory concepts, without requiring the restricive assumptions and sophisticated mathematics. This article presents some comparisons of the traditional actuarial methods and of simulation methods of the collective risk model.

  17. A modified social force model for crowd dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ummi Nurmasyitah; Zainuddin, Zarita; Abu-Sulyman, Ibtesam M.

    2017-08-01

    The Social Force Model (SFM) is one of the most successful models in microscopic pedestrian studies that is used to study the movement of pedestrians. Many modifications have been done to improvise the SFM by earlier researchers such as the incorporation of a constant respect factor into the self-stopping mechanism. Before the new mechanism is introduced, the researchers found out that a pedestrian will immediately come to a halt if other pedestrians are near to him, which seems to be an unrealistic behavior. Therefore, researchers introduce a self-slowing mechanism to gradually stop a pedestrian when he is approaching other pedestrians. Subsequently, the dynamic respect factor is introduced into the self-slowing mechanism based on the density of the pedestrians to make the model even more realistic. In real life situations, the respect factor of the pedestrians should be dynamic values instead of a constant value. However, when we reproduce the simulation of the dynamic respect factor, we found that the movement of the pedestrians are unrealistic because the pedestrians are lacking perception of the pedestrians in front of him. In this paper, we adopted both dynamic respect factor and dynamic angular parameter, called modified dynamic respect factor, which is dependent on the density of the pedestrians. Simulations are performed in a normal unidirectional walkway to compare the simulated pedestrians' movements produced by both models. The results obtained showed that the modified dynamic respect factor produces more realistic movement of the pedestrians which conform to the real situation. Moreover, we also found that the simulations endow the pedestrian with a self-slowing mechanism and a perception of other pedestrians in front of him.

  18. Forced Desorption of Bovine Serum Albumin and Lysozyme from Graphite: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2016-08-18

    We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study the adsorption and desorption of two widely different proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme, on a graphite surface. The adsorption is modeled using accelerated MD to allow the proteins to find optimum conformations on the surface. Our results demonstrate that the "hard protein" lysozyme retains much of its secondary structure during adsorption, whereas BSA loses it almost completely. BSA has a considerably larger adsorption energy compared to that of lysozyme, which does not scale with chain length. Desorption simulations are carried out using classical steered MD. The BSA molecule becomes fully unzipped during pull-off, whereas several helices survive this process in lysozyme. The unzipping process shows up in the force-distance curve of BSA as a series of peaks, whereas only a single or few, depending on protein orientation, force peaks occur for lysozyme. The maximum desorption force is larger for BSA than for lysozyme, but only by a factor of about 2.3.

  19. Experimental and simulation studies of hard contact in force reflecting teleoperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Blake; Anderson, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Experiments and simulations of a single-axis force-reflecting teleoperation system have been conducted to investigate the problem of contacting a hard environment and maintaining a controlled force in teleoperation in which position is fed forward from the hand controller (master) to the manipulator (slave), and force is fed back to the human operator through motors in the master. The simulations, using an electrical circuit model, reproduce the behavior of the real system, including effects of human operator biomechanics. It is shown that human operator properties, which vary as a result of different types of grasp of the handle, affect the stability of the system in the hard-contact task. The effect of a heavier grasp on the handle is equivalent to increased hand-controller velocity damping in terms of the systems stability in the contact task, but control system damping sufficient to guarantee stable contact results in perceptible sluggishness of the control handle's response in free motion. These results suggest that human operator biomechanics must be taken into account to guarantee stable and ergonomic performance of advanced teleoperators.

  20. A "Necklace" Model for Vesicles Simulations in 2D

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Mourad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new numerical model to simulate 2D vesicles interacting with a newtonian fluid. The inextensible membrane is modeled by a chain of circular rigid particles which are maintained in cohesion by using two different type of forces. First, a spring force is imposed between neighboring particles in the chain. Second, in order to model the bending of the membrane, each triplet of successive particles is submitted to an angular force. Numerical simulations of vesicles in shear flow have been run using Finite Element Method and the FreeFem++[1] software. Exploring different ratios of inner and outer viscosities, we recover the well known "Tank-Treading" and "Tumbling" motions predicted by theory and experiments. Moreover, for the first time, 2D simulations of the "Vacillating-Breathing" regime predicted by theory in [2] and observed experimentally in [3] are done without special ingredient like for example thermal fluctuations used in [4].

  1. Based on the Force Deployment Model of Unascertained Expectation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we utilize the unascertained mathematics method to give the unascertained number of countermeasure of anti-terrorism strategic force deployment and unknown event. It has been defined the situation sets of force deployment, condition density and mathematical expectation of density model. It has been given the unascertained parameters Cij which decide and direct the force deployment. Find out the condition density matrix of force deployment, further get the conditional density of single target force deployment, using the maximum density mathematical expectation in order to get the optimal mathematical model of multiple target force deployment. Analyzing the coefficient of model and provide two kinds of discussed computing method. The model overcomes the limitation of past deterministic thinking method which study the force deployment and provide the decision maker a relative substantial theory evidence.

  2. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt.

  3. Development of models and methods for the molecular simulation of large systems and molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Jonathan; Horsch, Martin; Vrabec, Jadran; Hasse, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The most important factor for quantitative results in molecular dynamics simulation are well developed force fields and models. In the present work, the development of new models and the usage of force fields from the literature in large systems are presented. Both tasks lead to time consuming simulations that require massively parallel high performance computing. In the present work, new models for carbon dioxide and cyclohexanolare discussed and a new method for the model development is introduced. Force fields and models for the simulation of PNIPAAm hydrogel in pure water and sodium chloride solution are tested and verified and applied to the simulation of nucleation processes.

  4. A Matlab Toolbox for Parametric Identification of Radiation-Force Models of Ships and Offshore Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Perez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a Matlab toolbox for parametric identification of fluid-memory models associated with the radiation forces ships and offshore structures. Radiation forces are a key component of force-to- motion models used in simulators, motion control designs, and also for initial performance evaluation of wave-energy converters. The software described provides tools for preparing non-parmatric data and for identification with automatic model-order detection. The identification problem is considered in the frequency domain.

  5. A contoured continuum surface force model for particle methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guangtao; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Chen, Bin

    2015-10-01

    A surface tension model is essential to simulate multiphase flows with deformed interfaces. This study develops a contoured continuum surface force (CCSF) model for particle methods. A color function that varies sharply across the interface to mark different fluid phases is smoothed in the transition region, where the local contour curvature can be regarded as the interface curvature. The local contour passing through each reference particle in the transition region is extracted from the local profile of the smoothed color function. The local contour curvature is calculated based on the Taylor series expansion of the smoothed color function, whose derivatives are calculated accurately according to the definition of the smoothed color function. Two schemes are proposed to specify the smooth radius: fixed scheme, where 2 ×re (re = particle interaction radius) is assigned to all particles in the transition region; and varied scheme, where re and 2 ×re are assigned to the central and edged particles in the transition region respectively. Numerical examples, including curvature calculation for static circle and ellipse interfaces, deformation of square droplet to a circle (2D and 3D), droplet deformation in shear flow, and droplet coalescence, are simulated to verify the CCSF model and compare its performance with those of other methods. The CCSF model with the fixed scheme is proven to produce the most accurate curvature and lowest parasitic currents among the tested methods.

  6. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the modelling, simulating and optimizing including experimental verification as being carried out as part of a Ph.D. project being written resp. supervised by the authors. The work covers dynamic performance of both water-tube boilers and fire tube boilers. A detailed dynamic...... model of the boiler has been developed and simulations carried out by means of the Matlab integration routines. The model is prepared as a dynamic model consisting of both ordinary differential equations and algebraic equations, together formulated as a Differential-Algebraic-Equation system. Being able...... to operate a boiler plant dynamically means that the boiler designs must be able to absorb any fluctuations in water level and temperature gradients resulting from the pressure change in the boiler. On the one hand a large water-/steam space may be required, i.e. to build the boiler as big as possible. Due...

  7. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lin; Zheng, Song; Zhai, Qinglan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results.

  8. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lin, E-mail: lz@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Zheng, Song [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhai, Qinglan [School of Economics Management and Law, Chaohu University, Chaohu 238000 (China)

    2016-02-05

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface force (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter via Cahn–Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection–diffusion equation for temperature field is resolved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then thermocapillary migration of two/three dimensional deformable droplet are simulated. Numerical results show that the predictions of present LBE agreed with the analytical solution/other numerical results. - Highlights: • A CSF LBE to thermocapillary flows. • Thermal layered Poiseuille flows. • Thermocapillary migration.

  9. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    force, but these models are computationally expensive and are not suitable for evaluating large numbers of different operation conditions or even design optimization. In the present paper, an effort is done to describe these fluid forces and their origin. An example of the total opposing fluid force...

  10. Force-time course parameters and force fatigue model during an intermittent fatigue protocol in motorcycle race riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, M; Rios, M; Torrado, P; Busquets, A; Angulo-Barroso, R

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue in forearm muscles may be critical for motorcycle riders in relation to performance and forearm disorders. Force-time course parameters were examined to better characterize the reduction in the maximal force generating capacity (MVC) during an intermittent fatigue protocol (IFP) specifically designed for motorcycle riders. Also, a mathematical force fatigue model is proposed. Forty motorcyclists (aged 27.6 ± 6.8 years) performed an IFP that simulated the braking gesture and posture of a rider. Fatigue was confirmed by a 40% decrement of the normalized MVC in comparison with basal value. Contraction time increased in comparison with basal condition (P ≤ 0.034). Relaxation kinetics presented two phases: (a) a pre-fatigue phase where half relaxation time (HRTraw ) and normalized (HRTnor ) decreased (P ≤ 0.013) while relaxation rate (RRraw ) remained unchanged; and (b) a fatiguing phase where HRTraw , HRTnor increased and RRraw decreased (P ≤ 0.047). Normalized RRraw (RRnor ) declined progressively (P ≤ 0.016). The proposed nonlinear force fatigue model confirmed a satisfactory adjustment (R(2)  = 0.977 ± 0.018). This mathematical expression derived three patterns of force fatigue: three-phase, exponential and linear, representing 70%, 13%, and 17% of the participants, respectively. Overall, these results provided further support to force fatigue theoretical and applied proposals.

  11. Intelligent Mobility Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    cog.cs.drexel.edu/act-r/index.html) •Models sensory / motor performance of human driver or teleoperator 27UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for...U.S. ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Intelligent Mobility Modeling and Simulation 1 Dr. P. Jayakumar, S. Arepally...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Contents 1. Mobility - Autonomy - Latency Relationship 2. Machine - Human Partnership 3. Development of Shared Control

  12. NUMERICAL MODEL APPLICATION IN ROWING SIMULATOR DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Chmátal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to carry out a hydraulic design of rowing/sculling and paddling simulator. Nowadays there are two main approaches in the simulator design. The first one includes a static water with no artificial movement and counts on specially cut oars to provide the same resistance in the water. The second approach, on the other hand uses pumps or similar devices to force the water to circulate but both of the designs share many problems. Such problems are affecting already built facilities and can be summarized as unrealistic feeling, unwanted turbulent flow and bad velocity profile. Therefore, the goal was to design a new rowing simulator that would provide nature-like conditions for the racers and provide an unmatched experience. In order to accomplish this challenge, it was decided to use in-depth numerical modeling to solve the hydraulic problems. The general measures for the design were taken in accordance with space availability of the simulator ́s housing. The entire research was coordinated with other stages of the construction using BIM. The detailed geometry was designed using a numerical model in Ansys Fluent and parametric auto-optimization tools which led to minimum negative hydraulic phenomena and decreased investment and operational costs due to the decreased hydraulic losses in the system.

  13. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  14. Cosmological Constraints on the Modified Entropic Force Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hao

    2010-01-01

    Very recently, Verlinde considered a theory in which space is emergent through a holographic scenario, and proposed that gravity can be explained as an entropic force caused by changes in the information associated with the positions of material bodies. Then, motivated by the Debye model in thermodynamics which is very successful in very low temperatures, Gao modified the entropic force scenario. The modified entropic force (MEF) model is in fact a modified gravity model, and the universe can...

  15. Stochastic model for aerodynamic force dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Luhur, Muhammad Ramzan; Kühn, Martin; Wächter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a stochastic approach to estimate the aerodynamic forces with local dynamics on wind turbine blades in unsteady wind inflow. This is done by integrating a stochastic model of lift and drag dynamics for an airfoil into the aerodynamic simulation software AeroDyn. The model is added as an alternative to the static table lookup approach in blade element momentum (BEM) wake model used by AeroDyn. The stochastic forces are obtained for a rotor blade element using full field turbulence simulated wind data input and compared with the classical BEM and dynamic stall models for identical conditions. The comparison shows that the stochastic model generates additional extended dynamic response in terms of local force fluctuations. Further, the comparison of statistics between the classical BEM, dynamic stall and stochastic models' results in terms of their increment probability density functions gives consistent results.

  16. On the transferability of three water models developed by adaptive force matching

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Hongyi; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Water is perhaps the most simulated liquid. Recently three water models have been developed following the adaptive force matching (AFM) method that provides excellent predictions of water properties with only electronic structure information as a reference. Compared to many other electronic structure based force fields that rely on fairly sophisticated energy expressions, the AFM water models use point-charge based energy expressions that are supported by most popular molecular dynamics packages. An outstanding question regarding simple force fields is whether such force fields provide reasonable transferability outside of their conditions of parameterization. A survey of three AFM water models, B3LYPD-4F, BLYPSP-4F, and WAIL are provided for simulations under conditions ranging from the melting point up to the critical point. By including ice-Ih configurations in the training set, the WAIL potential predicts the melting temperate, TM, of ice-Ih correctly. Without training for ice, BLYPSP-4F underestimates TM...

  17. Integration of the Forced-Choice Questionnaire and the Likert Scale: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yue; Liu, Hongyun; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The Thurstonian item response theory (IRT) model allows estimating the latent trait scores of respondents directly through their responses in forced-choice questionnaires. It solves a part of problems brought by the traditional scoring methods of this kind of questionnaires. However, the forced-choice designs may still have their own limitations: The model may encounter underidentification and non-convergence and the test may show low test reliability in simple test designs (e.g., test designs with only a small number of traits measured or short length). To overcome these weaknesses, the present study applied the Thurstonian IRT model and the Graded Response Model to a different test format that comprises both forced-choice blocks and Likert-type items. And the Likert items should have low social desirability. A Monte Carlo simulation study is used to investigate how the mixed response format performs under various conditions. Four factors are considered: the number of traits, test length, the percentage of Likert items, and the proportion of pairs composed of items keyed in opposite directions. Results reveal that the mixed response format can be superior to the forced-choice format, especially in simple designs where the latter performs poorly. Besides the number of Likert items needed is small. One point to note is that researchers need to choose Likert items cautiously as Likert items may bring other response biases to the test. Discussion and suggestions are given to construct personality tests that can resist faking as much as possible and have acceptable reliability.

  18. Integration of the Forced-Choice Questionnaire and the Likert Scale: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xiao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Thurstonian item response theory (IRT model allows estimating the latent trait scores of respondents directly through their responses in forced-choice questionnaires. It solves a part of problems brought by the traditional scoring methods of this kind of questionnaires. However, the forced-choice designs may still have their own limitations: The model may encounter underidentification and non-convergence and the test may show low test reliability in simple test designs (e.g., test designs with only a small number of traits measured or short length. To overcome these weaknesses, the present study applied the Thurstonian IRT model and the Graded Response Model to a different test format that comprises both forced-choice blocks and Likert-type items. And the Likert items should have low social desirability. A Monte Carlo simulation study is used to investigate how the mixed response format performs under various conditions. Four factors are considered: the number of traits, test length, the percentage of Likert items, and the proportion of pairs composed of items keyed in opposite directions. Results reveal that the mixed response format can be superior to the forced-choice format, especially in simple designs where the latter performs poorly. Besides the number of Likert items needed is small. One point to note is that researchers need to choose Likert items cautiously as Likert items may bring other response biases to the test. Discussion and suggestions are given to construct personality tests that can resist faking as much as possible and have acceptable reliability.

  19. Relationship between jump landing kinematics and peak ACL force during a jump in downhill skiing: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, D; van den Bogert, A J; Nachbauer, W

    2014-06-01

    Recent data highlight that competitive skiers face a high risk of injuries especially during off-balance jump landing maneuvers in downhill skiing. The purpose of the present study was to develop a musculo-skeletal modeling and simulation approach to investigate the cause-and-effect relationship between a perturbed landing position, i.e., joint angles and trunk orientation, and the peak force in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) during jump landing. A two-dimensional musculo-skeletal model was developed and a baseline simulation was obtained reproducing measurement data of a reference landing movement. Based on the baseline simulation, a series of perturbed landing simulations (n = 1000) was generated. Multiple linear regression was performed to determine a relationship between peak ACL force and the perturbed landing posture. Increased backward lean, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion as well as an asymmetric position were related to higher peak ACL forces during jump landing. The orientation of the trunk of the skier was identified as the most important predictor accounting for 60% of the variance of the peak ACL force in the simulations. Teaching of tactical decisions and the inclusion of exercise regimens in ACL injury prevention programs to improve trunk control during landing motions in downhill skiing was concluded. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The ultrasound detection of simulated long bone fractures by U.S. Army Special Forces Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Jason D; Baker, Benjamin L; McArthur, Todd J

    2010-01-01

    U.S. Army Special Forces Medics (18Ds) operate in austere environments where decisions regarding patient management may be limited by available resources. Portable ultrasound may allow for the detection of fractures in environments where other imaging modalities such as radiography are not readily available or practical. We used a simulation training model for the ultrasound diagnosis of long bone fractures to study the ability of 18Ds to detect the presence or absence of a fracture using a portable ultrasound. The fracture simulation model is composed of a bare turkey leg bone that is mechanically fractured and housed in a shallow plastic container within an opaque gelatin base solution. Five fracture patterns were created: transverse, segmental, oblique, comminuted, and no fracture. After a brief orientation session, twenty 18Ds evaluated the models in a blinded fashion with a SonoSite M-Turbo portable ultrasound device for the presence or absence of a fracture. 18Ds demonstrated 100% sensitivity (95% CI: 94.2% to 100%) in fracture detection and an overall specificity of 90% (95% CI: 66.8-98.2%) due to two false positive assessments of the no fracture model. Using a portable ultrasound device, 18Ds were able to correctly detect the presence or absence of a simulated long bone fracture with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Future studies are needed to investigate the clinical impact of this diagnostic ability. 2010.

  1. Analysis of the sEMG/force relationship using HD-sEMG technique and data fusion: A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harrach, Mariam; Carriou, Vincent; Boudaoud, Sofiane; Laforet, Jeremy; Marin, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between the surface Electromyogram (sEMG) signal and the force of an individual muscle is still ambiguous due to the complexity of experimental evaluation. However, understanding this relationship should be useful for the assessment of neuromuscular system in healthy and pathological contexts. In this study, we present a global investigation of the factors governing the shape of this relationship. Accordingly, we conducted a focused sensitivity analysis of the sEMG/force relationship form with respect to neural, functional and physiological parameters variation. For this purpose, we used a fast generation cylindrical model for the simulation of an 8×8 High Density-sEMG (HD-sEMG) grid and a twitch based force model for the muscle force generation. The HD-sEMG signals as well as the corresponding force signals were simulated in isometric non-fatiguing conditions and were based on the Biceps Brachii (BB) muscle properties. A total of 10 isometric constant contractions of 5s were simulated for each configuration of parameters. The Root Mean Squared (RMS) value was computed in order to quantify the sEMG amplitude. Then, an image segmentation method was used for data fusion of the 8×8 RMS maps. In addition, a comparative study between recent modeling propositions and the model proposed in this study is presented. The evaluation was made by computing the Normalized Root Mean Squared Error (NRMSE) of their fitting to the simulated relationship functions. Our results indicated that the relationship between the RMS (mV) and muscle force (N) can be modeled using a 3rd degree polynomial equation. Moreover, it appears that the obtained coefficients are patient-specific and dependent on physiological, anatomical and neural parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using sensitivity analysis to validate the predictions of a biomechanical model of bite forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, William Irvin; Crompton, Robin Huw

    2004-02-01

    Biomechanical modelling has become a very popular technique for investigating functional anatomy. Modern computer simulation packages make producing such models straightforward and it is tempting to take the results produced at face value. However the predictions of a simulation are only valid when both the model and the input parameters are accurate and little work has been done to verify this. In this paper a model of the human jaw is produced and a sensitivity analysis is performed to validate the results. The model is built using the ADAMS multibody dynamic simulation package incorporating the major occlusive muscles of mastication (temporalis, masseter, medial and lateral pterygoids) as well as a highly mobile temporomandibular joint. This model is used to predict the peak three-dimensional bite forces at each teeth location, joint reaction forces, and the contributions made by each individual muscle. The results for occlusive bite-force (1080N at M1) match those previously published suggesting the model is valid. The sensitivity analysis was performed by sampling the input parameters from likely ranges and running the simulation many times rather than using single, best estimate values. This analysis shows that the magnitudes of the peak retractive forces on the lower teeth were highly sensitive to the chosen origin (and hence fibre direction) of the temporalis and masseter muscles as well as the laxity of the TMJ. Peak protrusive force was also sensitive to the masseter origin. These result shows that the model is insufficiently complex to estimate these values reliably although the much lower sensitivity values obtained for the bite forces in the other directions and also for the joint reaction forces suggest that these predictions are sound. Without the sensitivity analysis it would not have been possible to identify these weaknesses which strongly supports the use of sensitivity analysis as a validation technique for biomechanical modelling.

