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Sample records for model simulations electronic

  1. Power electronics system modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1994-12-31

    This paper introduces control system design based softwares, SIMNON and MATLAB/SIMULINK, for power electronics system simulation. A complete power electronics system typically consists of a rectifier bridge along with its smoothing capacitor, an inverter, and a motor. The system components, featuring discrete or continuous, linear or nonlinear, are modeled in mathematical equations. Inverter control methods,such as pulse-width-modulation and hysteresis current control, are expressed in either computer algorithms or digital circuits. After describing component models and control methods, computer programs are then developed for complete systems simulation. Simulation results are mainly used for studying system performances, such as input and output current harmonics, torque ripples, and speed responses. Key computer programs and simulation results are demonstrated for educational purposes.

  2. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power Electronics,"…

  3. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power…

  4. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power…

  5. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Electronic Structure Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, M; Succi, S

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a new connection between density functional theory and kinetic theory has been proposed. In particular, it was shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations can be reformulated as a macroscopic limit of the steady-state solution of a suitable single-particle kinetic equation. By using a discrete version of this new formalism, the exchange and correlation energies of simple atoms and the geometrical configuration of the methane molecule were calculated accurately. Here, we discuss the main ideas behind the lattice kinetic approach to electronic structure computations, offer some considerations for prospective extensions, and also show additional numerical results, namely the geometrical configuration of the water molecule.

  6. Computational electronics semiclassical and quantum device modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileska, Dragica; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the simplest semiclassical approaches and ending with the description of complex fully quantum-mechanical methods for quantum transport analysis of state-of-the-art devices, Computational Electronics: Semiclassical and Quantum Device Modeling and Simulation provides a comprehensive overview of the essential techniques and methods for effectively analyzing transport in semiconductor devices. With the transistor reaching its limits and new device designs and paradigms of operation being explored, this timely resource delivers the simulation methods needed to properly model state-of

  7. Hopping electron model with geometrical frustration: kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Takamichi

    2016-09-01

    The hopping electron model on the Kagome lattice was investigated by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, and the non-equilibrium nature of the system was studied. We have numerically confirmed that aging phenomena are present in the autocorrelation function C ({t,tW )} of the electron system on the Kagome lattice, which is a geometrically frustrated lattice without any disorder. The waiting-time distributions p(τ ) of hopping electrons of the system on Kagome lattice has been also studied. It is confirmed that the profile of p (τ ) obtained at lower temperatures obeys the power-law behavior, which is a characteristic feature of continuous time random walk of electrons. These features were also compared with the characteristics of the Coulomb glass model, used as a model of disordered thin films and doped semiconductors. This work represents an advance in the understanding of the dynamics of geometrically frustrated systems and will serve as a basis for further studies of these physical systems.

  8. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  9. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano-electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-06-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano-scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano-transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano-electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I- V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical

  10. Time domain simulation and modeling of power electronic circuits. Development of a simulation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, O.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis presents the results of a study on the topic: Time domain modeling and simulation of power electronic circuits. The objectives of the presented work have been to improve and expand the simulation program KREAN. This also included search for, development and implementation of models suited for analysis of power electronic circuits. The main contribution of the work is the improved KREAN program itself and the models created for the program. Further, the work has led to this thesis which is a documentation of the applied methods. The thesis shows how to create a power electronic simulation tool and how to meet the special problems encountered in power electronic circuits. Among the major improvements of KREAN are: Better methods for solution of nonlinear algebraic equations. Major modifications have been implemented in the modified Newton iteration method. The old method suffered from insufficient control of the iteration error. Improved efficiency, accuracy and robustness of the breakpoint detection methods (breakpoints are time instants of discontinuous behavior in models). A new linear circuit now replaces the nonlinear modules at each stage in the iteration. The old one could give serious errors in the results and was not applicable after introduction of voltage response terminals. Several new models have been implemented as KREAN modules. Together with the old basic ones, they form a powerful set for simulation of power electronics. The thesis describes the applied methods, the implemented models and also presents results from study of the accuracy and efficiency of the program. The applied methods in the program are stated to be good enough for most simulation purposes. 100 refs., 93 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. Modeling of electron-electron collisions for particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea, D. d' ; Munz, C.D.; Schneider, R.

    2006-09-15

    The modeling of the physics of pulsed plasma thrusters requires the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for rarefied plasma flows where continuum assumptions fail. To tackle this challenging task, a cooperation between several institutes has been formed with the goal to develop a hybrid code based on Particle-In-Cell and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo techniques. These development activities are bundled in the project ''Numerische Simulation und Auslegung eines instationaeren gepulsten magnetoplasmadynamischen Triebwerks fuer eine Mondsonde'' which is funded by the Landesstiftung Baden-Wuerttemberg within the subject area ''Modellierung und Simulation auf Hochleistungscomputern''. In the frame of this project, the IHM is in charge to develop suitable physical-mathematical and numerical models to include charged particle collisions into the simulation. which can significantly affect the Parameters of such plasma devices. The intention of the present report is to introduce the Fokker-Planck approach for electron-electron interaction in Standard charged particle simulations. where the impact Parameter is usually large resulting in a small deflection angle. The theoretical and applicative framework is discussed in detail paying particular attention to the Particle-In-Cell approach in velocity space. a new technique which allows the self-consistent computation of the friction and diffusion coefficients arising from the Fokker-Planck treatment of collisions. These velocity-dependent coefficients thernselves are responsible for the change in velocity of the simulation particles, which is determined by the numerical solution of a Langevin-type equation. Simulation results for typical numerical experiments computed with the new developed Fokker-Planck solver are presented. demonstrating the quality. property and reliability of the applied numerical methods. (orig.)

  12. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    /Fourier series hybrid approach. The presentation will give background remarks about the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept and electron optics modeling, followed by a description of the alternate field modeling techniques that were tried, along with their incorporation into a ray-trace simulation. Next, the validation of this simulation against commercially available software will be discussed using an example lens as a test case. Then, the efficacy of aberration assessment using direct ray-tracing will be demonstrated, using this same validation case. The discussion will include practical error checks of the field solution. Finally, the ray-trace assessment of the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept will be shown and discussed. The authors believe this presentation will be of general interest to practitioners of modeling and simulation, as well as those with a general optics background. Because electron optics and photon optics share many basic concepts (e.g., lenses, images, aberrations, etc.), the appeal of this presentation need not be restricted to just those interested in charged particle optics.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of DC Power Electronics Systems Using Harmonic State Space (HSS) Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    For the efficiency and simplicity of electric systems, the dc based power electronics systems are widely used in variety applications such as electric vehicles, ships, aircrafts and also in homes. In these systems, there could be a number of dynamic interactions between loads and other dc...... based on the state-space averaging and generalized averaging, these also have limitations to show the same results as with the non-linear time domain simulations. This paper presents a modeling and simulation method for a large dc power electronic system by using Harmonic State Space (HSS) modeling....... Through this method, the required computation time and CPU memory for large dc power electronics systems can be reduced. Besides, the achieved results show the same results as with the non-linear time domain simulation, but with the faster simulation time which is beneficial in a large network....

  14. Modelling and Simulation of a Synchronous Machine with Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the modeling and simulation of a synchronous machine with a power electronic interface in direct phase model. The implementation of a direct phase model of synchronous machines in MATLAB/SIMULINK is presented .The power electronic system associated with the synchronous machine...... is modelled in SIMULINK as well. The resulting model can more accurately represent non-idea situations such as non-symmetrical parameters of the electrical machines and unbalance conditions. The model may be used for both steady state and large-signal dynamic analysis. This is particularly useful...

  15. Modelling and Simulation of a Synchronous Machine with Power Electronic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the modeling and simulation of a synchronous machine with a power electronic interface in direct phase model. The implementation of a direct phase model of synchronous machines in MATLAB/SIMULINK is presented .The power electronic system associated with the synchronous machine...... is modelled in SIMULINK as well. The resulting model can more accurately represent non-idea situations such as non-symmetrical parameters of the electrical machines and unbalance conditions. The model may be used for both steady state and large-signal dynamic analysis. This is particularly useful...

  16. The use of discrete-event simulation modeling to compare handwritten and electronic prescribing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghany, Ahmad; Vassanji, Karim; Kuziemsky, Craig; Keshavjee, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) is expected to bring many benefits to Canadian healthcare, such as a reduction in errors and adverse drug reactions. As there currently is no functioning e-prescribing system in Canada that is completely electronic, we are unable to evaluate the performance of a live system. An alternative approach is to use simulation modeling for evaluation. We developed two discrete-event simulation models, one of the current handwritten prescribing system and one of a proposed e-prescribing system, to compare the performance of these two systems. We were able to compare the number of processes in each model, workflow efficiency, and the distribution of patients or prescriptions. Although we were able to compare these models to each other, using discrete-event simulation software was challenging. We were limited in the number of variables we could measure. We discovered non-linear processes and feedback loops in both models that could not be adequately represented using discrete-event simulation software. Finally, interactions between entities in both models could not be modeled using this type of software. We have come to the conclusion that a more appropriate approach to modeling both the handwritten and electronic prescribing systems would be to use a complex adaptive systems approach using agent-based modeling or systems-based modeling.

  17. Multi-dimensional Vlasov simulations and modeling of trapped-electron-driven filamentation of electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, R. L., E-mail: berger5@llnl.gov; Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brunner, S., E-mail: stephan.brunner@epfl.ch [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CRPP-PPB, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Banks, J. W. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, AE 301, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Winjum, B. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Kinetic simulations of two-dimensional finite-amplitude electron plasma waves are performed in a one-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and wavenumber k{sub y}, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are compared with numerical and analytical solutions to a two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger model [H. A. Rose and L. Yin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 042311 (2008)] and to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] generalized to two dimensions.

  18. Construction of reduced transport model by gyro-kinetic simulation with kinetic electrons in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S.; Nakata, M.; Nunami, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2016-10-01

    A reduced model of the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is proposed by the gyrokinetic simulation code (GKV-X) with the adiabatic electrons for the high-Ti Large Helical Device discharge. The plasma parameter region of the short poloidal wavelength is studied, where the ion temperature gradient mode becomes unstable. The ion heat diffusivity by the nonlinear simulation with the kinetic electrons is found to be several times larger than the simulation results using the adiabatic electrons in the radial region 0.46 ion energy flux. The model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation and the squared zonal flow potential. Next, the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation is approximated with the mixing length estimate. The squared zonal flow potential fluctuation is shown as the linear zonal flow response function. The reduced model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the physical parameters by the linear GKV-X simulation with the kinetic electrons. This reduced model is applied to the transport code with the same procedure as.

  19. Frequency Domain Modeling and Simulation of DC Power Electronic Systems Using Harmonic State Space Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    For the efficiency and simplicity of electric systems, the dc power electronic systems are widely used in a variety of applications such as electric vehicles, ships, aircraft and also in homes. In these systems, there could be a number of dynamic interactions and frequency coupling between network...... with different switching frequency or harmonics from ac-dc converters makes that harmonics and frequency coupling are both problems of ac system and challenges of dc system. This paper presents a modeling and simulation method for a large dc power electronic system by using Harmonic State Space (HSS) modeling...... and loads and other converters. Hence, time-domain simulations are usually required to consider such a complex system behavior. However, simulations in the time-domain may increase the calculation time and the utilization of computer memory. Furthermore, frequency coupling driven by multiple converters...

  20. 3-D Parallel Simulation Model of Continuous Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalam, Ali F; Decyk, Viktor K; Huang Cheng Kun; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Mori, Warren; Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A 3D Particle-In-Cell model for continuous modeling of beam and electron cloud interaction in a circular accelerator is presented. A simple model for lattice structure, mainly the Quadruple and dipole magnets and chromaticity have been added to a plasma PIC code, QuickPIC, used extensively to model plasma wakefield acceleration concept. The code utilizes parallel processing techniques with domain decomposition in both longitudinal and transverse domains to overcome the massive computational costs of continuously modeling the beam-cloud interaction. Through parallel modeling, we have been able to simulate long-term beam propagation in the presence of electron cloud in many existing and future circular machines around the world. The exact dipole lattice structure has been added to the code and the simulation results for CERN-SPS and LHC with the new lattice structure have been studied. Also the simulation results are compared to the results from the two macro-particle modeling for strong head-tail instability. ...

  1. Evaluation of angular scattering models for electron-neutral collisions in Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J. F. J.; Pitchford, L. C.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-10-01

    In Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport through a neutral background gas, simplifying assumptions related to the shape of the angular distribution of electron-neutral scattering cross sections are usually made. This is mainly because full sets of differential scattering cross sections are rarely available. In this work simple models for angular scattering are compared to results from the recent quantum calculations of Zatsarinny and Bartschat for differential scattering cross sections (DCS’s) from zero to 200 eV in argon. These simple models represent in various ways an approach to forward scattering with increasing electron energy. The simple models are then used in Monte Carlo simulations of range, straggling, and backscatter of electrons emitted from a surface into a volume filled with a neutral gas. It is shown that the assumptions of isotropic elastic scattering and of forward scattering for the inelastic collision process yield results within a few percent of those calculated using the DCS’s of Zatsarinny and Bartschat. The quantities which were held constant in these comparisons are the elastic momentum transfer and total inelastic cross sections.

  2. Kinetic simulations and reduced modeling of longitudinal sideband instabilities in non-linear electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hausammann, L. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic Vlasov simulations of one-dimensional finite amplitude Electron Plasma Waves are performed in a multi-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and quasi- wavenumber δk, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are successfully compared against numerical and analytical solutions to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] for the Trapped Particle Instability (TPI). A model recently suggested by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)], which in addition to the TPI accounts for the so-called Negative Mass Instability because of a more detailed representation of the trapped particle dynamics, is also studied and compared with simulations.

  3. Predictive atomistic simulations of electronic properties of realistic nanoscale devices: A multiscale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedula, Ravi Pramod Kumar

    Scaling of CMOS towards its ultimate limits, where quantum effects and atomistic variability due to fabrication, along with recent emphasis on heterogeneous integration of non-digital devices for increasing the functional diversification presents us with fundamentally new challenges. A comprehensive understanding of design and operation of these nanoscale transistors, and other electronic devices like RF-MEMS, requires an insight into their electronic and mechanical properties that are strongly influenced by underlying atomic structure. Hence, continuum descriptions of materials and use of empirical models at these scales become questionable. This increase in complexity of electronic devices necessitates an understanding at a more fundamental level to accurately predict the performance and reliability of these devices. The objective of this thesis is to outline the application of multiscale predictive modeling methods, ranging from atoms to devices, for addressing these challenges. This capability is demonstrated using two examples: characterization of (i) dielectric charging in RF-MEMS, and (ii) transport properties of Ge-nanofins. For characterizing the dielectric charging phenomenon, a continuum dielectric charging model, augmented by first principles informed trap distributions, is used to predict current transient measurements across a broad range of voltages and temperatures. These simulations demonstrate using ab initio informed model not only reduces the empiricism (number of adjustable parameters) in the model but also leads to a more accurate model over a broad range of operating conditions, and enable the precise determination of additional material parameters. These atomistic calculations also provide detailed information about the nature of charge traps and their trapping mechanisms that are not accessible experimentally; such information could prove invaluable in defect engineering. The second problem addresses the effect of the in-homogeneous strain

  4. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  5. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory [University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Delettrez, Jacques [Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  6. An improved electrical and thermal model of a microbolometer for electronic circuit simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würfel, D.; Vogt, H.

    2012-09-01

    modelled more realistically when these higher order effects are taken into account. A Verilog-A model for electronic circuit simulations is developed based on the improved thermal model of the microbolometer. Finally, a simulation result of a simple circuit is presented.

  7. Modeling and Simulation for Nanoparticle Plasma Jet Diagnostic Probe for Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) rapid injection into a tokamak major disruption is followed by C60 gradual fragmentation along plasma-traversing path. The result is abundant C ion concentration in the core plasma enhancing the potential to probe and diagnose the runaway electrons (REs) during different phases of their dynamics. A C60/C NPPJ of 75 mg, high-density (>1023 m-3) , hyper-velocity (>4 km/s), and uniquely fast response-to-delivery time ( 1 ms) has been demonstrated on a test bed. It can rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to increase electron density to 2.4x1021 m-3, 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value. We will present the results of our on-going work on: 1) self-consistent model for RE current density evolution (by Dreicer mechanism and ``avalanche'') focused on the effect of fast and deep deposition of C ions, 2) improvement of single C60q+ fragmenting ion penetration model through tokamak B(R)-field and post-TQ plasma, and 3) simulation of C60q+ PJ penetration through the DIII-D characteristic 2 T B-field to the RE beam central location by using the Hybrid Electro-Magnetic 2D code (HEM-2D. Work supported by US DOE DE-SC0015776 Grant.

  8. Development of a model electronic Hamiltonian for understanding electronic relaxation dynamics of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} through molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Satoru; Koga, Nobuaki [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A model electronic Hamiltonian of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, which was recently refined for use in molecular dynamics simulations, is reviewed with some additional results. In particular, the quality of the refined model Hamiltonian is examined in terms of the vibrational frequencies and solvation structures of the lowest singlet and quintet states.

  9. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q1-frame, where Q1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q1-frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  10. Two-valley Hydrodynamical Models for Electron Transport in Gallium Arsenide: Simulation of Gunn Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marcello Anile

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To accurately describe non-stationary carrier transport in GaAs devices, it is necessary to use Monte Carlo methods or hydrodynamical (or energy transport models which incorporate population transfer between valleys.We present here simulations of Gunn oscillations in a GaAs diode based on two-valley hydrodynamical models: the classic Bløtekjær model and two recently developed moment expansion models. Scattering parameters within the models are obtained from homogeneous Monte Carlo simulations, and these are compared against expressions in the literature. Comparisons are made between our hydrodynamical results, existing work, and direct Monte Carlo simulations of the oscillator device.

  11. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems Advanced Perspectives for Modeling, Simulation and Control of Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Iannelli, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The increased efficiency and quality constraints imposed on electrical energy systems have inspired a renewed research interest in the study of formal approaches to the analysis and control of power electronics converters. Switched systems represent a useful framework for modeling these converters and the peculiarities of their operating conditions and control goals justify the specific classification of “switched electronic systems”. Indeed, idealized switched models of power converters introduce problems not commonly encountered when analyzing generic switched models or non-switched electrical networks. In that sense the analysis of switched electronic systems represents a source for new ideas and benchmarks for switched and hybrid systems generally. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems draws on the expertise of an international group of expert contributors to give an overview of recent advances in the modeling, simulation and control of switched electronic systems. The reader is provided...

  12. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport; Modelisation et simulation numerique multi-echelle du transport cinetique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duclous, R

    2009-11-15

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms.

  13. Additive Manufacturing Modeling and Simulation A Literature Review for Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seufzer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is coming into industrial use and has several desirable attributes. Control of the deposition remains a complex challenge, and so this literature review was initiated to capture current modeling efforts in the field of additive manufacturing. This paper summarizes about 10 years of modeling and simulation related to both welding and additive manufacturing. The goals were to learn who is doing what in modeling and simulation, to summarize various approaches taken to create models, and to identify research gaps. Later sections in the report summarize implications for closed-loop-control of the process, implications for local research efforts, and implications for local modeling efforts.

  14. CAE "FOCUS" for modelling and simulating electron optics systems: development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubitsyn, Andrey; Grachev, Evgeny; Gurov, Victor; Bochkov, Ilya; Bochkov, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Electron optics is a theoretical base of scientific instrument engineering. Mathematical simulation of occurring processes is a base for contemporary design of complicated devices of the electron optics. Problems of the numerical mathematical simulation are effectively solved by CAE system means. CAE "FOCUS" developed by the authors includes fast and accurate methods: boundary element method (BEM) for the electric field calculation, Runge-Kutta- Fieghlberg method for the charged particle trajectory computation controlling an accuracy of calculations, original methods for search of terms for the angular and time-of-flight focusing. CAE "FOCUS" is organized as a collection of modules each of which solves an independent (sub) task. A range of physical and analytical devices, in particular a microfocus X-ray tube of high power, has been developed using this soft.

  15. Modeling, simulation and measurement of radiation exposure using electronic personal dosimeters on realistic and ICRU phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Fuelle, D

    2003-01-01

    Exposure studies with voxel phantoms were carried out to understand the new personal dose measurand Hp(10) measured by personal dosimeters under realistic wearing conditions. Two simulated realistic voxel phantoms and the dosimeter assembly are described in a first step. Conditions such as photon fluence, radiation field geometry, and photon energy for simulating the external photon fields at the realistic model are specified. Person-related effective doses are calculated to evaluate the personal dose. The relation between measured deep personal dose and effective dose is demonstrated and discussed by means of the simulated response function of the dosimeters at realistic phantoms.

  16. Modeling and Design of GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors and Hot Electron Transistors through Monte Carlo Particle-based Device Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soligo, Riccardo

    In this work, the insight provided by our sophisticated Full Band Monte Carlo simulator is used to analyze the behavior of state-of-art devices like GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors and Hot Electron Transistors. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the description of the simulation tool used to obtain the results shown in this work. Moreover, a separate section is dedicated the set up of a procedure to validate to the tunneling algorithm recently implemented in the simulator. Chapter 2 introduces High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs), state-of-art devices characterized by highly non linear transport phenomena that require the use of advanced simulation methods. The techniques for device modeling are described applied to a recent GaN-HEMT, and they are validated with experimental measurements. The main techniques characterization techniques are also described, including the original contribution provided by this work. Chapter 3 focuses on a popular technique to enhance HEMTs performance: the down-scaling of the device dimensions. In particular, this chapter is dedicated to lateral scaling and the calculation of a limiting cutoff frequency for a device of vanishing length. Finally, Chapter 4 and Chapter 5 describe the modeling of Hot Electron Transistors (HETs). The simulation approach is validated by matching the current characteristics with the experimental one before variations of the layouts are proposed to increase the current gain to values suitable for amplification. The frequency response of these layouts is calculated, and modeled by a small signal circuit. For this purpose, a method to directly calculate the capacitance is developed which provides a graphical picture of the capacitative phenomena that limit the frequency response in devices. In Chapter 5 the properties of the hot electrons are investigated for different injection energies, which are obtained by changing the layout of the emitter barrier. Moreover, the large signal characterization of the

  17. Modeling and Simulation of Longitudinal Dynamics for Low Energy Ring_High Energy Ring at the Positron-Electron Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivetta, Claudio; Mastorides, T.; Fox, J.D.; Teytelman, D.; Van Winkle, D.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    A time domain dynamic modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) at the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) is presented. Dynamic simulation results for PEP-II are compared to measurements of the actual machine. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP-II radio-frequency (RF) systems at future higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as a test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the low-level RF (LLRF) architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamic behavior of the beam-cavity-LLRF interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macrobunches. Multiple RF stations in the ring are represented via one or two macrocavities. Each macrocavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF stations. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This enables modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting via the longitudinal beam model. The dynamics of the simulation model are validated by comparing the measured growth rates for the LER with simulation results. The simulated behavior of the LER at increased operation currents is presented via low-mode instability growth rates. Different control strategies are compared and the effects of both the imperfections in the LLRF signal processing and the nonlinear drivers and klystrons are explored.

  18. A Pedagogical Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Switching Mode DC-DC Converters for Power Electronics Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The power electronics course is a rather challenging subject for instructors and undergraduate students pursuing Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering. To enhance teaching effectiveness and motivate self-learning capabilities of the students, this paper presents a pedagogical approach for mathematical modeling and simulation of switching mode DC-DC converters. The Buck and Boost converters are analyzed as benchmark systems to study the power converter modeling methodologies. And a comparative analysis using digital simulation from Matlab/Simulink and ATP/EMTP is presented. A summary of student survey is also presented, which shows a high level of satisfaction. The presented pedagogical approach would be useful for classroom teaching for the power electronics course and similar engineering courses.

  19. Detection efficiency calculation for photons, electrons and positrons in a well detector. Part II: Analytical model versus simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomme, S. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: stefaan.pomme@ec.europa.eu; Sibbens, G.; Vidmar, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Camps, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Peyres, V. [Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Ed. 12, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-21

    A comparison is made between the results of Monte Carlo simulations and a new analytical model (cf. Part I) for the detection efficiency of a well-type NaI detector for photons, electrons and positrons in the energy range of 0.01 MeV-10 MeV. Using MCNP 5.1.40, GEANT3 and PENELOPE simulation results as benchmark, it was found that the analytical model was quite successful at reproducing the total detection efficiency for photons and positrons, and at giving rough indications on the photon peak-to-total ratio and the electron detection efficiency. It was also able to deal with cylindrical volume sources and vials, eccentric positioning of the source inside the detector well and the possible contribution of scattering or pair production in the surrounding lead shield.

  20. Synthesis of analog behavioral models of variable complexity for use in simulation of electronic circuits associated with microsystems

    CERN Document Server

    Boucher, J; Ayoub, K I; Cousineau, S M; Ahmadpanah, M; Rakotondrazafy, C; Harchani, N; Andreu, D; Montagner, L; Marin, M

    1999-01-01

    The analog behavioral modeling must constitute a privileged axis of research for a global simulation of systems and micro-systems. This paper presents a research/education (R&E) methodology which has been developed by the authors as a result of many years of experience in the domains of electronic components, circuits and systems, in different university and industrial research laboratories. It concerns the entire constitutive analog functions, used in the processing of energy and information, with different abstraction levels, extending from a simple component to complex macro-functions used in system electronics. (10 refs).

  1. A simple model for large-scale simulations of fcc metals with explicit treatment of electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D. R.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Sutton, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The continuing advance in computational power is beginning to make accurate electronic structure calculations routine. Yet, where physics emerges through the dynamics of tens of thousands of atoms in metals, simplifications must be made to the electronic Hamiltonian. We present the simplest extension to a single s-band model [A.P. Sutton, T.N. Todorov, M.J. Cawkwell and J. Hoekstra, Phil. Mag. A 81 (2001) p.1833.] of metallic bonding, namely, the addition of a second s-band. We show that this addition yields a reasonable description of the density of states at the Fermi level, the cohesive energy, formation energies of point defects and elastic constants of some face-centred cubic (fcc) metals.

  2. Polysilicon high frequency devices for large area electronics: Characterization, simulation and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botrel, J.L. [CEA-LETI 17, rue des Martyrs 38054 Grenoble (France); IMEP 23, rue des Martyrs 38016 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: jean-loius.botrel@cea.fr; Savry, O.; Rozeau, O.; Templier, F. [CEA-LETI 17, rue des Martyrs 38054 Grenoble (France); Jomaah, J. [IMEP 23, rue des Martyrs 38016 Grenoble (France)

    2007-07-16

    Laser Crystallised Polysilicon Thin Film Transistors have now sufficient good conduction properties to be used in high-frequency applications. In this work, we report the results for 5 {mu}m long polysilicon TFTs obtained at frequencies up to several hundred MHz for applications such as RFID tags or System-On-Panel. In order to investigate the device operation, DC and AC two-dimensional simulations of these devices in the Effective Medium framework have been performed. In the light of simulation results, the effects of carrier trapping and carrier transit on the device capacitances as a function of dimensions are analysed and compared. An equivalent small-signal circuit which accounts for the behaviour of these transistors in all regions of operation is proposed and a model for the most relevant elements of this circuit is presented. To validate our simulation results, scattering-parameters (S-parameters) measurements are performed for several structures such as multi-finger, serpentine and linear architectures and the most meaningful parameters will be given. Cut-off frequencies as high as 300 MHz and maximum oscillation frequencies of about 600 MHz have been extracted.

  3. Low-energy electron dose-point kernel simulations using new physics models implemented in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordes, Julien, E-mail: julien.bordes@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France); Incerti, Sébastien, E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Lampe, Nathanael, E-mail: nathanael.lampe@gmail.com [Université de Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bardiès, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.bardies@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France); Bordage, Marie-Claude, E-mail: marie-claude.bordage@inserm.fr [CRCT, UMR 1037 INSERM, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31037 Toulouse (France); UMR 1037, CRCT, Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, F-31037 (France)

    2017-05-01

    When low-energy electrons, such as Auger electrons, interact with liquid water, they induce highly localized ionizing energy depositions over ranges comparable to cell diameters. Monte Carlo track structure (MCTS) codes are suitable tools for performing dosimetry at this level. One of the main MCTS codes, Geant4-DNA, is equipped with only two sets of cross section models for low-energy electron interactions in liquid water (“option 2” and its improved version, “option 4”). To provide Geant4-DNA users with new alternative physics models, a set of cross sections, extracted from CPA100 MCTS code, have been added to Geant4-DNA. This new version is hereafter referred to as “Geant4-DNA-CPA100”. In this study, “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” was used to calculate low-energy electron dose-point kernels (DPKs) between 1 keV and 200 keV. Such kernels represent the radial energy deposited by an isotropic point source, a parameter that is useful for dosimetry calculations in nuclear medicine. In order to assess the influence of different physics models on DPK calculations, DPKs were calculated using the existing Geant4-DNA models (“option 2” and “option 4”), newly integrated CPA100 models, and the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code used in step-by-step mode for monoenergetic electrons. Additionally, a comparison was performed of two sets of DPKs that were simulated with “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” – the first set using Geant4′s default settings, and the second using CPA100′s original code default settings. A maximum difference of 9.4% was found between the Geant4-DNA-CPA100 and PENELOPE DPKs. Between the two Geant4-DNA existing models, slight differences, between 1 keV and 10 keV were observed. It was highlighted that the DPKs simulated with the two Geant4-DNA’s existing models were always broader than those generated with “Geant4-DNA-CPA100”. The discrepancies observed between the DPKs generated using Geant4-DNA’s existing models and “Geant4-DNA-CPA100” were

  4. Theory Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-23

    Los Alamos has a long history in theory, modeling and simulation. We focus on multidisciplinary teams that tackle complex problems. Theory, modeling and simulation are tools to solve problems just like an NMR spectrometer, a gas chromatograph or an electron microscope. Problems should be used to define the theoretical tools needed and not the other way around. Best results occur when theory and experiments are working together in a team.

  5. ULF wave penetration in the inner magnetosphere related to radiation belt electron acceleration and losses: Observations and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Marina; Daglis, Ioannis; Zesta, Eftyhia; Sibeck, David; Fok, Mei-ching; Balasis, Georgios; Mann, Ian; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2017-04-01

    Periodic oscillations in the Earth's magnetic field with frequencies in the range of a few mHz (ULF waves) can influence radiation belt dynamics due to their potential for strong interactions with charged particles and in particular, relativistic electrons. We have explored possible relationships between the spatial and temporal profile of ULF wave power with relativistic electron fluxes as well as different solar wind parameters. We used data from multiple ground magnetometer arrays contributing to the worldwide SuperMAG collaboration to calculate the ULF wave power in the Pc5 frequency band (2 - 7 mHz) from for a total of 40 moderate and intense magnetic storms over the last solar cycle 23. During the main phase of both sets of storms, there is a marked penetration of Pc5 wave power to L-shells as low as 2-3. The penetration of ULF waves is deeper into the inner magnetosphere during intense magnetic storms characterised by enhanced post-storm electron fluxes. Furthermore, later in the recovery phase, enhanced Pc5 wave activity was found to persist longer for storms marked by electron-enhanced storms flux enhancement than for those that do not produce such electron flux enhancements. Growth and decay characteristics of Pc5 waves were explored in association with the plasmapause location, determined from IMAGE EUV observations. Pc5 wave power enhancements and relativistic electron acceleration were not only intimately linked, but also restricted beyond the plasmapause. These observations provided the basis for a superposed epoch analysis, the results of which are compared to predictions from the Comprehensive Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (CIMI) model. These simulations are critical for understanding the extent to which ULF wave electric fields are responsible for the observed electron acceleration and for examining the nature of mechanisms responsible for driving such large-amplitude ULF waves in the magnetosphere. This work has been supported by the NOA

  6. Electron hole tracking PIC simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuteng; Hutchinson, Ian

    2016-10-01

    An electron hole is a coherent BGK mode solitary wave. Electron holes are observed to travel at high velocities relative to bulk plasmas. The kinematics of a 1-D electron hole is studied using a novel Particle-In-Cell simulation code with fully kinetic ions. A hole tracking technique enables us to follow the trajectory of a fast-moving solitary hole and study quantitatively hole acceleration and coupling to ions. The electron hole signal is detected and the simulation domain moves by a carefully designed feedback control law to follow its propagation. This approach has the advantage that the length of the simulation domain can be significantly reduced to several times the hole width, which makes high resolution simulations tractable. We observe a transient at the initial stage of hole formation when the hole accelerates to several times the cold-ion sound speed. Artificially imposing slow ion speed changes on a fully formed hole causes its velocity to change even when the ion stream speed in the hole frame greatly exceeds the ion thermal speed, so there are no reflected ions. The behavior that we observe in numerical simulations agrees very well with our analytic theory of hole momentum conservation and energization effects we call ``jetting''. The work was partially supported by the NSF/DOE Basic Plasma Science Partnership under Grant DE-SC0010491. Computer simulations were carried out on the MIT PSFC parallel AMD Opteron/Infiniband cluster Loki.

  7. Semiconductor device models for circuit simulation power electronics; Modeles de composants semiconducteurs pour la simulation des circuits en electronique de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berraies, M.O.

    1998-09-10

    In this thesis, an alternative strategy based on a regional approach to modeling and a new partition of the model library in the simulation is proposed. The main objective is to substitute for the usual concept of `one device, on model` that of an adaptable assembly of a limited number of submodels associated with well-identified regions of semiconductor structures. In other words, the library will only contain the primitive building-blocks of the power device models. This strategy guarantees the compatibility of the various semiconductor models in terms of physical concepts, validity domain, accuracy, homogeneity of parameter identification procedures, similarly of implementation in the simulator. This approach has been applied to PIN diodes and IGBTs for experimental validation. The next step consisted on the simulation of circuit involving several interacting devices. A simple IGBT/PIN diode chopper cell has been chosen. The results obtained compare well with experiment. This demonstrates the consistency of the proposed approach. (author) 43 refs.

  8. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  9. Simulating radial diffusion of energetic (MeV electrons through a model of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sarris

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a test particle simulation is performed in a model of analytic Ultra Low Frequency, ULF, perturbations in the electric and magnetic fields of the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of this work is to examine if the radial transport of energetic particles in quiet-time ULF magnetospheric perturbations of various azimuthal mode numbers can be described as a diffusive process and be approximated by theoretically derived radial diffusion coefficients. In the model realistic compressional electromagnetic field perturbations are constructed by a superposition of a large number of propagating electric and consistent magnetic pulses. The diffusion rates of the electrons under the effect of the fluctuating fields are calculated numerically through the test-particle simulation as a function of the radial coordinate L in a dipolar magnetosphere; these calculations are then compared to the symmetric, electromagnetic radial diffusion coefficients for compressional, poloidal perturbations in the Earth's magnetosphere. In the model the amplitude of the perturbation fields can be adjusted to represent realistic states of magnetospheric activity. Similarly, the azimuthal modulation of the fields can be adjusted to represent different azimuthal modes of fluctuations and the contribution to radial diffusion from each mode can be quantified. Two simulations of quiet-time magnetospheric variability are performed: in the first simulation, diffusion due to poloidal perturbations of mode number m=1 is calculated; in the second, the diffusion rates from multiple-mode (m=0 to m=8 perturbations are calculated. The numerical calculations of the diffusion coefficients derived from the particle orbits are found to agree with the corresponding theoretical estimates of the diffusion coefficient within a factor of two.

  10. Electronic Concepts Simulation Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory utilizes state-of-the-art digital models and simulations of both friendly and enemy airborne and ground-based weapon and command and control systems....

  11. Thermal Modeling and Simulation of Electron Beam Melting for Rapid Prototyping on Ti6Al4V Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira Arce, Alderson

    To be a viable solution for contemporary engineering challenges, the use of titanium alloys in a wider range of applications requires the development of new techniques and processes that are able to decrease production cost and delivery times. As a result, the use of material consolidation in a near-net-shape fashion, using dynamic techniques like additive manufacturing by electron beam selective melting EBSM represents a promising method for part manufacturing. However, a new product material development can be cost prohibitive, requiring the use of computer modeling and simulation as a way to decrease turnaround time. To ensure a proper representation of the EBSM process, a thermophysical material characterization and comparison was first performed on two Ti6Al4V powder feedstock materials prepared by plasma (PREP) and gas atomized (GA) processes. This evaluation comprises an evaluation on particle size distribution, density and powder surface area, collectively with the temperature dependence on properties such as heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and surface emissivity. Multiple techniques were employed in this evaluation, including high temperature differential scanning calorimetry (HT-DSC), laser flash analysis (LFA), infrared remote temperature analysis (IR-Thermography), laser diffraction, liquid and gas pycnometry using mercury and krypton adsorption respectively. This study was followed by the review of complementary strategies to simulate the temperature evolution during the EBSM process, using a finite element analysis package called COMSOL Multiphysics. Two alternatives dedicated to representing a moving heat source (electron beam) and the powder bed were developed using a step-by-step approximation initiative. The first method consisted of the depiction of a powder bed discretized on an array of domains, each one representing a static melt pool, where the moving heat source was illustrated by a series of time dependant selective

  12. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ropponen, T; Suominen, P; Koponen, T K; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2008-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  13. Hybrid simulation of electron cyclotron resonance heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)], E-mail: tommi.ropponen@phys.jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Suominen, P. [CERN Geneve 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Koponen, T.K. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Nanoscience Center, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland)

    2008-03-11

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) heating is a fundamentally important aspect in understanding the physics of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS). Absorption of the radio frequency (RF) microwave power by electron heating in the resonance zone depends on many parameters including frequency and electric field strength of the microwave, magnetic field structure and electron and ion density profiles. ECR absorption has been studied in the past by e.g. modelling electric field behaviour in the resonance zone and its near proximity. This paper introduces a new ECR heating code that implements damping of the microwave power in the vicinity of the resonance zone, utilizes electron density profiles and uses right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) electromagnetic waves to simulate electron heating in ECRIS plasma.

  14. Confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy investigation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm degradation using passive and active sodium hypochlorite irrigation within a simulated root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmmed, Saifalarab A; Vianna, Morgana E; Penny, Matthew R; Hilton, Stephen T; Mordan, Nicola; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2017-08-01

    Root canal irrigation is an important adjunct to control microbial infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2.5% (wt/vol) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) agitation on the removal, killing, and degradation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. A total of 45 root canal models were manufactured using 3D printing with each model comprising an 18 mm length simulated root canal of apical size 30 and taper 0.06. E. faecalis biofilms were grown on the apical 3 mm of the models for 10 days. A total of 60 s of 9 ml of 2.5% NaOCl irrigation using syringe and needle was performed, the irrigant was either left stagnant in the canal or agitated using manual (Gutta-percha), sonic, and ultrasonic methods for 30 s. Following irrigation, the residual biofilms were observed using confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Dunnett post hoc tests at a level of significance p ≤ .05. Consequence of root canal irrigation indicate that the reduction in the amount of biofilm achieved with the active irrigation groups (manual, sonic, and ultrasonic) was significantly greater when compared with the passive and untreated groups (p < .05). Collectively, finding indicate that passive irrigation exhibited more residual biofilm on the model surface than irrigant agitated by manual or automated (sonic, ultrasonic) methods. Total biofilm degradation and nonviable cells were associated with the ultrasonic group. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Tabulated square-shaped source model for linear accelerator electron beam simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Khaledi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that there was an excellent agreement between the results of our proposed model and measured data; furthermore, an optimum calculation speed was achieved because there was no need to define geometry and materials in the LINAC head.

