WorldWideScience

Sample records for model shock scattering

  1. Particle spectra and efficiency in nonlinear relativistic shock acceleration: survey of scattering models

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Donald C; Bykov, Andrei M

    2015-01-01

    We include a general form for the scattering mean free path in a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of relativistic shock formation and Fermi acceleration. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, as well as analytic work, suggest that relativistic shocks tend to produce short-scale, self-generated magnetic turbulence that leads to a scattering mean free path (mfp) with a stronger momentum dependence than the mfp ~ p dependence for Bohm diffusion. In unmagnetized shocks, this turbulence is strong enough to dominate the background magnetic field so the shock can be treated as parallel regardless of the initial magnetic field orientation, making application to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), pulsar winds, Type Ibc supernovae, and extra-galactic radio sources more straightforward and realistic. In addition to changing the scale of the shock precursor, we show that, when nonlinear effects from efficient Fermi acceleration are taken into account, the momentum dependence of the mfp has an important influence on the efficiency of cosm...

  2. Particle spectra and efficiency in nonlinear relativistic shock acceleration - survey of scattering models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Warren, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2016-03-01

    We include a general form for the scattering mean free path, λmfp(p), in a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of relativistic shock formation and Fermi acceleration. Particle-in-cell simulations, as well as analytic work, suggest that relativistic shocks tend to produce short-scale, self-generated magnetic turbulence that leads to a scattering mean free path with a stronger momentum dependence than the λmfp ∝ p dependence for Bohm diffusion. In unmagnetized shocks, this turbulence is strong enough to dominate the background magnetic field so the shock can be treated as parallel regardless of the initial magnetic field orientation, making application to γ-ray bursts, pulsar winds, type Ibc supernovae, and extragalactic radio sources more straightforward and realistic. In addition to changing the scale of the shock precursor, we show that, when nonlinear effects from efficient Fermi acceleration are taken into account, the momentum dependence of λmfp(p) has an important influence on the efficiency of cosmic ray production as well as the accelerated particle spectral shape. These effects are absent in non-relativistic shocks and do not appear in relativistic shock models unless nonlinear effects are self-consistently described. We show, for limited examples, how the changes in Fermi acceleration translate to changes in the intensity and spectral shape of γ-ray emission from proton-proton interactions and pion-decay radiation.

  3. Structure of shock compressed model basaltic glass: Insights from O K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution 27Al NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Park, Sun Young; Kim, Hyo-Im; Tschauner, Oliver; Asimow, Paul; Bai, Ligang; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (UNLV); (SNU); (CIT); (CIW)

    2012-05-29

    The detailed atomic structures of shock compressed basaltic glasses are not well understood. Here, we explore the structures of shock compressed silicate glass with a diopside-anorthite eutectic composition (Di{sub 64}An{sub 36}), a common Fe-free model basaltic composition, using oxygen K-edge X-ray Raman scattering and high-resolution {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR spectroscopy and report previously unknown details of shock-induced changes in the atomic configurations. A topologically driven densification of the Di{sub 64}An{sub 36} glass is indicated by the increase in oxygen K-edge energy for the glass upon shock compression. The first experimental evidence of the increase in the fraction of highly coordinated Al in shock compressed glass is found in the {sup 27}Al NMR spectra. This unambiguous evidence of shock-induced changes in Al coordination environments provides atomistic insights into shock compression in basaltic glasses and allows us to microscopically constrain the magnitude of impact events or relevant processes involving natural basalts on Earth and planetary surfaces.

  4. Inelastic X-Ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L.; Gericke, D. O.; Döppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. These first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  5. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  6. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  7. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  8. Modelling Hyperboloid Sound Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burry, Jane; Davis, Daniel; Peters, Brady;

    2011-01-01

    The Responsive Acoustic Surfaces workshop project described here sought new understandings about the interaction between geometry and sound in the arena of sound scattering. This paper reports on the challenges associated with modelling, simulating, fabricating and measuring this phenomenon using...

  9. Simulation of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Stimulated Raman Scattering In Shock Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, L; Liu, W D; Yan, R; Ren, C

    2016-01-01

    We study stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in shock ignition by comparing fluid and PIC simulations. Under typical parameters for the OMEGA experiments [Theobald \\emph{et al}., Phys. Plasmas \\textbf{19}, 102706 (2012)], a series of 1D fluid simulations with laser intensities ranging between 2$\\times$10$^{15}$ and 2$\\times$10$^{16}$ W/cm$^2$ finds that SBS is the dominant instability, which increases significantly with the incident intensity. Strong pump depletion caused by SBS and SRS limits the transmitted intensity at the 0.17n$_c$ to be less than 3.5$\\times$10$^{15}$ W/cm$^2$. The PIC simulations show similar physics but with higher saturation levels for SBS and SRS convective modes and stronger pump depletion due to higher seed levels for the electromagnetic fields in PIC codes. Plasma flow profiles are found to be important in proper modeling of SBS and limiting its reflectivity in both the fluid and PIC simulations.

  10. Evolution of Elastic X-ray Scattering in Laser-Shocked Warm Dense Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugland, N L; Gregori, G; Bandyopadhyay, S; Brenner, C; Brown, C; Constantin, C; Glenzer, S H; Khattak, F; Kritcher, A L; Niemann, C; Otten, A; Pasley, J; Pelka, A; Roth, M; Spindloe, C; Riley, D

    2009-06-02

    We have studied the dynamics of warm dense Li with near-elastic x-ray scattering. Li foils were heated and compressed using shock waves driven by 4 ns long laser pulses. Separate 1 ns long laser pulses were used to generate a bright source of 2.96 keV Cl Ly-{alpha} photons for x-ray scattering, and the spectrum of scattered photons was recorded at a scattering angle of 120{sup o} using a HOPG crystal operated in the von Hamos geometry. A variable delay between the heater and backlighter laser beams measured the scattering time evolution. Comparison with radiation hydrodynamics simulations shows that the plasma is highly coupled during the first several nanoseconds, then relaxes to a moderate coupling state at later times. Near-elastic scattering amplitudes have been successfully simulated using the screened one-component plasma model. Our main finding is that the near-elastic scattering amplitudes are quite sensitive to the mean ionization state {bar Z}, and by extension to the choice of ionization model in the radiation-hydrodynamics simulations used to predict plasma properties within the shocked Li.

  11. Tracking the density evolution in counter-propagating shock waves using imaging X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kraus, D.; Benage, J. F.; Drake, R. P.; Efthimion, P.; Falk, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Heimann, P.; Hill, K.; Keiter, P. A.; Lu, J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nagler, B.; Pablant, N.; Schropp, A.; Tobias, B.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from time-resolved X-ray imaging and inelastic scattering on collective excitations. These data are then employed to infer the mass density evolution within laser-driven shock waves. In our experiments, thin carbon foils are first strongly compressed and then driven into a dense state by counter-propagating shock waves. The different measurements agree that the graphite sample is about twofold compressed when the shock waves collide, and a sharp increase in forward scattering indicates disassembly of the sample 1 ns thereafter. We can benchmark hydrodynamics simulations of colliding shock waves by the X-ray scattering methods employed.

  12. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 30 September 2016 – 21 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and...release: distribution unlimited. PA#16490 Air Force Research Laboratory Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation Daniel W. Crews In-Space...unlimited. PA#16490 Overview • Motivation and Background • What is a Collisionless Shock Wave? • Features of the Collisionless Shock • The Shock Simulation

  13. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  14. Internal shock model for Microquasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Spruit, H C; Kaiser, Christian R.; Sunyaev, Rashid; Spruit, Henk C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for the radio outbursts of microquasars based on the assumption of quasi-continuous jet ejection. The jets are `lit up' by shock fronts traveling along the jets during outbursts. The observed comparatively flat decay light curves combined with gradually steepening spectral slopes are explained by a superposition of the radiation of the aging relativistic particle population left behind by the shocks. This scenario is the low energy, time-resolved equivalent to the internal shock model for GRBs. We show that this model predicts energy contents of the radiating plasma similar to the plasmon model. At the same time, the jet model relaxes the severe requirements on the central source in terms of the rate at which this energy must be supplied to the jet. Observations of `mini-bursts' with flat spectral slopes and of infrared emission far from the source centre suggest two different states of jet ejections: (i) A `mini-burst' mode with relatively stable jet production and weak radio emission with...

  15. Scattering of ultrasonic shock waves in suspensions of silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudoin, Michael; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Coulouvrat, François; Chanéac, Corinne

    2011-03-01

    Experiments are carried out to assess, for the first time, the validity of a generalized Burgers' equation, introduced first by Davidson [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 54, 1331-1342 (1973)] to compute the nonlinear propagation of finite amplitude acoustical waves in suspensions of "rigid" particles. Silica nanoparticles of two sizes (33 and 69 nm) have been synthesized in a water-ethanol mixture and precisely characterized via electron microscopy. An acoustical beam of high amplitude is generated at 1 MHz inside a water tank, leading to the formation of acoustical shock waves through nonlinear steepening. The signal is then measured after propagation in a cylinder containing either a reference solution or suspensions of nanoparticles. In this way, a "nonlinear attenuation" is obtained and compared to the numerical solution of a generalized Burgers' equation adapted to the case of hydrosols. An excellent agreement (corresponding to an error on the particles size estimation of 3 nm) is achieved in the frequency range from 1 to 40 MHz. Both visco-inertial and thermal scattering are significant in the present case, whereas thermal effects can generally be neglected for most hydrosols. This is due to the value of the specific heat ratio of water-ethanol mixture which significantly differs from unity.

  16. Thomson scattering measurement of a shock in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, T.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Moritaka, T. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tomita, K.; Nakayama, K.; Inoue, K.; Uchino, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ide, T.; Tsubouchi, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishio, K.; Ide, H.; Kuwada, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikane-yama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    We report the first direct measurement of temporally and spatially resolved plasma temperatures at a shock as well as its spatial structure and propagation in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas. Two shocks are formed in counter-streaming collisionless plasmas early in time, and they propagate opposite directions. This indicates the existence of counter-streaming collisionless flows to keep exciting the shocks, even though the collisional effects increase later in time. The shock images are observed with optical diagnostics, and the upstream and downstream plasma parameters of one of the shocks are measured using Thomson scattering technique.

  17. Modeling fluctuations in scattered waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jakeman, E

    2006-01-01

    Fluctuations in scattered waves limit the performance of imaging and remote sensing systems that operate on all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. To better understand these fluctuations, Modeling Fluctuations in Scattered Waves provides a practical guide to the phenomenology, mathematics, and simulation of non-Gaussian noise models and discusses how they can be used to characterize the statistics of scattered waves.Through their discussion of mathematical models, the authors demonstrate the development of new sensing techniques as well as offer intelligent choices that can be made for system analysis. Using experimental results and numerical simulation, the book illustrates the properties and applications of these models. The first two chapters introduce statistical tools and the properties of Gaussian noise, including results on phase statistics. The following chapters describe Gaussian processes and the random walk model, address multiple scattering effects and propagation through an extended med...

  18. GRB 060218/SN 2006aj: Prompt Emission from Inverse-Compton Scattering of Shock Breakout Thermal Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Z G; Liang, E W; Zhang, Bing

    2006-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218/SN 2006aj is a peculiar event, with the second lowest redshift, low luminosity, long duration, chromatic lightcurve features, and in particular, the presence of a thermal component in the X-ray and UV-optical spectra. Thanks to detailed temporal and spectral coverage of the {\\em Swift} observatory, the abundant data allow the GRB prompt emission to be modelled in great detail for the first time. The low flux of prompt UV/optical emission disfavors the conventional internal shock/synchrotron radiation models, which generally predict strong UV/optical emission. Here we show that the unusual prompt emission of GRB 060218 can be produced by inverse-Compton scattering of shock-accelerated relativistic electrons off the detected thermal photons. A pair of (forward plus reverse) shocks form when a relativistic outflow interacts with a preexisting slower shell. The observed gamma-ray emission and X-ray emission arise from the reverse-shocked and forward-shocked regions, respectively. ...

  19. Inferring the electron temperature and density of shocked liquid deuterium using inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, S P; Radha, P B; Boehly, T R; Goncharov, V N; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Smalyuk, V A [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, NY 14623-1299 (United States); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Falk, K; Gregori, G, E-mail: sreg@lle.rochester.ed [Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    An experiment designed to launch laser-ablation-driven shock waves (10 to 70 Mbar) in a planar liquid-deuterium target on the OMEGA Laser System and to diagnose the shocked conditions using inelastic x-ray scattering is described. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) is inferred from the Doppler-broadened Compton-downshifted peak of the noncollective ({alpha}{sub s} = 1k{lambda}{sub D} > 1) x-ray scattering for T{sub e} > T{sub Fermi}. The electron density (n{sub e}) is inferred from the downshifted plasmon peak of the collective ({alpha}{sub scatter} > 1) x-ray scattering. A cylindrical layer of liquid deuterium is formed in a cryogenic cell with 8-{mu}m-thick polyimide windows. The polyimide ablator is irradiated with peak intensities in the range of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and shock waves are launched. Predictions from a 1-D hydrodynamics code show the shocked deuterium has a thickness of {approx}0.1 mm with spatially uniform conditions. For the drive intensities under consideration, electron density up to {approx}5 x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature in the range of 10 to 25 eV are predicted. A laser-irradiated saran foil produces Cl Ly{sub {alpha}e}mission. The spectrally resolved x-ray scattering is recorded at 90{sup 0} for the noncollective scattering and at 40{sup 0} for the collective scattering with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) crystal spectrometer and an x-ray framing camera.

  20. MAGNETIC VARIANCES AND PITCH-ANGLE SCATTERING TIMES UPSTREAM OF INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Silvia; Zimbardo, Gaetano, E-mail: silvia.perri@fis.unical.it, E-mail: gaetano.zimbardo@fis.unical.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2012-07-20

    Recent observations of power-law time profiles of energetic particles accelerated at interplanetary shocks have shown the possibility of anomalous, superdiffusive transport for energetic particles throughout the heliosphere. Those findings call for an accurate investigation of the magnetic field fluctuation properties at the resonance frequencies upstream of the shock's fronts. Normalized magnetic field variances, indeed, play a crucial role in the determination of the pitch-angle scattering times and then of the transport regime. The present analysis investigates the time behavior of the normalized variances of the magnetic field fluctuations, measured by the Ulysses spacecraft upstream of corotating interaction region (CIR) shocks, for those events which exhibit superdiffusion for energetic electrons. We find a quasi-constant value for the normalized magnetic field variances from about 10 hr to 100 hr from the shock front. This rules out the presence of a varying diffusion coefficient and confirms the possibility of superdiffusion for energetic electrons. A statistical analysis of the scattering times obtained from the magnetic fluctuations upstream of the CIR events has also been performed; the resulting power-law distributions of scattering times imply long range correlations and weak pitch-angle scattering, and the power-law slopes are in qualitative agreement with superdiffusive processes described by a Levy random walk.

  1. Comparison between x-ray scattering and velocity-interferometry measurements from shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K.; Regan, S. P.; Vorberger, J.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hu, S. X.; Murphy, C. D.; Radha, P. B.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Wark, J. S.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.

    2013-04-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understand the structure of Jovian planets and inertial confinement fusion research. The Omega laser was used to drive a planar shock wave in the cryogenically cooled deuterium, creating warm dense matter conditions. X-ray scattering was used to determine the spectrum near the boundary of the collective and noncollective scattering regimes using a narrow band x-ray source in backscattering geometry. Our scattering spectra are thus sensitive to the individual electron motion as well as the collective plasma behavior and provide a measurement of the electron density, temperature, and ionization state. Our data are consistent with velocity-interferometry measurements previously taken on the same shocked deuterium conditions and presented by K. Falk [High Energy Density Phys.10.1016/j.hedp.2011.11.006 8, 76 (2012)]. This work presents a comparison of the two diagnostic systems and offers a detailed discussion of challenges encountered.

  2. Comparison between x-ray scattering and velocity-interferometry measurements from shocked liquid deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, K; Regan, S P; Vorberger, J; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Hu, S X; Murphy, C D; Radha, P B; Jephcoat, A P; Wark, J S; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G

    2013-04-01

    The equation of state of light elements is essential to understand the structure of Jovian planets and inertial confinement fusion research. The Omega laser was used to drive a planar shock wave in the cryogenically cooled deuterium, creating warm dense matter conditions. X-ray scattering was used to determine the spectrum near the boundary of the collective and noncollective scattering regimes using a narrow band x-ray source in backscattering geometry. Our scattering spectra are thus sensitive to the individual electron motion as well as the collective plasma behavior and provide a measurement of the electron density, temperature, and ionization state. Our data are consistent with velocity-interferometry measurements previously taken on the same shocked deuterium conditions and presented by K. Falk et al. [High Energy Density Phys. 8, 76 (2012)]. This work presents a comparison of the two diagnostic systems and offers a detailed discussion of challenges encountered.

  3. Multiple scattering Model in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Urbàn, L

    2002-01-01

    We present a new multiple scattering (MSC) model to simulate the multiple scattering of charged particles in matter. This model does not use the Moliere formalism, it is based on the more complete Lewis theory. The model simulates the scattering of the particle after a given step, computes the path length correction and the lateral displacement as well.

  4. Demonstration of combined radiography and x-ray scattering measurements of shocked foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Collins, Timothy; Bonino, Mark; Regan, Sean; Kozlowski, Pawel; Drake, Paul

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density physics experiments often use foams due to their low, tunable densities and being machinable. Simulating these experiments can be difficult due to the equation of state being largely unknown for shocked foams. This talk will focus on an experiments dedicated to measuring the temperature, ionization and density of shocked foams from simultaneous x-ray Thomson scattering and radiography measurements. The foam used in this experiment is carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde foam with an initial density of 0.1 g/cc. One OMEGA EP beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three beams irradiate a nickel foil coated with titanium to create the x-ray backlighter.. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS), spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. The IXTS is ideally suited to measure plasma conditions upstream, downstream and at the shock front in the foam. Preliminary results from this experiment will be shown. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  5. Elastic scattering in geometrical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebaniak, Zbigniew; Wibig, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental data on proton-proton elastic and inelastic scattering emerging from the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider, calls for an efficient model to fit the data. We have examined the optical, geometrical picture and we have found the simplest, linear dependence of this model parameters on the logarithm of the interaction energy with the significant change of the respective slopes at one point corresponding to the energy of about 300 GeV. The logarithmic dependence observed at high energies allows one to extrapolate the proton-proton elastic, total (and inelastic) cross sections to ultra high energies seen in cosmic rays events which makes a solid justification of the extrapolation to very high energy domain of cosmic rays and could help us to interpret the data from an astrophysical and a high energy physics point of view.

  6. Electron Scattering by High-Frequency Whistler Waves at Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Phan, T. D.; Hull, A. J.; Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.; Argall, M. R.; Le Contel, O.; Agapitov, O.; Gersham, D. J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electrons are accelerated to non-thermal energies at shocks in space and astrophysical environments. While different mechanisms of electron acceleration have been proposed, it remains unclear how non-thermal electrons are produced out of the thermal plasma pool. Here, we report in situ evidence of pitch-angle scattering of non-thermal electrons by whistler waves at Earths bow shock. On 2015 November 4, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission crossed the bow shock with an Alfvn Mach number is approximately 11 and a shock angle of approximately 84deg. In the ramp and overshoot regions, MMS revealed bursty enhancements of non-thermal (0.52 keV) electron flux, correlated with high-frequency (0.2 - 0.4 Omega(sub ce), where Omega(sub ce) is the cyclotron frequency) parallel-propagating whistler waves. The electron velocity distribution (measured at 30 ms cadence) showed an enhanced gradient of phase-space density at and around the region where the electron velocity component parallel to the magnetic field matched the resonant energy inferred from the wave frequency range. The flux of 0.5 keV electrons (measured at 1ms cadence) showed fluctuations with the same frequency. These features indicate that non-thermal electrons were pitch-angle scattered by cyclotron resonance with the high-frequency whistler waves. However, the precise role of the pitch-angle scattering by the higher-frequency whistler waves and possible nonlinear effects in the electron acceleration process remains unclear.

  7. Efficient Finite Element Modelling of Elastodynamic Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D and 3D scattering in isotropic material and guided wave scattering are presented.

  8. Shock tubes and blast injury modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Lei Ning; Yuan-Guo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Explosive blast injury has become the most prevalent injury in recent military conflicts and terrorist attacks.The magnitude of this kind of polytrauma is complex due to the basic physics of blast and the surrounding environments.Therefore,development of stable,reproducible and controllable animal model using an ideal blast simulation device is the key of blast injury research.The present review addresses the modeling of blast injury and applications of shock tubes.

  9. Monetary Shocks in Models with Inattentive Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Fernando E; Lippi, Francesco; Paciello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    We study models where prices respond slowly to shocks because firms are rationally inattentive. Producers must pay a cost to observe the determinants of the current profit maximizing price, and hence observe them infrequently. To generate large real effects of monetary shocks in such a model the time between observations must be long and/or highly volatile. Previous work on rational inattentiveness has allowed for observation intervals that are either constant-but-long (e.g. Caballero, 1989 or Reis, 2006) or volatile-but-short (e.g. Reis's, 2006 example where observation costs are negligible), but not both. In these models, the real effects of monetary policy are small for realistic values of the duration between observations. We show that non-negligible observation costs produce both of these effects: intervals between observations are infrequent and volatile. This generates large real effects of monetary policy for realistic values of the average time between observations.

  10. Boundary scattering in the phi^4 model

    CERN Document Server

    Dorey, Patrick; Mercer, James; Romanczukiewicz, Tomasz; Shnir, Yasha

    2015-01-01

    We study boundary scattering in the phi^4 model on a half-line with a one-parameter family of Neumann-type boundary conditions. A rich variety of phenomena is observed, which extends previously-studied behaviour on the full line to include regimes of near-elastic scattering, the restoration of a missing scattering window, and the creation of a kink or oscillon through the collision-induced decay of a metastable boundary state.

  11. Composed Scattering Model for Direct Volume Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文立; 石教英

    1996-01-01

    Based on the equation of transfer in transport theory of optical physics,a new volume rendering model,called composed scattering model(CSM),is presented.In calculating the scattering term of the equation,it is decomposed into volume scattering intensity and surface scattering intensity,and they are composed with the boundary detection operator as the weight function.This proposed model differs from the most current volume rendering models in the aspect that in CSM segmentation and illumination intensity calculation are taken as two coherent parts while in existing models they are regarded as two separate ones.This model has been applied to the direct volume rendering of 3D data sets obtained by CT and MRI.The resultant images show not only rich details but also clear boundary surfaces.CSM is demonstrated to be an accurate volume rendering model suitable for CT and MRI data sets.

  12. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  13. Powerful GeV emission from a gamma-ray-burst shock wave scattering stellar photons

    CERN Document Server

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The gamma-ray bursts of long duration are likely connected to the death of massive stars. The gamma-ray emission is believed to come from energy released internally in a flow that moves at ultrarelativistic speed. The fast flow drives a shock wave into the external medium leading to the afterglow emission. Most massive stars form in dense clusters, their high luminosity producing a very dense radiation field. Here, I explore the observational consequences of the interaction of the shocked external medium of the burst with the photon field of a nearby O star. I show that inverse Compton scattering of the stellar photons by electrons heated by the shock leads to powerful gamma-ray emission in the ~1-100 GeV range. This emission appears minutes to hours after the burst and can be easily detected by Cherenkov telescopes and likely with the GLAST satellite. This signal may have already been observed in GRB 940217 and can yield important information about the circumburst environment.

  14. Compton scattering in the Endpoint Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dagaonkar, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    We use the Endpoint model for exclusive hadronic processes to study Compton scattering of the proton. The parameters of the Endpoint model are fixed using the data for $F_1$ and the ratio of Pauli and Dirac form factors ($F_2/F_1$) and then used to get numerical predictions for the differential scattering cross section. We studied the Compton scattering at fixed $\\theta_{CM}$ in the $s \\sim t \\gg \\Lambda_{QCD}$ limit and at fixed $s$ much larger than $t$ limit. We observed that the calculations in the Endpoint Model give a good fit with experimental data in both regions.

  15. Rotational nuclear models and electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya de Guerra, E.

    1986-05-01

    A review is made of the basic formalism involved in the application of nuclear rotational models to the problem of electron scattering from axially symmetric deformed nuclei. Emphasis is made on the use of electron scattering to extract information on the nature of the collective rotational model. In this respect, the interest of using polarized beam and target is discussed with the help of illustrative examples. Concerning the nuclear structure four rotational models are considered: Two microscopic models, namely the Projected Hartree-Fock (PHF) and cranking models; and two collective models, the rigid rotor and the irrotational flow models. The problem of current conservation within the different models is also discussed.

  16. Modelling the inelastic scattering of fast electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); D' Alfonso, A.J., E-mail: a.j@dalfonso.com.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    Imaging at atomic resolution based on the inelastic scattering of electrons has become firmly established in the last three decades. Harald Rose pioneered much of the early theoretical work on this topic, in particular emphasising the role of phase and the importance of a mixed dynamic form factor. In this paper we review how the modelling of inelastic scattering has subsequently developed and how numerical implementation has been achieved. A software package μSTEM is introduced, capable of simulating various imaging modes based on inelastic scattering in both scanning and conventional transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Harald Rose was a pioneer of important work on atomic resolution imaging using inelastic scattering. • We review how the modelling of inelastic scattering has subsequently developed and been applied. • A software package μSTEM is introduced, capable of simulating various inelastic imaging modes.

  17. Particle acceleration at shock waves moving at arbitrary speed: the case of large scale magnetic field and anisotropic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Vietri, M

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical approach to investigate particle acceleration at shock waves moving at arbitrary speed in a medium with arbitrary scattering properties was first discussed in (Vietri 2003) and (Blasi & Vietri 2005}. We use this method and somewhat extend it in order to include the effect of a large scale magnetic field in the upstream plasma, with arbitrary orientation with respect to the direction of motion of the shock. We also use this approach to investigate the effects of anisotropic scattering on spectra and anisotropies of the distribution function of the accelerated particles.