  3. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2004-01-01

    on the boiler) have been dened. Furthermore a number of constraints related to: minimum and maximum boiler load gradient, minimum boiler size, Shrinking and Swelling and Steam Space Load have been dened. For dening the constraints related to the required boiler volume a dynamic model for simulating the boiler...... performance has been developed. Outputs from the simulations are shrinking and swelling of water level in the drum during for example a start-up of the boiler, these gures combined with the requirements with respect to allowable water level uctuations in the drum denes the requirements with respect to drum...... size. The model has been formulated with a specied building-up of the pressure during the start-up of the plant, i.e. the steam production during start-up of the boiler is output from the model. The steam outputs together with requirements with respect to steam space load have been utilized to dene...

  4. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sixie; Zhou, Caizhi

    2017-08-01

    Nanoindentation is a hardness test method applied to small volumes of material which can provide some unique effects and spark many related research activities. To fully understand the phenomena observed during nanoindentation tests, modeling and simulation methods have been developed to predict the mechanical response of materials during nanoindentation. However, challenges remain with those computational approaches, because of their length scale, predictive capability, and accuracy. This article reviews recent progress and challenges for modeling and simulation of nanoindentation, including an overview of molecular dynamics, the quasicontinuum method, discrete dislocation dynamics, and the crystal plasticity finite element method, and discusses how to integrate multiscale modeling approaches seamlessly with experimental studies to understand the length-scale effects and microstructure evolution during nanoindentation tests, creating a unique opportunity to establish new calibration procedures for the nanoindentation technique.

  5. Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Glimm; Xiaolin Li

    2006-01-10

    Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.

  6. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  7. Animal models for simulating weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, E.; Wronski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    NASA has developed a rat model to simulate on earth some aspects of the weightlessness alterations experienced in space, i.e., unloading and fluid shifts. Comparison of data collected from space flight and from the head-down rat suspension model suggests that this model system reproduces many of the physiological alterations induced by space flight. Data from various versions of the rat model are virtually identical for the same parameters; thus, modifications of the model for acute, chronic, or metabolic studies do not alter the results as long as the critical components of the model are maintained, i.e., a cephalad shift of fluids and/or unloading of the rear limbs.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of free and forced BSA adsorption on a hydrophobic graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2011-11-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto a hydrophobic graphite surface is studied using molecular-dynamics simulation. In addition to the free, that is, unsteered, adsorption, we also investigate forced adsorption, in which the action of an AFM tip pushing the protein with constant force to the surface is modeled. Using an implicit inviscid water model, the adsorption dynamics and energetics are monitored for two different initial protein orientations toward the surface. In all cases, we find that the protein partially unfolds and spreads on the surface. The spreading is in agreement with the well-known high biocompatibility of graphite-based implants. The denaturation is, however, greatly enhanced in the case of forced adsorption. We follow the position of the so-called lipid-binding pocket found in subdomain IIIA (Sudlow site II) during adsorption and find that it is tilted and moved toward the graphite surface in all cases, in agreement with its hydrophobic character. The relevance of our findings for the common measurement procedure of studying protein adhesion using AFM experiments is discussed.

  9. Steady Thermal Field Simulation of Forced Air-cooled Column-type Air-core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qiu; LI Zhenbiao; YIN Xiaogen; YUAN Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the steady thermal field of the column-type air-core reactor,and further analyzing its distribution regularity,will help optimizing reactor design as well as improving its quality.The operation mechanism and inner insulation structure of a novel current limiting column-type air-core reactor is introduced in this paper.The finite element model of five encapsulation forced air-cooled column type air-core reactor is constructed using Fluent.Most importantly,this paper present a new method that,the steady thermal field of reactor working under forced air-cooled condition is simulated without arbitrarily defining the convection heat transfer coefficient for the initial condition; The result of the thermal field distribution shows that,the maximum steady temperature rise of forced air-cooled columntype air-core reactor happens approximately 5% to its top.The law of temperature distribution indicates:In the 1/3part of the reactor to its bottom,the temperature will rise rapidly to the increasing of height,yet the gradient rate is gradually decreasing; In the 5 % part of the reactor to its top,the temperature will drop rapidly to the increasing of height; In the part between,the temperature will rise slowly to the increasing of height.The conclusion draws that more thermal withstand capacity should be considered at the 5 % part of the reactor to its top to achieve optimal design solution.

  10. Simulating the amplification of orbital forcing by ocean feedbacks in the last glaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodri, M; Leclainche, Y; Ramstein, G; Braconnot, P; Marti, O; Cortijo, E

    2001-03-29

    According to Milankovitch theory, the lower summer insolation at high latitudes about 115,000 years ago allowed winter snow to persist throughout summer, leading to ice-sheet build-up and glaciation. But attempts to simulate the last glaciation using global atmospheric models have failed to produce this outcome when forced by insolation changes only. These results point towards the importance of feedback effects-for example, through changes in vegetation or the ocean circulation-for the amplification of solar forcing. Here we present a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model of the last glaciation that produces a build-up of perennial snow cover at known locations of ice sheets during this period. We show that ocean feedbacks lead to a cooling of the high northern latitudes, along with an increase in atmospheric moisture transport from the Equator to the poles. These changes agree with available geological data and, together, they lead to an increased delivery of snow to high northern latitudes. The mechanism we present explains the onset of glaciation-which would be amplified by changes in vegetation-in response to weak orbital forcing.

  11. Continuous surface force based lattice Boltzmann equation method for simulating thermocapillary flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Lin; Zhai, Qinglan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we extend a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with continuous surface fore (CSF) to simulate thermocapillary flows. The model is designed on our previous CSF LBE for athermal two phase flow, in which the interfacial tension forces and the Marangoni stresses as the results of the interface interactions between different phases are described by a conception of CSF. In this model, the sharp interfaces between different phases are separated by a narrow transition layers, and the kinetics and morphology evolution of phase separation would be characterized by an order parameter visa Cahn-Hilliard equation which is solved in the frame work of LBE. The scalar convection-diffusion equation for temperature field is also solved by thermal LBE. The models are validated by thermal two layered Poiseuille flow, and a two superimposed planar fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers for the thermocapillary driven convection, which have analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature. Then ...

  12. Point Defects in Carbon Nanotubes: ab initio and Force-Fields Based Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Jaap; Pietrucci, Fabio; Curioni, Alessandro; Andreoni, Wanda

    2014-03-01

    We present an extended investigation of point defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their effects on mechanical and electronic properties. This study is based on large-scale calculations using DFT with exchange and correlation functionals of the GGA - including empirical corrections for van-der-Waals interactions - and of the hybrid type. Additional simulations using classical interatomic potentials allow us to obtain a critical comparison between the outcome of DFT and force-fields. The CNT models adopted have a range of sizes and chiralities. In particular, (i) our simulations of oxygen chemisorption revealed a tendency to clustering and the existence of kinetic traps (epoxides), which explain STS data; (ii) the extension to oxygen isovalent species on CNTs and other graphitic surfaces has suggested a simple predictive model for the chemisorption pattern. Moreover, (iii) our analysis shows an intrinsic difficulty of available force fields to account for the energetics of vacancies and adsorption site preferences. Additional results aiming at characterizing the interaction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with the CNT surface will also be presented. Work supported by SNSF Nano-Tera.ch and CSCS.

  13. Simulation Tool for Inventory Models: SIMIN

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiksha Saxen; Tulsi Kushwaha

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated simulation optimization model for the inventory system is developed. An effective algorithm is developed to evaluate and analyze the back-end stored simulation results. This paper proposes simulation tool SIMIN (Inventory Simulation) to simulate inventory models. SIMIN is a tool which simulates and compares the results of different inventory models. To overcome various practical restrictive assumptions, SIMIN provides values for a number of performance measurement...

  14. Comparison of simulation and experiment on levitation force between GdBCO bulk superconductor and superconducting magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, S., E-mail: satoshi@sum.sd.keio.ac.j [Department of System Design Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Nagashima, K.; Seino, H. [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari-cho, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Murakami, T.; Sawa, K. [Department of System Design Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    High temperature bulk superconductors have significant potential for various engineering applications such as a flywheel energy storage system. This system is expected to decrease the energy loss by using bulk superconductors for the bearing. Recently, the authors have developed a new superconducting magnet to realize large levitation force. In this system, the axial component of magnetic field is canceled each other but the radial component of magnetic field expects to be enhanced. Thus, it was expected that the large levitation force can be realized and its time relaxation will be decreased. And in the previous paper, the levitation force and its time relaxation were measured under the various conditions by using this new magnet. But it is difficult to consider what phenomenon has happened in the bulk from only experimental results. In addition the quantitative evaluation cannot be done only by the experimental results, for example, the influence of the magnetic field penetration and magnetic distribution around a bulk superconductor on the maximum force and so on. Thus, in this paper, the authors simulated the levitation force of bulk superconductor by using ELF/MAGIC, which is a three-dimensional electromagnetic analytical software. In the simulation the bulk was considered as a rigid body and the simulation was executed under the same conditions and model with the experiment. The distribution of magnetic field and the levitation force were obtained and discussed.

  15. An Analysis of Biomolecular Force Fields for Simulations of Polyglutamine in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluitt, Aaron M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) peptides are a useful model system for biophysical studies of protein folding and aggregation, both for their intriguing aggregation properties and their own relevance to human disease. The genetic expansion of a polyQ tract triggers the formation of amyloid aggregates associated with nine neurodegenerative diseases. Several clearly identifiable and separable factors, notably the length of the polyQ tract, influence the mechanism of aggregation, its associated kinetics, and the ensemble of structures formed. Atomistic simulations are well positioned to answer open questions regarding the thermodynamics and kinetics of polyQ folding and aggregation. The additional, explicit representation of water permits deeper investigation of the role of solvent dynamics, and it permits a direct comparison of simulation results with infrared spectroscopy experiments. The generation of meaningful simulation results hinges on satisfying two essential criteria: achieving sufficient conformational sampling to draw statistically valid conclusions, and accurately reproducing the intermolecular forces that govern system structure and dynamics. In this work, we examine the ability of 12 biomolecular force fields to reproduce the properties of a simple, 30-residue polyQ peptide (Q30) in explicit water. In addition to secondary and tertiary structure, we consider generic structural properties of polymers that provide additional dimensions for analysis of the highly degenerate disordered states of the molecule. We find that the 12 force fields produce a wide range of predictions. We identify AMBER ff99SB, AMBER ff99SB*, and OPLS-AA/L to be most suitable for studies of polyQ folding and aggregation.

  16. Evacuation in the Social Force Model is not stationary

    CERN Document Server

    Gawroński, P; Kämpf, M; Kantelhardt, J W

    2011-01-01

    An evacuation process is simulated within the Social Force Model. Thousand pedestrians are leaving a room by one exit. We investigate the stationarity of the distribution of time lags between instants when two successive pedestrians cross the exit. The exponential tail of the distribution is shown to gradually vanish. Taking fluctuations apart, the time lags decrease in time till there are only about 50 pedestrians in the room, then they start to increase. This suggests that at the last stage the flow is laminar. In the first stage, clogging events slow the evacuation down. As they are more likely for larger crowds, the flow is not stationary. The data are investigated with detrended fluctuation analysis.

  17. Flow in complex domains simulated by Dissipative Particle Dynamics driven by geometry-specific body-forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Alireza; Deng, Mingge; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how the quality of simulations by Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) of flows in complex geometries is greatly enhanced when driven by body forces suitably tailored to the geometry. In practice, the body force fields are most conveniently chosen to be the pressure gradient of the corresponding Navier-Stokes (N-S) flow. In the first of three examples, the driving-force required to yield a stagnation-point flow is derived from the pressure field of the potential flow for a lattice of counter-rotating line vortices. Such a lattice contains periodic squares bounded by streamlines with four vortices within them. Hence, the DPD simulation can be performed with periodic boundary conditions to demonstrate the value of a non-uniform driving-force without the need to model real boundaries. The second example is an irregular geometry consisting of a 2D rectangular cavity on one side of an otherwise uniform channel. The Navier-Stokes pressure field for the same geometry is obtained numerically, and its interpolated gradient is then employed as the driving-force for the DPD simulation. Finally, we present a third example, where the proposed method is applied to a complex 3D geometry of an asymmetric constriction. It is shown that in each case the DPD simulations closely reproduce the Navier-Stokes solutions. Convergence rates are found to be much superior to alternative methods; in addition, the range of convergence with respect to Reynolds number and Mach number is greatly extended.

  18. Classical force field for hydrofluorocarbon molecular simulations. Application to the study of gas solubility in poly(vinylidene fluoride).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachet, V; Teuler, J-M; Rousseau, B

    2015-01-08

    A classical all-atoms force field for molecular simulations of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) has been developed. Lennard-Jones force centers plus point charges are used to represent dispersion-repulsion and electrostatic interactions. Parametrization of this force field has been performed iteratively using three target properties of pentafluorobutane: the quantum energy of an isolated molecule, the dielectric constant in the liquid phase, and the compressed liquid density. The accuracy and transferability of this new force field has been demonstrated through the simulation of different thermophysical properties of several fluorinated compounds, showing significant improvements compared to existing models. This new force field has been applied to study solubilities of several gases in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) above the melting temperature of this polymer. The solubility of CH4, CO2, H2S, H2, N2, O2, and H2O at infinite dilution has been computed using test particle insertions in the course of a NpT hybrid Monte Carlo simulation. For CH4, CO2, and their mixtures, some calculations beyond the Henry regime have also been performed using hybrid Monte Carlo simulations in the osmotic ensemble, allowing both swelling and solubility determination. An ideal mixing behavior is observed, with identical solubility coefficients in the mixtures and in pure gas systems.

  19. A New Method of Comparing Forcing Agents in Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; MacMartin, Douglas; Rasch, Philip J.; Jarvis, Andrew

    2015-10-14

    We describe a new method of comparing different climate forcing agents (e.g., CO2, CH4, and solar irradiance) that avoids many of the ambiguities introduced by temperature-related climate feedbacks. This is achieved by introducing an explicit feedback loop external to the climate model that adjusts one forcing agent to balance another while keeping global mean surface temperature constant. Compared to current approaches, this method has two main advantages: (i) the need to define radiative forcing is bypassed and (ii) by maintaining roughly constant global mean temperature, the effects of state dependence on internal feedback strengths are minimized. We demonstrate this approach for several different forcing agents and derive the relationships between these forcing agents in two climate models; comparisons between forcing agents are highly linear in concordance with predicted functional forms. Transitivity of the relationships between the forcing agents appears to hold within a wide range of forcing. The relationships between the forcing agents obtained from this method are consistent across both models but differ from relationships that would be obtained from calculations of radiative forcing, highlighting the importance of controlling for surface temperature feedback effects when separating radiative forcing and climate response.

  20. Standard for Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    This NASA Technical Standard establishes uniform practices in modeling and simulation to ensure essential requirements are applied to the design, development, and use of models and simulations (MS), while ensuring acceptance criteria are defined by the program project and approved by the responsible Technical Authority. It also provides an approved set of requirements, recommendations, and criteria with which MS may be developed, accepted, and used in support of NASA activities. As the MS disciplines employed and application areas involved are broad, the common aspects of MS across all NASA activities are addressed. The discipline-specific details of a given MS should be obtained from relevant recommended practices. The primary purpose is to reduce the risks associated with MS-influenced decisions by ensuring the complete communication of the credibility of MS results.

  1. Collective Mission Simulation Capability for the Netherlands Armed Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmers, A.; Karelse, R.; Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Klomp, J.

    2010-01-01

    Military forces all over the world are transforming to adapt to the changed world politics. The application of the latest technology is key in this transformation process. Examples of operational changes are more expeditionary operations, joint and combined operations, information data management, a

  2. Force on Force Modeling with Formal Task Structures and Dynamic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    shared metrics and an executable integration architecture. • Generate a formal top-down mission specification for sample operating force organizations...in a simulation environment. The mission specification team applied best military judgement to specify required capability for collective tasks by

  3. CHARMM-GUI ligand reader and modeler for CHARMM force field generation of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonghoon; Lee, Jumin; Jo, Sunhwan; Brooks, Charles L; Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2017-06-05

    Reading ligand structures into any simulation program is often nontrivial and time consuming, especially when the force field parameters and/or structure files of the corresponding molecules are not available. To address this problem, we have developed Ligand Reader & Modeler in CHARMM-GUI. Users can upload ligand structure information in various forms (using PDB ID, ligand ID, SMILES, MOL/MOL2/SDF file, or PDB/mmCIF file), and the uploaded structure is displayed on a sketchpad for verification and further modification. Based on the displayed structure, Ligand Reader & Modeler generates the ligand force field parameters and necessary structure files by searching for the ligand in the CHARMM force field library or using the CHARMM general force field (CGenFF). In addition, users can define chemical substitution sites and draw substituents in each site on the sketchpad to generate a set of combinatorial structure files and corresponding force field parameters for throughput or alchemical free energy simulations. Finally, the output from Ligand Reader & Modeler can be used in other CHARMM-GUI modules to build a protein-ligand simulation system for all supported simulation programs, such as CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, GENESIS, LAMMPS, Desmond, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. Ligand Reader & Modeler is available as a functional module of CHARMM-GUI at http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/ligandrm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  5. Dynamic Modeling and Force-feedback Control of Haptic Device with Parallel Structure Based on Virtual Simulation%基于虚拟仿真的并联构型手控器动力学建模与力反馈控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭盛; 梁艺瀚; 王志群; 曲海波

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic modeling and control method is presented based on virtual simulation to achieve force-feedback operation of complicated haptic device with parallel structure. Firstly, the Maryland haptic device is analyzed and its mathe-matic model is established. And, a physical simulation model is built in SimMechanics environment, which can be amended and compensated directly according to the experimental environment and the calibration parameters. The driving results of the two models are contrasted, and the result shows that the revised simulation model has higher precision and can be used for dynamic control. Finally, a semi-physical simulation system is established according to control requirements, after designing the collision simulation module on the basis of the simulation model. And the experiment is accomplished about generating horizontal feedback force according to collision sign in operation process. The haptic device forces in the simulation and the experiment are consistent, which shows the feasibility and accuracy of the control method.%为了对结构复杂的并联构型手控器进行力反馈操作,提出一种基于虚拟仿真的动力学建模与控制方法。首先分析Maryland构型的手控器并建立其数学模型,同时在SimMechanics仿真环境下建立其物理仿真模型,其中仿真模型能够根据实验环境与标定参数直接进行修正补偿。通过对比两种模型的驱动结果,证实修正后的仿真模型精度更高,可应用于动力学控制。最后按控制需求,在仿真模型基础上设计碰撞模块,搭建出半实物仿真系统,完成了根据碰撞信号在操作过程中生成水平反馈力的实验。其中手控器的受力情况与系统的仿真结果一致,证实了控制方法的可行性和准确性。

  6. Mutable polyelectrolyte tube arrays: mesoscale modeling and lateral force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Steven W; Han, Lin; Ortiz, Christine; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-08-23

    In this study, the pH-dependent friction of layer-by-layer assemblies of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAH/PAA) are quantified for microtube array structures via experimental and simulated lateral force microscopy (LFM). A novel coarse-grain tube model is developed, utilizing a molecular dynamics (MD) framework with a Hertzian soft contact potential (such that F ∼ δ(3/2)) to allow the efficient dynamic simulation of 3D arrays consisting of hundreds of tubes at micrometer length scales. By quantitatively comparing experimental LFM and computational results, the coupling between geometry (tube spacing and swelling) and material properties (intrinsic stiffness) results in a transition from bending dominated deformation to bending combined with inter-tube contact, independent of material adhesion assumptions. Variation of tube spacing (and thus control of contact) can be used to exploit the normal and lateral resistance of the tube arrays as a function of pH (2.0/5.5), beyond the effect of areal tube density, with increased resistances (potential mutability) up to a factor of ∼60. This study provides a novel modeling platform to assess and design dynamic polyelectrolyte-based substrates/coatings with tailorable stimulus-responsive surface friction. Our results show that micro-geometry can be used alongside stimulus-responsive material changes to amplify and systematically tune mutability.