  16. Modeling of a Micro-Electronic Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Deformable Mirror for Simulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    25  B.  MODEL USER APPLICABILITY ........................................................29  V.  CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK...this research, as it is the most complex mirror type. This device is composed of two mechanical systems: an array of actuations and a non- linear ...3.5) Equation (3.5) can be adapted into an algebraic expression in order to solve for the plate

  17. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  18. Simulations of Gaussian electron guns for RHIC electron lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-02-28

    Simulations of two versions of the electron gun for RHIC electron lens are presented. The electron guns have to generate an electron beam with Gaussian radial profile of the electron beam density. To achieve the Gaussian electron emission profile on the cathode we used a combination of the gun electrodes and shaping of the cathode surface. Dependence of electron gun performance parameters on the geometry of electrodes and the margins for electrodes positioning are presented.

  19. Fast Electron Beam Simulation and Dose Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Trindade, A; Peralta, L; Lopes, M C; Alves, C; Chaves, A

    2003-01-01

    A flexible multiple source model capable of fast reconstruction of clinical electron beams is presented in this paper. A source model considers multiple virtual sources emulating the effect of accelerator head components. A reference configuration (10 MeV and 10x10 cm2 field size) for a Siemens KD2 linear accelerator was simulated in full detail using GEANT3 Monte Carlo code. Our model allows the reconstruction of other beam energies and field sizes as well as other beam configurations for similar accelerators using only the reference beam data. Electron dose calculations were performed with the reconstructed beams in a water phantom and compared with experimental data. An agreement of 1-2% / 1-2 mm was obtained, equivalent to the accuracy of full Monte Carlo accelerator simulation. The source model reduces accelerator simulation CPU time by a factor of 7500 relative to full Monte Carlo approaches. The developed model was then interfaced with DPM, a fast radiation transport Monte Carlo code for dose calculati...

  20. Creating Electronic Books-Chapters for Computers and Tablets Using Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, EjsS Modeling Tool

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2015-01-01

    This paper shares my journey (tools used, design principles derived and modeling pedagogy implemented) when creating electronic books-chapters (epub3 format) for computers and tablets using Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, (old name EJS, new EjsS) Modeling Tool. The theory underpinning this work grounded on learning by doing through dynamic and interactive simulation-models that can be more easily made sense of instead of the static nature of printed materials. I started combining related computer models with supporting texts and illustrations into a coherent chapter, a logical next step towards tighter support for teachers and students ,developing prototypes electronic chapters on the topics of Simple Harmonic Motion and Gravity customized for the Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (A-level). I aim to inspire more educators to create interactive and open educational resources for the benefit of all. Prototypes: http://iwant2study.org/ospsg/index.php/interactive-resources/phy...

  1. Simulating the microdosimetry of cosmic electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Abel A.; Oliveira, Cassia F. Silva, E-mail: abel@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The human presence in space is a matter of concern especially regarding the deleterious effects of the cosmic radiation. Doses in astronauts during space missions must be closely monitored. On the other hand, the development of organic electronics with applications to the monitoring of physiological functions through the implant of electronic devices under the skin is coming to become a reality in the near future. Therefore, doses in astronauts can affect not only the biological tissue, but also the electronic one represented by silicon (Si). In some orbital regions around the Earth, cosmic electrons are predominant with energies ranging from keV to MeV. In this study, the lineal energy (LE) and the absorbed dose (AD) from cosmic electron flux based on the AE8MAX model are simulated for microscopic sites (radius = 1μm) of tissue equivalent material (TEM) and Si at a depth of 100 μm in the skin using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code for uncertainties < 10%. Cosmic electrons yielded LE decreasing with the energy of particles crossing the sites. Maximum values of LE were around 0.7 eV/μm for cosmic electron energies of 100 keV. LE for Si sites was up to 3.7 times higher than that for TEM ones, increasing with particle's energy. Maximum values of AD were around 54 μGy for TEM sites and 40 μGy for Si ones. (author)

  2. Simulating Policy Processes through Electronic Mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Focuses on the use of electronic mail for teaching and learning about social welfare policy processes and compares electronic mail as a simulation medium to more structured computer applications. (Author)

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  4. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : reference guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. It is targeted specifically to run on large-scale parallel computing platforms but also runs well on a variety of architectures including single processor workstations. It also aims to support a variety of devices and models specific to Sandia needs. This document is intended to complement the Xyce Users Guide. It contains comprehensive, detailed information about a number of topics pertinent to the usage of Xyce. Included in this document is a netlist reference for the input-file commands and elements supported within Xyce; a command line reference, which describes the available command line arguments for Xyce; and quick-references for users of other circuit codes, such as Orcad's PSpice and Sandia's ChileSPICE.

  5. Establishing an Initial Electron Beam Model with Monte Carlo Simulation for a Single 6 MV X-ray Medical Linac Based on Particle Dynamics Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong-bin; KONG Xiao-xiao; LI Quan-feng; LIN Xiao-qi; BAO Shang-lian

    2009-01-01

    Objective:In this study,we try to establish an initial electron beam model by combining Monte Carlo simulation method with particle dynamic calculation (TRSV) for the single 6 MV X-ray accelerating waveguide of BJ- 6 medical linac. Methods and Materials:1. We adapted the treatment head configuration of BJ- 6 medical linac made by Beijing Medical Equipment Institute (BMEI) as the radiation system for this study. 2. Use particle dynamics calculation code called TRSV to drive out the initial electron beam parameters of the energy spectrum, the spatial intensity distribution, and the beam incidence angle. 3. Analyze the 6 MV X-ray beam characteristics of PDDc, OARc in a water phantom by using Monte Carlo simulation (BEAMnrc,DOSXYZnrc) for a preset of the initial electron beam parameters which have been determined by TRSV, do the comparisons of the measured results of PDDm, OARm in a real water phantom, and then use the deviations of calculated and measured results to slightly modify the initial electron beam model back and forth until the deviations meet the error less than 2%. Results:The deviations between the Monte Carlo simulation results of percentage depth doses at PDDc and off-axis ratios OARc and the measured results of PDDm and OARm in a water phantom were within 2%. Conclusion:When doing the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the parameters of an initial electron beam for a particular medical linac like BJ- 6, modifying some parameters based on the particle dynamics calculation code would give some more reasonable and more acceptable results.

  6. Modeling of power electronic systems with EMTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Dravid, Narayan V.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the potential impact of power electronics on power systems, there is need for a computer modeling/analysis tool to perform simulation studies on power systems with power electronic components as well as to educate engineering students about such systems. The modeling of the major power electronic components of the NASA Space Station Freedom Electric Power System is described along with ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) and it is demonstrated that EMTP can serve as a very useful tool for teaching, design, analysis, and research in the area of power systems with power electronic components. EMTP modeling of power electronic circuits is described and simulation results are presented.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of electron slowing down in indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouabah, Z.; Hannachi, M. [Materials and Electronic Systems Laboratory (LMSE), University of Bordj Bou Arreridj, Bordj Bou Arreridj (Algeria); Champion, C. [Université de Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, (CENBG), Gradignan (France); Bouarissa, N., E-mail: n_bouarissa@yahoo.fr [Laboratory of Materials Physics and its Applications, University of M' sila, 28000 M' sila (Algeria)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Electron scattering in indium targets. • Modeling of elastic cross-sections. • Monte Carlo simulation of low energy electrons. - Abstract: In the current study, we aim at simulating via a detailed Monte Carlo code, the electron penetration in a semi-infinite indium medium for incident energies ranging from 0.5 to 5 keV. Electron range, backscattering coefficients, mean penetration depths as well as stopping profiles are then reported. The results may be seen as the first predictions for low-energy electron penetration in indium target.

  8. A MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF SECONDARY ELECTRON AND BACKSCATTERED ELECTRON IMAGES IN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.M. Li; Z.J. Ding

    2005-01-01

    A new parallel Monte Carlo simulation method of secondary electron (SE) and backscattered electron images (BSE) of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for a complex geometric structure has been developed. This paper describes briefly the simulation method and the modification to the conventional sampling method for the step length. Example simulation results have been obtained for several artificial structures.

  9. Simulation modeling and arena

    CERN Document Server

    Rossetti, Manuel D

    2015-01-01

    Emphasizes a hands-on approach to learning statistical analysis and model building through the use of comprehensive examples, problems sets, and software applications With a unique blend of theory and applications, Simulation Modeling and Arena®, Second Edition integrates coverage of statistical analysis and model building to emphasize the importance of both topics in simulation. Featuring introductory coverage on how simulation works and why it matters, the Second Edition expands coverage on static simulation and the applications of spreadsheets to perform simulation. The new edition als

  10. NASCAP simulation of laboratory charging tests using multiple electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASCAP calculations have been performed simulating exposure of a spacecraft-like model to multiple electron guns. The results agree well with experiment. It is found that magnetic field effects are fairly small, but substantial differential charging can result from electron gun placement. Conditions for surface flashover are readily achieved.

  11. Time-dependent simulation and analytical modelling of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometry with edge-states wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggi, Andrea; Bordone, Paolo; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    We compute the exact single-particle time-resolved dynamics of electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on Landau edge-states transport, and assess the effect of the spatial localization of carriers on the interference pattern. The exact carrier dynamics is obtained by solving numerically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a suitable 2D potential profile reproducing the interferometer design. An external magnetic field, driving the system to the quantum Hall regime with filling factor one, is included. The injected carriers are represented by a superposition of edge states, and their interference pattern—controlled via magnetic field and/or area variation—reproduces the one of (Ji et al 2003 Nature 422 415). By tuning the system towards different regimes, we find two additional features in the transmission spectra, both related to carrier localization, namely a damping of the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations with increasing difference in the arms length, and an increased mean transmission that we trace to the energy-dependent transmittance of quantum point contacts. Finally, we present an analytical model, also accounting for the finite spatial dispersion of the carriers, able to reproduce the above effects.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Shocks Including Electronic Heat Conduction and Electron-Phonon Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dmitriy S.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; De Koning, Maurice; Remington, Bruce A.; Caturla, Maria Jose; Pollaine, Stephen M.

    2004-07-01

    Shocks are often simulated using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) method in which the electrons are not included explicitly and the interatomic interaction is described by an effective potential. As a result, the fast electronic heat conduction in metals and the coupling between the lattice vibrations and the electronic degrees of freedom can not be represented. Under conditions of steep temperature gradients that can form near the shock front, however, the electronic heat conduction can play an important part in redistribution of the thermal energy in the shocked target. We present the first atomistic simulation of a shock propagation including the electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The computational model is based on the two-temperature model (TTM) that describes the time evolution of the lattice and electron temperatures by two coupled non-linear differential equations. In the combined TTM-MD method, MD substitutes the TTM equation for the lattice temperature. Simulations are performed with both MD and TTM-MD models for an EAM Al target shocked at 300 kbar. The target includes a tilt grain boundary, which provides a region where shock heating is more pronounced and, therefore, the effect of the electronic heat conduction is expected to be more important. We find that the differences between the predictions of the MD and TTM-MD simulations are significantly smaller as compared to the hydrodynamics calculations performed at similar conditions with and without electronic heat conduction.

  13. MEIC Electron Cooling Simulation Using Betacool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [JLAB; Zhang, Yuhong [JLAB

    2013-12-01

    Electron cooling of ion beams is the most critical R&D issue in Jefferson Lab's MEIC design. In the ion collider ring, a bunched electron beam driven by an energy-recovery SRF linac assisted by a circulate ring will be employed to cool protons or ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u, a parameter regime that electron cooling has never been applied. It is essential to understand how efficient the electron cooling is, particularly in the high energy range, to confirm the feasibility of the design. Electron cooling is also important in LEIC design although the ion energy is 25 GeV/u, lower than MEIC. In this paper, we will present first results of the simulation studies of electron cooling processes in the collider ring of both MEIC and LEIC using BETACOOL code.

  14. Simple simulation for electron energy levels in geometrical potential wells

    CERN Document Server

    Pengpan, Teparksorn

    2008-01-01

    An octopus program is demonstrated to generate electron energy levels in three-dimensional geometrical potential wells. The wells are modeled to have shapes similar to cone, pyramid and truncated-pyramid. To simulate the electron energy levels in quantum mechanical scheme like the ones in parabolic band approximation scheme, the program is run initially to find a suitable electron mass fraction that can produce ground-state energies in the wells as close to those in quantum dots as possible and further to simulate excited-state energies. The programs also produce wavefunctions for exploring and determining their degeneracies and vibrational normal modes.

  15. Modeling microwave/electron-cloud interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Mattes, M; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Starting from the separate codes BI-RME and ECLOUD or PyECLOUD, we are developing a novel joint simulation tool, which models the combined effect of a charged particle beam and of microwaves on an electron cloud. Possible applications include the degradation of microwave transmission in tele-communication satellites by electron clouds; the microwave-transmission tecchniques being used in particle accelerators for the purpose of electroncloud diagnostics; the microwave emission by the electron cloud itself in the presence of a magnetic field; and the possible suppression of electron-cloud formation in an accelerator by injecting microwaves of suitable amplitude and frequency. A few early simulation results are presented.

  16. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  17. Computer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronskikh, V. S. [Fermilab

    2014-05-09

    Verification and validation of computer codes and models used in simulation are two aspects of the scientific practice of high importance and have recently been discussed by philosophers of science. While verification is predominantly associated with the correctness of the way a model is represented by a computer code or algorithm, validation more often refers to model’s relation to the real world and its intended use. It has been argued that because complex simulations are generally not transparent to a practitioner, the Duhem problem can arise for verification and validation due to their entanglement; such an entanglement makes it impossible to distinguish whether a coding error or model’s general inadequacy to its target should be blamed in the case of the model failure. I argue that in order to disentangle verification and validation, a clear distinction between computer modeling (construction of mathematical computer models of elementary processes) and simulation (construction of models of composite objects and processes by means of numerical experimenting with them) needs to be made. Holding on to that distinction, I propose to relate verification (based on theoretical strategies such as inferences) to modeling and validation, which shares the common epistemology with experimentation, to simulation. To explain reasons of their intermittent entanglement I propose a weberian ideal-typical model of modeling and simulation as roles in practice. I suggest an approach to alleviate the Duhem problem for verification and validation generally applicable in practice and based on differences in epistemic strategies and scopes

  18. Electron Beam Simulations on the SCSS Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Toru; Shintake, Tsumoru

    2004-01-01

    The SPring-8 Compact SASE Source (SCSS) is a SASE-FEL project aiming at soft X-ray radiation at its first stage using 1 GeV electron beams. One of the unique features of the SCSS is the use of a pulsed high-voltage electron gun with a thermionic cathode. Main reason for this choice is its high stability and the well developed technology relating to the gun. Meanwhile, the electron bunch should be compressed properly at the injector in order to obtain sufficient peak currents. In this presentation, the results of the electron beam simulations along the accelerator and the expected parameters of the electron beam will be given.

  19. Simulated electron holography of PSD particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Les

    2016-04-01

    Electron holography is an experimental technique that is capable of observing magnetic microstructures on the same scale as can be determined using numerical modeling and thus bridge the gap between experimental measurements and theory. I will present a technique for simulating holographic images from the results of micromagnetic models and demonstrate an easily used tool for generating holograms on the fly in an interactive environment (ie in ParaView). Since holography flattens 3D information onto a 2D image, some useful information can be lost. By looking at some examples of holograms of interesting 3D magnetizations (ie PSD structures), particularly how they change as they're rotated, along with comparisons of different structures, I will examine what information can be retrieved and what might be lost. The existance of an external dipole can be indicative of an in-plane component of a seemingly out-of-plane vortex core. It is also seen, however, that two quite different structures (in this case a [111] vortex core and a [111] uniform magnetization) can sometimes be quite indistinguishable.

  20. Evaluation of computational models and cross sections used by MCNP6 for simulation of characteristic X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by kiloelectronvolt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poškus, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of the single-event (SE) and condensed-history (CH) models of electron transport in MCNP6.1 when simulating characteristic Kα, total K (=Kα + Kβ) and Lα X-ray emission from thick targets bombarded by electrons with energies from 5 keV to 30 keV. It is shown that the MCNP6.1 implementation of the CH model for the K-shell impact ionization leads to underestimation of the K yield by 40% or more for the elements with atomic numbers Z 25. The Lα yields are underestimated by more than an order of magnitude in CH mode, because MCNP6.1 neglects X-ray emission caused by electron-impact ionization of L, M and higher shells in CH mode (the Lα yields calculated in CH mode reflect only X-ray fluorescence, which is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption of bremsstrahlung photons). The X-ray yields calculated by MCNP6.1 in SE mode (using ENDF/B-VII.1 library data) are more accurate: the differences of the calculated and experimental K yields are within the experimental uncertainties for the elements C, Al and Si, and the calculated Kα yields are typically underestimated by (20-30)% for the elements with Z > 25, whereas the Lα yields are underestimated by (60-70)% for the elements with Z > 49. It is also shown that agreement of the experimental X-ray yields with those calculated in SE mode is additionally improved by replacing the ENDF/B inner-shell electron-impact ionization cross sections with the set of cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), which are also used in the PENELOPE code system. The latter replacement causes a decrease of the average relative difference of the experimental X-ray yields and the simulation results obtained in SE mode to approximately 10%, which is similar to accuracy achieved with PENELOPE. This confirms that the DWBA inner-shell impact ionization cross sections are significantly more accurate than the corresponding ENDF/B cross sections when energy of incident electrons

  1. Simulation modeling of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwein, L B; Cohen, S M

    1992-03-01

    A discrete-time simulation model of carcinogenesis is described mathematically using recursive relationships between time-varying model variables. The dynamics of cellular behavior is represented within a biological framework that encompasses two irreversible and heritable genetic changes. Empirical data and biological supposition dealing with both control and experimental animal groups are used together to establish values for model input variables. The estimation of these variables is integral to the simulation process as described in step-by-step detail. Hepatocarcinogenesis in male F344 rats provides the basis for seven modeling scenarios which illustrate the complexity of relationships among cell proliferation, genotoxicity, and tumor risk.

  2. Evolving Nonthermal Electrons in Simulations of Black Hole Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander

    2017-06-01

    Current simulations of hot accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. However, processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks can accelerate electrons into a nonthermal distribution, which will not quickly thermalise at the very low densities found in many systems. Such nonthermal electrons have been invoked to explain the infrared and X-ray spectra and strong variability of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center. We present a method for self-consistent evolution of a nonthermal electron population in the GRMHD code KORAL. The electron distribution is tracked across Lorentz factor space and is evolved in space and time, in parallel with thermal electrons, thermal ions, and radiation. At present, for simplicity, energy injection into the nonthermal distribution is taken as a fixed fraction of the local electron viscous heating rate. Numerical results are presented for a model with a low mass accretion rate similar to Sgr A*. We find that the presence of a nonthermal population of electrons has negligible effect on the overall dynamics of the system. Relative to a purely thermal simulation, the radiative power in the nonthermal simulation is enhanced at large radii and at high frequencies. The energy distribution of the nonthermal electrons shows a synchrotron cooling break, with the break Lorentz factor varying with location and time, reflecting the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength, and fluid velocity.

  3. Correcting Misconceptions on Electronics: Effects of a Simulation-Based Learning Environment Backed by a Conceptual Change Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lung; Pan, Pei-Rong; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2013-01-01

    Computer simulation has significant potential as a supplementary tool for effective conceptual-change learning based on the integration of technology and appropriate instructional strategies. This study elucidates misconceptions in learning on diodes and constructs a conceptual-change learning system that incorporates…

  4. Nonsmooth Modeling and Simulation for Switched Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Acary, Vincent; Brogliato, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    "Nonsmooth Modeling and Simulation for Switched Circuits" concerns the modeling and the numerical simulation of switched circuits with the nonsmooth dynamical systems (NSDS) approach, using piecewise-linear and multivalued models of electronic devices like diodes, transistors, switches. Numerous examples (ranging from introductory academic circuits to various types of power converters) are analyzed and many simulation results obtained with the INRIA open-source SICONOS software package are presented. Comparisons with SPICE and hybrid methods demonstrate the power of the NSDS approach

  5. Numerical simulation of RCS for carrier electronic warfare airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Kuizhi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the radar cross section (RCS of carrier electronic warfare airplanes. Under the typical naval operations section, the mathematical model of the radar wave’s pitch angle incidence range analysis is established. Based on the CATIA software, considering dynamic deflections of duck wing leading edge flaps, flaperons, horizontal tail, and rudder, as well as aircraft with air-to-air missile, anti-radiation missile, electronic jamming pod, and other weapons, the 3D models of carrier electronic warfare airplanes Model A and Model B with weapons were established. Based on the physical optics method and the equivalent electromagnetic flow method, by the use of the RCSAnsys software, the characteristics of carrier electronic warfare airplanes’ RCS under steady and dynamic flights were simulated under the UHF, X, and S radar bands. This paper researches the detection probability of aircraft by radars under the condition of electronic warfare, and completes the mathematical statistical analysis of the simulation results. The results show that: The Model A of carrier electronic warfare airplane is better than Model B on stealth performance and on discover probability by radar detection effectively.

  6. Development of the electron cooling simulation program for JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Chen, Jie [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Huang, He [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Luo, Li-Shi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    In the JLab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) project the traditional electron cooling technique is used to reduce the ion beam emittance at the booster ring, and to compensate the intrabeam scattering effect and maintain the ion beam emittance during collision at the collider ring. A new electron cooling process simulation program has been developed to fulfill the requirements of the JLEIC electron cooler design. The new program allows the users to calculate the electron cooling rate and simulate the cooling process with either DC or bunched electron beam to cool either coasting or bunched ion beam. It has been benchmarked with BETACOOL in aspect of accuracy and efficiency. In typical electron cooling process of JLEIC, the two programs agree very well and we have seen a significant improvement of computational speed using the new one. Being adaptive to the modern multicore hardware makes it possible to further enhance the efficiency for computationally intensive problems. The new program is being actively used in the electron cooling study and cooler design for JLEIC. We will present our models and some simulation results in this paper.

  7. Modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casetti, E.; Vogt, W.G.; Mickle, M.H.

    1984-01-01

    This conference includes papers on the uses of supercomputers, multiprocessors, artificial intelligence and expert systems in various energy applications. Topics considered include knowledge-based expert systems for power engineering, a solar air conditioning laboratory computer system, multivariable control systems, the impact of power system disturbances on computer systems, simulating shared-memory parallel computers, real-time image processing with multiprocessors, and network modeling and simulation of greenhouse solar systems.

  8. Validation of simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehman, Muniza; Pedersen, Stig Andur

    2012-01-01

    In philosophy of science, the interest for computational models and simulations has increased heavily during the past decades. Different positions regarding the validity of models have emerged but the views have not succeeded in capturing the diversity of validation methods. The wide variety...... of models has been somewhat narrow-minded reducing the notion of validation to establishment of truth. This article puts forward the diversity in applications of simulation models that demands a corresponding diversity in the notion of validation....... of models with regards to their purpose, character, field of application and time dimension inherently calls for a similar diversity in validation approaches. A classification of models in terms of the mentioned elements is presented and used to shed light on possible types of validation leading...

  9. Detailed Monte Carlo Simulation of electron transport and electron energy loss spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian Shandiz, M; Salvat, F; Gauvin, R

    2016-11-01

    A computer program for detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the transport of electrons with kinetic energies in the range between about 0.1 and about 500 keV in bulk materials and in thin solid films is presented. Elastic scattering is described from differential cross sections calculated by the relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave expansion method with different models of the scattering potential. Inelastic interactions are simulated from an optical-data model based on an empirical optical oscillator strength that combines optical functions of the solid with atomic photoelectric data. The generalized oscillator strength is built from the adopted optical oscillator strength by using an extension algorithm derived from Lindhard's dielectric function for a free-electron gas. It is shown that simulated backscattering fractions of electron beams from bulk (semi-infinite) specimens are in good agreement with experimental data for beam energies from 0.1 keV up to about 100 keV. Simulations also yield transmitted and backscattered fractions of electron beams on thin solid films that agree closely with measurements for different film thicknesses and incidence angles. Simulated most probable deflection angles and depth-dose distributions also agree satisfactorily with measurements. Finally, electron energy loss spectra of several elemental solids are simulated and the effects of the beam energy and the foil thickness on the signal to background and signal to noise ratios are investigated. SCANNING 38:475-491, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  11. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriyash, I.A., E-mail: igor.andriyash@gmail.com [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Lehe, R.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA-ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  12. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, Igor A; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field-particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the algorithm, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  13. Analysis and simulation of BGK electron holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Muschietti

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations from satellites crossing regions of magnetic-field-aligned electron streams reveal solitary potential structures that move at speeds much greater than the ion acoustic/thermal velocity. The structures appear as positive potential pulses rapidly drifting along the magnetic field, and are electrostatic in their rest frame. We interpret them as BGK electron holes supported by a drifting population of trapped electrons. Using Laplace transforms, we analyse the behavior of one phase-space electron hole. The resulting potential shapes and electron distribution functions are self-consistent and compatible with the field and particle data associated with the observed pulses. In particular, the spatial width increases with increasing amplitude. The stability of the analytic solution is tested by means of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code with open boundaries. We consider a strongly magnetized parameter regime in which the bounce frequency of the trapped electrons is much less than their gyrofrequency. Our investigation includes the influence of the ions, which in the frame of the hole appear as an incident beam, and impinge on the BGK potential with considerable energy. The nonlinear structure is remarkably resilient

  14. Simulation of electron cloud effects to heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Fatih; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2011-07-01

    Electron cloud (EC) driven instability can cause beam loss, emittance growth, trajectory change and wake fields. Mentioned crucial effects of EC motivated researchers to understand the EC build up mechanism and the effects of EC to the beam. This motivation also induced the progress of developing new simulation codes. EC simulations can roughly be divided into two classes such as, softwares whose goals are to simulate the build up of the EC during the passage of a bunch train and the codes which model the interaction of a bunch with an EC. The aim of this study is to simulate the effects of electron cloud (EC) on the dynamics of heavy ion beams which are used in heavy ion synchrotron (SIS-18) at GSI. To do this, a 3-D and self-consistent simulation program based on particle in cell (PIC) method is used. In the PIC cycle, accurate solution of the Maxwell equations is obtained by employing discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. As a model, we assumed a perfectly conducting beam pipe which was uniformly (or randomly) loaded with the electrons. Then as parallel with the realistic cases in SIS-18, a single bunch consisting of U{sup +73} ions was extracted which could propagate in this pipe. Due to EC-ion bunch interaction, electrons gained energy and their displacements were observed. Electric and magnetic field components and EC charge density were calculated, numerically.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of electron beam air plasma characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Yong-Feng; Han Xian-Wei; Tan Chang

    2009-01-01

    A high-energy electron beam generator is used to generate a plasma in atmosphere. Based on a Monte Carlo toolkit named GEANT4,a model including complete physics processes is established to simulate the passage of the electron beam in air. Based on the model,the characteristics of the electron beam air plasma are calculated. The energy distribution of beam electrons (BEs) indicates that high-energy electrons almost reside in the centre region of the beam,but low-energy electrons always live in the fringe area. The energy deposition is calculated in two cases,i.e.,with and without secondary electrons (SEs). Analysis indicates that the energy deposition of Ses accounts for a large part of the total energy deposition. The results of the energy spectrum show that the electrons in the inlet layer of the low-pressure chamber (LPC) are monoenergetic,but the energy spectrum of the electrons in the outlet layer is not pure. The SEs are largely generated at the outlet of the LPC. Moreover,both the energy distribution of Bes and the magnitude of the density of SEs are closely related to the pressure of LPC. Thus,a conclusion is drawn that a low magnitude of LPC pressure is helpful for reducing the energy loss in the LPC and also useful for greatly increasing the secondary electron density in dense air.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of electron back diffusion in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmilović, M.; Stojanović, V.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    1999-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was applied to study the back-diffusion of electrons in argon at low and moderate values of E/N from 10Td to 10 kTd. Simulations were performed for gaps of 1 cm and for pressures corresponding to the breakdown voltages taken from experimental Paschen curves. Effects of inelastic collisions, ionization, reflection of electrons and anisotropic scattering as well as anisotropic initial and reflected angular distributions of electrons were included. A complete and detailed set of electron scattering cross sections that describes well electron transport in argon was used. We found a very good agreement of the results of simulations with the experimental data for well defined initial conditions, and with several models available in the literature.(A.V. Phelps and Z.LJ. Petrović), Plasma Sources Sci. Tehnol. 8, R21 (1999). While effect of reflection may be large, for realistic values of reflection coefficient and for realistic secondary electron productions the effect may be neglected for the accuracy required in gas discharge modeling.

  17. A complete comparison of simulated electron diffraction patterns using different parameterizations of the electron scattering factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I; Van Dyck, D

    2015-08-01

    The steadily improving experimental possibilities in instrumental resolution as in sensitivity and quantization of the data recording put increasingly higher demands on the precision of the scattering factors, which are the key ingredients for electron diffraction or high-resolution imaging simulation. In the present study, we will systematically investigate the accuracy of fitting of the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor for the calculation of electron diffraction intensities. It is shown that the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor are consistent to calculate electron diffraction intensities for thin specimens and low angle scattering. Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior (Lobato and Dyck [5], Kirkland [4], and Weickenmeier and Kohl [2]) produce similar results for both the undisplaced lattice model and the frozen phonon model, except for certain thicknesses and reflections.

  18. High resolution measurements of the electron scattering for applications in electron microscopy and Monte-Carlo simulations of electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, D

    2000-01-01

    scanning electron microscope is examined. By means of the scattering at mono-crystalline samples the influence of channeling (anomalous absorption and transmission) on backscattered electron spectra is shown. Captions are given in English language. This work presents high resolution measurements of the energy and complete angular distribution of the scattering of 20 keV electrons (energy resolution 0.55%). The examinations include take-off angles close to the target surface and non-perpendicular incidences of electrons partly for the first time. The results are of interest for the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, the interpretation of signals and new detector systems in electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy. Furthermore, they are used for the verification of electron scattering models and simulations. The applied compact electrostatic spectrometers with spherical and toroidal geometries are characterized and compared. High resolution spectra are obtained by deconvolution of the measu...

  19. Boltzmann electron PIC simulation of the E-sail effect

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    The solar wind electric sail (E-sail) is a planned in-space propulsion device that uses the natural solar wind momentum flux for spacecraft propulsion with the help of long, charged, centrifugally stretched tethers. The problem of accurately predicting the E-sail thrust is still somewhat open, however, due to a possible electron population trapped by the tether. Here we develop a new type of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for predicting E-sail thrust. In the new simulation, electrons are modelled as a fluid, hence resembling hydrid simulation, but in contrast to normal hybrid simulation, the Poisson equation is used as in normal PIC to calculate the self-consistent electrostatic field. For electron-repulsive parts of the potential, the Boltzmann relation is used. For electron-attractive parts of the potential we employ a power law which contains a parameter that can be used to control the number of trapped electrons. We perform a set of runs varying the parameter and select the one with the smallest number...

  20. Electronic noise modeling in statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-06-01

    We consider electronic noise modeling in tomographic image reconstruction when the measured signal is the sum of a Gaussian distributed electronic noise component and another random variable whose log-likelihood function satisfies a certain linearity condition. Examples of such likelihood functions include the Poisson distribution and an exponential dispersion (ED) model that can approximate the signal statistics in integration mode X-ray detectors. We formulate the image reconstruction problem as a maximum-likelihood estimation problem. Using an expectation-maximization approach, we demonstrate that a reconstruction algorithm can be obtained following a simple substitution rule from the one previously derived without electronic noise considerations. To illustrate the applicability of the substitution rule, we present examples of a fully iterative reconstruction algorithm and a sinogram smoothing algorithm both in transmission CT reconstruction when the measured signal contains additive electronic noise. Our simulation studies show the potential usefulness of accurate electronic noise modeling in low-dose CT applications.

  1. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; /SLAC; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  3. VHDL simulation with access to transistor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Hardware description languages such as VHDL have evolved to aid in the design of systems with large numbers of elements and a wide range of electronic and logical abstractions. For high performance circuits, behavioral models may not be able to efficiently include enough detail to give designers confidence in a simulation's accuracy. One option is to provide a link between the VHDL environment and a transistor level simulation environment. The coupling of the Vantage Analysis Systems VHDL simulator and the NOVA simulator provides the combination of VHDL modeling and transistor modeling.

  4. Simulations of electron transport in GaN devices

    CERN Document Server

    Arabshahi, H

    2002-01-01

    model of a device with traps to investigate this suggestion. The model includes the simulation of the capture and release of electrons by traps whose charge has a direct effect on the current flowing through the transistor terminals. The influence of temperature and light on the occupancy of the traps and the I-V characteristics are considered. It is concluded that traps are likely to play a substantial role in the behaviour of GaN field effect transistors. Further simulations were performed to model electron transport in AIGaN/GaN heterojunction FETs. So called HFET structures with a 78 nm Al sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 N pseudomorphically strained layer have been simulated, with the inclusion of spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects in the strained layer. The polarization effects are shown to not only increase the current density, but also improve the electron transport by inducing a higher electron density close to the positive charge sheet that occurs in the channel. This thesis de...

  5. Validation experiments for LBM simulations of electron beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Regina; Rüde, Ulrich; Markl, Matthias; Jüchter, Vera; Körner, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    This paper validates three-dimensional (3D) simulation results of electron beam melting (EBM) processes by comparing experimental and numerical data. The physical setup is presented which is discretized by a 3D thermal lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). An experimental process window is used for the validation depending on the line energy injected into the metal powder bed and the scan velocity of the electron beam. In the process window, the EBM products are classified into the categories, porous, good and swelling, depending on the quality of the surface. The same parameter sets are used to generate a numerical process window. A comparison of numerical and experimental process windows shows a good agreement. This validates the EBM model and justifies simulations for future improvements of the EBM processes. In particular, numerical simulations can be used to explain future process window scenarios and find the best parameter set for a good surface quality and dense products.

  6. Aircraft Electronics Maintenance Training Simulator. Curriculum Outlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    Instructional materials are provided for nine courses in an aircraft electronics maintenance training program. Courses are as follows: aviation basic electricity, direct current and alternating current electronics, basic avionic installations, analog electronics, digital electronics, microcomputer electronics, radio communications, aircraft…

  7. BITLLES: Electron Transport Simulation with Quantum Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Albareda, Guillermo; Benali, Abdelilah; Alarcón, Alfonso; Moises, Simeon; Oriols, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After the seminal work of R. Landauer in 1957 relating the electrical resistance of a conductor to its scattering properties, much progress has been made in our ability to predict the performance of electron devices in the DC (stationary) regime. Computational tools to describe their dynamical behavior (including the AC, transient and noise performance), however, are far from being as trustworthy as would be desired by the electronic industry. While there is no fundamental limitation to correctly modeling the high-frequency quantum transport and its fluctuations, certainly more careful attention must be paid to delicate issues such as overall charge neutrality, total current conservation, or the back action of the measuring apparatus. In this review, we will show how the core ideas behind the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics can be exploited to design an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm that provides a quantitative description of electron transport in open quantum systems. By making the most of traject...

  8. Wake modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.;

    , have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...... and trailed vorticity, has been approached by a simple semi-empirical model essentially based on an eddy viscosity philosophy. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the DWM approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power- and load aspects can be treated simultaneously...... methodology has been implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and example simulations of wake situations, from the small Tjæreborg wind farm, have been performed showing satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements...

  9. Multidisciplinary Modelling Tools for Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad

    This thesis presents multidisciplinary modelling techniques in a Design For Reliability (DFR) approach for power electronic circuits. With increasing penetration of renewable energy systems, the demand for reliable power conversion systems is becoming critical. Since a large part of electricity...... in reliability assessment of power modules, a three-dimensional lumped thermal network is proposed to be used for fast, accurate and detailed temperature estimation of power module in dynamic operation and different boundary conditions. Since an important issue in the reliability of power electronics...... are generic and valid to be used in circuit simulators or any programing software. These models are important building blocks for the reliable design process or performance assessment of power electronic circuits. The models can save time and cost in power electronics packaging and power converter to evaluate...

  10. A complete comparison of simulated electron diffraction patterns using different parameterizations of the electron scattering factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, I., E-mail: Ivan.Lobato@uantwerpen.be; Van Dyck, D.

    2015-08-15

    The steadily improving experimental possibilities in instrumental resolution as in sensitivity and quantization of the data recording put increasingly higher demands on the precision of the scattering factors, which are the key ingredients for electron diffraction or high-resolution imaging simulation. In the present study, we will systematically investigate the accuracy of fitting of the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor for the calculation of electron diffraction intensities. It is shown that the main parameterizations of the electron scattering factor are consistent to calculate electron diffraction intensities for thin specimens and low angle scattering. Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior (Lobato and Dyck [5], Kirkland [4], and Weickenmeier and Kohl [2]) produce similar results for both the undisplaced lattice model and the frozen phonon model, except for certain thicknesses and reflections. - Highlights: • Parameterizations of the electron scattering factor with the correct asymptotic behavior produce similar electron diffraction intensities. • Peng et al. parameterization is not adequate for calculations that involves higher-order Laue zones reflections. • Electron diffraction calculations of Cu-crystal with and without inclusion of phonons.

  11. Simulated Performance of the Wisconsin Superconducting Electron Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Bosch, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    The Wisconsin superconducting electron gun is modeled with multiparticle tracking simulations using the ASTRA and GPT codes. To specify the construction of the emittance-compensation solenoid, we studied the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the solenoid's strength and field errors. We also evaluated the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the bunch's initial emittance and the size of the laser spot on the photocathode. The results suggest that a 200-pC bunch with an emittance of about one mm-mrad can be produced for a free-electron laser.

  12. CMS: Simulated Higgs to two jets and two electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    1997-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the CMS detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. Here a Higgs boson is produced which decays into two jets of hadrons and two electrons. The lines represent the possible paths of particles produced by the proton-proton collision in the detector while the energy these particles deposit is shown in blue.