  18. GeV photons from up-scattering of supernova shock breakout X-rays by an outside GRB jet

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X Y; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Meszaros, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Shock breakout X-ray emission has been reported for the first time from a supernova connected with a gamma-ray burst, namely GRB060218/SN2006aj. The gamma-ray emission and the power-law decaying X-ray afterglow are ascribed to a highly relativistic jet, while the thermal soft X-rays are thought to be produced when the radiation-dominated shock breaks from the optically thick stellar wind. We study the inverse Compton emission of the breakout thermal soft X-rays scattered by relativistic electrons in the jet forward shock, which is is expected to be at larger radii than the breakout shock. This IC emission produces sub-GeV to GeV photons, which may be detectable by GLAST. The detection of such GeV photons simultaneously with the supernova shock breakout emission would give evidence for the presence of a GRB jet ahead of the shock while the shock is breaking out. The anisotropic scattering between the X-rays and relativistic electrons may lead to large angle emission outside of the jet opening angle. This has i...

  19. Improving Pulsar Distances by Modelling Interstellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Deshpande, A A

    1998-01-01

    We present here a method to study the distribution of electron density fluctuations in pulsar directions as well as to estimate pulsar distances. The method, based on a simple two-component model of the scattering medium discussed by Gwinn et al. (1993), uses scintillation & proper motion data in addition to the measurements of angular broadening & temporal broadening to solve for the model parameters, namely, the fractional distance to a discrete scatterer and the ascociated relative scattering strength. We show how this method can be used to estimate pulsar distances reliably, when the location of a discrete scatterer (e.g. an HII region), if any, is known. Considering the specific example of PSR B0736-40, we illustrate how a simple characterization of the Gum nebula region (using the data on the Vela pulsar) is possible and can be used along with the temporal broadening measurements to estimate pulsar distances.

  20. Transparent alumina: A light scattering model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apetz, R.; Van Bruggen, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    A model based on Rayleigh-Gans-Debye light scattering theory has been developed to describe the light transmission properties of fine-grained, fully dense polycrystalline ceramics consisting of birefringent crystals. This model extends light transmission models based on geometrical optics, which are

  1. Measurements of Ionic Structure in Shock Compressed Lithium Hydride from Ultra-fast X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Brown, C; Davis, P; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Gericke, D O; Gregori, G; Holst, B; Landen, O L; Lee, H J; Morse, E C; Pelka, A; Redmer, R; Roth, M; Vorberger, J; Wunsch, K; Glenzer, S H

    2009-07-14

    We present the first ultrafast temporally, spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measurements from shock-compressed matter. These laser-compressed lithium-hydride samples are well characterized by inelastic Compton and Plasmon scattering of a K-{alpha} x-ray probe providing independent measurements of temperature and density. The experimental spectra yield the absolute elastic and inelastic scattering intensities from the measured density of free electrons. The data show excellent agreement with the total intensity and structure when using the two-species form factor and accounting for ionic screening.

  2. Quark model for kaon nucleon scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Osman

    2011-12-01

    Kaon nucleon elastic scattering is studied using chiral (3) quark model including antiquarks. Parameters of the present model are essentially based on nucleon–nucleon and nucleon–hyperon interactions. The mass of the scalar meson is taken as 635 MeV. Using this model, the phase shifts of the and partial waves of the kaon nucleon elastic scattering are investigated for isospins 0 and 1. The results of the numerical calculations of different partial waves are in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Comparison of geometrical shock dynamics and kinematic models for shock-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoux, J.; Lardjane, N.; Monasse, L.; Coulouvrat, F.

    2017-09-01

    Geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) is a simplified model for nonlinear shock-wave propagation, based on the decomposition of the shock front into elementary ray tubes. Assuming small changes in the ray tube area, and neglecting the effect of the post-shock flow, a simple relation linking the local curvature and velocity of the front, known as the A{-}M rule, is obtained. More recently, a new simplified model, referred to as the kinematic model, was proposed. This model is obtained by combining the three-dimensional Euler equations and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the front, which leads to an equation for the normal variation of the shock Mach number at the wave front. In the same way as GSD, the kinematic model is closed by neglecting the post-shock flow effects. Although each model's approach is different, we prove their structural equivalence: the kinematic model can be rewritten under the form of GSD with a specific A{-}M relation. Both models are then compared through a wide variety of examples including experimental data or Eulerian simulation results when available. Attention is drawn to the simple cases of compression ramps and diffraction over convex corners. The analysis is completed by the more complex cases of the diffraction over a cylinder, a sphere, a mound, and a trough.

  4. Scattering Amplitudes and Worldsheet Models of QFTs

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    I will describe recent progress on the study of scattering amplitudes via ambitwistor strings and the scattering equations. Ambitwistor strings are worldsheet models of quantum field theories, inspired by string theory. They naturally lead to a representation of amplitudes based on the scattering equations. While worldsheet models and related ideas have had a wide-ranging impact on the modern study of amplitudes, their direct application at loop level is a very recent success. I will show how a major difficulty in the loop-level story, the technicalities of higher-genus Riemann surfaces, can be avoided by turning the higher-genus surface into a nodal Riemann sphere, with the nodes representing the loop momenta. I will present new formulas for the one-loop integrands of gauge theory and gravity, with or without supersymmetry, and also some two-loop results.

  5. On a Stochastic Failure Model under Random Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ji Hwan

    2013-02-01

    In most conventional settings, the events caused by an external shock are initiated at the moments of its occurrence. In this paper, we study a new classes of shock model, where each shock from a nonhomogeneous Poisson processes can trigger a failure of a system not immediately, as in classical extreme shock models, but with delay of some random time. We derive the corresponding survival and failure rate functions. Furthermore, we study the limiting behaviour of the failure rate function where it is applicable.

  6. Stable and flux-conserved meshfree formulation to model shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael J.; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Slawson, Thomas R.; Danielson, Kent T.

    2016-05-01

    Accurate shock modeling requires that two critical issues be addressed: (1) correct representation of the essential shock physics, and (2) control of Gibbs phenomenon oscillation at the discontinuity. In this work a stable (oscillation limiting) and flux-conserved formulation under the reproducing kernel particle method is developed for shock modeling. A smoothed flux divergence is constructed under the framework of stabilized conforming nodal integration, which is locally-enriched with a Riemann solution to satisfy the entropy production constraints. This Riemann-enriched flux divergence is embedded into the reproducing kernel formulation through a velocity correction that also provides oscillation control at the shock. The correction is constrained to the shock region by an automatic shock detection algorithm that is constructed using the intrinsic spectral decomposition feature of the reproducing kernel approximation. Several numerical examples are provided to verify accuracy of the proposed formulation.

  7. The MAPPINGS III Library of Fast Radiative Shock Models

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Mark G; Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J

    2008-01-01

    We present a new library of fully-radiative shock models calculated with the MAPPINGS III shock and photoionization code. The library consists of grids of models with shock velocities in the range v=100-1000 km/s and magnetic parameters B/sqrt(n) of 10^-4 - 10 muG cm^(3/2) for five different atomic abundance sets, and for a pre-shock density of 1.0 cm^(-3). Additionally, Solar abundance model grids have been calculated for densities of 0.01, 0.1, 10, 100, and 1000 cm^(-3) with the same range in v and B/sqrt(n). Each model includes components of both the radiative shock and its photoionized precursor, ionized by the EUV and soft X-ray radiation generated in the radiative gas. We present the details of the ionization structure, the column densities, and the luminosities of the shock and its precursor. Emission line ratio predictions are separately given for the shock and its precursor as well as for the composite shock+precursor structure to facilitate comparison with observations in cases where the shock and i...

  8. Directional Dipole Model for Subsurface Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Hachisuka, Toshiya; Kjeldsen, Thomas Kim

    2014-01-01

    Rendering translucent materials using Monte Carlo ray tracing is computationally expensive due to a large number of subsurface scattering events. Faster approaches are based on analytical models derived from diffusion theory. While such analytical models are efficient, they miss out on some...... point source diffusion. A ray source corresponds better to the light that refracts through the surface of a translucent material. Using this ray source, we are able to take the direction of the incident light ray and the direction toward the point of emergence into account. We use a dipole construction...... similar to that of the standard dipole model, but we now have positive and negative ray sources with a mirrored pair of directions. Our model is as computationally efficient as existing models while it includes single scattering without relying on a separate Monte Carlo simulation, and the rendered images...

  9. Braided rings a scattering billiard model

    CERN Document Server

    Bénet, L

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a billiard scattering model consisting of two non-overlapping rotating discs in the context of the formation and structural properties of planetary rings. We show that due to the arrangement of the symmetric periodic orbits, stable orbits are found which in the configuration space lead to the appearance of patterns qualitatively similar to planetary rings. Rings associated with different stability regions are naturally braided; different braids may overlap displaying features similar to clumps. Erosion mechanisms within the model are discussed.

  10. Latent Utility Shocks in a Structural Empirical Asset Pricing Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Raahauge, Peter

    We consider a random utility extension of the fundamental Lucas (1978) equilibriumasset pricing model. The resulting structural model leads naturally to a likelihoodfunction. We estimate the model using U.S. asset market data from 1871 to2000, using both dividends and earnings as state variables....... We find that current dividendsdo not forecast future utility shocks, whereas current utility shocks do forecastfuture dividends. The estimated structural model produces a sequence of predictedutility shocks which provide better forecasts of future long-horizon stock market returnsthan the classical...... dividend-price ratio.KEYWORDS: Randomutility, asset pricing, maximumlikelihood, structuralmodel,return predictability...

  11. Diagnosing Direct-Drive, Shock-Heated, and Compressed Plastic Planar Foils with Noncollective Spectrally Resolved X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S.P.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Goncharov, V.N.; Boehly, T.R.; Epstein, R.; Sangster, T.C.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Gregori, G.; Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.

    2007-12-14

    The electron temperature (Te) and average ionization (Z) of nearly Fermi-degenerate, direct-drive, shock-heated, and compressed plastic planar foils were investigated using noncollective spectrally resolved x-ray scattering on the OMEGA Laser System. Plastic (CH) and Br-doped CH foils were driven with six beams, having an overlapped intensity of ~1 × 10^14 W/cm^2 and generating ~15-Mbar pressure in the foil.

  12. Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock can be caused by any condition that reduces blood flow, including: Heart problems (such as heart attack or heart failure ) Low blood volume (as with heavy bleeding or dehydration ) Changes in blood vessels (as with infection ...

  13. A sparse scattering model for nanoparticles on rough substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Wriedt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present and validate an efficient forward scattering model for nanoparticles on rough contaminated substrates.......We present and validate an efficient forward scattering model for nanoparticles on rough contaminated substrates....

  14. Modeling of Shock Propagation and Attenuation in Viscoelastic Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rusovici

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection from the potentially damaging effects of shock loading is a common design requirement for diverse mechanical structures ranging from shock accelerometers to spacecraft. High damping viscoelastic materials are employed in the design of geometrically complex, impact-absorbent components. Since shock transients are characterized by a broad frequency spectrum, it is imperative to properly model frequency dependence of material behavior over a wide frequency range. The Anelastic Displacement Fields (ADF method is employed herein to model frequency-dependence within a time-domain finite element framework. Axisymmetric, ADF finite elements are developed and then used to model shock propagation and absorption through viscoelastic structures. The model predictions are verified against longitudinal wave propagation experimental data and theory.

  15. Microwave scattering and emission models for users

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    Today, microwave remote sensing has evolved into a valuable and economical tool for a variety of applications. It is used in a wide range of areas, from geological sensing, geographical mapping, and weather monitoring, to GPS positioning, aircraft traffic, and mapping of oil pollution over the sea surface. This unique resource provides you with practical scattering and emission data models that represent the interaction between electromagnetic waves and a scene on the Earth surface in the microwave region. The book helps you understand and apply these models to your specific work in the field.

  16. Analytic amplitude models for forward scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, K; Ezhela, Vladimir V; Gauron, P; Kuyanov, Yu V; Lugovsky, S B; Nicolescu, Basarab; Tkachenko, N P; Kuyanov, Yu. V.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fits of a large class of analytic amplitude models for forward scattering against the comprehensive data for all available reactions. To differentiate the goodness of the fits of many possible parametrizations to a large sample of data, we developed and used a set of quantitative indicators measuring statistical quality of the fits over and beyond the typical criterion of the $\\Chi^2 /dof$. These indicators favor models with a universal $ log^2 s$ Pomeron term, which enables one to extend the fit down to $\\sqrt s = 4$ GeV.

  17. Model of Light Scattering in Cavitation Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Skvortsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The offered work presents analysis of extinction mechanisms and justification of light scattering model in ultrasonic cavitation area to justify a control method of ultrasonic cavitation through its optical sounding by low-intensity laser radiation and through photo-detector record of last radiation.The analysis of the extinction mechanisms has shown that the most essential mechanism causing a change of the transmission coefficient with time is dispersion on pulsating cavitation bubbles. Other extinction mechanisms lead to the time-constant reduction of last radiation intensity and can be taken into consideration by normalizing a recorded transmission coefficient for a previously measured liquid transmission coefficient when there is no cavitation.The feature of light scattering on the cavitation bubbles is primary dispersion in a forward direction that is connected with great values of bubbles radius from units to hundreds of micrometers. In case of single bubbles, dispersion can be described by Mi's theory, and, as to the cavitation area, it is reasonable to use the theory of V. Tversky for multiple light scattering. Thus, dispersion section, according to the paradox of extinction, can be considered to be equal to doubled geometrical section of a bubble. With increasing bubble radius the transmission coefficient monotonically decreases. So, the law of bubble pulsations and the model of light scattering define the law of changing transmission coefficient.Therefore, the cavitation area with its optical sounding acts as a peculiar opto-acoustic modulator. Thus, the demodulated signal of a photo-detector comprises information on pulsations of bubbles.The paper examines the influence of cavitation area thickness and bubbles concentration on the transmission coefficient. It shows a type of transmission coefficient dependence on the radius of cavitation bubbles.The optical sounding method is attractive because it allows us to obtain data on the

  18. Hydrogen scattering from a cesiated surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutigliano, Maria; Palma, Amedeo; Sanna, Nico

    2017-10-01

    A cesiated surface model was considered to study the dynamics of hydrogen atom scattering using a semiclassical collisional method. Using dipole correction method, the work function of the considered surface, is calculated to be 1.81 eV (± 0.02) eV. The Potential Energy Surface for the interaction of H atoms with the surface was determined via first principle electronic structure calculations including the interaction with both Cs and Mo atoms of the surface. We found the scattered H atoms to have a negative partial charge of nearly 0.4 with the backscattered flux arising mainly from H atoms impinging directly (or very close) to Cs atoms on the surface. On the contrary, H atoms impinging in the voids between the Cs atoms propagate through the first Cs layer and remain adsorbed. The propagation occurs mainly in the vertical direction. The scattering probability after a very quick increase remains almost constant around an average value of 0.35.

  19. Shock Acceleration Model for the Toothbrush Radio Relic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu; Jones, T. W.

    2017-05-01

    Although many of the observed properties of giant radio relics detected in the outskirts of galaxy clusters can be explained by relativistic electrons accelerated at merger-driven shocks, significant puzzles remain. In the case of the so-called Toothbrush relic, the shock Mach number estimated from X-ray observations ({M}{{X}}≈ 1.2{--}1.5) is substantially weaker than that inferred from the radio spectral index ({M}{rad}≈ 2.8). Toward understanding such a discrepancy, we here consider the following diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) models: (1) weak-shock models with {M}{{s}}≲ 2 and a preexisting population of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) with a flat energy spectrum, and (2) strong-shock models with {M}{{s}}≈ 3 and either shock-generated suprathermal electrons or preexisting fossil CRe. We calculate the synchrotron emission from the accelerated CRe, following the time evolution of the electron DSA, and the subsequent radiative cooling and postshock turbulent acceleration (TA). We find that both models could reproduce reasonably well the observed integrated radio spectrum of the Toothbrush relic, but the observed broad transverse profile requires the stochastic acceleration by downstream turbulence, which we label “turbulent acceleration” or TA to distinguish it from DSA. Moreover, to account for the almost uniform radio spectral index profile along the length of the relic, the weak-shock models require a preshock region over 400 kpc with a uniform population of preexisting CRe with a high cutoff energy (≳ 40 {GeV}). Due to the short cooling time, it is challenging to explain the origin of such energetic electrons. Therefore, we suggest the strong-shock models with low-energy seed CRe (≲ 150 {MeV}) are preferred for the radio observations of this relic.

  20. A hybrid Scatter/Transform cloaking model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Licht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Scatter/Transform cloak is developed that combines the light bending of refraction characteristic of a Transform cloak with the scatter cancellation characteristic of a Scatter cloak. The hybrid cloak incorporates both Transform’s variable index of refraction with modified linear intrusions to maximize the Scatter cloak effect. Scatter/Transform improved the scattering cross-section of cloaking in a 2-dimensional space to 51.7% compared to only 39.6% or 45.1% respectively with either Scatter or Transform alone. Metamaterials developed with characteristics based on the new ST hybrid cloak will exhibit superior cloaking capabilities.

  1. Computer modeling of test particle acceleration at oblique shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the basic techniques and illustrative results of charged particle-modeling numerical codes suitable for particle acceleration at oblique, fast-mode collisionless shocks emphasizes the treatment of ions as test particles, calculating particle dynamics through numerical integration along exact phase-space orbits. Attention is given to the acceleration of particles at planar, infinitessimally thin shocks, as well as to plasma simulations in which low-energy ions are injected and accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks with internal structure.

  2. On Numerical Considerations for Modeling Reactive Astrophysical Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Papatheodore, Thomas L

    2013-01-01

    Simulating detonations in astrophysical environments is often complicated by numerical approximations to shock structure. A common prescription to ensure correct detonation speeds and associated quantities is to prohibit burning inside the numerically broadened shock (Fryxell et al. 1989). We have performed a series of simulations to verify the efficacy of this approximation and to understand how resolution and dimensionality might affect its use. Our results show that, in one dimension, prohibiting burning in the shock is important wherever the carbon burning length is not resolved, in keeping with the results of Fryxell et al. (1989). In two dimensions, we find that the prohibition of shock burning effectively inhibits the development of cellular structure for all but the most highly-resolved cases. We discuss the possible impacts this outcome may have on sub-grid models and detonation propagation in models of Type Ia supernovae, including potential impacts on observables.

  3. A Conditional Approach to Panel Data Models with Common Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Forchini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effects of common shocks on the OLS estimators of the slopes’ parameters in linear panel data models. The shocks are assumed to affect both the errors and some of the explanatory variables. In contrast to existing approaches, which rely on using results on martingale difference sequences, our method relies on conditional strong laws of large numbers and conditional central limit theorems for conditionally-heterogeneous random variables.

  4. Astronomical Receiver Modelling Using Scattering Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    King, O G; Copley, C; Davis, R J; Leahy, J P; Leech, J; Muchovej, S J C; Pearson, T J; Taylor, Angela C

    2014-01-01

    Proper modelling of astronomical receivers is vital: it describes the systematic errors in the raw data, guides the receiver design process, and assists data calibration. In this paper we describe a method of analytically modelling the full signal and noise behaviour of arbitrarily complex radio receivers. We use electrical scattering matrices to describe the signal behaviour of individual components in the receiver, and noise correlation matrices to describe their noise behaviour. These are combined to produce the full receiver model. We apply this approach to a specified receiver architecture: a hybrid of a continous comparison radiometer and correlation polarimeter designed for the C-Band All-Sky Survey. We produce analytic descriptions of the receiver Mueller matrix and noise temperature, and discuss how imperfections in crucial components affect the raw data. Many of the conclusions drawn are generally applicable to correlation polarimeters and continuous comparison radiometers.

  5. Forward modeling of shock-ramped tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin L.; Carpenter, John H.; Seagle, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic materials experiments on the Z-machine are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down. Time dependent phenomena such as strength and phase transition kinetics often make the data obtained in these experiments difficult to interpret. We present an inverse analysis methodology to infer the equation of state (EOS) from velocimetry data in these types of experiments, building on recent advances in the propagation of uncertain EOS information through a hydrocode simulation. An example is given for a shock-ramp experiment in which tantalum was shock compressed to 40 GPa followed by a ramp to 80 GPa. The results are found to be consistent with isothermal compression and Hugoniot data in this regime.

  6. Modeling Scattering Polarization for Probing Solar Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of modeling the light polarization that emerges from an astrophysical plasma composed of atoms whose excitation state is significantly influenced by the anisotropy of the incident radiation field. In particular, it highlights how radiative transfer simulations in three-dimensional models of the quiet solar atmosphere may help us to probe its thermal and magnetic structure, from the near equilibrium photosphere to the highly non-equilibrium upper chromosphere. The paper finishes with predictions concerning the amplitudes and magnetic sensitivities of the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes in two transition region lines, which should encourage us to develop UV polarimeters for sounding rockets and space telescopes with the aim of opening up a new diagnostic window in astrophysics.

  7. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moors, Kristof, E-mail: kristof@itf.fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sorée, Bart [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Physics Department, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); KU Leuven, Electrical Engineering (ESAT) Department, Kasteelpark Arenberg 10, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Magnus, Wim [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Physics Department, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  8. Relativistic models for quasielastic electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meucci Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic models developed within the framework of the impulse approximation for quasielastic (QE electron scattering and successfully tested in comparison with electron-scattering data have been extended to neutrino-nucleus scattering. Different descriptions of final-state interactions (FSI in the inclusive scattering are compared. In the relativistic Green’s function (RGF model FSI are described consistently with the exclusive scattering using a complex optical potential. In the relativistic mean field (RMF model FSI are described by the same RMF potential which gives the bound states. The results of the models are compared for electron and neutrino scattering and, for neutrino scattering, with the recently measured charged-current QE (CCQE MiniBooNE cross sections.

  9. Modeling And Forecasting Exchange-Rate Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Andreou, A. S.; Zombanakis, George A.; Likothanassis, S. D.; Georgakopoulos, E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers the extent to which the application of neural networks methodology can be used in order to forecast exchange-rate shocks. Four major foreign currency exchange rates against the Greek Drachma as well as the overnight interest rate in the Greek market are employed in an attempt to predict the extent to which the local currency may be suffering an attack. The forecasting is extended to the estimation of future exchange rates and interest rates. The MLP proved to be highly ...

  10. An external-shock model for GRB afterglow 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Panaitescu, A; Wozniak, P

    2013-01-01

    The complex multiwavelength emission of GRB afterglow 130427A (monitored in the radio up to 10 days, in the optical and X-ray until 50 days, and at GeV energies until 1 day) can be accounted for by a hybrid reverse-forward shock synchrotron model, with inverse-Compton emerging only above a few GeV. The high ratio of the early optical to late radio flux requires that the ambient medium is a wind and that the forward-shock synchrotron spectrum peaks in the optical at about 10 ks. The latter has two consequences: the wind must be very tenuous and the optical emission before 10 ks must arise from the reverse-shock, as suggested also by the bright optical flash that Raptor has monitored during the prompt emission phase (<100 s). The VLA radio emission is from the reverse-shock, the Swift X-ray emission is mostly from the forward-shock, but the both shocks give comparable contributions to the Fermi GeV emission. The weak wind implies a large blast-wave radius (8 t_{day}^{1/2} pc), which requires a very tenuous c...

  11. Independent scattering model and velocity dispersion in trabecular bone: comparison with a multiple scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïat, G; Naili, S

    2011-02-01

    Speed of sound measurements are used clinically to assess bone strength. Trabecular bone is an attenuating composite material in which negative values of velocity dispersion have been measured; this behavior remaining poorly explained physically. The aim of this work is to describe the ultrasonic propagation in trabecular bone modeled by infinite cylinders immersed in a saturating matrix and to derive the physical determinants of velocity dispersion. An original homogenization model accounting for the coupling of independent scattering and absorption phenomena allows the computation of phase velocity and of dispersion while varying bone properties. The first step of the model consists in the computation of the attenuation coefficient at all frequencies. The second step of the model corresponds to the application of the general Kramers-Krönig relationship to derive the frequency dependence of phase velocity. The model predicts negative values of velocity dispersion in agreement with experimental results obtained in phantoms mimicking trabecular bone. In trabecular bone, only negative values of velocity dispersion are predicted by the model, which span within the range of values measured experimentally. However, the comparison of the present results with results obtained in Haiat et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 124:4047-4058, 2008) assuming multiple scattering indicates that accounting for multiple scattering phenomena leads to a better prediction of velocity dispersion in trabecular bone.

  12. Estimating seabed scattering mechanisms via Bayesian model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Gavin; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative inversion procedure is developed and applied to determine the dominant scattering mechanism (surface roughness and/or volume scattering) from seabed scattering-strength data. The classification system is based on trans-dimensional Bayesian inversion with the deviance information criterion used to select the dominant scattering mechanism. Scattering is modeled using first-order perturbation theory as due to one of three mechanisms: Interface scattering from a rough seafloor, volume scattering from a heterogeneous sediment layer, or mixed scattering combining both interface and volume scattering. The classification system is applied to six simulated test cases where it correctly identifies the true dominant scattering mechanism as having greater support from the data in five cases; the remaining case is indecisive. The approach is also applied to measured backscatter-strength data where volume scattering is determined as the dominant scattering mechanism. Comparison of inversion results with core data indicates the method yields both a reasonable volume heterogeneity size distribution and a good estimate of the sub-bottom depths at which scatterers occur.

  13. A surface-scattering model satisfying energy conservation and reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Sasihithlu, Karthik; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In order for surface scattering models to be accurate they must necessarily satisfy energy conservation and reciprocity principles. Roughness scattering models based on Kirchoff's approximation or perturbation theory do not satisfy these criteria in all frequency ranges. Here we present a surface scattering model based on analysis of scattering from a layer of particles on top of a substrate in the dipole approximation which satisfies both energy conservation and reciprocity and is thus accurate in all frequency ranges. The model takes into account the absorption in the substrate induced by the particles but does not take into account the near-field interactions between the particles.