  7. Raytracing simulations of coupled dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Pace, Francesco; Moscardini, Lauro; Bacon, David; Crittenden, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Dark matter and dark energy are usually assumed to be independent, coupling only gravitationally. An extension to this simple picture is to model dark energy as a scalar field which is directly coupled to the cold dark matter fluid. Such a non-trivial coupling in the dark sector leads to a fifth force and a time-dependent dark matter particle mass. In this work we examine the impact that dark energy-dark matter couplings have on weak lensing statistics by constructing realistic simulated weak-lensing maps using raytracing techniques through a suite of N-body cosmological simulations. We construct maps for an array of different lensing quantities, covering a range of scales from a few arcminutes to several degrees. The concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model is compared to different coupled dark energy models, described either by an exponential scalar field potential (standard coupled dark energy scenario) or by a SUGRA potential (bouncing model). We analyse several statistical quantities, in particular the power spect...

  8. Vegetation Monitoring with Gaussian Processes and Latent Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Valls, Gustau; Svendsen, Daniel; Martino, Luca; Campos, Manuel; Luengo, David

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring vegetation by biophysical parameter retrieval from Earth observation data is a challenging problem, where machine learning is currently a key player. Neural networks, kernel methods, and Gaussian Process (GP) regression have excelled in parameter retrieval tasks at both local and global scales. GP regression is based on solid Bayesian statistics, yield efficient and accurate parameter estimates, and provides interesting advantages over competing machine learning approaches such as confidence intervals. However, GP models are hampered by lack of interpretability, that prevented the widespread adoption by a larger community. In this presentation we will summarize some of our latest developments to address this issue. We will review the main characteristics of GPs and their advantages in vegetation monitoring standard applications. Then, three advanced GP models will be introduced. First, we will derive sensitivity maps for the GP predictive function that allows us to obtain feature ranking from the model and to assess the influence of examples in the solution. Second, we will introduce a Joint GP (JGP) model that combines in situ measurements and simulated radiative transfer data in a single GP model. The JGP regression provides more sensible confidence intervals for the predictions, respects the physics of the underlying processes, and allows for transferability across time and space. Finally, a latent force model (LFM) for GP modeling that encodes ordinary differential equations to blend data-driven modeling and physical models of the system is presented. The LFM performs multi-output regression, adapts to the signal characteristics, is able to cope with missing data in the time series, and provides explicit latent functions that allow system analysis and evaluation. Empirical evidence of the performance of these models will be presented through illustrative examples.

  9. The Canadian Forces Recruitment/Attrition Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    implications of policies or actions can be simulated before decisions are made. In addition, decisions can be made with more information on the potential...total Erloa rt,tofa] bse rved strength Roll Up St renght simulation base loca idetaed / Account year strength Qrop,s,tosa,mila] (2) [rk~byr] backcast

  10. Non-monotonic resonance in a spatially forced Lengyel-Epstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haim, Lev [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Department of Oncology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Hagberg, Aric [Center for Nonlinear Studies, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Meron, Ehud [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus, Midreshet Ben-Gurion 84990 (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    We study resonant spatially periodic solutions of the Lengyel-Epstein model modified to describe the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction under spatially periodic illumination. Using multiple-scale analysis and numerical simulations, we obtain the stability ranges of 2:1 resonant solutions, i.e., solutions with wavenumbers that are exactly half of the forcing wavenumber. We show that the width of resonant wavenumber response is a non-monotonic function of the forcing strength, and diminishes to zero at sufficiently strong forcing. We further show that strong forcing may result in a π/2 phase shift of the resonant solutions, and argue that the nonequilibrium Ising-Bloch front bifurcation can be reversed. We attribute these behaviors to an inherent property of forcing by periodic illumination, namely, the increase of the mean spatial illumination as the forcing amplitude is increased.

  11. Understanding Social-Force Model in Psychological Principles of Collective Behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    To well understand crowd behavior, microscopic models have been developed in recent decades, in which an individual's behavioral/psychological status can be modeled and simulated. A well-known model is the social-force model innovated by physical scientists. This model has been widely accepted and mainly used in simulation of mass evacuation in the past decade. A problem, however, is that the testing results of the model were not explained in consistency with the social-psychological findings, resulting in misunderstanding of the model by social-psychologists. This paper will bridge the gap between psychological studies and physical explanation about this model. We interpret this physics-based model from a psychological perspective, clarifying that the model is consistent with psychological studies on stress and time-pressure. The simulation result of this model actually explicates how stress could improve or impair collective performance of crowd behaviors.

  12. Altering Kinetic Energy Entrainment in Large Eddy Simulations of Large Wind Farms Using Unconventional Wind Turbine Actuator Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire VerHulst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, horizontally periodic large eddy simulations (LES are utilized to study turbulent atmospheric boundary-layer flow over wind turbines in the far-downstream portion of a large wind farm where the wakes have merged and the flow is fully developed. In an attempt to increase power generation by enhancing the mean kinetic energy (MKE entrainment to the wind turbines, hypothetical synthetic forcing is applied to the flow at the turbine rotor locations. The synthetic forcing is not meant to represent any existing devices or control schemes, but rather acts as a proof of concept to inform future designs. The turbines are modeled using traditional actuator disks, and the unconventional synthetic forcing is applied in the vertical direction with the magnitude and direction dependent on the instantaneous velocity fluctuation at the rotor disk; in one set of LES meant to enhance the vertical entrainment of MKE, a downward force is prescribed in conjunction with a positive axial velocity fluctuation, whereas a negative axial velocity fluctuation results in an upward force. The magnitude of the forcing is proportional to the instantaneous thrust force with prefactors ranging from 0.1 to 1. The synthetic vertical forcing is found to have a significant effect on the power generated by the wind farm. Consistent with previous findings, the MKE flux to the level of the turbines is found to vary along with the total power produced by the wind turbine array. The reverse strategy of downward forcing of slow axial velocity flow is found to have almost no effect on the power output or entrainment. Several of the scenarios tested, e.g., where the vertical force is of similar magnitude to the horizontal thrust, would be very difficult to implement in practice, but the simulations serve the purpose of identifying trends and bounds on possible power increases from flow modifications through action at the turbine rotor.

  13. State-space model identification and feedback control of unsteady aerodynamic forces

    CERN Document Server

    Brunton, Steven L; Rowley, Clarence W

    2014-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic models are necessary to accurately simulate forces and develop feedback controllers for wings in agile motion; however, these models are often high dimensional or incompatible with modern control techniques. Recently, reduced-order unsteady aerodynamic models have been developed for a pitching and plunging airfoil by linearizing the discretized Navier-Stokes equation with lift-force output. In this work, we extend these reduced-order models to include multiple inputs (pitch, plunge, and surge) and explicit parameterization by the pitch-axis location, inspired by Theodorsen's model. Next, we investigate the na\\"{\\i}ve application of system identification techniques to input--output data and the resulting pitfalls, such as unstable or inaccurate models. Finally, robust feedback controllers are constructed based on these low-dimensional state-space models for simulations of a rigid flat plate at Reynolds number 100. Various controllers are implemented for models linearized at base angles of ...

  14. Design of a Combined Ballistic Simulator and Primer Force Experimental Fixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ARL-MR-0896 ●AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Design of a Combined Ballistic Simulator and Primer Force Experimental Fixture...SUBTITLE Design of a Combined Ballistic Simulator and Primer Force Experimental Fixture 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Contents List of Figures iv Acknowledgments v 1. Introduction 1 2. Background 1 3. Technical Approach 4 3.1 Hardware Design 4 3.2 Experimental Setup

  15. Interbilayer repulsion forces between tension-free lipid bilayers from simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, Y. G.; Aeffner, S.; Risselada, H. J.; Salditt, T.; Marrink, S. J.; Mueller, M.; Knecht, V.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report studies on biologically important intermembrane repulsion forces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental (osmotic stress) investigations of repulsion forces between 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers. We show that the repulsion between tension-

  16. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model (PF-SPH) and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the accuracy of the model under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, to demonstrate the capabilities and robustness of the model we use it to simulate flow of three fluids in a porous material.

  17. Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for multiphase flow: Surface tension and contact line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Panchenko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel formulation of the Pairwise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model and use it to simulate two- and three-phase flows in bounded domains. In the PF-SPH model, the Navier-Stokes equations are discretized with the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, and the Young-Laplace boundary condition at the fluid-fluid interface and the Young boundary condition at the fluid-fluid-solid interface are replaced with pairwise forces added into the Navier-Stokes equations. We derive a relationship between the parameters in the pairwise forces and the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we demonstrate the model's accuracy under static and dynamic conditions. Finally, we use the Pf-SPH model to simulate three phase flow in a porous medium.

  18. Combining simulations and solution experiments as a paradigm for RNA force field refinement

    CERN Document Server

    Cesari, Andrea; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational efforts have shown that the current potential energy models used in molecular dynamics are not accurate enough to describe the conformational ensemble of RNA oligomers and suggest that molecular dynamics should be complemented with experimental data. We here propose a scheme based on the maximum entropy principle to combine simulations with bulk experiments. In the proposed scheme the noise arising from both the measurements and the forward models used to back calculate the experimental observables is explicitly taken into account. The method is tested on RNA nucleosides and is then used to construct chemically consistent corrections to the Amber RNA force field that allow a large set of experimental data on nucleosides and dinucleosides to be correctly reproduced. The transferability of these corrections is assessed against independent data on tetranucleotides and displays a previously unreported agreement with experiments. This procedure can be applied to enforce multiple experimental d...

  19. Protein Simulations in Fluids: Coupling the OPEP Coarse-Grained Force Field with Hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2015-04-14

    A novel simulation framework that integrates the OPEP coarse-grained (CG) model for proteins with the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methodology to account for the fluid solvent at mesoscale level is presented. OPEP is a very efficient, water-free and electrostatic-free force field that reproduces at quasi-atomistic detail processes like peptide folding, structural rearrangements, and aggregation dynamics. The LB method is based on the kinetic description of the solvent in order to solve the fluid mechanics under a wide range of conditions, with the further advantage of being highly scalable on parallel architectures. The capabilities of the approach are presented, and it is shown that the strategy is effective in exploring the role of hydrodynamics on protein relaxation and peptide aggregation. The end result is a strategy for modeling systems of thousands of proteins, such as in the case of dense protein suspensions. The future perspectives of the multiscale approach are also discussed.

  20. Numerical simulation of greening effects for idealised roofs with regional climate forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Guenter [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie und Klimatologie

    2012-04-15

    A numerical model was used to simulate temperature distribution in and above an extensive green roof with a long term forcing adopted from a regional climate model. Time variations of temperature for different time scales ranging from days to decades have been calculated. The results are in good agreement with selected field experiments and generally reinforce the understanding prevailing in literature regarding temperature differences of green roofs compared to a concrete roof. Green roofs result in a significant reduction of daytime human heat load and an improvement of thermal comfort conditions, while during night-time a concrete roof favours low temperatures and a low number of minimum temperatures above 20 C (tropical nights). A future shift in seasonal precipitation would necessitate irrigation in the summer months to ensure the vitality of roof vegetation. An estimation of the amount of additional watering and the increased number of watering days per year is given. (orig.)

  1. The simulation of the half-dry stroke based on the force feedback technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chao; Hou, Zeng-xuan; Zheng, Shuan-zhu; Yang, Guang-qing

    2017-02-01

    A novel stroke simulation method of the Half-dry style of Chinese calligraphy based on the force feedback technology is proposed for the virtual painting. Firstly, according to the deformation of the brush when the force is exerted on it, the brush footprint between the brush and paper is calculated. The complete brush stroke is obtained by superimposing brush footprints along the painting direction, and the dynamic painting of the brush stroke is implemented. Then, we establish the half-dry texture databases and propose the concept of half-dry value by researching the main factors that affect the effects of the half-dry stroke. In the virtual painting, the half-dry texture is mapped into the stroke in real time according to the half-dry value and painting technique. A technique of texture blending based on the KM model is applied to avoid the seams while texture mapping. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the virtual painting system based on the force feedback technology. In this system, users can implement the painting in real time with a Phantom Desktop haptic device, which can effectively enhance reality to users.

  2. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Simulation Tools and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oplatková, Zuzana; Carvalho, Marco; Kisiel-Dorohinicki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The human capacity to abstract complex systems and phenomena into simplified models has played a critical role in the rapid evolution of our modern industrial processes and scientific research. As a science and an art, Modelling and Simulation have been one of the core enablers of this remarkable human trace, and have become a topic of great importance for researchers and practitioners. This book was created to compile some of the most recent concepts, advances, challenges and ideas associated with Intelligent Modelling and Simulation frameworks, tools and applications. The first chapter discusses the important aspects of a human interaction and the correct interpretation of results during simulations. The second chapter gets to the heart of the analysis of entrepreneurship by means of agent-based modelling and simulations. The following three chapters bring together the central theme of simulation frameworks, first describing an agent-based simulation framework, then a simulator for electrical machines, and...

  3. Verifying and Validating Simulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    This presentation is a high-level discussion of the Verification and Validation (V&V) of computational models. Definitions of V&V are given to emphasize that “validation” is never performed in a vacuum; it accounts, instead, for the current state-of-knowledge in the discipline considered. In particular comparisons between physical measurements and numerical predictions should account for their respective sources of uncertainty. The differences between error (bias), aleatoric uncertainty (randomness) and epistemic uncertainty (ignorance, lack-of- knowledge) are briefly discussed. Four types of uncertainty in physics and engineering are discussed: 1) experimental variability, 2) variability and randomness, 3) numerical uncertainty and 4) model-form uncertainty. Statistical sampling methods are available to propagate, and analyze, variability and randomness. Numerical uncertainty originates from the truncation error introduced by the discretization of partial differential equations in time and space. Model-form uncertainty is introduced by assumptions often formulated to render a complex problem more tractable and amenable to modeling and simulation. The discussion concludes with high-level guidance to assess the “credibility” of numerical simulations, which stems from the level of rigor with which these various sources of uncertainty are assessed and quantified.

  4. Advanced model for the calculation of meshing forces in spur gear planetary transmissions

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias Santamaría, Miguel; Fernández del Rincón, Alfonso; Juan de Luna, Ana Magdalena de; Díez Ibarbia, Alberto; García Fernández, Pablo; Viadero Rueda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a planar spur gear planetary transmission model, describing in great detail aspects such as the geometric definition of geometric overlaps and the contact forces calculation, thus facilitating the reproducibility of results by fellow researchers. The planetary model is based on a mesh model already used by the authors in the study of external gear ordinary transmissions. The model has been improved and extended to allow for the internal meshing simulation, taking into cons...

  5. Rapid Calculation of Thermal Forces in Coarse Grained Simulation of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Fiore, Andrew; Donev, Aleksander; Balboa, Florencio

    2016-11-01

    In the presented work, we will demonstrate a spectrally accurate method for calculation of thermal forces in implicit solvent simulations of soft materials such as colloidal dispersions. For implicit solvent models, the stochastic forces must be drawn from a normal distribution whose covariance is a complicated function of the particle configuration. For a system of interacting N particles, drawing a single sample requires O (N3) operations, if numerically exact techniques from linear algebra are employed. So-called "fast" methods can approximate the sampling with roughly O (Nm logN) computational complexity, where m is a coefficient greater than one which depends on the configuration of the particles. The computational complexity of the presented approach is O (N(logN) d / (d + 3)) , where d is the fractal dimension of the particulate structures being modeled. Remarkably, this new approach adapts to the structure of the material under study by leveraging the algebraic structure of Ewald summation and balancing the computational effort spent evaluating near-field and far-field contributions to the hydrodynamic interactions among the suspended particles. Applications of this approach to modeling colloidal gelation and particulate suspensions will be discussed.

  6. Modeling and simulation of crushing process of spiral mining head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Yi-min; BU Ying-yong; TANG Pu-hua; ZHOU Zhi-jin; MA Zhi-guo

    2006-01-01

    According to the characteristics of spiral mining head for deep seabed cobalt-rich crust, the kinematic model, cutting loads model, quantity of cutting picks model of mining head, granularity distribution model and energy consumption model were constructed. Based on these models, computer simulation program of cutting loads was developed with VB software. The mechanical parameters of mining head were obtained in the cutting depth range of5 - 160 mm. Making use of the simulation results, the effect of cutting depth of spiral mining head on the mining process was studied. The results show that the maximum force of single pick is 4. 705 1 kN, the maximum force and 160 mm.

  7. Training Community Modeling and Simulation Business Plan: 2009 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    HLA user community • Develop Federate compliance test tools • Revise the HLA Object Model Template ( OMT ) • Update the Distributed Simulation...Ocean, Atmosphere, and Space Environmental Services OCONUS Outside of the Continental United States OFT Office of Force Transformation OMT Object

  8. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2004-01-01

    on the boiler) have been dened. Furthermore a number of constraints related to: minimum and maximum boiler load gradient, minimum boiler size, Shrinking and Swelling and Steam Space Load have been dened. For dening the constraints related to the required boiler volume a dynamic model for simulating the boiler...... size. The model has been formulated with a specied building-up of the pressure during the start-up of the plant, i.e. the steam production during start-up of the boiler is output from the model. The steam outputs together with requirements with respect to steam space load have been utilized to dene...... of the boiler is (with an acceptable accuracy) proportional with the volume of the boiler. For the dynamic operation capability a cost function penalizing limited dynamic operation capability and vise-versa has been dened. The main idea is that it by mean of the parameters in this function is possible to t its...

  9. Modelling toolkit for simulation of maglev devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Roche, J.; Badía-Majós, A.

    2017-01-01

    A stand-alone App1 has been developed, focused on obtaining information about relevant engineering properties of magnetic levitation systems. Our modelling toolkit provides real time simulations of 2D magneto-mechanical quantities for superconductor (SC)/permanent magnet structures. The source code is open and may be customised for a variety of configurations. Ultimately, it relies on the variational statement of the critical state model for the superconducting component and has been verified against experimental data for YBaCuO/NdFeB assemblies. On a quantitative basis, the values of the arising forces, induced superconducting currents, as well as a plot of the magnetic field lines are displayed upon selection of an arbitrary trajectory of the magnet in the vicinity of the SC. The stability issues related to the cooling process, as well as the maximum attainable forces for a given material and geometry are immediately observed. Due to the complexity of the problem, a strategy based on cluster computing, database compression, and real-time post-processing on the device has been implemented.

  10. Virtual-Wall Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Qian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A large number of molecules are usually required to model atomic walls in molecular dynamics simulations. A virtual-wall model is proposed in this study to describe fluid-wall molecular interactions, for reducing the computational time. The infinite repetition of unit cell structures within the atomic wall causes the periodicity of the force acting on a fluid molecule from the wall molecules. This force is first calculated and then stored in the memory. A fluid molecule appearing in the wall force field is subjected to the force from the wall molecules. The force can then be determined by the position of the molecule relative to the wall. This model avoids excessive calculations of fluid-wall interactions and reduces the computational time drastically. The time reduction is significant for small fluid density and channel height. The virtual-wall model is applied to Poiseuille and Couette flows, and to a flow in a channel with a rough surface. Results of the virtual and atomic wall simulations agree well with each other, thereby indicating the usefulness of the virtual-wall model. The appropriate bin size and cut-off radius in the virtual-wall model are also discussed.

  11. Accelerating Steered Molecular Dynamics: Toward Smaller Velocities in Forced Unfolding Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2016-03-08

    The simulation of forced unfolding experiments, in which proteins are pulled apart, is conventionally done using steered molecular dynamics. We present here a hybrid scheme in which accelerated molecular dynamics is used together with steered molecular dynamics. We show that the new scheme changes the force-distance curves mainly in the region around the force maximum and thus demonstrate that the improved equilibration of the protein-solvent system brought about by using accelerated molecular dynamics makes the simulation more comparable to experimental data.