  13. Theory, modeling, and simulation annual report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report briefly discusses research on the following topics: development of electronic structure methods; modeling molecular processes in clusters; modeling molecular processes in solution; modeling molecular processes in separations chemistry; modeling interfacial molecular processes; modeling molecular processes in the atmosphere; methods for periodic calculations on solids; chemistry and physics of minerals; graphical user interfaces for computational chemistry codes; visualization and analysis of molecular simulations; integrated computational chemistry environment; and benchmark computations.

  14. Delay modeling in logic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acken, J. M.; Goldstein, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    As digital integrated circuit size and complexity increases, the need for accurate and efficient computer simulation increases. Logic simulators such as SALOGS (SAndia LOGic Simulator), which utilize transition states in addition to the normal stable states, provide more accurate analysis than is possible with traditional logic simulators. Furthermore, the computational complexity of this analysis is far lower than that of circuit simulation such as SPICE. An eight-value logic simulation environment allows the use of accurate delay models that incorporate both element response and transition times. Thus, timing simulation with an accuracy approaching that of circuit simulation can be accomplished with an efficiency comparable to that of logic simulation. 4 figures.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of large electron fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto

    2008-03-01

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, the latter with two different 'physics lists,' were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results to measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the six electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration matched the average measured with a diode and parallel-plate chamber to 0.04 cm or better. Calculated depth dose curves agreed to 2% with diode measurements in the build-up region, although for the lower beam energies there was a discrepancy of up to 5% in this region when calculated results are compared to parallel-plate measurements. Dose profiles at the depth of maximum dose matched to 2-3% in the central 25 cm of the field, corresponding to the field size of the largest applicator. A 4% match was obtained outside the central region. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. Simulations with the different codes and physics lists used different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. The true source and geometry parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to determine which parameter set, including the energy of the source, was closest to the truth. These results underscore the requirement for experimental benchmarks of depth penetration and electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  16. Computer Simulation of Electron Positron Annihilation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, y

    2003-10-02

    With the launching of the Next Linear Collider coming closer and closer, there is a pressing need for physicists to develop a fully-integrated computer simulation of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation process at center-of-mass energy of 1TeV. A simulation program acts as the template for future experiments. Either new physics will be discovered, or current theoretical uncertainties will shrink due to more accurate higher-order radiative correction calculations. The existence of an efficient and accurate simulation will help us understand the new data and validate (or veto) some of the theoretical models developed to explain new physics. It should handle well interfaces between different sectors of physics, e.g., interactions happening at parton levels well above the QCD scale which are described by perturbative QCD, and interactions happening at much lower energy scale, which combine partons into hadrons. Also it should achieve competitive speed in real time when the complexity of the simulation increases. This thesis contributes some tools that will be useful for the development of such simulation programs. We begin our study by the development of a new Monte Carlo algorithm intended to perform efficiently in selecting weight-1 events when multiple parameter dimensions are strongly correlated. The algorithm first seeks to model the peaks of the distribution by features, adapting these features to the function using the EM algorithm. The representation of the distribution provided by these features is then improved using the VEGAS algorithm for the Monte Carlo integration. The two strategies mesh neatly into an effective multi-channel adaptive representation. We then present a new algorithm for the simulation of parton shower processes in high energy QCD. We want to find an algorithm which is free of negative weights, produces its output as a set of exclusive events, and whose total rate exactly matches the full Feynman amplitude calculation. Our strategy is to create

  17. Simulating Ru L3-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, N.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-01

    Ruthenium L2,3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes transitions from core 2p orbitals to the 4d levels of the atom and is a powerful tool for interrogating the local electronic and molecular structure around the metal atom. However, a molecular-level interpretation of the Ru L2,3-edge spectral lineshapes is often complicated by spin–orbit coupling (SOC) and multiplet effects. In this study, we develop spin-free time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) as a viable and predictive tool to simulate the Ru L3-edge spectra. We successfully simulate and analyze the ground state Ru L3-edge XA spectra of a series of RuII and RuIII complexes: [Ru(NH3)6]2+/3+, [Ru(CN)6]4-/3-, [RuCl6]4-/3-, and the ground (1A1) and photoexcited (3MLCT) transient states of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). The TDDFT simulations reproduce all the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. The advantage of using TDDFT to assign complicated Ru L3-edge spectra is illustrated by its ability to identify ligand specific charge transfer features in complex molecules. We conclude that the B3LYP functional is the most reliable functional for accurately predicting the location of charge transfer features in these spectra. Experimental and simulated Ru L3-edge XA spectra are presented for the transition metal mixed-valence dimers [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5]- (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. We explore the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy and our simulations reveal that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is crucial for reproducing the experimentally determined valencies, highlighting the importance of the role of the solvent in transition metal charge transfer chemistry.

  18. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  19. Computer simulations of the random barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A brief review of experimental facts regarding ac electronic and ionic conduction in disordered solids is given followed by a discussion of what is perhaps the simplest realistic model, the random barrier model (symmetric hopping model). Results from large scale computer simulations are presented......, focusing on universality of the ac response in the extreme disorder limit. Finally, some important unsolved problems relating to hopping models for ac conduction are listed....

  20. Preparations, models, and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheinberger, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an outline for a typology of the different forms that scientific objects can take in the life sciences. The first section discusses preparations (or specimens)--a form of scientific object that accompanied the development of modern biology in different guises from the seventeenth century to the present: as anatomical-morphological specimens, as microscopic cuts, and as biochemical preparations. In the second section, the characteristics of models in biology are discussed. They became prominent from the end of the nineteenth century onwards. Some remarks on the role of simulations--characterising the life sciences of the turn from the twentieth to the twenty-first century--conclude the paper.

  1. Design, Modelling and Simulation of Two-Phase Two-Stage Electronic System with Orthogonal Output for Supplying of Two-Phase ASM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Prazenica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the two-stage two-phase electronic systems with orthogonal output voltages and currents - DC/AC/AC. Design of two-stage DC/AC/AC high frequency converter with two-phase orthogonal output using single-phase matrix converter is also introduced. Output voltages of them are strongly nonharmonic ones, so they must be pulse-modulated due to requested nearly sinusoidal currents with low total harmonic distortion. Simulation experiment results of matrix converter for both steady and transient states for IM motors are given in the paper, also experimental verification under R-L load, so far. The simulation results confirm a very good time-waveform of the phase current and the system seems to be suitable for low-cost application in automotive/aerospace industries and application with high frequency voltage sources.

  2. Modulator simulations for coherent electron cooling using a variable density electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, George I; Schwartz, Brian T; Bruhwiler, David L; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Wang, Gang; Hao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Increasing the luminosity of relativistic hadron beams is critical for the advancement of nuclear physics. Coherent electron cooling (CEC) promises to cool such beams significantly faster than alternative methods. We present simulations of 40 GeV/nucleon Au+79 ions through the first (modulator) section of a coherent electron cooler. In the modulator, the electron beam copropagates with the ion beam, which perturbs the electron beam density and velocity via anisotropic Debye shielding. In contrast to previous simulations, where the electron density was constant in time and space, here the electron beam has a finite transverse extent, and undergoes focusing by quadrupoles as it passes through the modulator. The peak density in the modulator increases by a factor of 3, as specified by the beam Twiss parameters. The inherently 3D particle and field dynamics is modeled with the parallel VSim framework using a $\\delta$f PIC algorithm. Physical parameters are taken from the CEC proof-of-principle experiment under de...

  3. SIMULATION IN THERMAL DESIGN FOR ELECTRONIC CONTROL UNIT OF ELECTRONIC UNIT PUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quankui; ZHU Keqing; ZHUO Bin; MAO Xiaojian; WANG Junxi

    2008-01-01

    The high working junction temperature of power component is the most common reason of its failure. So the thermal design is of vital importance in electronic control unit (ECU) design. By means of circuit simulation, the thermal design of ECU for electronic unit pump (EUP) fuel system is applied. The power dissipation model of each power component in the ECU is created and simulated. According to the analyses of simulation results, the factors which affect the power dissipation of components are analyzed. Then the ways for reducing the power dissipation of power components are carried out. The power dissipation of power components at different engine state is calculated and analyzed. The maximal power dissipation of each power component in all possible engine state is also carried out based on these simulations. A cooling system is designed based on these studies. The tests show that the maximum total power dissipation of ECU drops from 43.2 W to 33.84 W after these simulations and optimizations. These applications of simulations in thermal design of ECU can greatly increase the quality of the design, save the design cost and shorten design time

  4. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : users' guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers; (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only); and (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is

  5. Modelling the inelastic scattering of fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); D' Alfonso, A.J., E-mail: a.j@dalfonso.com.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    Imaging at atomic resolution based on the inelastic scattering of electrons has become firmly established in the last three decades. Harald Rose pioneered much of the early theoretical work on this topic, in particular emphasising the role of phase and the importance of a mixed dynamic form factor. In this paper we review how the modelling of inelastic scattering has subsequently developed and how numerical implementation has been achieved. A software package μSTEM is introduced, capable of simulating various imaging modes based on inelastic scattering in both scanning and conventional transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Harald Rose was a pioneer of important work on atomic resolution imaging using inelastic scattering. • We review how the modelling of inelastic scattering has subsequently developed and been applied. • A software package μSTEM is introduced, capable of simulating various inelastic imaging modes.

  6. Model Order Reduction for Electronic Circuits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Shontz, Suzanne

    Electronic circuits are ubiquitous; they are used in numerous industries including: the semiconductor, communication, robotics, auto, and music industries (among many others). As products become more and more complicated, their electronic circuits also grow in size and complexity. This increased ...... in the semiconductor industry. Circuit simulation proceeds by using Maxwell’s equations to create a mathematical model of the circuit. The boundary element method is then used to discretize the equations, and the variational form of the equations are then solved on the graph network....

  7. Notes on modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    These notes present a high-level overview of how modeling and simulation are carried out by practitioners. The discussion is of a general nature; no specific techniques are examined but the activities associated with all modeling and simulation approaches are briefly addressed. There is also a discussion of validation and verification and, at the end, a section on why modeling and simulation are useful.

  8. Simulations of electron capture supernovae with approximate neutrino transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Heiko [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Fischer, Tobias [University of Wroclaw (Poland); Jones, Sam [Keele University (United Kingdom); Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [TU Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    We have performed simulations of electron capture supernovae in a spherically symmetric general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics model with approximate neutrino treatment. We base our study on an 8.8 M {sub CircleDot} O-Ne-Mg core progenitor (Nomoto, 1984, 1987). We successfully obtain an explosion and compare our results with a reference run performed with an state-of-the-art three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport scheme implemented into the same hydrodynamic code. In general, we find good agreement in the the electron-flavor neutrino spectra. However, we find shorter explosion timescales and also significantly lower explosion energies of only 1.4 . 10{sup 48} erg. This result is in agreement with the explosion energy of SN 2008S as derived by Tominaga et al. (2013) based on light curve studies. Currently we are extending our simulations to the recently published super-AGB star progenitor models by Jones et al. (2013) with regard to their evolution towards an electron capture supernova. Our study also explores the role of weak interaction rates in determining the evolution and shaping the spectra of the emitted neutrinos.

  9. Application of Hardware-in-loop Simulation in Electronic Governor Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qian; HUANG Ying; ZHANG Fu-jun; ZHANG Yan-fang

    2008-01-01

    By building a turbine charged diesel engine model and a proportional electromagnet-rack model in Matlab/Simulink and using dSPACE, a hardware-in-loop(HIL) simulation platform for the electronic governor is constructed. A developed electronic governor is simulated in this platform. The comparison between the experiment and simulation results indicates that the built models can meet the HIL requirements. The control parameters obtained from virtual calibration and the control algorithm validated by HIL simulation can be applied in real bench experiments directly.

  10. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics: Modeling Atmospheric Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of work on this project has been completed. This report provides a summary of the progress made and the plan for the coming year. Also included with this report is a preprint of an article that was accepted for publication in Journal of Geophysical Research and describes in detail most of the results from the first year of effort. The goal for the first year was to develop a radiation belt electron model for fitting to data from the SAMPEX and Polar satellites that would provide an empirical description of the electron losses into the upper atmosphere. This was largely accomplished according to the original plan (with one exception being that, for reasons described below, the inclusion of the loss cone electrons in the model was deferred). The main concerns at the start were to accurately represent the balance between pitch angle diffusion and eastward drift that determines the dominant features of the low altitude data, and then to accurately convert the model into simulated data based on the characteristics of the particular electron detectors. Considerable effort was devoted to achieving these ends. Once the model was providing accurate results it was applied to data sets selected from appropriate periods in 1997, 1998, and 1999. For each interval of -30 to 60 days, the model parameters were calculated daily, thus providing good short and long term temporal resolution, and for a range of radial locations from L = 2.7 to 3.9. .

  11. Evaluating uncertainty in simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, M.D.; Beckman, R.J.; Morrison, J.D.; Upton, S.C.

    1998-12-01

    The authors discussed some directions for research and development of methods for assessing simulation variability, input uncertainty, and structural model uncertainty. Variance-based measures of importance for input and simulation variables arise naturally when using the quadratic loss function of the difference between the full model prediction y and the restricted prediction {tilde y}. The concluded that generic methods for assessing structural model uncertainty do not now exist. However, methods to analyze structural uncertainty for particular classes of models, like discrete event simulation models, may be attainable.

  12. Polaron Model of the Formation of Hydrated Electron States

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A computer simulation of the formation of photoexcited electrons in water is performed within the framework of a dynamic model. The obtained results are discussed in comparison with experimental data and theoretical estimates.

  13. Simulation Model of a Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation model of a controller that enables an active-stall wind turbine to ride through transient faults. The simulated wind turbine is connected to a simple model of a power system. Certain fault scenarios are specified and the turbine shall be able to sustain operation...... in case of such faults. The design of the controller is described and its performance assessed by simulations. The control strategies are explained and the behaviour of the turbine discussed....

  14. Simulation Model of a Transient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Sørensen, Poul; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the simulation model of a controller that enables an active-stall wind turbine to ride through transient faults. The simulated wind turbine is connected to a simple model of a power system. Certain fault scenarios are specified and the turbine shall be able to sustain operation...

  15. Dynamical simulations of strongly correlated electron materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Joel; Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Kotliar, Gabriel

    We present a formulation of quantum molecular dynamics that includes electron correlation effects via the Gutzwiller method. Our new scheme enables the study of the dynamical behavior of atoms and molecules with strong electron interactions. The Gutzwiller approach goes beyond the conventional mean-field treatment of the intra-atomic electron repulsion and captures crucial correlation effects such as band narrowing and electron localization. We use Gutzwiller quantum molecular dynamics to investigate the Mott transition in the liquid phase of a single-band metal and uncover intriguing structural and transport properties of the atoms.

  16. Modelling elliptically polarised Free Electron Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, J R; Freund, H P; McNeil, B W J

    2016-01-01

    A model of a Free Electron Laser operating with an elliptically polarised undulator is presented. The equations describing the FEL interaction, including resonant harmonic radiation fields, are averaged over an undulator period and generate a generalised Bessel function scaling factor, similar to that of planar undulator FEL theory. Comparison between simulations of the averaged model with those of an unaveraged model show very good agreement in the linear regime. Two unexpected results were found. Firstly, an increased coupling to harmonics for elliptical rather than planar polarisarised undulators. Secondly, and thought to be unrelated to the undulator polarisation, a signficantly different evolution between the averaged and unaveraged simulations of the harmonic radiation evolution approaching FEL saturation.

  17. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  18. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  19. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  20. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  1. IVOA Recommendation: Simulation Data Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lemson, Gerard; Cervino, Miguel; Gheller, Claudio; Gray, Norman; LePetit, Franck; Louys, Mireille; Ooghe, Benjamin; Wagner, Rick; Wozniak, Herve

    2014-01-01

    In this document and the accompanying documents we describe a data model (Simulation Data Model) describing numerical computer simulations of astrophysical systems. The primary goal of this standard is to support discovery of simulations by describing those aspects of them that scientists might wish to query on, i.e. it is a model for meta-data describing simulations. This document does not propose a protocol for using this model. IVOA protocols are being developed and are supposed to use the model, either in its original form or in a form derived from the model proposed here, but more suited to the particular protocol. The SimDM has been developed in the IVOA Theory Interest Group with assistance of representatives of relevant working groups, in particular DM and Semantics.

  2. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baur, David Gregory [Raytheon, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. Xyce 's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS Department at the University of California. The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://charleston.sandia.gov/bugzilla World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov http://charleston.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only)

  4. Particle-in-cell Simulations with Kinetic Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-02-12

    A new scheme, based on an exact separation between adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of drift-type modes is presented. The (linear and nonlinear) elliptic equations for the scalar fields are solved using a multi-grid solver. The new scheme yields linear growth rates in excellent agreement with theory and it is shown to conserve energy well into the nonlinear regime. It is also demonstrated that simulations with few electrons are reliable and accurate, suggesting that large-scale, PIC simulations with electron dynamics in toroidal geometry (e.g., tokamaks and stellarators plasmas) are within reach of present-day massively parallel supercomputers.

  5. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.6.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aadithya, Karthik Venkatraman [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2016 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Acknowledgements The BSIM Group at the University of California, Berkeley developed the BSIM3, BSIM4, BSIM6, BSIM-CMG and BSIM-SOI models. The BSIM3 is Copyright c 1999, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM4 is Copyright c 2006, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM6 is Copyright c 2015, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM-CMG is Copyright c 2012 and 2016, Regents of the University of California. The BSIM-SOI is Copyright c 1990, Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. The Mextram model has been developed by NXP Semiconductors until 2007, Delft University of Technology from 2007 to 2014, and Auburn University since April 2015. Copyrights c of Mextram are with Delft University of Technology, NXP Semiconductors and Auburn University. The MIT VS Model Research Group developed the MIT Virtual Source (MVS) model. Copyright c 2013 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. Trademarks Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and Tec

  6. Electron cloud effects: codes and simulations at KEK

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K

    2013-01-01

    Electron cloud effects had been studied at KEK-Photon Factory since 1995. e-p instability had been studied in proton rings since 1965 in BINP, ISR and PSR. Study of electron cloud effects with the present style, which was based on numerical simulations, started at 1995 in positron storage rings. The instability observed in KEKPF gave a strong impact to B factories, KEKB and PEPII, which were final stage of their design in those days. History of cure for electron cloud instability overlapped the progress of luminosity performance in KEKB. The studies on electron cloud codes and simulations in KEK are presented.

  7. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  8. Modeling and Simulation with INS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen D.; And Others

    INS, the Integrated Network Simulation language, puts simulation modeling into a network framework and automatically performs such programming activities as placing the problem into a next event structure, coding events, collecting statistics, monitoring status, and formatting reports. To do this, INS provides a set of symbols (nodes and branches)…

  9. Simulative Design of Pad Structure for High Density Electronic Interconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingyu LI; Chunqing WANG

    2005-01-01

    Solder bridge is a serious defect of solder joints in ultrafine pitch electronic device assemblies. Generation of the solder bridge is closely related to forming process of the solder joints. A three-dimensional model to simulate the formation of the solder bridge of QFP256 (quad flat packaging with 256 leads) is established and numerically calculated to predict the formation shape of the solder joints using surface evolver program. Based on the model, influence of structure of pads printed on circuit board on solder bridging is investigated. The results show that there is a critical solder volume Vc for solder joints to avoid solder bridging, and parameters of the pad size influence the critical solder volume.

  10. Simulation modeling of estuarine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A simulation model has been developed of Galveston Bay, Texas ecosystem. Secondary productivity measured by harvestable species (such as shrimp and fish) is evaluated in terms of man-related and controllable factors, such as quantity and quality of inlet fresh-water and pollutants. This simulation model used information from an existing physical parameters model as well as pertinent biological measurements obtained by conventional sampling techniques. Predicted results from the model compared favorably with those from comparable investigations. In addition, this paper will discuss remotely sensed and conventional measurements in the framework of prospective models that may be used to study estuarine processes and ecosystem productivity.

  11. Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, Peter S.; Murphree, Tom; Frederickson, Paul A.; Guest, Arlene A.

    2012-01-01

    MOVES Research & Education Systems Seminar: Presentation; Session 4: Collaborative NWDC/NPS M&S Research; Moderator: Curtis Blais; Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects; speakers: Peter Guest, Paul Frederickson & Tom Murphree Environmental Effects Group

  12. Common LISP as Simulation Program (CLASP of Electronic Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cerny

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an unusual and efficient usage of functional programming language Common LISP as simulation program (CLASP for electronic circuits is proposed. The principle of automatic self-modifying program has enabled complete freedom in definition of methods for optimized solution of any problem and speeding up the entire process of simulation. A new approach to program structure in electronic circuit simulator CLASP is described. The definition of simple electronic devices as resistor, voltage source and diode is given all together with description of their memory management in program CLASP. Other circuit elements can be easily defined in the same way. Simulation methods for electronic circuits as linear and nonlinear direct current analysis (DC are suggested. A comparison of performances of two different linear solvers (an original and the standard GNU GSL for circuit equations is demonstrated by an algorithm for automatic generation of huge circuits.

  13. TREAT Modeling and Simulation Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, Mark David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a four-phase process used to describe the strategy in developing modeling and simulation software for the Transient Reactor Test Facility. The four phases of this research and development task are identified as (1) full core transient calculations with feedback, (2) experiment modeling, (3) full core plus experiment simulation and (4) quality assurance. The document describes the four phases, the relationship between these research phases, and anticipated needs within each phase.

  14. Revolutions in energy through modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatro, M.; Woodard, J.

    1998-08-01

    The development and application of energy technologies for all aspects from generation to storage have improved dramatically with the advent of advanced computational tools, particularly modeling and simulation. Modeling and simulation are not new to energy technology development, and have been used extensively ever since the first commercial computers were available. However, recent advances in computing power and access have broadened the extent and use, and, through increased fidelity (i.e., accuracy) of the models due to greatly enhanced computing power, the increased reliance on modeling and simulation has shifted the balance point between modeling and experimentation. The complex nature of energy technologies has motivated researchers to use these tools to understand better performance, reliability and cost issues related to energy. The tools originated in sciences such as the strength of materials (nuclear reactor containment vessels); physics, heat transfer and fluid flow (oil production); chemistry, physics, and electronics (photovoltaics); and geosciences and fluid flow (oil exploration and reservoir storage). Other tools include mathematics, such as statistics, for assessing project risks. This paper describes a few advancements made possible by these tools and explores the benefits and costs of their use, particularly as they relate to the acceleration of energy technology development. The computational complexity ranges from basic spreadsheets to complex numerical simulations using hardware ranging from personal computers (PCs) to Cray computers. In all cases, the benefits of using modeling and simulation relate to lower risks, accelerated technology development, or lower cost projects.

  15. Electronic circuits modeling using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejević Miona V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper artificial neural networks (ANN are applied to modeling of electronic circuits. ANNs are used for application of the black-box modeling concept in the time domain. Modeling process is described, so the topology of the ANN, the testing signal used for excitation, together with the complexity of ANN are considered. The procedure is first exemplified in modeling of resistive circuits. MOS transistor, as a four-terminal device, is modeled. Then nonlinear negative resistive characteristic is modeled in order to be used as a piece-wise linear resistor in Chua's circuit. Examples of modeling nonlinear dynamic circuits are given encompassing a variety of modeling problems. A nonlinear circuit containing quartz oscillator is considered for modeling. Verification of the concept is performed by verifying the ability of the model to generalize i.e. to create acceptable responses to excitations not used during training. Implementation of these models within a behavioral simulator is exemplified. Every model is implemented in realistic surrounding in order to show its interaction, and of course, its usage and purpose.

  16. Stochastic modeling analysis and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Barry L

    1995-01-01

    A coherent introduction to the techniques for modeling dynamic stochastic systems, this volume also offers a guide to the mathematical, numerical, and simulation tools of systems analysis. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate-level industrial engineers and management science majors, it proposes modeling systems in terms of their simulation, regardless of whether simulation is employed for analysis. Beginning with a view of the conditions that permit a mathematical-numerical analysis, the text explores Poisson and renewal processes, Markov chains in discrete and continuous time, se

  17. Model reduction for circuit simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hinze, Michael; Maten, E Jan W Ter

    2011-01-01

    Simulation based on mathematical models plays a major role in computer aided design of integrated circuits (ICs). Decreasing structure sizes, increasing packing densities and driving frequencies require the use of refined mathematical models, and to take into account secondary, parasitic effects. This leads to very high dimensional problems which nowadays require simulation times too large for the short time-to-market demands in industry. Modern Model Order Reduction (MOR) techniques present a way out of this dilemma in providing surrogate models which keep the main characteristics of the devi

  18. Kinetic simulation of the electron-cyclotron maser instability: effect of a finite source size

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, A A

    2012-01-01

    The electron-cyclotron maser instability is widespread in the Universe, producing, e.g., radio emission of the magnetized planets and cool substellar objects. Diagnosing the parameters of astrophysical radio sources requires comprehensive nonlinear simulations of the radiation process. We simulate the electron-cyclotron maser instability in a very low-beta plasma. The model used takes into account the radiation escape from the source region and the particle flow through this region. We developed a kinetic code to simulate the time evolution of an electron distribution in a radio emission source. The model includes the terms describing the particle injection to and escape from the emission source region. The spatial escape of the emission from the source is taken into account by using a finite amplification time. The unstable electron distribution of the horseshoe type is considered. A number of simulations were performed for different parameter sets typical of the magnetospheres of planets and ultracool dwarf...

  19. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Organization (NATO) Sensors Electronics Technology (SET)-227 Panel on Cognitive Radar. The FAR M&S architecture developed in Phase I allows for...Air Force’s previously developed radar M&S tools. This report is organized as follows. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the FAR framework...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0074 FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT Kristine L. Bell and Anthony Kellems Metron, Inc

  20. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  1. The Portability of the "Electronics Workbench" Simulation Software to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi-Cheng, Dong; Collis, Betty

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the portability of a Canadian-made educational simulation software package, "The Electronics Workbench," to China that was part of a larger study conducted at the University of Twente (The Netherlands). Evaluation results of the software use in China are presented, including functionality for electronics education, ease of use,…

  2. The portability of the "Electronics Workbench" simulation software to China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Zhi-Cheng, Dong

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the portability of the Canadian-made simulation software package, "Electronic Workbench" package (EWB) to China. As part of a larger project investigating the portability of various educational software packages, the EWB package was used in electronics instruction in China and

  3. Geant4-DNA simulation of electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, S.; Kyriakou, I.; Tran, H. N.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents the simulation of monoenergetic electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water by the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (release 10.2p01). These spectra are simulated for several incident energies using the most recent Geant4-DNA physics models, and they are compared to literature data. The influence of Auger electron production is discussed. For the first time, a dedicated Geant4-DNA example allowing such simulations is described and is provided to Geant4 users, allowing further verification of Geant4-DNA track structure simulation capabilities.

  4. Geant4-DNA simulation of electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incerti, S., E-mail: sebastien.incerti@tdt.edu.vn [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170, Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Kyriakou, I. [Medical Physics Laboratory, University of Ioannina Medical School, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2017-04-15

    This work presents the simulation of monoenergetic electron slowing-down spectra in liquid water by the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit (release 10.2p01). These spectra are simulated for several incident energies using the most recent Geant4-DNA physics models, and they are compared to literature data. The influence of Auger electron production is discussed. For the first time, a dedicated Geant4-DNA example allowing such simulations is described and is provided to Geant4 users, allowing further verification of Geant4-DNA track structure simulation capabilities.

  5. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  6. Electronic emission of radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation : experiment and simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. -P.; Sence, M.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cafarelli, P.; Amsellem, A.; Sicard-Roselli, C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on electronic emission of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compare them to the gold bulk electron emission. This subject has undergone new interest within the perspective of using GNPs as a radiotherapy enhancer. The experimental results were simulated using various models (Livermore and PENELOPE) of the Geant 4 simulation toolkit dedicated to the calculation of the transportation of particles through the matter. O...

  7. Electron-plasmon model in the electron liquid theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.Vavrukh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose an accurate approach to the description of the electron liquid model in the electron and plasmon terms. Our ideas in the present paper are close to the conception of the collective variables which was developed in the papers of Bohm and Pines. However we use another body of mathematics in the transition to the expanded space of variable particles and plasmons realized by the transition operator. It is evident that in the Random Phase Approximation (RPA, the model which consists of two interactive subsystems of electrons and plasmons is equivalent to the electron liquid model with Coulomb interaction.

  8. Efficacy of Simulation-Based Learning of Electronics Using Visualization and Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Lung; Hong, Yu-Ru; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2011-01-01

    Software for simulation-based learning of electronics was implemented to help learners understand complex and abstract concepts through observing external representations and exploring concept models. The software comprises modules for visualization and simulative manipulation. Differences in learning performance of using the learning software…

  9. Monte-Carlo simulation of backscattered electrons in Auger electron spectroscopy. Part 1: Backscattering factor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholomier, M.; Vicario, E.; Doghmane, N.

    1987-10-01

    The contribution of backscattered electrons to Auger electrons yield was studied with a multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulation. The Auger backscattering factor has been calculated in the 5 keV-60 keV energy range. The dependence of the Auger backscattering factor on the primary energy and the beam incidence angle were determined. Spatial distributions of backscattered electrons and Auger electrons are presented for a point incident beam. Correlations between these distributions are briefly investigated.

  10. A VRLA battery simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoe, P.E.; Anbuky, A.H. [Invensys Energy Systems NZ Limited, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2004-05-01

    A valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery simulation model is an invaluable tool for the standby power system engineer. The obvious use for such a model is to allow the assessment of battery performance. This may involve determining the influence of cells suffering from state of health (SOH) degradation on the performance of the entire string, or the running of test scenarios to ascertain the most suitable battery size for the application. In addition, it enables the engineer to assess the performance of the overall power system. This includes, for example, running test scenarios to determine the benefits of various load shedding schemes. It also allows the assessment of other power system components, either for determining their requirements and/or vulnerabilities. Finally, a VRLA battery simulation model is vital as a stand alone tool for educational purposes. Despite the fundamentals of the VRLA battery having been established for over 100 years, its operating behaviour is often poorly understood. An accurate simulation model enables the engineer to gain a better understanding of VRLA battery behaviour. A system level multipurpose VRLA battery simulation model is presented. It allows an arbitrary battery (capacity, SOH, number of cells and number of strings) to be simulated under arbitrary operating conditions (discharge rate, ambient temperature, end voltage, charge rate and initial state of charge). The model accurately reflects the VRLA battery discharge and recharge behaviour. This includes the complex start of discharge region known as the coup de fouet. (author)

  11. Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma%Simulations and Measurement of Electron Energy and Effective Electron Temperature of Nanosecond Pulsed Argon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻雪晴; 信裕; 冯春雷; 丁洪斌

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of argon plasma driven by nanosecond pulsed plasma in a low-pressure plasma reactor is investigated using a global model, and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. The time evolution of plasma density and the electron energy probability function are calculated by solving the energy balance and Boltzmann equations. During and shortly after the discharge pulse, the electron energy probability function can be represented by a bi-Maxwellian distribution, indicating two energy groups of electrons. According to the effective electron temperature calculation, we find that there are more high-energy electrons that play an important role in the excitation and ionization processes than low-energy electrons. The effective electron temperature is also measured via optical emission spectroscopy to evaluate the simulation model. In the comparison, the simulation results are found to be in agreement with the measure- ments. Furthermore, variations of the effective electron temperature are presented versus other discharge parameters, such as pulse width time, pulse rise time and gas pressure.

  12. Modelling and Simulation: An Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McAleer (Michael); F. Chan (Felix); L. Oxley (Les)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe papers in this special issue of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation cover the following topics: improving judgmental adjustment of model-based forecasts, whether forecast updates are progressive, on a constrained mixture vector autoregressive model, whether all estimators are bor

  13. General introduction to simulation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation can be defined as a representation of real life systems to gain insight into their functions and to investigate the effects of alternative conditions or actions on the modeled system. Models are a simplification of a system. Most often, it is best to use experiments and field...

  14. Modelling, simulating and optimizing Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    of the boiler has been developed and simulations carried out by means of the Matlab integration routines. The model is prepared as a dynamic model consisting of both ordinary differential equations and algebraic equations, together formulated as a Differential-Algebraic- Equation system. Being able to operate...

  15. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-03-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provides a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  16. Continuum-atomistic simulation of picosecond laser heating of copper with electron heat capacity from ab initio calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of ab initio quantum mechanics (QM) calculation, the obtained electron heat capacity is implemented into energy equation of electron subsystem in two temperature model (TTM). Upon laser irradiation on the copper film, energy transfer from the electron subsystem to the lattice subsystem is modeled by including the electron-phonon coupling factor in molecular dynamics (MD) and TTM coupled simulation. The results show temperature and thermal melting difference between the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation and pure MD-TTM coupled simulation. The successful construction of the QM-MD-TTM integrated simulation provide a general way that is accessible to other metals in laser heating.

  17. Beam distribution reconstruction simulation for electron beam probe

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yongchun; Li, Peng; Kang, Xincai; Yin, Yan; Liu, Tong; You, Yaoyao; Chen, Yucong; Zhao, Tiecheng; Xu, Zhiguo; Wang, Yanyu; Yuan, Youjin

    2016-01-01

    Electron beam probe (EBP) is a new principle detector, which makes use of a low-intensity and low-energy electron beam to measure the transverse profile, bunch shape, beam neutralization and beam wake field of an intense beam with small dimensions. While can be applied to many aspects, we limit our analysis to beam distribution reconstruction. This kind of detector is almost non-interceptive for all of the beam and does not disturb the machine environment. In this paper, we present the theoretical aspects behind this technique for beam distribution measurement and some simulation results of the detector involved. First, a method to obtain parallel electron beam is introduced and a simulation code is developed. And then, EBP as a profile monitor for dense beam is simulated using fast scan method under various target beam profile, such as KV distribution, waterbag distribution, parabolic distribution, Gaussian distribution and halo distribution. Profile reconstruction from the deflected electron beam trajectory...

  18. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF SPIN-POLARIZED SECONDARY ELECTRONS FROM IRON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X. Sun; Z.J. Ding; H.M Li; K. Salma; Z.M. Zhang; W.S. Tan

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model considering the electron spin direction and spin asymmetry has been developed. The energy distribution of the secondary electron polarization and the primary energy dependence of the polarization from Fe are studied. The simulation results show that:(1) the intensity of the spin-up secondary electrons is larger thanvthat of thevspin-down secondary electrons, suggesting the secondary electrons are spin polarized; (2) the spin polarization of secondary electrons with nearly zero kinetic energy is higher than the average valance spin polarization, Pb=27% for Fe. With increasing kinetic energy, the spin polarization of the secondary electrons decreases to the value of Pb remaining constant at higher kinetic energies;(3) the spin polarization increases with an increase in the primary energy and reaches a saturation value at higher primary energy in both the Monte Carlo simulation and experimental results.

  19. Efficient simulations with electronic open boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfield, Andrew P.; Boleininger, Max; D'Agosta, Roberto; Iyer, Vyas; Thong, Aaron; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; White, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    We present a reformulation of the hairy-probe method for introducing electronic open boundaries that is appropriate for steady-state calculations involving nonorthogonal atomic basis sets. As a check on the correctness of the method we investigate a perfect atomic wire of Cu atoms and a perfect nonorthogonal chain of H atoms. For both atom chains we find that the conductance has a value of exactly one quantum unit and that this is rather insensitive to the strength of coupling of the probes to the system, provided values of the coupling are of the same order as the mean interlevel spacing of the system without probes. For the Cu atom chain we find in addition that away from the regions with probes attached, the potential in the wire is uniform, while within them it follows a predicted exponential variation with position. We then apply the method to an initial investigation of the suitability of graphene as a contact material for molecular electronics. We perform calculations on a carbon nanoribbon to determine the correct coupling strength of the probes to the graphene and obtain a conductance of about two quantum units corresponding to two bands crossing the Fermi surface. We then compute the current through a benzene molecule attached to two graphene contacts and find only a very weak current because of the disruption of the π conjugation by the covalent bond between the benzene and the graphene. In all cases we find that very strong or weak probe couplings suppress the current.

  20. Design and numerical simulation of thermionic electron gun

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseinzadeh, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the simulation of an electron gun. The effects of some parameters on the beam quality were studied and optimal choices were identified. It gives numerical beam qualities in common electrostatic triode gun, and the dependences on design parameters such as electrode geometries and bias voltages to these electrodes are shown. An electron beam of diameter 5 mm with energy of five kilo electron volt was assumed for simulation process. Some design parameters were identified as variable parameters in the presence of space charge. These parameters are the inclination angle of emission electrode, the applied voltage to focusing electrode, the gap width between the emission electrode and the focusing electrode and the diameter of the focusing electrode. The triode extraction system is designed and optimized by using CST software (for Particle Beam Simulations). The physical design of the extraction system is given in this paper. From the simulation results, it is concluded that the inclination angle ...

  1. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.2.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-09-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2014 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  2. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baur, David Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  3. Electron Thermodynamics in GRMHD Simulations of Low-Luminosity Black Hole Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Ressler, Sean M; Quataert, Eliot; Chandra, Mani; Gammie, Charles F

    2015-01-01

    Simple assumptions made regarding electron thermodynamics often limit the extent to which general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations can be applied to observations of low-luminosity accreting black holes. We present, implement, and test a model that self-consistently evolves an electron entropy equation and takes into account the effects of spatially varying electron heating and relativistic anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. We neglect the back-reaction of electron pressure on the dynamics of the accretion flow. Our model is appropriate for systems accreting at $\\ll 10^{-5}$ of the Eddington rate, so radiative cooling by electrons can be neglected. It can be extended to higher accretion rates in the future by including electron cooling and proton-electron Coulomb collisions. We present a suite of tests showing that our method recovers the correct solution for electron heating under a range of circumstances, including strong shocks and driven turbulence. Our initial a...

  4. Quantitative Test of the Evolution of Geant4 Electron Backscattering Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Basaglia, Tullio; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Evolutions of Geant4 code have affected the simulation of electron backscattering with respect to previously published results. Their effects are quantified by analyzing the compatibility of the simulated electron backscattering fraction with a large collection of experimental data for a wide set of physics configuration options available in Geant4. Special emphasis is placed on two electron scattering implementations first released in Geant4 version 10.2: the Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model and a single Coulomb scattering model based on Mott cross section calculation. The new Goudsmit-Saunderson multiple scattering model appears to perform equally or less accurately than the model implemented in previous Geant4 versions, depending on the electron energy. The new Coulomb scattering model was flawed from a physics point of view, but computationally fast in Geant4 version 10.2; the physics correction released in Geant4 version 10.2p01 severely degrades its computational performance. Evolutions in ...