  14. Simulation of Forward and Inverse X-ray Scattering From Shocked Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, John; Marksteiner, Quinn; Barnes, Cris

    2012-02-01

    The next generation of high-intensity, coherent light sources should generate sufficient brilliance to perform in-situ coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) of shocked materials. In this work, we present beginning-to-end simulations of this process. This includes the calculation of the partially-coherent intensity profiles of self-amplified stimulated emission (SASE) x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs), as well as the use of simulated, shocked molecular-dynamics-based samples to predict the evolution of the resulting diffraction patterns. In addition, we will explore the corresponding inverse problem by performing iterative phase retrieval to generate reconstructed images of the simulated sample. The development of these methods in the context of materials under extreme conditions should provide crucial insights into the design and capabilities of shocked in-situ imaging experiments.

  15. A model for multiple scattering in GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Urbán, László

    2006-01-01

    We present a model to simulate the multiple scattering of charged particles in matter. The model is based on Lewis theory; it does not use the Moliere formalism. It simulates the scattering of a charged particle after a given step, computes the path length correction and the lateral displacement as well. This model is used in GEANT4.

  16. Multi-scattering inversion for low model wavenumbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-08-19

    A successful full wavenumber inversion (FWI) implementation updates the low wavenumber model components first for proper wavefield propagation description, and slowly adds the high-wavenumber potentially scattering parts of the model. The low-wavenumber components can be extracted from the transmission parts of the recorded data given by direct arrivals or the transmission parts of the single and double-scattering wave-fields developed from a predicted scatter field. We develop a combined inversion of data modeled from the source and those corresponding to single and double scattering to update both the velocity model and the component of the velocity (perturbation) responsible for the single and double scattering. The combined inversion helps us access most of the potential model wavenumber information that may be embedded in the data. A scattering angle filter is used to divide the gradient of the combined inversion so initially the high wavenumber (low scattering angle) components of the gradient is directed to the perturbation model and the low wavenumber (high scattering angle) components to the velocity model. As our background velocity matures, the scattering angle divide is slowly lowered to allow for more of the higher wavenumbers to contribute the velocity model.

  17. A Soluble Model for Scattering and Decay in Quaternionic Quantum Mechanics II Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, L P

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, it was shown that a soluble model can be constructed for the description of a decaying system in analogy to the Lee-Friedrichs model of complex quantum theory. It is shown here that this model also provides a soluble scattering theory, and therefore constitutes a model for a decay scattering system. Generalized second resolvent equations are obtained for quaternionic scattering theory. It is shown explicitly for this model, in accordance with a general theorem of Adler, that the scattering matrix is complex subalgebra valued. It is also shown that the method of Adler, using an effective optical potential in the complex sector to describe the effect of the quaternionic interactions, is equivalent to the general method of Green's functions described here.

  18. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  19. Scattering for mixtures of hard spheres: comparison of total scattering intensities with model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B J; Gopalakrishnan, V; Ramakrishnan, S; Zukoski, C F

    2006-03-01

    The angular dependence of the intensity of x-rays scattered from binary and ternary hard sphere mixtures is investigated and compared to the predictions of two scattering models. Mixture ratio and total volume fraction dependent effects are investigated for size ratios equal to 0.51 and 0.22. Comparisons of model predictions with experimental results indicate the significant impact of the role of particle size distributions in interpreting the angular dependence of the scattering at wave vectors probing density fluctuations intermediate between the sizes of the particles in the mixture.

  20. Simulating Photon Scattering Effects in Structurally Detailed Ventricular Models Using a Monte Carlo Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Bishop

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantlydistort the optically-recorded action potential (AP upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modelling approaches based on the photondiffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such assmall cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon `packets' as they propagate through tissuewith differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals withinunstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, includingrepresentations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct `humped' morphology.Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with `virtual-electrode' regions of strong de-/hyper-polarised tissue surrounding cavitiesduring shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarisation. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity.

  1. Modeling non-thermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, V; Miceli, M; Bonito, R; de Castro, E

    2016-01-01

    Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing throughout the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. We apply our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life.From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high energy fl...

  2. Comparison of CME/shock propagation models with heliospheric imaging and in situ observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xinhua; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Xueshang; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Lu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the arrival time for fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks is highly desirable in space weather studies. In this paper, we use two shock propagation models, i.e. Data Guided Shock Time Of Arrival (DGSTOA) and Data Guided Shock Propagation Model (DGSPM), to predict the kinematical evolution of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs. DGSTOA is based on the similarity theory of shock waves in the solar wind reference frame, and DGSPM on the non-similarity theory in the stationary reference frame. The inputs are the kinematics of the CME front at the maximum speed moment obtained from the geometric triangulation method applied to STEREO imaging observations together with the Harmonic Mean approximation. The outputs provide the subsequent propagation of the associated shock. We apply these models to the CMEs on 2012 January 19, January 23, and March 7. We find that the shock models predict reasonably well the shock's propagation after the impulsive acceleration. ...

  3. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT COSMOLOGICAL SHOCK WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyesung [Department of Earth Sciences, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Dongsu, E-mail: kang@uju.es.pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-10

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large-scale structure of the universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfvenic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model, the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number M{sub s} , while the MFA factor depends on the Alfvenic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at {approx}20% of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks with M{sub s} {approx}> 10. In the test-particle regime (M{sub s} {approx}< 3), it is expected that the magnetic field is not amplified and the Alfvenic drift effects are insignificant, although relevant plasma physical processes at low Mach number shocks remain largely uncertain.

  4. Surface Ship Shock Modeling and Simulation: Two-Dimensional Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling and simulation of the response of a surface ship system to underwater explosion requires an understanding of many different subject areas. These include the process of underwater explosion events, shock wave propagation, explosion gas bubble behavior and bubble-pulse loading, bulk and local cavitation, free surface effect, fluid-structure interaction, and structural dynamics. This paper investigates the effects of fluid-structure interaction and cavitation on the response of a surface ship using USA-NASTRAN-CFA code. First, the one-dimensional Bleich-Sandler model is used to validate the approach, and second, the underwater shock response of a two-dimensional mid-section model of a surface ship is predicted with a surrounding fluid model using a constitutive equation of a bilinear fluid which does not allow transmission of negative pressures.

  5. Initial Conditions and Modeling for Shock Driven Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    We focus on the simulation of shock-driven material mixing driven by flow instabilities and initial conditions. Beyond complex multi-scale resolution of shocks and variable density turbulence, me must address the equally difficult problem of predicting flow transition promoted by energy deposited at the material interfacial layer during the shock interface interactions. Transition involves unsteady large-scale coherent-structure dynamics which can be captured by LES, but not by URANS based on equilibrium turbulence assumptions and single-point-closure modeling. Such URANS is frequently preferred on the engineering end of computation capabilities for full-scale configurations - and with reduced 1D/2D dimensionality being also a common aspect. With suitable initialization around each transition - e.g., reshock, URANS can be used to simulate the subsequent near-equilibrium weakly turbulent flow. We demonstrate 3D state-of-the-art URANS performance in one such flow regime. We simulate the CEA planar shock-tube experiments by Poggi et al. (1998) with an ILES strategy. Laboratory turbulence and mixing data are used to benchmark ILES. In turn, the ILES generated data is used to initialize and as reference to assess state-of-the-art 3D URANS. We find that by prescribing physics-based 3D initial conditions and allowing for 3D flow convection with just enough resolution, the additionally computed dissipation in 3D URANS effectively blends with the modeled dissipation to yield significantly improved statistical predictions.

  6. Oil shocks in New Keynesian models: Positive and normative implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jian

    Chapter 1 investigates optimal monetary policy response towards oil shocks in a New Keynesian model. We find that optimal policy, in general, becomes contractionary in response to an adverse oil shock. However, the optimal policy rule and the inflation-output trade-off depend on the specific structure of the model. The benchmark economy consists of a flexible-price energy sector and a sticky-price manufacturing sector where energy is used as an intermediate input. We show that optimal policy is to stabilize the sticky (core) price level. We then show that after incorporating a less oil-dependent sticky-price service sector, the model exhibits a trade-off in stabilizing prices and output gaps in the different sticky-price sectors. It predicts that central bank should not try to stabilize the core price level, and the economy will experience higher inflation and rising output gaps, even if central banks respond optimally. Chapter 2 addresses the observed volatility and persistence of real exchange rates and the terms of trade. It contributes to the literature with a quantitative study on the U.S. and Canada. A two-country New Keynesian model consisting of traded, non-traded, and oil production sectors is proposed to examine the time series properties of the real exchange rate, the terms of trade and the real oil price. We find that after incorporating several realistic features (namely oil price shocks, sector specific labor, non-traded goods, asymmetric pricing decisions of exporters and asymmetric consumer preferences over tradables), the benchmark model broadly matches the volatilities of the relative prices and some business cycle correlations. The model matches the data more closely after adding real demand shocks, suggesting their importance in explaining the relative price movements between the US and Canada. Chapter 3 explores several sources and transmission channels of international relative price movements. In particular, we elaborate on the role of

  7. Self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations of proton acceleration in coronal shocks: Effect of anisotropic pitch-angle scattering of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Vainio, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Context. Solar energetic particles observed in association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are produced by the CME-driven shock waves. The acceleration of particles is considered to be due to diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Aims. We aim at a better understanding of DSA in the case of quasi-parallel shocks, in which self-generated turbulence in the shock vicinity plays a key role. Methods. We have developed and applied a new Monte Carlo simulation code for acceleration of protons in parallel coronal shocks. The code performs a self-consistent calculation of resonant interactions of particles with Alfv\\'en waves based on the quasi-linear theory. In contrast to the existing Monte Carlo codes of DSA, the new code features the full quasi-linear resonance condition of particle pitch-angle scattering. This allows us to take anisotropy of particle pitch-angle scattering into account, while the older codes implement an approximate resonance condition leading to isotropic scattering.We performed simulations with...

  8. Experimental Septic Shock: Models and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-14

    abnormally affected, although respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis were regularly observed in both models. Significant differences in responses I...affected, although respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis were regularly observed in both models. Significant differences in responses between...evidence of respiratory depression although data indicate the presence of metabolic acidosis . Lowered pCO2 in baboons given live E. coli organisms was

  9. Modeling of PZT Ferroelectric Ceramic Depolarization Driven by Shock Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Chao-Hui; PENG Yu-Fei; LONG Ji-Dong; WANG Qiang; WANG Wen-Dou

    2011-01-01

    @@ Shock-induced phase transition of ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 causes elastic stiffening and depolarization,releasing stored electrostatic energy into the load circuit.We develop a model to describe the response of the PZT ferroelectric ceramic and implement it into simulation codes.The model is based on the phenomenological theory of phase transition dyynamics and takes into account the effects of the self-generated intensive electrical field and stress.Connected with the discharge model and external circuit, the whole transient process of PZT ceramic depoling can be investigated.The results show the finite transition velocity of the ferroelectric phase and the double wave structure caused by phase transition.Simulated currents are compared with the results from experiments with shock pressures varying from 0.4 to 2.8GPa.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Dual-Pulse Shock Test Machine for Simulating Underwater Explosion Shock Loads on Warship Equipments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-yi; WANG Gong-xian; WANG Yu

    2009-01-01

    In order to qualify shock resistance performance of shipboard equipments and simulate real underwater explosion environment, a novel dual-puise shock test machine is proposed. The new machine will increase testing capability and meet special shock testing requirement. Two key parts of the machine, the velocity generator and the shock pulse regulator, play an important role in producing the positive acceleration pulse and the succeeding negative acceleration pulse, respectively. The generated dual-pulse shock for test articles is in conformity with an anti-shock test specification. Based on the impact theory, a nonlinear dynamic model of the hydraulically-actuated test machine is established with thorough analysis on its mechanism that involves conversion of gas potential energy and dissipation of kinetic energy. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed machine is able to produce a double-pulse acceleration shock in the time domain or a desired shock response spectrum in the frequency domain, which sets up a base for the construction of the machine.

  11. 3D numerical modeling of YSO accretion shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsakos T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of YSO accretion shocks is determined by radiative processes as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field. A quasi-periodic emission signature is theoretically expected to be observed, but observations do not confirm any such pattern. In this work, we assume a uniform background field, in the regime of optically thin energy losses, and we study the multi-dimensional shock evolution in the presence of perturbations, i.e. clumps in the stream and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We perform 3D MHD simulations using the PLUTO code, modelling locally the impact of the infalling gas onto the chromosphere. We find that the structure and dynamics of the post-shock region is strongly dependent on the plasma-beta (thermal over magnetic pressure, different values of which may give distinguishable emission signatures, relevant for observations. In particular, a strong magnetic field effectively confines the plasma inside its flux tubes and leads to the formation of quasi-independent fibrils. The fibrils may oscillate out of phase and hence the sum of their contributions in the emission results in a smooth overall profile. On the contrary, a weak magnetic field is not found to have any significant effect on the shocked plasma and the turbulent hot slab that forms is found to retain its periodic signature.

  12. Web software reliability modeling with random impulsive shocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Yang; Ming Zhao; Wensheng Hu

    2014-01-01

    As the web-server based business is rapidly developed and popularized, how to evaluate and improve the reliability of web-servers has been extremely important. Although a large num-ber of software reliability growth models (SRGMs), including those combined with multiple change-points (CPs), have been available, these conventional SRGMs cannot be directly applied to web soft-ware reliability analysis because of the complex web operational profile. To characterize the web operational profile precisely, it should be realized that the workload of a web server is normal y non-homogeneous and often observed with the pattern of random impulsive shocks. A web software reliability model with random im-pulsive shocks and its statistical analysis method are developed. In the proposed model, the web server workload is characterized by a geometric Brownian motion process. Based on a real data set from IIS server logs of ICRMS website (www.icrms.cn), the proposed model is demonstrated to be powerful for estimating impulsive shocks and web software reliability.

  13. Visualizing a Dusty Plasma Shock Wave via Interacting Multiple-Model Mode Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Oxtoby, Neil P.; Ralph, Jason F.; Durniak, Céline; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Particles in a dusty plasma crystal disturbed by a shock wave are tracked using a three-mode interacting multiple model approach. Color-coded mode probabilities are used to visualize the shock wave propagation through the crystal.

  14. Monetary Shocks in a Model with Loss of Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban-Pretel; Elisa, Faraglia

    2005-01-01

    Unemployment shows persistent and long lasting responses to nominal and real shocks. Standard real business cycle models with search frictions but homogeneous labor force are able to generate some persistence, but not enough to match the empirical evidence. Moreover, empirical studies emphasize the importance of the heterogeneity of the unemployment pool to fully understand unemployment dynamics. In particular, in most European countries the incidence of long term unemployment is big and well...

  15. Exactly solvable models of scattering with SL(2, C) symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Technical University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2002-08-02

    Using the theory of induced representations two exactly solvable models of non-relativistic scattering with SL(2, C) symmetry are presented. The first describes the scattering of a charged particle moving on the Poincare upper half space H under the influence of an SU(2) non-Abelian gauge potential with isospin s. The second deals with a one-dimensional coupled-channel scattering problem for a charged particle in a matrix-valued scalar potential containing Morse-like interaction terms. The coupled channel wavefunctions and the corresponding scattering matrices are calculated. A detailed description of the underlying geometric structures is also given and a generalization for restricting the motion to fundamental domains of H (three manifolds of constant negative sectional curvature) is outlined. Such models provide an interesting generalization to the known ones of multichannel scattering, quantum chaos and chaotic cosmology. (author)

  16. Bi-Spectrum Scattering Model for Dielectric Randomly Rough Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁; 李宗谦

    2003-01-01

    The bistatic scattering model is offen used for remote microwave sensing. The bi-spectrum model (BSM) for conducting surfaces was used to develop a scattering model for dielectric randomly rough surfaces to estimate their bistatic scattering coefficients. The model for dielectric rough surfaces differs from the BSM for a conducting surface by including Fresnell reflection and transmission from dielectric rough surfaces. The bistatic scattering coefficients were defined to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. Values calculated using the BSM for dielectric randomly rough surfaces compare well with those of the integral equation model (IEM) and with experimental data, showing that the BSM accuracy is acceptable and its range of validity is similar to that of IEM while the BSM expression is simpler than that of IEM.

  17. Bi-Spectrum Scattering Model for Conducting Randomly Rough Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁; 李宗谦

    2002-01-01

    A scattering model is developed to predict the scattering coefficient of a conducting randomly rough surface by analyzing the randomly rough surface in the spectral domain using the bi-spectrum method. For common randomly rough surfaces without obvious two-scale characteristics, a scale-compression filter can divide the auto-correlation spectrum into two parts with different correlation lengths. The Kirchhoff approximation and the small perturbation method are used to obtain the surface field, then a bistatic scattering model, the bi-spectrum model (BSM), is used to derive an explicit expression from the surface field. Examples using the integral equation model (IEM), finite difference of the time domain (FDTD) method, and BSM show that the BSM accuracy is acceptable and its range of validity is similar to IEM. BSM can also be extended to a scattering model for dielectric randomly rough surfaces.

  18. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  19. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  20. Rabbit model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and hypotensive resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Rezende-Neto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinically relevant animal models capable of simulating traumatic hemorrhagic shock are needed. We developed a hemorrhagic shock model with male New Zealand rabbits (2200-2800 g, 60-70 days old that simulates the pre-hospital and acute care of a penetrating trauma victim in an urban scenario using current resuscitation strategies. A laparotomy was performed to reproduce tissue trauma and an aortic injury was created using a standardized single puncture to the left side of the infrarenal aorta to induce hemorrhagic shock similar to a penetrating mechanism. A 15-min interval was used to simulate the arrival of pre-hospital care. Fluid resuscitation was then applied using two regimens: normotensive resuscitation to achieve baseline mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, 10 animals and hypotensive resuscitation at 60% of baseline MAP (10 animals. Another 10 animals were sham operated. The total time of the experiment was 85 min, reproducing scene, transport and emergency room times. Intra-abdominal blood loss was significantly greater in animals that underwent normotensive resuscitation compared to hypotensive resuscitation (17.1 ± 2.0 vs 8.0 ± 1.5 mL/kg. Antithrombin levels decreased significantly in normotensive resuscitated animals compared to baseline (102 ± 2.0 vs 59 ± 4.1%, sham (95 ± 2.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%, and hypotensive resuscitated animals (98 ± 7.8 vs 59 ± 4.1%. Evidence of re-bleeding was also noted in the normotensive resuscitation group. A hypotensive resuscitation regimen resulted in decreased blood loss in a clinically relevant small animal model capable of reproducing hemorrhagic shock caused by a penetrating mechanism.

  1. Laser shock experiments to investigate and to model various aspects of the response of metals to shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthe L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven shocks allow studying the dynamic behaviour of condensed matter over small spatial (∼μm to mm-order and temporal (∼ps to ns-order scales, at extremely high strain rates (∼107 s−1. They can be used to test the predictive capability of constitutive models over wide ranges of loading pressures and pulse durations. We present experimental results in laser shock-loaded metals (iron, gold, tin, based on various, complementary techniques including time-resolved velocity measurements, transverse shadowgraphy and post-shock analyses of recovered samples. The data are used to investigate several shock wave processes such as yielding and polymorphic transformations, melting, spall fracture and dynamic fragmentation in both solid and melted states. On the basis of comparisons with numerical simulations, the abilities and limitations of several models are briefly discussed.

  2. Forward modelling to determine the observational signatures of white-light imaging and interplanetary scintillation for the propagation of an interplanetary shock in the ecliptic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Ming; Bisi, M M; Owens, M J; Fallows, R A; Dorrian, G D; Davies, J A; Thomasson, P

    2011-01-01

    Recent coordinated observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) and stereoscopic heliospheric imagers (HIs) are significant to continuously track the propagation and evolution of solar eruptions throughout interplanetary space. In order to obtain a better understanding of the observational signatures in these two remote-sensing techniques, the magnetohydrodynamics of the macro-scale interplanetary disturbance and the radio-wave scattering of the micro-scale electron-density fluctuation are coupled and investigated using a newly-constructed multi-scale numerical model. This model is then applied to a case of an interplanetary shock propagation within the ecliptic plane. The shock could be nearly invisible to an HI, once entering the Thomson-scattering sphere of the HI. The asymmetry in the optical images between the western and eastern HIs suggests the shock propagation off the Sun-Earth line. Meanwhile, an IPS signal, strongly dependent on the local electron density, is insensitive to the density cavity...

  3. Two body scattering length of Yukawa model on a lattice

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F; Roiesnel, C; Boucaud, P; Leroy, J P; Pène, O; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The extraction of scattering parameters from Euclidean simulations of a Yukawa model in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions is analyzed both in non relativistic quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory.

  4. Dunkl operator, integrability, and pairwise scattering in rational Calogero model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakhanyan, David

    2017-05-01

    The integrability of the Calogero model can be expressed as zero curvature condition using Dunkl operators. The corresponding flat connections are non-local gauge transformations, which map the Calogero wave functions to symmetrized wave functions of the set of N free particles, i.e. it relates the corresponding scattering matrices to each other. The integrability of the Calogero model implies that any k-particle scattering is reduced to successive pairwise scatterings. The consistency condition of this requirement is expressed by the analog of the Yang-Baxter relation.

  5. Simple mixing model for pressurized thermal shock applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chexal, B.; Chao, J.; Nickell, R.; Griesbach, T. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1983-02-01

    The phenomenon of fluid/thermal mixing in the cold leg and downcomer of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been a critical issue related to the concern of pressurized thermal shock. The question of imperfect mixing arises when the possibility of cold emergency core cooling water contacting the vessel wall during an overcooling transient could produce thermal stresses large enough to initiate a flaw in a radiation embrittled vessel wall. The temperature of the fluid in contact with the vessel wall is crucial to a determination of vessel integrity since temperature affects both the stresses and the material toughness of the vessel material. A simple mixing model is described which was developed as part of the EPRI pressurized thermal shock program for evaluation of reactor vessel integrity.

  6. Fast sampling model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for X-ray Rayleigh scattering is discussed in terms of the process total cross-section and the angular distribution of scattered X-ray photons. Comparisons with other calculations and experimental data are presented. The model is optimized for the simulation of X-ray tracking inside experimental setups with complex geometry where performance and memory volume are issues to be optimized. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Crossing symmetric potential model of pion-nucleon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Blankleider, B; Skawronski, T

    2010-01-01

    A crossing symmetric $\\pi N$ scattering amplitude is constructed through a complete attachment of two external pions to the dressed nucleon propagator of an underlying $\\pi N$ potential model. Our formulation automatically provides expressions also for the crossing symmetric and gauge invariant pion photoproduction and Compton scattering amplitudes. We show that our amplitudes are unitary if they coincide on-shell with the amplitudes obtained by attaching one pion to the dressed $\\pi NN$ vertex of the same potential model.

  8. Validation of Compton Scattering Monte Carlo Simulation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kuster, Markus; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several models for the Monte Carlo simulation of Compton scattering on electrons are quantitatively evaluated with respect to a large collection of experimental data retrieved from the literature. Some of these models are currently implemented in general purpose Monte Carlo systems; some have been implemented and evaluated for possible use in Monte Carlo particle transport for the first time in this study. Here we present first and preliminary results concerning total and differential Compton scattering cross sections.

  9. A Generalized Model of Nonlinear Diffusive Shock Acceleration Coupled to an Evolving Supernova Remnant

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2012-01-01

    To better model the efficient production of cosmic rays (CRs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) with the associated coupling between CR production and SNR dynamics, we have generalized an existing cr-hydro-NEI code (i.e., Ellison et al. 2012) to include the following processes: (1) an explicit calculation of the upstream precursor structure including the position dependent flow speed, density, temperature, and magnetic field strength; (2) a momentum and space dependent CR diffusion coefficient; (3) an explicit calculation of magnetic field amplification (MFA); (4) calculation of the maximum CR momentum using the amplified magnetic field; (5) a finite Alfven speed for the particle scattering centers; and (6) the ability to accelerate a superthermal seed population of CRs as well as the ambient thermal plasma. While a great deal of work has been done modeling SNRs, most work has concentrated on either the continuum emission from relativistic electrons or ions, or the thermal emission from the shock heated plasma. Ou...

  10. Thermochemical model for shock-induced chemical reactions in porous thermite: The heat detonation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B.

    1989-01-01

    A thermochemical model has been developed that treats a shock-induced solid state chemical reaction as a special type of detonation, called a ''heat detonation'' to distinguish it from an ordinary explosive detonation and describe the final form that the chemical energy takes. According to shock temperature measurements, chemical energy can be released from porous reactive solids on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. By comparing the experimental shock temperature for porous thermite to that calculated by the model, the amount of thermite reacted when shocked to about 4 GPa was estimated to be between 60 and 70%. Calculated shock temperatures are extremely strong functions of the extent of reaction, but are relatively insensitive to the initial porosity and amount of volatile impurities. Thus, shock temperature measurements are the most useful for real-time studies of shock-induced exothermic chemical reactions in solids. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Modeling plasmonic scattering combined with thin-film optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Klenk, R; Lux-Steiner, M Ch; Topic, M; Krc, J

    2011-01-14

    Plasmonic scattering from metal nanostructures presents a promising concept for improving the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The determination of optimal nanostructures and their position within the solar cell is crucial to boost the efficiency. Therefore we established a one-dimensional optical model combining plasmonic scattering and thin-film optics to simulate optical properties of thin-film solar cells including metal nanoparticles. Scattering models based on dipole oscillations and Mie theory are presented and their integration in thin-film semi-coherent optical descriptions is explained. A plasmonic layer is introduced in the thin-film structure to simulate scattering properties as well as parasitic absorption in the metal nanoparticles. A proof of modeling concept is given for the case of metal-island grown silver nanoparticles on glass and ZnO:Al/glass substrates. Using simulations a promising application of the nanoparticle integration is shown for the case of CuGaSe(2) solar cells.

  12. Atomistic modeling of shock-induced void collapse in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, L P; Erhart, P; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A; Lubarda, V A; Schneider, M S; Becker, R; Kumar, M

    2005-03-09

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that shock-induced void collapse in copper occurs by emission of shear loops. These loops carry away the vacancies which comprise the void. The growth of the loops continues even after they collide and form sessile junctions, creating a hardened region around the collapsing void. The scenario seen in our simulations differs from current models that assume that prismatic loop emission is responsible for void collapse. We propose a new dislocation-based model that gives excellent agreement with the stress threshold found in the MD simulations for void collapse as a function of void radius.