  12. Model simulation of storm surge potential for Andaman islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, V.S.; RameshBabu, V.; Babu, M.T.; Dhinakaran, G.; Rajamanickam, G.V.

    ) for storm surge forecasting at the eastern coast of India. Flather (1994) has applied another analytical model of Holland (1980) for wind and pressure fields in the case of surge simulation, forced by April 1991 Bangladesh storm. The basic atmospheric... parameters remain the same in all the parameterization schemes of storm wind field. Storm Surge Model Storm surge operational models are in use for a long time for forecasting and warning of storm surge disasters bordering the coasts in the parts of northern...

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  14. Forced reptation revealed by chain pull-out simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulacu, Monica; van der Giessen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    We report computation results obtained from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of tensile disentanglement of connector chains placed at the interface between two polymer bulks. Each polymer chain (either belonging to the bulks or being a connector) is treated as a sequence of beads

  15. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  16. Uterine Contraction Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Belfore, Lee A.; Shen, Yuzhong; Scerbo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Building a training system for medical personnel to properly interpret fetal heart rate tracing requires developing accurate models that can relate various signal patterns to certain pathologies. In addition to modeling the fetal heart rate signal itself, the change of uterine pressure that bears strong relation to fetal heart rate and provides indications of maternal and fetal status should also be considered. In this work, we have developed a group of parametric models to simulate uterine contractions during labor and delivery. Through analysis of real patient records, we propose to model uterine contraction signals by three major components: regular contractions, impulsive noise caused by fetal movements, and low amplitude noise invoked by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus. The regular contractions are modeled by an asymmetric generalized Gaussian function and least squares estimation is used to compute the parameter values of the asymmetric generalized Gaussian function based on uterine contractions of real patients. Regular contractions are detected based on thresholding and derivative analysis of uterine contractions. Impulsive noise caused by fetal movements and low amplitude noise by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus are modeled by rational polynomial functions and Perlin noise, respectively. Experiment results show the synthesized uterine contractions can mimic the real uterine contractions realistically, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co$_{50}$Fe$_{50}$ elliptical nanomagnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N V S S SESHAGIRI RAO; V SATYA NARAYANA MURTHY; Y J V S RAMAKRISHNA SHARMA

    2016-06-01

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies and the simulation data showed the formation of single and vortex states depending on the thickness of nanomagnets.

  18. Modeling and Simulation Network Data Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    support, force capability, force composition , force requirements, mix assessment, system effectiveness, combat development, and model-test-model...each use of a hop on the waveform. User defined. 14.0 Message Dissemination Protocol ( MDP ) Sub-element defines MDP . 14.1 Name Name of the protocol...entry_code Always 1 (send to lower layer). The destination protocol (TCP, UDP, MDP ). 5 equip_id The destination protocol (TCP, UDP, MDP ). 6 intf_in_id

  19. Changes in the width of the tropical belt due to simple radiative forcing changes in the GeoMIP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Seidel, Dian J.; Birner, Thomas; Davis, Sean M.; Tilmes, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Model simulations of future climates predict a poleward expansion of subtropical arid climates at the edges of Earth's tropical belt, which would have significant environmental and societal impacts. This expansion may be related to the poleward shift of the Hadley cell edges, where subsidence stabilizes the atmosphere and suppresses precipitation. Understanding the primary drivers of tropical expansion is hampered by the myriad forcing agents in most model projections of future climate. While many previous studies have examined the response of idealized models to simplified climate forcings and the response of comprehensive climate models to more complex climate forcings, few have examined how comprehensive climate models respond to simplified climate forcings. To shed light on robust processes associated with tropical expansion, here we examine how the tropical belt width, as measured by the Hadley cell edges, responds to simplified forcings in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). The tropical belt expands in response to a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and contracts in response to a reduction in the solar constant, with a range of a factor of 3 in the response among nine models. Models with more surface warming and an overall stronger temperature response to quadrupled carbon dioxide exhibit greater tropical expansion, a robust result in spite of inter-model differences in the mean Hadley cell width, parameterizations, and numerical schemes. Under a scenario where the solar constant is reduced to offset an instantaneous quadrupling of carbon dioxide, the Hadley cells remain at their preindustrial width, despite the residual stratospheric cooling associated with elevated carbon dioxide levels. Quadrupled carbon dioxide produces greater tropical belt expansion in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere. This expansion is strongest in austral summer and autumn. Ozone depletion has been argued to cause

  20. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  1. Heinrich events modeled in transient glacial simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemen, Florian; Kapsch, Marie; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Heinrich events are among the most prominent events of climate variability recorded in proxies across the northern hemisphere. They are the archetype of ice sheet — climate interactions on millennial time scales. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms that cause Heinrich events are still under debate, and their climatic consequences are far from being fully understood. We address open questions by studying Heinrich events in a coupled ice sheet model (ISM) atmosphere-ocean-vegetation general circulation model (AOVGCM) framework, where this variability occurs as part of the model generated internal variability. The framework consists of a northern hemisphere setup of the modified Parallel Ice Sheet Model (mPISM) coupled to the global AOVGCM ECHAM5/MPIOM/LPJ. The simulations were performed fully coupled and with transient orbital and greenhouse gas forcing. They span from several millennia before the last glacial maximum into the deglaciation. To make these long simulations feasible, the atmosphere is accelerated by a factor of 10 relative to the other model components using a periodical-synchronous coupling technique. To disentangle effects of the Heinrich events and the deglaciation, we focus on the events occurring before the deglaciation. The modeled Heinrich events show a peak ice discharge of about 0.05 Sv and raise the sea level by 2.3 m on average. The resulting surface water freshening reduces the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and ocean heat release. The reduction in ocean heat release causes a sub-surface warming and decreases the air temperature and precipitation regionally and downstream into Eurasia. The surface elevation decrease of the ice sheet enhances moisture transport onto the ice sheet and thus increases precipitation over the Hudson Bay area, thereby accelerating the recovery after an event.

  2. Creep force modelling for rail traction vehicles based on the Fastsim algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Polach, Oldrich; Cole, Colin

    2013-11-01

    The evaluation of creep forces is a complex task and their calculation is a time-consuming process for multibody simulation (MBS). A methodology of creep forces modelling at large traction creepages has been proposed by Polach [Creep forces in simulations of traction vehicles running on adhesion limit. Wear. 2005;258:992-1000; Influence of locomotive tractive effort on the forces between wheel and rail. Veh Syst Dyn. 2001(Suppl);35:7-22] adapting his previously published algorithm [Polach O. A fast wheel-rail forces calculation computer code. Veh Syst Dyn. 1999(Suppl);33:728-739]. The most common method for creep force modelling used by software packages for MBS of running dynamics is the Fastsim algorithm by Kalker [A fast algorithm for the simplified theory of rolling contact. Veh Syst Dyn. 1982;11:1-13]. However, the Fastsim code has some limitations which do not allow modelling the creep force - creep characteristic in agreement with measurements for locomotives and other high-power traction vehicles, mainly for large traction creep at low-adhesion conditions. This paper describes a newly developed methodology based on a variable contact flexibility increasing with the ratio of the slip area to the area of adhesion. This variable contact flexibility is introduced in a modification of Kalker's code Fastsim by replacing the constant Kalker's reduction factor, widely used in MBS, by a variable reduction factor together with a slip-velocity-dependent friction coefficient decreasing with increasing global creepage. The proposed methodology is presented in this work and compared with measurements for different locomotives. The modification allows use of the well recognised Fastsim code for simulation of creep forces at large creepages in agreement with measurements without modifying the proven modelling methodology at small creepages.

  3. Threshold of the volcanic forcing that leads the El Niño-like warming in the last millennium: results from the ERIK simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Young-Gyu; Park, Jae-Hun; Park, Rokjin; Song, Chang-Keun

    2016-06-01

    In order to examine the threshold of the volcanic forcing that leads to the El Niño-like warming, we analyze a millennium ERIK simulation (AD 1000-1850) forced by three external forcings including greenhouse gases, solar forcing and volcanic eruptions using the ECHO-G coupled climate model. It is found that there exists a threshold of the volcanic forcing above 15 W/m2 to lead the El Niño-like warming in the climate model. When the volcanic forcing is above this threshold forcing, then the intensity of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is weakened and its position is shifted to the south. This might be associated with the processes of less evaporation in the subtropical cloudless region by a cooling due to the reduction of net surface shortwave radiation. Concurrently, a weakening of ITCZ is associated with a weakening of the trade winds and the subsequent Bjerknes feedback causes El Niño-like warming. Therefore, El Niño-like warming events can occur when volcanic eruption is above threshold forcing, implying that there exists a certain level of radiative forcing change which is capable of changing the state of tropical Pacific sea surface temperature. The last millennium simulation of Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Project Phase 3 climate models also indicates that there may exist a threshold forcing to lead the El Niño-like warming, which has been also discussed in the present study.

  4. Pedestrians’ behavior in emergency evacuation: Modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zheng, Jie-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Shuang; Zhang, Jian-Lin; Wang, Qiu-Zhen; Zhang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    The social force model has been widely used to simulate pedestrian evacuation by analyzing attractive, repulsive, driving, and fluctuating forces among pedestrians. Many researchers have improved its limitations in simulating behaviors of large-scale population. This study modifies the well-accepted social force model by considering the impacts of interaction among companions and further develops a comprehensive model by combining that with a multi-exit utility function. Then numerical simulations of evacuations based on the comprehensive model are implemented in the waiting hall of the Wulin Square Subway Station in Hangzhou, China. The results provide safety thresholds of pedestrian density and panic levels in different operation situations. In spite of the operation situation and the panic level, a larger friend-group size results in lower evacuation efficiency. Our study makes important contributions to building a comprehensive multi-exit social force model and to applying it to actual scenarios, which produces data to facilitate decision making in contingency plans and emergency treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 71471163).

  5. A Comparison of Force-Time History Analysis Methods for Simplified Aircraft Impact Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sangshup; Hahm, Daegi; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, by comparing the various F-T History analysis method, we are about to propose the most reliable simplified method under the same condition with M-T Interaction analysis method. To find the suitable loading area applied aircraft crash, the studies for a various loading area (Case 1, 2, 3) ware performed using F-T History analysis method, and the former results were compared to the result of Case 4 using M-T Interaction analysis method. The various results according to the proposed loading area were pointed out. Thus, the results for a simplified loading area applied impact load may be fairly sensitive to the assumption associated with loading area. Finally, we can conclude that the Case 3 shows conservative and the most similar results with realistic simulation using M-T Interaction analysis method, i. e., Case 4. The reaction force-time relationship for accidental strike of Boeing 707-320 aircraft against a rigid surface was proposed by Riera. After that, the aircraft impact analysis has been studied significantly in the last few decades. The only way to acquire an exact solution of the aircraft impact analysis is direct impact test. However, for the large commercial aircraft impact, this direct test has been hardly performed because the scale of aircraft and impacted wall is very huge. Up to date, the numerical simulation using Missile-Target (M-T) Interaction analysis method is known as the only way to obtain a relatively accurate solution. However, because of its massive computational efforts and modeling complexity, this method is inadequate and inefficient to the application of the fragility analysis and risk assessments which is required many times of iterative simulations. Thus, a more simplified and conservative analysis method is required. The simplified method such as Force-Time (F-T) History analysis method has been studied by Riera, Sugano et al., Mullapudi et al. and etc.

  6. Development of reactive force fields using ab initio molecular dynamics simulation minimally biased to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Arntsen, Christopher; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-10-01

    Incorporation of quantum mechanical electronic structure data is necessary to properly capture the physics of many chemical processes. Proton hopping in water, which involves rearrangement of chemical and hydrogen bonds, is one such example of an inherently quantum mechanical process. Standard ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods, however, do not yet accurately predict the structure of water and are therefore less than optimal for developing force fields. We have instead utilized a recently developed method which minimally biases AIMD simulations to match limited experimental data to develop novel multiscale reactive molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) force fields by using relative entropy minimization. In this paper, we present two new MS-RMD models using such a parameterization: one which employs water with harmonic internal vibrations and another which uses anharmonic water. We show that the newly developed MS-RMD models very closely reproduce the solvation structure of the hydrated excess proton in the target AIMD data. We also find that the use of anharmonic water increases proton hopping, thereby increasing the proton diffusion constant.

  7. Simulations of cardiovascular blood flow accounting for time dependent deformational forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters Randles, Amanda; Melchionna, Simone; Latt, Jonas; Succi, Sauro; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently the leading cause of death in the United States, and early detection is critical. Despite advances in imaging technology, 50% of these deaths occur suddenly and with no prior symptoms. The development and progression of coronary diseases such as atherosclerosis has been linked to prolonged areas of low endothelial shear stress (ESS); however, there is currently no way to measure ESS in vivo. We will present a patient specific fluid simulation that applies the Lattice Boltzmann equation to model the blood flow in the coronary arteries whose geometries are derived from computed tomography angiography data. Using large-scale supercomputers up to 294,912 processors, we can model a full heartbeat at the resolution of the red blood cells. We are investigating the time dependent deformational forces exerted on the arterial flows from the movement of the heart. The change in arterial curvature that occurs over a heartbeat has been shown to have significant impact on flow velocity and macroscopic quantities like shear stress. We will discuss a method for accounting for these resulting forces by casting them into a kinetic formalism via a Gauss-Hermite projection and their impact on ESS while maintaining the static geomtry obtained from CTA data.

  8. Applications of Joint Tactical Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING by Steve VanLandingham December 1997...SUBTITLE APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) VanLandingham, Steve 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...release; distribution is unlimited. APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING Steve VanLandingham Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S

  9. Method and Process for the Creation of Modeling and Simulation Tools for Human Crowd Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    measurements under controlled conditions. These methods and measures include motion capture of subjects in a laboratory environment to derive coefficients for...Experimentation, Empirical Data, Behavioral Models, Target Behavioral Response Laboratory, Crowds, Predictive Crowd Modeling, Motion Capture 16...MRAD – Handheld stand-off NLW operated by Control ForceSimulated Projectile Weapon • Simulated Handheld Directed Energy NLW (VDE) – Simulated

  10. Conservative and dissipative force field for simulation of coarse-grained alkane molecules: A bottom-up approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trément, Sébastien; Rousseau, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.rousseau@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie-Physique, UMR 8000 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Schnell, Benoît; Petitjean, Laurent; Couty, Marc [Manufacture Française des Pneumatiques MICHELIN, Centre de Ladoux, 23 place des Carmes, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2014-04-07

    We apply operational procedures available in the literature to the construction of coarse-grained conservative and friction forces for use in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The full procedure rely on a bottom-up approach: large molecular dynamics trajectories of n-pentane and n-decane modeled with an anisotropic united atom model serve as input for the force field generation. As a consequence, the coarse-grained model is expected to reproduce at least semi-quantitatively structural and dynamical properties of the underlying atomistic model. Two different coarse-graining levels are studied, corresponding to five and ten carbon atoms per DPD bead. The influence of the coarse-graining level on the generated force fields contributions, namely, the conservative and the friction part, is discussed. It is shown that the coarse-grained model of n-pentane correctly reproduces self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of real n-pentane, while the fully coarse-grained model for n-decane at ambient temperature over-predicts diffusion by a factor of 2. However, when the n-pentane coarse-grained model is used as a building block for larger molecule (e.g., n-decane as a two blobs model), a much better agreement with experimental data is obtained, suggesting that the force field constructed is transferable to large macro-molecular systems.

  11. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...... already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity. © IWA Publishing 2013....... and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work...

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Linear Nanomotor Driven by Thermophoretic Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    ,7,8,9 Nanomotors are an attractive goal for nanotechnology.9-13 Such nano-scale structures capable of converting thermal energy into work will be needed in many types of nanodevices, including nanoconveyors14, memory devices15 and nano-encapsulated material delivery systems16,17. Moreover to design and manufacture...... future molecular machines a complete understanding of the friction forces involved on the transport process at the molecular level have to be addressed.18 In this work we perform Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the MD package FASTTUBE19 to study a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial...... of the capsule is driven by thermophoresis we perform additional simulations in order to study the friction and thermophoretic forces acting on the inner CNT. In these simulations, we constrain the velocity of center of mass of the inner CNT and extract from the simulations the external forces required to drive...

  13. SWEEPOP a simulation model for Target Simulation Mode minesweeping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, H.E.; Beckers, A.L.D.; Cleophas, P.L.H.

    2005-01-01

    SWEEPOP is a flexible model that simulates the physical interaction between objects in a maritime underwater environment. The model was built to analyse the deployment and the performance of a Target Simulation Mode (TSM) minesweeping system for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) and to support its p

  14. cellGPU: Massively parallel simulations of dynamic vertex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Daniel M.

    2017-10-01

    Vertex models represent confluent tissue by polygonal or polyhedral tilings of space, with the individual cells interacting via force laws that depend on both the geometry of the cells and the topology of the tessellation. This dependence on the connectivity of the cellular network introduces several complications to performing molecular-dynamics-like simulations of vertex models, and in particular makes parallelizing the simulations difficult. cellGPU addresses this difficulty and lays the foundation for massively parallelized, GPU-based simulations of these models. This article discusses its implementation for a pair of two-dimensional models, and compares the typical performance that can be expected between running cellGPU entirely on the CPU versus its performance when running on a range of commercial and server-grade graphics cards. By implementing the calculation of topological changes and forces on cells in a highly parallelizable fashion, cellGPU enables researchers to simulate time- and length-scales previously inaccessible via existing single-threaded CPU implementations. Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/6j2cj29t3r.1 Licensing provisions: MIT Programming language: CUDA/C++ Nature of problem: Simulations of off-lattice "vertex models" of cells, in which the interaction forces depend on both the geometry and the topology of the cellular aggregate. Solution method: Highly parallelized GPU-accelerated dynamical simulations in which the force calculations and the topological features can be handled on either the CPU or GPU. Additional comments: The code is hosted at https://gitlab.com/dmsussman/cellGPU, with documentation additionally maintained at http://dmsussman.gitlab.io/cellGPUdocumentation

  15. Steered molecular dynamics simulations of a type IV pilus probe initial stages of a force-induced conformational transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Baker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Type IV pili are long, protein filaments built from a repeating subunit that protrudes from the surface of a wide variety of infectious bacteria. They are implicated in a vast array of functions, ranging from bacterial motility to microcolony formation to infection. One of the most well-studied type IV filaments is the gonococcal type IV pilus (GC-T4P from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea. Cryo-electron microscopy has been used to construct a model of this filament, offering insights into the structure of type IV pili. In addition, experiments have demonstrated that GC-T4P can withstand very large tension forces, and transition to a force-induced conformation. However, the details of force-generation, and the atomic-level characteristics of the force-induced conformation, are unknown. Here, steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulation was used to exert a force in silico on an 18 subunit segment of GC-T4P to address questions regarding the nature of the interactions that lead to the extraordinary strength of bacterial pili. SMD simulations revealed that the buried pilin α1 domains maintain hydrophobic contacts with one another within the core of the filament, leading to GC-T4P's structural stability. At the filament surface, gaps between pilin globular head domains in both the native and pulled states provide water accessible routes between the external environment and the interior of the filament, allowing water to access the pilin α1 domains as reported for VC-T4P in deuterium exchange experiments. Results were also compared to the experimentally observed force-induced conformation. In particular, an exposed amino acid sequence in the experimentally stretched filament was also found to become exposed during the SMD simulations, suggesting that initial stages of the force induced transition are well captured. Furthermore, a second sequence was shown to be initially hidden in the native filament and became exposed upon

  16. Climate Forcings and Climate Sensitivities Diagnosed from Coupled Climate Model Integrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, P M A F; Taylor, K E

    2006-07-25

    A simple technique is proposed for calculating global mean climate forcing from transient integrations of coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs). This 'climate forcing' differs from the conventionally defined radiative forcing as it includes semi-direct effects that account for certain short timescale responses in the troposphere. Firstly, we calculate a climate feedback term from reported values of 2 x CO{sub 2} radiative forcing and surface temperature time series from 70-year simulations by twenty AOGCMs. In these simulations carbon dioxide is increased by 1%/year. The derived climate feedback agrees well with values that we diagnose from equilibrium climate change experiments of slab-ocean versions of the same models. These climate feedback terms are associated with the fast, quasi-linear response of lapse rate, clouds, water vapor and albedo to global surface temperature changes. The importance of the feedbacks is gauged by their impact on the radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We find partial compensation between longwave and shortwave feedback terms that lessens the inter-model differences in the equilibrium climate sensitivity. There is also some indication that the AOGCMs overestimate the strength of the positive longwave feedback. These feedback terms are then used to infer the shortwave and longwave time series of climate forcing in 20th and 21st Century simulations in the AOGCMs. We validate the technique using conventionally calculated forcing time series from four AOGCMs. In these AOGCMs the shortwave and longwave climate forcings we diagnose agree with the conventional forcing time series within {approx}10%. The shortwave forcing time series exhibit order of magnitude variations between the AOGCMs, differences likely related to how both natural forcings and/or anthropogenic aerosol effects are included. There are also factor of two differences in the longwave climate forcing time series, which may indicate

  17. Stability of GOY Model Under Modulation of Periodic External Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying-Kui; CHEN Shi-Gang; WANG Guang-Rui

    2008-01-01

    There is a phase transition between quasi-periodic state and intermittent chaos in GOY model with a critical value δ0. When we add a modulated periodic external force to the system, the phase transition can also be found with a critical value δe. Due to coupling between the force and the intrinsic fluctuation of the velocity on shells in GOY model, the stability of the system has been changed, which results in the variation of the critical value. For proper intensity and period of the force, δe is unequal to δ0. The critical value is a nonlinear function of amplitude of the force, and the fluctuation of the velocity can resonate with the external force for certain period Te.