  5. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  6. Simulation of the microtron electron beam profile formation using flattening filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloichikova, I. A.; Stuchebrov, S. G.; Danilova, I. B.; Naumenko, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of new modern methods of electron beam profile forming becomes an important problem with the expansion of the application spectrum of electrons, both in industry and in medicine. This paper presents the results of a numerical simulation of the electron beam profile formed by flattening filters of different materials (aluminum and ABS-plastic). The model corresponding to the actual beam was developed based on the experimental estimation of shape and profile of the extracted microtron electron beam. Next, the geometry of flattening filters made of aluminum and ABS-plastic was calculated, and the electron beam profile was theoretically analyzed.

  7. Stochastic models: theory and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2008-03-01

    Many problems in applied science and engineering involve physical phenomena that behave randomly in time and/or space. Examples are diverse and include turbulent flow over an aircraft wing, Earth climatology, material microstructure, and the financial markets. Mathematical models for these random phenomena are referred to as stochastic processes and/or random fields, and Monte Carlo simulation is the only general-purpose tool for solving problems of this type. The use of Monte Carlo simulation requires methods and algorithms to generate samples of the appropriate stochastic model; these samples then become inputs and/or boundary conditions to established deterministic simulation codes. While numerous algorithms and tools currently exist to generate samples of simple random variables and vectors, no cohesive simulation tool yet exists for generating samples of stochastic processes and/or random fields. There are two objectives of this report. First, we provide some theoretical background on stochastic processes and random fields that can be used to model phenomena that are random in space and/or time. Second, we provide simple algorithms that can be used to generate independent samples of general stochastic models. The theory and simulation of random variables and vectors is also reviewed for completeness.

  8. Hybrid simulation of whistler excitation by electron beams in two-dimensional non-periodic domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodroffe, J.R., E-mail: woodrofj@erau.edu; Streltsov, A.V., E-mail: streltsa@erau.edu

    2014-11-01

    We present a two-dimensional hybrid fluid-PIC scheme for the simulation of whistler wave excitation by relativistic electron beams. This scheme includes a number of features which are novel to simulations of this type, including non-periodic boundary conditions and fresh particle injection. Results from our model suggest that non-periodicity of the simulation domain results in the development of fundamentally different wave characteristics than are observed in periodic domains.

  9. Numerical modeling of electron-beam welding of dissimilar metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krektuleva, R. A.; Cherepanov, O. I.; Cherepanov, R. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to numerical modeling of heat transfer processes and estimation of thermal stresses in weld seams created by electron beam welding of heterogeneous metals. The mathematical model is based on a system of equations that includes the Lagrange's variational equation of theory of plasticity and variational equation of M. Biot's principle to simulate the heat transfer processes. The two-dimensional problems (plane strain and plane stress) are considered for estimation of thermal stresses in welds considering differences of mechanical properties of welded materials. The model is developed for simulation of temperature fields and stresses during electron beam welding.

  10. Dynamical electron backscatter diffraction patterns. Part I: pattern simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; De Graef, Marc

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for the simulation of dynamic electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns is introduced. The computational approach merges deterministic dynamic electron-scattering computations based on Bloch waves with a stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the energy, depth, and directional distributions of the backscattered electrons (BSEs). An efficient numerical scheme is introduced, based on a modified Lambert projection, for the computation of the scintillator electron count as a function of the position and orientation of the EBSD detector; the approach allows for the rapid computation of an individual EBSD pattern by bi-linear interpolation of a master EBSD pattern. The master pattern stores the BSE yield as a function of the electron exit direction and exit energy and is used along with weight factors extracted from the MC simulation to obtain energy-weighted simulated EBSD patterns. Example simulations for nickel yield realistic patterns and energy-dependent trends in pattern blurring versus filter window energies are in agreement with experimental energy-filtered EBSD observations reported in the literature.

  11. Computational Modeling of Simulation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Mexico , March 1979. 14. Kinney, G. F.,.::. IeiN, .hoce 1h Ir, McMillan, p. 57, 1962. 15. Courant and Friedrichs, ,U: r. on moca an.: Jho...AD 79 275 NEW MEXICO UNIV ALBUGUERGUE ERIC H WANG CIVIL ENGINE-ETC F/6 18/3 COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS.(U) JUN 80 6 LEIGH, W CHOWN, B...COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF SIMULATION TESTS00 0G. Leigh W. Chown B. Harrison Eric H. Wang Civil Engineering Research Facility University of New Mexico

  12. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian; Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver; Petrov, Fedor

    2013-11-01

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  13. Electronic emission of radio-sensitizing gold nanoparticles under X-ray irradiation : experiment and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Casta, R; Sence, M; Moretto-Capelle, P; Cafarelli, P; Amsellem, A; Sicard-Roselli, C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on electronic emission of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and compare them to the gold bulk electron emission. This subject has undergone new interest within the perspective of using GNPs as a radiotherapy enhancer. The experimental results were simulated using various models (Livermore and PENELOPE) of the Geant 4 simulation toolkit dedicated to the calculation of the transportation of particles through the matter. Our results show that the GNPs coating is a key parameter to correctly construe the experimental GNPs electronic emission after X-ray irradiation and point out some limitations of the PENELOPE model. Using XPS spectra and Geant4 Livermore simulations,we propose a method to determine precisely the coating surface density of the GNPs. We also show that the expected intrinsic nano-scale electronic emission enhancement effect - suspected to contribute to the GNPs radio-sensitizing properties - participates at most for a few pe...

  14. Backscattered electron emission after proton impact on carbon and gold films: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hespeels, F.; Heuskin, A.C. [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Scifoni, E. [TIFPA-INFN, Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraemer, M. [GSI-Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Biophysik, Max Planck-Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Lucas, S., E-mail: stephane.lucas@unamur.be [University of Namur, PMR, 61 rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    This work aims at measuring the proton induced secondary electron energy spectra from nanometer thin films. Backscattered electron energy spectra were measured within an energy range from 0 to 600 eV using a Retarding Field Analyser (RFA). This paper presents energy spectra obtained for proton (0.5 MeV; 1 MeV; 1.5 MeV; 2 MeV) irradiation of thin carbon films (50 and 100 nm thick) and thin gold film (200 nm). These experimental spectra were compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on TRAX code and Geant4 simulation toolkit. Good agreement between experimental, TRAX and Geant4 results were observed for the carbon target. For the gold target, we report major differences between both Monte Carlo environments. Limitation of Geant4 models for low energy electron emission was highlighted. On the contrary, TRAX simulations present encouraging results for the modeling of low-energy electron emission from gold target.

  15. SIMULATION OF COLLECTIVE RISK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Pacáková

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on providing brief theoretical definitions of the basic terms and methods of modeling and simulations of insurance risks in non-life insurance by means of mathematical and statistical methods using statistical software. While risk assessment of insurance company in connection with its solvency is a rather complex and comprehensible problem, its solution starts with statistical modeling of number and amount of individual claims. Successful solution of these fundamental problems enables solving of curtail problems of insurance such as modeling and simulation of collective risk, premium an reinsurance premium calculation, estimation of probabiliy of ruin etc. The article also presents some essential ideas underlying Monte Carlo methods and their applications to modeling of insurance risk. Solving problem is to find the probability distribution of the collective risk in non-life insurance portfolio. Simulation of the compound distribution function of the aggregate claim amount can be carried out, if the distibution functions of the claim number process and the claim size are assumed given. The Monte Carlo simulation is suitable method to confirm the results of other methods and for treatments of catastrophic claims, when small collectives are studied. Analysis of insurance risks using risk theory is important part of the project Solvency II. Risk theory is analysis of stochastic features of non-life insurance process. The field of application of risk theory has grown rapidly. There is a need to develop the theory into form suitable for practical purposes and demostrate their application. Modern computer simulation techniques open up a wide field of practical applications for risk theory concepts, without requiring the restricive assumptions and sophisticated mathematics. This article presents some comparisons of the traditional actuarial methods and of simulation methods of the collective risk model.

  16. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  17. Many-beam dynamical simulation of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, Aimo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)], E-mail: winkelm@mpi-halle.mpg.de; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Sweeney, Francis [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Day, Austin P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd., Dixton Rd., Monmouth, Gwent, NP25 3PP (United Kingdom); Parbrook, Peter [EPSRC National Centre for III-V Technologies, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    We present an approach for the simulation of complete electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns where the relative intensity distributions in the patterns are accurately reproduced. The Bloch wave theory is applied to describe the electron diffraction process. For the simulation of experimental patterns with a large field of view, a large number of reflecting planes has to be taken into account. This is made possible by the Bethe perturbation of weak reflections. Very good agreement is obtained for simulated and experimental patterns of gallium nitride GaN{l_brace}0001{r_brace} at 20 kV electron energy. Experimental features like zone-axis fine structure and higher-order Laue zone rings are accurately reproduced. We discuss the influence of the diffraction of the incident beam in our experiment.

  18. Molecular modeling and multiscaling issues for electronic material applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamoto, Nancy; Yuen, Matthew; Fan, Haibo

    Volume 1 : Molecular Modeling and Multiscaling Issues for Electronic Material Applications provides a snapshot on the progression of molecular modeling in the electronics industry and how molecular modeling is currently being used to understand material performance to solve relevant issues in this field. This book is intended to introduce the reader to the evolving role of molecular modeling, especially seen through the eyes of the IEEE community involved in material modeling for electronic applications.  Part I presents  the role that quantum mechanics can play in performance prediction, such as properties dependent upon electronic structure, but also shows examples how molecular models may be used in performance diagnostics, especially when chemistry is part of the performance issue.  Part II gives examples of large-scale atomistic methods in material failure and shows several examples of transitioning between grain boundary simulations (on the atomistic level)and large-scale models including an example ...

  19. Modeling and Simulation for Design of Suspended MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-21

    simulating systems with complicated electronics is limited. Exporting reduced-order models to aHDLs enables co-simulation with transistor-level...circuit-level behavioral simulation, the models are implemented in analog hardware description languages ( aHDLs ) or directly in element matrices, both...end of module The physical equations could be implemented in the aHDLs in multiple alternative ways. It has been noticed that the language

  20. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the modelling, simulating and optimizing including experimental verification as being carried out as part of a Ph.D. project being written resp. supervised by the authors. The work covers dynamic performance of both water-tube boilers and fire tube boilers. A detailed dynamic...... model of the boiler has been developed and simulations carried out by means of the Matlab integration routines. The model is prepared as a dynamic model consisting of both ordinary differential equations and algebraic equations, together formulated as a Differential-Algebraic-Equation system. Being able...... to operate a boiler plant dynamically means that the boiler designs must be able to absorb any fluctuations in water level and temperature gradients resulting from the pressure change in the boiler. On the one hand a large water-/steam space may be required, i.e. to build the boiler as big as possible. Due...

  1. Simulations of electron channeling in bent silicon crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Sushko, G B; Korol, A V; Greiner, Walter; Solov'yov, A V; Polozkov, R G; Ivanov, V K

    2013-01-01

    We report on the results of theoretical simulations of the electron channeling in a bent silicon crystal. The dynamics of ultra-relativistic electrons in the crystal is computed using the newly developed part [1] of the MBN Explorer package [2,3], which simulates classical trajectories of in a crystalline medium by integrating the relativistic equations of motion with account for the interaction between the projectile and crystal atoms. A Monte Carlo approach is employed to sample the incoming electrons and to account for thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms. The electron channeling along Si(110) crystallographic planes are studied for the projectile energies 195--855 MeV and different curvatures of the bent crystal.

  2. Simulation of relativistically colliding laser-generated electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiaohu; Sarri, Gianluca; Borghesi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The plasma dynamics resulting from the simultaneous impact, of two equal, ultra-intense laser pulses, in two spatially separated spots, onto a dense target is studied via particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The simulations show that electrons accelerated to relativistic speeds, cross the target and exit at its rear surface. Most energetic electrons are bound to the rear surface by the ambipolar electric field and expand along it. Their current is closed by a return current in the target, and this current configuration generates strong surface magnetic fields. The two electron sheaths collide at the midplane between the laser impact points. The magnetic repulsion between the counter-streaming electron beams separates them along the surface normal direction, before they can thermalize through other beam instabilities. This magnetic repulsion is also the driving mechanism for the beam-Weibel (filamentation) instability, which is thought to be responsible for magnetic field growth close to the internal shocks of ...

  3. Intelligent Mobility Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    cog.cs.drexel.edu/act-r/index.html) •Models sensory / motor performance of human driver or teleoperator 27UNCLASSIFIED: Distribution Statement A. Approved for...U.S. ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Intelligent Mobility Modeling and Simulation 1 Dr. P. Jayakumar, S. Arepally...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Contents 1. Mobility - Autonomy - Latency Relationship 2. Machine - Human Partnership 3. Development of Shared Control

  4. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永锋; 谭畅; 韩先伟; 谭永华

    2012-01-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  5. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator: Reference Guide, Version 5.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Rankin, Eric Lamont [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Schiek, Richard Louis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Santarelli, Keith R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Fixel, Deborah A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical and Microsystems Modeling; Coffey, Todd S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Mathematics and Applications; Pawlowski, Roger P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Applied Mathematics and Applications

    2009-11-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users’ Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users’ Guide.

  6. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Warrender, Christina E.; Baur, David Gregory.

    2013-08-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  7. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  8. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 4.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-03-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  10. Simulation on Buildup of Electron Cloud in Proton Circular Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beam are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerator. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detail processes on the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron cloud. China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the largest scientific project in building, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H- linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80Mev proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6GeV with a repetition rate 25Hz. During the beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause a serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and dens...

  11. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2004-01-01

    on the boiler) have been dened. Furthermore a number of constraints related to: minimum and maximum boiler load gradient, minimum boiler size, Shrinking and Swelling and Steam Space Load have been dened. For dening the constraints related to the required boiler volume a dynamic model for simulating the boiler...... performance has been developed. Outputs from the simulations are shrinking and swelling of water level in the drum during for example a start-up of the boiler, these gures combined with the requirements with respect to allowable water level uctuations in the drum denes the requirements with respect to drum...... size. The model has been formulated with a specied building-up of the pressure during the start-up of the plant, i.e. the steam production during start-up of the boiler is output from the model. The steam outputs together with requirements with respect to steam space load have been utilized to dene...

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sixie; Zhou, Caizhi

    2017-08-01

    Nanoindentation is a hardness test method applied to small volumes of material which can provide some unique effects and spark many related research activities. To fully understand the phenomena observed during nanoindentation tests, modeling and simulation methods have been developed to predict the mechanical response of materials during nanoindentation. However, challenges remain with those computational approaches, because of their length scale, predictive capability, and accuracy. This article reviews recent progress and challenges for modeling and simulation of nanoindentation, including an overview of molecular dynamics, the quasicontinuum method, discrete dislocation dynamics, and the crystal plasticity finite element method, and discusses how to integrate multiscale modeling approaches seamlessly with experimental studies to understand the length-scale effects and microstructure evolution during nanoindentation tests, creating a unique opportunity to establish new calibration procedures for the nanoindentation technique.

  13. Multiscale Stochastic Simulation and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Glimm; Xiaolin Li

    2006-01-10

    Acceleration driven instabilities of fluid mixing layers include the classical cases of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, driven by a steady acceleration and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, driven by an impulsive acceleration. Our program starts with high resolution methods of numerical simulation of two (or more) distinct fluids, continues with analytic analysis of these solutions, and the derivation of averaged equations. A striking achievement has been the systematic agreement we obtained between simulation and experiment by using a high resolution numerical method and improved physical modeling, with surface tension. Our study is accompanies by analysis using stochastic modeling and averaged equations for the multiphase problem. We have quantified the error and uncertainty using statistical modeling methods.

  14. Modeling Electronic Properties of Complex Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Karthik

    Complex oxides are a class of materials that have recently emerged as potential candidates for electronic applications owing to their interesting electronic properties. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a fundamental understanding of these electronic properties using a combination of first-principles approaches based on density functional theory (DFT), and Schr odinger-Poisson (SP) simulation (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.

  15. Simulation of high-energy radiation belt electron fluxes using NARMAX-VERB coupled codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhotin, I P; Drozdov, A Y; Shprits, Y Y; Boynton, R J; Subbotin, D A; Balikhin, M A

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a fusion of data-driven and physics-driven methodologies of energetic electron flux forecasting in the outer radiation belt. Data-driven NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Averages with eXogenous inputs) model predictions for geosynchronous orbit fluxes have been used as an outer boundary condition to drive the physics-based Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code, to simulate energetic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt environment. The coupled system has been tested for three extended time periods totalling several weeks of observations. The time periods involved periods of quiet, moderate, and strong geomagnetic activity and captured a range of dynamics typical of the radiation belts. The model has successfully simulated energetic electron fluxes for various magnetospheric conditions. Physical mechanisms that may be responsible for the discrepancies between the model results and observations are discussed.

  16. Simulations of space charge neutralization in a magnetized electron cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerity, James [Texas A-M; McIntyre, Peter M. [Texas A-M; Bruhwiler, David Leslie [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Hall, Christopher [RadiaSoft, Boulder; Moens, Vince Jan [Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne; Park, Chong Shik [Fermilab; Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab

    2017-02-02

    Magnetized electron cooling at relativistic energies and Ampere scale current is essential to achieve the proposed ion luminosities in a future electron-ion collider (EIC). Neutralization of the space charge in such a cooler can significantly increase the magnetized dynamic friction and, hence, the cooling rate. The Warp framework is being used to simulate magnetized electron beam dynamics during and after the build-up of neutralizing ions, via ionization of residual gas in the cooler. The design follows previous experiments at Fermilab as a verification case. We also discuss the relevance to EIC designs.

  17. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  18. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  19. Animal models for simulating weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey-Holton, E.; Wronski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    NASA has developed a rat model to simulate on earth some aspects of the weightlessness alterations experienced in space, i.e., unloading and fluid shifts. Comparison of data collected from space flight and from the head-down rat suspension model suggests that this model system reproduces many of the physiological alterations induced by space flight. Data from various versions of the rat model are virtually identical for the same parameters; thus, modifications of the model for acute, chronic, or metabolic studies do not alter the results as long as the critical components of the model are maintained, i.e., a cephalad shift of fluids and/or unloading of the rear limbs.

  20. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Amstutz, Christian; Weber, Marc; Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows \\mbox{co-simulation} with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g.~VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  1. Simulation Tool for Inventory Models: SIMIN

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiksha Saxen; Tulsi Kushwaha

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated simulation optimization model for the inventory system is developed. An effective algorithm is developed to evaluate and analyze the back-end stored simulation results. This paper proposes simulation tool SIMIN (Inventory Simulation) to simulate inventory models. SIMIN is a tool which simulates and compares the results of different inventory models. To overcome various practical restrictive assumptions, SIMIN provides values for a number of performance measurement...

  2. Modeling and simulation of electronic control full hydraulic steering system for grain combine harvester%谷物联合收割机电控全液压转向系统建模与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张成涛; 谭彧; 吴刚; 王书茂

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, combine harvester navigation system based on machine vision had important significance in improving the harvesting efficiency of combine harvester, reducing the labor intensity of the driver and so on. In order to realize the automatic steering control of the combine operation path, it is necessary to reconstruct the original hydraulic steering system of combine harvester. To analyze the steering performance of the modified electronically controlled hydraulic steering system for combine harvester in visual navigation system, mathematical models of the electronically controlled hydraulic steering system were established after introducing the structure of combine harvester visual navigation system. The system was mainly composed of combine harvester body, full hydraulic steering, steering transmission mechanism and hybrid stepping motor. In this paper, the mathematical models of the parts were established respectively. The steering model of combine harvester was firstly simplified to linear 2-DOF rear wheel steering vehicle model, and the basic handling dynamics model of combine harvester was established. Then, the dynamic mathematical model of simplified hydraulic steering system was given in the analysis of the fully hydraulic steering work principle for combine harvester. And then, the static model of the steering transmission mechanism was established according to its geometrical structures. Finally, the stepping motor model was simplified as an inertial system according to the step response performance, and its transfer function was given. The electronically controlled hydraulic steering system was simulated through the joint simulation method of each mathematical model by Simulink software. In order to verify the correctness of simulation models, the dynamic response characteristics of steering system was tested with the steering wheel angle step input of 90° on Xinjiang 2A combine harvester. In the real vehicle test, vehicle yaw rate was

  3. 3D simulations of gyrosynchrotron emission from mildly anisotropic nonuniform electron distributions in symmetric magnetic loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, Alexey A; Fleishman, Gregory D

    2011-01-01

    Microwave emission of solar flares is formed primarily by incoherent gyrosynchrotron radiation generated by accelerated electrons in coronal magnetic loops. The resulting emission depends on many factors, including pitch-angle distribution of the emitting electrons and the source geometry. In this work, we perform systematic simulations of solar microwave emission using recently developed tools (GS Simulator and fast gyrosynchrotron codes) capable of simulating maps of radio brightness and polarization as well as spatially resolved emission spectra. A 3D model of a symmetric dipole magnetic loop is used. We compare the emission from isotropic and anisotropic (of loss-cone type) electron distributions. We also investigate effects caused by inhomogeneous distribution of the emitting particles along the loop. It is found that effect of the adopted moderate electron anisotropy is the most pronounced near the footpoints and it also depends strongly on the loop orientation. Concentration of the emitting particles a...

  4. Electron acceleration mechanisms in the interaction of ultrashort lasers with underdense plasmas: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, J.; Lefebvre, E.; Malka, V.; Marques, J.-R.; Amiranoff, F.; Solodov, A.; Mora, P.

    2002-06-30

    An experiment investigating the production of relativistic electrons from the interaction of ultrashort multi-terawatt laser pulses with an underdense plasma is presented. Electrons were accelerated to tens of MeV and the maximum electron energy increased as the plasma density decreased. Simulations have been performed in order to model the experiment. They show a good agreement with the trends observed in the experiment and the spectra of accelerated electrons could be reproduced successfully. The simulations have been used to study the relative contribution of the different acceleration mechanisms: plasma wave acceleration, direct laser acceleration and stochastic heating. The results show that in low density case (1 percent of the critical density) acceleration by laser is dominant mechanism. The simulations at high density also suggest that direct laser acceleration is more efficient that stochastic heating.

  5. A simple approach for electron-electron scattering in nonequilibrium Green's function simulations (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winge, David O.; Franckie, Martin; Verozzi, Claudio; Wacker, Andreas; Pereira, Mauro F.

    2016-10-01

    Regardless of all the success of Mid Infrared Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), they still do not operate at room temperature in the THz range. The main temperature degrading mechanism for THz QCLs is not known in time of writing this abstract and it is still a topic of debate by the community [S. Khanal et al, J. Opt. 16 094001, 2014]. This is a challenge to theory and it is crucial to treat all possible scattering channels with the same mathematical footing. A summary of different methods for simulating these structures is found in [C. Jirauschek et al, Appl. Phys. Rev. 1 011307, 2014]. In this work we include and study the effects of electron-electron scattering via the Single Plasmon Pole Approximation (SPPA). In this approximation we capture both the static limit as well as dynamic effects. This gives an energy dependent (non-local in time) interaction beyond the Hartree-Fock approximation. This has been studied in a similar model with promising results [T. Schmielau and M.F. Pereira, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 231111, 2009], and with this work we want to adapt the idea into the model described in Ref. [A. Wacker et a, IEEE Journal of Sel. Top. in Quantum Electron.,19 1200611, 2013]. We start by summarizing the theory underlying the SPPA and we show how it is implemented in the context of our formalism, by showing good agreement with the results for a four well quantum cascade laser [M. Amanti et al, New J. Phys. 11 125022, 2009].

  6. Simulation Tools for Power Electronics Courses Based on Java Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesin, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Flavio A. S.; Sampaio, Leonardo P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents interactive power electronics educational tools. These interactive tools make use of the benefits of Java language to provide a dynamic and interactive approach to simulating steady-state ideal rectifiers (uncontrolled and controlled; single-phase and three-phase). Additionally, this paper discusses the development and use of…

  7. Simulation Tools for Power Electronics Courses Based on Java Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesin, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Flavio A. S.; Sampaio, Leonardo P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents interactive power electronics educational tools. These interactive tools make use of the benefits of Java language to provide a dynamic and interactive approach to simulating steady-state ideal rectifiers (uncontrolled and controlled; single-phase and three-phase). Additionally, this paper discusses the development and use of…

  8. Determination of Mean Inner Potential by Electron Holography Along with Electron Dynamic Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩国; 刘红荣; 杨奇斌; 张泽

    2003-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography in a field-emission-gun transmission electron microscope and electron dynamic simulation is used to determine the mean inner potential of copper. The phase shift of object wave versus specimen thickness is calculated up to 30 nm using electron dynamic formula, and the sample thickness is decided by match of the experimental and calculated phase shift. Based on the measured phase shift, the calculated mean inner potential of Cu is 21.2 V, which agrees with the reported values within the experimental error.

  9. Functional models of power electronic components for system studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Yang, Lifeng; Dravid, Narayan

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to model power electronic circuits has been developed to facilitate simulation studies of system-level issues. The underlying concept for this approach is to develop an equivalent circuit, the functional model, that performs the same functions as the actual circuit but whose operation can be simulated by using larger time step size and the reduction in model complexity, the computation time required by a functional model is significantly shorter than that required by alternative approaches. The authors present this novel modeling approach and discuss the functional models of two major power electronic components, the DC/DC converter unit and the load converter, that are being considered by NASA for use in the Space Station Freedom electric power system. The validity of these models is established by comparing the simulation results with available experimental data and other simulation results obtained by using a more established modeling approach. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by incorporating these models into a power system model and simulating the system responses and interactions between components under various conditions.

  10. Simulation of Electron Trajectories in the Multicusp Ion Source Using Geantn4 Monte Carlo Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi Azadboni, Fatemeh; Sedaghatizade, Mahmood

    2010-04-01

    To optimize the multicusp ion source, understanding of transport properties of electrons is indispensable. Since the transport of electrons in the multicusp ion source is a three-dimensional problem, we use the 3D computer code Geant4, to model the particle trajectories. The goal is to study the effect of electron injection into a cylindrical gas chamber and the electron trajectories. The role of the magnetic filter in contemporary negative ion sources is analyzed. The conditions in the magnetic filter adjacent to the plasma electrode optimum for the generation, formation, and extraction of an H- ion beam are found. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Electron Beam Melting and Refining of Metals: Computational Modeling and Optimization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katia Vutova; Veliko Donchev

    2013-01-01

    ..., instrument engineering, electronics, etc. A time-dependent 3D axis-symmetrical heat model for simulation of thermal transfer in metal ingots solidified in a water-cooled crucible at electron beam melting and refining (EBMR) is developed...

  12. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, A; Beebe, E N; Raparia, D

    2013-03-01

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 ÷ 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 ÷ 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  13. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  14. Modelling low energy electron interactions for biomedical uses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M; Garcia, G [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A; Oller, J C [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Huerga, C; Tellez, M [Hospital Universitario La Paz, paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Hubin-Fraskin, M J [Department of Chemistry, University of Liege, 4000 Liege 1 (Belgium); Nixon, K; Brunger, M, E-mail: g.garcia@imaff.cfmac.csic.e [School of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Current radiation based medical applications in the field of radiotherapy, radio-diagnostic and radiation protection require modelling single particle interactions at the molecular level. Due to their relevance in radiation damage to biological systems, special attention should be paid to include the effect of low energy secondary electrons. In this study we present a single track simulation procedure for photons and electrons which is based on reliable experimental and theoretical cross section data and the energy loss distribution functions derived from our experiments. The effect of including secondary electron interactions in this model will be discussed.

  15. Simulating electron spin entanglement in a double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Moreno, M. A.; Hernandez de La Luz, A. D.; Meza-Montes, Lilia

    2011-03-01

    One of the biggest advantages of having a working quantum-computing device when compared with a classical one, is the exponential speedup of calculations. This exponential increase is based on the ability of a quantum system to create and operate on entangled states. In order to study theoretically the entanglement between two electron spins, we simulate the dynamics of two electron spins in an electrostatically-defined double quantum dot with a finite barrier height between the dots. Electrons are initially confined to separated quantum dots. Barrier height is varied and the spin entanglement as a function of this variation is investigated. The evolution of the system is simulated by using a numerical approach for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two particles. Partially supported by VIEP-BUAP.

  16. Standard for Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    This NASA Technical Standard establishes uniform practices in modeling and simulation to ensure essential requirements are applied to the design, development, and use of models and simulations (MS), while ensuring acceptance criteria are defined by the program project and approved by the responsible Technical Authority. It also provides an approved set of requirements, recommendations, and criteria with which MS may be developed, accepted, and used in support of NASA activities. As the MS disciplines employed and application areas involved are broad, the common aspects of MS across all NASA activities are addressed. The discipline-specific details of a given MS should be obtained from relevant recommended practices. The primary purpose is to reduce the risks associated with MS-influenced decisions by ensuring the complete communication of the credibility of MS results.

  17. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  18. Numerical simulations of a hollow electron lens as a scraping device for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Previtali, V; Valishev, A; Redaelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The use of hollow electron beam lens for scraping high energy proton beams has been extensively tested at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. In order to evaluate a possible application of a similar a device in the LHC, a dedicated new routine has been implemented in the standard 6D tracking code used at CERN for the design of the LHC collimation system. The effects of a finite length cylinder of electrons encompassing the main proton beam and traveling in the opposite direction is described in the routine. Realistic electron distributions, including measured radial imperfections, have been included in the model. Various operating modes have been simulated for the 7 TeV machine operation with sextupoles and octupoles included. The loss rate caused by the electron lens has been studied through an extended simulation campaign; the obtained halo removal rates for the different electron lens operating modes are presented.

  19. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.smeu@northwestern.edu; Ratner, Mark A., E-mail: ratner@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H{sup +}), alkali metal cations (M{sup +}), calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}), and hydronium ions (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NS{sub 2}), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M{sup +} + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M{sup +} = H{sup +}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, or K{sup +}. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  20. Electron dynamics in collisionless magnetic reconnection with a PIC simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation is used to investigate electron dynamics in colli-sionless magnetic reconnection, and the proton/electron mass ratio is taken to be ml/me = 256. The results show that the presence of a strong initial guide field will change the direction of the electron flow. The electron density cavities and the parallel electric field can be found in the electron inflow re-gion along the separatrix, and the electron inflow and density cavities only appear in the second and fourth quadrants. What is different from the results with a smaller mass ratio is that new structures appear in the diffusion region near the X line: (1) Narrow regions of density enhancement and density cavities can be found synchronously in this region; and (2) corresponding to the electron density changes near the X line, the strong parallel electric fields are found to occur in the first and third quadrants. These electric fields perhaps play a more important role in acceleration and heating elec-trons than those fields located in the density cavities.

  1. Simulation Models for Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Speybroeck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence and evolution of socioeconomic inequalities in health involves multiple factors interacting with each other at different levels. Simulation models are suitable for studying such complex and dynamic systems and have the ability to test the impact of policy interventions in silico. Objective: To explore how simulation models were used in the field of socioeconomic inequalities in health. Methods: An electronic search of studies assessing socioeconomic inequalities in health using a simulation model was conducted. Characteristics of the simulation models were extracted and distinct simulation approaches were identified. As an illustration, a simple agent-based model of the emergence of socioeconomic differences in alcohol abuse was developed. Results: We found 61 studies published between 1989 and 2013. Ten different simulation approaches were identified. The agent-based model illustration showed that multilevel, reciprocal and indirect effects of social determinants on health can be modeled flexibly. Discussion and Conclusions: Based on the review, we discuss the utility of using simulation models for studying health inequalities, and refer to good modeling practices for developing such models. The review and the simulation model example suggest that the use of simulation models may enhance the understanding and debate about existing and new socioeconomic inequalities of health frameworks.

  2. Simulation of the layer-by-layer synthesis of articles with an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudskoi, A. I.; Kondrat'ev, S. Yu.; Sokolov, Yu. A.; Kopaev, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    The production of powder articles by layer-by-layer electron-beam synthesis is simulated. The following types of spatial distribution of the specific beam power over the surface of a powder layer are analyzed: truncated Gaussian distribution and β distribution. The mathematical description of the layer-by-layer electron- beam synthesis of articles includes a model for the interaction of a scanning electron beam with an article and a model for the heat-and-mass transfer processes that occur during the formation of an article.

  3. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  4. Design, simulation and construction of quadrupole magnets for focusing electron beam in powerful industrial electron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S KH Mousavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the design and simulation of quadrupole magnets and electron beam optical of that by CST Studio code has been studied. Based on simulation result the magnetic quadrupole has been done for using in beam line of first Iranian powerful electron accelerator. For making the suitable magnetic field the effects of material and core geometry and coils current variation on quadrupole magnetic field have been studied. For test of quadrupole magnet the 10 MeV beam energy and 0.5 pi mm mrad emittance of input beam has been considered. We see the electron beam through the quadrupole magnet focus in one side and defocus in other side. The optimum of distance between two quadrupole magnets for low emittance have been achieved. The simulation results have good agreement with experimental results

  5. Modeling of an Electron Injector for the AWAKE Project

    CERN Document Server

    Mete, O; Apsimon, R; Burt, G; Doebert, S; Fiorito, R; Welsch, C

    2015-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations were performed by using PARMELA to characterise an electron injector with a booster linac for the AWAKE project in order to provide the baseline specifications required by the plasma wakefield experiments. Tolerances and errors were investigated. A 3 GHz travelling wave structure designed by using CST code. Particles were tracked by using the field maps acquired from these electromagnetic simulations. These results are pre- sented in comparison with the generic accelerating structure model within PARMELA.

  6. Games and simulations in distance learning: the AIDLET Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bidarra, José; Rothschild, Meagan; Squire, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the selection and potential use of electronic games and simulations in distance learning supported by an operational model called AIDLET. After analyzing the different approaches to the use of games and simulations in education, and discussing their benefits and shortcomings, a framework was developed to facilitate the selection, repurposing, design and implementation of games and simulations, with focus on the practical aspects of the processes used in Open and Distanc...

  7. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  8. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  9. Boltzmann-Electron Model in Aleph.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Thomas Patrick; Hooper, Russell

    2014-11-01

    We apply the Boltzmann-electron model in the electrostatic, particle-in-cell, finite- element code Aleph to a plasma sheath. By assuming a Boltzmann energy distribution for the electrons, the model eliminates the need to resolve the electron plasma fre- quency, and avoids the numerical "grid instability" that can cause unphysical heating of electrons. This allows much larger timesteps to be used than with kinetic electrons. Ions are treated with the standard PIC algorithm. The Boltzmann-electron model re- quires solution of a nonlinear Poisson equation, for which we use an iterative Newton solver (NOX) from the Trilinos Project. Results for the spatial variation of density and voltage in the plasma sheath agree well with an analytic model

  10. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Simulation Tools and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oplatková, Zuzana; Carvalho, Marco; Kisiel-Dorohinicki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The human capacity to abstract complex systems and phenomena into simplified models has played a critical role in the rapid evolution of our modern industrial processes and scientific research. As a science and an art, Modelling and Simulation have been one of the core enablers of this remarkable human trace, and have become a topic of great importance for researchers and practitioners. This book was created to compile some of the most recent concepts, advances, challenges and ideas associated with Intelligent Modelling and Simulation frameworks, tools and applications. The first chapter discusses the important aspects of a human interaction and the correct interpretation of results during simulations. The second chapter gets to the heart of the analysis of entrepreneurship by means of agent-based modelling and simulations. The following three chapters bring together the central theme of simulation frameworks, first describing an agent-based simulation framework, then a simulator for electrical machines, and...

  11. Verifying and Validating Simulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-23

    This presentation is a high-level discussion of the Verification and Validation (V&V) of computational models. Definitions of V&V are given to emphasize that “validation” is never performed in a vacuum; it accounts, instead, for the current state-of-knowledge in the discipline considered. In particular comparisons between physical measurements and numerical predictions should account for their respective sources of uncertainty. The differences between error (bias), aleatoric uncertainty (randomness) and epistemic uncertainty (ignorance, lack-of- knowledge) are briefly discussed. Four types of uncertainty in physics and engineering are discussed: 1) experimental variability, 2) variability and randomness, 3) numerical uncertainty and 4) model-form uncertainty. Statistical sampling methods are available to propagate, and analyze, variability and randomness. Numerical uncertainty originates from the truncation error introduced by the discretization of partial differential equations in time and space. Model-form uncertainty is introduced by assumptions often formulated to render a complex problem more tractable and amenable to modeling and simulation. The discussion concludes with high-level guidance to assess the “credibility” of numerical simulations, which stems from the level of rigor with which these various sources of uncertainty are assessed and quantified.

  12. WiBro Mobility Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Qayyum

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available WiBro, or Wireless Broadband, is the newest variety of mobile wireless broadband access. WiBro technology is being developed by the Korean Telecoms industry. It is based on the IEEE 802.16e (Mobile WiMax international standard. Korean based fixed-line operators KT, SK Telecom were the first to get the licenses by the South Korean government to provide WiBro Commercially. Samsung had a demonstration on WiBro Mobile Phones and Systems at the "APEC IT Exhibition 2006". WiBro is comprised of two phases namely WiBro Phase I and WiBro Phase II. Samsung Electronics has been extensively contributing to Koreas WiBro (Wireless Broadband initiative as well as the IEEE 802.16 standards. The WiBro is a specific subset of the 802.16 standards, specially focusing on supporting full mobility of wireless access systems with OFDMA PHY interface. In this work, we have developed a simulation model of the WiBro system consisting of a set of Base Stations and Mobile Subscriber Stations by using the OPNET Modeler. The simulation model has been utilized to evaluate effective MAC layer throughput, resource usage efficiency, QoS class differentiation, and system capacity and performance under various simulation scenarios.

  13. Theory and modeling of electron fishbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, G.; Fusco, V.; Briguglio, S.; Fogaccia, G.; Zonca, F.; Wang, X.

    2016-10-01

    Internal kink instabilities exhibiting fishbone like behavior have been observed in a variety of experiments where a high energy electron population, generated by strong auxiliary heating and/or current drive systems, was present. After briefly reviewing the experimental evidences of energetic electrons driven fishbones, and the main results of linear and nonlinear theory of electron fishbones, the results of global, self-consistent, nonlinear hybrid MHD-Gyrokinetic simulations will be presented. To this purpose, the extended/hybrid MHD-Gyrokinetic code XHMGC will be used. Linear dynamics analysis will enlighten the effect of considering kinetic thermal ion compressibility and diamagnetic response, and kinetic thermal electrons compressibility, in addition to the energetic electron contribution. Nonlinear saturation and energetic electron transport will also be addressed, making extensive use of Hamiltonian mapping techniques, discussing both centrally peaked and off-axis peaked energetic electron profiles. It will be shown that centrally peaked energetic electron profiles are characterized by resonant excitation and nonlinear response of deeply trapped energetic electrons. On the other side, off-axis peaked energetic electron profiles are characterized by resonant excitation and nonlinear response of barely circulating energetic electrons which experience toroidal precession reversal of their motion.