  13. Modeling cellular lysis in skeletal muscle due to electric shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, Carlos J; Lee, Raphael C; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2011-05-01

    High-voltage electrical trauma frequently results in injury patterns that cannot be completely attributed to Joule heating. An electrical-injury model describing cellular lysis damage caused by supraphysiological electric fields is introduced, and used to evaluate the effects of high-voltage electric shock on the skeletal muscle of a human upper limb in a configuration that simulates hand-to-hand contact. A novel multiresolution admittance method, capable of efficiently handling large computational models while maintaining excellent accuracy, was used to perform the numerical computations. Values for the computed current through the arm and the upper limb impedance are reported.

  14. Modeling shock waves in an ideal gas: combining the Burnett approximation and Holian's conjecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi-Guang; Tang, Xiu-Zhang; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2008-07-01

    We model a shock wave in an ideal gas by combining the Burnett approximation and Holian's conjecture. We use the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the average temperature in the Burnett transport coefficients. The shock wave profiles and shock thickness are compared with other theories. The results are found to agree better with the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) data than the Burnett equations and the modified Navier-Stokes theory.

  15. Neutrino-Electron Scattering and the Little Higgs Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Na; YUE Chong-Xing; LI Xu-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The neutrino-electron scattering process is sensitive to the standard model (SM) and the new physics beyond the SM.We calculate the corrections of the littlest Higgs model and the SU(3) simple group model to the vee scattering cross section.Using the LSND experimental measured values,we obtain the bounds on the relevant free parameters,which might be compatible with those from the electroweak precision data.Neutrino-electron scattering is a simple and purely leptonic weak interaction process that can play an important role to perform precision tests of the standard model (SM) and probe various kinds of new physics models beyond the SM.[1-3] Thus,this process provides an ideal tool for electroweak studies.%The neutrino-electron scattering process is sensitive to the standard model (SM) and the new physics beyond the SM. We calculate the corrections of the littlest Higgs model and the SU(3) simple group model to the vee scattering cross section. Using the LSND experimental measured values, we obtain the bounds on the relevant free parameters, which might be compatible with those from the electroweak precision data.

  16. Electromagnetic Model Reliably Predicts Radar Scattering Characteristics of Airborne Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Djordje; Stepanian, Phillip M.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Chilson, Phillip B.

    2016-10-01

    The radar scattering characteristics of aerial animals are typically obtained from controlled laboratory measurements of a freshly harvested specimen. These measurements are tedious to perform, difficult to replicate, and typically yield only a small subset of the full azimuthal, elevational, and polarimetric radio scattering data. As an alternative, biological applications of radar often assume that the radar cross sections of flying animals are isotropic, since sophisticated computer models are required to estimate the 3D scattering properties of objects having complex shapes. Using the method of moments implemented in the WIPL-D software package, we show for the first time that such electromagnetic modeling techniques (typically applied to man-made objects) can accurately predict organismal radio scattering characteristics from an anatomical model: here the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). The simulated scattering properties of the bat agree with controlled measurements and radar observations made during a field study of bats in flight. This numerical technique can produce the full angular set of quantitative polarimetric scattering characteristics, while eliminating many practical difficulties associated with physical measurements. Such a modeling framework can be applied for bird, bat, and insect species, and will help drive a shift in radar biology from a largely qualitative and phenomenological science toward quantitative estimation of animal densities and taxonomic identification.

  17. Light scattering by neutrophils: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Yurkin, Maxim A; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determined the absolute differential light-scattering cross sections of neutrophils. We also proposed an optical model for a neutrophil as a sphere filled by small spheres and prolate spheroids that correspond to granules and segmented nucleus, respectively. This model was used in simulations of LSPs using the discrete dipole approximation and different compositions of internal organelles. A comparison of experimentally measured and simulated LSPs gives a good qualitative agreement in LSP shape and quantitative agreement in overall magnitude of the differential light-scattering cross section.

  18. Dual absorptive model and np elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1980-06-01

    The most recent measurements of the angular distribution and total cross-sections in np elastic scattering at high energies from 70 to 400 GeV/c have been fitted by using the dual absorptive model. Comparison has also been made with the Kane-Siedl model and the simple Regge pole model.

  19. Geometric Feature Extraction and Model Reconstruction Based on Scattered Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡鑫; 习俊通; 金烨

    2004-01-01

    A method of 3D model reconstruction based on scattered point data in reverse engineering is presented here. The topological relationship of scattered points was established firstly, then the data set was triangulated to reconstruct the mesh surface model. The curvatures of cloud data were calculated based on the mesh surface, and the point data were segmented by edge-based method; Every patch of data was fitted by quadric surface of freeform surface, and the type of quadric surface was decided by parameters automatically, at last the whole CAD model was created. An example of mouse model was employed to confirm the effect of the algorithm.

  20. Ion-acoustic shocks with reflected ions: modeling and PIC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T; Vshivkov, V; Malkov, M

    2015-01-01

    Non-relativistic collisionless shock waves are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas and are known as efficient particle accelerators. However, our understanding of collisionless shocks, including their structure and the mechanisms whereby they accelerate particles remains incomplete. We present here the results of numerical modeling of an ion-acoustic collisionless shock based on one-dimensional (1D) kinetic approximation both for electrons and ions with a real mass ratio. Special emphasis is made on the shock-reflected ions as the main driver of shock dissipation. The reflection efficiency, velocity distribution of reflected particles and the shock electrostatic structure are studied in terms of the shock parameters. Applications to particle acceleration in geophysical and astrophysical shocks are discussed.

  1. Diffuse Scattering Model of Indoor Wideband Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a discrete-time numerical algorithm for computing field distribution in indoor environment by diffuse scattering from walls. Calculations are performed for a rectangular room with semi-reflective walls. The walls are divided into 0.5 x 0.5 m segments, resulting in 2272 wall...... segments in total and approximately 2 min running time on average computer. Frequency independent power levels at the walls around the circumference of the room and at four receiver locations in the middle of the room are observed. It is demonstrated that after finite period of initial excitation the field...... intensity in all locations eventually follows exponential decay with the same slope and approximately the same level for given delay. These observations are shown to be in good agreement with theory and previous measurements—the slopes of the decay curves for measurement, simulation and theory are found...

  2. [Novel findings from an animal tourniquet shock model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2003-09-01

    This article is a review of our experimental results regarding the physiological statuses and roles of chemical mediators in tourniquet shock, and a novel phenomenon, modulation reflex, that is commonly observed in this shock model is discussed. In a rabbit with a tourniquet applied to a hind limb for 24 hrs, blood pressure (BP) gradually falls after release of the tourniquet, but the decline in BP stops when a tourniquet is again applied to the hind limb, indicating that shock mediators are attributed to the hind limb. The levels of dipeptides (anserine and carnosine) and lysosomes in blood samples as well as the levels of leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4) in blood and muscle samples from rabbits in tourniquet shock were elevated. However, injection of a large amount of a dipeptide into an ear vein of a rabbit did not reduce BP, suggesting that both peptides may not be directly related with reduction in BP of rabbits in tourniquet shock. Injection of a platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist into an ear vein resulted in slight elevation of BP and the elevated level was maintained for about 1 to 4 hrs during the period of decline in BP in tourniquet shock. As for interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-6-deficient mice at young ages have a significantly greater blood volume than do wild-type mice without concomitant changes in body composition. Therefore, the role for IL-6 in the regulation of peripheral circulation may be to elevate, not reduce BP. In mice in tourniquet shock, superoxide (O2-) production is observed in skeletal muscle cells and these cells correspond to mitochondria-rich cells. However, RT-PCR of muscle samples showed no significant nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA expression after tourniquet release. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors before tourniquet release reduced O2- production in the skeletal muscle. These results indicate that O2- produced in muscle subjected to ischemia/repefusion may be involved in shock. As for changes in mRNA expression patterns of pro

  3. GNSS-Reflectometry: Forest canopies polarization scattering properties and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be a new promising remote sensing tool in the ocean, snow/ice and land surfaces, e.g., vegetation biomass monitoring. Although GNSS-R provides a potentially special L-band multi-angular and multi-polarization measurement, the theoretical vegetation scattering properties and mechanisms for GNSS-R are not understood clearly. In this paper, the GNSS-R vegetation polarization scattering properties are studied and modeled at different incidence angles (specular direction). The bistatic scattering model Bi-mimics is employed, which is the first-order radiative transfer equation. As a kind of forest stand, the Aspen’s crown layer is composed of entire leaves, and its parameters in Mimics handbook are used as model input. The specular circular polarizations (co-polarization RR and cross-polarization LR) are simulated. For cross-polarization, the received polarization is assumed as a linear (horizontal and vertical) polarizations and ±45° linear polarizations. Therefore, the HR VR, +45R and -45R polarizations are simulated here. Contributions from different scattering components at RR, LR and VR polarization are also presented. For co-polarization, it is large in the whole specular angles (10-80°). The scattering trends of the other cross polarization (HR, LR, +45R and -45R) are a little similar when compared to the RR and RV. Therefore, the RHCP and V polarizations are more favorable to collect the reflected signals. The trunk heights and crown depths do not affect the scattering trends of RR, RV and RL, while the trunk height has some effect on the scattering amplitude of different polarizations. The azimuth angle has more effects on RR, RL and RV scattering, especially in lower than 50°. The observation angles and polarization combinations are extremely important for GNSS-R remote sensing.

  4. Linear-mixing model for shock-compressed liquid deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A model has been developed for the equation of state of deuterium that builds in the correct limiting behavior for the molecular fluid at low pressure and extends smoothly through dissociation to the very high-density monatomic-metallic fluid. The key assumption is that the Helmholtz free energy of the dissociating mixture is a function that can be approximated by the composition average of the free energy of the pure molecular and metallic hydrogen equations of state. The composition is determined by minimizing the free energy. In comparison to earlier studies this model leads to an enhancement of molecular dissociation and a lowering of shock temperatures and pressures. Calculations for shock-compressed liquid deuterium are in agreement with experiments to a pressure of 2.1 Mbar. At about 1 Mbar and 20thinsp000 K liquid deuterium is 90{percent} dissociated and is a nearly degenerate metal. The model predicts that molecular dissociation will lead to negative values of ({partial_derivative}P/{partial_derivative}T){sub V} in the range 4000 to 10thinsp000 K and volumes below 7 cc/mol. This feature suggests the formation of covalently bonded species in the partially dissociated mixture. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Modeling secondary accidents identified by traffic shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junhua, Wang; Boya, Liu; Lanfang, Zhang; Ragland, David R

    2016-02-01

    The high potential for occurrence and the negative consequences of secondary accidents make them an issue of great concern affecting freeway safety. Using accident records from a three-year period together with California interstate freeway loop data, a dynamic method for more accurate classification based on the traffic shock wave detecting method was used to identify secondary accidents. Spatio-temporal gaps between the primary and secondary accident were proven be fit via a mixture of Weibull and normal distribution. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate major factors contributing to secondary accident occurrence. Traffic shock wave speed and volume at the occurrence of a primary accident were explicitly considered in the model, as a secondary accident is defined as an accident that occurs within the spatio-temporal impact scope of the primary accident. Results show that the shock waves originating in the wake of a primary accident have a more significant impact on the likelihood of a secondary accident occurrence than the effects of traffic volume. Primary accidents with long durations can significantly increase the possibility of secondary accidents. Unsafe speed and weather are other factors contributing to secondary crash occurrence. It is strongly suggested that when police or rescue personnel arrive at the scene of an accident, they should not suddenly block, decrease, or unblock the traffic flow, but instead endeavor to control traffic in a smooth and controlled manner. Also it is important to reduce accident processing time to reduce the risk of secondary accident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF HEAT SHOCK RESPONSE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufi Neder Meyer

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a simple model for the elicitation of the heat shock response in rats. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratories. Sample: Seventy-nine adult male albino rats (weight range 200 g to 570 g. Procedures: Exposure to heat stress by heating animals in a warm bath for 5 min after their rectal temperatures reached 107.60 F (420 C. Liver and lung samples were collected for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 detection (Western analysis. Results: Western analysis was positive for HSP70 in the liver and in the lungs of heated animals. There was a temporal correlation between heating and HSP70 detection: it was strongest 1 day after heating and reduced afterwards. No heated animals died. Conclusion: These data show that heating rats in a warm (45o C bath, according to parameters set in this model, elicits efficiently the heat shock response.OBJETIVO: Obter um modelo simples para tentar esclarecer a resposta ao choque térmico em ratos. LOCAL: Laboratório de pesquisa da Universidade. MÉTODO: Amostra: 79 ratos albinos, adultos, entre 200g a 570g. Procedimentos: Exposição ao calor, em banho quente, por 5 minutos, após a temperatura retal chegar a 42 graus centigrados. Biópsias de fígado e pulmão foram obtidas para detectar a proteina 70 (HSP 70, pelo "Western blot". RESULTADOS: As análises foram positivas nos animais aquecidos, com uma correlação entre aquecimento e constatação da HSP 70. Foi mais elevada no primeiro dia e não houve óbitos nos animais aquecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Os ratos aquecidos a 45 graus centígrados respondem eficientemente ao choque térmico.

  7. Spermatozoa scattering by a microchannel feature: an elastohydrodynamic model

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Sperm traverse their microenvironment through viscous fluid by propagating flagellar waves; the waveform emerges as a consequence of elastic structure, internal active moments, and low Reynolds number fluid dynamics. Engineered microchannels have recently been proposed as a method of sorting and manipulating motile cells; the interaction of cells with these artificial environments therefore warrants investigation. A numerical method is presented for the geometrically nonlinear elastohydrodynamic interaction of active swimmers with domain features. This method is employed to examine hydrodynamic scattering by a model microchannel backstep feature. Scattering is shown to depend on backstep height and the relative strength of viscous and elastic forces in the flagellum. In a 'high viscosity' parameter regime corresponding to human sperm in cervical mucus analogue, this hydrodynamic contribution to scattering is comparable in magnitude to recent data on contact effects, being of the order of 5-10 degrees. Scatter...

  8. Efficient finite element modeling of elastodynamic scattering with non-reflecting boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    An efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped scatterer is presented. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the scatterer is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. This model uses non-reflecting boundary conditions on the surface surrounding the scatterer which are non-local in space. Example results for 2D and 3D scattering in isotropic material and guided wave scattering are presented.

  9. A scattering model for surface-textured thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, K.; Zeman, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a mathematical model that relates the surface morphology of randomly surface-textured thin films with the intensity distribution of scattered light. The model is based on the first order Born approximation [see e.g., M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University

  10. A scattering model for surface-textured thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, K.; Zeman, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a mathematical model that relates the surface morphology of randomly surface-textured thin films with the intensity distribution of scattered light. The model is based on the first order Born approximation [see e.g., M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of Optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University

  11. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  12. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S.; Castelletto, S.; Aruldoss, C.; Scholten, R. E.; Roberts, A.

    2007-08-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  13. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/Ecarbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  14. Water Hammer Model of Shock Absorber Throttle Slice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-jie; GU Liang; LEI Sheng-guang; GUAN Ji-fu

    2008-01-01

    In allusion to easy invalidation of damping valve in vehicle shock absorber caused by the impact from the road surface, the importance of the study of damping valve water hammer pressure is presented. The physical model of damping valve with the circle throttle slice is established. The time for the throttle slice deformation is studied by using the finite software, and the laws that how the structure parameters affect the deformation time are obtained. Combining the theory of water hammer, the water hammer initial and boundary condition of the damping valve is deduced, and the water hammer model of throttle slice is established. The analysis of simulation results indicates that the water hammer pressure amplitude and the amount of water hammer oscillation period can be reduced and the dependability of the valve can be enhanced by modifying the structure parameters and aperture width between slice and valve body.

  15. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations

  16. Shock tube and chemical kinetic modeling study of the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjean, Baptiste; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Wang, Weijing; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A

    2013-02-21

    A detailed kinetic model describing the oxidation of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF), a potential second-generation biofuel, is proposed. The kinetic model is based upon quantum chemical calculations for the initial DMF consumption reactions and important reactions of intermediates. The model is validated by comparison to new DMF shock tube ignition delay time measurements (over the temperature range 1300-1831 K and at nominal pressures of 1 and 4 bar) and the DMF pyrolysis speciation measurements of Lifshitz et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. A 1998 , 102 ( 52 ), 10655 - 10670 ]. Globally, modeling predictions are in good agreement with the considered experimental targets. In particular, ignition delay times are predicted well by the new model, with model-experiment deviations of at most a factor of 2, and DMF pyrolysis conversion is predicted well, to within experimental scatter of the Lifshitz et al. data. Additionally, comparisons of measured and model predicted pyrolysis speciation provides validation of theoretically calculated channels for the oxidation of DMF. Sensitivity and reaction flux analyses highlight important reactions as well as the primary reaction pathways responsible for the decomposition of DMF and formation and destruction of key intermediate and product species.

  17. Comparison of CME/Shock Propagation Models with Heliospheric Imaging and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinhua; Liu, Ying D.; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Xueshang; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Lu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    The prediction of the arrival time for fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shocks is highly desirable in space weather studies. In this paper, we use two shock propagation models, i.e., Data Guided Shock Time Of Arrival (DGSTOA) and Data Guided Shock Propagation Model (DGSPM), to predict the kinematical evolution of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs. DGSTOA is based on the similarity theory of shock waves in the solar wind reference frame, and DGSPM is based on the non-similarity theory in the stationary reference frame. The inputs are the kinematics of the CME front at the maximum speed moment obtained from the geometric triangulation method applied to STEREO imaging observations together with the Harmonic Mean approximation. The outputs provide the subsequent propagation of the associated shock. We apply these models to the CMEs on 2012 January 19, January 23, and March 7. We find that the shock models predict reasonably well the shock’s propagation after the impulsive acceleration. The shock’s arrival time and local propagation speed at Earth predicted by these models are consistent with in situ measurements of WIND. We also employ the Drag-Based Model (DBM) as a comparison, and find that it predicts a steeper deceleration than the shock models after the rapid deceleration phase. The predictions of DBM at 1 au agree with the following ICME or sheath structure, not the preceding shock. These results demonstrate the applicability of the shock models used here for future arrival time prediction of interplanetary shocks associated with fast CMEs.

  18. Modelling Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, T; Mosel, U

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a model to describe the interactions of neutrinos with nucleons and nuclei via charged and neutral currents, focusing on the region of the quasielastic and Delta(1232) peaks. For neutrino nucleon collisions a fully relativistic formalism is used. The extension to finite nuclei has been done in the framework of a coupled-channel BUU transport model where we have studied exclusive channels taking into account in-medium effects and final state interactions.

  19. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  20. Wave chaotic experiments and models for complicated wave scattering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jen-Hao

    Wave scattering in a complicated environment is a common challenge in many engineering fields because the complexity makes exact solutions impractical to find, and the sensitivity to detail in the short-wavelength limit makes a numerical solution relevant only to a specific realization. On the other hand, wave chaos offers a statistical approach to understand the properties of complicated wave systems through the use of random matrix theory (RMT). A bridge between the theory and practical applications is the random coupling model (RCM) which connects the universal features predicted by RMT and the specific details of a real wave scattering system. The RCM gives a complete model for many wave properties and is beneficial for many physical and engineering fields that involve complicated wave scattering systems. One major contribution of this dissertation is that I have utilized three microwave systems to thoroughly test the RCM in complicated wave systems with varied loss, including a cryogenic system with a superconducting microwave cavity for testing the extremely-low-loss case. I have also experimentally tested an extension of the RCM that includes short-orbit corrections. Another novel result is development of a complete model based on the RCM for the fading phenomenon extensively studied in the wireless communication fields. This fading model encompasses the traditional fading models as its high-loss limit case and further predicts the fading statistics in the low-loss limit. This model provides the first physical explanation for the fitting parameters used in fading models. I have also applied the RCM to additional experimental wave properties of a complicated wave system, such as the impedance matrix, the scattering matrix, the variance ratio, and the thermopower. These predictions are significant for nuclear scattering, atomic physics, quantum transport in condensed matter systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, geophysics, etc.

  1. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  2. Modeling of energy transfer in hypersonic shocks using high fidelity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong

    The spectra of high-temperature, chemically reacting hypersonic flows provides the most powerful diagnostic available for testing thermochemically nonequilibrium models in re-entry conditions. Several shock tube experiments have revealed that conventional phenomenological approach can not accurately predict the internal temperature of the gas and also the corresponding radiation. In particular, large rotational nonequilibrium in strong shocks has been observed in several experiments with high peak translational temperatures. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a particlebased simulation method that is capable of properly simulating flows with large nonequilibrium. In the experiments above, one dimensional shocks are most widely studied but they are challenging to simulate using the DSMC method due to the unsteady nature of the flows and especially for hypersonic flows with chemical reactions taking place. Therefore, efficient approaches for simulating one-dimensional shocks are developed for use in DSMC simulations. Both a shock stabilization technique and a modified DSMC unsteady sampling approach are used in simulating one dimensional, unsteady shocks. In the latter approach, a moving sampling region is used to obtain an accurate profile of the reflected shock in air. The shock number density and temperature profiles are obtained and used to calculate excitation and radiation. The Quasi-Steady-State (QSS) assumption is made in the excitation calculation where both electron impact and heavy particle impact excitation for the NO(A2sum +) and the N+2 (B2sum +u ) states are studied. The calculated NOradiation in the wavelength range o lambda = 235 +/- 7 nm for shock speeds below 7 km/s are in good agreement with the experiment, but, the predicted radiation is lower than the experiment for shock speeds above 7 km/s. In addition, the N+2 radiation in the wavelength range of lambda = 391.4 +/- 0.2 nm are in good agreement with the experimental data for

  3. Condensate Accretion in Shock Tube's Expansion Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem-Denis; DeSilva, Upul P.; Hunte, F.; Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1997-01-01

    It has been shown that turbulence and temperature influence the droplet sizes in expansion fan induced condensation by studying the Rayleigh scattering from one port in our shock tube's test section. We have modified our set-up so as to allow, using two ports, the real time measurement of the influence of turbulence and temperature on the rate at which these droplets grow. To do this, we looked at the Rayleigh scattering from two different ports for ten Reynolds numbers at five different temperatures. We modeled the time of flight of droplets, using the equations of one-dimensional gas dynamics and the measured shock wave speed in shock tube's driven section.

  4. Modeling of detective quantum efficiency considering scatter-reduction devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Woong; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) cannot be restored and thus has become a severe issue in digital mammography.1 Therefore, antiscatter grids are typically used in mammography. Scatter-cleanup performance of various scatter-reduction devices, such as air gaps,2 linear (1D) or cellular (2D) grids,3, 4 and slot-scanning devices,5 has been extensively investigated by many research groups. In the present time, a digital mammography system with the slotscanning geometry is also commercially available.6 In this study, we theoretically investigate the effect of scattered photons on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance of digital mammography detectors by using the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) approach. We show a simple DQE formalism describing digital mammography detector systems equipped with scatter reduction devices by regarding the scattered photons as additive noise sources. The LFD increased with increasing PMMA thickness, and the amounts of LFD indicated the corresponding SF. The estimated SFs were 0.13, 0.21, and 0.29 for PMMA thicknesses of 10, 20, and 30 mm, respectively. While the solid line describing the measured MTF for PMMA with 0 mm was the result of least-squares of regression fit using Eq. (14), the other lines were simply resulted from the multiplication of the fit result (for PMMA with 0 mm) with the (1-SF) estimated from the LFDs in the measured MTFs. Spectral noise-power densities over the entire frequency range were not much changed with increasing scatter. On the other hand, the calculation results showed that the spectral noise-power densities increased with increasing scatter. This discrepancy may be explained by that the model developed in this study does not account for the changes in x-ray interaction parameters for varying spectral shapes due to beam hardening with increasing PMMA thicknesses.

  5. Geant4 models for simulation of multiple scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanchenko, V N; Maire, M; Urban, L

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in development of single and multiple scattering models within the Geant4 toolkit is presented. Different options available to users are discussed. The comparisons with the data are shown. The trade of precision versus CPU performance is discussed with the focus on LHC detectors simulation

  6. Elastic scattering of surface plasmon polaritons: Modeling and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Coello, V.

    1998-01-01

    excitation wavelengths (594 and 633 nm) and different metal (silver and gold) films. The near-field optical images obtained are related to the calculated SPP intensity distributions demonstrating that the model developed can be successfully used in studies of SPP elastic scattering, e.g., to design...

  7. Effective single scattering albedo estimation using regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by modifying the optical parameterization of Regional Climate model (RegCM), the authors have computed and compared the Effective Single-Scattering Albedo (ESSA) which is a representative of VIS spectral region. The arid, semi...

  8. Three dimensional rigorous model for optical scattering problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, X.

    2006-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional model based on the finite element method for solving the time-harmonic Maxwell equation in optics. It applies to isotropic or anisotropic dielectrics and metals, and to many configurations such as an isolated scatterer in a multilayer, bi-gratings and crystals. We shal

  9. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  10. Computational modeling of single particle scattering over large distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Rebecca; Plumley, Rajan; McCracken, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of the propagation of a single particle through a large three-dimensional volume under the influence of individual scattering events. In such systems, short paths can be quickly and accurately simulated using random walks defined by individual scattering parameters, but the simulation time greatly increases as the size of the space grows. We present a method for reducing the overall simulation time by restricting the simulation to a cube of unit length; each `cell' is characterized by a set of parameters which dictate the distributions of allowable step lengths and polar scattering angles. We model propagation over large distances by constructing a lattice of cells with physical parameters that depend on position, such that the full set would represent a space within the entire volume available to the particle. With these, we propose the use of Markov chains to determine a probable path for the particle, thereby removing the need to simulate every step in the particle's path. For a single particle with constant velocity, we can use the step statistics to determine the travel time of the particle. We investigate the effect of scattering parameters such as average step distance and possible scattering angles on the probabilities of a cell.