  18. Ripping RNA by Force using Gaussian Network Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-01-01

    Using force as a probe to map the folding landscapes of RNA molecules has become a reality thanks to major advances in single molecule pulling experiments. Although the unfolding pathways under tension are complicated to predict studies in the context of proteins have shown that topology plays is the major determinant of the unfolding landscapes. By building on this finding we study the responses of RNA molecules to force by adapting Gaussian network model (GNM) that represents RNAs using a bead-spring network with isotropic interactions. Cross-correlation matrices of residue fluctuations, which are analytically calculated using GNM even upon application of mechanical force, show distinct allosteric communication as RNAs rupture. The model is used to calculate the force-extension curves at full thermodynamic equilibrium, and the corresponding unfolding pathways of four RNA molecules subject to a quasi-statically increased force.Our study finds that the analysis using GNM captures qualitatively the unfolding p...

  19. A transient climate change simulation with greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing: projected climate to the twenty-first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, G.J.; Flato, G.; Ramsden, D. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The potential climatic consequences of increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentration and sulfate aerosol loading are investigated for the years 1900 to 2100 based on five simulations with the CCCma coupled climate model. The five simulations comprise a control experiment without change in GHG or aerosol amount, three independent simulations with increasing GHG and aerosol forcing, and a simulation with increasing GHG forcing only. Climate warming accelerates from the present with global mean temperatures simulated to increase by 1.7 C to the year 2050 and by a further 2.7 C by the year 2100. The warming is nonuniform as to hemisphere, season, and underlying surface. Changes in interannual variability of temperature show considerable structure and seasonal dependence. The effect of the comparatively localized negative radiative forcing associated with the aerosol is to retard and reduce the warming by about 0.9 C at 2050 and 1.2 C at 2100. Its primary effect on temperature is to counteract the global pattern of GHG-induced warming and only secondarily to affect local temperatures suggesting that the first order transient climate response of the system is determined by feedback processes and only secondarily by the local pattern of radiative forcing. The warming is accompanied by a more active hydrological cycle with increases in precipitation and evaporation rates that are delayed by comparison with temperature increases. There is an ''El Nino-like'' shift in precipitation and an overall increase in the interannual variability of precipitation. The effect of the aerosol forcing is again primarily to delay and counteract the GHG-induced increase. Decreases in soil moisture are common but regionally dependent and interannual variability changes show considerable structure. (orig.)

  20. A View on Future Building System Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetter, Michael

    2011-04-01

    This chapter presents what a future environment for building system modeling and simulation may look like. As buildings continue to require increased performance and better comfort, their energy and control systems are becoming more integrated and complex. We therefore focus in this chapter on the modeling, simulation and analysis of building energy and control systems. Such systems can be classified as heterogeneous systems because they involve multiple domains, such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, electrical systems, control systems and communication systems. Also, they typically involve multiple temporal and spatial scales, and their evolution can be described by coupled differential equations, discrete equations and events. Modeling and simulating such systems requires a higher level of abstraction and modularisation to manage the increased complexity compared to what is used in today's building simulation programs. Therefore, the trend towards more integrated building systems is likely to be a driving force for changing the status quo of today's building simulation programs. Thischapter discusses evolving modeling requirements and outlines a path toward a future environment for modeling and simulation of heterogeneous building systems.A range of topics that would require many additional pages of discussion has been omitted. Examples include computational fluid dynamics for air and particle flow in and around buildings, people movement, daylight simulation, uncertainty propagation and optimisation methods for building design and controls. For different discussions and perspectives on the future of building modeling and simulation, we refer to Sahlin (2000), Augenbroe (2001) and Malkawi and Augenbroe (2004).

  1. Techniques and Simulation Models in Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela GHEORGHE

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, the scientific approach of the research starts from the theoretical framework of the simulation concept and then continues in the setting of the practical reality, thus providing simulation models for a broad range of inherent risks specific to any organization and simulation of those models, using the informatics instrument @Risk (Palisade). The reason behind this research lies in the need for simulation models that will allow the person in charge with decision taking i...

  2. Dynamic simulation of viscoelastic soft tissue in acoustic radiation force creep imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) creep imaging applies step ARF excitation to induce creep displacement of soft tissue, and the corresponding time-dependent responses are used to estimate soft tissue viscoelasticity or its contrast. Single degree of freedom (SDF) and homogeneous analytical models have been used to characterize soft tissue viscoelasticity in ARF creep imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate the fundamental limitations of the commonly used SDF and homogeneous assumptions in ARF creep imaging. In this paper, finite element (FE) models are developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of viscoelastic soft tissue subjected to step ARF. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous models are studied with different soft tissue viscoelasticity and ARF configurations. The results indicate that the SDF model can provide good estimations for homogeneous soft tissue with high viscosity, but exhibits poor performance for low viscosity soft tissue. In addition, a smaller focal region of the ARF is desirable to reduce the estimation error with the SDF models. For heterogeneous media, the responses of the focal region are highly affected by the local heterogeneity, which results in deterioration of the effectiveness of the SDF and homogeneous simplifications.

  3. Effects of different regional climate model resolution and forcing scales on projected hydrologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pablo A.; Mizukami, Naoki; Ikeda, Kyoko; Clark, Martyn P.; Gutmann, Ethan D.; Arnold, Jeffrey R.; Brekke, Levi D.; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    2016-10-01

    We examine the effects of regional climate model (RCM) horizontal resolution and forcing scaling (i.e., spatial aggregation of meteorological datasets) on the portrayal of climate change impacts. Specifically, we assess how the above decisions affect: (i) historical simulation of signature measures of hydrologic behavior, and (ii) projected changes in terms of annual water balance and hydrologic signature measures. To this end, we conduct our study in three catchments located in the headwaters of the Colorado River basin. Meteorological forcings for current and a future climate projection are obtained at three spatial resolutions (4-, 12- and 36-km) from dynamical downscaling with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional climate model, and hydrologic changes are computed using four different hydrologic model structures. These projected changes are compared to those obtained from running hydrologic simulations with current and future 4-km WRF climate outputs re-scaled to 12- and 36-km. The results show that the horizontal resolution of WRF simulations heavily affects basin-averaged precipitation amounts, propagating into large differences in simulated signature measures across model structures. The implications of re-scaled forcing datasets on historical performance were primarily observed on simulated runoff seasonality. We also found that the effects of WRF grid resolution on projected changes in mean annual runoff and evapotranspiration may be larger than the effects of hydrologic model choice, which surpasses the effects from re-scaled forcings. Scaling effects on projected variations in hydrologic signature measures were found to be generally smaller than those coming from WRF resolution; however, forcing aggregation in many cases reversed the direction of projected changes in hydrologic behavior.

  4. Modelling force deployment from army intelligence using the transportation system capability (TRANSCAP) model : a standardized approach.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. F., Jr.; Love, R. J.; Macal, C. M.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2004-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) developed the transportation system capability (TRANSCAP) model to simulate the deployment of forces from Army bases, in collaboration with and under the sponsorship of the Military Transportation Management Command Transportation Engineering Agency (MTMCTEA). TRANSCAP's design separates its pre- and post-processing modules (developed in Java) from its simulation module (developed in MODSIM III). This paper describes TRANSCAP's modelling approach, emphasizing Argonne's highly detailed, object-oriented, multilanguage software design principles. Fundamental to these design principles is TRANSCAP's implementation of an improved method for standardizing the transmission of simulated data to output analysis tools and the implementation of three Army deployment/redeployment community standards, all of which are in the final phases of community acceptance. The first is the extensive hierarchy and object representation for transport simulations (EXHORT), which is a reusable, object-oriented deployment simulation source code framework of classes. The second and third are algorithms for rail deployment operations at a military base.

  5. A new model to simulate impact breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelli, Alessandro; Farinella, Paolo

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a preliminary version of a new type of code to simulate the outcomes of impacts between solid bodies, which we plan to further refine for application to both asteroid science and space debris studies. In the current code, colliding objects are modeled as two-dimensional arrays of finite elements, which can interact with each other in both an elastic and a shock-wave regime. The finite elements are hard spheres with a given value for mass and radius. When two of them come into contact the laws of inelastic scattering are applied, thus giving rise to the propagation of shock waves. Moreover each spherical element interacts elastically with its nearest neighbours. The interaction force corresponds to that of a spring having an equilibrium length equal to the lattice spacing, and results into the propagation of elastic waves in the lattice. Dissipation effects are modeled by means of a dissipative force term proportional to the relative velocity, with a given characteristic time of decay. The possible occurrence of fractures in the material is modeled by assuming that when the distance of two neighbouring elements exceeds a threshold value, the binding force between them disappears for ever. This model requires finding a plausible correspondence between the input parameters appearing in the equations of motion, and the physical properties of real solid materials. Some of the required links are quite obvious (e.g., the relationship between mass of the elements and elastic constant on one side, and material density and sound velocity on the other side), some others a priori are unclear, and additional hypotheses on them must be made (e.g., on the restitution coefficient of inelastic scattering). Despite the preliminary character of the model, we have obtained some interesting results, which appear to mimic in a realistic way the outcomes of actual impacts. For instance, we have observed the formation of craters and fractures, and (for high impact

  6. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  7. Molecular model for force production and transmission during vertebrate gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Katherine; Shook, David R; Chang, Chenbei; Keller, Ray; Skoglund, Paul

    2016-02-15

    Vertebrate embryos undergo dramatic shape changes at gastrulation that require locally produced and anisotropically applied forces, yet how these forces are produced and transmitted across tissues remains unclear. We show that depletion of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) levels in the embryo blocks force generation at gastrulation through two distinct mechanisms: destabilizing the myosin II (MII) hexameric complex and inhibiting MII contractility. Molecular dissection of these two mechanisms demonstrates that normal convergence force generation requires MII contractility and we identify a set of molecular phenotypes correlated with both this failure of convergence force generation in explants and of blastopore closure in whole embryos. These include reduced rates of actin movement, alterations in C-cadherin dynamics and a reduction in the number of polarized lamellipodia on intercalating cells. By examining the spatial relationship between C-cadherin and actomyosin we also find evidence for formation of transcellular linear arrays incorporating these proteins that could transmit mediolaterally oriented tensional forces. These data combine to suggest a multistep model to explain how cell intercalation can occur against a force gradient to generate axial extension forces. First, polarized lamellipodia extend mediolaterally and make new C-cadherin-based contacts with neighboring mesodermal cell bodies. Second, lamellipodial flow of actin coalesces into a tension-bearing, MII-contractility-dependent node-and-cable actin network in the cell body cortex. And third, this actomyosin network contracts to generate mediolateral convergence forces in the context of these transcellular arrays.

  8. An Updated Analytical Structural Pounding Force Model Based on Viscoelasticity of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qichao Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the summary of existing pounding force analytical models, an updated pounding force analysis method is proposed by introducing viscoelastic constitutive model and contact mechanics method. Traditional Kelvin viscoelastic pounding force model can be expanded to 3-parameter linear viscoelastic model by separating classic pounding model parameters into geometry parameters and viscoelastic material parameters. Two existing pounding examples, the poundings of steel-to-steel and concrete-to-concrete, are recalculated by utilizing the proposed method. Afterwards, the calculation results are compared with other pounding force models. The results show certain accuracy in proposed model. The relative normalized errors of steel-to-steel and concrete-to-concrete experiments are 19.8% and 12.5%, respectively. Furthermore, a steel-to-polymer pounding example is calculated, and the application of the proposed method in vibration control analysis for pounding tuned mass damper (TMD is simulated consequently. However, due to insufficient experiment details, the proposed model can only give a rough trend for both single pounding process and vibration control process. Regardless of the cheerful prospect, the study in this paper is only the first step of pounding force calculation. It still needs a more careful assessment of the model performance, especially in the presence of inelastic response.

  9. Numerical simulation of lava flow using a GPU SPH model

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio Rustico; Annamaria Vicari; Giuseppe Bilotta; Alexis Hérault; Ciro Del Negro

    2011-01-01

    A smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method for lava-flow modeling was implemented on a graphical processing unit (GPU) using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) developed by NVIDIA. This resulted in speed-ups of up to two orders of magnitude. The three-dimensional model can simulate lava flow on a real topography with free-surface, non- Newtonian fluids, and with phase change. The entire SPH code has three main components, neighbor list construction, force computation, an...

  10. Bridging experiments, models and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria; Burrage, Kevin; Rodríguez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Computational models in physiology often integrate functional and structural information from a large range of spatiotemporal scales from the ionic to the whole organ level. Their sophistication raises both expectations and skepticism concerning how computational methods can improve our understan...... that contributes to defining the specific aspects of cardiac electrophysiology the MSE system targets, rather than being only an external test, and that this is driven by advances in experimental and computational methods and the combination of both....... of biovariability; 2) testing and developing robust techniques and tools as a prerequisite to conducting physiological investigations; 3) defining and adopting standards to facilitate the interoperability of experiments, models, and simulations; 4) and understanding physiological validation as an iterative process...... understanding of living organisms and also how they can reduce, replace, and refine animal experiments. A fundamental requirement to fulfill these expectations and achieve the full potential of computational physiology is a clear understanding of what models represent and how they can be validated. The present...

  11. Radiative forcing by aerosols as derived from the AeroCom present-day and pre-industrial simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schulz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine different global models with detailed aerosol modules have independently produced instantaneous direct radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. The anthropogenic impact is derived from the difference of two model simulations with prescribed aerosol emissions, one for present-day and one for pre-industrial conditions. The difference in the solar energy budget at the top of the atmosphere (ToA yields a new harmonized estimate for the aerosol direct radiative forcing (RF under all-sky conditions. On a global annual basis RF is −0.22 Wm−2, ranging from +0.04 to −0.41 Wm−2, with a standard deviation of ±0.16 Wm−2. Anthropogenic nitrate and dust are not included in this estimate. No model shows a significant positive all-sky RF. The corresponding clear-sky RF is −0.68 Wm−2. The cloud-sky RF was derived based on all-sky and clear-sky RF and modelled cloud cover. It was significantly different from zero and ranged between −0.16 and +0.34 Wm−2. A sensitivity analysis shows that the total aerosol RF is influenced by considerable diversity in simulated residence times, mass extinction coefficients and most importantly forcing efficiencies (forcing per unit optical depth. The clear-sky forcing efficiency (forcing per unit optical depth has diversity comparable to that for the all-sky/ clear-sky forcing ratio. While the diversity in clear-sky forcing efficiency is impacted by factors such as aerosol absorption, size, and surface albedo, we can show that the all-sky/clear-sky forcing ratio is important because all-sky forcing estimates require proper representation of cloud fields and the correct relative altitude placement between absorbing aerosol and clouds. The analysis of the sulphate RF shows that long sulphate residence times are compensated by low mass extinction coefficients and vice versa. This is explained by more sulphate particle humidity growth and thus higher extinction in those models where short-lived sulphate

  12. LADEE Satellite Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael; Cannon, Howard; Frost, Chad

    2011-01-01

    As human activity on and around the Moon increases, so does the likelihood that our actions will have an impact on its atmosphere. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), a NASA satellite scheduled to launch in 2013, will orbit the Moon collecting composition, density, and time variability data to characterize the current state of the lunar atmosphere. LADEE will also test the concept of the "Modular Common Bus" spacecraft architecture, an effort to reduce both development time and cost by designing reusable, modular components for use in multiple missions with similar requirements. An important aspect of this design strategy is to both simulate the spacecraft and develop the flight code in Simulink, a block diagram-style programming language that allows easy algorithm visualization and performance testing. Before flight code can be tested, however, a realistic simulation of the satellite and its dynamics must be generated and validated. This includes all of the satellite control system components such as actuators used for force and torque generation and sensors used for inertial orientation reference. My primary responsibilities have included designing, integrating, and testing models for the LADEE thrusters, reaction wheels, star trackers, and rate gyroscopes.

  13. Climate forcings and climate sensitivities diagnosed from atmospheric global circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Bruce T. [Boston University, Department of Geography and Environment, Boston, MA (United States); Knight, Jeff R.; Ringer, Mark A. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); Deser, Clara; Phillips, Adam S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Yoon, Jin-Ho [University of Maryland, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites, Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, College Park, MD (United States); Cherchi, Annalisa [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, and Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Understanding the historical and future response of the global climate system to anthropogenic emissions of radiatively active atmospheric constituents has become a timely and compelling concern. At present, however, there are uncertainties in: the total radiative forcing associated with changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere; the effective forcing applied to the climate system resulting from a (temporary) reduction via ocean-heat uptake; and the strength of the climate feedbacks that subsequently modify this forcing. Here a set of analyses derived from atmospheric general circulation model simulations are used to estimate the effective and total radiative forcing of the observed climate system due to anthropogenic emissions over the last 50 years of the twentieth century. They are also used to estimate the sensitivity of the observed climate system to these emissions, as well as the expected change in global surface temperatures once the climate system returns to radiative equilibrium. Results indicate that estimates of the effective radiative forcing and total radiative forcing associated with historical anthropogenic emissions differ across models. In addition estimates of the historical sensitivity of the climate to these emissions differ across models. However, results suggest that the variations in climate sensitivity and total climate forcing are not independent, and that the two vary inversely with respect to one another. As such, expected equilibrium temperature changes, which are given by the product of the total radiative forcing and the climate sensitivity, are relatively constant between models, particularly in comparison to results in which the total radiative forcing is assumed constant. Implications of these results for projected future climate forcings and subsequent responses are also discussed. (orig.)

  14. Long term evolution of heat budget in the Mediterranean Sea from Med-CORDEX forced and coupled simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzallah, Ali; Jordà, Gabriel; Dubois, Clotilde; Sannino, Gianmaria; Carillo, Adriana; Li, Laurent; Arsouze, Thomas; Cavicchia, Leone; Beuvier, Jonathan; Akhtar, Naveed

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the Mediterranean Sea heat budget components from a set of forced and coupled simulations performed in the frame of the Med-CORDEX project. The simulations use regional climate system models (RCSMs) dedicated to the Mediterranean area and driven by the ERA40/ERA-Interim reanalyses. The study focuses on the period 1980-2010. Interannual variations of the average net heat flux at the sea surface are consistent among models but the spread in the mean values is large (from -4.8 to +2.2 Wm-2) with the coupled models showing the lowest heat loss from the sea. For the heat flux at the Strait of Gibraltar both interannual variations and mean values show a large intermodel spread. The basin average temperature shows positive trends with highest values in the coupled models; it also shows interannual variations that are in good agreement with observations. The heat content rate is calculated based on the derivative of the average temperature and is found to be significantly correlated for most models with the net heat flux at the sea surface (average correlation ~0.5) but not with the net heat flux through the Strait of Gibraltar (average correlation ~0.2), suggesting that in the considered RCSMs the interannual variability of the heat content rate is mainly driven by the surface heat fluxes. The resemblance between the simulated and observed heat content rates is stronger in the forced models than in the coupled ones. This is explained by the stronger constraint applied to the forced models by the use of the surface temperature relaxation to observations. The temperature of the outflowing water through the Strait of Gibraltar shows positive and significant trends, also higher in the coupled models. It is suggested that the Mediterranean Sea warming found in most models and in particular in the coupled ones, induces a change of the hydrographic conditions that affects the Strait of Gibraltar.