  14. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  15. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  16. Rotational nuclear models and electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya de Guerra, E.

    1986-05-01

    A review is made of the basic formalism involved in the application of nuclear rotational models to the problem of electron scattering from axially symmetric deformed nuclei. Emphasis is made on the use of electron scattering to extract information on the nature of the collective rotational model. In this respect, the interest of using polarized beam and target is discussed with the help of illustrative examples. Concerning the nuclear structure four rotational models are considered: Two microscopic models, namely the Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) and cranking models; and two collective models, the rigid rotor and the irrotational flow models. The problem of current conservation within the different models is also discussed.

  17. GEANT4 simulation of electron energy deposition in extended media

    CERN Document Server

    Kadri, O; Gharbi, F; Trabelsi, A

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that GEANT4 yields a consistent description of electron transport processes in semi-infinite homogeneous and heterogeneous extended media. This comparison covers the e− energy deposition profiles in a range of elements from aluminum to tantalum through molybdenum at source energies from 0.3 to 1.0 MeV and at incident angles from 0° to 60°. The good agreement between simulation results and data confirms that the Monte Carlo used code is capable of accurate electron beam energy deposition calculation even under such conditions.

  18. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  19. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2004-01-01

    on the boiler) have been dened. Furthermore a number of constraints related to: minimum and maximum boiler load gradient, minimum boiler size, Shrinking and Swelling and Steam Space Load have been dened. For dening the constraints related to the required boiler volume a dynamic model for simulating the boiler...... size. The model has been formulated with a specied building-up of the pressure during the start-up of the plant, i.e. the steam production during start-up of the boiler is output from the model. The steam outputs together with requirements with respect to steam space load have been utilized to dene...... of the boiler is (with an acceptable accuracy) proportional with the volume of the boiler. For the dynamic operation capability a cost function penalizing limited dynamic operation capability and vise-versa has been dened. The main idea is that it by mean of the parameters in this function is possible to t its...

  20. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Electron Beams Focused by Periodic Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) model of an electron beam focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack has been developed. First, the simulation code MAFIA was used to model a PPM stack using the magnetostatic solver. The exact geometry of the magnetic focusing structure was modeled; thus, no approximations were made regarding the off-axis fields. The fields from the static solver were loaded into the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) solver of MAFIA where fully 3D behavior of the beam was simulated in the magnetic focusing field. The PIC solver computes the time-integration of electromagnetic fields simultaneously with the time integration of the equations of motion of charged particles that move under the influence of those fields. Fields caused by those moving charges are also taken into account; thus, effects like space charge and magnetic forces between particles are fully simulated. The electron beam is simulated by a number of macro-particles. These macro-particles represent a given charge Q amounting to that of several million electrons in order to conserve computational time and memory. Particle motion is unrestricted, so particle trajectories can cross paths and move in three dimensions under the influence of 3D electric and magnetic fields. Correspondingly, there is no limit on the initial current density distribution of the electron beam, nor its density distribution at any time during the simulation. Simulation results including beam current density, percent ripple and percent transmission will be presented, and the effects current, magnetic focusing strength and thermal velocities have on beam behavior will be demonstrated using 3D movies showing the evolution of beam characteristics in time and space. Unlike typical beam optics models, this 3D model allows simulation of asymmetric designs such as non- circularly symmetric electrostatic or magnetic focusing as well as the inclusion of input/output couplers.

  1. Simulation of scanning transmission electron microscope images on desktop computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: christian.dwyer@mcem.monash.edu.au [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Two independent strategies are presented for reducing the computation time of multislice simulations of scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images: (1) optimal probe sampling, and (2) the use of desktop graphics processing units. The first strategy is applicable to STEM images generated by elastic and/or inelastic scattering, and requires minimal effort for its implementation. Used together, these two strategies can reduce typical computation times from days to hours, allowing practical simulation of STEM images of general atomic structures on a desktop computer.

  2. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide, Version 6.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Aadithya, Karthik V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Schiek, Richard L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Verley, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation

    2016-06-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users’ Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users’ Guide. The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright © 2002-2016 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of the secondary electrons energy deposition produced by proton beams in PMMA: influence of the target electronic excitation description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapor, Maurizio; Abril, Isabel; de Vera, Pablo; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    We have studied the radial dependence of the energy deposition of the secondary electron generated by swift proton beams incident with energies T = 50 keV-5 MeV on poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA). Two different approaches have been used to model the electronic excitation spectrum of PMMA through its energy loss function (ELF), namely the extended-Drude ELF and the Mermin ELF. The singly differential cross section and the total cross section for ionization, as well as the average energy of the generated secondary electrons, show sizeable differences at T ⩽ 0.1 MeV when evaluated with these two ELF models. In order to know the radial distribution around the proton track of the energy deposited by the cascade of secondary electrons, a simulation has been performed that follows the motion of the electrons through the target taking into account both the inelastic interactions (via electronic ionizations and excitations as well as electron-phonon and electron trapping by polaron creation) and the elastic interactions. The radial distribution of the energy deposited by the secondary electrons around the proton track shows notable differences between the simulations performed with the extended-Drude ELF or the Mermin ELF, being the former more spread out (and, therefore, less peaked) than the latter. The highest intensity and sharpness of the deposited energy distributions takes place for proton beams incident with T ~ 0.1-1 MeV. We have also studied the influence in the radial distribution of deposited energy of using a full energy distribution of secondary electrons generated by proton impact or using a single value (namely, the average value of the distribution); our results show that differences between both simulations become important for proton energies larger than ~0.1 MeV. The results presented in this work have potential applications in materials science, as well as hadron therapy (due to the use of PMMA as a tissue phantom) in order to properly consider the

  4. Simulated annealing model of acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2015-05-01

    The growth control singularity model suggests that acupuncture points (acupoints) originate from organizers in embryogenesis. Organizers are singular points in growth control. Acupuncture can cause perturbation of a system with effects similar to simulated annealing. In clinical trial, the goal of a treatment is to relieve certain disorder which corresponds to reaching certain local optimum in simulated annealing. The self-organizing effect of the system is limited and related to the person's general health and age. Perturbation at acupoints can lead a stronger local excitation (analogous to higher annealing temperature) compared to perturbation at non-singular points (placebo control points). Such difference diminishes as the number of perturbed points increases due to the wider distribution of the limited self-organizing activity. This model explains the following facts from systematic reviews of acupuncture trials: 1. Properly chosen single acupoint treatment for certain disorder can lead to highly repeatable efficacy above placebo 2. When multiple acupoints are used, the result can be highly repeatable if the patients are relatively healthy and young but are usually mixed if the patients are old, frail and have multiple disorders at the same time as the number of local optima or comorbidities increases. 3. As number of acupoints used increases, the efficacy difference between sham and real acupuncture often diminishes. It predicted that the efficacy of acupuncture is negatively correlated to the disease chronicity, severity and patient's age. This is the first biological - physical model of acupuncture which can predict and guide clinical acupuncture research.

  5. Simulation Transition Radiation and Electron Identification Ability of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Klinkby, E B; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Using test-beam as well as collision data, the transition radiation model of the ATLAS simulation is tuned to match data. Furthermore the electron identification abilities of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker are discussed, and example on usage in physics analysis are shown.

  6. Simulations of interference effects in gated two-dimensional ballistic electron systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Pichugin, K.N.; Sadreev, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    We present detailed simulations addressing recent electronic interference experiments,where a metallic gate is used to locally modify the Fermi wavelength of the charge carriers. Our numerical calculations are based on a solution of the one-particle Schrodinger equation for a realistic model of t...

  7. Model Order Reduction for Electronic Circuits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Shontz, Suzanne

    Electronic circuits are ubiquitous; they are used in numerous industries including: the semiconductor, communication, robotics, auto, and music industries (among many others). As products become more and more complicated, their electronic circuits also grow in size and complexity. This increased...... the need for circuit simulators to evaluate potential designs before fabrication, as integrated circuit prototypes are expensive to build, and troubleshooting is difficult. In this report, we focus on the simulation of printed circuit boards (PCB’s) and interconnects both of which are of great importance...

  8. Simulations and measurements in scanning electron microscopes at low electron energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher G H; Frank, Luděk; Müllerová, Ilona

    2016-11-01

    The advent of new imaging technologies in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) using low energy (0-2 keV) electrons has brought about new ways to study materials at the nanoscale. It also brings new challenges in terms of understanding electron transport at these energies. In addition, reduction in energy has brought new contrast mechanisms producing images that are sometimes difficult to interpret. This is increasing the push for simulation tools, in particular for low impact energies of electrons. The use of Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the transport of electrons in materials has been undertaken by many authors for several decades. However, inaccuracies associated with the Monte Carlo technique start to grow as the energy is reduced. This is not simply associated with inaccuracies in the knowledge of the scattering cross-sections, but is fundamental to the Monte Carlo technique itself. This is because effects due to the wave nature of the electron and the energy band structure of the target above the vacuum energy level become important and these are properties which are difficult to handle using the Monte Carlo method. In this review we briefly describe the new techniques of scanning low energy electron microscopy and then outline the problems and challenges of trying to understand and quantify the signals that are obtained. The effects of charging and spin polarised measurement are also briefly explored. SCANNING 38:802-818, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-06-01

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm2, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm2, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  10. Uterine Contraction Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Belfore, Lee A.; Shen, Yuzhong; Scerbo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Building a training system for medical personnel to properly interpret fetal heart rate tracing requires developing accurate models that can relate various signal patterns to certain pathologies. In addition to modeling the fetal heart rate signal itself, the change of uterine pressure that bears strong relation to fetal heart rate and provides indications of maternal and fetal status should also be considered. In this work, we have developed a group of parametric models to simulate uterine contractions during labor and delivery. Through analysis of real patient records, we propose to model uterine contraction signals by three major components: regular contractions, impulsive noise caused by fetal movements, and low amplitude noise invoked by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus. The regular contractions are modeled by an asymmetric generalized Gaussian function and least squares estimation is used to compute the parameter values of the asymmetric generalized Gaussian function based on uterine contractions of real patients. Regular contractions are detected based on thresholding and derivative analysis of uterine contractions. Impulsive noise caused by fetal movements and low amplitude noise by maternal breathing and measuring apparatus are modeled by rational polynomial functions and Perlin noise, respectively. Experiment results show the synthesized uterine contractions can mimic the real uterine contractions realistically, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  12. The simulation of TGF origin in lightning leader electric fields by cosmic ray shower electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, P. H.; Atri, D.

    2015-12-01

    With the TGF simulation package LEPTRACK we can easily create all kinds of electric field geometries and electron flux fields to simulate Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches - it is script driven, with the details of high energy scattering physics hidden from the user, and an easily accessible output database for each particle created or scattered. We will show the results of simulating a realistic scenario of TGF origin based on cosmic ray shower electron flux fields in the neighbourhood of electric field geometries expected around lightning leader tips. Electron fluxes are derived from simulations using the CORSIKA cosmic ray simulation package and leader electric field geometry from current models. Presuming a TGF observed at orbital altitudes must come from a lightning leader pointing "upwards", and that cosmic rays enter at angles pointing "downwards" to "horizontal", we will show which combinations allow the electron flux to curve into the compact electric field of the leader and gain sufficient acceleration to create a TGF photon flux observable in orbit.

  13. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  14. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION STUDY OF SURFACE ELECTRONIC EXCITATION OF NOBLE METALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.M. Li; Z.J. Ding; Q.R. Pu; Z.M. Zhang

    2002-01-01

    In this work we present a numerical simulation of REELS-spectrum for noble metals,Au and Ag. The calculation is based on an electron-surface inelastic scattering modelpreviously developed. The differential inelastic cross section is obtained fron an inho-mogeneous electron self-energy in the surface region, which provides full informationof the dependency of the total and differential cross section on the kinetic energy,the distance from the surface and the moving direction of electrons, accommodatingthe formulation to the practical situation in surface electron spectroscopes. A novelMonte Carlo simulation code of electron interaction with a surface incorporating thelocal scattering mean free path has been developed. The comparison of the simulatedREELS-spectra with the experimental measurements shows a remarkable agreement onthe spectrum shape, which then confirms that the present model for electron-surfaceinelastic .scattering is quite reasonable. The simulation has further shown the compo.nent to surface excitation due to the individual scattering processes along trajectorypart, i.e., the loss in vacuum before reflection, the loss in vacuum after reflection andloss in metal events.

  15. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hwataik

    2011-01-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sens...

  16. Applications of Joint Tactical Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING by Steve VanLandingham December 1997...SUBTITLE APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) VanLandingham, Steve 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...release; distribution is unlimited. APPLICATIONS OF JOINT TACTICAL SIMULATION MODELING Steve VanLandingham Lieutenant, United States Navy B.S

  17. Development of Advanced Models for 3D Photocathode PIC Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Cary, John R; Feldman, Donald; Jensen, Kevin; Messmer, Peter; Stoltz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Codes for simulating photocathode electron guns invariably assume the emission of an idealized electron distribution from the cathode, regardless of the particular particle emission model that is implemented. The output of such simulations, a relatively clean and smooth distribution with very little variation as a function of the azimuthal angle, is inconsistent with the highly irregular and asymmetric electron bunches seen in experimental diagnostics. To address this problem, we have implemented a recently proposed theoretical model* that takes into account detailed solid-state physics of photocathode materials in the VORPAL particle-in-cell code.** Initial results from 3D simulations with this model and future research directions will be presented and discussed.

  18. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...... already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity. © IWA Publishing 2013....... and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work...

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of MLC-shaped TrueBeam electron fields benchmarked against measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Samantha AM; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) and combined, modulated photon/electron radiotherapy (MPERT) have received increased research attention, having shown capacity for reduced low dose exposure to healthy tissue and comparable, if not improved, target coverage for a number of treatment sites. Accurate dose calculation tools are necessary for clinical treatment planning, and Monte Carlo (MC) is the gold standard for electron field simulation. With many clinics replacing older accelerators, MC source models of the new machines are needed for continued development, however, Varian has kept internal schematics of the TrueBeam confidential and electron phase-space sources have not been made available. TrueBeam electron fields are not substantially different from those generated by the Clinac 21EX, so we have modified the internal schematics of the Clinac 21EX to simulate TrueBeam electrons. BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc were used to simulate 5x5 and 20x20 cm$^2$ electron fields with MLC-shaped apertures. Secondary collimati...

  20. SWEEPOP a simulation model for Target Simulation Mode minesweeping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, H.E.; Beckers, A.L.D.; Cleophas, P.L.H.

    2005-01-01

    SWEEPOP is a flexible model that simulates the physical interaction between objects in a maritime underwater environment. The model was built to analyse the deployment and the performance of a Target Simulation Mode (TSM) minesweeping system for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) and to support its p

  1. VEHICLE SIMULATION MODEL FOR DEVELOPING AN INTELLIGENT SLOPE SHIFT STRATEGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Hui; Ge Anlin

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid development of electronics and the growing demand for higher vehicle performance,intelligent shift technology is becoming increasingly important,and it promises to be a developing trend in vehicle automatic transmissions.A new simulation model is presented,which includes engine,powertrain,tire and vehicle dynamics models.Based on the model,simulation experiments are conducted to investigate the slope shift strategy.The data and conclusions obtained from the simulations are valuable contributions to the development of an intelligent slope shift strategy.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. Simulation of the transport of low-energy electrons in various forms of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrissol, M.; Combes, M.A.; Patau, J.P. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    This work describes a Monte Carlo transport simulation of electrons with energies ranging from 10 eV to 30 keV in homogeneous and porous graphites and amorphous carbon. We have used results of Lindhard theory adapted by Ritchie for the free electron model and by Ashley who takes electron bond into account. In the case of porous graphite we have considered the pore crossing as an interaction with the possibility of surface plasmon creation at interfaces. We compare our results with Jacobi experiments and Ashley calculations.

  4. Simulations of the electron cloud buildup and its influence on the microwave transmission measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Oliver Sebastian, E-mail: o.haas@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, Oliver [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Petrov, Fedor [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Schlossgartenstraße 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-11-21

    An electron cloud density in an accelerator can be measured using the Microwave Transmission (MWT) method. The aim of our study is to evaluate the influence of a realistic, nonuniform electron cloud on the MWT. We conduct electron cloud buildup simulations for beam pipe geometries and bunch parameters resembling roughly the conditions in the CERN SPS. For different microwave waveguide modes the phase shift induced by a known electron cloud density is obtained from three different approaches: 3D Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of the electron response, a 2D eigenvalue solver for waveguide modes assuming a dielectric response function for cold electrons, a perturbative method assuming a sufficiently smooth density profile. While several electron cloud parameters, such as temperature, result in minor errors in the determined density, the transversely inhomogeneous density can introduce a large error in the measured electron density. We show that the perturbative approach is sufficient to describe the phase shift under realistic electron cloud conditions. Depending on the geometry of the beam pipe, the external magnetic field configuration and the used waveguide mode, the electron cloud density can be concentrated at the beam pipe or near the beam pipe center, leading to a severe over- or underestimation of the electron density. -- Author-Highlights: •Electron cloud distributions are very inhomogeneous, especially in dipoles. •These inhomogeneities affect the microwave transmission measurement results. •Electron density might be over- or underestimated, depending on setup. •This can be quantified with several models, e.g. a perturbative approach.

  5. Electronic Education System Model-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güllü, Fatih; Kuusik, Rein; Laanpere, Mart

    2015-01-01

    In this study we presented new EES Model-2 extended from EES model for more productive implementation in e-learning process design and modelling in higher education. The most updates were related to uppermost instructional layer. We updated learning processes object of the layer for adaptation of educational process for young and old people,…

  6. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with parametrization model

    CERN Document Server

    Artamonov, A A; Usoskin, I G

    2016-01-01

    A new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. The propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with atmospheric molecules is carried out with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE 00 atmospheric model. The ionization yields is compared with an analytical parametrization for various energies of incident precipitating electron, using a flux of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved. Subsequently, on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons at 30.10.2002 and 07.01....

  7. Mechanism Study of Gate Leakage Current for AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor Structure Under High Reverse Bias by Thin Surface Barrier Model and Technology Computer Aided Design Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Yutaro; Oishi, Toshiyuki; Otsuka, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Koji; Nakayama, Masatoshi; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki

    2013-04-01

    Gate leakage current mechanism in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been studied using a two-dimensional thin surface barrier (TSB) model to represent two unintentional donor thin layers that exit under and outside the gate electrode due to the existence of surface defects. The donor thin layer outside the gate affects the reverse gate current at the high gate voltage above the pinch-off voltage. Higher donor concentration of thin layer outside the gate results in larger ratio of lateral to vertical components of the electric field at the gate edge. On the other hand, the electric field at the center of the gate has only the vertical electric field component. As a result, the two-dimensional effects are only important for the reverse gate current above the pinch-off voltage. We have confirmed in this paper that the simulation results provided by our model correlate very well with the experimental reverse gate current characteristics of the device for a very wide range of reverse gate voltage from 0.1 to 90 V.

  8. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  9. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. E-mail: jesman@ele.uva.es; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M

    2003-04-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  10. Validation Test of Geant4 Simulation of Electron Backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sung Hun; Basaglia, Tullio; Han, Min Cheol; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Saracco, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Backscattering is a sensitive probe of the accuracy of electron scattering algorithms implemented in Monte Carlo codes. The capability of the Geant4 toolkit to describe realistically the fraction of electrons backscattered from a target volume is extensively and quantitatively evaluated in comparison with experimental data retrieved from the literature. The validation test covers the energy range between approximately 100 eV and 20 MeV, and concerns a wide set of target elements. Multiple and single electron scattering models implemented in Geant4, as well as preassembled selections of physics models distributed within Geant4, are analyzed with statistical methods. The evaluations concern Geant4 versions from 9.1 to 10.1. Significant evolutions are observed over the range of Geant4 versions, not always in the direction of better compatibility with experiment. Goodness-of-fit tests complemented by categorical analysis tests identify a configuration based on Geant4 Urban multiple scattering model in Geant4 vers...

  11. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  12. Gyrokinetic δ particle simulation of trapped electron mode driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jianying

    2007-11-01

    Turbulent transport driven by collisionless trapped electron modes (CTEM) is systematically studied using gyrokinetic delta-f particle-in-cell simulation. Scaling with local plasma parameters, including density gradient, electron temperature gradient, magnetic shear, temperature ratio and aspect ratio, is investigated. Simulation results are compared with previous simulations and theoretical predictions. Nonlinearly the transport level increases with increasing magnetic shear. We explain the nonlinear magnetic shear scaling by differences in the radial correlation lengths caused by toroidal coupling. The turbulence is more radially elongated at higher magnetic shear compared with low magnetic shear. We show that the suppression effect of zonal flow on CTEM transport depends on both the electron temperature gradient and the electron to ion temperature ratio. This helps explain the previous contradictory conclusions on the importance of zonal flows in different parameter regimes.ootnotetextT. Dannert, F. Jenko, Phys. Plasmas 12, 072309 (2005); D. Ernst, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2637 (2004). Zonal flow suppression is consistent with the rate of EXB shearing from the ambient turbulence as well as the radial broadening of the spectra. Strong geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are generated along with zonal flows and the frequency of the GAMs agrees well with kinetic theory.ootnotetextT. Watari, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 062504 (2006). We further explore the nonlinear saturation mechanism when the zonal flows are not important. We find that when only a single toroidal mode (and its conjugate) is kept, reasonable nonlinear saturation is obtained. Investigating a range of n, modes with larger mode number n saturate at a higher level relative to lower n modes, indicating a turbulent inverse cascade process.

  13. Techniques and Simulation Models in Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Mirela GHEORGHE

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, the scientific approach of the research starts from the theoretical framework of the simulation concept and then continues in the setting of the practical reality, thus providing simulation models for a broad range of inherent risks specific to any organization and simulation of those models, using the informatics instrument @Risk (Palisade). The reason behind this research lies in the need for simulation models that will allow the person in charge with decision taking i...

  14. Characterization of electron temperature by simulating a multicusp ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Yeong Heum; Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Kim, Sang Bum; Jun, Woo Jung; Lee, Jong Chul; Mohamed Gad, Khaled Mohamed; Namgoong, Ho; Chai, Jong Seo

    2016-12-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used in cyclotrons and linear accelerators to produce high beam currents. The structure of a multicusp ion source consists of permanent magnets, filaments, and an anode body. The configuration of the array of permanent magnets, discharge voltage of the plasma, extraction bias voltage, and structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the quality of the beam. The electrons are emitted from the filament by thermionic emission. The emission current can be calculated from thermal information pertaining to the filament, and from the applied voltage and current. The electron trajectories were calculated using CST Particle Studio to optimize the plasma. The array configuration of the permanent magnets decides the magnetic field inside the ion source. The extraction bias voltage and the structure of the multicusp ion source body decide the electric field. Optimization of the electromagnetic field was performed with these factors. CST Particle Studio was used to calculate the electron temperature with a varying permanent magnet array. Four types of permanent magnet array were simulated to optimize the electron temperature. It was found that a 2-layer full line cusp field (with inverse field) produced the best electron temperature control behavior.

  15. Modeling and simulation of surface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrikar, Rajendra M

    2004-04-30

    With the technology advancement, electronic devices are miniaturized at every development node. Physical parameters such as microscopic roughness are affecting these devices because surface to volume ratio is increasing rapidly. On all the real surfaces microscopic roughness appears, which affects many electronic properties of the material, which in turn decides the yield and reliability of the devices. Different type of parameters and simulation methods are used to describe the surface roughness. Classically surface roughness was modeled by methods such as power series and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Limitations of this methods lead to use the concept of self-similar fractals to model the rough surface through Mandelbrot-Weierstrass function. It is difficult to express surface roughness as a function of process parameters in the form of analytical functions. Method based on neural networks has been used to model these surfaces to map the process parameters to roughness parameters. Finally, change in electrical parameters such as capacitance, resistance and noise due to surface roughness has been computed by numerical methods.

  16. Status of Galileo interim radiation electron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EDP) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii.

  17. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  18. Vlasov Simulations of Electron-Ion Collision Effects on Damping of Electron Plasma Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, J W; Berger, R L; Tran, T M

    2016-01-01

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping is about a factor of two smaller than is obtained from linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementat...

  19. Vlasov simulations of electron-ion collision effects on damping of electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, J. W., E-mail: banksj3@rpi.edu [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Brunner, S.; Tran, T. M. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Plasma Center (SPC), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Collisional effects can play an essential role in the dynamics of plasma waves by setting a minimum damping rate and by interfering with wave-particle resonances. Kinetic simulations of the effects of electron-ion pitch angle scattering on Electron Plasma Waves (EPWs) are presented here. In particular, the effects of such collisions on the frequency and damping of small-amplitude EPWs for a range of collision rates and wave phase velocities are computed and compared with theory. Both the Vlasov simulations and linear kinetic theory find the direct contribution of electron-ion collisions to wave damping significantly reduced from that obtained through linearized fluid theory. To our knowledge, this simple result has not been published before. Simulations have been carried out using a grid-based (Vlasov) approach, based on a high-order conservative finite difference method for discretizing the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function. Details of the implementation of the collision operator within this framework are presented. Such a grid-based approach, which is not subject to numerical noise, is of particular interest for the accurate measurements of the wave damping rates.

  20. Electron Energization in Guide Field Reconnection Outflows with Kinetic Riemann Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2016-12-01

    How electrons are heated during magnetic reconnection in the coronahas been a basic puzzle for a long time. Here we carry out PIC Riemannsimulations to explore electron energization including its dependenceon parameters. Riemann simulations, with its simple magnetic geometry,facilitate the study of the reconnection outflow far downstream ofx-line in much more detail than is possible with conventionalreconnection simulations. We find that the electron temperature in theexhaust increases and approaches a constant, suggesting that electronheating in the exhausts can extend to macroscopic scales in thecorona. Such heating only weakly depends on the proton-to-electronmass ratio used in the simulation. We develop a model demonstratingthat it's mostly the ion dynamics that controls the magnitude ofelectron heating: the ions get accelerated at both rotationaldiscontinuities to counter stream and give rise to two slow shocks.Ions get decelerated and partly reflected at the slow shocks byparallel electric potentials, which energize electrons and produceelectron heating. The prediction of electron heating from this modelapproximately agrees with simulations.

  1. Bridging experiments, models and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria; Burrage, Kevin; Rodríguez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Computational models in physiology often integrate functional and structural information from a large range of spatiotemporal scales from the ionic to the whole organ level. Their sophistication raises both expectations and skepticism concerning how computational methods can improve our understan...... that contributes to defining the specific aspects of cardiac electrophysiology the MSE system targets, rather than being only an external test, and that this is driven by advances in experimental and computational methods and the combination of both....... of biovariability; 2) testing and developing robust techniques and tools as a prerequisite to conducting physiological investigations; 3) defining and adopting standards to facilitate the interoperability of experiments, models, and simulations; 4) and understanding physiological validation as an iterative process...... understanding of living organisms and also how they can reduce, replace, and refine animal experiments. A fundamental requirement to fulfill these expectations and achieve the full potential of computational physiology is a clear understanding of what models represent and how they can be validated. The present...

  2. Simulating Ru L 3 -Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-30

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  3. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.7.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aadithya, Karthik Venkatraman [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verley, Jason [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2017 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Trademarks Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov https://info.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only) Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki-vm.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://morannon.sandia.gov/bugzilla

  4. IrPd nanoalloys: simulations, from surface segregation to local electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriamiharintsoa, T. H. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France); Rakotomahevitra, A. [Institut pour la Maîtrise de l’Énergie, Faculté des sciences d’Antananarivo (Madagascar); Piccolo, L. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement de Lyon IRCELYON, UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1 (France); Goyhenex, C., E-mail: christine.goyhenex@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg CNRS-UDS UMR 7504 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Using semi-empirical modeling, namely tight-binding at different levels of accuracy, the chemical, crystallographic, and electronic structures of bimetallic IrPd nanoparticles are characterized. For the purpose, model cuboctahedral particles containing 561 atoms are considered. Atomistic simulations show that core–shell nanoparticles are highly stable, with a strong surface segregation of Pd, at least for one atomic shell thickness. Within self-consistent tight-binding calculations founded on the density functional theory, an accurate insight is given into the electronic structure of these materials which have a high potential as catalysts.

  5. Analog electronic model of the lobster pyloric central pattern generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkovskii, A [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Brugioni, S [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Istituto Nazionale di Ottica Applicata Largo E. Fermi 6 50125 Florence (Italy); Levi, R [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Rabinovich, M [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Selverston, A [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States); Abarbane, H D I [Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    An electronic circuit intended to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of a simplified 3-cell model of the pyloric central pattern generator in California spiny lobster stomato gastric ganglion is presented. The model employs the synaptic phase locked loop (SPLL) concept where the frequency of oscillations of a postsynaptic cell is mainly controlled by the synaptic current which depends on the phase shift between the oscillations. The theoretical study showed that the system has a stable steady state with correct phase shifts between the oscillations and that this regime is stable when the frequency of the pacemaker cell is varied over a wide range. The main bifurcations in the system were studied analytically, in computer simulations, and in experiments with the electronic circuit. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the expectations of the theoretical model.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulation of electron trajectories and irradiation uniformity in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Zhou, Guangxue; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    In order to study electron trajectories in an annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) source based on carbon fiber bunches, the transmission process of electrons emitted from the annular cathode was simulated using a particle-in-cell model with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). The simulation results show that the intense flow of the electrons emitted from the annular cathode are expanded during the transmission process, and the uniformity of the electron distribution is improved in the transportation process. The irradiation current decreases with the irradiation distance and the pressure, and increases with the negative voltage. In addition, when the irradiation distance and the cathode voltage are larger than 40 mm and -15 kV, respectively, a uniform irradiation current distribution along the circumference of the anode can be obtained. The simulation results show that good irradiation uniformity of circular components can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  7. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with a parametrization model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a comparison of a new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) with a commonly used parametric model of atmospheric ionization is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth's atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. Propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with air is simulated with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model. Ionization yields are computed and compared with a parametrization model for different energies of incident precipitating energetic electrons, using simulated fluxes of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved in the mesosphere but the contribution of Bremsstrahlung in the stratosphere, which is not accounted for in the parametric models, is found significant. As an example, we calculated profiles of the ion production rates in the middle and upper atmosphere (below 100 km) on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons for 30-October-2002 and 07-January-2004.

  8. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  9. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  10. Modeling power electronics and interfacing energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Discusses the application of mathematical and engineering tools for modeling, simulation and control oriented for energy systems, power electronics and renewable energy. This book builds on the background knowledge of electrical circuits, control of dc/dc converters and inverters, energy conversion and power electronics. The book shows readers how to apply computational methods for multi-domain simulation of energy systems and power electronics engineering problems. Each chapter has a brief introduction on the theoretical background, a description of the problems to be solved, and objectives to be achieved. Block diagrams, electrical circuits, mathematical analysis or computer code are covered. Each chapter concludes with discussions on what should be learned, suggestions for further studies and even some experimental work.

  11. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  12. Modeling and Real-Time Simulation of UPFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Misao; Takahashi, Choei; Kishibe, Hideto; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Noro, Yasuhiro; Iio, Naotaka

    We have developed a digital real time simulator of Power Electronics Controllers, so called FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission Systems) Controllers and/or Custom Power by using MATLABTM/SIMULINKTM and dSPACETM System. This paper describes the modeling and the calculation accuracy of a UPFC (Unified Power Flow Controller) model. Hence the developed simulator operates at a large time step, in order to improve simulation accuracy, a correction processing of the switching delay is implemented into the UPFC model. Calculation accuracy of the real time UPFC model is the same level as EMTDCTM results. We confirm stable operation of the developed UPFC model with connecting a commercial real time digital simulator (RTDSTM).

  13. Modelling and simulation of superalloys. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogal, Jutta; Hammerschmidt, Thomas; Drautz, Ralf (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    Superalloys are multi-component materials with complex microstructures that offer unique properties for high-temperature applications. The complexity of the superalloy materials makes it particularly challenging to obtain fundamental insight into their behaviour from the atomic structure to turbine blades. Recent advances in modelling and simulation of superalloys contribute to a better understanding and prediction of materials properties and therefore offer guidance for the development of new alloys. This workshop will give an overview of recent progress in modelling and simulation of materials for superalloys, with a focus on single crystal Ni-base and Co-base alloys. Topics will include electronic structure methods, atomistic simulations, microstructure modelling and modelling of microstructural evolution, solidification and process simulation as well as the modelling of phase stability and thermodynamics.

  14. Design, simulation and construction of a Wire Chamber electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istemihan, Zehra

    2017-02-01

    Tracking charged particles has a wide spectrum of applications in scientific and industrial projects. The Delay Wire Chamber (DWC) is a kind of gaseous detector which is a simpler form of the Multi Wire Proportional Chamber, and was developed by the Beam Instrumentation Group at CERN. It is preferred in accelerator and particle physics experiments because of its ease of use, affordability and durability, and it also provides decent position precision. In this work, we describe the working principles of the readout electronics of a new DWC that is being designed and constructed at our laboratory. Results from the simulation of the circuit and the constructed prototype will be presented.

  15. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  16. Simulating Strongly Correlated Electron Systems with Hybrid Monte Carlo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan

    2000-01-01

    Using the path integral representation, the Hubbard and the periodic Anderson model on D-dimensional cubic lattice are transformed into field theories of fermions in D + 1 dimensions. These theories at half-filling possess a positive definite real symmetry fermion matrix and can be simulated using the hybrid Monte Carlo method.

  17. An Approach to Average Modeling and Simulation of Switch-Mode Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of average modeling of PWM switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The paper discusses the derivation of PSPICE/ORCAD-compatible average models of the switch-mode power stages, their software implementation, and…

  18. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  19. Hybrid (particle in cell-fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic soliton generation including super-thermal and trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nopoush, M.; Abbasi, H. [Faculty of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P. O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    The present paper is devoted to the simulation of the nonlinear disintegration of a localized perturbation into an ion-acoustic soliton in a plasma. Recently, this problem was studied by a simple model [H. Abbasi et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095007 (2008)]. The main assumptions were (i) in the electron velocity distribution function (DF), the ion-acoustic soliton velocity was neglected in comparison to the electron thermal velocity, (ii) on the ion-acoustic evolution time-scale, the electron velocity DF was assumed to be stationary, and (iii) the calculation was restricted to the small amplitude case. In order to generalize the model, one has to consider the evolution of the electron velocity DF for finite amplitudes. For this purpose, a one dimensional electrostatic hybrid code, particle in cell (PIC)-fluid, was designed. It simulates the electrons dynamics by the PIC method and the cold ions dynamics by the fluid equations. The plasma contains a population of super-thermal electrons and, therefore, a Lorentzian (kappa) velocity DF is used to model the high energy tail in the electron velocity DF. Electron trapping is included in the simulation in view of their nonlinear resonant interaction with the localized perturbation. A Gaussian initial perturbation is used to model the localized perturbation. The influence of both the trapped and the super-thermal electrons on this process is studied and compared with the previous model.

  20. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Justin R. [Cornell University; Hencey, Brondon M. [Cornell University

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  1. Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Filipe, Joaquim; Kacprzyk, Janusz; Pina, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    This book includes extended and revised versions of a set of selected papers from the 2012 International Conference on Simulation and Modeling Methodologies, Technologies and Applications (SIMULTECH 2012) which was sponsored by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication (INSTICC) and held in Rome, Italy. SIMULTECH 2012 was technically co-sponsored by the Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS), GDR I3, Lionphant Simulation, Simulation Team and IFIP and held in cooperation with AIS Special Interest Group of Modeling and Simulation (AIS SIGMAS) and the Movimento Italiano Modellazione e Simulazione (MIMOS).

  2. An introduction to enterprise modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostic, J.K.; Cannon, C.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Modeling and Analysis Group

    1996-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to continuously improve productivity, quality, and efficiency of both industry and Department of Energy enterprises, Los Alamos National Laboratory is investigating various manufacturing and business enterprise simulation methods. A number of enterprise simulation software models are being developed to enable engineering analysis of enterprise activities. In this document the authors define the scope of enterprise modeling and simulation efforts, and review recent work in enterprise simulation at Los Alamos National Laboratory as well as at other industrial, academic, and research institutions. References of enterprise modeling and simulation methods and a glossary of enterprise-related terms are provided.

  3. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  4. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of electron beams from an accelerator head using PENELOPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempau, J.; Sánchez-Reyes, A.; Salvat, F.; Oulad ben Tahar, H.; Jiang, S. B.; Fernández-Varea, J. M.

    2001-04-01

    The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE has been used to simulate electron beams from a Siemens Mevatron KDS linac with nominal energies of 6, 12 and 18 MeV. Owing to its accuracy, which stems from that of the underlying physical interaction models, PENELOPE is suitable for simulating problems of interest to the medical physics community. It includes a geometry package that allows the definition of complex quadric geometries, such as those of irradiation instruments, in a straightforward manner. Dose distributions in water simulated with PENELOPE agree well with experimental measurements using a silicon detector and a monitoring ionization chamber. Insertion of a lead slab in the incident beam at the surface of the water phantom produces sharp variations in the dose distributions, which are correctly reproduced by the simulation code. Results from PENELOPE are also compared with those of equivalent simulations with the EGS4-based user codes BEAM and DOSXYZ. Angular and energy distributions of electrons and photons in the phase-space plane (at the downstream end of the applicator) obtained from both simulation codes are similar, although significant differences do appear in some cases. These differences, however, are shown to have a negligible effect on the calculated dose distributions. Various practical aspects of the simulations, such as the calculation of statistical uncertainties and the effect of the `latent' variance in the phase-space file, are discussed in detail.

  6. Simulation modeling and analysis with Arena

    CERN Document Server

    Altiok, Tayfur

    2007-01-01

    Simulation Modeling and Analysis with Arena is a highly readable textbook which treats the essentials of the Monte Carlo discrete-event simulation methodology, and does so in the context of a popular Arena simulation environment.” It treats simulation modeling as an in-vitro laboratory that facilitates the understanding of complex systems and experimentation with what-if scenarios in order to estimate their performance metrics. The book contains chapters on the simulation modeling methodology and the underpinnings of discrete-event systems, as well as the relevant underlying probability, statistics, stochastic processes, input analysis, model validation and output analysis. All simulation-related concepts are illustrated in numerous Arena examples, encompassing production lines, manufacturing and inventory systems, transportation systems, and computer information systems in networked settings.· Introduces the concept of discrete event Monte Carlo simulation, the most commonly used methodology for modeli...