  11. Neutron scattering and models: Iron. Nuclear data and measurements series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Differential elastic and inelastic neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental iron are measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV in increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each incident energy the measurements are made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17{degrees} and 160{degrees}, with emphasis on elastic scattering and inelastic scattering due to the excitation of the yrast 2{sup +} state. The measured data is combined with earlier lower-energy results from this laboratory, with recent high-precision {approx} 9.5 {yields} 15 MeV results from the Physilalisch Technische Bundesanstalt and with selected values from the literature to provide a detailed neutron-scattering data base extending from {approx} 1.5 to 26 MeV. This data is interpreted in the context of phenomenological spherical-optical and coupled-channels (vibrational and rotational) models, and physical implications discussed. Deformation, coupling, asymmetry and dispersive effects are explored. It is shown that, particularly in a collective context, a good description of the interaction of neutrons with iron is achieved over the energy range {approx} 0 {yields} 26 MeV, avoiding the dichotomy between high and low-energy interpretations found in previous work.

  12. Empirical modeling of soot formation in shock-tube pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Clary, D. W.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for empirical modeling of soot formation during shock-tube pyrolysis of aromatic hydrocarbons is developed. The method is demonstrated using data obtained in pyrolysis of argon-diluted mixtures of toluene behind reflected shock waves. The developed model is in good agreement with experiment.

  13. Model Validation for Shipboard Power Cables Using Scattering Parameters%Model Validation for Shipboard Power Cables Using Scattering Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lukas Graber; Diomar Infante; Michael Steurer; William W. Brey

    2011-01-01

    Careful analysis of transients in shipboard power systems is important to achieve long life times of the com ponents in future all-electric ships. In order to accomplish results with high accuracy, it is recommended to validate cable models as they have significant influence on the amplitude and frequency spectrum of voltage transients. The authors propose comparison of model and measurement using scattering parameters. They can be easily obtained from measurement and simulation and deliver broadband information about the accuracy of the model. The measurement can be performed using a vector network analyzer. The process to extract scattering parameters from simulation models is explained in detail. Three different simulation models of a 5 kV XLPE power cable have been validated. The chosen approach delivers an efficient tool to quickly estimate the quality of a model.

  14. Modeling shock responses of plastic bonded explosives using material point method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hailin; Zhao, Feng; Fu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Shock responses of plastic bonded explosives are modeled using material point method as implemented in the Uintah Computational Framework. Two-dimensional simulation model was established based on the micrograph of PBX9501. Shock loading for the explosive was performed by a piston moving at a constant velocity. Unreactive simulation results indicate that under shock loading serious plastic strain appears on the boundary of HMX grains. Simultaneously, the plastic strain energy transforms to thermal energy, causing the temperature to rise rapidly on grain boundary areas. The influence of shock strength on the responses of explosive was also investigated by increasing the piston velocity. And the results show that with increasing shock strength, the distribution of plastic strain and temperature does not have significant changes, but their values increase obviously. Namely, the higher the shock strength is, the higher the temperature rise will be.

  15. Reverse and Forward Shock X-ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O

    2014-01-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) which include the efficient production of cosmic rays via non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization (NEI), hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles which the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line em...

  16. Testing the Empirical Shock Arrival Model using Quadrature Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, N; Xie, H; Yashiro, S

    2013-01-01

    The empirical shock arrival (ESA) model was developed based on quadrature data from Helios (in-situ) and P-78 (remote-sensing) to predict the Sun-Earth travel time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) [Gopalswamy et al. 2005a]. The ESA model requires earthward CME speed as input, which is not directly measurable from coronagraphs along the Sun-Earth line. The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) were in quadrature during 2010 - 2012, so the speeds of Earth-directed CMEs were observed with minimal projection effects. We identified a set of 20 full halo CMEs in the field of view of SOHO that were also observed in quadrature by STEREO. We used the earthward speed from STEREO measurements as input to the ESA model and compared the resulting travel times with the observed ones from L1 monitors. We find that the model predicts the CME travel time within about 7.3 hours, which is similar to the predictions by the ENLIL model. We also find that CME-CME and CME...

  17. Modelos experimentales sobre shock hemorrágico Experimental models on hemorragic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Mauriz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describe la fisiopatología y potenciales tratamientos del shock hemorrágico, situación que se produce por una rápida y significante pérdida de volumen intravascular. El shock hemorrágico se inicia con una inestabilidad hemodinámica, descenso en el aporte y perfusión de oxígeno a los tejidos, lo que induce hipoxia celular. Una de las complicaciones más usuales es el daño multiorgánico, debido a un proceso sistémico inflamatorio que afecta a los órganos vitales y que puede conducir a la muerte del individuo. También, se ha descrito un incremento en la activación de los macrófagos por translocación bacteriana y por la propia isquemia/reperfusión. Además, la activación de las células de Kupffer favorece la liberación de citoquinas, radicales libres y óxido nítrico que pueden llevar a un empeoramiento del cuadro. En los últimos años se han llevado a cabo investigaciones para profundizar en el conocimiento de la fisiopatología y potenciales tratamientos del shock hemorrágico. Diferentes estudios han mostrado efectos positivos por la administración de antioxidantes, aminoácidos o lípidos en este tipo de shock.This review addresses the pathophysiology and treatment of hemorrhagic shock, a condition produced by rapid and significant loss of intravascular volume. Hemorrhagic shock may lead sequentially to hemodynamic instability, decreases in oxygen delivery, decreased tissue perfusion and cellular hypoxia. Multiple organ failure, a systemic inflammatory process that leads to dysfunction of different vital organs, is a frequent complication after hemorrhagic shock and accounts for a high incidence of mortality. The pathogenesis of organ injury secondary to hypovolemic insults is still not completely understood, but both experimental studies and clinical observations indicate that macrophages are activated by translocated endotoxin-bacteria and ischemia/reperfusion. Activated Kupffer cells release

  18. THEORETICAL-MODEL FOR THE SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY DENTIN AND COMPARISON WITH MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJP, [No Value; TENBOSCH, JJ

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model of the scattering of light by dentin is presented. The model that results is a superposition of several scattering contributions, i.e., scattering by mineral crystals, collagen fibrils, and dentinal tubules. These tubules are oriented so that they cause an asymmetrical scattering

  19. A weak-scattering model for turbine-tone haystacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, A.; Powles, C. J.; Tester, B. J.

    2013-08-01

    Noise and emissions are critical technical issues in the development of aircraft engines. This necessitates the development of accurate models to predict the noise radiated from aero-engines. Turbine tones radiated from the exhaust nozzle of a turbofan engine propagate through turbulent jet shear layers which causes scattering of sound. In the far-field, measurements of the tones may exhibit spectral broadening, where owing to scattering, the tones are no longer narrow band peaks in the spectrum. This effect is known colloquially as 'haystacking'. In this article a comprehensive analytical model to predict spectral broadening for a tone radiated through a circular jet, for an observer in the far field, is presented. This model extends previous work by the authors which considered the prediction of spectral broadening at far-field observer locations outside the cone of silence. The modelling uses high-frequency asymptotic methods and a weak-scattering assumption. A realistic shear layer velocity profile and turbulence characteristics are included in the model. The mathematical formulation which details the spectral broadening, or haystacking, of a single-frequency, single azimuthal order turbine tone is outlined. In order to validate the model, predictions are compared with experimental results, albeit only at polar angle equal to 90°. A range of source frequencies from 4 to 20kHz, and jet velocities from 20 to 60ms-1, are examined for validation purposes. The model correctly predicts how the spectral broadening is affected when the source frequency and jet velocity are varied.

  20. Comparison Between Surf and Multi-Shock Forest Fire High Explosive Burn Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Nicholas Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-18

    PAGOSA1 has several different burn models used to model high explosive detonation. Two of these, Multi-Shock Forest Fire and Surf, are capable of modeling shock initiation. Accurately calculating shock initiation of a high explosive is important because it is a mechanism for detonation in many accident scenarios (i.e. fragment impact). Comparing the models to pop-plot data give confidence that the models are accurately calculating detonation or lack thereof. To compare the performance of these models, pop-plots2 were created from simulations where one two cm block of PBX 9502 collides with another block of PBX 9502.

  1. $^{-} - {}^{12}C$ elastic scattering above the resonance using diffraction model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Arafah

    2008-01-01

    Phenomenological analysis of the $^{-}- ^{12}C$ elastic scattering differential cross-section at 400, 486, 500, 584, 663, 672 and 766 MeV is presented. The analysis is made in the diffraction model framework using the recently proposed parametrization of the phase-shift function. Good description of the experimental data is achieved at all energies. Microscopic interpretation of the parameters of the phase-shift function is provided in terms of Helm's model density parameters.

  2. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and acceleration efficiency. In our DSA model the CR acceleration efficiency is determined mainly by the sonic Mach number Ms, while the MFA factor depends on the Alfv'enic Mach number and the degree of shock modification by CRs. We show that at strong CR modified shocks, if scattering centers drift with an effective Alfv'en speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum is steepened and the acceleration efficiency is reduced significantly, compared to the cases without such effects. As a result, the postshock C...

  3. Deconstruction and Elastic pi pi Scattering in Higgsless Models

    CERN Document Server

    Chivukula, R S; Kurachi, M; Simmons, E H; Tanabashi, M; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2007-01-01

    We study elastic pion-pion scattering in global linear moose models and apply the results to a variety of Higgsless models in flat and AdS space using the Equivalence Theorem. In order to connect the global moose to Higgsless models, we first introduce a block-spin transformation which corresponds, in the continuum, to the freedom to perform coordinate transformations in the Higgsless model. We show that it is possible to make an "f-flat" deconstruction in which all of the f-constants f_j of the linear moose model are identical; the phenomenologically relevant f-flat models are those in which the coupling constants of the groups at either end of the moose are small - corresponding to the global linear moose. In studying pion-pion scattering, we derive various sum rules, including one analogous to the KSRF relation, and use them in evaluating the low-energy and high-energy forms of the leading elastic partial wave scattering amplitudes. We obtain elastic unitarity bounds as a function of the mass of the lighte...

  4. Model Independent Form Factors for Spin Independent Neutralino-Nucleon Scattering from Elastic Electron Scattering Data

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, G; Kemper, A; Duda, Gintaras; Gondolo, Paolo; Kemper, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of neutralino cross sections with various nuclei are of great interest to direct dark matter searches such as CDMS, EDELWEISS, ZEPLIN, and other experiments. These cross sections and direct detection rates are generally computed with standard, one or two parameter model-dependent nuclear form factors, which may not exactly mirror the actual form factor for the particular nucleus in question. As is well known, elastic electron scattering can allow for very precise determinations of nuclear form factors and hence nuclear charge densities for spherical or near-spherical nuclei. We use charge densities derived from elastic electron scattering data to calculate model independent form factors for various target nuclei important in dark matter searches, such as Si, Ge, S, Ca and others. We have found that for nuclear recoils in the range of 1-100 keV significant differences in cross sections and rates exist when the model independent form factors are used. DarkSUSY, a publicly-available adva...

  5. Reverse and Forward Shock X-Ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants Undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-08-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  6. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ellison, Donald C. [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Nagataki, Shigehiro, E-mail: slee@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp, E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  7. Impact of Scattering Model on Disdrometer Derived Attenuation Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael; Luini, Lorenzo; Nessel, James; Riva, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and the Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) are currently entering the third year of a joint propagation study in Milan, Italy utilizing the 20 and 40 GHz beacons of the Alphasat TDP#5 Aldo Paraboni scientific payload. The Ka- and Q-band beacon receivers were installed at the POLIMI campus in June of 2014 and provide direct measurements of signal attenuation at each frequency. Collocated weather instrumentation provides concurrent measurement of atmospheric conditions at the receiver; included among these weather instruments is a Thies Clima Laser Precipitation Monitor (optical disdrometer) which records droplet size distributions (DSD) and droplet velocity distributions (DVD) during precipitation events. This information can be used to derive the specific attenuation at frequencies of interest and thereby scale measured attenuation data from one frequency to another. Given the ability to both predict the 40 gigahertz attenuation from the disdrometer and the 20 gigahertz time-series as well as to directly measure the 40 gigahertz attenuation with the beacon receiver, the Milan terminal is uniquely able to assess these scaling techniques and refine the methods used to infer attenuation from disdrometer data. In order to derive specific attenuation from the DSD, the forward scattering coefficient must be computed. In previous work, this has been done using the Mie scattering model, however, this assumes a spherical droplet shape. The primary goal of this analysis is to assess the impact of the scattering model and droplet shape on disdrometer-derived attenuation predictions by comparing the use of the Mie scattering model to the use of the T-matrix method, which does not assume a spherical droplet. In particular, this paper will investigate the impact of these two scattering approaches on the error of the resulting predictions as well as on the relationship between prediction error and rain rate.

  8. Improvements of the shock arrival times at the Earth model STOA

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H -L

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of the shocks' arrival times (SATs) at the Earth is very important for space weather forecast. There is a well-known SAT model, STOA, which is widely used in the space weather forecast. However, the shock transit time from STOA model usually has a relative large error compared to the real measurements. In addition, STOA tends to yield too much `yes' prediction, which causes a large number of false alarms. Therefore, in this work, we work on the modification of STOA model. First, we give a new method to calculate the shock transit time by modifying the way to use the solar wind speed in STOA model. Second, we develop new criteria for deciding whether the shock will arrive at the Earth with the help of the sunspot numbers and the angle distances of the flare events. It is shown that our work can improve the SATs prediction significantly, especially the prediction of flare events without shocks arriving at the Earth.

  9. FDTD Modeling of Transient Scattering by Subsurface Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Zhu-qian; Zhu Guo-qiang

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional (2-D) finitedifference time-domain method (FDTD) scheme is used to simulate the transient scattering characteristics of buried objects, which are modeled by columns of arbitrary permittivities, conductivities, and sizes. The FDTD soil is modeled by isotropic, homogeneous and lossy media. The standing-trave-ling wave boundary condition (STWBC) that can simplify calculation and save CPU storage is used for modeling physical absorbers inside the FDTD computational domain. Reflection of electromagnetic pulses incident on a layered medium and transient scattering by the ground and an underground air square cylinder are computed. These results verify the validity of the FDTD scheme by comparisons with those shown in some references. Numerical results presented in the final part of this paper are desirable and meaningful, explicitly distinguishing echo waves stemming from the ground and the buried objects.

  10. A Theoretic Model for the Shock Observed in Geo-space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Kui; WANG Xiao; ZHANG Tie-Long; Torkar Klaus; LIU Zhen-Xing

    2005-01-01

    An electrostatic model for the shock observed in the earth's polar region is established by deriving the "Sagdeev potential" from the magnetohydrodynamic equations in a cylindrical coordinate system. The results show that the shock can develop from the ion acoustic wave or ion cyclotron wave. in the polar region, and can exist when the Mach number M and the initial electric field E0 satisfy the condition of |(a/M2 - 1) E0| = 1. Also, some features of the shock wave are discussed. The result can interpret the electrostatic shock observed in the earth's polar region.

  11. Scattering intensities for a white beam (120 kV) presenting a semi-empirical model to preview scattered beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, O. D.; Boldt, S.; Kasch, K. U.

    2016-09-01

    This work aims at measuring the scattering cross sections for white beams and the verification of a semi-empirical model predicting scattered energy spectra of an X-ray beam produced by an industrial X-ray tube (Pantack Sievert, 120 kV, tungsten target) incident on a water sample. Both, theoretical and semi-empirical results presented are based on the form factor approach with results well corresponding to performed measurements. The elastic (Rayleigh) scattering cross sections are based on Thomson scattering with a form factor correction as published by Morin (1982). The inelastic (Compton) contribution is based on the Klein Nishina equation (Klein and Nishina, 1929) multiplied by the incoherent scattering factors calculated by Hubbel et al. (1975). Two major results are presented: first, the experimental integrated in energy cross sections corresponds with theoretical cross sections obtained at the mean energy of the measured scattered spectra at a given angle. Secondly, the measured scattered spectra at a given angle correspond to those obtained utilizing the semi-empirical model as proposed here. A good correspondence of experimental results and model predictions can be shown. The latter, therefore, proves to be a useful method to calculate the scattering contributions in a number of applications as for example cone beam tomography.

  12. Phenomenological models of elastic nucleon scattering and predictions for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kundrat, V; Lokajicek, M; Prochazka, J

    2011-01-01

    The hitherto analyses of elastic collisions of charged nucleons involving common influence of Coulomb and hadronic scattering have been based practically on West and Yennie formula. However, this approach has been shown recently to be inadequate from experimental as well as theoretical points of view. The eikonal model enabling to determine physical characteristics in impact parameter space seems to be more pertinent. The contemporary phenomenological models admit, of course, different distributions of collision processes in the impact parameter space and cannot give any definite answer. Nevertheless, some predictions for the planned LHC energy that have been given on their basis may be useful, as well as the possibility of determining the luminosity from elastic scattering. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid Modeling of Elastic Wave Scattering in a Welded Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, A.; Shah, A. H.; Popplewell, N.

    2003-03-01

    In the present study, a 3D hybrid method, which couples the finite element region with guided elastic wave modes, is formulated to investigate the scattering by a non-axisymmetric crack in a welded steel pipe. The algorithm is implemented on a parallel computing platform. Implementation is facilitated by the dynamic memory allocation capabilities of Fortran 90™ and the parallel processing directives of OpenMp™. The algorithm is validated against available numerical results. The agreement with a previous 2D hybrid model is excellent. Novel results are presented for the scattering of the first longitudinal mode from different non-axisymmetric cracks. The trend of the new results is consistent with the previous findings for the axisymmetric case. The developed model has potential application in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of welded steel pipes.

  14. Scattering as a key to improved room acoustic computer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for a long time that surface scattering plays a very important role in room acoustics. With room acoustic computer models like ODEON it is possible to study the influence of scattering coefficients, which can be assigned to the surfaces of the room. In the latest version...... of the program an additional effect has been modelled, namely the attenuation of sound due to diffraction, which is particularly pronounced for small surfaces, low frequencies and long reflecting paths. The present paper describes a parameter study of how to optimize the choice of the number of rays...... room acoustic parameters. Results from two different halls have shown that a relative low number of rays are sufficient for reliable and stable calculation results. The optimum value of the transition order is two or three. The inclusion of diffraction effect leads to clearly improved results....

  15. Does the Foreign Income Shock in a Small Open Economy DSGE Model Fit Croatian Data?

    OpenAIRE

    Arčabić, Vladimir; Globan, Tomislav; Nadoveza, Ozana; Rogić Dumančić, Lucija; Tica, Josip

    2016-01-01

    The paper compares theoretical impulse response functions from a DSGE model for a small open economy with an empirical VAR model estimated for the Croatian economy. The theoretical model fits the data well as long as monetary policy is modelled as a fixed exchange rate regime. The paper considers only a foreign output gap shock. A positive foreign shock increases domestic GDP and prices and decreases terms of trade, which is in compliance with theoretical assumptions. Interest rates behave di...

  16. Nonrelativistic factorizable scattering theory of multicomponent Calogero-Sutherland model

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, C; Nam, S; Ahn, Changrim; Lee, Kong Ju Bock; Nam, Soonkeon

    1995-01-01

    We relate two integrable models in (1+1) dimensions, namely, multicomponent Calogero-Sutherland model with particles and antiparticles interacting via the hyperbolic potential and the nonrelativistic factorizable S-matrix theory with SU(N)-invariance. We find complete solutions of the Yang-Baxter equations without implementing the crossing symmetry, and one of them is identified with the scattering amplitudes derived from the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation of the Calogero-Sutherland model. This particular solution is of interest in that it cannot be obtained as a nonrelativistic limit of any known relativistic solutions of the SU(N)-invariant Yang-Baxter equations.

  17. A fully polarimetric scattering model for a coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, M. A.; Fung, A. K.; Lopes, A.; Mougin, E.

    1991-01-01

    For an elliptically polarized plane wave exciting a coniferous forested canopy a fully polarimetric scattering model has been developed to account for the size and orientation distributions of each forest constituent. A canopy is divided into three layers over a rough interface. The upper two layers represent the crown with its constituents (leaves, stems, and branches). The lower layer stands for the trunks and the rough interface is the canopy-ground interface. For a plane wave exciting the canopy, the explicit expressions for the bistatic scattering coefficient associated with each scattering mechanism are given. For an elliptically polarized incidence wave, the present model can be recast in a form suitable for polarimetric wave synthesis. The model validation is justified by comparing the measured and the calculated values of the backscattering coefficients for a linearly polarized incident wave. The comparison is made over a wide range of frequencies and incident angles. Numerical simulations are conducted to calculate the radar polarization signature of the canopy for different incident frequencies and angles.

  18. The shocking transit of WASP-12b: Modelling the observed early ingress in the near ultraviolet

    CERN Document Server

    Llama, J; Jardine, M; Vidotto, A A; Helling, Ch; Fossati, L; Haswell, C A

    2011-01-01

    Near ultraviolet observations of WASP-12b have revealed an early ingress compared to the optical transit lightcurve. This has been interpreted as due to the presence of a magnetospheric bow shock which forms when the relative velocity of the planetary and stellar material is supersonic. We aim to reproduce this observed early ingress by modelling the stellar wind (or coronal plasma) in order to derive the speed and density of the material at the planetary orbital radius. From this we determine the orientation of the shock and the density of compressed plasma behind it. With this model for the density structure surrounding the planet we perform Monte Carlo radiation transfer simulations of the near UV transits of WASP-12b with and without a bow shock. We find that we can reproduce the transit lightcurves with a wide range of plasma temperatures, shock geometries and optical depths. Our results support the hypothesis that a bow shock could explain the observed early ingress.

  19. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    CERN Document Server

    Aude, Sivéry; Thommen, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  20. On terminating Poisson processes in some shock models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Maxim, E-mail: FinkelMI@ufs.ac.z [Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein (South Africa); Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock (Germany); Marais, Francois, E-mail: fmarais@csc.co [CSC, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    A system subject to a point process of shocks is considered. Shocks occur in accordance with the homogeneous Poisson process. Different criteria of system failure (termination) are discussed and the corresponding probabilities of failure (accident)-free performance are derived. The described analytical approach is based on deriving integral equations for each setting and solving these equations through the Laplace transform. Some approximations are analyzed and further generalizations and applications are discussed.

  1. Evaluation of fracture models through pressurized-thermal-shock testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Bryan, R.H.; Bass, B.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Two multiple-transient pressurized-thermal-shock experiments (PTSEs) have been conducted under the NRC-sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program. The first test (PTSE-1) employed an SA-508 class 2 steel with high Charpy upper-shelf energy level and a relatively high brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. The second test (PTSE-2) used a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel (SA-387 grade 22) that had been given a special heat treatment to yield a low Charpy upper-shelf energy level and attendant low tearing resistance. Each experiment included two combined thermal and pressure transients that give rise to propagation and arrest of an initial long flaw that extended about 10% through the thick wall of the test cylinder. Both materials exhibited the ability to inhibit crack propagation by warm prestressing, high initiation toughness values and high crack-arrest toughness values. Cleavage initiation and arrest are modeled well by available fracture theories. However, calculations of ductile tearing based on resistance curves did not consistently predict the observed tearing.

  2. Exploring temporal transcription regulation structure of Aspergillus fumigatus in heat shock by state space model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyano Satoru

    2009-07-01

    feed-forward loop type of regulation of heat shock proteins with metabolic genes became less frequent with increasing temperature. This might be the reason for dramatic increase in the expression of heat shock proteins and the number of heat shock response genes at heat shock of 48°C. Conclusion We systemically analysed the thermal adaption mechanism of A. fumigatus by state space model with times series microarray data in terms of transcription regulation structure. We suggest for the first time that heat shock proteins might efficiently regulate metabolic genes using the coherent feed-forward loop type of regulation structure. This type of regulation structure would also be efficient for adjustment to the other stresses requiring rapid change of metabolic mode as well as thermal adaptation.

  3. Modeling the anisotropic shock response of single-crystal RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Darby

    Explosives initiate under impacts whose energy, if distributed homogeneously throughout the material, translates to temperature increases that are insufficient to drive the rapid chemistry observed. Heterogeneous thermomechanical interactions at the meso-scale (i.e. between single-crystal and macroscale) leads to the formation of localized hot spots. Direct numerical simulations of mesoscale response can contribute to our understanding of hot spots if they include the relevant deformation mechanisms that are essential to the nonlinear thermomechanical response of explosive molecular crystals. We have developed a single-crystal model for the finite deformation thermomechanical response of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX). Because of the low symmetry of RDX, a complete description of nonlinear thermoelasticity requires a careful decomposition of free energy into components that represent the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) response and the coupling between isochoric deformation and both deviatoric and hydrostatic stresses. An equation-of-state (EOS) based on Debye theory that defines the PVT response was constructed using experimental data and density functional theory calculations. This EOS replicates the equilibrium states of phase transformation from alpha to gamma polymorphs observed in static high-pressure experiments. Lattice thermoelastic parameters defining the coupled isochoric free energy were obtained from molecular dynamics calculations and previous experimental data. Anisotropic crystal plasticity is modeled using Orowan's expression relating slip rate to dislocation density and velocity. Details of the theory will be presented followed by discussion of simulations of flyer plate impact experiments, including recent experiments diagnosed with in situ X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Impact conditions explored within the experimental effort have spanned shock pressures ranging from 1-10 GPa for several crystallographic orientations

  4. Evolving model-free scattering matrix via evolutionary algorithm: $^{16}$O-$^{16}$O elastic scattering at 350 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Korda, V Y; Korda, L P

    2005-01-01

    We present a new procedure which enables to extract a scattering matrix $S(l)$ as a complex function of angular momentum directly from the scattering data, without any a priori model assumptions implied. The key ingredient of the procedure is the evolutionary algorithm with diffused mutation which evolves the population of the scattering matrices, via their smooth deformations, from the primary arbitrary analytical $S(l)$ shapes to the final ones giving high quality fits to the data. Due to the automatic monitoring of the scattering matrix derivatives, the final $S(l)$ shapes are monotonic and do not have any distortions. For the $^{16}$O-$^{16}$O elastic scattering data at 350 MeV, we show the independence of the final results of the primary $S(l)$ shapes. Contrary to the other approaches, our procedure provides an excellent fit by the $S(l)$ shapes which support the ``rainbow'' interpretation of the data under analysis.