  15. Free energy simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and metadynamics on GPU platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Guohui

    2016-03-05

    The free energy calculation library PLUMED has been incorporated into the OpenMM simulation toolkit, with the purpose to perform enhanced sampling MD simulations using the AMOEBA polarizable force field on GPU platform. Two examples, (I) the free energy profile of water pair separation (II) alanine dipeptide dihedral angle free energy surface in explicit solvent, are provided here to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our implementation. The converged free energy profiles could be obtained within an affordable MD simulation time when the AMOEBA polarizable force field is employed. Moreover, the free energy surfaces estimated using the AMOEBA polarizable force field are in agreement with those calculated from experimental data and ab initio methods. Hence, the implementation in this work is reliable and would be utilized to study more complicated biological phenomena in both an accurate and efficient way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acoustofluidics: theory and simulation of radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is combined with numerical simulations to optimize designs and functionalities of acoustofluidic devices, i.e. microfluidic devices in which ultrasound waves are used to anipulate biological particles. The resonance frequencies and corresponding modes of the acoustic fields...... the largest possible acoustic powers are obtained in the microfluidic system, the time-averaged acoustic radiation force on single particles is determined. Schemes for in situ calibration of this force are presented and discussed....

  17. Numerical simulation of laminar jet-forced flow using lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LI; Ya-li DUAN; Yan GUO; Ru-xun LIU

    2009-01-01

    In the paper, a numerical study on symmetrical and asymmetrical laminar jet-forced flows is carried out by using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a special boundary treatment. The simulation results are in very good agreement with the available numerical prediction. It is shown that the LBM is a competitive method for the laminar jet-forced flow in terms of computational efficiency and stability.

  18. Gothic simulation of single-channel fuel heatup following a loss of forced flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X-Q; Tahir, A. [NSS, Dept. of Thermal Hydraulics Analysis, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Parlatan, Y. [Ontario Power Generation, NSATD, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Kwee, M. [Bruce Power, NSASD, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    GOTHIC v7.2 was used to develop a computer model for the simulation of 28- and 37-element fuel heat-up at a loss of forced flow. The model has accounted for the non-uniformity of both axial and radial power distributions along the fuel channel for a typical CANDU reactor. In addition, the model has also accounted for the fuel rods, end-fittings, feeders and headers. Experimental test conditions for both 28- and 37-element bundles at either low or high powers were used for model validation. GOTHIC predictions of the rod and/or pressure-tube temperatures at a variety of test locations were compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. It is found that the numerical results agree well with the experimental measurements for most of the test locations. Results have also shown that the channel venting time is sensitive to the initial temperature distribution in the feeders and headers. An imposed temperature asymmetry at the beginning will cause the channel flow to vent earlier. (author)

  19. Real-space phase-field simulation of piezoresponse force microscopy accounting for stray electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lun; Dayal, Kaushik

    2012-04-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is a powerful scanning-probe technique used to characterize important aspects of the microstructure in ferroelectrics. It has been widely applied to understand domain patterns, domain nucleation and the structure of domain walls. In this paper, we apply a real-space phase-field model to consistently simulate various PFM configurations. We model the PFM tip as a charged region that is external to the ferroelectric, and implement a boundary element method to efficiently and accurately account for the external stray fields that mediate the interactions between the tip and the ferroelectric. Our phase-field model and the solution method together are able to account for the electrical fields both within the specimen as well as those outside, and also consistently solve for the resulting electromechanical response with the same phase-field model. We apply this to various problems: first, the effect of crystal lattice orientation on the induced tip displacement and rotation; second, PFM scanning of a 90° domain wall that emerges at a free surface; third, the effect of closure domain microstructure on PFM response; fourth, the effect of surface modulations on PFM response; and fifth, the effect of surface charge compensation on PFM response.

  20. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Reischl, Bernhard; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L.; Nordlund, Kai; Lassila, Antti

    2017-03-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20-60 %rh. Force-distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation.

  1. Sensitivity of simulated circulation dynamics to the choice of surface wind forcing in the Japan/East Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick J.; Hurlburt, Harley E.

    2005-06-01

    The circulation sensitivity to the choice of wind-forcing product is investigated with the NRL Layered Ocean Model (NLOM) configured for the Japan/East Sea. Monthly climatologies from seven different wind-stress data sets (and wind-stress curl) are formed from observed and model-derived atmospheric data sets. The resulting maps of wind-stress curl reveal significantly different spatial patterns and magnitudes, even two with largely opposite large-scale patterns of wind-stress curl. These wind sets were used in forcing three sets of simulations, 1/8° linear and 1/8° and 1/32° nonlinear. In addition, seasonally varying straits forcing (inflow through Tsushima balanced by outflow through Tsugaru and Soya) was included in all the simulations, and simulations with straits forcing only were performed. The 1.5-layer linear reduced-gravity simulations include only the lowest order dynamics, mainly Munk β 1/3 western boundary layers (due to both wind and straits forcing) and a Sverdrup interior. The nonlinear simulations add bottom topography, multiple internal modes, diapycnal mixing, and ventilation of layer interfaces. At 1/8° resolution, only weak barotropic/baroclinic instabilities occur, but at 1/32° resolution these are much stronger, allowing vigorous transfer of energy from the upper ocean to the abyssal layer via baroclinic instability. This drives much stronger mean abyssal currents that more strongly steer upper-ocean current pathways than at 1/8°, i.e. there is much stronger upper ocean-topographical coupling. The linear model simulates most of the basic features, e.g., the subpolar gyre with all but the straits forcing only, the East Korean Warm Current (EKWC) and its connection to the subpolar front with all but one wind-forcing set, but the remaining wind set gives a continuous Nearshore Branch (NB) of the Tsushima Warm Current along the coast of Honshu. In all of the linear simulations with an EKWC, the separation latitude from the coast of Korea is

  2. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) Workflow: Initialization, Forcing and Multiscale Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Cheng, X.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Xiao, H.; Endo, S.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Toto, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is developing a routine large-eddy simulation (LES) modeling framework at the ARM Climate Research Facility sites, known as the "LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation" (LASSO) Workflow. The routine simulations will be assessed using comprehensive ARM observations of the atmosphere and land-surface states, particularly cloud observations. Since small changes in thermodynamic profiles can manifest large changes in cloud properties, successful simulations require careful initialization, appropriate forcing, and possibly suitable lateral boundary conditions. We use a multiscale data assimilation (MS-DA) system as a major methodology for producing forcing datasets required by the LES modeling. The MS-DA will be implemented in the regional Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a cloud resolving resolution (~1 km). MS-DA leverages existing reanalyses (e.g., the NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis, NARR) and operational forecasting products (e.g. the North American Mesoscale Forecast System, NAM; the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh, HRRR) products, and takes advantage of ARM observations to directly constrain the spectra of horizontal scales down to a few km. The analysis from the MS-DA allows deriving initial conditions and forcing datasets for a range of spatial and temporal scales, developing hydrometeor forcing, exploring time-varying boundary conditions, and diagnosing other needed thermodynamic variables. It is stressed that the datasets from the MS-DA are integrated with datasets from other sources to form ensembles to account for uncertainties. The methodologies, implementation and evaluations are presented.

  3. A Simple Analytical Model for Batoid Wake topology and Propulsive Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Y Alvarado, Pablo; Srivatsa, Karthik

    2013-11-01

    Batoids swim by forcing waves along their large pectoral fins. These waves determine the topology of the shed wakes and the resulting propulsive forces. An understanding of the relation between fin kinematics and wake topology is essential to control vehicles that use batoid-like fin propulsion. Simulations of the fluid-structure interactions during fin motions provide information of the changes in wake topology and the propulsive forces that result with variations in fin kinematics. However, simulations require computing power usually not available in mobile robots and cannot be used for real time control. An alternative is to develop simple qualitative models whose errors can be compensated by closed loop feedback controllers. Here we describe an analytical model that can be used to predict wake geometry and resulting propulsive forces in batoid-like fins. The model incorporates important fin kinematic parameters such as wave number, amplitude envelope, and flapping frequency. Dye flow visualization and particle image velocimetry along with force measurements confirm the model applicability to batoid-like fin propulsion. This work was funded in whole or in part by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF) through the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART).

  4. Modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for ver tical wheel on rotating table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongcai Zhang; Yuqiang Wu; Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the problem of modeling and adaptive motion/force tracking for a class of nonholonomic dy-namic systems with affine constraints (NDSAC): a vertical wheel on a rotating table. Prior to the development of tracking control er, the dynamic model of the wheel in question is derived in a meticu-lous manner. A continuously differentiable friction model is also considered in the modeling. By exploiting the inherent cascade interconnected structure of the wheel dynamics, an adaptive mo-tion/force tracking control er is presented guaranteeing that the trajectory tracking errors asymptotical y converge to zero while the contact force tracking errors can be made smal enough by tuning design parameters. Simulation results are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking methodology.

  5. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  6. A radial distribution function-based open boundary force model for multi-centered molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Neumann, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    We derive an expression for radial distribution function (RDF)-based open boundary forcing for molecules with multiple interaction sites. Due to the high-dimensionality of the molecule configuration space and missing rotational invariance, a computationally cheap, 1D approximation of the arising integral expressions as in the single-centered case is not possible anymore. We propose a simple, yet accurate model invoking standard molecule- and site-based RDFs to approximate the respective integral equation. The new open boundary force model is validated for ethane in different scenarios and shows very good agreement with data from periodic simulations. © World Scientific Publishing Company.

  7. A force-based model to reproduce stop-and-go waves in pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Stop-and-go waves in single-file movement are a phenomenon that is ob- served empirically in pedestrian dynamics. It manifests itself by the co-existence of two phases: moving and stopping pedestrians. We show analytically based on a simplified one-dimensional scenario that under some conditions the system can have instable homogeneous solutions. Hence, oscillations in the trajectories and in- stabilities emerge during simulations. To our knowledge there exists no force-based model which is collision- and oscillation-free and meanwhile can reproduce phase separation. We develop a new force-based model for pedestrian dynamics able to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenon of phase separation. We investigate analytically the stability condition of the model and define regimes of parameter values where phase separation can be observed. We show by means of simulations that the predefined conditions lead in fact to the expected behavior and validate our model with respect to empirical findings.

  8. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  9. The Model Intercomparison Project on the Climatic Response to Volcanic Forcing (VolMIP): Experimental Design and Forcing Input Data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  10. The Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP): experimental design and forcing input data for CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchettin, Davide; Khodri, Myriam; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Schmidt, Anja; Gerber, Edwin P.; Hegerl, Gabriele; Robock, Alan; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Ball, William T.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bekki, Slimane; Dhomse, Sandip S.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Mann, Graham W.; Marshall, Lauren; Mills, Michael; Marchand, Marion; Niemeier, Ulrike; Poulain, Virginie; Rozanov, Eugene; Rubino, Angelo; Stenke, Andrea; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Tummon, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer by volcanic eruptions induces a complex set of responses causing global and regional climate effects on a broad range of timescales. Uncertainties exist regarding the climatic response to strong volcanic forcing identified in coupled climate simulations that contributed to the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In order to better understand the sources of these model diversities, the Model Intercomparison Project on the climatic response to Volcanic forcing (VolMIP) has defined a coordinated set of idealized volcanic perturbation experiments to be carried out in alignment with the CMIP6 protocol. VolMIP provides a common stratospheric aerosol data set for each experiment to minimize differences in the applied volcanic forcing. It defines a set of initial conditions to assess how internal climate variability contributes to determining the response. VolMIP will assess to what extent volcanically forced responses of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system are robustly simulated by state-of-the-art coupled climate models and identify the causes that limit robust simulated behavior, especially differences in the treatment of physical processes. This paper illustrates the design of the idealized volcanic perturbation experiments in the VolMIP protocol and describes the common aerosol forcing input data sets to be used.

  11. Dynamic Modelling And Simulation Of Sit To Stand On Simmechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasım Serbest

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simulation of developed an inverse dynamics model to analysis of sit to stand which is the one of the essential tasks of daily function was carried out. The human body has been composed as a total of 6 rigid- open loop-body model consisted of a foot, a leg, a thigh, a trunk, an arm and a forearm using SimMechanics (2.7.1. Motion of the subject whose anthropometric properties transferred to the SimMechanics model has been viewed with a video camera to drive the joints. The reaction forces when the subject placed on reflective markers performs movements (standing from 20 cm, 40 cm and 50 cm height have been measured by the force plate. It has been benefited by codes created with MATLAB (7.6.0 to digitize monitored the two- dimensional movements. The calculated vertical ground reaction forces, as a result of the simulation of the inverse dynamics model on SimMechanics, have been compared with the measured vertical ground reaction forces and it has been observed the results are close to each other when the subject performs the movements. This study has been shown that SimMechanics was successful to analyse human movements. It is possible to perform different analysis thanks to its flexible structure of the model.

  12. Model resolution influence on simulated sea ice decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Sewall

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations and model predictions of recent and future Arctic sea ice decline have raised concerns over the timing and potential impacts of a seasonally ice-free Arctic Ocean. Model predictions of seasonally ice-free Arctic conditions are, however, highly variable. Here I present results from fourteen climate system models from the World Climate Research Programme's (WCRP's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3 multi-model dataset that indicate modeled Arctic sea ice sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO2 forcing is strongly correlated with ice/ocean model horizontal resolution. Based on coupled model analyses and ice only simulations with the Los Alamos National Lab sea ice model (CICE, the correlation between declining Arctic sea ice cover and ice/ocean model resolution appears to depend largely on ocean model resolution and its influence on ocean heat transport into the Arctic basin. The correlation between model resolution, northward ocean heat transport, and the degree of Arctic ice loss is independent of ice model physics and complexity. This not only illustrates one difficulty in using numerical models to accurately predict the timing and magnitude of Arctic sea ice decline under increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas forcing, but also highlights one area where improved simulation (of northward ocean heat transport could greatly decrease the uncertainties associated with predictions of future Arctic sea ice cover.

  13. Ground Contact Model for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Way, David

    2012-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST 2) has been successful in simulating the flight of launch vehicles and entry bodies on earth and other planets. POST 2 has been the primary simulation tool for the Entry Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of numerous Mars lander missions such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997, the twin Mars Exploration Rovers (MER-A and MER-B) in 2004, Mars Phoenix lander in 2007, and it is now the main trajectory simulation tool for Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. In all previous missions, the POST 2 simulation ended before ground impact, and a tool other than POST 2 simulated landing dynamics. It would be ideal for one tool to simulate the entire EDL sequence, thus avoiding errors that could be introduced by handing off position, velocity, or other fight parameters from one simulation to the other. The desire to have one continuous end-to-end simulation was the motivation for developing the ground interaction model in POST 2. Rover landing, including the detection of the postlanding state, is a very critical part of the MSL mission, as the EDL landing sequence continues for a few seconds after landing. The method explained in this paper illustrates how a simple ground force interaction model has been added to POST 2, which allows simulation of the entire EDL from atmospheric entry through touchdown.

  14. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A continuous tropospheric and stratospheric vertically resolved ozone time series, from 1850 to 2099, has been generated to be used as forcing in global climate models that do not include interactive chemistry. A multiple linear regression analysis of SAGE I+II satellite observations and polar ozonesonde measurements is used for the stratospheric zonal mean dataset during the well-observed period from 1979 to 2009. In addition to terms describing the mean annual cycle, the regression includes terms representing equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle variability. The EESC regression fit coefficients, together with pre-1979 EESC values, are used to extrapolate the stratospheric ozone time series backward to 1850. While a similar procedure could be used to extrapolate into the future, coupled chemistry climate model (CCM simulations indicate that future stratospheric ozone abundances are likely to be significantly affected by climate change, and capturing such effects through a regression model approach is not feasible. Therefore, the stratospheric ozone dataset is extended into the future (merged in 2009 with multi-model mean projections from 13 CCMs that performed a simulation until 2099 under the SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B greenhouse gas scenario and the A1 adjusted halogen scenario in the second round of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal-2 Activity. The stratospheric zonal mean ozone time series is merged with a three-dimensional tropospheric data set extracted from simulations of the past by two CCMs (CAM3.5 and PUCCINI and of the future by one CCM (CAM3.5. The future tropospheric ozone time series continues the historical CAM3.5 simulation until 2099 following the four different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. Generally good agreement is found between the historical segment of the ozone database and satellite observations, although it should be noted that total

  15. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A continuous tropospheric and stratospheric vertically resolved ozone time series, from 1850 to 2099, has been generated to be used as forcing in global climate models that do not include interactive chemistry. A multiple linear regression analysis of SAGE I+II satellite observations and polar ozonesonde measurements is used for the stratospheric zonal mean dataset during the well-observed period from 1979 to 2009. In addition to terms describing the mean annual cycle, the regression includes terms representing equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle variability. The EESC regression fit coefficients, together with pre-1979 EESC values, are used to extrapolate the stratospheric ozone time series backward to 1850. While a similar procedure could be used to extrapolate into the future, coupled chemistry climate model (CCM simulations indicate that future stratospheric ozone abundances are likely to be significantly affected by climate change, and capturing such effects through a regression model approach is not feasible. Therefore, the stratospheric ozone dataset is extended into the future (merged in 2009 with multi-model mean projections from 13 CCMs that performed a simulation until 2099 under the SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B greenhouse gas scenario and the A1 adjusted halogen scenario in the second round of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal-2 Activity. The stratospheric zonal mean ozone time series is merged with a three-dimensional tropospheric data set extracted from simulations of the past by two CCMs (CAM3.5 and GISS-PUCCINI and of the future by one CCM (CAM3.5. The future tropospheric ozone time series continues the historical CAM3.5 simulation until 2099 following the four different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. Generally good agreement is found between the historical segment of the ozone database and satellite observations, although it should be noted that

  16. The Effect of Varying Jaw-elevator Muscle Forces on a Finite Element Model of a Human Cranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analyses simulating masticatory system loading are increasingly undertaken in primates, hominin fossils and modern humans. Simplifications of models and loadcases are often required given the limits of data and technology. One such area of uncertainty concerns the forces applied to cranial models and their sensitivity to variations in these forces. We assessed the effect of varying force magnitudes among jaw-elevator muscles applied to a finite element model of a human cranium. The model was loaded to simulate incisor and molar bites using different combinations of muscle forces. Symmetric, asymmetric, homogeneous, and heterogeneous muscle activations were simulated by scaling maximal forces. The effects were compared with respect to strain distribution (i.e., modes of deformation) and magnitudes; bite forces and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces. Predicted modes of deformation, strain magnitudes and bite forces were directly proportional to total applied muscle force and relatively insensitive to the degree of heterogeneity of muscle activation. However, TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains decrease and increase on the balancing and working sides according to the degree of asymmetry of loading. These results indicate that when modes, rather than magnitudes, of facial deformation are of interest, errors in applied muscle forces have limited effects. However the degree of asymmetric loading does impact on TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains. These findings are of particular interest in relation to studies of skeletal and fossil material, where muscle data are not available and estimation of muscle forces from skeletal proxies is prone to error. Anat Rec, 299:828-839, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: a biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlman, Sarah J; Murray, Wendy M

    2013-03-15

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force production at the thumb-tip. We hypothesized that accurate representations of the axes of rotation of the thumb joints were necessary to simulate the magnitude of endpoint forces produced by human subjects. We augmented a musculoskeletal model with axes of rotation derived from experimental measurements (Holzbaur et al., 2005) by defining muscle-tendon paths and maximum isometric force-generating capacity for the five intrinsic muscles. We then evaluated if this augmented model replicated a broad range of experimental data from the literature and identified which parameters most influenced model performance. The simulated endpoint forces generated by the combined action of all thumb muscles in our model yielded comparable forces in magnitude to those produced by nonimpaired subjects. A series of 8 sets of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that the difference in the axes of rotation of the thumb joints between studies best explains the improved performance of our model relative to previous work. In addition, we demonstrate that the endpoint forces produced by individual muscles cannot be replicated with existing experimental data describing muscle moment arms.

  18. Study of deformation of droplet in external force field by using liquid-gas model of lattice-gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebihara, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Tadashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    The deformation of the droplet by the external force which is assumed to be gravity is studied by using the liquid-gas model of lattice-gas. Two types of liquid-gas models, one is the minimal model and the other is the maximal model, which are distinguished from each other by the added long-range interactions are used for the simulation of the droplet deformation. The difference of the droplet deformation between the maximal model and the minimal model was observed. While the droplet of the minimal model elongates in the direction of the external force, the droplet of the maximal model elongates in the perpendicular direction to the external force. Therefore the droplet deformation in the external force field of the maximal model is more similar to the droplet deformation which is observed in experiments than that of the minimal model. (author)

  19. Quantitative Verification of a Force-based Model for Pedestrian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas; Mackens, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatially continuous force-based model for simulating pedestrian dynamics. The main intention of this work is the quantitative description of pedestrian movement through bottlenecks and in corridors. Measurements of flow and density at bottlenecks will be presented and compared with empirical data. Furthermore the fundamental diagram for the movement in a corridor is reproduced. The results of the proposed model show a good agreement with empirical data.