  7. North west cape-induced electron precipitation and theoretical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-xia; Li, Xin-qiao; Wang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Lun-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of the electron fluxes in the inner radiation belt, which is induced by the powerful North West Cape (NWC) very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitter, have been observed and analyzed by several research groups. However, all of the previous publications have focused on NWC-induced > 100-keV electrons only, based on observations from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites. Here, we present flux enhancements with 30-100-keV electrons related to NWC transmitter for the first time, which were observed by the GOES satellite at night. Similar to the 100-300-keV precipitated-electron behavior, the low energy 30-100-keV electron precipitation is primarily located east of the transmitter. However, the latter does not drift eastward to the same extent as the former, possibly because of the lower electron velocity. The 30-100-keV electrons are distributed in the L = 1.8-2.1 L-shell range, in contrast to the 100-300-keV electrons which are at L = 1.67-1.9. This is consistent with the perspective that the energy of the VLF-wave-induced electron flux enhancement decreases with higher L-shell values. We expand upon the rationality of the simultaneous enhancement of the 30-100- and 100-300-keV electron fluxes through comparison with the cyclotron resonance theory for the quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. In addition, we interpret the asymmetry characteristics of NWC electric power distribution in north and south hemisphere by ray tracing model. Finally, we present considerable discussion and show that good agreement exists between the observation of satellites and theory. Supported by the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite Mission Ground-Based Verification Project of the Administration of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense and Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organization Project (APSCO-SP/PM-EARTHQUAKE).

  8. Juno model rheometry and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampl, Manfred; Macher, Wolfgang; Oswald, Thomas; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-10-01

    The experiment Waves aboard the Juno spacecraft, which will arrive at its target planet Jupiter in 2016, was devised to study the plasma and radio waves of the Jovian magnetosphere. We analyzed the Waves antennas, which consist of two nonparallel monopoles operated as a dipole. For this investigation we applied two independent methods: the experimental technique, rheometry, which is based on a downscaled model of the spacecraft to measure the antenna properties in an electrolytic tank and numerical simulations, based on commercial computer codes, from which the quantities of interest (antenna impedances and effective length vectors) are calculated. In this article we focus on the results for the low-frequency range up to about 4 MHz, where the antenna system is in the quasi-static regime. Our findings show that there is a significant deviation of the effective length vectors from the physical monopole directions, caused by the presence of the conducting spacecraft body. The effective axes of the antenna monopoles are offset from the mechanical axes by more than 30°, and effective lengths show a reduction to about 60% of the antenna rod lengths. The antennas' mutual capacitances are small compared to the self-capacitances, and the latter are almost the same for the two monopoles. The overall performance of the antennas in dipole configuration is very stable throughout the frequency range up to about 4-5 MHz and therefore can be regarded as the upper frequency bound below which the presented quasi-static results are applicable.

  9. Computer modeling of electron and proton transport in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N; Vershubskii, Alexey V

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important biological processes in biosphere, which provides production of organic substances from atmospheric CO2 and water at expense of solar energy. In this review, we contemplate computer models of oxygenic photosynthesis in the context of feedback regulation of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, the energy-transducing organelles of the plant cell. We start with a brief overview of electron and proton transport processes in chloroplasts coupled to ATP synthesis and consider basic regulatory mechanisms of oxygenic photosynthesis. General approaches to computer simulation of photosynthetic processes are considered, including the random walk models of plastoquinone diffusion in thylakoid membranes and deterministic approach to modeling electron transport in chloroplasts based on the mass action law. Then we focus on a kinetic model of oxygenic photosynthesis that includes key stages of the linear electron transport, alternative pathways of electron transfer around photosystem I (PSI), transmembrane proton transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. This model includes different regulatory processes: pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport, down-regulation of photosystem II (PSII) activity (non-photochemical quenching), the light-induced activation of the Bassham-Benson-Calvin (BBC) cycle. The model correctly describes pH-dependent feedback control of electron transport in chloroplasts and adequately reproduces a variety of experimental data on induction events observed under different experimental conditions in intact chloroplasts (variations of CO2 and O2 concentrations in atmosphere), including a complex kinetics of P700 (primary electron donor in PSI) photooxidation, CO2 consumption in the BBC cycle, and photorespiration. Finally, we describe diffusion-controlled photosynthetic processes in chloroplasts within the framework of the model that takes into account complex architecture of

  10. Network Modeling and Simulation A Practical Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Guizani, Mohsen; Khan, Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Network Modeling and Simulation is a practical guide to using modeling and simulation to solve real-life problems. The authors give a comprehensive exposition of the core concepts in modeling and simulation, and then systematically address the many practical considerations faced by developers in modeling complex large-scale systems. The authors provide examples from computer and telecommunication networks and use these to illustrate the process of mapping generic simulation concepts to domain-specific problems in different industries and disciplines. Key features: Provides the tools and strate

  11. Largest Particle Simulations Downgrade the Runaway Electron Risk for ITER

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yulei; Yang, Guangwen; Zheng, Jiangshan; Yao, Yicun; Zheng, Yifeng; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Fusion energy will be the ultimate clean energy source for mankind. One of the most visible concerns of the future fusion device is the threat of deleterious runaway electrons (REs) produced during unexpected disruptions of the fusion plasma. Both efficient long-term algorithms and super-large scale computing power are necessary to reveal the complex dynamics of REs in a realistic fusion reactor. In the present study, we deploy the world's fastest supercomputer, Sunway TaihuLight, and the newly developed relativistic volume-preserving algorithm to carry out long-term particle simulations of 10^7 sampled REs in 6D phase space, which involves simulation scale of 10^18 particle-steps, the largest ever achieved in fusion research. Our simulations show that in a realistic fusion reactor, the concern of REs is not as serious as previously thought. Specifically, REs are confined much better than previously predicted and the maximum average energy is in the range of 150MeV, less than half of previous estimate.

  12. PGOPHER: A program for simulating rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The PGOPHER program is a general purpose program for simulating and fitting molecular spectra, particularly the rotational structure. The current version can handle linear molecules, symmetric tops and asymmetric tops and many possible transitions, both allowed and forbidden, including multiphoton and Raman spectra in addition to the common electric dipole absorptions. Many different interactions can be included in the calculation, including those arising from electron and nuclear spin, and external electric and magnetic fields. Multiple states and interactions between them can also be accounted for, limited only by available memory. Fitting of experimental data can be to line positions (in many common formats), intensities or band contours and the parameters determined can be level populations as well as rotational constants. PGOPHER is provided with a powerful and flexible graphical user interface to simplify many of the tasks required in simulating, understanding and fitting molecular spectra, including Fortrat diagrams and energy level plots in addition to overlaying experimental and simulated spectra. The program is open source, and can be compiled with open source tools. This paper provides a formal description of the operation of version 9.1.

  13. \\emph{Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Malone, Fionn; Schoof, Tim; Sjostrom, Travis; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Warm dense matter is one of the most active frontiers in plasma physics due to its relevance for dense astrophysical objects as well as for novel laboratory experiments in which matter is being strongly compressed e.g. by high-power lasers. Its description is theoretically very challenging as it contains correlated quantum electrons at finite temperature---a system that cannot be accurately modeled by standard analytical or ground state approaches. Recently several breakthroughs have been achieved in the field of fermionic quantum Monte Carlo simulations. First, it was shown that exact simulations of a finite model system ($30 \\dots 100$ electrons) is possible that avoid any simplifying approximations such as fixed nodes [Schoof {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 115}, 130402 (2015)]. Second, a novel way to accurately extrapolate these results to the thermodynamic limit was reported by Dornheim {\\em et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 117}, 156403 (2016)]. As a result, now thermodynamic results for the warm dense...

  14. Teaching Chemistry with Electron Density Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, Gwendolyn P.; Shusterman, Alan J.

    1997-07-01

    Linus Pauling once said that a topic must satisfy two criteria before it can be taught to students. First, students must be able to assimilate the topic within a reasonable amount of time. Second, the topic must be relevant to the educational needs and interests of the students. Unfortunately, the standard general chemistry textbook presentation of "electronic structure theory", set as it is in the language of molecular orbitals, has a difficult time satisfying either criterion. Many of the quantum mechanical aspects of molecular orbitals are too difficult for most beginning students to appreciate, much less master, and the few applications that are presented in the typical textbook are too limited in scope to excite much student interest. This article describes a powerful new method for teaching students about electronic structure and its relevance to chemical phenomena. This method, which we have developed and used for several years in general chemistry (G.P.S.) and organic chemistry (A.J.S.) courses, relies on computer-generated three-dimensional models of electron density distributions, and largely satisfies Pauling's two criteria. Students find electron density models easy to understand and use, and because these models are easily applied to a broad range of topics, they successfully convey to students the importance of electronic structure. In addition, when students finally learn about orbital concepts they are better prepared because they already have a well-developed three-dimensional picture of electronic structure to fall back on. We note in this regard that the types of models we use have found widespread, rigorous application in chemical research (1, 2), so students who understand and use electron density models do not need to "unlearn" anything before progressing to more advanced theories.

  15. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : users' guide, version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator capable of simulating electrical circuits at a variety of abstraction levels. Primarily, Xyce has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: {sm_bullet} Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. {sm_bullet} Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. {sm_bullet} Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including many radiation-aware devices. {sm_bullet} A client-server or multi-tiered operating model wherein the numerical kernel can operate independently of the graphical user interface (GUI). {sm_bullet} Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. One feature required by designers is the ability to add device models, many specific to the needs of Sandia, to the code. To this end, the device package in the Xyce

  16. Collision of highly charged ion with clusters. Simulation study for electronic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabana, Kazuhiro [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Collision of highly charged ion with cluster, for example, collision of C{sub 60}-Ar{sup 8+} at E=80 KeV, was simulated by the time-dependence Kohn-Shame equation. The distribution of electron densities and the self-consistent potential were obtained. A part of C{sub 60} potential curve became depressed by the Coulomb force of ion, so that the saddle point was produced on the potential. The behavior of electron transfer on the saddle point was agreed with the classical barrier model. Time-dependent density functional method was explained. (S.Y.)

  17. Simulation of the relativistic electron dynamics and acceleration in a linearly-chirped laser pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Jisrawi, Najeh M; Salamin, Yousef I

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical investigations are presented, and their results are discussed, of the laser acceleration of a single electron by a chirped pulse. Fields of the pulse are modeled by simple plane-wave oscillations and a $\\cos^2$ envelope. The dynamics emerge from analytic and numerical solutions to the relativistic Lorentz-Newton equations of motion of the electron in the fields of the pulse. All simulations have been carried out by independent Mathematica and Python codes, with identical results. Configurations of acceleration from a position of rest as well as from injection, axially and sideways, at initial relativistic speeds are studied.

  18. Electronic Warfare in Army Models - A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Improvement Program (AMIP), Joint (Army, AF, Marines) EW Center, and SAGA (Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency) of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to identify an...Virginia, January, 1973. 5. Catalog of Wargaming and Military Simulation Models, 7th Edition, SAGA 180-77, Studies, Analysis, and Gaming Agency, Organization...snow/sleet. It can simulate nighttime with full moon and twilight , smoke and dust as they affect the target acquisition capability of an RPV-type device

  19. Simple predictive electron transport models applied to sawtoothing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.; Merle, A.; Sauter, O.; Goodman, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we introduce two simple transport models to evaluate the time evolution of electron temperature and density profiles during sawtooth cycles (i.e. over a sawtooth period time-scale). Since the aim of these simulations is to estimate reliable profiles within a short calculation time, two simplified ad-hoc models have been developed. The goal for these models is to rely on a few easy-to-check free parameters, such as the confinement time scaling factor and the profiles’ averaged scale-lengths. Due to the simplicity and short calculation time of the models, it is expected that these models can also be applied to real-time transport simulations. We show that it works well for Ohmic and EC heated L- and H-mode plasmas. The differences between these models are discussed and we show that their predictive capabilities are similar. Thus only one model is used to reproduce with simulations the results of sawtooth control experiments on the TCV tokamak. For the sawtooth pacing, the calculated time delays between the EC power off and sawtooth crash time agree well with the experimental results. The map of possible locking range is also well reproduced by the simulation.

  20. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  1. Real-Time Robust Adaptive Modeling and Scheduling for an Electronic Commerce Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bing; Ruan, Chun

    With the increasing importance and pervasiveness of Internet services, it is becoming a challenge for the proliferation of electronic commerce services to provide performance guarantees under extreme overload. This paper describes a real-time optimization modeling and scheduling approach for performance guarantee of electronic commerce servers. We show that an electronic commerce server may be simulated as a multi-tank system. A robust adaptive server model is subject to unknown additive load disturbances and uncertain model matching. Overload control techniques are based on adaptive admission control to achieve timing guarantees. We evaluate the performance of the model using a complex simulation that is subjected to varying model parameters and massive overload.

  2. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua; Wang, Xuyong; Wang, Xiaohua

    2014-12-01

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  3. Three axis electronic flight motion simulator real time control system design and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhiyuan; Miao, Zhonghua, E-mail: zhonghua-miao@163.com; Wang, Xiaohua [School of Mechatronic Engineering and Automation, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200072 (China); Wang, Xuyong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-12-15

    A three axis electronic flight motion simulator is reported in this paper including the modelling, the controller design as well as the hardware implementation. This flight motion simulator could be used for inertial navigation test and high precision inertial navigation system with good dynamic and static performances. A real time control system is designed, several control system implementation problems were solved including time unification with parallel port interrupt, high speed finding-zero method of rotary inductosyn, zero-crossing management with continuous rotary, etc. Tests were carried out to show the effectiveness of the proposed real time control system.

  4. Towards Novel Energy Solutions - an Electronic/Atomistic Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Rui

    This thesis focuses on computer modeling and multi-scale simulations of new materials that can potentially be used in novel energy applications, i.e., the dye molecules in dye-sensitizedsolar- cells and polymers for the capacitive energy storage. The aim is to understand physical properties of existing materials and then to find ways to improve them. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  5. Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ingmar; Fortini, Andrea; Wagner, Claudia Simone; Wittemann, Alexander; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    We consider a theoretical model for a binary mixture of colloidal particles and spherical emulsion droplets. The hard sphere colloids interact via additional short-ranged attraction and long-ranged repulsion. The droplet-colloid interaction is an attractive well at the droplet surface, which induces the Pickering effect. The droplet-droplet interaction is a hard-core interaction. The droplets shrink in time, which models the evaporation of the dispersed (oil) phase, and we use Monte Carlo simulations for the dynamics. In the experiments, polystyrene particles were assembled using toluene droplets as templates. The arrangement of the particles on the surface of the droplets was analyzed with cryogenic field emission scanning electron microscopy. Before evaporation of the oil, the particle distribution on the droplet surface was found to be disordered in experiments, and the simulations reproduce this effect. After complete evaporation, ordered colloidal clusters are formed that are stable against thermal fluctuations. Both in the simulations and with field emission scanning electron microscopy, we find stable packings that range from doublets, triplets, and tetrahedra to complex polyhedra of colloids. The simulated cluster structures and size distribution agree well with the experimental results. We also simulate hierarchical assembly in a mixture of tetrahedral clusters and droplets, and find supercluster structures with morphologies that are more complex than those of clusters of single particles.

  6. Numerical Simulations of X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2014-11-04

    We study a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray free electron lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in [A. Fratalocchi and G. Ruocco, Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011), 105504]. Since XFEL are more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudospectral method to investigate numerically the behavior of the model versus that of its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time-averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases [P. Antonelli, A. Athanassoulis, H. Hajaiej, and P. Markowich, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal., 211 (2014), pp. 711--732].

  7. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  8. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Kornilov, S. Yu., E-mail: kornilovsy@gmail.com; Rempe, N. G. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (Russian Federation); Shidlovskiy, S. V. [Tomsk State University (Russian Federation); Shklyaev, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Current Electronics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  9. Evolving non-thermal electrons in simulations of black hole accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chael, Andrew A.; Narayan, Ramesh; Sa¸dowski, Aleksander

    2017-09-01

    Current simulations of hot accretion flows around black holes assume either a single-temperature gas or, at best, a two-temperature gas with thermal ions and electrons. However, processes like magnetic reconnection and shocks can accelerate electrons into a non-thermal distribution, which will not quickly thermalize at the very low densities found in many systems. Such non-thermal electrons have been invoked to explain the infrared and X-ray spectra and strong variability of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the black hole at the Galactic Center. We present a method for self-consistent evolution of a non-thermal electron population in the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code koral. The electron distribution is tracked across Lorentz factor space and is evolved in space and time, in parallel with thermal electrons, thermal ions and radiation. In this study, for simplicity, energy injection into the non-thermal distribution is taken as a fixed fraction of the local electron viscous heating rate. Numerical results are presented for a model with a low mass accretion rate similar to that of Sgr A*. We find that the presence of a non-thermal population of electrons has negligible effect on the overall dynamics of the system. Due to our simple uniform particle injection prescription, the radiative power in the non-thermal simulation is enhanced at large radii. The energy distribution of the non-thermal electrons shows a synchrotron cooling break, with the break Lorentz factor varying with location and time, reflecting the complex interplay between the local viscous heating rate, magnetic field strength and fluid velocity.

  10. Electron beam simulation from gun to collector: Towards a complete solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertzig, R., E-mail: robert.mertzig@cern.ch; Shornikov, A., E-mail: robert.mertzig@cern.ch; Wenander, F. [CERN, Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Beebe, E.; Pikin, A. [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An electron-beam simulation technique for high-resolution complete EBIS/T modelling is presented. The technique was benchmarked on the high compression HEC{sup 2} test-stand with an electron beam current, current density and energy of 10 A, 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and 49.2 keV, and on the immersed electron beam at REXEBIS for electron beam characteristics of 0.4 A, 200 A/cm{sup 2} and 4.5 keV. In both Brillouin-like and immersed beams the electron-beam radius varies from several millimeters at the gun, through some hundreds of micrometers in the ionization region to a few centimeters at the collector over a total length of several meters. We report on our approach for finding optimal meshing parameters, based on the local beam properties such as magnetic field-strength, electron energy and beam radius. This approach combined with dividing the problem domain into sub-domains, and subsequent splicing of the local solutions allowed us to simulate the beam propagation in EBISes from the gun to the collector using a conventional PC in about 24–36 h. Brillouin-like electron beams propagated through the complete EBIS were used to analyze the beam behavior within the collector region. We checked whether elastically reflected paraxial electrons from a Brillouin-like beam will escape from the collector region and add to the loss current. We have also studied the power deposition profiles as function of applied potentials using two electrode geometries for a Brillouin-like beam including the effects of backscattered electrons.

  11. Real-time simulations of photoinduced coherent charge transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmayer, Thomas J; Buda, Francesco

    2014-10-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) are fundamental processes in natural phenomena, most noticeably in photosynthesis. Time-resolved spectroscopic evidence of coherent oscillatory behavior associated with these processes has been reported both in complex biological environments, as well as in biomimetic models for artificial photosynthesis. Here, we consider a few biomimetic models to investigate these processes in real-time simulations based on ab initio molecular dynamics and Ehrenfest dynamics. This allows for a detailed analysis on how photon-to-charge conversion is promoted by a coupling of the electronic excitation with specific vibrational modes and with proton displacements. The ET process shows a characteristic coherence that is linked to the nuclear motion at the interface between donor and acceptor. We also show real-time evidence of PCET in a benzimidazole-phenol redox relay. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Final Report for 'ParSEC-Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L Bruhwiler

    2005-09-16

    the same physical parameters but with different ''seeds'' for the particle loading. VORPAL can now be used to simulate other electron cooling facilities around the world, and it is also suitable for other accelerator modeling applications of direct interest to the Department of Energy. For example: (a) the Boersch effect in transport of strongly-magnetized electron beams for electron cooling sections, (b) the intrabeam scattering (IBS) effect in heavy ion accelerators, (c) the formation of crystalline beams and (d) target physics for heavy-ion fusion (HIF).

  13. SU-E-T-489: Quantum versus Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo Simulations of Low Energy Electron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R; Kawrakow, I

    2012-06-01

    Widely-used classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations of low energy electron transport neglect the quantum nature of electrons; however, at sub-1 keV energies quantum effects have the potential to become significant. This work compares quantum and classical simulations within a simplified model of electron transport in water. Electron transport is modeled in water droplets using quantum mechanical (QM) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Water droplets are modeled as collections of point scatterers representing water molecules from which electrons may be isotropically scattered. The role of inelastic scattering is investigated by introducing absorption. QM calculations involve numerically solving a system of coupled equations for the electron wavefield incident on each scatterer. A minimum distance between scatterers is introduced to approximate structured water. The average QM water droplet incoherent cross section is compared with the MC cross section; a relative error (RE) on the MC results is computed. RE varies with electron energy, average and minimum distances between scatterers, and scattering amplitude. The mean free path is generally the relevant length scale for estimating RE. The introduction of a minimum distance between scatterers increases RE substantially (factors of 5 to 10), suggesting that the structure of water must be modeled for accurate simulations. Inelastic scattering does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations: for the same magnitude of elastic scattering, the introduction of inelastic scattering increases RE. Droplet cross sections are sensitive to droplet size and shape; considerable variations in RE are observed with changing droplet size and shape. At sub-1 keV energies, quantum effects may become non-negligible for electron transport in condensed media. Electron transport is strongly affected by the structure of the medium. Inelastic scatter does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations of low

  14. Itinerant electron model and conductance of DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen QU; Da-wei KANG; Xu-tuan GAO; Shi-jie XIE

    2008-01-01

    DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) has recently caught the attention of chemists and physicists.A major reason for this interest is DNA's potential use in nanoelectronie devices,both as a template for assembling nanocireuits and as an element of such circuits.However,the electronic properties of the DNA molecule remain very controversial. Charge-transfer reactions and conductivity measurements show a large variety of possible electronic behavior,ranging from Anderson and bandgap insulators to effective molecular wires and induced superconductors.In this review article,we summarize the wide-ranging experimental and theoretical results of charge transport in DNA.An itinerant electron model is suggested and the effect of the density of itinerant electrons on the conductivity of DNA is studied.Calculations show that a DNA molecule may show conductivity from insulating to metallic,which explains the controversial and profuse electric characteristics of DNA to some extent.

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical m

  17. Whole-building Hygrothermal Simulation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Grau, Karl

    2003-01-01

    An existing integrated simulation tool for dynamic thermal simulation of building was extended with a transient model for moisture release and uptake in building materials. Validation of the new model was begun with comparison against measurements in an outdoor test cell furnished with single mat...

  18. Unbalanced Load Simulation of Electronic Power Transformer in Distribution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Dan; Mao Chengxiong; Lu Jiming; Fan Shu; Cao Jiewei; Wang Ben

    2006-01-01

    A control scheme of electronic power transformer (EPT) in a three-phase four-wire distribution system, which included an input section, an isolating section and an output section, was researched under unbalanced loads. The simple and appropriate control scheme was developed through analyzing the system requirements of the primary side and the load requirements of the secondary side. In the input section, a dual-loop control in synchronous rotating d-q coordinates was introduced, and in the output section, a dual-loop control based on instantaneous output voltage wasused. Load characteristics of EPT were investigated by using Matlab/Simulink software. Simulation results showed that, with the proposed control scheme, the EPT has good performances and the sinusoidal input current and constant output voltage can be realized under both balanced and unbalanced loads.

  19. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: fractional electron approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Hu, Hao; Hu, Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J; Yang, Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+) and Ru(H(2)O)(6)(2+/3+). The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  20. First-Principles Simulations of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Molecular Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Lu, Wei; Luo, Yi

    2005-08-01

    A generalized Green's function theory is developed to simulate the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of molecular junctions. It has been applied to a realistic molecular junction with an octanedithiolate embedded between two gold contacts in combination with the hybrid density functional theory calculations. The calculated spectra are in excellent agreement with recent experimental results. Strong temperature dependence of the experimental IETS spectra is also reproduced. It is shown that the IETS is extremely sensitive to the intra-molecular conformation and to the molecule-metal contact geometry.

  1. Validation of Compton Scattering Monte Carlo Simulation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kuster, Markus; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several models for the Monte Carlo simulation of Compton scattering on electrons are quantitatively evaluated with respect to a large collection of experimental data retrieved from the literature. Some of these models are currently implemented in general purpose Monte Carlo systems; some have been implemented and evaluated for possible use in Monte Carlo particle transport for the first time in this study. Here we present first and preliminary results concerning total and differential Compton scattering cross sections.

  2. Electron beam treatment of simulated marine diesel exhaust gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licki Janusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The exhaust gases from marine diesel engines contain high SO2 and NOx concentration. The applicability of the electron beam flue gas treatment technology for purification of marine diesel exhaust gases containing high SO2 and NOx concentration gases was the main goal of this paper. The study was performed in the laboratory plant with NOx concentration up to 1700 ppmv and SO2 concentration up to 1000 ppmv. Such high NOx and SO2 concentrations were observed in the exhaust gases from marine high-power diesel engines fuelled with different heavy fuel oils. In the first part of study the simulated exhaust gases were irradiated by the electron beam from accelerator. The simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOx were obtained and their removal efficiencies strongly depend on irradiation dose and inlet NOx concentration. For NOx concentrations above 800 ppmv low removal efficiencies were obtained even if applied high doses. In the second part of study the irradiated gases were directed to the seawater scrubber for further purification. The scrubbing process enhances removal efficiencies of both pollutants. The SO2 removal efficiencies above 98.5% were obtained with irradiation dose greater than 5.3 kGy. For inlet NOx concentrations of 1700 ppmv the NOx removal efficiency about 51% was obtained with dose greater than 8.8 kGy. Methods for further increase of NOx removal efficiency are presented in the paper.

  3. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  4. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  5. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  6. A framework of modeling detector systems for computed tomography simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Nam, J.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ultimate development in computed tomography (CT) technology may be a system that can provide images with excellent lesion conspicuity with the patient dose as low as possible. Imaging simulation tools have been cost-effectively used for these developments and will continue. For a more accurate and realistic imaging simulation, the signal and noise propagation through a CT detector system has been modeled in this study using the cascaded linear-systems theory. The simulation results are validated in comparisons with the measured results using a laboratory flat-panel micro-CT system. Although the image noise obtained from the simulations at higher exposures is slightly smaller than that obtained from the measurements, the difference between them is reasonably acceptable. According to the simulation results for various exposure levels and additive electronic noise levels, x-ray quantum noise is more dominant than the additive electronic noise. The framework of modeling a CT detector system suggested in this study will be helpful for the development of an accurate and realistic projection simulation model.

  7. Electron Correlation Models for Optical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhn, E. G.; O. E. Weigang, Jr.

    1968-01-01

    A two-system no-overlap model for rotatory strength is developed for electric-dipole forbidden as well as allowed transitions. General equations which allow for full utilization of symmetry in the chromophore and in the environment are obtained. The electron correlation terms are developed in full...

  8. A critical review of constitutive models for solders in electronic packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Gang; Zhao, Xiaochen; Wu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    .... Because the failure of the whole electronic packaging is often induced by the failure of solders, modeling and simulation of solder joint performance are quite important in ensuring the quality...

  9. Whole-building Hygrothermal Simulation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Grau, Karl

    2003-01-01

    An existing integrated simulation tool for dynamic thermal simulation of building was extended with a transient model for moisture release and uptake in building materials. Validation of the new model was begun with comparison against measurements in an outdoor test cell furnished with single...... materials. Almost quasi-steady, cyclic experiments were used to compare the indoor humidity variation and the numerical results of the integrated simulation tool with the new moisture model. Except for the case with chipboard as furnishing, the predictions of indoor humidity with the detailed model were...

  10. Simulation model of metallurgical production management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Šnapka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused to the problems of the metallurgical production process intensification. The aim is the explaining of simulation model which presents metallurgical production management system adequated to new requirements. The knowledge of a dynamic behavior and features of metallurgical production system and its management are needed to this model creation. Characteristics which determine the dynamics of metallurgical production process are characterized. Simulation model is structured as functional blocks and their linkages with regard to organizational and temporal hierarchy of their actions. The creation of presented simulation model is based on theoretical findings of regulation, hierarchical systems and optimization.

  11. Modeling and multidimensional optimization of a tapered free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy extraction efficiency of a free electron laser (FEL can be greatly increased using a tapered undulator and self-seeding. However, the extraction rate is limited by various effects that eventually lead to saturation of the peak intensity and power. To better understand these effects, we develop a model extending the Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth, one-dimensional theory to include the physics of diffraction, optical guiding, and radially resolved particle trapping. The predictions of the model agree well with that of the GENESIS single-frequency numerical simulations. In particular, we discuss the evolution of the electron-radiation interaction along the tapered undulator and show that the decreasing of refractive guiding is the major cause of the efficiency reduction, particle detrapping, and then saturation of the radiation power. With this understanding, we develop a multidimensional optimization scheme based on GENESIS simulations to increase the energy extraction efficiency via an improved taper profile and variation in electron beam radius. We present optimization results for hard x-ray tapered FELs, and the dependence of the maximum extractable radiation power on various parameters of the initial electron beam, radiation field, and the undulator system. We also study the effect of the sideband growth in a tapered FEL. Such growth induces increased particle detrapping and thus decreased refractive guiding that together strongly limit the overall energy extraction efficiency.

  12. Trapped Electron Model 2 (TEM-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-25

    Ginet (AFRL and MIT/Lincoln Lab). We made extensive use of the IRBEM (formerly ONERA ) library of magnetic field models and field line tracing...several others. We are aware of other efforts to develop reanalysis models of the electron radiation belts. One effort, at ONERA (Office National...sensors on GPS and geosynchronous (GEO) satellites, the ONERA group has obtained promising results, including a first physics-based data

  13. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadre, Nitin Ramchandra

    2011-03-01

    The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is `difficult' to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  14. Mathematical model I. Electron and quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramchandra Gadre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic particle electron obeys various theories like electrodynamics, quantum mechanics and special relativity. Particle under different experimental conditions behaves differently, allowing us to observe different characteristics which become basis for these theories. In this paper, we have made an attempt to suggest a classical picture by studying the requirements of these three modern theories. The basic presumption is: There must be certain structural characteristics in a particle like electron which make it obey postulates of modern theories. As it is ‘difficult’ to find structure of electron experimentally, we make a mathematical attempt. For a classical approach, we require well defined systems and we have studied a system with two charged particles, proton and electron in a hydrogen atom. An attempt has been made to give a model to describe electron as seen by the proton. We then discuss how the model can satisfy the requirements of the three modern theories in a classical manner. The paper discusses basic aspects of relativity and electrodynamics. However the focus of the paper is on quantum mechanics.

  15. Simulation modeling for the health care manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the use of simulation software to solve administrative problems faced by health care managers. Spreadsheet add-ins, process simulation software, and discrete event simulation software are available at a range of costs and complexity. All use the Monte Carlo method to realistically integrate probability distributions into models of the health care environment. Problems typically addressed by health care simulation modeling are facility planning, resource allocation, staffing, patient flow and wait time, routing and transportation, supply chain management, and process improvement.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Early-Stage Dynamics of Electron Bunches Emitted from Plasmonic Photocathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lueangaramwong, Anusorn; Andonian, Gerard; Piot, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    High-brightness electron sources are a key ingredient to the development of compact accelerator-based light sources. The electron sources are commonly based on (linear) a photoemission process where a laser pulse with proper wavelength impinges on the surface of a metallic or semiconductor cathode. Very recently the use of plasmonic cathodes--cathodes with a nano-patterned surface--have demonstrated great enhancement in quantum efficiencies [1]. Alternatively, this cathode type could support the formation of structured beams composed of transversely separated beamlets. In this paper we discuss numerical simulations of the early-stage beam dynamics of the emission process from plasmonic cathodes using the Warp [2] framework. The model is used to investigate the properties of beams emitted from this type of cathode and combined with PIC simulation to explore the imaging of cathode pattern after acceleration in a radiofrequency gun.

  17. Warehouse Simulation Through Model Configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verriet, J.H.; Hamberg, R.; Caarls, J.; Wijngaarden, B. van

    2013-01-01

    The pre-build development of warehouse systems leads from a specific customer request to a specific customer quotation. This involves a process of configuring a warehouse system using a sequence of steps that contain increasingly more details. Simulation is a helpful tool in analyzing warehouse desi

  18. Vlasov simulations of electron hole dynamics in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Vasko, Ivan; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Artemyev, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Electron holes (EHs) or phase space vortices are solitary electrostatic waves existing due to electrons trapped within EH electrostatic potential. Since the first direct observation [1], EHs have been widely observed in the Earth's magnetosphere: in reconnecting current sheets [2], injection fronts [3], auroral region [4], and many other space plasma systems. EHs have typical spatial scales up to tens of Debye lengths, electric field amplitudes up to hundreds of mV/m and propagate along magnetic field lines with velocities of about electron thermal velocity [5]. The role of EHs in energy dissipation and supporting of large-scale potential drops is under active investigation. The accurate interpretation of spacecraft observations requires understanding of EH evolution in inhomogeneous plasma. The critical role of plasma density gradients in EH evolution was demonstrated in [6] using PIC simulations. Interestingly, up to date no studies have addressed a role of magnetic field gradients in EH evolution. In this report, we use 1.5D gyrokinetic Vlasov code to demonstrate the critical role of magnetic field gradients in EH dynamics. We show that EHs propagating into stronger (weaker) magnetic field are decelerated (accelerated) with deceleration (acceleration) rate dependent on the magnetic field gradient. Remarkably, the reflection points of decelerating EHs are independent of the average magnetic field gradient in the system and depend only on the EH parameters. EHs are decelerated (accelerated) faster than would follow from the "quasi-particle" concept assuming that EH is decelerated (accelerated) entirely due to the mirror force acting on electrons trapped within EH. We demonstrate that EH propagation in inhomogeneous magnetic fields results in development of a net potential drop along an EH, which depends on the magnetic field gradient. The revealed features will be helpful for interpreting spacecraft observations and results of advanced particle simulations. In

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Matrix Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fu-rong; Klumpner, Christian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling and simulation of matrix converter. Two models of matrix converter are presented: one is based on indirect space vector modulation and the other is based on power balance equation. The basis of these two models is• given and the process on modeling is introduced...

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of the relaxation of electron beams in inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; Tsiklauri, David

    2016-12-01

    Previous theoretical considerations of electron beam relaxation in inhomogeneous plasmas have indicated that the effects of the irregular solar wind may account for the poor agreement of homogeneous modelling with the observations. Quasi-linear theory and Hamiltonian models based on Zakharov's equations have indicated that when the level of density fluctuations is above a given threshold, density irregularities act to de-resonate the beam-plasma interaction, restricting Langmuir wave growth on the expense of beam energy. This work presents the first fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of beam relaxation under the influence of density irregularities. We aim to independently determine the influence of background inhomogeneity on the beam-plasma system, and to test theoretical predictions and alternative models using a fully kinetic treatment. We carry out one-dimensional (1-D) PIC simulations of a bump-on-tail unstable electron beam in the presence of increasing levels of background inhomogeneity using the fully electromagnetic, relativistic EPOCH PIC code. We find that in the case of homogeneous background plasma density, Langmuir wave packets are generated at the resonant condition and then quasi-linear relaxation leads to a dynamic increase of wavenumbers generated. No electron acceleration is seen - unlike in the inhomogeneous experiments, all of which produce high-energy electrons. For the inhomogeneous experiments we also observe the generation of backwards-propagating Langmuir waves, which is shown directly to be due to the refraction of the packets off the density gradients. In the case of higher-amplitude density fluctuations, similar features to the weaker cases are found, but also packets can also deviate from the expected dispersion curve in -space due to nonlinearity. Our fully kinetic PIC simulations broadly confirm the findings of quasi-linear theory and the Hamiltonian model based on Zakharov's equations. Strong density fluctuations

  1. Quantum simulation of the t- J model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2002-12-01

    Computer simulation of a many-particle quantum system is bound to reach the inevitable limits of its ability as the system size increases. The primary reason for this is that the memory size used in a classical simulator grows polynomially whereas the Hilbert space of the quantum system does so exponentially. Replacing the classical simulator by a quantum simulator would be an effective method of surmounting this obstacle. The prevailing techniques for simulating quantum systems on a quantum computer have been developed for purposes of computing numerical algorithms designed to obtain approximate physical quantities of interest. The method suggested here requires no numerical algorithms; it is a direct isomorphic translation between a quantum simulator and the quantum system to be simulated. In the quantum simulator, physical parameters of the system, which are the fixed parameters of the simulated quantum system, are under the control of the experimenter. A method of simulating a model for high-temperature superconducting oxides, the t- J model, by optical control, as an example of such a quantum simulation, is presented.

  2. CAUSA - An Environment For Modeling And Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Werner; Moeller, Juergen

    1989-03-01

    CAUSA is an environment for modeling and simulation of dynamic systems on a quantitative level. The environment provides a conceptual framework including primitives like objects, processes and causal dependencies which allow the modeling of a broad class of complex systems. The facility of simulation allows the quantitative and qualitative inspection and empirical investigation of the behavior of the modeled system. CAUSA is implemented in Knowledge-Craft and runs on a Symbolics 3640.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Matrix Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fu-rong; Klumpner, Christian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling and simulation of matrix converter. Two models of matrix converter are presented: one is based on indirect space vector modulation and the other is based on power balance equation. The basis of these two models is• given and the process on modeling is introduced...... in details. The results of simulations developed for different researches reveal that different mdel may be suitable for different purpose, thus the model should be chosen different carefully. Some details and tricks in modeling are also introduced which give a reference for further research....

  4. Simulation-based Manufacturing System Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫东; 金烨; 范秀敏; 严隽琪

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, computer simulation appears to be very advantageous technique for researching the resource-constrained manufacturing system. This paper presents an object-oriented simulation modeling method, which combines the merits of traditional methods such as IDEF0 and Petri Net. In this paper, a four-layer-one-angel hierarchical modeling framework based on OOP is defined. And the modeling description of these layers is expounded, such as: hybrid production control modeling and human resource dispatch modeling. To validate the modeling method, a case study of an auto-product line in a motor manufacturing company has been carried out.

  5. Simulation of Electronic Center Formation by Irradiation in Silicon Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeritsyan, H. N.; Sahakyan, A. A.; Grigoryan, N. E.; Harutyunyan, V. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Amatuni, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a study on localized electronic centers formed in crystals by external influences (impurity introduction and irradiation). The main aim is to determine the nature of these centers in the forbidden gap of the energy states of the crystal lattice. For the case of semiconductors, silicon (Si) was applied as model material to determine the energy levels and concentration of radiation defects for application to both doped and other materials. This method relies on solving the appropriate equation describing the variation of the charge carrier concentration as a function of temperature n( T) for silicon crystals with two different energy levels and for a large set of N 1, N 2 (concentrations of electronic centers at each level), and n values. A total of almost 500 such combinations were found. For silicon, energy level values of ɛ 1 = 0.22 eV and ɛ 2 = 0.34 eV were used for the forbidden gap (with corresponding slopes determined from experimental temperature-dependent Hall-effect measurements) and compared with photoconductivity spectra. Additionally, it was shown that, for particular correlations among N 1, N 2, and n, curve slopes of ɛ 1/2 = 0.11 eV, ɛ 2/2 = 0.17 eV, and α = 1/2( ɛ 1 + ɛ 2) = 0.28 eV also apply. Comparison between experimental results for irradiation of silicon crystals by 3.5-MeV energy electrons and Co60 γ-quanta revealed that the n( T) curve slopes do not always coincide with the actual energy levels (electronic centers).