  5. Dynamics and Lax Phillips scattering for generalized Lamb models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Massimo; Noja, Diego; Posilicano, Andrea

    2006-12-01

    This paper treats the dynamics and scattering of a model of coupled oscillating systems, a finite dimensional one and a wave field on the half line. The coupling is realized producing the family of self-adjoint extensions of the suitably restricted self-adjoint operator describing the uncoupled dynamics. The spectral theory of the family is studied and the associated quadratic forms constructed. The dynamics turns out to be Hamiltonian and the Hamiltonian is described, including the case in which the finite-dimensional systems comprise nonlinear oscillators; in this case, the dynamics is shown to exist as well. In the linear case, the system is equivalent, on a dense subspace, to a wave equation on the half line with higher order boundary conditions, described by a differential polynomial p(∂x) explicitly related to the model parameters. In terms of such structure, the Lax-Phillips scattering of the system is studied. In particular, we determine the scattering operator, which turns out to be unitarily equivalent to the multiplication operator given by the rational function -p(iκ)*/p(iκ), the incoming and outgoing translation representations and the Lax-Phillips semigroup, which describes the evolution of the states which are neither incoming in the past nor outgoing in the future.

  6. Dynamics and Lax-Phillips scattering for generalized Lamb models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Massimo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Milano, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Noja, Diego [Dipartimento di Matematica e Applicazioni, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126, Milan (Italy); Posilicano, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita dell' Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2006-12-08

    This paper treats the dynamics and scattering of a model of coupled oscillating systems, a finite dimensional one and a wave field on the half line. The coupling is realized producing the family of self-adjoint extensions of the suitably restricted self-adjoint operator describing the uncoupled dynamics. The spectral theory of the family is studied and the associated quadratic forms constructed. The dynamics turns out to be Hamiltonian and the Hamiltonian is described, including the case in which the finite-dimensional systems comprise nonlinear oscillators; in this case, the dynamics is shown to exist as well. In the linear case, the system is equivalent, on a dense subspace, to a wave equation on the half line with higher order boundary conditions, described by a differential polynomial p({partial_derivative}{sub x}) explicitly related to the model parameters. In terms of such structure, the Lax-Phillips scattering of the system is studied. In particular, we determine the scattering operator, which turns out to be unitarily equivalent to the multiplication operator given by the rational function -p(i{kappa})*/p(i{kappa}), the incoming and outgoing translation representations and the Lax-Phillips semigroup, which describes the evolution of the states which are neither incoming in the past nor outgoing in the future.

  7. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-04-24

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a coherence-gated, micrometer-resolution imaging technique that focuses a broadband near-infrared laser beam to penetrate into optical scattering media, e.g. biological tissues. The OCT resolution is split into two parts, with the axial resolution defined by half the coherence length, and the depth-dependent lateral resolution determined by the beam geometry, which is well described by a Gaussian beam model. The depth dependence of lateral resolution directly results in the defocusing effect outside the confocal region and restricts current OCT probes to small numerical aperture (NA) at the expense of lateral resolution near the focus. Another limitation on OCT development is the presence of a mixture of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous papers have adopted the first Born approximation with the assumption of small perturbation of the incident field in inhomogeneous media. The Rytov method of the same order with smooth phase perturbation assumption benefits from a wider spatial range of validity. A deconvolution method for solving the inverse problem associated with the first Rytov approximation is developed, significantly reducing the defocusing effect through depth and therefore extending the feasible range of NA.

  8. Quantum inverse scattering and the lambda deformed principal chiral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appadu, Calan; Hollowood, Timothy J.; Price, Dafydd

    2017-07-01

    The lambda model is a one parameter deformation of the principal chiral model that arises when regularizing the non-compactness of a non-abelian T dual in string theory. It is a current-current deformation of a WZW model that is known to be integrable at the classical and quantum level. The standard techniques of the quantum inverse scattering method cannot be applied because the Poisson bracket is non ultra-local. Inspired by an approach of Faddeev and Reshetikhin, we show that in this class of models, there is a way to deform the symplectic structure of the theory leading to a much simpler theory that is ultra-local and can be quantized on the lattice whilst preserving integrability. This lattice theory takes the form of a generalized spin chain that can be solved by standard algebraic Bethe Ansatz techniques. We then argue that the IR limit of the lattice theory lies in the universality class of the lambda model implying that the spin chain provides a way to apply the quantum inverse scattering method to this non ultra-local theory. This points to a way of applying the same ideas to other lambda models and potentially the string world-sheet theory in the gauge-gravity correspondence.

  9. Single and double shock initiation modelling for high explosive materials in last three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T.; Yan, Liu

    2016-08-01

    The explosives materials are normally in an energetically metastable state. These can undergo rapid chemical decomposition only if sufficient energy has first been added to get the process started. Such energy can be provided by shocks. To predict the response of these materials under impacts of shocks of different strengths and durations and at various conditions, mathematical models are used. During the last three decades, a lot of research has been carried out and several shock initiation models have been presented. The models can be divided into continuum based and physics based models. In this study the single and double shock initiation models presented in last three decades have been reviewed and the ranges of their application has been discussed.

  10. Semi-transparent shock model for major solar energetic particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocharov, Leon

    2014-05-01

    Production of solar energetic particles in major events typically comprises two stages: (i) the initial stage associated with shocks and magnetic reconnection in solar corona and (ii) the main stage associated with the CME-bow shock in solar wind. The coronal emission of energetic particles from behind the interplanetary shock wave continues for about one hour , being not shielded by the CME shock in solar wind and having the prompt access to particle detectors at 1 AU. On occasion of two well-separated solar eruptions from the same active region, the newly accelerated solar particles may be emitted well behind the previous CME, and those solar particles may penetrate through the interplanetary shock of the previous CME to arrive at the Earth's orbit without significant delay, which is another evidence that high-energy particles from the solar corona can penetrate through travelling interplanetary shocks. Diffusive shock acceleration is fast only if the particle mean free path near the shock is small. The small mean free path (high turbulence level), however, implies that energetic particles from coronal sources could not penetrate through the interplanetary shock, and even the particles accelerated by the interplanetary shock itself could not escape to its far upstream region. If so, they could not be promptly observed at 1 AU. However, high-energy particles in major solar events are detected well before the shock arrival at 1 AU. The theoretical difficulty can be obviated in the framework of the proposed model of a "semitransparent" shock. As in situ plasma observations indicate, the turbulence energy levels in neighboring magnetic tubes of solar wind may differ from each other by more than one order of magnitude. Such an intermittence of coronal and solar wind plasmas can affect energetic particle acceleration in coronal and interplanetary shocks. The new modeling incorporates particle acceleration in the shock front and the particle transport both in parallel

  11. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  12. Characteristics of Hydraulic Shock Waves in an Inclined Chute Contraction by Using Three Dimensional Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chao; Jan, Chyan-Deng; Su, Yu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    The inclined rectangular chute construction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as the increase of bottom slope, the transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, the drainage construction, and the reduction of chute width due to bridges, flood diversion structures or irrigation systems. The converging vertical sidewalls of a chute contraction deflect the supercritical flow to form hydraulic shock waves. Hydraulic shock waves have narrow and locally extreme wavy surfaces, which commonly results in the requirement of higher height of sidewalls. Therefore, predicting the possible height and position of maximum hydraulic shock wave are necessary to design the required height of sidewalls to prevent flow overtopping. In this study, we used a three-dimensional computation fluid dynamics model (i.e., FLOW-3D) to simulate the characteristics of hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction. For this purpose, the parameters of simulated hydraulic shock wave, such as the shock angle, maximum shock wave height and maximum shock wave position in various conditions are compared with those calculated by the empirical relations obtained from literatures. We showed that the simulated results are extremely close to the experimental results. The numerical results validated the applicability of these empirical relations and extend their applicability to higher approach Froude numbers from 3.51 to 7.27. Furthermore, we also applied the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel under 200-year peak flow condition to FLOW-3D model to simulate the hydraulic shock waves and validate the effect of the installation of a diversion pier in the channel on promoting the stability of flow fluid. The results revealed that a diversion pier installed in the Yuan-Shan-Tsu flood diversion channel is helpful for improving the stability of flow field. In summary, this study demonstrates that FLOW-3D model can be used to simulate the

  13. The Quantum Inverse Scattering Method for Hubbard-like Models

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, M J

    1997-01-01

    This work is concerned with various aspects of the formulation of the quantum inverse scattering method for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. We first establish the essential tools to solve the eigenvalue problem for the transfer matrix of the classical ``covering'' Hubbard model within the algebraic Bethe Ansatz framework. The fundamental commutation rules exhibit a hidden 6-vertex symmetry which plays a crucial role in the whole algebraic construction. Next we apply this formalism to study the SU(2) highest weights properties of the eigenvectors and the solution of a related coupled spin model with twisted boundary conditions. The machinery developed in this paper is applicable to many other models, and as an example we present the algebraic solution of the Bariev XY coupled model.

  14. On the proper Mach number and ratio of specific heats for modeling the Venus bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Observational data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter are used to investigate the physical characteristics of the Venus bow shock, and to explore some general issues in the numerical simulation of collisionless shocks. It is found that since equations from gas-dynamic (GD) models of the Venus shock cannot in general replace MHD equations, it is not immediately obvious what the optimum way is to describe the desired MHD situation with a GD code. Test case analysis shows that for quasi-perpendicular shocks it is safest to use the magnetospheric Mach number as an input to the GD code. It is also shown that when comparing GD predicted temperatures with MHD predicted temperatures total energy should be compared since the magnetic energy density provides a significant fraction of the internal energy of the MHD fluid for typical solar wind parameters. Some conclusions are also offered on the properties of the terrestrial shock.

  15. Predicting effects of cold shock: modeling the decline of a thermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Trent, D.S.; Schneider, M.J.

    1977-10-01

    Predicting direct impact of cold shock on aquatic organisms after termination of power plant thermal discharges requires thermal tests that provide quantitative data on the resistance of acclimated species to lower temperatures. Selected examples from the literature on cold shock resistance of freshwater and marine fishes are illustrated to show predictive use. Abrupt cold shock data may be applied to field situations involving either abrupt or gradual temperature declines but yield conservative estimates under the latter conditions. Gradual cold shock data may be applied where heated plumes gradually dissipate because poikilotherms partially compensate for lowering temperature regimes. A simplified analytical model is presented for estimating thermal declines in terminated plumes originating from offshore, submerged discharges where shear current and boundary effects are minimal. When applied to site-specific conditions, the method provides time-temperature distributions for correlation with cold resistance data and, therefore, aids in assessing cold shock impact on aquatic biota.

  16. Modelling X-ray emitting stationary shocks in magnetized protostellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustamujic, S.; Orlando, S.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.

    2017-03-01

    The early stages of a star birth are characterized by a variety of mass ejection phenomena, including outflows and collimated jets that are strongly related to the accretion process developed in the context of the star-disc interaction. Jets move through the ambient medium producing complex structures observed at different wavelengths. In particular, X-ray observations show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary. They are interpreted as shock diamonds. We aim at investigating the physical properties of the shocked plasma and the role of magnetic fields on the collimation of the jet and the formation of a stationary shock. We performed 2.5D MHD simulations modelling the propagation of a jet ramming with a supersonic speed into an initially isothermal and homogeneous magnetized medium and compared the results with observations.

  17. The Empowerment of Plasma Modeling by Fundamental Electron Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling of low temperature plasmas addresses at least 3 goals - investigation of fundamental processes, analysis and optimization of current technologies, and prediction of performance of as yet unbuilt systems for new applications. The former modeling may be performed on somewhat idealized systems in simple gases, while the latter will likely address geometrically and electromagnetically intricate systems with complex gas mixtures, and now gases in contact with liquids. The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering data (FSD) required for these activities increases from the former to the latter, while the accuracy required of that data probably decreases. In each case, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSD. Modeling is, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSD in plasma modeling will be discussed from each of these three perspectives using results from multidimensional and global models. The fundamental studies will focus on modeling of inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Ar/Cl2 where the electron scattering from feed gases and their fragments ultimately determine gas temperatures. Examples of the optimization of current technologies will focus on modeling of remote plasma etching of Si and Si3N4 in Ar/NF3/N2/O2 mixtures. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids Work was supported by the US Dept. of Energy (DE-SC0001939), National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and the Semiconductor Research Corp.

  18. Exact Shock Solution of a Coupled System of Delay Differential Equations: A Car-Following Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutiya, Yohei; Kanai, Masahiro

    2007-08-01

    In this letter, we present exact shock solutions of a coupled system of delay differential equations, which was introduced as a traffic-flow model called car-following model. We use the Hirota method, originally developed in order to solve soliton equations. The relevant delay differential equations have been known to allow exact solutions expressed by elliptic functions with periodic boundary conditions. In the present work, however, shock solutions are obtained with open boundaries, representing the stationary propagation of a traffic jam.

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling and simulations of shock ignition thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafon M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Shock Ignition (SI scheme [1] offers to reduce the laser requirements by relaxing the implosion phase to sub-ignition velocities and later adding an intense laser spike. Depending on laser energy, target characteristics and implosion velocity, high gains are expected [2,3]. Relevant intensities for scaled targets imploded in the velocity range from 150 to 400 km/s are defined at ignition thresholds. A range of moderate implosion velocities is specified to match safe implosions. These conditions for target design are then inferred for relevant NIF and LMJ shock-ignited targets.

  20. NUMERICAL MODELING OF MULTICYLINDER ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC SYSTEM AND CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR SHOCK TEST MACHINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Deying; ZHANG Zhiyi; WANG Gongxian; HUA Hongxing

    2007-01-01

    A high fidelity dynamic model of a high-energy hydraulically-actuated shock test machine for heavy weight devices is presented to satisfy the newly-built shock resistance standard and simulate the actual underwater explosion environments in laboratory as well as increase the testing capability of shock test machine. In order to produce the required negative shock pulse in the given time duration, four hydraulic actuators are utilized. The model is then used to formulate an advanced feedforward controller for the system to produce the required negative waveform and to address the motion synchronization of the four cylinders. The model provides a safe and easily controllable way to perform a "virtual testing" before starting potentially destructive tests on specimen and to predict performance of the system. Simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the controller.

  1. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions (heat detonations) in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boslough, M.B. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (US))

    1990-02-01

    Recent advances in studies of shock-induced chemistry in reactive solids have led to the recognition of a new class of energetic materials which are unique in their response to shock waves. Experimental work has shown that chemical energy can be released on a time scale shorter than shock-transit times in laboratory samples. However, for many compositions, the reaction products remain in the condensed state upon release from high pressure, and no sudden expansion takes place. Nevertheless, if such a reaction is sufficiently rapid, it can be modeled as a type of detonation, termed heat detonation'' in the present paper. It is shown that unlike an explosive detonation, an unsupported heat detonation will decay to zero unless certain conditions are met. An example of such a reaction is Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} +2Al+shock{r arrow}Al{sub 2} O{sub 3} +2Fe (the standard thermite reaction). A shock-wave equation of state is determined from a mixture theory for reacted and unreacted porous thermite. The calculated shock temperatures are compared to experimentally measured shock temperatures, demonstrating that a shock-induced reaction takes place. Interpretation of the measured temperature history in the context of the thermochemical model implies that the principal rate-controlling kinetic mechanism is dynamic mixing at the shock front. Despite the similarity in thermochemical modeling of heat detonations to explosive detonations, the two processes are qualitatively very different in reaction mechanism as well as in the form the energy takes upon release, with explosives producing mostly work and heat detonations producing mostly heat.

  2. Observation and Modeling of a Termination Shock in a Solar Eruption as a Possible Particle Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Dale E.; Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S.; Shen, Chengcai; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Solar eruptions and their associated solar flares are the most energetic particle accelerators in our solar system. Yet the acceleration mechanism remains uncertain. A possible candidate often invoked in the standard picture of solar eruptions is a termination shock, produced by fast reconnection outflows impinging upon dense, closed loops in a helmet-type geometry. However, the importance of termination shocks in solar particle acceleration remains controversial, mainly because there has been no direct detection of such shocks. Here we report direct imaging of the location and evolution of a termination shock during the rise phase of a solar eruption. The shock appears at radio wavelengths as a narrow surface sandwiched between multitudes of downward-moving plasma blobs and the underlying, newly-reconnected flaring loops, and evolves coherently with a loop-top hard X-ray source in the shock downstream region. The shock produces many short-lived, point-like radio sources, each interpreted as emission from a turbulence cell interacting with fast (nonthermal) electrons. These point-like radio sources clearly outline the termination shock front and their positions change in reaction to the arrival of the fast plasma blobs, which are well-reproduced by our numerical simulations based on a resistive magnetohydrodynamics reconnection model in a standard two-ribbon flare geometry. We further show that a temporary disruption of the shock coincides with a reduction of radio and hard X-ray emission associated with the energetic electron population. Our observations strongly favor a scenario in which the termination shock is responsible for accelerating electrons to high energies.

  3. Using numerical models of bow shocks to investigate the circumstellar medium of massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, A. J.; Decin, L.; Cox, N. L. J.; Meliani, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Many massive stars travel through the interstellar medium at supersonic speeds. As a result they form bow shocks at the interface between the stellar wind. We use numerical hydrodynamics to reproduce such bow shocks numerically, creating models that can be compared to observations. In this paper we discuss the influence of two physical phenomena, interstellar magnetic fields and the presence of interstellar dust grains on the observable shape of the bow shocks of massive stars. We find that the interstellar magnetic field, though too weak to restrict the general shape of the bow shock, reduces the size of the instabilities that would otherwise be observed in the bow shock of a red supergiant. The interstellar dust grains, due to their inertia can penetrate deep into the bow shock structure of a main sequence O-supergiant, crossing over from the ISM into the stellar wind. Therefore, the dust distribution may not always reflect the morphology of the gas. This is an important consideration for infrared observations, which are dominated by dust emission. Our models clearly show, that the bow shocks of massive stars are useful diagnostic tools that can used to investigate the properties of both the stellar wind as well as the interstellar medium.

  4. The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2 During Myocardial Dysfunction in a Canine Model of Endotoxin Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Yang, Rongli

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during myocardial dysfunction in a canine model of endotoxin shock, 26 mongrel canines were randomly divided into the following four groups: A (control group; n = 6), B2 (shock after 2 h; n = 7), B4 (shock after 4 h; n = 7), and B6 (shock after 6 h; n = 6). Escherichia coli endotoxin was injected into the canines via the central vein, and hemodynamics were monitored. Energy metabolism, UCP2 mRNA and protein expression, and UCP2 localization were analyzed, and the correlation between energy metabolism changes, and UCP2 expression was determined. After the canine endotoxin shock model was successfully established, the expression of UCP2 mRNA and protein was found to increase, with later time points showing significant increases (P shock (P shock, and UCP2 may play an important role in this process. The negative correlation between UCP2 expression and energy metabolism requires further study, as the results might contribute to the treatment of sepsis with heart failure.

  5. Mathematical modeling of heat shock protein synthesis in response to temperature change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Zuzanna; Zylicz, Maciej

    2009-08-07

    One of the most important questions in cell biology is how cells cope with rapid changes in their environment. The range of common molecular responses includes a dramatic change in the pattern of gene expression and the elevated synthesis of so-called heat shock (or stress) proteins (HSPs). Induction of HSPs increases cell survival under stress conditions [Morimoto, R.I., 1993. Cells in stress: transcriptional activation of heat shock genes. Science 259, 1409-1410]. In this paper we propose a mathematical model of heat shock protein synthesis induced by an external temperature stimulus. Our model consists of a system of nine nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing the temporal evolution of the key variables involved in the regulation of HSP synthesis. Computational simulations of our model are carried out for different external temperature stimuli. We compare our model predictions with experimental data for three different cases-one corresponding to heat shock, the second corresponding to slow heating conditions and the third corresponding to a short heat shock (lasting about 40 min). We also present our model predictions for heat shocks carried out up to different final temperatures and finally we present a new hypothesis concerning the molecular response to stress that explains some phenomena observed in experiments.

  6. An empirical mixing model for pressurized thermal shock applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chexal, V.K.; Chao, J.; Griesbach, T.J.; Nickell, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    Empirical correlations are developed for the local temperature and velocity distributions in the pressurized water reactor downcomer for pressurized thermal shock scenarios. The correlation is based on Creare test data and has been validated with Science Applications, Inc., experiments and COMMIX code calculations. It provides good agreement under pump flow and natural circulation conditions and gives a conservative estimate under stagnation conditions.

  7. An In Silico Model of Endotoxic Shock Mediators (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 6 Vasoactive lipid mediators in endotoxic shock Eicosanoids can be detected in circulation...unlimited 23 Arachidonic acid (AA) cascade Species differences Interspecies differences in eicosanoid involvement highlight the need to consider the AA...calcium mobilization phospholipase C phospholipase D phospholipase A2 eicosanoids inositol metabolism protein kinase C COOH NH2 PAF

  8. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares within the Internal Shock Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maxham, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical E_p - E_iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal pr...

  9. Plasma Modeling Enabled Technology Development Empowered by Fundamental Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Technology development increasingly relies on modeling to speed the innovation cycle. This is particularly true for systems using low temperature plasmas (LTPs) and their role in enabling energy efficient processes with minimal environmental impact. In the innovation cycle, LTP modeling supports investigation of fundamental processes that seed the cycle, optimization of newly developed technologies, and prediction of performance of unbuilt systems for new applications. Although proof-of-principle modeling may be performed for idealized systems in simple gases, technology development must address physically complex systems that use complex gas mixtures that now may be multi-phase (e.g., in contact with liquids). The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering, and radiation transport data (FSRD) required for this modeling increases as the innovation cycle progresses, while the accuracy required of that data depends on the intended outcome. In all cases, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSRD. Modeling and technology development are, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSRD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSRD in the innovation cycle enabled by plasma modeling will be discussed using results from multidimensional and global models. Examples of fundamental studies and technology optimization will focus on microelectronics fabrication and on optically pumped lasers. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  10. Free-Surface Optical Scattering as an Indicator of the Shock-Induced Solid-Liquid Phase Transition in Tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, G. D.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.; Furlanetto, M. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Jensen, B. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Wilke, M. D.

    2008-07-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. A familiar manifestation of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in VISAR measurements, which occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity) that show relatively small (1%–10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  11. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares Within the Internal Shock Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang, Bing

    2009-12-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge, and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical Ep -E iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal profile, we calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width, and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width, and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. The same shell model predicts an external shock X-ray afterglow component, which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave. However, the predicted X-ray afterglow is too bright as compared with the observed flux level, unless epsilon e is

  12. How Bad or Good Are the External Forward Shock Afterglow Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Gao; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Li, Liang; Deng, Can-Min; Qin, Song-Mei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Kann, D. Alexander; Ryde, Felix; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-07-01

    The external forward shock models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broadband afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic; that is, the break times should be the same in different frequencies. Multiwavelength observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the external forward shock origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, using a large sample of GRBs with both X-ray and optical afterglow data, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad or good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs up to 2014 March with well-monitored X-ray and optical light curves. Based on how well the data abide by the external forward shock models, we categorize them into five grades and three samples. The first two grades (Grade I and II) include 45 of 85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal and spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (the “closure relations”) of the forward shock models. These GRBs are included in the Gold sample. The next two grades (Grade III and IV) include 37 of 85 GRBs. They are also consistent with having an achromatic break, even though one or more afterglow segments do not comply with the closure relations. These GRBs are included in the Silver sample. Finally, Grade V (3/85) shows direct evidence of chromatic behaviors, suggesting that the external shock models are inconsistent with the data. These are included in the Bad sample. We further perform statistical analyses of various observational properties (temporal index α, spectral index β, break time tb) and model parameters (energy injection index q, electron spectral index p, jet opening angle {θ }j, radiative efficiency ηγ, and so on) of the GRBs in the Gold sample

  13. A Model for High Energy Scattering in Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, T; Banks, Tom; Fischler, Willy

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for high energy two body scattering in a quantum theory of gravity. The model is applicable for center of mass energies higher than the relevant Planck scale. At impact parameters smaller than the Schwarzchild radius appropriate to the center of mass energy and total charge of the initial state, the cross section is dominated by an inelastic process in which a single large black hole is formed. The black hole then decays by Hawking radiation. The elastic cross section is highly suppressed at these impact parameters because of the small phase space for thermal decay into a high energy two body state. For very large impact parameter the amplitude is dominated by eikonalized single graviton exchange. At intermediate impact parameters the scattering is more complicated, but since the Schwarzchild radius grows with energy, we speculate that a more sophisticated eikonal calculation which uses the nonlinear classical solutions of the field equations may provide a good approximation at all larger i...

  14. Low-energy $^{6}$He scattering in a microscopic model

    CERN Document Server

    Descouvemont, P

    2016-01-01

    A microscopic version of the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) method is used to investigate $^{6}$He scattering on $^{27}$Al, $^{58}$Ni, $^{120}$Sn, and $^{208}$Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The $^{6}$He nucleus is described by an antisymmetric 6-nucleon wave function, defined in the Resonating Group Method. The $^{6}$He continuum is simulated by square-integrable positive-energy states. The model is based only on well known nucleon-target potentials, and is therefore does not depend on any adjustable parameter. I show that experimental elastic cross sections are fairly well reproduced. The calculation suggests that breakup effects increase for high target masses. For a light system such as $^{6}$He+$^{27}$Al, breakup effects are small, and a single-channel approximation provides fair results. This property is explained by a very simple model, based on the sharp-cut-off approximation for the scattering matrix. I also investigate the $^{6}$He-target optical potentials, which confirm th...