  20. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: fromCanopy to Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2007-02-08

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions amongatmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys tounderstanding the water cycling system that supports our life system onearth. Properly modeling such interactionsis a difficult task because oftheinherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures amongsubsystems. In this paper, we present a model that simulates thelandsurface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing.This model combines a state of the art landsurface model, the NCARCommunity Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variablysaturatedgroundwater model, the TOUGH2, through an internal interfacethat includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels.Specifically, TOUGH2, in its simulation, uses infiltration, evaporation,and rootuptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms? CLM3, inits simulation, uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles,calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables. This new model, CLMT2,preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state of the artmodeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes from CLM3and the more realistic physical process based modeling capability ofsubsurface hydrologic processes from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulationresults show that the coupled model greatly improves the predictions ofthe water table, evapotranspiration, surface temperature, and moisture inthe top 20 cm of soil at a real watershed, as evaluated from 18 years ofobserved data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with anatmospheric simulation model, representing one of the first models thatare capable to simulate hydraulic processes from top of the atmosphere todeep ground.

  1. Double diffusivity model under stochastic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2017-05-01

    The "double diffusivity" model was proposed in the late 1970s, and reworked in the early 1980s, as a continuum counterpart to existing discrete models of diffusion corresponding to high diffusivity paths, such as grain boundaries and dislocation lines. It was later rejuvenated in the 1990s to interpret experimental results on diffusion in polycrystalline and nanocrystalline specimens where grain boundaries and triple grain boundary junctions act as high diffusivity paths. Technically, the model pans out as a system of coupled Fick-type diffusion equations to represent "regular" and "high" diffusivity paths with "source terms" accounting for the mass exchange between the two paths. The model remit was extended by analogy to describe flow in porous media with double porosity, as well as to model heat conduction in media with two nonequilibrium local temperature baths, e.g., ion and electron baths. Uncoupling of the two partial differential equations leads to a higher-ordered diffusion equation, solutions of which could be obtained in terms of classical diffusion equation solutions. Similar equations could also be derived within an "internal length" gradient (ILG) mechanics formulation applied to diffusion problems, i.e., by introducing nonlocal effects, together with inertia and viscosity, in a mechanics based formulation of diffusion theory. While being remarkably successful in studies related to various aspects of transport in inhomogeneous media with deterministic microstructures and nanostructures, its implications in the presence of stochasticity have not yet been considered. This issue becomes particularly important in the case of diffusion in nanopolycrystals whose deterministic ILG-based theoretical calculations predict a relaxation time that is only about one-tenth of the actual experimentally verified time scale. This article provides the "missing link" in this estimation by adding a vital element in the ILG structure, that of stochasticity, that takes into

  2. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Maurice; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2014-04-07

    This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King's classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied in isolation. The results of this study suggest that activation of superficial and deep muscles may be effective in reducing spinal curvature at low Cobb angles when muscle groups are selected for activation based on the curve type. The findings further suggest the potential for a hybrid treatment involving combined muscle activation and applied external forces at larger Cobb angles.

  3. Dynamic force spectroscopy on multiple bonds: experiments and model

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmann, T; Nassoy, P; Schwarz, U S

    2007-01-01

    We probe the dynamic strength of multiple biotin-streptavidin adhesion bonds under linear loading using the biomembrane force probe setup for dynamic force spectroscopy. Measured rupture force histograms are compared to results from a master equation model for the stochastic dynamics of bond rupture under load. This allows us to extract the distribution of the number of initially closed bonds. We also extract the molecular parameters of the adhesion bonds, in good agreement with earlier results from single bond experiments. Our analysis shows that the peaks in the measured histograms are not simple multiples of the single bond values, but follow from a superposition procedure which generates different peak positions.

  4. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... is given using an analytically solvable example, showing the explicit form of the force terms and highlighting the significance of the added mass and history term in certain fast switching valve applications. A general approximate model for arbitrary valve geometries is then proposed with offset...

  5. Validation of Hill-type muscle models in relation to neuromuscular recruitment and force-velocity properties: predicting patterns of in vivo muscle force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewener, Andrew A; Wakeling, James M; Lee, Sabrina S; Arnold, Allison S

    2014-12-01

    We review here the use and reliability of Hill-type muscle models to predict muscle performance under varying conditions, ranging from in situ production of isometric force to in vivo dynamics of muscle length change and force in response to activation. Muscle models are frequently used in musculoskeletal simulations of movement, particularly when applied to studies of human motor performance in which surgically implanted transducers have limited use. Musculoskeletal simulations of different animal species also are being developed to evaluate comparative and evolutionary aspects of locomotor performance. However, such models are rarely validated against direct measures of fascicle strain or recordings of muscle-tendon force. Historically, Hill-type models simplify properties of whole muscle by scaling salient properties of single fibers to whole muscles, typically accounting for a muscle's architecture and series elasticity. Activation of the model's single contractile element (assigned the properties of homogenous fibers) is also simplified and is often based on temporal features of myoelectric (EMG) activation recorded from the muscle. Comparison of standard one-element models with a novel two-element model and with in situ and in vivo measures of EMG, fascicle strain, and force recorded from the gastrocnemius muscles of goats shows that a two-element Hill-type model, which allows independent recruitment of slow and fast units, better predicts temporal patterns of in situ and in vivo force. Recruitment patterns of slow/fast units based on wavelet decomposition of EMG activity in frequency-time space are generally correlated with the intensity spectra of the EMG signals, the strain rates of the fascicles, and the muscle-tendon forces measured in vivo, with faster units linked to greater strain rates and to more rapid forces. Using direct measures of muscle performance to further test Hill-type models, whether traditional or more complex, remains critical for

  6. IMPLEMENTATION MODEL OF MOTOR TRACTION FORCE OF MAGLEV TRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Polyakov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Traction force implementation (TFI by the motor of magnetic levitation train (MLT occurs in the process of electric-to-kinetic energy transformation at interaction of inductor and armature magnetic fields. Ac-cordingly, the aim of this study is to obtain a correct description of such energy transformation. Methodology. At the present stage, a mathematical and, in particular, computer simulation is the main and most universal tool for analysis and synthesis of processes and systems. At the same time, radical advantages of this tool make the precision of selection of a particular research methodology even more important. It is especially important for such a large and complex system as MLT. Therefore the special attention in the work is given to the rationale for choosing the research paradigm selective features. Findings. The analysis results of existing TFI process model versions indicate that each of them has both advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, one of the main results of this study was the creation of a mathematical model for such process that would preserve the advantages of previous versions, but would be free from their disadvantages. The work provides rationale for application (for the purposes of research of train motor TFI of the integrative holistic paradigm, which assimilates the advantages of the theory of electric circuit and magnetic field. Originality. The priority of creation of such paradigm and corresponding version of FI model constitute the originality of the research. Practical value. The main manifestation of practical value of this research in the opportunity, in case of use of its results, for significant increase in efficiency of MLT dynamic studies, on the condition that their generalized costs will not rise.

  7. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Justin R. [Cornell University; Hencey, Brondon M. [Cornell University

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  8. Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Filipe, Joaquim; Kacprzyk, Janusz; Pina, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2012 International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications (SIMULTECH 2012) which was sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in Rome, Italy. SIMULTECH 2012 was technically co-sponsored by the Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS), GDR I3, Lionphant Simulation, Simulation Team and IFIP and held in cooperation with AIS Special Interest Group of Modeling and Simulation (AIS SIGMAS) and the Movimento Italiano Modellazione e Simulazione (MIMOS).

  9. An introduction to enterprise modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostic, J.K.; Cannon, C.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Modeling and Analysis Group

    1996-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to continuously improve productivity, quality, and efficiency of both industry and Department of Energy enterprises, Los Alamos National Laboratory is investigating various manufacturing and business enterprise simulation methods. A number of enterprise simulation software models are being developed to enable engineering analysis of enterprise activities. In this document the authors define the scope of enterprise modeling and simulation efforts, and review recent work in enterprise simulation at Los Alamos National Laboratory as well as at other industrial, academic, and research institutions. References of enterprise modeling and simulation methods and a glossary of enterprise-related terms are provided.

  10. Forces Mobilization Model (FORCEMOB): Unclassified Training Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    industrial output occur 6. Models the use of emergency investment to redress shortfalls; computes investment demand iv Table 1. FORCEMOB Input...use of emergency investment to redress shortfalls and compute emergency investment demand  This section will give a high level overview of how...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data

  11. Simulation on dissolute and dust dispersion in comprehensive mechanized heading face with forced-exhaust ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE Wen; CHENG Wei-min; HAN Li; ZHOU Sheng-ju; YU Yan-bin; ZHAO Shan-shan

    2011-01-01

    According to the characteristics of comprehensive mechanized heading face,established the mathematical model of single-phase air flow with k-e two equations model,and have established k-e-(O)-kp mathematic model to solve two-phase flow of gas and particles in dust space with eulefian-eulerian method and eulerian-lagrangian method.Numerical solution of gas-particle two-phase flow was put forward based on collocated grid SIMPLE algorithm.Moreover,numerical simulation of dust concentration in fully mechanized caving face was carried out by using Fluent software.Finally,when in forced-exhaust ventilation circumstance,drawer type fan drum have less dust absorption,and most of dust spread to the other site; the dust concentration is inversely proportional to the distance from tunneling head,and the dust concentration has already diffused to decrease below 102 mg/m3 at the position ofx=12 m.Dust are more focused on relative side(in the range about y from 0 to 2 meter) of roadway space of press-ventilated fan drum,especially between tunneling place and drawer type fan drum; the roadway with road header have a higher dust concentration.These conclusions provide reliable theory basis for the dust prevention in comprehensive mechanized heading face.

  12. Adapted nested force-gradient integrators for the Schwinger model

    CERN Document Server

    Shcherbakov, Dmitry; Günther, Michael; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Peardon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study a novel class of numerical integrators, the adapted nested force-gradient schemes, used within the molecular dynamics step of the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm. We test these methods in the Schwinger model on the lattice, a well known benchmark problem. We derive the analytical basis of nested force-gradient type methods and demonstrate the advantage of the proposed approach, namely reduced computational costs compared with other numerical integration schemes in HMC.

  13. Unified Model of Dynamic Forced Barrier Crossing in Single Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friddle, R W

    2007-06-21

    Thermally activated barrier crossing in the presence of an increasing load can reveal kinetic rate constants and energy barrier parameters when repeated over a range of loading rates. Here we derive a model of the mean escape force for all relevant loading rates--the complete force spectrum. Two well-known approximations emerge as limiting cases; one of which confirms predictions that single-barrier spectra should converge to a phenomenological description in the slow loading limit.

  14. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  15. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  16. Nonparametric Model of Smooth Muscle Force Production During Electrical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Marc; Eikenberry, Steffen; Kato, Takahide; Sandler, Roman A; Yamashiro, Stanley M; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z

    2017-03-01

    A nonparametric model of smooth muscle tension response to electrical stimulation was estimated using the Laguerre expansion technique of nonlinear system kernel estimation. The experimental data consisted of force responses of smooth muscle to energy-matched alternating single pulse and burst current stimuli. The burst stimuli led to at least a 10-fold increase in peak force in smooth muscle from Mytilus edulis, despite the constant energy constraint. A linear model did not fit the data. However, a second-order model fit the data accurately, so the higher-order models were not required to fit the data. Results showed that smooth muscle force response is not linearly related to the stimulation power.

  17. Influence of external climate forcing on coastal upwelling systems analysed in ensemble of past millennium climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim, Nele; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit; Yi, Xin; Emeis, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are highly productive coastal ocean areas where nutrient rich, cold water upwells by the action of favorable winds. Observations over the 20th century and ocean sediment records, which may be indicative of upwelling, display an intensification due to stronger external climate forcing, such as increasing greenhouse gas concentrations or changes in solar irradiance. This intensification is compatible with the hypothesis put forward by Bakun (1990) that a stronger external radiative forcing should lead to a more intense coastal upwelling. Here, we analyze ensemble of simulations covering the past millennium with the aim of identifying and quantifying the role of external climate forcing on upwelling in the major Eastern Boundary Upwelling System. We analyse the decadal variability and centennial trends of upwelling in ensemble of simulations with the global climate model MPI-ESM covering the past millennium, the last 150 years and the next 100 years. The future simulations were driven by three IPCC scenarios of concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, RCP2.5, RCP4.5 and RCP 8.5. For the past millennium and the last 150 years, coastal upwelling does not show any imprint of external forcing. This result indicates that chaotic internal variability has dominated upwelling intensity in major upwelling regions over the last thousand years and even since industrialisation up to present. For the 21st century, all ensemble members show a consistent and significant intensification of upwelling in the strongest scenario RCP8.5 for the Benguela upwelling region, consistent and significant weakening for Morocco and California, and no significant change for the Peruvian upwelling. Weaker scenarios do not produce consistent long-term trends that are replicated in all ensemble members. The results are confirmed by analysing another ensemble of past millennium simulations with the model CESM-CAM5 (Community Earth System Model

  18. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  19. Influence of external forcings on abrupt millennial-scale climate changes: a statistical modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Takahito; Crucifix, Michel

    2016-07-01

    The last glacial period was punctuated by a series of abrupt climate shifts, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. The frequency of DO events varied in time, supposedly because of changes in background climate conditions. Here, the influence of external forcings on DO events is investigated with statistical modelling. We assume two types of simple stochastic dynamical systems models (double-well potential-type and oscillator-type), forced by the northern hemisphere summer insolation change and/or the global ice volume change. The model parameters are estimated by using the maximum likelihood method with the NGRIP Ca^{2+} record. The stochastic oscillator model with at least the ice volume forcing reproduces well the sample autocorrelation function of the record and the frequency changes of warming transitions in the last glacial period across MISs 2, 3, and 4. The model performance is improved with the additional insolation forcing. The BIC scores also suggest that the ice volume forcing is relatively more important than the insolation forcing, though the strength of evidence depends on the model assumption. Finally, we simulate the average number of warming transitions in the past four glacial periods, assuming the model can be extended beyond the last glacial, and compare the result with an Iberian margin sea-surface temperature (SST) record (Martrat et al. in Science 317(5837): 502-507, 2007). The simulation result supports the previous observation that abrupt millennial-scale climate changes in the penultimate glacial (MIS 6) are less frequent than in the last glacial (MISs 2-4). On the other hand, it suggests that the number of abrupt millennial-scale climate changes in older glacial periods (MISs 6, 8, and 10) might be larger than inferred from the SST record.

  20. Flight Testing an Iced Business Jet for Flight Simulation Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Barnhart, Billy P.; Lee, Sam; Cooper, Jon

    2007-01-01

    A flight test of a business jet aircraft with various ice accretions was performed to obtain data to validate flight simulation models developed through wind tunnel tests. Three types of ice accretions were tested: pre-activation roughness, runback shapes that form downstream of the thermal wing ice protection system, and a wing ice protection system failure shape. The high fidelity flight simulation models of this business jet aircraft were validated using a software tool called "Overdrive." Through comparisons of flight-extracted aerodynamic forces and moments to simulation-predicted forces and moments, the simulation models were successfully validated. Only minor adjustments in the simulation database were required to obtain adequate match, signifying the process used to develop the simulation models was successful. The simulation models were implemented in the NASA Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD) to enable company pilots to evaluate flight characteristics of the simulation models. By and large, the pilots confirmed good similarities in the flight characteristics when compared to the real airplane. However, pilots noted pitch up tendencies at stall with the flaps extended that were not representative of the airplane and identified some differences in pilot forces. The elevator hinge moment model and implementation of the control forces on the ICEFTD were identified as a driver in the pitch ups and control force issues, and will be an area for future work.

  1. Optimizing Muscle Parameters in Musculoskeletal Modeling Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea; Reed, Erik; Cavanagh, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts assigned to long-duration missions experience bone and muscle atrophy in the lower limbs. The use of musculoskeletal simulation software has become a useful tool for modeling joint and muscle forces during human activity in reduced gravity as access to direct experimentation is limited. Knowledge of muscle and joint loads can better inform the design of exercise protocols and exercise countermeasure equipment. In this study, the LifeModeler(TM) (San Clemente, CA) biomechanics simulation software was used to model a squat exercise. The initial model using default parameters yielded physiologically reasonable hip-joint forces. However, no activation was predicted in some large muscles such as rectus femoris, which have been shown to be active in 1-g performance of the activity. Parametric testing was conducted using Monte Carlo methods and combinatorial reduction to find a muscle parameter set that more closely matched physiologically observed activation patterns during the squat exercise. Peak hip joint force using the default parameters was 2.96 times body weight (BW) and increased to 3.21 BW in an optimized, feature-selected test case. The rectus femoris was predicted to peak at 60.1% activation following muscle recruitment optimization, compared to 19.2% activation with default parameters. These results indicate the critical role that muscle parameters play in joint force estimation and the need for exploration of the solution space to achieve physiologically realistic muscle activation.

  2. Simulation modeling and analysis with Arena

    CERN Document Server

    Altiok, Tayfur

    2007-01-01

    Simulation Modeling and Analysis with Arena is a highly readable textbook which treats the essentials of the Monte Carlo discrete-event simulation methodology, and does so in the context of a popular Arena simulation environment.” It treats simulation modeling as an in-vitro laboratory that facilitates the understanding of complex systems and experimentation with what-if scenarios in order to estimate their performance metrics. The book contains chapters on the simulation modeling methodology and the underpinnings of discrete-event systems, as well as the relevant underlying probability, statistics, stochastic processes, input analysis, model validation and output analysis. All simulation-related concepts are illustrated in numerous Arena examples, encompassing production lines, manufacturing and inventory systems, transportation systems, and computer information systems in networked settings.· Introduces the concept of discrete event Monte Carlo simulation, the most commonly used methodology for modeli...

  3. Nonsmooth Modeling and Simulation for Switched Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Acary, Vincent; Brogliato, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    "Nonsmooth Modeling and Simulation for Switched Circuits" concerns the modeling and the numerical simulation of switched circuits with the nonsmooth dynamical systems (NSDS) approach, using piecewise-linear and multivalued models of electronic devices like diodes, transistors, switches. Numerous examples (ranging from introductory academic circuits to various types of power converters) are analyzed and many simulation results obtained with the INRIA open-source SICONOS software package are presented. Comparisons with SPICE and hybrid methods demonstrate the power of the NSDS approach

  4. Transient simulations, empirical reconstructions and forcing mechanisms for the Mid-holocene hydrological climate in southern Patagonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Widmann, Martin; Jones, Julie [Institute for Coastal Research, GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Haberzettl, Torsten; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd [University of Bremen, Institute of Geography, Bremen (Germany); Luecke, Andreas; Mayr, Christoph [Research Centre Juelich, Institute of Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere V, Juelich (Germany); Schaebitz, Frank [University of Cologne, Seminar for Geography and its Didactics, Cologne (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    This study investigates the atmospheric circulation in transient climate simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) for the mid-Holocene (MH) period 7-4.5 ka BP driven with combinations of orbital, solar and greenhouse gas forcings. The focus is on southern South America. Statistical downscaling models are derived from observational data and applied to the simulations to estimate precipitation in south-eastern Patagonia during the MH. These estimates are compared with lake level estimates for Laguna Potrok Aike (LPA) from sediments. Relative to pre-industrial conditions (i.e. 1550-1850), which show extraordinarily high lake levels, the proxy-based reconstructed lake levels during the MH are lower. The downscaled simulated circulation differences indicate higher LPA precipitation during the MH from March to August, higher annual means, and reduced precipitation from September to February. Thus the reconstructed lower LPA lake levels can not be explained solely by the simulated precipitation changes. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Based on proxy data from southern South America hypotheses have also been proposed on the latitudinal position of the southern hemispheric westerlies (SHWs). In agreement with some of these hypotheses our simulations show an increased seasonal cycle of the latitudinal position of the SHWs during the MH, which can be explained by the orbital forcing. The simulations also show stronger SHWs over southern Patagonia during austral summer and weaker SHWs during winter. The downscaling model associates weaker SHWs with increased precipitation in the LPA region. However, this relationship is only moderate, and therefore the downscaling model does not support the assumption of a strong link between mean SHWs and precipitation over south-eastern Patagonia, which is the basis of many proxy-based hypotheses about the SHWs. (orig.)