  6. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Electron and Ion Dissipation by Whistler Turbulence: Variations with Electron β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Two ensembles of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence have been carried out on a model of collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma with parameters similar to those of the solar wind near Earth. Initial, relatively isotropic, narrowband spectra of relatively long wavelength modes cascade to anisotropic, broadband spectra of magnetic fluctuations at shorter wavelengths. Electron and ion dissipation rates are computed as functions of the initial electron beta, βe, over the range 0.1 ≤ βe ≤ 5.0, where this quantity is varied by changes in the background magnetic field magnitude Bo. Ensemble One holds the value of the dimensionless initial magnetic fluctuation energy density ɛo ≡ Σk | δ {B}{{k}}{| }2/{B}{{o}}2 constant; Ensemble Two follows solar wind observations, imposing the initial condition ɛo = 0.20 βe. In both ensembles, the maximum dissipation rate of the electrons, Qe, and the maximum dissipation rate of the ions, Qi, satisfy Qe ≫ Qi. In Ensemble One, both dissipation rates scale approximately as {β }{{e}}-1, whereas over 0.1 ≤ βe ≤ 1.0 in Ensemble Two, Qe is approximately constant while Qi scales approximately as {β }{{e}}1/2. These results, when combined with conclusions from earlier PIC simulations, suggest that sufficiently long wavelength and sufficiently large-amplitude magnetosonic-whistler turbulence at sufficiently large βe may heat ions more rapidly than electrons.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Microbial Fuel Cell Based on Redox Electron Mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of redox electron mediator and its impact to power generation of microbial fuel cell ( MFC ) , this study carries out the numerical modeling of a typical two⁃chamber MFC based on assumption of interfacial electron transfer via redox electron mediator and acetate as sole electron donor. The model simulates the development of cell voltage, current, substrate concentration, redox electron mediator concentration, polarization and power density output under defined conditions. The results demonstrate that the developed models can fit the experimental results well on a qualitative basis, and concentration of electron reduced mediator plays a dominant role in electron transfer process, and the mass transfer may constitute the limiting step when its concentration is at a relatively low level. This study not only provides a better understanding of electron redox mediator behavior during power generation, but also suggests a strategy to improve electron transfer in the anode of MFC.

  8. Multiscale Model Approach for Magnetization Dynamics Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Lucia, Andrea; Tretiakov, Oleg A; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of magnetization dynamics in a multiscale environment enable rapid evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a mesoscopic sample with nanoscopic accuracy in areas where such accuracy is required. We have developed a multiscale magnetization dynamics simulation approach that can be applied to large systems with spin structures that vary locally on small length scales. To implement this, the conventional micromagnetic simulation framework has been expanded to include a multiscale solving routine. The software selectively simulates different regions of a ferromagnetic sample according to the spin structures located within in order to employ a suitable discretization and use either a micromagnetic or an atomistic model. To demonstrate the validity of the multiscale approach, we simulate the spin wave transmission across the regions simulated with the two different models and different discretizations. We find that the interface between the regions is fully transparent for spin waves with f...

  9. Exactly solvable models of strongly correlated electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Korepin, Vladimir E

    1994-01-01

    Systems of strongly correlated electrons are at the heart of recent developments in condensed matter theory. They have applications to phenomena like high-T c superconductivity and the fractional quantum hall effect. Analytical solutions to such models, though mainly limited to one spatial dimension, provide a complete and unambiguous picture of the dynamics involved. This volume is devoted to such solutions obtained using the Bethe Ansatz, and concentrates on the most important of such models, the Hubbard model. The reprints are complemented by reviews at the start of each chapter and an exte

  10. Systematic modelling and simulation of refrigeration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjarne D.; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    The task of developing a simulation model of a refrigeration system can be very difficult and time consuming. In order for this process to be effective, a systematic method for developing the system model is required. This method should aim at guiding the developer to clarify the purpose of the s......The task of developing a simulation model of a refrigeration system can be very difficult and time consuming. In order for this process to be effective, a systematic method for developing the system model is required. This method should aim at guiding the developer to clarify the purpose...... of the simulation, to select appropriate component models and to set up the equations in a well-arranged way. In this paper the outline of such a method is proposed and examples showing the use of this method for simulation of refrigeration systems are given....

  11. Software-Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. Y.; Abdel-Hamid, T.; Sherif, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Software Engineering Process Simulation (SEPS) model is described which was developed at JPL. SEPS is a dynamic simulation model of the software project development process. It uses the feedback principles of system dynamics to simulate the dynamic interactions among various software life cycle development activities and management decision making processes. The model is designed to be a planning tool to examine tradeoffs of cost, schedule, and functionality, and to test the implications of different managerial policies on a project's outcome. Furthermore, SEPS will enable software managers to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of software project development and perform postmodern assessments.

  12. Systematic modelling and simulation of refrigeration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bjarne D.; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    The task of developing a simulation model of a refrigeration system can be very difficult and time consuming. In order for this process to be effective, a systematic method for developing the system model is required. This method should aim at guiding the developer to clarify the purpose...... of the simulation, to select appropriate component models and to set up the equations in a well-arranged way. In this paper the outline of such a method is proposed and examples showing the use of this method for simulation of refrigeration systems are given....

  13. HVDC System Characteristics and Simulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S.I.; Han, B.M.; Jang, G.S. [Electric Enginnering and Science Research Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    This report deals with the AC-DC power system simulation method by PSS/E and EUROSTAG for the development of a strategy for the reliable operation of the Cheju-Haenam interconnected system. The simulation using both programs is performed to analyze HVDC simulation models. In addition, the control characteristics of the Cheju-Haenam HVDC system as well as Cheju AC system characteristics are described in this work. (author). 104 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Simulation study of the ferrous ferric electron transfer at a metal--aqueous electrolyte interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.B.; Halley, J.W. (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States))

    1994-12-15

    We report a new simulation study of the rate of ferrous--ferric electron transfer at a metal electrolyte interface. In contrast with earlier work, new features in our study include a detailed account of the effects of the field associated with the charging of the electrode, inclusion of entropic effects in the calculated free energy barriers, and a study of the dependence of the relevant free energy surfaces on the distance of the ion from the electrode. The qualitative picture of the reaction mechanism which emerges is significantly more detailed than that in earlier work. The dominant factors in determining the rate and mechanisms of electron transfer are the distance dependence of the work function of the metal, the redox species concentration profile, and the electronic matrix element. Calculated free energy barriers are consistent with experimentally measured ones. We also estimate the equilibrium potential for this reaction from the model, and find it to be consistent with the experimental equilibrium potential.

  15. Simulation modeling and analysis with Arena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayfur Altiok; Benjamin Melamed [Rutgers University, NJ (United States). Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering

    2007-06-15

    The textbook which treats the essentials of the Monte Carlo discrete-event simulation methodology, and does so in the context of a popular Arena simulation environment. It treats simulation modeling as an in-vitro laboratory that facilitates the understanding of complex systems and experimentation with what-if scenarios in order to estimate their performance metrics. The book contains chapters on the simulation modeling methodology and the underpinnings of discrete-event systems, as well as the relevant underlying probability, statistics, stochastic processes, input analysis, model validation and output analysis. All simulation-related concepts are illustrated in numerous Arena examples, encompassing production lines, manufacturing and inventory systems, transportation systems, and computer information systems in networked settings. Chapter 13.3.3 is on coal loading operations on barges/tugboats.

  16. Simulation of Quiet-Sun Hard X-Rays Related to Solar Wind Superhalo Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Wang, Linghua; Krucker, Säm; Hannah, Iain

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose that the accelerated electrons in the quiet Sun could collide with the solar atmosphere to emit Hard X-rays (HXRs) via non-thermal bremsstrahlung, while some of these electrons would move upwards and escape into the interplanetary medium, to form a superhalo electron population measured in the solar wind. After considering the electron energy loss due to Coulomb collisions and the ambipolar electrostatic potential, we find that the sources of the superhalo could only occur high in the corona (at a heliocentric altitude ≳ 1.9 R_{⊙} (the mean radius of the Sun)), to remain a power-law shape of electron spectrum as observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) at 1 AU near solar minimum (Wang et al. in Astrophys. J. Lett. 753, L23, 2012). The modeled quiet-Sun HXRs related to the superhalo electrons fit well to a power-law spectrum, f ˜ ɛ^{-γ} in the photon energy ɛ, with an index γ≈2.0 - 2.3 (3.3 - 3.7) at 10 - 100 keV, for the warm/cold-thick-target (thin-target) emissions produced by the downward-traveling (upward-traveling) accelerated electrons. These simulated quiet-Sun spectra are significantly harder than the observed spectra of most solar HXR flares. Assuming that the quiet-Sun sources cover 5 % of the solar surface, the modeled thin-target HXRs are more than six orders of magnitude weaker than the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) upper limit for quiet-Sun HXRs (Hannah et al. in Astrophys. J. 724, 487, 2010). Using the thick-target model for the downward-traveling electrons, the RHESSI upper limit restricts the number of downward-traveling electrons to at most {≈} 3 times the number of escaping electrons. This ratio is fundamentally different from what is observed during solar flares associated with escaping electrons where the fraction of downward-traveling electrons dominates by a factor of 100 to 1000 over the escaping population.

  17. Electronic Warfare M-on-N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    E. Jarvis Electronic Warfare M-on- N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Advanced Techniques Branch Tactical...12-04-2017 NRL Memorandum Report Electronic Warfare M-on- N Digital Simulation Logging Requirements and HDF5: A Preliminary Analysis Donald E...ELECTRONIC WARFARE M-ON- N DIGITAL SIMULATION LOGGING REQUIREMENTS AND HDF5: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS 1. INTRODUCTION HDF5 technology [Folk] has been

  18. Semiempirical model for nanoscale device simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Petersen, Dan Erik; Smidstrup, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a semiempirical model for calculating electron transport in atomic-scale devices. The model is an extension of the extended Hückel method with a self-consistent Hartree potential that models the effect of an external bias and corresponding charge rearrangements in the device. It is als...

  19. Modeling of high-speed electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kudrya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The theme of this publication is the modeling of electronic tools that operate in the frequency range from zero to terahertz and higher. Application of new concepts and technologies, including biotechnology and nanotechnology in the development of monolithic integrated circuits led to a backlog of technologies of projecting from technologies and experimental research and manufacturing. The aim of this work is to develop algorithms for analysis, reflecting not only topological as well as morphological properties of the object, that is designing within the framework of accounting EMI communicational  transmission of energy and information in the volume of the monolithic integrated circuit. Basic steps for constructing the algorithm. The object of design is presented in the form of basic elements, which can be combined with a communication structure. The object of design is presented in the form of basic elements, which can be combined with a communication structure. There are three types of matrix equations: component; component - communication structure; communication structure. Systems of equations are reduced to standardized descriptors of mathematical model by which to understand current of poles and voltage arcs whole set of basic elements. In this way obtained mathematical model that can be implemented in CAD nano and micro technology electronics. Conclusions. Mathematical models of analysis of high-speed digital and analog electronic means. The algorithm allows morphological optimization is to minimize the adverse effects outside the system of electromagnetic interaction between the components and communicator.

  20. Object Oriented Modelling and Dynamical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Falko Jens; Poulsen, Mikael Zebbelin

    1998-01-01

    This report with appendix describes the work done in master project at DTU.The goal of the project was to develop a concept for simulation of dynamical systems based on object oriented methods.The result was a library of C++-classes, for use when both building componentbased models and when...... onduction simulation experiments....

  1. Modeling and simulation for RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Frevert, Ronny; Jancke, Roland; Knöchel, Uwe; Schwarz, Peter; Kakerow, Ralf; Darianian, Mohsen

    2005-01-01

    Focusing on RF specific modeling and simulation methods, and system and circuit level descriptions, this work contains application-oriented training material. Accompanied by a CD- ROM, it combines the presentation of a mixed-signal design flow, an introduction into VHDL-AMS and Verilog-A, and the application of commercially available simulators.

  2. Modeling and simulation of complex systems a framework for efficient agent-based modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Siegfried, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Robert Siegfried presents a framework for efficient agent-based modeling and simulation of complex systems. He compares different approaches for describing structure and dynamics of agent-based models in detail. Based on this evaluation the author introduces the "General Reference Model for Agent-based Modeling and Simulation" (GRAMS). Furthermore he presents parallel and distributed simulation approaches for execution of agent-based models -from small scale to very large scale. The author shows how agent-based models may be executed by different simulation engines that utilize underlying hard

  3. Modeling High Altitude EMP using a Non-Equilibrium Electron Swarm Model to Monitor Conduction Electron Evolution (LA-UR-15-26151)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri, E. N.; Morris, H. E.; Nelson, E.; Ji, W.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events in the atmosphere are important physical phenomena that occur through both man-made and natural processes, such as lightning, and can be disruptive to surrounding electrical systems. Due to the disruptive nature of EMP, it is important to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation with computational models. In EMP, low-energy conduction electrons are produced from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. These conduction electrons continue to interact with the surrounding air and alter the EMP waveform. Many EMP simulation codes use an equilibrium ohmic model for computing the conduction current. The equilibrium model works well when the equilibration time is short compared to the rise time or duration of the EMP. However, at high altitude, the conduction electron equilibration time can be comparable to or longer than the rise time or duration of the EMP. This matters, for example, when calculating the EMP propagating upward toward a satellite. In these scenarios, the equilibrium ionization rate becomes very large for even a modest electric field. The ohmic model produces an unphysically large number of conduction electrons that prematurely and abruptly short the EMP in the simulation code. An electron swarm model, which simulates the time evolution of conduction electrons, can be used to overcome the limitations exhibited by the equilibrium ohmic model. We have developed and validated an electron swarm model in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure previously in Pusateri et al. (2015). This swarm model has been integrated into CHAP-LA, a state-of-the-art EMP code developed by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which previously calculated conduction current using an ohmic model. We demonstrate the EMP damping behavior caused by the ohmic model at high altitudes and show improvements on high altitude EMP modeling obtained by employing the swarm model.

  4. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : users' guide, version 4.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is a

  5. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : users' guide. Version 5.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-11-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is a

  6. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  7. Modelling Reactive and Proactive Behaviour in Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mazlina Abdul; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated the simulation model behaviour of a traditional and combined discrete event as well as agent based simulation models when modelling human reactive and proactive behaviour in human centric complex systems. A departmental store was chosen as human centric complex case study where the operation system of a fitting room in WomensWear department was investigated. We have looked at ways to determine the efficiency of new management policies for the fitting room operation through simulating the reactive and proactive behaviour of staff towards customers. Once development of the simulation models and their verification had been done, we carried out a validation experiment in the form of a sensitivity analysis. Subsequently, we executed a statistical analysis where the mixed reactive and proactive behaviour experimental results were compared with some reactive experimental results from previously published works. Generally, this case study discovered that simple proactive individual behaviou...

  8. Challenges in SysML Model Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Nikolaidou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Systems Modeling Language (SysML is a standard proposed by the OMG for systems-of-systems (SoS modeling and engineering. To this end, it provides the means to depict SoS components and their behavior in a hierarchical, multi-layer fashion, facilitating alternative engineering activities, such as system design. To explore the performance of SysML, simulation is one of the preferred methods. There are many efforts targeting simulation code generation from SysML models. Numerous simulation methodologies and tools are employed, while different SysML diagrams are utilized. Nevertheless, this process is not standardized, although most of current approaches tend to follow the same steps, even if they employ different tools. The scope of this paper is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the similarities and differences of existing approaches and identify current challenges in fully automating SysML models simulation process.

  9. SIMULATION MODELING SLOW SPATIALLY HETER- OGENEOUS COAGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Zdorovtsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new model of spatially inhomogeneous coagulation, i.e. formation of larger clusters by joint interaction of smaller ones, is under study. The results of simulation are compared with known analytical and numerical solutions.

  10. The Strength of Chaos: Accurate Simulation of Resonant Electron Scattering by Many-Electron Ions and Atoms in the Presence of Quantum Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0012 The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence...SUBTITLE The Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many- electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos...Strength of Chaos: accurate simulation of resonant electron scattering by many-electron ions and atoms in the presence of quantum chaos” Date 13

  11. Application of Chebyshev Polynomial to simulated modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Hai-hong; LI Dian-pu

    2006-01-01

    Chebyshev polynomial is widely used in many fields, and used usually as function approximation in numerical calculation. In this paper, Chebyshev polynomial expression of the propeller properties across four quadrants is given at first, then the expression of Chebyshev polynomial is transformed to ordinary polynomial for the need of simulation of propeller dynamics. On the basis of it,the dynamical models of propeller across four quadrants are given. The simulation results show the efficiency of mathematical model.

  12. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 September 2016 – 21 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and...release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 Air Force Research Laboratory Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation Daniel W. Crews In-Space...unlimited. PA#16490 Overview • Motivation and Background • What is a Collisionless Shock Wave? • Features of the Collisionless Shock • The Shock Simulation

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of a Linear Accelerator and Electron Beam Parameters Used in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni Toossi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent decades, several Monte Carlo codes have been introduced for research and medical applications. These methods provide both accurate and detailed calculation of particle transport from linear accelerators. The main drawback of Monte Carlo techniques is the extremely long computing time that is required in order to obtain a dose distribution with good statistical accuracy. Material and Methods: In this study, the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the electron beams generated by a Neptun 10 PC linear accelerator. The depth dose curves and related parameters to depth dose and beam profiles were calculated for 6, 8 and 10 MeV electron beams with different field sizes and these data were compared with the corresponding measured values. The actual dosimetry was performed by employing a Welhofer-Scanditronix dose scanning system, semiconductor detectors and ionization chambers. Results: The result showed good agreement (better than 2% between calculated and measured depth doses and lateral dose profiles for all energies in different field sizes. Also good agreements were achieved between calculated and measured related electron beam parameters such as E0, Rq, Rp and R50. Conclusion: The simulated model of the linac developed in this study is capable of computing electron beam data in a water phantom for different field sizes and the resulting data can be used to predict the dose distributions in other complex geometries.

  14. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Nicholas Walker

    using a fully three-dimensional electrodynamics simulation of both the electron energy loss probability and the near-electric field enhancements. The optical-frequency magnetic and electric properties of cyclic aromatic plasmon-supporting metal nanoparticle oligomers are explored through a combination of STEM/EELS simulation and first-principles theory. A tight-binding type model is introduced to explore the rich hybridization physics in these plasmonic systems and tested with full-wave numerical electrodynamics simulations of the STEM electron probe. Building from a microscopic electric model, connection is made at the macroscopic level between the hybridization of localized magnetic moments into delocalized magnetic plasmons of controllable magnetic order and the mixing of atomic pz orbitals into delocalized pi molecular orbitals of varying nodal structure spanning the molecule. It is found that the STEM electrons are uniquely capable of exciting all of the different hybridized eigenmodes of the nanoparticle assembly---including multipolar closed-loop ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic plasmons, giant electric dipole resonances, and radial breathing modes---by raster scanning the beam to the appropriate position. Comparison to plane wave light scattering and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy is made. Through numerical simulation, we predict the existence of the Fano interference effect in the EELS and CL of symmetry-broken nanorod dimers that are heterogeneous in material composition and asymmetric in length. The differing selection rules of the electron probe in comparison to the photon of a plane wave allow for the simultaneous excitation of both optically bright and dark plasmons of each monomer unit, suggesting that Fano resonances will not arise in EELS and CL. Yet, interferences are manifested in the dimer's scattered near- and far-fields and are evident in EELS and CL due to the rapid pi-phase offset in the polarizations between super-radiant and sub

  15. Modeling of magnetic particle suspensions for simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Satoh, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the book is to highlight the modeling of magnetic particles with different shapes and magnetic properties, to provide graduate students and young researchers information on the theoretical aspects and actual techniques for the treatment of magnetic particles in particle-based simulations. In simulation, we focus on the Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, lattice Boltzmann and stochastic rotation dynamics (multi-particle collision dynamics) methods. The latter two simulation methods can simulate both the particle motion and the ambient flow field simultaneously. In general, specialized knowledge can only be obtained in an effective manner under the supervision of an expert. The present book is written to play such a role for readers who wish to develop the skill of modeling magnetic particles and develop a computer simulation program using their own ability. This book is therefore a self-learning book for graduate students and young researchers. Armed with this knowledge,...

  16. Electronic processes in molecular dynamics simulations of nanoscale metal tips under electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Parviainen, S; Djurabekova, F; Timko, H

    2011-01-01

    Electronic effects play a crucial role in the temperature evolution of metal parts which have electric currents running through them. The increase in temperature due to resistive heating can cause the melting of metal nanoscale wires creating damage in electric circuits. Likewise, electric currents are also present in sharp features on metal surfaces exposed to high electric fields. The destruction of such tips can lead to vacuum arcs, supplying the neutral species to build up plasma over the surface. To follow the temperature evolution caused by electric currents in such a tip, we developed a new model, based on an existing molecular dynamics code, to include resistive heating and electronic thermal conduction. The results given by the new simulation model are in good agreement with analytical predictions. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A simple model of the wave load on slender members of offshore structures is described. The wave elevation of the sea state is modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...... velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first-passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results...

  18. Modelling and Simulation of Wave Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1985-01-01

    A simple model of the wave load on stender members of offshore structures is described . The wave elevation of the sea stateis modelled by a stationary Gaussian process. A new procedure to simulate realizations of the wave loads is developed. The simulation method assumes that the wave particle...... velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian Markov process. Known approximate results for the first passage density or equivalently, the distribution of the extremes of wave loads are presented and compared with rather precise simulation results. It is demonstrated that the approximate results...

  19. Modeling and simulation of multiport RF switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijay, J [Student, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India); Saha, Ivan [Scientist, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) (India); Uma, G [Lecturer, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India); Umapathy, M [Assistant Professor, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India)

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of 'Multi Port RF Switch' where the latching mechanism is realized with two hot arm electro thermal actuators and the switching action is realized with electrostatic actuators. It can act as single pole single thrown as well as single pole multi thrown switch. The proposed structure is modeled analytically and required parameters are simulated using MATLAB. The analytical simulation results are validated using Finite Element Analysis of the same in the COVENTORWARE software.

  20. Modeling and simulation of discrete event systems

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Byoung Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Computer modeling and simulation (M&S) allows engineers to study and analyze complex systems. Discrete-event system (DES)-M&S is used in modern management, industrial engineering, computer science, and the military. As computer speeds and memory capacity increase, so DES-M&S tools become more powerful and more widely used in solving real-life problems. Based on over 20 years of evolution within a classroom environment, as well as on decades-long experience in developing simulation-based solutions for high-tech industries, Modeling and Simulation of Discrete-Event Systems is the only book on

  1. Traffic Modeling in WCDMA System Level Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Traffic modeling is a crucial element in WCDMA system level simulations. A clear understanding of the nature of traffic in the WCDMA system and subsequent selection of an appropriate random traffic model are critical to the success of the modeling enterprise. The resultant performances will evidently be of a function that our design has been well adapted to the traffic, channel and user mobility models, and these models are also accurate. In this article, our attention will be focused on modeling voice and WWW data traffic with the SBBP model and Victor model respectively.

  2. TGF electron avalanches and gamma-ray emission with LEPTRACK - a new detailed simulation software package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Paul

    2014-05-01

    In designing the MXGS coded mask imager of the ASIM mission on the ISS, to detect and locate gamma-rays from Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, it was necessary to write software to simulate the expansion of gamma-ray photons from 15-20 km altitudes for an initial estimate of TGF spectra and diffuse beam structure likely to be observed at orbital altitudes. From this a new detailed LEPTRACK simulation software package has been developed to track all electron-photon scattering via Bremsstrahlung and ionization, and via any spatial electric-magnetic field geometies which will drive the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) process at the heart of TGF origin. LEPTRACK uses the standard physics of keV-MeV photon interactions, Bremsstrahlung scattering, Binary-Electron-Bethe models of electron ionization-scattering, positron Bhabha scattering and annihilation. Unlike simulation packages GEANT4, EGS, etc, the physics of these processes is transferred outside the software and controlled by a standard database of text files of total scattering cross sections, differential energy transfer and deflection angle PDFs - easy to read and plot - but which can also be changed, if the user understands the physics involved and wishes to create their own modified database. It also uses a superparticle spatial mesh system to control particle density and flux fields, electric field evolution, and exponential avalanche growth. Results will be presented of TGF simulations using macro electric field geometries expected in storm clouds and micro field geometries expected around streamer tips - and combinations of both - and will include video displays showing the evolving ionization structure of electron trajectories, the time evolution of photon-electron-positron density and flux fields, local molecular ion densities, the dielectric effect of induced local electric fields - and the important effect of the local earth magnetic field on circular lepton feedback and TGF beam direction

  3. A reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport in solids and dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, M.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph; Santos, J. J.; Gremillet, L.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-07-01

    A hybrid reduced model for relativistic electron beam transport based on the angular moments of the relativistic kinetic equation with a special closure is presented. It takes into account collective effects with the self-generated electromagnetic fields as well as collisional effects with the slowing down of the relativistic electrons by plasmons, bound and free electrons and their angular scattering on both ions and electrons. This model allows for fast computations of relativistic electron beam transport while describing their energy distribution evolution. Despite the loss of information concerning the angular distribution of the electron beam, the model reproduces analytical estimates in the academic case of a monodirectional and monoenergetic electron beam propagating through a warm and dense plasma and hybrid particle-in-cell simulation results in a realistic laser-generated electron beam transport case.

  4. Slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct-current glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, S. I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct current (DC) glow discharge. Electrons originating from non-local ionization (secondary) contribute significantly to the energy balance of slow electrons. An approach towards calculating effective energy brought by a secondary electron to the group of slow electrons by means of Coulomb collisions is suggested. The value of effective energy shows a considerable dependence on external parameters of a discharge, such as gas pressure, type, and geometric parameters. The slow electron energy balance was implemented into a simple hybrid model that uses analytical formulation for the description of non-local ionization by fast electrons. Simulations of short (without positive column) DC glow discharge in argon are carried out for a range of gas pressures. Comparison with experimental data showed generally good agreement in terms of current-voltage characteristics, electron density, and electron temperature. Simulations also capture the trend of increasing electron density with decreasing pressure observed in the experiment. Analysis shows that for considered conditions, the product of maximum electron density ne and electron temperature Te in negative glow is independent of gas pressure and depends on the gas type, cathode material, and discharge current. Decreasing gas pressure reduces the heating rate of slow electrons during Coulomb collisions with secondary electrons, which leads to lower values of Te and, in turn, higher maximum ne.

  5. Modeling and simulation of luminescence detection platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Khaled; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Hassibi, Arjang; El-Gamal, Abbas

    2004-06-15

    Motivated by the design of an integrated CMOS-based detection platform, a simulation model for CCD and CMOS imager-based luminescence detection systems is developed. The model comprises four parts. The first portion models the process of photon flux generation from luminescence probes using ATP-based and luciferase label-based assay kinetics. An optics simulator is then used to compute the incident photon flux on the imaging plane for a given photon flux and system geometry. Subsequently, the output image is computed using a detailed imaging sensor model that accounts for photodetector spectral response, dark current, conversion gain, and various noise sources. Finally, signal processing algorithms are applied to the image to enhance detection reliability and hence increase the overall system throughput. To validate the model, simulation results are compared to experimental results obtained from a CCD-based system that was built to emulate the integrated CMOS-based platform.

  6. SOFT MODELLING AND SIMULATION IN STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Rossoni

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A certain resistance on the part of the responsible controllers for the strategy exists, in using techniques and tools of modeling and simulation. Many find them excessively complicated, already others see them as rigid and mathematical for excessively for the use of strategies in uncertain and turbulent environments. However, some interpretative boarding that take care of, in part exist, the necessities of these borrowers of decision. The objective of this work is to demonstrate of a clear and simple form, some of the most powerful boarding, methodologies and interpretative tools (soft of modeling and simulation in the business-oriented area of strategy. We will define initially, what they are on models, simulation and some aspects to the modeling and simulation in the strategy area. Later we will see some boarding of modeling soft, that they see the modeling process much more of that simply a mechanical process, therefore, as seen for Simon, the human beings rationally are limited and its decisions are influenced by a series of questions of subjective character, related to the way where it is inserted. Keywords: strategy, modeling and simulation, soft systems methodology, cognitive map, systems dynamics.

  7. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator Users' Guide, Version 6.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Aadithya, Karthik V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Mei, Ting [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Russo, Thomas V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Schiek, Richard L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Sholander, Peter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Thornquist, Heidi K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation; Verley, Jason C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electrical Models and Simulation

    2016-06-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright © 2002-2016 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.

  8. Xyce parallel electronic simulator users' guide, Version 6.0.1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Warrender, Christina E.; Baur, David Gregory.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandias needs, including some radiationaware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase a message passing parallel implementation which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows.

  9. Xyce parallel electronic simulator users guide, version 6.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Warrender, Christina E.; Baur, David Gregory.

    2013-08-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandias needs, including some radiationaware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase a message passing parallel implementation which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows.

  10. Comparison of initial seed electron generation mechanisms in kinetic simulations of positive streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher; Fierro, Andrew; Jorgenson, Roy; Biedermann, Laura; Clem, Paul; Hjalmarson, Harold; Hopkins, Matthew; Martinez, Raymond

    2016-09-01

    Positive streamer simulations typically resort to initiation by artificially seeding a small region with an initial plasma. However, in order to simulate observed variations in breakdown voltages and times in pulsed voltage experiments, a more physical model for the generation of the initial plasma/electrons is necessary. This work will investigate several models of generating the initial seed plasma in an air-filled gap with a dielectric present: a ``typical'' artificial initial plasma, ionization of the background air due to cosmic rays, field emission from the dielectric, and simulation of radiation incident on surfaces prior to applying the voltage resulting in diffuse e- and O2-densities. 2D axisymmetric PIC-DSMC simulations using a detailed e--air collision model including field-dependent detachment and photon transport will be compared to experiments of an air gap with a dielectric cylinder and a 10 GV/s applied potential. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Xyce parallel electronic simulator users guide, version 6.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-03-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas; Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers; A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models; Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiationaware devices (for Sandia users only); and Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase-a message passing parallel implementation-which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Hydraulic Engine Mounts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shanzhong; Marshall McNea

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic engine mounts are widely used in automotive powertrains for vibration isolation.A lumped mechanical parameter model is a traditional approach to model and simulate such mounts.This paper presents a dynamical model of a passive hydraulic engine mount with a double-chamber,an inertia track,a decoupler,and a plunger.The model is developed based on analogy between electrical systems and mechanical-hydraulic systems.The model is established to capture both low and high frequency dynatmic behaviors of the hydraulic mount.The model will be further used to find the approximate pulse responses of the mounts in terms of the force transmission and top chamber pressure.The close form solution from the simplifiod linear model may provide some insight into the highly nonlinear behavior of the mounts.Based on the model,computer simulation has been carried out to study dynamic performance of the hydraulic mount.

  13. Modelling and simulating fire tube boiler performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels;

    2003-01-01

    A model for a flue gas boiler covering the flue gas and the water-/steam side has been formulated. The model has been formulated as a number of sub models that are merged into an overall model for the complete boiler. Sub models have been defined for the furnace, the convection zone (split in 2......: a zone submerged in water and a zone covered by steam), a model for the material in the boiler (the steel) and 2 models for resp. the water/steam zone (the boiling) and the steam. The dynamic model has been developed as a number of Differential-Algebraic-Equation system (DAE). Subsequently Mat......Lab/Simulink has been applied for carrying out the simulations. To be able to verify the simulated results experiments has been carried out on a full scale boiler plant....

  14. Modelling and simulating fire tube boiler performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Karstensen, Claus; Condra, Thomas Joseph;

    2003-01-01

    A model for a ue gas boiler covering the ue gas and the water-/steam side has been formulated. The model has been formulated as a number of sub models that are merged into an overall model for the complete boiler. Sub models have been dened for the furnace, the convection zone (split in 2: a zone...... submerged in water and a zone covered by steam), a model for the material in the boiler (the steel) and 2 models for resp. the water/steam zone (the boiling) and the steam. The dynamic model has been developed as a number of Differential-Algebraic- Equation system (DAE). Subsequently MatLab/Simulink has...... been applied for carrying out the simulations. To be able to verify the simulated results an experiments has been carried out on a full scale boiler plant....

  15. Computer Modeling and Simulation of Ultrasonic Signal Processing and Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Gandole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The system for simulation, measurement, and processing in Graphical User Interface implementation is presented. The received signal from the simulation is compared to that of an actual measurement in the time domain. The comparison of simulated, experimental data clearly shows that acoustic wave propagation can be modeled. The feasibility has been demonstrated in an ultrasound transducer setup for material property investigations. The results of simulation are compared to experimental measurements. The simulation result has good agreement with the experimental data which confirms the validity of the model. The simulation tool therefore provides a way to predict the received signal before anything is built. Furthermore, the use of an ultrasonic simulation package allows for the development of the associated electronics to amplify and process the received ultrasonic signals. Such a virtual design and testing procedure not only can save us time and money, but also can provide better understanding on design failures and allow us to modify designs more efficiently and economically.

  16. Animated-simulation modeling facilitates clinical-process costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelman, W N; Glick, N D; Blackmore, C C

    2001-09-01

    Traditionally, the finance department has assumed responsibility for assessing process costs in healthcare organizations. To enhance process-improvement efforts, however, many healthcare providers need to include clinical staff in process cost analysis. Although clinical staff often use electronic spreadsheets to model the cost of specific processes, PC-based animated-simulation tools offer two major advantages over spreadsheets: they allow clinicians to interact more easily with the costing model so that it more closely represents the process being modeled, and they represent cost output as a cost range rather than as a single cost estimate, thereby providing more useful information for decision making.

  17. Modeling and simulating of unloading welding transformer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The simulation model of an unloading welding transformer was established on the basis of MATLAB software, and the modeling principle was described in detail in the paper. The model was made up of three sub-models, i.e. the linear inductor sub-model, the non-linear inductor sub-model and series connection sub-model controlled by current, and these sub-models were jointed together by means of segmented linearization. The simulating results showed that, in the conditions of the high convert frequency and the large cross section of the magnet core of a welding transformer, the non-linear inductor sub-model can be substituted by a linear inductor sub-model in the model; and the leakage reactance in the welding transformer is one of the main reasons of producing over-current and over-voltage in the inverter. The simulation results demonstrate that the over-voltage produced by leakage reactance is nearly two times of the input voltage supplied to the transformer, and the lasting time of over-voltage depends on time constant τ1. With reducing of τ1, the amplitude of the over-current will increase, and the lasting time becomes shorter. Contrarily, with increasing of τ1, the amplitude of the over-current will decrease, and the lasting time becomes longer. The model has played the important role for the development of the inverter resistance welding machine.

  18. Simulation of runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by impurity injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Tamas

    2011-03-15

    Disruptions are dangerous instabilities in tokamaks that should be avoided or mitigated. One possible disruption mitigation method is to inject impurities into the plasma to shut it down in a controlled way. Runaway Electrons (REs) can be generated after the plasma is cooled down by the impurities and these electrons can damage the tokamak. In this work a simulation code is developed to investigate different disruption mitigation scenarios. The response of the bulk plasma, more precisely the temperature evolution of electrons, deuterium and impurity ions are described by energy balance equations in a 1D cylindrical plasma model. The induction and resistive diffusion of electric field is calculated. RE generation rates are used to calculate the runaway current. The Dreicer, hot-tail and avalanche effect is taken into account and a simple model for RE losses is also included. RE generation is studied in JET-like plasmas during pellet injection. Carbon pellets cause effective cooling but these scenarios are prone to runaway generation. A mixture of argon and deuterium gas could be used for safe shutdown without RE generation. In ITER the hot-tail RE generation process becomes important, and the simulation is therefore extended to take this into account. Shutdown scenarios with different concentration of neon and argon impurities were tested in ITER-like plasmas. To simplify the problem the impurity injection into the plasma is not modeled in these cases, only the response of the bulk plasma. The avalanche process cannot be suppressed in a simple way and would produce high runaway current. It can be avoided if some runaway loss phenomenon is included in the simulations, like diffusion due to magnetic perturbations

  19. Boron doped simulated graphene field effect transistor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preetika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Gupta, Shuchi; Singh, Sukhbir

    2016-05-01

    Graphene based electronic devices due to its unique properties has transformed electronics. A Graphene Field Effect Transistor (GNRFET) model is simulated in Virtual Nano Lab (VNL) and the calculations are based on density functional theory (DFT). Simulations were performed on this pristine GNRFET model and the transmission spectrum was observed. The graph obtained showed a uniform energy gap of +1 to -1eV and the highest transmission peak at -1.75 eV. To this pristine model of GNRFET, doping was introduced and its effect was seen on the Fermi level obtained in the transmission spectrum. Boron as a dopant was used which showed variations in both the transmission peaks and the energy gap. In this model, first the single boron was substituted in place of carbon and Fermi level showed an energy gap of 1.5 to -0.5eV with the highest transmission peak at -1.3 eV. In another variation in the model, two carbon atoms were replaced by two boron atoms and Fermi level shifted from 2 to 0.25eV. In this observation, the highest transmission peak was observed at -1(approx.). The use of nanoelectronic devices have opened many areas of applications as GFET is an excellent building block for electronic circuits, and is being used in applications such as high-performance frequency doublers and mixers, digital modulators, phase detectors, optoelectronics and spintronics.

  20. Inventory Reduction Using Business Process Reengineering and Simulation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    center is analyzed using simulation modeling and business process reengineering (BPR) concepts. The two simulation models were designed and evaluated by...reengineering and simulation modeling offer powerful tools to aid the manager in reducing cycle time and inventory levels.

  1. The drying of amaranth grain: mathematical modeling and simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Calzetta Resio

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A model for isothermal diffusion of bound water was used to simulate the thin-layer drying kinetics of amaranth grain. The model assumes that the driving force for the transport of bound water is the gradient of spreading pressure. The gradient of spreading pressure was related to the moisture gradient using the GAB isotherm. This variation shows a relative maximum moisture content about 8% (d.b, after which the diffusion coefficient falls sharply as the moisture content is further reduced. To verify the model, drying tests of amaranth grain were conducted at 40 to 70ºC in a laboratory drier from 32.5 to 6% moisture (d.b.. Equilibrium moisture contents were also determined using an electronic hygrometer at temperatures and relative humidities corresponding to drying conditions. The applicability of the model to simulation of drying curves was satisfactory in the full range of moisture.