  15. Quasi-one-dimensional scattering in a discrete model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente, Manuel; Moelmer, Klaus [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2011-11-15

    We study quasi-one-dimensional scattering of one and two particles with short-range interactions on a discrete lattice model in two dimensions. One of the directions is tightly confined by an arbitrary trapping potential. We obtain the collisional properties of these systems both at finite and zero Bloch quasimomenta, considering as well finite sizes and transversal traps that support a continuum of states. This is made straightforward by using the exact ansatz for the quasi-one-dimensional states from the beginning. In the more interesting case of genuine two-particle scattering, we find that more than one confinement-induced resonances appear due to the nonseparability of the center-of-mass and relative coordinates on the lattice. This is done by solving its corresponding Lippmann-Schwinger-like equation. We characterize the effective one-dimensional interaction and compare it with a model that includes only the effect of the dominant, broadest resonance, which amounts to a single-pole approximation for the interaction coupling constant.

  16. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Marta; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients.

  17. Computational Models of Material Interfaces for the Study of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fagnan, Kirsten; Matula, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a noninvasive treatment for a variety of musculoskeletal ailments. A shock wave is generated in water and then focused using an acoustic lens or reflector so the energy of the wave is concentrated in a small treatment region where mechanical stimulation enhances healing. In this work we have computationally investigated shock wave propagation in ESWT by solving a Lagrangian form of the isentropic Euler equations in the fluid and linear elasticity in the bone using high-resolution finite volume methods. We solve a full three-dimensional system of equations and use adaptive mesh refinement to concentrate grid cells near the propagating shock. We can model complex bone geometries, the reflection and mode conversion at interfaces, and the the propagation of the resulting shear stresses generated within the bone. We discuss the validity of our simplified model and present results validating this approach.

  18. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carrara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients.

  19. Mortality Prediction Model of Septic Shock Patients Based on Routinely Recorded Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Marta; Baselli, Giuseppe; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    We studied the problem of mortality prediction in two datasets, the first composed of 23 septic shock patients and the second composed of 73 septic subjects selected from the public database MIMIC-II. For each patient we derived hemodynamic variables, laboratory results, and clinical information of the first 48 hours after shock onset and we performed univariate and multivariate analyses to predict mortality in the following 7 days. The results show interesting features that individually identify significant differences between survivors and nonsurvivors and features which gain importance only when considered together with the others in a multivariate regression model. This preliminary study on two small septic shock populations represents a novel contribution towards new personalized models for an integration of multiparameter patient information to improve critical care management of shock patients. PMID:26557154

  20. Non-line-of-sight polarized single-scatter propagation model for noncoplanar geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Hongwei; Jia, Honghui; Luo, Jianfeng; Chang, Shengli; Yang, Juncai

    2012-01-01

    The classical model of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) single-scatter propagation for coplanar geometries was recently extended to include noncoplanar geometries; the calculation processes in the extended model are partly based on the Cartesian coordinate system and are somewhat complicated. A new NLOS single-scatter propagation model for noncoplanar geometries is presented based only on the prolate spheroidal coordinate system, which can be considered as the simplified version of the extended model mentioned above. Similar to the polarization-extension of the Monte-Carlo-based multiple-scatter model, the new single-scatter model for noncoplanar geometries is also extended to take polarization into account; the polarized single-scatter model is validated by the Monte-Carlo-based polarized model, results show perfect match. The theoretical feasibility of a 2-polarization UV communication link is validated based on the polarized single-scatter model.

  1. Modeling shock waves using exponential interpolation functions with the Least-Squares Finite Element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bradford Scott, Jr.

    The hypothesis of this research is that exponential interpolation functions will approximate fluid properties at shock waves with less error than polynomial interpolation functions. Exponential interpolation functions are derived for the purpose of modeling sharp gradients. General equations for conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for an inviscid flow of a perfect gas are converted to finite element equations using the least-squares method. Boundary conditions and a mesh adaptation scheme are also presented. An oblique shock reflection problem is used as a benchmark to determine whether or not exponential interpolation provides any advantages over Lagrange polynomial interpolation. Using exponential interpolation in elements downstream of a shock and having edges coincident with the shock showed a slight reduction in the solution error. However there was very little qualitative difference between solutions using polynomial and exponential interpolation. Regardless of the type of interpolation used, the shocks were smeared and oscillations were present both upstream and downstream of the shock waves. When a mesh adaptation scheme was implemented, exponential elements adjacent to the shock waves became much smaller and the numerical solution diverged. Changing the exponential elements to polynomial elements yielded a convergent solution. There appears to be no significant advantage to using exponential interpolation in comparison to Lagrange polynomial interpolation.

  2. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  3. Shock-associated MHD waves - A model for interstellar density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the density fluctuations responsible for radio scintillations could be due to ion-beam-generated MHD waves near interstellar shock waves is discussed. This suggestion is inspired by spacecraft observations which reveal these phenomena near shocks in the solar system. The model quite naturally accounts for the scale on which these fluctuations occur; it is dictated by the wavelength of the unstable waves.

  4. Model atmospheres with periodic shocks. [pulsations and mass loss in variable stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. H.

    1989-01-01

    The pulsation of a long-period variable star generates shock waves which dramatically affect the structure of the star's atmosphere and produce conditions that lead to rapid mass loss. Numerical modeling of atmospheres with periodic shocks is being pursued to study the processes involved and the evolutionary consequences for the stars. It is characteristic of these complex dynamical systems that most effects result from the interaction of various time-dependent processes.

  5. A new compressibility modification k-ε turbulence model with shock unsteadiness effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN XingSi; YE TaoHong; ZHU MinMing; CHEN YiLiang

    2008-01-01

    A new compressibility modification k-ε model, including shock unsteadiness effect and the previous compressibility modification of pressure dilatation and dilatational dissipation rate, was developed with a simple formulation for numerical simulation in supersonic complex turbulent flows. The shock unsteadiness effect was modeled by inhibiting turbulent kinetic energy production in the governing equations of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Sarkar's correction models were employed accounting for the dilatational compressibility effects in the new model.Two types of flows, the free supersonic mixing layers and complex supersonic flow with transverse injection were simulated with different flow conditions. Comparisons with experimental data of the free supersonic mixing layers showed that the new compressibility modification k-ε model significantly inhibited the excessive growth of turbulent kinetic energy and improved predictions. On the supersonic mixing layer flows, prediction results with the new model were in close agreement with experimental data, accurately predicting the decreasing trend of the mixing layer spreading rate with the increase of the convective Mach number. Due to the complicated flow field with flow separation, shock unsteadiness modification inhibited excessive growth of the turbulent kinetic energy in shock regions and wider shock regions are predicted, thereby significantly improving results of the flow with a strong separation forecast. The flow separation was stronger, which was the primary modification effect of the new model. Predictions accord with experimental results even in strong separation flows.

  6. Epicardial shock-wave therapy improves ventricular function in a porcine model of ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Zimpfer, Daniel; Albrecht-Schgoer, Karin; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Paulus, Patrick; Dumfarth, Julia; Thomas, Anita; Lobenwein, Daniela; Tepeköylü, Can; Rosenhek, Raphael; Schaden, Wolfgang; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Grimm, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Previously we have shown that epicardial shock-wave therapy improves left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in a rat model of myocardial infarction. In the present experiments we aimed to address the safety and efficacy of epicardial shock-wave therapy in a preclinical large animal model and to further evaluate mechanisms of action of this novel therapy. Four weeks after left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation in pigs, the animals underwent re-thoracotomy with (shock-wave group, n = 6) or without (control group, n = 5) epicardial shock waves (300 impulses at 0.38 mJ/mm(2) ) applied to the infarcted anterior wall. Efficacy endpoints were improvement of LVEF and induction of angiogenesis 6 weeks after shock-wave therapy. Safety endpoints were haemodynamic stability during treatment and myocardial damage. Four weeks after LAD ligation, LVEF decreased in both the shock-wave (43 ± 3%, p wave animals 6 weeks after treatment (62 ± 9%, p = 0.006); no improvement was observed in controls (41 ± 4%, p = 0.36), yielding a significant difference. Quantitative histology revealed significant angiogenesis 6 weeks after treatment (controls 2 ± 0.4 arterioles/high-power field vs treatment group 9 ± 3; p = 0.004). No acute or chronic adverse effects were observed. As a potential mechanism of action in vitro experiments showed stimulation of VEGF receptors after shock-wave treatment in human coronary artery endothelial cells. Epicardial shock-wave treatment in a large animal model of ischaemic heart failure exerted a positive effect on LVEF improvement and did not show any adverse effects. Angiogenesis was induced by stimulation of VEGF receptors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of scattered electromagnetic waves for stroke analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, N; Rajkumar, E R

    2013-01-01

    Stroke has become one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide and about 800 in every 100,000 people suffer from stroke each year. The occurrence of stroke is ranked third among the causes of acute death and first among the causes for neurological dysfunction. Currently, Neurological examinations followed by medical imaging with CT, MRI or Angiography are used to provide better identification of the location and the type of the stroke, however they are neither fast, cost-effective nor portable. Microwave technology has emerged to complement these modalities to diagnose stroke as it is sensitive to the differences between the distinct dielectric properties of the brain tissues and blood. This paper investigates the possibility of diagnosing the type of stroke using Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The object of interest is a simulated head phantom with stroke, created with its specifying material characteristics like electrical conductivity and relative permittivity. The phantom is then placed in an electromagnetic field generated by a dipole antenna radiating at 1 GHz. The FEM forward model solver computes the scattered electromagnetic field by finding the solution for the Maxwell's wave equation in the head volume. Subsequently the inverse scattering problem is solved using the Contrast Source Inversion (CSI) method to reconstruct the dielectric profile of the head phantom.

  8. Fitting Data to Model: Structural Equation Modeling Diagnosis Using Two Scatter Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces two simple scatter plots for model diagnosis in structural equation modeling. One plot contrasts a residual-based M-distance of the structural model with the M-distance for the factor score. It contains information on outliers, good leverage observations, bad leverage observations, and normal cases. The other plot contrasts…

  9. Exponential Disks from Stellar Scattering: III. Stochastic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    Stellar scattering off irregularities in a galaxy disk has been shown to make an exponential radial profile, but no fundamental reason for this has been suggested. Here we show that exponentials are mathematically expected from random scattering in a disk when there is a slight inward bias in the scattering probability. Such a bias was present in our previous scattering experiments that formed exponential profiles. Double exponentials can arise when the bias varies with radius. This is a fundamental property of scattering and may explain why piece-wise exponential profiles are ubiquitous in galaxies, even after minor mergers and other disruptive events.

  10. Well-posed Euler model of shock-induced two-phase flow in bubbly liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukhvatullina, R. R.; Frolov, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    A well-posed mathematical model of non-isothermal two-phase two-velocity flow of bubbly liquid is proposed. The model is based on the two-phase Euler equations with the introduction of an additional pressure at the gas bubble surface, which ensures the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem for a system of governing equations with homogeneous initial conditions, and the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for radial pulsations of gas bubbles. The applicability conditions of the model are formulated. The model is validated by comparing one-dimensional calculations of shock wave propagation in liquids with gas bubbles with a gas volume fraction of 0.005-0.3 with experimental data. The model is shown to provide satisfactory results for the shock propagation velocity, pressure profiles, and the shock-induced motion of the bubbly liquid column.

  11. Modeling properties of chromospheric evaporation driven by thermal conduction fronts from reconnection shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Brannon, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the corona results in contracting flare loops, releasing energy into plasma heating and shocks. The hydrodynamic shocks so produced drive thermal conduction fronts (TCFs) which transport energy into the chromosphere and drive upflows (evaporation) and downflows (condensation) in the cooler, denser footpoint plasma. Observations have revealed that certain properties of the transition point between evaporation and condensation (the "flow reversal point" or FRP), such as temperature and velocity-temperature derivative at the FRP, vary between different flares. These properties may provide a diagnostic tool to determine parameters of the coronal energy release mechanism and the loop atmosphere. In this study, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamical flare loop model with a simplified three-region atmosphere (chromosphere/transition region/corona), with TCFs initiated by shocks introduced in the corona. We investigate the effect of two different flare loop parameters (post-shock temperature and tra...

  12. Analytical model of Weibel-mediated electron-ion collisionless shock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyer, C.; Gremillet, L.; Bonnaud, G.; Riconda, C.

    2015-11-01

    We address the formation of ion-electron collisionless shocks in the non-relativistic regime. The shocks formed by the non-linear evolution of the Weibel-type instabilities, arise during plasma collisions in numerous high-energy astrophysical scenario such as pulsar wind nebulae or supernova remnants. For the first time, a predictive fully analytical model of the ion Weibel saturation based on the coalescence of filaments is presented and allows to describe the evolution of the plasma and its characteristics until shock-formation. It is compared successfully to Weibel-mediated shock simulations until quasi-isotropisation of the ions, and close to shock formation. Our model compares well with two different recent experiments and allows us to pinpoint the role of the electron screening on the ion-Weibel dynamics. Our theoretical results, supported by both experiments and simulations, proves for the first time the effect of an artificially low ion to electron mass ratio on the formation of collisionless shocks commonly used in many numerical works.

  13. Evaluation of a Model-Based Hemodynamic Monitoring Method in a Porcine Study of Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Revie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The accuracy and clinical applicability of an improved model-based system for tracking hemodynamic changes is assessed in an animal study on septic shock. Methods. This study used cardiovascular measurements recorded during a porcine trial studying the efficacy of large-pore hemofiltration for treating septic shock. Four Pietrain pigs were instrumented and induced with septic shock. A subset of the measured data, representing clinically available measurements, was used to identify subject-specific cardiovascular models. These models were then validated against the remaining measurements. Results. The system accurately matched independent measures of left and right ventricle end diastolic volumes and maximum left and right ventricular pressures to percentage errors less than 20% (except for the 95th percentile error in maximum right ventricular pressure and all R2>0.76. An average decrease of 42% in systemic resistance, a main cardiovascular consequence of septic shock, was observed 120 minutes after the infusion of the endotoxin, consistent with experimentally measured trends. Moreover, modelled temporal trends in right ventricular end systolic elastance and afterload tracked changes in corresponding experimentally derived metrics. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that this model-based method can monitor disease-dependent changes in preload, afterload, and contractility in porcine study of septic shock.

  14. Studies on blast traumatic brain injury using in-vitro model with shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Peethambaran; Spadaro, John; John, Jennifer; Gharavi, Robert B; Bentley, Timothy B; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2011-06-11

    One of the major limitations in studying the mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) or screening therapeutics for protection is the lack of suitable laboratory model systems that can closely mimic the complex blast exposure. Although animal models of bTBI that use shock tubes to mimic blast exposure are available, no high throughput shock tube-based in-vitro models have been reported. Here, we report an in-vitro bTBI model using a compressed air-driven shock tube and mouse neuroblastoma/rat glioblastoma hybrid cells (NG108-15) or SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells in tissue culture plates. Our data showed significant neurobiological effects with decreased adenosine triphosphate levels, increased cellular injury, lactate dehydrogenase release, and reactive oxygen species formation after blast exposure.

  15. Prandtl number effects in MRT lattice Boltzmann models for shocked and unshocked compressible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper constructs a new multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model which is not only for the shocked compressible fluids,but also for the unshocked compressible fluids.To make the model work for unshocked compressible fluids,a key step is to modify the collision operators of energy flux so that the viscous coefficient in momentum equation is consistent with that in energy equation even in the unshocked system.The unnecessity of the modification for systems under strong shock is analyzed.The model ...

  16. Modeling and simulation of HTS cables for scattering parameter analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Su Sik; Lee, Geon Seok; Kwon, Gu-Young; Lee, Yeong Ho; Chang, Seung Jin; Lee, Chun-Kwon; Sohn, Songho; Park, Kijun; Shin, Yong-June

    2016-11-01

    Most of modeling and simulation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are inadequate for high frequency analysis since focus of the simulation's frequency is fundamental frequency of the power grid, which does not reflect transient characteristic. However, high frequency analysis is essential process to research the HTS cables transient for protection and diagnosis of the HTS cables. Thus, this paper proposes a new approach for modeling and simulation of HTS cables to derive the scattering parameter (S-parameter), an effective high frequency analysis, for transient wave propagation characteristics in high frequency range. The parameters sweeping method is used to validate the simulation results to the measured data given by a network analyzer (NA). This paper also presents the effects of the cable-to-NA connector in order to minimize the error between the simulated and the measured data under ambient and superconductive conditions. Based on the proposed modeling and simulation technique, S-parameters of long-distance HTS cables can be accurately derived in wide range of frequency. The results of proposed modeling and simulation can yield the characteristics of the HTS cables and will contribute to analyze the HTS cables.

  17. Integrated modeling/analyses of thermal-shock effects in SNS targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Haines, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In a spallation neutron source (SNS), extremely rapid energy pulses are introduced in target materials such as mercury, lead, tungsten, uranium, etc. Shock phenomena in such systems may possibly lead to structural material damage beyond the design basis. As expected, the progression of shock waves and interaction with surrounding materials for liquid targets can be quite different from that in solid targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe ORNL`s modeling framework for `integrated` assessment of thermal-shock issues in liquid and solid target designs. This modeling framework is being developed based upon expertise developed from past reactor safety studies, especially those related to the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project. Unlike previous separate-effects modeling approaches employed (for evaluating target behavior when subjected to thermal shocks), the present approach treats the overall problem in a coupled manner using state-of-the-art equations of state for materials of interest (viz., mercury, tungsten and uranium). That is, the modeling framework simultaneously accounts for localized (and distributed) compression pressure pulse generation due to transient heat deposition, the transport of this shock wave outwards, interaction with surrounding boundaries, feedback to mercury from structures, multi-dimensional reflection patterns & stress induced (possible) breakup or fracture.

  18. The Use of Scattering Matrix to Model Multi-Modal Array Inspection with the Tfm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-03-01

    The scattering coefficient matrix describes the far field amplitude of scattered signals from a scatterer as a function of incident and scattering angles. In this paper an FE model is used to predict scattering matrices. By combining the predicted scattering coefficient matrix with a ray tracing model to predict the full matrix of array data, an efficient forward model of the complete array inspection process is presented. Longitudinal wave, shear waves and wave mode conversions are considered in the model. The TFM images for various wave mode combination cases from a weld sample are predicted and measured. Results show that by selecting the optimum array mode combination a good image for a given defect in the weld sample can be produced using an array. It is also shown how the model can be used to optimize the array inspection configuration.

  19. An algebraic model of Coulomb scattering with spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levay, P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Technical University, Budapest (Hungary); Amos, K. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia)

    2001-05-11

    A new matrix-valued realization for the so(3,1) algebra leads to a natural generalization of the Coulomb scattering problem of a particle with spin. The underlying su(2) gauge structure of this realization recasts the scattering problem into a familiar form, namely, the Coulomb scattering problem of a collection of dyons (particles having both electric and magnetic charges). Using this equivalent form and the results of Zwanziger for such systems, the scattering matrix can be calculated in the helicity formalism. (author)

  20. Equation-of-state model for shock compression of hot dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, J C

    2007-01-01

    A quantum equation-of-state model is presented and applied to the calculation of high-pressure shock Hugoniot curves beyond the asymptotic fourfold density, close to the maximum compression where quantum effects play a role. An analytical estimate for the maximum attainable compression is proposed. It gives a good agreement with the equation-of-state model.

  1. Modelling grain-scattered ultrasound in austenitic stainless-steel welds: A hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowers, O.; Duxbury, D. J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds can be challenging due to their coarse grain structure, charaterised by preferentially oriented, elongated grains. The anisotropy of the weld is manifested as both a `steering' of the beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the influence of weld properties, such as mean grain size and orientation distribution, on the magnitude of scattered ultrasound is not well understood. A hybrid model has been developed to allow the study of grain-scatter effects in austenitic welds. An efficient 2D Finite Element (FE) method is used to calculate the complete scattering response from a single elliptical austenitic grain of arbitrary length and width as a function of the specific inspection frequency. A grain allocation model of the weld is presented to approximate the characteristic structures observed in austenitic welds and the complete scattering behaviour of each grain calculated. This model is incorporated into a semi-analytical framework for a single-element inspection of a typical weld in immersion. Experimental validation evidence is demonstrated indicating excellent qualitative agreement of SNR as a function of frequency and a minimum SNR difference of 2 dB at a centre frequency of 2.25 MHz. Additionally, an example Monte-Carlo study is presented detailing the variation of SNR as a function of the anisotropy distribution of the weld, and the application of confidence analysis to inform inspection development.

  2. Modeling the shock initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mace, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mas, Eric M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leininger, Lara [HINMAN CONSULTING; Springer, H Keo [ONE BUSH STREET

    2008-01-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT).

  3. Light scattering by neutrophils: Model, simulation, and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlova, D.Y.; Yurkin, M.A.; Hoekstra, A.G.; Maltsev, V.P.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the elastic light-scattering properties of human blood neutrophils, both experimentally and theoretically. The experimental study was performed with a scanning flow cytometer measuring the light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual cells over an angular range of 5-60 deg. We determine

  4. Nonaligned shocks for discrete velocity models of the Boltzmann equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Greenberg

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available At the conclusion of I. Bonzani's presentation on the existence of structured shock solutions to the six-velocity, planar, discrete Boltzmann equation (with binary and triple collisions, Greenberg asked whether such solutions were possible in directions e(α=(cosα ,sinα when α was not one of the particle flow directions. This question generated a spirited discussion but the question was still open at the conclusion of the conference. In this note the author will provide a partial resolution to the question raised above. Using formal perturbation arguments he will produce approximate solutions to the equation considered by Bonzani which represent traveling waves propagating in any direction e(α=(cosα ,sinα.

  5. Theoretical Models of Light Scattering Applied in Sizing Particles in Coal Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁哲; 张荣曾; 徐志强

    2004-01-01

    Advantges and disadvantage of Mie scattering model and Fraunhofer diffraction model are discussed. The result shows that 1) the Fraunhofer diffraction model is simple in design and fast in operation, which is quite suitable for on-line control and 2) the intensity and energy distribution of diffracted light of both the Mie scattering model and the Fraunhofer theoretical model are compared and researched. Feasibility of using the Fraunhofer diffraction model to replace the Mie scattering model in measuring particles in coal water slurry is demonstrated.

  6. Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenchun; Wang, Pengfei; Zhang, An; Zuo, Guoqing; Zheng, Yuanyi; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI) for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device) image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and the heart rate (HR) were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p 0.05). Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

  7. Evaluation of the microcirculation in a rabbit hemorrhagic shock model using laser Doppler imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchun Luo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of Laser Doppler imaging (LDI for noninvasive and dynamic assessment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit model. A rabbit model of hemorrhagic shock was generated and LDI of the microcirculation in the rabbit ears was performed before and at 0, 30, 60, and 90 min after hemorrhage. The CCD (Charge Coupled Device image of the ears, the mean arterial pressure (MAP and the heart rate (HR were monitored. The mean LDI flux was calculated. The HR of rabbits was significantly (p 0.05. Both the flux numbers and the red-to-blue color changes on LDI imaging showed the reduction of the microcirculation. LDI imaging is a noninvasive and non-contact approach to evaluate the microcirculation and may offer benefits in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhage shock. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness in clinical practice.

  8. A Data-Driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-Scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kozarev, Kamen A

    2016-01-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona (Kozarev et al. 2015), using remote observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory's Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front's surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model's performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate ...

  9. Continuum modelling of shock waves through granular gases and the role of statistical fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2016-11-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. Two-dimensional event-driven Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were previously completed to investigate the stability of piston driven shock waves through dilute granular gases. By considering viscoelastic collisions, allowing for finite dissipation within the shock wave, instabilities were found in the form of distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. This work is now extended to the continuum level. Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for granular gases are modelled with a modified cooling rate to include an impact threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. The shock structure predicted by the continuum formulation is found in good agreement with the structure obtained by MD. Introducing strong perturbations to the incoming density field, in accordance with the spacial fluctuations in the upstream state seen in MD, yields similar instabilities as those previously observed. While the inviscid model predicts a highly turbulent structure from these perturbations, the inclusion of viscosity and heat conductivity yields comparable wavelengths of pattern formations to those seen in MD.

  10. Micro-process model of hydraulic shock absorber with abnormal structural noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to discover the causes of the abnormal noise of shock absorbers,it is necessary to identify the operating characteristics of the shock absorbers.A micro-process model for operation of the hydraulic shock absorber was presented.A novel concept,which describes the process of hydraulic shock absorber by dividing it into smaller steps,was proposed.The dynamic model and the differential equations were established.The results of numerical simulation agree well with data obtained from the vibrostand test,indicating that the collision between the piston and the oil,the alternation of static friction and sliding friction acted between the piston and the cylinder,and the adherence between valve plate and piston result in impact on the piston head near the top dead center and the bottom dead center.Ultimately,the impact excites the high-frequency vibration of the piston structure,which can generate the abnormal noise in the hydraulic shock absorber after its transfer.And the maximum vibration acceleration on the piston head and the abnormal noise increase with the increase of the gap between the oil and piston rod head,the maximum static friction force and the adhering function,respectively.

  11. Modeling Properties Of Chromospheric Evaporation Driven By Thermal Conduction Fronts From Reconnection Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, Sean; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the corona results in contracting flare loops, releasing energy into plasma heating and shocks. These hydrodynamic shocks drive thermal conduction fronts (TCFs), which deposit energy into the chromosphere, driving upflows (evaporation) and downflows (condensation) across a range of temperatures. Observations have revealed that the transition between evaporation and condensation, the "velocity reversal point" (VRP), occurs at a characteristic temperature and with a characteristic slope, which vary between different flares. In this study, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamical flare loop model with a simplified three-region atmosphere (chromosphere / transition region (TR) / corona), with TCFs initiated by piston shocks introduced in the corona. We investigate the effect of three different flare loop parameters (post-shock temperature, TR temperature ratio, and TR thickness) on the temperature and slope of the VRP. We find that both of the evaporation characteristics have power-law relationships to the varied flare parameters, and we report the scaling exponents for our model. Finally, we develop a method to determine the best-fit post-shock temperature and TR temperature ratio based on the observed quantities, and discuss the results for two sets of published data.