  5. A Possible Unification Model for All Basic Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Yue-Liang, Wu; Guang-Zhao, Zhou

    1997-01-01

    A unification model for strong, electromagnetic, weak and gravitational forces is proposed. The tangent space of ordinary coordinate 4-dimensional spacetime is a submanifold of an 14-dimensional internal spacetime spanned by four frame fields. The unification of the standard model with gravity is governed by gauge symmetry in the internal spacetime.

  6. A model of psychological resilience for the Netherlands Armed Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Venrooij, W.; Berg, C. van den

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, a model of psychological resilience was developed for the Netherlands Armed Forces and a number of important relations were tested using a longitudinal design. The model of resilience was based on a systematic literature review of resilience in high-risk professions and intervi

  7. Juno model rheometry and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampl, Manfred; Macher, Wolfgang; Oswald, Thomas; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-10-01

    The experiment Waves aboard the Juno spacecraft, which will arrive at its target planet Jupiter in 2016, was devised to study the plasma and radio waves of the Jovian magnetosphere. We analyzed the Waves antennas, which consist of two nonparallel monopoles operated as a dipole. For this investigation we applied two independent methods: the experimental technique, rheometry, which is based on a downscaled model of the spacecraft to measure the antenna properties in an electrolytic tank and numerical simulations, based on commercial computer codes, from which the quantities of interest (antenna impedances and effective length vectors) are calculated. In this article we focus on the results for the low-frequency range up to about 4 MHz, where the antenna system is in the quasi-static regime. Our findings show that there is a significant deviation of the effective length vectors from the physical monopole directions, caused by the presence of the conducting spacecraft body. The effective axes of the antenna monopoles are offset from the mechanical axes by more than 30°, and effective lengths show a reduction to about 60% of the antenna rod lengths. The antennas' mutual capacitances are small compared to the self-capacitances, and the latter are almost the same for the two monopoles. The overall performance of the antennas in dipole configuration is very stable throughout the frequency range up to about 4-5 MHz and therefore can be regarded as the upper frequency bound below which the presented quasi-static results are applicable.

  8. Network Modeling and Simulation A Practical Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Guizani, Mohsen; Khan, Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Network Modeling and Simulation is a practical guide to using modeling and simulation to solve real-life problems. The authors give a comprehensive exposition of the core concepts in modeling and simulation, and then systematically address the many practical considerations faced by developers in modeling complex large-scale systems. The authors provide examples from computer and telecommunication networks and use these to illustrate the process of mapping generic simulation concepts to domain-specific problems in different industries and disciplines. Key features: Provides the tools and strate

  9. BUSINESS SIMULATION OF TOURISM COMPANIES USING THE LEVEL I EXERCISE FIRM MODEL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nora Codruta Curta; Razvan Petrusel; Corina Anamaria Iftinca

    2015-01-01

    .... We now focus on the business simulation of tourism companies. Based on the Michael Porter's five forces model, our approach is to create a virtual business environment consisting of several mini-companies that interact directly...

  10. Investigations of the intermolecular forces between RDX and polyethylene by force-distance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D E; Strawhecker, K E; Shanholtz, E R; Sorescu, D C; Sausa, R C

    2014-07-10

    The development of novel nanoenergetic materials with enhanced bulk properties requires an understanding of the intermolecular interactions occurring between molecular components. We investigate the surface interactions between 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) and polyethylene (PE) crystals on the basis of combined use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and force-distance spectroscopy, in conjunction with Lifshitz macroscopic theory of van der Waals forces between continuous materials. The binding energy in the RDX-PE system depends both on the degree of PE crystallinity and on the RDX crystal face. Our MD simulations yield binding energies of approximately 132 and 120 mJ/m(2) for 100% amorphous and 100% crystalline PE on RDX (210), respectively. The average value is about 36% greater than our experimental value of 81 ± 15 mJ/m(2) for PE (∼48% amorphous) on RDX (210). By comparison, Liftshitz theory predicts a value of about 79 mJ/m(2) for PE interacting with RDX. Our MD simulations also predict larger binding energies for both amorphous and crystalline PE on RDX (210) compared to the RDX (001) surface. Analysis of the interaction potential indicates that about 60% of the binding energy in the PE-RDX system is due to attractive interactions between HPE-ORDX and CPE-NRDX pairs of atoms. Further, amorphous PE shows a much longer interaction distance than crystalline PE with the (210) and (001) RDX surfaces due to the possibility of larger polymer elongations in the case of amorphous PE as strain is applied. Also, we report estimates of the binding energies of energetic materials RDX and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) with PE, propylene, polystyrene, and several fluorine-containing polymers using Lifshitz theory and compare these with reported MD calculations.

  11. Modeling and analysis of grinding force in ultrasonic honing considering the scale effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linzheng Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To research the power ultrasonic honing mechanism at the micro scale, the scale effect is considered and the strain gradient plasticity theory based on the dislocation mechanism (MSG is applied to establish the model of a whetstone grinding force, and the simulation analysis is conducted. Results show: the grinding force will increase when the scale effect is considered; the main influence parameter is honing depth on the grinding force; the grinding force increases nonlinearly with the continued reduce of honing depth after which decreases to 1.4 μm, which decreases slightly with the increase of the relative velocity of a whetstone. So the material becomes difficult to remove at the micro scale.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation study of friction force and torque on a rough spherical particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohale, Swapnil C; Khare, Rajesh

    2010-06-21

    Recent developments in techniques of micro- and nanofluidics have led to an increased interest in nanoscale hydrodynamics in confined geometries. In our previous study [S. C. Kohale and R. Khare, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 164706 (2008)], we analyzed the friction force experienced by a smooth spherical particle that is translating in a fluid confined between parallel plates. The magnitude of three effects--velocity slip at particle surface, the presence of confining surfaces, and the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between periodic images of the moving particle--that determine the friction force was quantified in that work using molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we have studied the motion of a rough spherical particle in a confined geometry. Specifically, the friction force experienced by a translating particle and the torque experienced by a rotating particle are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that the surface roughness of the particle significantly reduces the slip at the particle surface, thus leading to higher values of the friction force and hence a better agreement with the continuum predictions. The particle size dependence of the friction force and the torque values is shown to be consistent with the expectations from the continuum theory. As was observed for the smooth sphere, the cooperative hydrodynamic interactions between the images of the sphere have a significant effect on the value of the friction force experienced by the translating sphere. On the other hand, the torque experienced by a spherical particle that is rotating at the channel center is insensitive to this effect.

  13. Hybrid simulations : combining atomistic and coarse-grained force fields using virtual sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rzepiela, Andrzej J.; Louhivuori, Martti; Peter, Christine; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid simulations, in which part of the system is represented at atomic resolution and the remaining part at a reduced, coarse-grained, level offer a powerful way to combine the accuracy associated with the atomistic force fields to the sampling speed obtained with coarse-grained (CG) potentials. I

  14. Molecular simulation of gas adsorption and diffusion in a breathing MOF using a rigid force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, E; Serra-Crespo, P; Hamad, S; Kapteijn, F; Gascon, J

    2014-08-14

    Simulation of gas adsorption in flexible porous materials is still limited by the slow progress in the development of flexible force fields. Moreover, the high computational cost of such flexible force fields may be a drawback even when they are fully developed. In this work, molecular simulations of gas adsorption and diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane in NH2-MIL-53(Al) are carried out using a linear combination of two crystallographic structures with rigid force fields. Once the interactions of carbon dioxide molecules and the bridging hydroxyls groups of the framework are optimized, an excellent match is found for simulations and experimental data for the adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide, including the stepwise uptake due to the breathing effect. In addition, diffusivities of pure components are calculated. The pore expansion by the breathing effect influences the self-diffusion mechanism and much higher diffusivities are observed at relatively high adsorbate loadings. This work demonstrates that using a rigid force field combined with a minimum number of experiments, reproduces adsorption and simulates diffusion of carbon dioxide and methane in the flexible metal-organic framework NH2-MIL-53(Al).

  15. Acoustofluidics: Theory and simulation of streaming and radiation forces at ultrasound resonances in microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    fields, which are directly related to the acoustic radiation force on single particles and to the acoustic streaming of the liquid. For the radiation pressure effects, there is good agreement between theory and simulation, while the numeric results for the acoustic streaming effects are more problematic...

  16. Springback Control With Variable Binder Force — Experiments And FEA Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changqing; Wu, Jin; Militisky, Marcio; Principe, James; Garnett, Mark; Zhang, Li

    2004-06-01

    Side-wall-curl is a springback phenomena in typical automotive structural components, such as channel like rails and cross members. Minimizing or eliminating the side-wall-curl is one of the major challenges in stamping production. This challenge is exasperated when the component is formed from advanced high strength steels (AHSS). In this study a standard three-piece draw die is used, in a series of experimental tests, to form a stamping with a hat-shaped section from dual phase 590 (DP590). During the forming stroke, the binder force is varied to evaluate its influence on side-wall-curl. FEA springback simulations for two types of experiments with varied binder forces are also performed. The binder force profiles for several sheet materials are discussed and the correlation between the simulation results and the actual part measurements are illustrated.

  17. A theoretical model for the Lorentz force particle analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, René; Tao, Zhen; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-07-01

    In a previous paper [X. Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 120, 014903 (2016)], several experimental devices have been presented, which demonstrate the efficiency of electromagnetic techniques for detecting and sizing electrically insulating particles entrained in the flow of a molten metal. In each case, a non-uniform magnetic field is applied across the flow of the electrically conducting liquid, thereby generating a braking Lorentz force on this moving medium and a reaction force on the magnet, which tends to be entrained in the flow direction. The purpose of this letter is to derive scaling laws for this Lorentz force from an elementary theoretical model. For simplicity, as in the experiments, the flowing liquid is modeled as a solid body moving with a uniform velocity U. The eddy currents in the moving domain are derived from the classic induction equation and Ohm's law, and expressions for the Lorentz force density j ×B and for its integral over the entire moving domain follow. The insulating particles that are eventually present and entrained with this body are then treated as small disturbances in a classic perturbation analysis, thereby leading to scaling laws for the pulses they generate in the Lorentz force. The purpose of this letter is both to illustrate the eddy currents without and with insulating particles in the electrically conducting liquid and to derive a key relation between the pulses in the Lorentz force and the main parameters (particle volume and dimensions of the region subjected to the magnetic field).

  18. Reconstruction of the Tambora forcing with global aerosol models : Challenges and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodri, Myriam; Zanchettin, Davide; Timmreck, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    It is now generally recognised that volcanic eruptions have an important effect on climate variability from inter-annual to decadal timescales. For the largest tropical volcanic eruptions of the last millennium, simulated volcanic surface cooling derived from climate models often disagrees with the cooling seen in tree-ring-based proxies. Furthermore, cooling estimates from simulations show large uncertainties. Such disagreement can be related to several sources, including inconsistency of the currently available volcanic forcing datasets, unrealistic modelled volcanic forcing, insufficient representation of relevant climate processes, and different background climate states simulated at the time of the eruption. In particular, for eruptions that occurred before the observational period forcing characteristics related to the eruption magnitude and stratospheric aerosol properties are deduced from indirect evidences. So, while climatically relevant forcing properties for recent volcanic eruptions are relatively well constrained by direct observations, large uncertainties remain regarding processes of aerosol formation and evolution in the stratosphere after large tropical eruptions of the remote past. Several coordinated modelling assessments have been defined to frame future modeling activities and constrain the above-mentioned uncertainties. Among these, the sixth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6) has endorsed a multi-model assessment focused on the climatic response to strong volcanic eruptions (VolMIP). VolMIP defines a protocol for idealized volcanic-perturbation experiments to improve comparability among climate model results. Identification of a consensual volcanic forcing dataset for the 1815 Tambora eruption is a key step of VolMIP, as it is the largest-magnitude volcanic eruption of the past five centuries and reference for the VolMIP core experiments. Therefore, as a first key step, five current/state-of-the-art global aerosol

  19. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  20. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  1. Development of a Computational Elbow Model with Experimental Validation of Kinematics and Muscle Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusins, Jonathan R; Willing, Ryan; King, Graham J; Ferreira, Louis M

    2016-08-01

    A computational elbow joint model was developed with a main goal of providing complimentary data to experimental results. The computational model was developed and validated using an experimental elbow joint phantom consisting of a linked total joint replacement. An established in-vitro motion simulator was used to actively flex/extend the experimental elbow in multiple orientations. Muscle forces predicted by the computational model were similar to the experimental model in 4 out of the 5 orientations with errors less than 7.5 N. Valgus angle kinematics were in agreement with differences less than 2.3°. In addition, changes in radial head length, a clinically relevant condition following elbow reconstruction, were simulated in both models and compared. Both lengthening and shortening of the radial head prosthesis altered muscle forces by less than 3.5 N in both models, and valgus angles agreed within 1°. The computational model proved valuable in cross validation with the experimental model, elucidating important limitations in the in-vitro motion simulator's controller. With continued development, the computational model can be a complimentary tool to experimental studies by providing additional noninvasive outcome measurements.

  2. Protein simulations in fluids: coupling the OPEP coarse-grained force field with hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Fabio; Derreumaux, Philippe; Melchionna, Simone

    2017-01-01

    A novel simulation framework that integrates the OPEP coarse-grained (CG) model for proteins with the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methodology to account for the fluid solvent at mesoscale level, is presented. OPEP is a very efficient, water-free and electrostatic-free force field that reproduces at quasi-atomistic detail processes like peptide folding, structural rearrangements and aggregation dynamics. The LB method is based on the kinetic description of the solvent in order to solve the fluid mechanics under a wide range of conditions, with the further advantage of being highly scalable on parallel architectures. The capabilities of the approach are presented and it is shown that the strategy is effective in exploring the role of hydrodynamics on protein relaxation and peptide aggregation. The end result is a strategy for modelling systems made up to thousands of proteins, such as in the case of dense protein suspensions. The future perspectives of the multi-scale approach are also discussed. PMID:26574390

  3. Integration of the Forced-Choice Questionnaire and the Likert Scale: A Simulation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Yue; Liu, Hongyun; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The Thurstonian item response theory (IRT) model allows estimating the latent trait scores of respondents directly through their responses in forced-choice questionnaires. It solves a part of problems brought by the traditional scoring methods of this kind of questionnaires. However, the forced-choice designs may still have their own limitations: The model may encounter underidentification and non-convergence and the test may show low test reliability in simple test designs (e.g., test design...

  4. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  5. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  6. CMIP5 Historical Simulations (1850-2012) with GISS ModelE2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald Lindsay; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Nazarenko, Larissa S.; Tausnev, Nick; Bauer, Susanne E.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Kelley, Max; Lo, Ken K.; Ruedy, Reto; Shindell, Drew T.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Observations of climate change during the CMIP5 extended historical period (1850-2012) are compared to trends simulated by six versions of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE2 Earth System Model. The six models are constructed from three versions of the ModelE2 atmospheric general circulation model, distinguished by their treatment of atmospheric composition and the aerosol indirect effect, combined with two ocean general circulation models, HYCOM and Russell. Forcings that perturb the model climate during the historical period are described. Five-member ensemble averages from each of the six versions of ModelE2 simulate trends of surface air temperature, atmospheric temperature, sea ice and ocean heat content that are in general agreement with observed trends, although simulated warming is slightly excessive within the past decade. Only simulations that include increasing concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases match the warming observed during the twentieth century. Differences in twentieth-century warming among the six model versions can be attributed to differences in climate sensitivity, aerosol and ozone forcing, and heat uptake by the deep ocean. Coupled models with HYCOM export less heat to the deep ocean, associated with reduced surface warming in regions of deepwater formation, but greater warming elsewhere at high latitudes along with reduced sea ice. All ensembles show twentieth-century annular trends toward reduced surface pressure at southern high latitudes and a poleward shift of the midlatitude westerlies, consistent with observations.

  7. Differential activity patterns in the masseter muscle under simulated clenching and grinding forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, H J; Türp, J C; Blaser, R; Lenz, J

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether the masseter muscle shows differential activation under experimental conditions which simulate force generation during clenching and grinding activities; and (ii) whether there are (a) preferentially active muscle regions or (b) force directions which show enhanced muscle activation. To answer these questions, the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the right masseter muscle was recorded with five intramuscular electrodes placed in two deep muscle areas and in three surface regions. Intraoral force transfer and force measurement were achieved by a central bearing pin device equipped with three strain gauges (SG). The activity distribution in the muscle was recorded in four different mandibular positions (central, left, right, anterior). In each position, maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was exerted in vertical, posterior, anterior, medial and lateral directions. The investigated muscle regions showed different amount of EMG activity. The relative intensity of the activation, with respect to other regions, changed depending on the task. In other words, the muscle regions demonstrated heterogeneous changes of the EMG pattern for the various motor tasks. The resultant force vectors demonstrated similar amounts in all horizontal bite directions. Protrusive force directions revealed the highest relative activation of the masseter muscle. The posterior deep muscle region seemed to be the most active compartment during the different motor tasks. The results indicate a heterogeneous activation of the masseter muscle under test conditions simulating force generation during clenching and grinding. Protrusively directed bite forces were accompanied by the highest activation in the muscle, with the posterior deep region as the most active area.

  8. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chibum [Department of Mechanical System Design Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Salapaka, Srinivasa M., E-mail: salapaka@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  9. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  10. Sea Ice Trends in the AO-UMUKCA model: Interplay of Forcing and Internal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jrrar, Amna; Abraham, Luke; Holland, David; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic Sea is showing a declining trend particularly in summer. Antarctic sea is showing a modest increase, a very controversial observation in a warming climate. Several studies have attributed these changes to internal variability. Hence in this paper we investigate sea ice trends in both hemispheres as simulated in a version of the Atmosphere-Ocean coupled chemistry climate model AO-UMUKCA under two different atmospheric forcing scenarios. One simulation is a pre-industrial control, where atmospheric forcing is fixed at 1850 level. The second simulation is also a time slice experiment but forced with the year 2000 atmospheric forcing (TS2000). The model simulates a significant reduction in NH Sea Ice Extent (SIE) under the TS2000 scenario, but shows negligible difference in SH SIE between the two scenarios. In agreement with observational studies, we find that NH SIE and distribution are connected to the Arctic Oscillation and the Dipole Anomaly in both simulations, particularly in summer time. While SH winter SIE shows a high correlation with zonal wave-3 pattern and the Pacific South American mode, particularly in TS2000. Connections between SIE and oceanic modes of variability in both hemispheres are also detected. Total NH SIE shows significant correlation with Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) on interannual and decadal timescales, but shows significant correlation with the Inter Pacific Decadal Oscillation (IPO) on multi-decadal timescale only. However, total SH SIE shows significant correlation only with IPO on decadal and multi-decadal scales. The SIE response to oceanic modes is comparable in both simulations.

  11. Modeling the mechanics of cells in the cell-spreading process driven by traction forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Lai, King W. C.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of cells and their mechanical interaction with the extracellular environments are main factors influencing cellular function, thus indicating the progression of cells in different disease states. By considering the mechanical interactions between cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular environment, we developed a cell mechanical model that can characterize the mechanical changes in cells during cell spreading. A cell model was established that consisted of various main subcellular components, including cortical cytoskeleton, nuclear envelope, actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. We demonstrated the structural changes in subcellular components and the changes in spreading areas during cell spreading driven by traction forces. The simulation of nanoindentation tests was conducted by integrating the indenting force to the cell model. The force-indentation curve of the cells at different spreading states was simulated, and the results showed that cell stiffness increased with increasing traction forces, which were consistent with the experimental results. The proposed cell mechanical model provides a strategy to investigate the mechanical interactions of cells with the extracellular environments through the adhesion molecules and to reveal the cell mechanical properties at the subcellular level as cells shift from the suspended state to the adherent state.

  12. Temperature control of colloidal phases by Critical Casimir forces -- a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triet Dang, Minh; Nguyen, Van Duc; Vila Verde, Ana; Bolhuis, Peter; Schall, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Critical Casimir forces arising from the confinement of critical solvent fluctuations between the surfaces of colloidal particles have recently been shown a promising route to control colloidal assembly. Such forces are strongly temperature dependent, and thus allow for direct temperature control of colloidal interactions. However, colloidal phase transitions controlled by this highly temperature-dependent potential are still poorly understood. Here, we report Monte Carlo