  2. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-04-20

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  3. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  4. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  5. Modeling & Simulation Executive Agent Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Richard W. ; 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy...acquisition, and training communities.” MSEA Role • Facilitator in the project startup phase • Catalyst during development • Certifier in the...ACOUSTIC MODELS Parabolic Equation 5.0 ASTRAL 5.0 ASPM 4.3 Gaussian Ray Bundle 1.0 High Freq Env Acoustic (HFEVA) 1.0 COLOSSUS II 1.0 Low Freq Bottom LOSS

  6. MODELLING, SIMULATING AND OPTIMIZING BOILERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    , and the total stress level (i.e. stresses introduced due to internal pressure plus stresses introduced due to temperature gradients) must always be kept below the allowable stress level. In this way, the increased water-/steam space that should allow for better dynamic performance, in the end causes limited...... freedom with respect to dynamic operation of the plant. By means of an objective function including as well the price of the plant as a quantification of the value of dynamic operation of the plant an optimization is carried out. The dynamic model of the boiler plant is applied to define parts...

  7. Modelling, simulating and optimizing Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    , and the total stress level (i.e. stresses introduced due to internal pressure plus stresses introduced due to temperature gradients) must always be kept below the allowable stress level. In this way, the increased water-/steam space that should allow for better dynamic performance, in the end causes limited...... freedom with respect to dynamic operation of the plant. By means of an objective function including as well the price of the plant as a quantication of the value of dynamic operation of the plant an optimization is carried out. The dynamic model of the boiler plant is applied to dene parts...

  8. Simulering af dagslys i digitale modeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villaume, René Domine; Ørstrup, Finn Rude

    2004-01-01

    Projektet undersøger via forskellige simuleringer af dagslys, kvaliteten af visualiseringer af komplekse lysforhold i digitale modeller i forbindelse med formidling af arkitektur via nettet. I en digital 3D model af Utzon Associates Paustians hus, simulers naturligt dagslysindfald med  forskellig...... Renderingsmetoder som: "shaded render" /  ”raytraceing” /  "Final Gather /  ”Global Illumination”...

  9. Validity of microgravity simulation models on earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regnard, J; Heer, M; Drummer, C

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have used water immersion and head-down bed rest as experimental models to simulate responses to microgravity. However, some data collected during space missions are at variance or in contrast with observations collected from experimental models. These discrepancies could reflect inc...

  10. Hybrid simulation models of production networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kouikoglou, Vassilis S

    2001-01-01

    This book is concerned with a most important area of industrial production, that of analysis and optimization of production lines and networks using discrete-event models and simulation. The book introduces a novel approach that combines analytic models and discrete-event simulation. Unlike conventional piece-by-piece simulation, this method observes a reduced number of events between which the evolution of the system is tracked analytically. Using this hybrid approach, several models are developed for the analysis of production lines and networks. The hybrid approach combines speed and accuracy for exceptional analysis of most practical situations. A number of optimization problems, involving buffer design, workforce planning, and production control, are solved through the use of hybrid models.

  11. 3D electrostatic gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion simulation of lower-hybrid drift instability of Harris current sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Tummel, Kurt; Chen, Liu

    2016-07-01

    The eigenmode stability properties of three-dimensional lower-hybrid-drift-instabilities (LHDI) in a Harris current sheet with a small but finite guide magnetic field have been systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation model with a realistic ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me . In contrast to the fully kinetic PIC simulation scheme, the fast electron cyclotron motion and plasma oscillations are systematically removed in the GeFi model, and hence one can employ the realistic mi/me . The GeFi simulations are benchmarked against and show excellent agreement with both the fully kinetic PIC simulation and the analytical eigenmode theory. Our studies indicate that, for small wavenumbers, ky, along the current direction, the most unstable eigenmodes are peaked at the location where k →.B → =0 , consistent with previous analytical and simulation studies. Here, B → is the equilibrium magnetic field and k → is the wavevector perpendicular to the nonuniformity direction. As ky increases, however, the most unstable eigenmodes are found to be peaked at k →.B → ≠0 . In addition, the simulation results indicate that varying mi/me , the current sheet width, and the guide magnetic field can affect the stability of LHDI. Simulations with the varying mass ratio confirm the lower hybrid frequency and wave number scalings.

  12. Analysis of operating model of electronic invoice colombian Colombian electronic billing analysis of the operational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Roberto da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colombia has been one of the first countries to introduce electronic billing process on a voluntary basis, from a traditional to a digital version. In this context, the article analyzes the electronic billing process implemented in Colombia and the advantages. Methodological research is applied, qualitative, descriptive and documentary; where the regulatory framework and the conceptualization of the model is identified; the process of adoption of electronic billing is analyzed, and finally the advantages and disadvantages of its implementation is analyzed. The findings indicate that the model applied in Colombia to issue an electronic billing in sending and receiving process, is not complex, but it requires a small adequate infrastructure and trained personnel to reach all sectors, especially the micro and business which is the largest business network in the country.

  13. Investigating Output Accuracy for a Discrete Event Simulation Model and an Agent Based Simulation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mazlina Abdul; Siebers, Peer-Olaf

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate output accuracy for a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model and Agent Based Simulation (ABS) model. The purpose of this investigation is to find out which of these simulation techniques is the best one for modelling human reactive behaviour in the retail sector. In order to study the output accuracy in both models, we have carried out a validation experiment in which we compared the results from our simulation models to the performance of a real system. Our experiment was carried out using a large UK department store as a case study. We had to determine an efficient implementation of management policy in the store's fitting room using DES and ABS. Overall, we have found that both simulation models were a good representation of the real system when modelling human reactive behaviour.

  14. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramidis, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  15. Modelling and simulation of vehicle electric power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wootaik; Choi, Daeho; Sunwoo, Myoungho

    In recent years, the demand for an increased number of vehicle functions by legislation and customer expectations has introduced many electronic control systems and electrical driven units in vehicles and has resulted in steadily increasing electrical loads. Moreover, due to heavy urban traffic conditions, the idling time fraction has increased and reduced the power generation of the alternator. In the vehicle design phase, in order to avoid an over- or under-design problem of the electric power system, it is necessary to understand both the characteristics of each component of the vehicle electric power system and the interactions between the components. For this purpose, model and simulation algorithms of the vehicle power system are required. In this study, the vehicle electric power system, which is mainly composed of a generator and battery, is modelled and evaluated. Among the various proposed battery models, two types are compared in terms of accuracy and ease-of-use. These two models are distinguished by the consideration of inrush current at the beginning of charging and discharging. In addition, a variable terminal voltage alternator model (VTVA model) is proposed, and is compared with a constant terminal voltage alternator model (CTVA model). Based on the major component model, a simulation algorithm is developed and used to perform a case study. Compared with real data from the vehicle, the simulation results of energy generation and consumption are comparable.

  16. Simulation of Gravity Currents Using VOF Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹建锋; 黄钰期; 应新亚; 任安禄

    2002-01-01

    By the Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase flow model two-dimensional gravity currents with three phases including air are numerically simulated in this article. The necessity of consideration of turbulence effect for high Reynolds numbers is demonstrated quantitatively by LES (the Large Eddy Simulation) turbulence model. The gravity currents are simulated for h ≠ H as well as h = H, where h is the depth of the gravity current before the release and H is the depth of the intruded fluid. Uprising of swell occurs when a current flows horizontally into another lighter one for h ≠ H. The problems under what condition the uprising of swell occurs and how long it takes are considered in this article. All the simulated results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results available.

  17. Progress and new advances in simulating electron microscopy datasets using MULTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, I; Van Aert, S; Verbeeck, J

    2016-09-01

    A new version of the open source program MULTEM is presented here. It includes a graphical user interface, tapering truncation of the atomic potential, CPU multithreading functionality, single/double precision calculations, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) simulations using experimental detector sensitivities, imaging STEM (ISTEM) simulations, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) simulations, STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) simulations along with other improvements in the algorithms. We also present a mixed channeling approach for the calculation of inelastic excitations, which allows one to considerably speed up time consuming EFTEM/STEM-EELS calculations.

  18. Development of NASA's Models and Simulations Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, William J.; Zang, Thomas A.; Steele, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    From the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation, there were several NASA-wide actions that were initiated. One of these actions was to develop a standard for development, documentation, and operation of Models and Simulations. Over the course of two-and-a-half years, a team of NASA engineers, representing nine of the ten NASA Centers developed a Models and Simulation Standard to address this action. The standard consists of two parts. The first is the traditional requirements section addressing programmatics, development, documentation, verification, validation, and the reporting of results from both the M&S analysis and the examination of compliance with this standard. The second part is a scale for evaluating the credibility of model and simulation results using levels of merit associated with 8 key factors. This paper provides an historical account of the challenges faced by and the processes used in this committee-based development effort. This account provides insights into how other agencies might approach similar developments. Furthermore, we discuss some specific applications of models and simulations used to assess the impact of this standard on future model and simulation activities.

  19. Quantum Ising model coupled with conducting electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Yasufumi; Yonemitsu, Kenji [Institute for Molecular Science, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced studies, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2005-01-01

    The effect of photo-doping on the quantum paraelectric SrTiO{sub 3} is studied by using the one-dimensional quantum Ising model, where the Ising spin describes the effective lattice polarization of an optical phonon. Two types of electron-phonon couplings are introduced through the modulation of transfer integral via lattice deformations. After the exact diagonalization and the perturbation studies, we find that photo-induced low-density carriers can drastically alter quantum fluctuations when the system locates near the quantum critical point between the quantum para- and ferro-electric phases.

  20. Quantum Ising model coupled with conducting electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yasufumi; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    The effect of photo-doping on the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 is studied by using the one-dimensional quantum Ising model, where the Ising spin describes the effective lattice polarization of an optical phonon. Two types of electron-phonon couplings are introduced through the modulation of transfer integral via lattice deformations. After the exact diagonalization and the perturbation studies, we find that photo-induced low-density carriers can drastically alter quantum fluctuations when the system locates near the quantum critical point between the quantum para- and ferro-electric phases.

  1. A hybrid approach to simulation of electron transfer in complex molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions in biomolecular systems represent an important class of processes at the interface of physics, chemistry and biology. The theoretical description of these reactions constitutes a huge challenge because extensive systems require a quantum-mechanical treatment and a broad range of time scales are involved. Thus, only small model systems may be investigated with the modern density functional theory techniques combined with non-adiabatic dynamics algorithms. On the other hand, model calculations based on Marcus's seminal theory describe the ET involving several assumptions that may not always be met. We review a multi-scale method that combines a non-adiabatic propagation scheme and a linear scaling quantum-chemical method with a molecular mechanics force field in such a way that an unbiased description of the dynamics of excess electron is achieved and the number of degrees of freedom is reduced effectively at the same time. ET reactions taking nanoseconds in systems with hundreds of quantum atoms can be simulated, bridging the gap between non-adiabatic ab initio simulations and model approaches such as the Marcus theory. A major recent application is hole transfer in DNA, which represents an archetypal ET reaction in a polarizable medium. Ongoing work focuses on hole transfer in proteins, peptides and organic semi-conductors. PMID:23883952

  2. Thermomechanical finite element simulations of selective electron beam melting processes: performance considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlbauer, Daniel; Steinmann, Paul; Mergheim, Julia

    2014-07-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the macroscopic modelling of the selective electron beam melting process by using the finite element method. The modelling and simulation of the selective electron beam melting process involves various challenges: complex material behaviour, phase changes, thermomechanical coupling, high temperature gradients, different time and length scales etc. The present contribution focuses on performance considerations of solution approaches for thermomechanically coupled problems, i.e. the monolithic and the adiabatic split approach. The material model is restricted to nonlinear thermoelasticity with temperature-dependent material parameters. As a numerical example a straight scanning path is simulated, the predicted temperatures and stresses are analysed and the performance of the two algorithms is compared. The adiabatic split approach turned out to be much more efficient for linear thermomechanical problems, i.e. the solution time is three times less than with the monolithic approach. For nonlinear problems, stability issues necessitated the use of the Euler backward integration scheme, and therefore, the adiabatic split approach required small time steps for reasonable accuracy. Thus, for nonlinear problems and in combination with the Euler backward integration scheme, the monolithic solver turned out to be more efficient.

  3. Diabatic Population Matrix Formalism for Performing Molecular Mechanics Style Simulations with Multiple Electronic States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2014-12-09

    An accurate description of nonbonded interactions is important in investigating dynamics of molecular systems. In many situations, fixed point charge models are successfully applied to explaining various chemical phenomena. However, these models with conventional formulations will not be appropriate in elucidating the detailed dynamics during nonadiabatic events. This is mainly because the chemical properties of any molecule, especially its electronic populations, significantly change with respect to molecular distortions in the vicinity of the surface crossing. To overcome this issue in molecular simulations yet within the framework of the fixed point charge model, we define a diabatic electronic population matrix and substitute it for the conventional adiabatic partial charges. We show that this matrix can be readily utilized toward attaining more reliable descriptions of Coulombic interactions, in combination with the interpolation formalism for obtaining the intramolecular interaction potential. We demonstrate how the mixed formalism with the diabatic charges and the interpolation can be applied to molecular simulations by conducting adiabatic and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics trajectory calculations of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion in aqueous environment.

  4. Piecewise-homogeneous model for electron side injection into linear plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanov, A.A., E-mail: agolovanov256@gmail.com; Kostyukov, I.Yu., E-mail: kost@appl.sci-nnov.ru

    2016-09-01

    An analytical piecewise-homogeneous model for electron side injection into linear plasma waves is developed. The dynamics of transverse betatron oscillations are studied. Based on the characteristics of the transversal motion the longitudinal motion of electrons is described. The electron parameters for which the electron trapping and subsequent acceleration are possible are estimated. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulations in the scope of the piecewise-homogeneous model. The results predicted by this model are also compared to the results given by a more realistic inhomogeneous model. - Highlights: • A piecewise-homogeneous model of side injection into a linear wakefield is developed. • The dynamics of betatron oscillations in the focusing phase is analytically studied. • The area of parameters for electron trapping is determined. • The model is compared to a more realistic inhomogeneous model.

  5. Boltzmann equation analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in N2-O2 streamer discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dujko, S.; Ebert, U.; White, R.D.; Petrović, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of electron transport in N$_{2}$-O$_{2}$ mixtures has been carried out using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique instead of conventional two-term theory often employed in plasma modeling community. We focus on the

  6. Modelling and Simulation of Crude Oil Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai JIMOH

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research work was carried out to develop a model equation for the dispersion of crude oil in water. Seven different crude oils (Bonny Light, Antan Terminal, Bonny Medium, Qua Iboe Light, Brass Light Mbede, Forcados Blend and Heavy H were used as the subject crude oils. The developed model equation in this project which is given as...It was developed starting from the equation for the oil dispersion rate in water which is given as...The developed equation was then simulated with the aid of MathCAD 2000 Professional software. The experimental and model results obtained from the simulation of the model equation were plotted on the same axis against time of dispersion. The model results revealed close fittings between the experimental and the model results because the correlation coefficients and the r-square values calculated using Spreadsheet Program were both found to be unity (1.00.

  7. Monte Carlo model for electron degradation in methane

    CERN Document Server

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    2015-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model for degradation of 1-10,000 eV electrons in an atmosphere of methane. The electron impact cross sections for CH4 are compiled and analytical representations of these cross sections are used as input to the model.model.Yield spectra, which provides information about the number of inelastic events that have taken place in each energy bin, is used to calculate the yield (or population) of various inelastic processes. The numerical yield spectra, obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations, is represented analytically, thus generating the Analytical Yield Spectra (AYS). AYS is employed to obtain the mean energy per ion pair and efficiencies of various inelastic processes.Mean energy per ion pair for neutral CH4 is found to be 26 (27.8) eV at 10 (0.1) keV. Efficiency calculation showed that ionization is the dominant process at energies >50 eV, for which more than 50% of the incident electron energy is used. Above 25 eV, dissociation has an efficiency of 27%. Below 10 eV, vibrational e...

  8. Multi-scale simulation of electron emission from a triode-type electron source with a carbon-nanotube column array cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joel; Hong, Nguyen Tuan; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Leblanc, Francois; Lee, Soonil; Cipriani, Fabrice

    2013-11-22

    We have designed and fabricated a new type of field electron source for a novel onboard mass spectrometer. The new electron source, which is a field effect emitter in a triode configuration, consists of a CNT-column array cathode and an extraction gate with holes that are aligned concentrically with respect to the cylindrical CNT columns. In triode mode operation, cathode currents as large as ~420 μA have been emitted with an anode-to-gate current ratio of ~1.5. To account for the observed emission characteristics of the new electron source, we have carried out multi-scale simulations that combine a three-dimensional (3D) microscopic model in the vicinity of an actual emission site with a two-dimensional (2D) macroscopic model that covers the whole device structure. Because the mesh size in the microscopic 3D model is as small as 100 nm, the contributions of the extruding CNT bundle at the top edge of an electron column can be examined in detail. Unlike the macroscopic 2D simulation that shows only small field enhancement at CNT column's top edge, the multi-scale simulation successfully reproduced the local electric field strongly enough to emit the measured cathode currents and the electric field distribution which is consistent with the measured anode-to-gate current ratio.

  9. Simulation and measurement of pulse height and rise-time for electron signals in CZT detectors:. influence of material and electronics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathy, F.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Gliere, A.; Mestais, C.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    A model for simulation of amplitude vs. rise-time biparametric spectra as a function of CZT materials properties was developed. This model takes into account the physical properties of the CZT detectors, the electric field profile and the physics of γ- ray interaction with CZT. The model has been refined to include the filtering effects of the front-end electronics and applied again to biparametric spectra. The electronic filtering is represented by a combination of linear band pass filters. The rise-time measurement circuit induces a non-linearity that is taken into account. A comparison between the electronics simulations and calibration measurements on the actual circuits is presented. In addition, physical and electrical properties of several CZT samples have been characterized and these properties have been incorporated in the model so that actual and simulated biparametric spectra can be compared. Finally, the model is applied to show the influence of the main physical parameters (mobility and lifetime) and of the applied electric field on the biparametric spectra.

  10. Simulation Modeling of Software Development Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calavaro, G. F.; Basili, V. R.; Iazeolla, G.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of software process productivity indices, such as cost and time-to-market, and the sensitivity analysis of such indices to changes in the organization parameters and user requirements. The approach uses a timed Petri Net and Object Oriented top-down model specification. Results demonstrate the model representativeness, and its usefulness in verifying process conformance to expectations, and in performing continuous process improvement and optimization.

  11. Incorporation of RAM techniques into simulation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.C. Jr.; Haire, M.J.; Schryver, J.C.

    1995-07-01

    This work concludes that reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) analytical techniques can be incorporated into computer network simulation modeling to yield an important new analytical tool. This paper describes the incorporation of failure and repair information into network simulation to build a stochastic computer model represents the RAM Performance of two vehicles being developed for the US Army: The Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS) and the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV). The AFAS is the US Army`s next generation self-propelled cannon artillery system. The FARV is a resupply vehicle for the AFAS. Both vehicles utilize automation technologies to improve the operational performance of the vehicles and reduce manpower. The network simulation model used in this work is task based. The model programmed in this application requirements a typical battle mission and the failures and repairs that occur during that battle. Each task that the FARV performs--upload, travel to the AFAS, refuel, perform tactical/survivability moves, return to logistic resupply, etc.--is modeled. Such a model reproduces a model reproduces operational phenomena (e.g., failures and repairs) that are likely to occur in actual performance. Simulation tasks are modeled as discrete chronological steps; after the completion of each task decisions are programmed that determine the next path to be followed. The result is a complex logic diagram or network. The network simulation model is developed within a hierarchy of vehicle systems, subsystems, and equipment and includes failure management subnetworks. RAM information and other performance measures are collected which have impact on design requirements. Design changes are evaluated through ``what if`` questions, sensitivity studies, and battle scenario changes.

  12. Particle-in-cell Simulation of Electron Acceleration in Solar Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, G.; Nordlund, Å.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate electron acceleration resulting from three-dimensional magnetic reconnection between an emerging, twisted magnetic flux rope and a pre-existing weak, open magnetic field. We first follow the rise of an unstable, twisted flux tube with a resistive MHD simulation where the numerical resolution is enhanced by using fixed mesh refinement. As in previous MHD investigations of similar situations, the rise of the flux tube into the pre-existing inclined coronal magnetic field results in the formation of a solar coronal jet. A snapshot of the MHD model is then used as an initial and boundary condition for a particle-in-cell simulation, using up to half a billion cells and over 20 billion charged particles. Particle acceleration occurs mainly in the reconnection current sheet, with accelerated electrons displaying a power law in the energy probability distribution with an index of around -1.5. The main acceleration mechanism is a systematic electric field, striving to maintaining the electric current in the current sheet against losses caused by electrons not being able to stay in the current sheet for more than a few seconds at a time.

  13. Testing turbulent closure models with convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Snellman, J E; Mantere, M J; Rheinhardt, M; Dintrans, B

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To compare simple analytical closure models of turbulent Boussinesq convection for stellar applications with direct three-dimensional simulations both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous (bounded) setups. Methods: We use simple analytical closure models to compute the fluxes of angular momentum and heat as a function of rotation rate measured by the Taylor number. We also investigate cases with varying angles between the angular velocity and gravity vectors, corresponding to locating the computational domain at different latitudes ranging from the pole to the equator of the star. We perform three-dimensional numerical simulations in the same parameter regimes for comparison. The free parameters appearing in the closure models are calibrated by two fit methods using simulation data. Unique determination of the closure parameters is possible only in the non-rotating case and when the system is placed at the pole. In the other cases the fit procedures yield somewhat differing results. The quality of the closu...

  14. Analyzing Strategic Business Rules through Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta, Elena; Ruiz, Mercedes; Toro, Miguel

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) holds promise for business agility since it allows business process to change to meet new customer demands or market needs without causing a cascade effect of changes in the underlying IT systems. Business rules are the instrument chosen to help business and IT to collaborate. In this paper, we propose the utilization of simulation models to model and simulate strategic business rules that are then disaggregated at different levels of an SOA architecture. Our proposal is aimed to help find a good configuration for strategic business objectives and IT parameters. The paper includes a case study where a simulation model is built to help business decision-making in a context where finding a good configuration for different business parameters and performance is too complex to analyze by trial and error.

  15. Model of electron pairs in electron-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. J.; Khan, Shakeel

    2016-07-01

    In the order parameter of hole-doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap phase, two holes enter the order parameter from opposite sides and pass through various CuO2 cells jumping from one O2- to the other under the influence of magnetic field offered by the Cu2+ ions in that CuO2 cell and thus forming hole pairs. In the pseudogap phase of electron-doped cuprates, two electrons enter the order parameter at Cu2+ sites from opposite ends and pass from one Cu2+ site to the diagonally opposite Cu2+ site. Following this type of path, they are subjected to high magnetic fields from various Cu2+ ions in that cell. They do not travel from one Cu2+ site to the other along straight path but by helical path. As they pass through the diagonal, they face high to low to very high magnetic field. Therefore, frequency of helical motion and pitch goes on changing with the magnetic field. Just before reaching the Cu2+ ions at the exit points of all the cells, the pitch of the helical motion is enormously decreased and thus charge density at these sites is increased. So the velocity of electrons along the diagonal path is decreased. Consequently, transition temperature of electron-doped cuprates becomes less than that of hole-doped cuprates. Symmetry of the order parameter of the electron-doped cuprates has been found to be of 3dx2-y2 + iS type. It has been inferred that internal magnetic field inside the order parameter reconstructs the Fermi surface, which is requisite for superconductivity to take place. Electron pairs formed in the pseudogap phase are the precursors of superconducting order parameter when cooled below Tc.

  16. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Serge; Rosinski, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical applications. A classification of operator stable Levy processes in two dimensions is provided according to their exponents and symmetry groups. We conclude with some remarks and extensions to general operator self-similar processes.

  17. Hemispherical sky simulator for daylighting model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkowitz, S.

    1981-07-01

    The design of a 24-foot-diameter hemispherical sky simulator recently completed at LBL is described. The goal was to produce a facility in which large models could be tested; which was suitable for research, teaching, and design; which could provide a uniform sky, an overcast sky, and several clear-sky luminance distributions, as well as accommodating an artificial sun. Initial operating experience with the facility is described, the sky simulator capabilities are reviewed, and its strengths and weaknesses relative to outdoor modeling tests are discussed.

  18. Wind Shear Target Echo Modeling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind shear is a dangerous atmospheric phenomenon in aviation. Wind shear is defined as a sudden change of speed or direction of the wind. In order to analyze the influence of wind shear on the efficiency of the airplane, this paper proposes a mathematical model of point target rain echo and weather target signal echo based on Doppler effect. The wind field model is developed in this paper, and the antenna model is also studied by using Bessel function. The spectrum distribution of symmetric and asymmetric wind fields is researched by using the mathematical model proposed in this paper. The simulation results are in accordance with radial velocity component, and the simulation results also confirm the correctness of the established model of antenna.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...

  1. Simulation of Laser-Compton Cooling of Electron Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgaki, T.

    2000-01-01

    We study a method of laser-Compton cooling of electron beams. Using a Monte Carlo code, we evaluate the effects of the laser-electron interaction for transverse cooling. The optics with and without chromatic correction for the cooling are examined. The laser-Compton cooling for JLC/NLC at E_0=2 GeV is considered.

  2. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  3. Battery thermal models for hybrid vehicle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    This paper summarizes battery thermal modeling capabilities for: (1) an advanced vehicle simulator (ADVISOR); and (2) battery module and pack thermal design. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) ADVISOR is developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment. There are several battery models in ADVISOR for various chemistry types. Each one of these models requires a thermal model to predict the temperature change that could affect battery performance parameters, such as resistance, capacity and state of charges. A lumped capacitance battery thermal model in the Matlab/Simulink environment was developed that included the ADVISOR battery performance models. For thermal evaluation and design of battery modules and packs, NREL has been using various computer aided engineering tools including commercial finite element analysis software. This paper will discuss the thermal ADVISOR battery model and its results, along with the results of finite element modeling that were presented at the workshop on "Development of Advanced Battery Engineering Models" in August 2001.

  4. Particle-in-Cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Patel, Kartik

    2016-01-01

    We carry out Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On other hand, in strong relativistic case the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behaviour. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  5. 3D PIC simulations of electron beams created via reflection of intense laser light from a water target

    CERN Document Server

    Ngirmang, Gregory K; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John T; Chowdhury, Enam A; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, W M

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) modeling of an ultra-intense laser experiment by the Extreme Light group at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) using the PIC code LSP. This is the first time PIC simulations have been performed in 3D for this experiment which involves an ultra-intense, short-pulse (30 fs) laser interacting with a water jet target at normal incidence. These 3D PIC simulation results are compared to results from 2D(3$v$) PIC simulations for both $5.4\\cdot10^{17}$ W cm$^{-2}$ and $3\\cdot10^{18}$ W cm$^{-2}$ intensities. Comparing the 2D(3$v$) and 3D simulation results, the laser-energy-to-ejected-electron-energy conversion efficiencies were comparable, but the angular distribution of ejected electrons show interesting differences with qualitative differences at higher intensity. An analytic plane-wave model is provided that provides some explanation for the angular distribution and energies of ejected electrons in the 2D(3$v$) simulations. We also performed a 3D simulation with circular...

  6. MEGACELL: A nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroppa, Daniel G., E-mail: dstroppa@lnls.br [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mechanical Engineering School, University of Campinas, 13083-860 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Righetto, Ricardo D. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Campinas, 13083-852 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Montoro, Luciano A. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ramirez, Antonio J. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Mechanical Engineering School, University of Campinas, 13083-860 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. -- Highlights: {yields} A software to support the HRTEM image simulation of nanocrystals in actual size. {yields} MEGACELL allows the construction of complex nanocrystals models for multislice image simulation. {yields} Some examples of improved nanocrystalline system characterization are presented, including the analysis of 3D morphology and growth behavior.

  7. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron–neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron–neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron–ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  8. Kanban simulation model for production process optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golchev Riste

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A long time has passed since the KANBAN system has been established as an efficient method for coping with the excessive inventory. Still, the possibilities for its improvement through its integration with other different approaches should be investigated further. The basic research challenge of this paper is to present benefits of KANBAN implementation supported with Discrete Event Simulation (DES. In that direction, at the beginning, the basics of KANBAN system are presented with emphasis on the information and material flow, together with a methodology for implementation of KANBAN system. Certain analysis on combining the simulation with this methodology is presented. The paper is concluded with a practical example which shows that through understanding the philosophy of the implementation methodology of KANBAN system and the simulation methodology, a simulation model can be created which can serve as a basis for a variety of experiments that can be conducted within a short period of time, resulting with production process optimization.

  9. Tutorial on agent-based modeling and simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macal, C. M.; North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2005-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) is a new approach to modeling systems comprised of autonomous, interacting agents. ABMS promises to have far-reaching effects on the way that businesses use computers to support decision-making and researchers use electronic laboratories to support their research. Some have gone so far as to contend that ABMS is a third way of doing science besides deductive and inductive reasoning. Computational advances have made possible a growing number of agent-based applications in a variety of fields. Applications range from modeling agent behavior in the stock market and supply chains, to predicting the spread of epidemics and the threat of bio-warfare, from modeling consumer behavior to understanding the fall of ancient civilizations, to name a few. This tutorial describes the theoretical and practical foundations of ABMS, identifies toolkits and methods for developing ABMS models, and provides some thoughts on the relationship between ABMS and traditional modeling techniques.

  10. Multiscale modelling of charge transport in organic electronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jenny

    2010-03-01

    Charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors is controlled by a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. In this presentation we will show how a set of computational methods, namely molecular modelling methods to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport can be used to reproduce experimental charge mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Using case studies, we will show how such simulations can explain the relative values of electron and hole mobility and the effects of grain size, side chains and polymer molecular weight on charge mobility. Although currently applied to material systems of relatively high symmetry or well defined structure, this approach can be developed to address more complex systems such as multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers.

  11. PIC simulations of the MagnetoRotational instability in electron-positron plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchingolo, Giannandrea; Grismayer, Thomas; Loureiro, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a crucial mechanism of angular momentum transport in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, as e-e+ plasmas accretion disks nearness neutron stars and black holes. The MRI has been widely studied using MHD models and simulations, in order to understand the behavior of astrophysical fluids in a state of differential rotation. When the timescale for electron and ion collisions is longer than the inflow time in the disk, the plasma is macroscopically collisionless and MHD breaks down. This is the case of the limit of weak magnetic field, i.e., as the ratio of the ion cyclotron frequency to orbital frequency becomes small. Leveraging on the recent addition of the shearing co-rotating frames equations of motion and Maxwell's equations modules in our PIC code OSIRIS 3.0, we intend to present our recent results of the analysis of MRI in electron-positron plasma in the limit of weak magnetic field. We will recall the theoretical 1D linear model of Krolik et Zweibel that describes the behavior of MRI in the limit of weak magnetic field and use it to support our results. Moving to 2D simulations, the analysis of MRI via PIC code permits to investigate also how MRI will act in comparison with other Kinetic instabilities, like mirror instability.

  12. Equation of state of metallic hydrogen from coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, D M

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of hydrogen at pressures higher than molecular dissociation using the coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo method. These calculations use the accurate reptation quantum Monte Carlo method to estimate the electronic energy and pressure while doing a Monte Carlo simulation of the protons. In addition to presenting simulation results for the equation of state over a large region of the phase diagram, we report the free energy obtained by thermodynamic integration. We find very good agreement with density-functional theory based molecular-dynamics calculations for pressures beyond 600 GPa and densities above rho=1.4 g/cm(3) , both for thermodynamic and structural properties. This agreement provides a strong support to the different approximations employed in the density-functional treatment of the system, specifically the approximate exchange-correlation potential and the use of pseudopotentials for the range of densities considered. We find disagreement with chemical models, which suggests that a reinvestigation of planetary models--previously constructed using the Saumon-Chabrier-Van Horn equations of state--might be needed.

  13. Investigation of NWC-induced electron precipitation and theoretical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenxia; Wang, Chenyu; Chen, Lunjin

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of the electron fluxes in the inner radiation belt, which is induced by the powerful North West Cape (NWC) very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitter, have been observed and analyzed by several research groups. However, all of the previous publications have focused on NWC-induced >100-keV electrons only, based on observations from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites. Here, we present flux enhancements with 30--100-keV electrons related to NWC transmitter for the first time, which were observed by the GOES satellite at night. Similar to the 100--300-keV precipitated-electron havior, the low energy 30--100-keV electron precipitation is primarily located east of the transmitter. However, the latter does not drift eastward to the same extent as the former, possibly because of the lower electron velocity. The 30--100-keV electrons are distributed in the L=1.8--2.1 shell range, in ...

  14. Simulation of the Beam Dump for a High Intensity Electron Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, S; Lefevre, T; Pepitone, K

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC Drive Beam is a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. A test facility for the Drive Beam electron gun will soon be commissioned at CERN. In this contribution we outline the design of a beam dump / Faraday cup capable of resisting the beam’s thermal load. The test facility will operate initially up to 140 keV. At such low energies, the electrons are absorbed very close to the surface of the dump, leading to a large energy deposition density in this thin layer. In order not to damage the dump, the beam must be spread over a large surface. For this reason, a small-angled cone has been chosen. Simulations using Geant4 have been performed to estimate the distribution of energy deposition in the dump. The heat transport both within the electron pulse and between pulses has been modelled using finite element methods to check the resistance of the dump at high repetition rates. In addition, the possibility of using a moveable dump to measure the beam profile and emittance is discussed.

  15. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  16. Theory, Modeling and Simulation: Research progress report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, B.C.; Dixon, D.A.; Dunning, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). In April 1994, construction began on the new EMSL, a collaborative research facility devoted to advancing the understanding of environmental molecular science. Research in the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM and S) program will play a critical role in understanding molecular processes important in restoring DOE`s research, development, and production sites, including understanding the migration and reactions of contaminants in soils and ground water, developing processes for isolation and processing of pollutants, developing improved materials for waste storage, understanding the enzymatic reactions involved in the biodegradation of contaminants, and understanding the interaction of hazardous chemicals with living organisms. The research objectives of the TM and S program are fivefold: to apply available electronic structure and dynamics techniques to study fundamental molecular processes involved in the chemistry of natural and contaminated systems; to extend current electronic structure and dynamics techniques to treat molecular systems of future importance and to develop new techniques for addressing problems that are computationally intractable at present; to apply available molecular modeling techniques to simulate molecular processes occurring in the multi-species, multi-phase systems characteristic of natural and polluted environments; to extend current molecular modeling techniques to treat ever more complex molecular systems and to improve the reliability and accuracy of such simulations; and to develop technologies for advanced parallel architectural computer systems. Research highlights of 82 projects are given.

  17. MEGACELL: a nanocrystal model construction software for HRTEM multislice simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroppa, Daniel G; Righetto, Ricardo D; Montoro, Luciano A; Ramirez, Antonio J

    2011-07-01

    Image simulation has an invaluable importance for the accurate analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) results, especially due to its non-linear image formation mechanism. Because the as-obtained images cannot be interpreted in a straightforward fashion, the retrieval of both qualitative and quantitative information from HRTEM micrographs requires an iterative process including the simulation of a nanocrystal model and its comparison with experimental images. However most of the available image simulation software requires atom-by-atom coordinates as input for the calculations, which can be prohibitive for large finite crystals and/or low-symmetry systems and zone axis orientations. This paper presents an open source citation-ware tool named MEGACELL, which was developed to assist on the construction of nanocrystals models. It allows the user to build nanocrystals with virtually any convex polyhedral geometry and to retrieve its atomic positions either as a plain text file or as an output compatible with EMS (Electron Microscopy Software) input protocol. In addition to the description of this tool features, some construction examples and its application for scientific studies are presented. These studies show MEGACELL as a handy tool, which allows an easier construction of complex nanocrystal models and improves the quantitative information extraction from HRTEM images. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-space grids and the Octopus code as tools for the development of new simulation approaches for electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Xavier; De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Oliveira, Micael J T; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Varas, Alejandro; Theophilou, Iris; Helbig, Nicole; Verstraete, Matthieu; Stella, Lorenzo; Nogueira, Fernando; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Castro, Alberto; Marques, Miguel A L; Rubio, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Real-space grids are a powerful alternative for the simulation of electronic systems. One of the main advantages of the approach is the flexibility and simplicity of working directly in real space where the different fields are discretized on a grid, combined with competitive numerical performance and great potential for parallelization. These properties constitute a great advantage at the time of implementing and testing new physical models. Based on our experience with the Octopus code, in this article we discuss how the real-space approach has allowed for the recent development of new ideas for the simulation of electronic systems. Among these applications are approaches to calculate response properties, modeling of photoemission, optimal control of quantum systems, simulation of plasmonic systems, and the exact solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for low-dimensionality systems.

  19. Real-space grids and the Octopus code as tools for the development of new simulation approaches for electronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Strubbe, David; De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Varas, Alejandro; Theophilou, Iris; Helbig, Nicole; Verstraete, Matthieu J.; Stella, Lorenzo; Nogueira, Fernando; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Castro, Alberto; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Rubio, Angel

    Real-space grids are a powerful alternative for the simulation of electronic systems. One of the main advantages of the approach is the flexibility and simplicity of working directly in real space where the different fields are discretized on a grid, combined with competitive numerical performance and great potential for parallelization. These properties constitute a great advantage at the time of implementing and testing new physical models. Based on our experience with the Octopus code, in this article we discuss how the real-space approach has allowed for the recent development of new ideas for the simulation of electronic systems. Among these applications are approaches to calculate response properties, modeling of photoemission, optimal control of quantum systems, simulation of plasmonic systems, and the exact solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation for low-dimensionality systems.

  20. Real-space grids and the Octopus code as tools for the development of new simulation approaches for electronic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Strubbe, David; De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Oliveira, Micael J T; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Varas, Alejandro; Theophilou, Iris; Helbig, Nicole; Verstraete, Matthieu J; Stella, Lorenzo; Nogueira, Fernando; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Castro, Alberto; Marques, Miguel A L; Rubio, Angel

    2015-12-21

    Real-space grids are a powerful alternative for the simulation of electronic systems. One of the main advantages of the approach is the flexibility and simplicity of working directly in real space where the different fields are discretized on a grid, combined with competitive numerical performance and great potential for parallelization. These properties constitute a great advantage at the time of implementing and testing new physical models. Based on our experience with the Octopus code, in this article we discuss how the real-space approach has allowed for the recent development of new ideas for the simulation of electronic systems. Among these applications are approaches to calculate response properties, modeling of photoemission, optimal control of quantum systems, simulation of plasmonic systems, and the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation for low-dimensionality systems.