  12. A minimal titration model of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivéry, Aude; Courtade, Emmanuel; Thommen, Quentin

    2016-12-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the heat shock response (HSR) and leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain cellular proteostasis. Controlled by highly intricate regulatory mechanisms, having stress-induced activation and feedback regulations with multiple partners, the HSR is still incompletely understood. In this context, we propose a minimal molecular model for the gene regulatory network of the HSR that reproduces quantitatively different heat shock experiments both on heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and HSPs activities. This model, which is based on chemical kinetics laws, is kept with a low dimensionality without altering the biological interpretation of the model dynamics. This simplistic model highlights the titration of HSF1 by chaperones as the guiding line of the network. Moreover, by a steady states analysis of the network, three different temperature stress regimes appear: normal, acute, and chronic, where normal stress corresponds to pseudo thermal adaption. The protein triage that governs the fate of damaged proteins or the different stress regimes are consequences of the titration mechanism. The simplicity of the present model is of interest in order to study detailed modelling of cross regulation between the HSR and other major genetic networks like the cell cycle or the circadian clock.

  13. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web, and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  14. Non-line-of-sight ultraviolet single-scatter propagation model in random turbulent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Houfei; Zuo, Yong; Wu, Jian; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2013-09-01

    Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) ultraviolet communication (UVC) uses the atmosphere as a propagation medium. In previous literature, various scatter propagation models have been derived based on the premise that atmospheric turbulence was ignored and the atmosphere was considered as a turbid medium, also called random scatterers. In this Letter, a NLOS single-scatter propagation model is proposed to describe the singly scattered radiation in a turbulent medium, also called a random continuum, such as the clear atmosphere. The model is established based on the relationship between the scattered power and the characteristics of the random turbulent medium. The scattering cross section is further investigated in terms of different correlation distances and wavelengths. The received power dependence for NLOS UVC is also analyzed for different factors, including refractive-index structure parameter and transceiver range.

  15. Localization of a small change in a multiple scattering environment without modeling of the actual medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonarivo, S T; Walker, S C; Kuperman, W A; Roux, P

    2011-12-01

    A method to actively localize a small perturbation in a multiple scattering medium using a collection of remote acoustic sensors is presented. The approach requires only minimal modeling and no knowledge of the scatterer distribution and properties of the scattering medium and the perturbation. The medium is ensonified before and after a perturbation is introduced. The coherent difference between the measured signals then reveals all field components that have interacted with the perturbation. A simple single scatter filter (that ignores the presence of the medium scatterers) is matched to the earliest change of the coherent difference to localize the perturbation. Using a multi-source/receiver laboratory setup in air, the technique has been successfully tested with experimental data at frequencies varying from 30 to 60 kHz (wavelength ranging from 0.5 to 1 cm) for cm-scale scatterers in a scattering medium with a size two to five times bigger than its transport mean free path.

  16. Next generation experiments and models for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Current phenomenological hydrodynamic reactive flow models, such as Ignition and Growth and Johnson- Tang-Forest, when normalized to embedded gauge and laser velocimetry data, have been very successful in predicting shock initiation and detonation properties of solid explosives in most scenarios. However, since these models use reaction rates based on the compression and pressure of the reacting mixture, they can not easily model situations in which the local temperature, which controls the local reaction rate, changes differently from the local pressure. With the advent of larger, faster, parallel computers, microscopic modeling of the hot spot formation processes and Arrhenius chemical kinetic reaction rates that dominate shock initiation and detonation can now be attempted. Such a modeling effort can not be successful without nanosecond or better time resolved experimental data on these processes. The experimental and modeling approaches required to build the next generation of physically realistic reactive flow models are discussed.

  17. A survival prediction model of rats in hemorrhagic shock using the random forest classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joon Yul; Kim, Sung Kean; Lee, Wan Hyung; Yoo, Tae Keun; Kim, Deok Won

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is the cause of one third of deaths resulting from injury in the world. Although many studies have tried to diagnose hemorrhagic shock early and accurately, such attempts were inconclusive due to compensatory mechanisms of humans. The objective of this study was to construct a survival prediction model of rats in hemorrhagic shock using a random forest (RF) model, which is a newly emerged classifier acknowledged for its performance. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR), lactate concentration (LC), and perfusion (PF) measured in rats were used as input variables for the RF model and its performance was compared with that of a logistic regression (LR) model. Before constructing the models, we performed a 5-fold cross validation for RF variable selection and forward stepwise variable selection for the LR model to see which variables are important for the models. For the LR model, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) were 1, 0.89, 0.94, and 0.98, respectively. For the RF models, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and AUC were 0.96, 1, 0.98, and 0.99, respectively. In conclusion, the RF model was superior to the LR model for survival prediction in the rat model.

  18. Riccati-coupled similarity shock wave solutions for multispeed discrete Boltzmann models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornille, H. (Service de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Platkowski, T. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland))

    1993-05-01

    The authors study nonstandard shock wave similarity solutions for three multispeed discrete boltzmann models: (1) the square 8[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]2 with the x axis along one median, (2) the Cabannes cubic 14[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]3 and the x axis perpendicular to one face, and (3) another 14[upsilon][sub i] model with speeds 1 and [radical]2. These models have five independent densities and two nonlinear Riccati-coupled equations. The standard similarity shock waves, solutions of scalar Riccati equations, are monotonic and the same behavior holds for the conservative macroscopic quantities. First, the exact similarity shock-wave solutions of coupled Riccati equations are determined and the nonmonotonic behavior for one density and a smaller effect for one conservative macroscopic quantity are observed when a violation of the microreversibility is allowed. Second, new results are obtained on the Whitham weak shock wave propagation. Third, the corresponding dynamical system is numerically solved, with microreversibility satisfied or not, and the analogous nonmonotonic behavior is observed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Modeling plasma glow discharges in Air near a Mach 3 bow shock with KRONOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassou, Sebastien; Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Elias, Paul-Quentin

    2016-09-01

    In this work, plasma glow discharge in Air is modeled near a Mach 3 bow shock. Numerical simulations are performed using the coupling KRONOS which have been developed at ONERA. The flow field is modeled using the code CFD: CEDRE from ONERA and the electrical and plasma part by the EDF open-source code CODE_SATURNE. The plasma kinetic modeling consists on a two-term Boltzmann equation solver and a chemical reaction solver depending of the electric field. The coupling KRONOS is fully parallelized and run on ONERA supercomputers. The shock wave is formed by the propagation of a supersonic flow (M = 3) through a truncated conical model mounted with a central spike. Depending on the spike's voltage value, corona, glow or arc regime could be obtained in a steady flow. The parameters for the supersonic flow and the spike configurations are chosen to be in glow discharge regime and to reproduce the experimental setup. In our simulations, 12 species and 80 reactions (ionization, electronic or vibrational excitation, attachment etc ...) are considered to properly model the glow discharge and the afterglow. In a stationary flow, glow discharge is observed only at the upstream of the shock wave near the high voltage spike. Behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, negative ions are provided by electrons attachment with O2. The negative ions flow convection ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge.

  20. SEMIINCLUSIVE DEEP-INELASTIC LEPTON SCATTERING IN A PION CLOUD MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIEPERINK, AEL; POLLOCK, SJ

    1994-01-01

    In this note we explore the consequences of the pion cloud model for semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering. We argue that by scattering on a few-nucleon target, the detection of the recoiling target would provide a valuable test of the meson cloud model. We estimate the semi-inclusive cros

  1. Numerical modelling of multiple scattering between two elastical particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1998-01-01

    in suspension have been studied extensively since Foldy's formulation of his theory for isotropic scattering by randomly distributed scatterers. However, a number of important problems related to multiple scattering are still far from finding their solutions. A particular, but still unsolved, problem...... is higher than 20 g/l of sand particles. This paper reports an attempt to illuminate and to solve the proximity threshold question, by an in-depth numerical study of the interaction of ultrasonic signals with two canonically shaped elastic particles. Introductory experimental results seem to create evidence...

  2. Pressure measurements and an analytical model for laser-generated shock waves in solids at low irradiance

    CERN Document Server

    Romain, J P; Dayma, G; Boustie, M; Resseguier, T D; Combis, P

    2002-01-01

    Low amplitude shock waves (from 1 to 300 bar) have been generated in gold layers deposited on a quartz substrate, by laser pulses at an incident fluence from 0.4 to 4.0 J cm sup - sup 2. The quartz was used as a pressure gauge for recording the induced shock profile. At a fluence <1.4 J cm sup - sup 2 , the shock pressure does not exceed 10 bar and the shock front is followed by a tension peak typical of an absorption in solid state. An analytical model of the compression-tension process has been developed, accounting for shock pressure and shock profile evolution as a function of irradiation conditions and material properties. From this model a mechanical interpretation is given to previous observations of spalling of the irradiated target surface.

  3. Coupled-channel scattering in 1+1 dimensional lattice model

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation approach, a generalized L\\"uscher's formula in 1+1 dimensions for two particles scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived. A 2D coupled-channel scattering lattice model is presented, the model represents a two-coupled-channel resonant scattering scalars system. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed on finite lattices and in various moving frames. The 2D generalized L\\"uscher's formula is used to extract the scattering amplitudes for the coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum.

  4. Generalized Chou-Yang Model and Meson-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Mohammad; Aleem, Fazal-E.; Rashid, Haris

    The various characteristics of meson-proton elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting pions(kaons) and protons. A new parametrization of the proton form factor consistent with the recent experimental data is proposed. It is then shown that all the data for meson-proton elastic scattering at 200 and 250 GeV/c are in agreement with theoretical computations. The physical picture of generalized Chou-Yang model which is based on multiple scattering theory is given in detail.

  5. Generalized Chou-Yang model and meson-proton elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Aleem, F.E.; Rashid, H.

    1989-01-01

    The various characteristics of meson-proton elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting pions(kaons) and protons. A new parametrization of the proton form factor consistent with the recent experimental data is proposed. It is then shown that all the data for meson-proton elastic scattering at 200 and 250 GeV/c are in agreement with theoretical computations. The physical picture of generalized Chou-Yang model which is based on multiple scattering theory is given in detail.

  6. Comparing generic models for interplanetary shocks and magnetic clouds axis configurations at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal; Masias-Meza, Jimmy; Lugaz, Noe

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections are the manifestation of solar transient eruptions, which can significantly modify the plasma and magnetic conditions in the heliosphere. They are often preceded by a shock, and a magnetic flux rope is detected in situ in a third to half of them. The main aim of this study is to obtain the best quantitative shape for the flux rope axis and for the shock surface from in situ data obtained during spacecraft crossings of these structures. We first compare the orientation of the flux ropes axes and shock normals obtained from independent data analyses of the same events, observed in situ at 1AU from the Sun. Then, we carry out an original statistical analysis of axes/shock normals by deriving the statistical distributions of their orientations. We fit the observed distributions using the distributions derived from several synthetic models describing these shapes. We show that the distributions of axis/shock orientations are very sensitive to their respective shape. One classi...

  7. The structure of radiative shock waves. III. The model grid for partially ionized hydrogen gas

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyev, Y A; Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2001-01-01

    The grid of the models of radiative shock waves propagating through partially ionized hydrogen gas with temperature 3000K <= T_1 <= 8000K and density 10^{-12} gm/cm^3 <= \\rho_1 <= 10^{-9}gm/cm^3 is computed for shock velocities 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 90 km/s. The fraction of the total energy of the shock wave irreversibly lost due to radiation flux ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 for 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 70 km/s. The postshock gas is compressed mostly due to radiative cooling in the hydrogen recombination zone and final compression ratios are within 1 <\\rho_N/\\rho_1 \\lesssim 10^2, depending mostly on the shock velocity U_1. The preshock gas temperature affects the shock wave structure due to the equilibrium ionization of the unperturbed hydrogen gas, since the rates of postshock relaxation processes are very sensitive to the number density of hydrogen ions ahead the discontinuous jump. Both the increase of the preshock gas temperature and the decrease of the preshock gas density lead to lower postsh...

  8. Constitutive modeling of weak and strong shock-initiation of porous explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, L.S.

    1998-12-31

    A continuum based reactive burn model for shocked loaded high explosives has been developed that uses heterogeneous distribution of pore collapse energy to one or more of the constituents (a hot spot) as an ignition source, represents constituents with independent equations of state and has multiple competing and sequential chemical reactions. Reaction propagates from the hot spot to the remainder of the material through either a pressure or temperature dependence of heat transfer through a film layer. The reaction may be quenched by heat transfer or shock release if it is not rapid enough.

  9. Laser Beam Propagation Through Inhomogeneous Media with Shock-Like Profiles: Modeling and Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Ida, Nathan

    1997-01-01

    Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media has been studied for such diverse applications as propagation of radiowaves in atmosphere, light propagation through thin films and in inhomogeneous waveguides, flow visualization, and others. In recent years an increased interest has been developed in wave propagation through shocks in supersonic flows. Results of experiments conducted in the past few years has shown such interesting phenomena as a laser beam splitting and spreading. The paper describes a model constructed to propagate a laser beam through shock-like inhomogeneous media. Numerical techniques are presented to compute the beam through such media. The results of computation are presented, discussed, and compared with experimental data.

  10. Non-relativistic perpendicular shocks modeling young supernova remnants: nonstationary dynamics and particle acceleration at forward and reverse shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wieland, Volkmar; Niemiec, Jacek; Rafighi, Iman; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    For parameters that are applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants, we present results of 2D3V particle-in-cell simulations of a non-relativistic plasma shock with a large-scale perpendicular magnetic field inclined at 45-deg angle to the simulation plane to approximate 3D physics. We developed an improved clean setup that uses the collision of two plasma slabs with different density and velocity, leading to the development of two distinctive shocks and a contact discontinuity. The shock formation is mediated by Weibel-type filamentation instabilities that generate magnetic turbulence. Cyclic reformation is observed in both shocks with similar period, for which we note global variations on account of shock rippling and local variations arising from turbulent current filaments. The shock rippling occurs on spatial and temporal scales given by gyro-motions of shock-reflected ions. The drift motion of electrons and ions is not a gradient drift, but commensurates with E x B drift. We observe a stabl...

  11. Modeling wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube using hybrid MD-DSMC algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watvisave, D. S.; Puranik, B. P.; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2016-07-01

    Wall effects in a micro-scale shock tube are investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method as well as a hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm. In the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo simulations, the Cercignani-Lampis-Lord model of gas-surface interactions is employed to incorporate the wall effects, and it is shown that the shock attenuation is significantly affected by the choice of the values of tangential momentum accommodation coefficient. A loosely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo approach is then employed to demonstrate incomplete accommodation in micro-scale shock tube flows. This approach uses fixed values of the accommodation coefficients in the gas-surface interaction model, with their values determined from a separate dynamically similar Molecular Dynamics simulation. Finally, a completely coupled Molecular Dynamics-Direct Simulation Monte Carlo algorithm is used, wherein the bulk of the flow is modeled using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, while the interaction of gas molecules with the shock tube walls is modeled using Molecular Dynamics. The two regions are separate and coupled both ways using buffer zones and a bootstrap coupling algorithm that accounts for the mismatch of the number of molecules in both regions. It is shown that the hybrid method captures the effect of local properties that cannot be captured using a single value of accommodation coefficient for the entire domain.

  12. Dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations: Application of analytical (mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhir E.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Some basic problems of the dynamic response of electronic and photonic (E&P systems to shocks and vibrations are addressed and discussed. The emphasis is on analytical (mathematical modeling, the reliability physics behind the addressed phenomena, and design-for-reliability (DfR issues and challenges. The addressed problems include 1 linear response: effect of viscous damping, shock tests vs. drop tests, role of compliant interfaces, and maximum acceleration and maximum dynamic stress as a suitable reliability criterion; 2 nonlinear response: printed circuit board (PCB experiencing an impact load applied to its support contour and ball-grid-array (BGA testing on the board level; 3 shock protection of portable electronics, including the possible use of nano-wires as a suitable protective “cushion”. The fruitfulness of the probabilistic DfR (PDfR concept to quantify and assure the field (operational reliability of E&P devices and systems is also indicated.

  13. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray s...

  14. Shock-wave compression of silica gel as a model material for comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A shock-wave compression experiment using synthesized silica gel was investigated as a model for a comet impact event on the Earth's surface. The sample shocked at 20.7 GPa showed considerable structural changes, a release of water molecules, and the dehydration of silanol (Si-OH) that led to the formation of a new Si-O-Si network structure containing larger rings (e.g., six-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra). The high aftershock temperature at 20.7 GPa, which could be close to 800 °C, influenced the sample structure. However, some silanols, which were presumed to be the mutually hydrogen-bonded silanol group, remained at pressures >20.7 GPa. This type of silanol along with a small number of water molecules may remain even after shock compression at 30.9 GPa, although the intermediate structure of the sample recovered was similar to that of silica glass.

  15. Rebound Shock Breakouts of Exploding Massive Stars: A MHD Void Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Ren-Yu

    2008-01-01

    With a self-similar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of an exploding progenitor star and an outgoing rebound shock and with the thermal bremsstrahlung as the major radiation mechanism in X-ray bands, we reproduce the early X-ray light curve observed for the recent event of XRO 080109/SN 2008D association. The X-ray light curve consists of a fast rise, as the shock travels into the "visible layer" in the stellar envelope, and a subsequent power-law decay, as the plasma cools in a self-similar evolution. The observed spectral softening is naturally expected in our rebound MHD shock scenario. We propose to attribute the "non-thermal spectrum" observed to be a superposition of different thermal spectra produced at different layers of the stellar envelope.

  16. Prompt high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    CERN Document Server

    Bosnjak, Z; Dubus, G

    2008-01-01

    The prompt GRB emission is thought to arise from electrons accelerated in internal shocks propagating within a highly relativistic outflow. The launch of Fermi offers the prospect of observations with unprecedented sensitivity in high-energy (>100 MeV) gamma-rays. The aim is to explore the predictions for HE emission from internal shocks, taking into account both dynamical and radiative aspects, and to deduce how HE observations constrain the properties of the relativistic outflow. The emission is modeled by combining a time-dependent radiative code with a dynamical code giving the evolution of the physical conditions in the shocked regions.Synthetic lightcurves and spectra are compared to observations. The HE emission deviates significantly from analytical estimates, which tend to overpredict the IC component, when the time dependence and full cross-sections are included. The exploration of the parameter space favors the case where the dominant process in the BATSE range is synchrotron emission. The HE compo...

  17. Modelling multi-wavelength observational characteristics of bow shocks from runaway early type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Acreman, David M; Harries, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    We assess the multi-wavelength observable properties of the bow shock around a runaway early type star using a combination of hydrodynamical modelling, radiative transfer calculations and synthetic imaging. Instabilities associated with the forward shock produce dense knots of material which are warm, ionised and contain dust. These knots of material are responsible for the majority of emission at far infra-red, H alpha and radio wavelengths. The large scale bow shock morphology is very similar and differences are primarily due to variations in the assumed spatial resolution. However infra-red intensity slices (at 22 microns and 12 microns) show that the effects of a temperature gradient can be resolved at a realistic spatial resolution for an object at a distance of 1 kpc.

  18. The Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor : FY08 testing for functionality, model validation, and technology readiness.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Blecke, Jill; Baker, Michael Sean; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Mitchell, John Anthony; Brake, Matthew Robert; Epp, David S.; Wittwer, Jonathan W.

    2008-10-01

    This report summarizes the functional, model validation, and technology readiness testing of the Sandia MEMS Passive Shock Sensor in FY08. Functional testing of a large number of revision 4 parts showed robust and consistent performance. Model validation testing helped tune the models to match data well and identified several areas for future investigation related to high frequency sensitivity and thermal effects. Finally, technology readiness testing demonstrated the integrated elements of the sensor under realistic environments.

  19. Asymmetric and common absorption of shocks in nonlinear autoregressive models

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, Dick van; Franses, Philip Hans; Boswijk, Peter

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA key feature of many nonlinear time series models is that they allow for the possibility that the model structure experiences changes, depending on for example the state of the economy or of the financial market. A common property of these models is that it generally is not possible to fully understand the structure of the model by considering the estimated values of the model parameters only. Put differently, it often is difficult to interpret a specific nonlinear model. To shed...

  20. Facilitating model reconstruction for single-particle scattering using small-angle X-ray scattering methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shufen; Liu, Haiguang

    2016-04-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers generate intense femtosecond X-ray pulses, so that high-resolution structure determination becomes feasible from noncrystalline samples, such as single particles or single molecules. At the moment, the orientation of sample particles cannot be precisely controlled, and consequently the unknown orientation needs to be recovered using computational algorithms. This delays the model reconstruction until all the scattering patterns have been re-oriented, which often entails a long elapse of time and until the completion of the experiment. The scattering patterns from single particles or multiple particles can be summed to form a virtual powder diffraction pattern, and the low-resolution region, corresponding to the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) regime, can be analysed using existing SAXS methods. This work presents a pipeline that converts single-particle data sets into SAXS data, from which real-time model reconstruction is achieved using the model retrieval approach implemented in the software package SASTBX [Liu, Hexemer & Zwart (2012). J. Appl. Cryst.45, 587-593]. To illustrate the applications, two case studies are presented with real experimental data sets collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

  1. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Ellison, Donald C

    2008-01-01

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occuring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to devel...

  2. Simulations of transonic shock-tube flow with a model micro-cylinder in the driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kendall, Mark A F

    2007-02-01

    A unique hand-held needle-free powder injection system, using a transient shock-tube flow to deliver powder genes and drugs into human skin for a wide range of treatments, has been proposed. In the development of such devices, a strong non-linear phenomenon, possibly shock process instead of unsteady expansion waves, was observed in the driver portion of the shock-tube flow in the presence of a gas micro-cylinder. In this paper, we further investigate effects of a model micro-cylinder in the driver on the gas dynamics of a prototype clinical device numerically. To accurately simulate such complex shock-tube flows, an efficient numerical solver, MIFVS, is extended to incorporate with a transition-modified turbulence model. Comparison with experimental measurements shows that the extended MIFVS accurately predicts pressure traces in both laminar and turbulent regimes. The separation zone due to a strong non-linear process is properly captured via such transition-modified turbulence model. Numerical investigations and discoveries are presented and discussed.

  3. Dynamic response and modeling of a carbon fiber— epoxy composite subject to shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. S.; Key, C. T.; Schumacher, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite samples were tested to determine their response to one dimensional shock loading with the ultimate goal of developing a micromechanics based numerical model of the dynamic response. The material tested had high fiber content (62-68% by volume) and low porosity. Wave speeds for shocks traveling along the carbon fibers are significantly higher than for those traveling transverse to the fibers or through the bulk epoxy. As a result, the dynamic material response is dependent on the relative shock—fiber orientation; a complication that must be captured in the numerical models. Shocks traveling transverse to the fibers show an inelastic response consistent with the material constituent parts. Shocks traveling along the fiber direction travel faster and exhibit both elastic and plastic characteristics over the stress range tested; up to 15 GPa. Results presented detail the anisotropic material response, which is governed by different mechanisms along each of the two principle directions in the composite. Finally, numerical modeling of this response is described in detail and validated against the experimental data.

  4. Nonrelativistic Perpendicular Shocks Modeling Young Supernova Remnants: Nonstationary Dynamics and Particle Acceleration at Forward and Reverse Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Volkmar; Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Rafighi, Iman; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    For parameters that are applicable to the conditions at young supernova remnants, we present results of two-dimensional, three-vector (2D3V) particle-in-cell simulations of a non-relativistic plasma shock with a large-scale perpendicular magnetic field inclined at a 45^\\circ angle to the simulation plane to approximate three-dimensional (3D) physics. We developed an improved clean setup that uses the collision of two plasma slabs with different densities and velocities, leading to the development of two distinctive shocks and a contact discontinuity. The shock formation is mediated by Weibel-type filamentation instabilities that generate magnetic turbulence. Cyclic reformation is observed in both shocks with similar period, for which we note global variations due to shock rippling and local variations arising from turbulent current filaments. The shock rippling occurs on spatial and temporal scales produced by the gyro-motions of shock-reflected ions. The drift motion of electrons and ions is not a gradient drift, but is commensurate with {\\boldsymbol{E}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}} drift. We observe a stable supra-thermal tail in the ion spectra, but no electron acceleration because the amplitude of the Buneman modes in the shock foot is insufficient for trapping relativistic electrons. We see no evidence of turbulent reconnection. A comparison with other two-dimensional (2D) simulation results suggests that the plasma beta and the ion-to-electron mass ratio are not decisive for efficient electron acceleration, but the pre-acceleration efficacy might be reduced with respect to the 2D results once 3D effects are fully accounted for. Other microphysical factors may also play a part in limiting the amplitude of the Buneman waves or preventing the return of electrons to the foot region.

  5. Experimentally validated multiphysics computational model of focusing and shock wave formation in an electromagnetic lithotripter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fovargue, Daniel E; Mitran, Sorin; Smith, Nathan B; Sankin, Georgy N; Simmons, Walter N; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A multiphysics computational model of the focusing of an acoustic pulse and subsequent shock wave formation that occurs during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is presented. In the electromagnetic lithotripter modeled in this work the focusing is achieved via a polystyrene acoustic lens. The transition of the acoustic pulse through the solid lens is modeled by the linear elasticity equations and the subsequent shock wave formation in water is modeled by the Euler equations with a Tait equation of state. Both sets of equations are solved simultaneously in subsets of a single computational domain within the BEARCLAW framework which uses a finite-volume Riemann solver approach. This model is first validated against experimental measurements with a standard (or original) lens design. The model is then used to successfully predict the effects of a lens modification in the form of an annular ring cut. A second model which includes a kidney stone simulant in the domain is also presented. Within the stone the linear elasticity equations incorporate a simple damage model.

  6. Shock Wave Dynamics of Novel Aluminized Detonations and Empirical Model for Temperature Evolution from Post-Detonation Combustion Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    astrophysical events. Cox [15] and Raymond [50] apply shock analysis to interstellar phenomena by modeling a gas as it interacts with a shock front from a...is / (6) For pure RDX at TMD of 1.81 g/cm3, its detonation wave traveling at 8.8 km/s can traverse the length of the 0.4064 m test article in...shock wave cannot propagate indefinitely. As the shock wave travels , it is attenuated from behind by a rarefaction wave [14, p. 174]. Another

  7. Light scattering change precedes loss of cerebral adenosine triphosphate in a rat global ischemic brain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2009-08-14

    Measurement of intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) is an attractive technique for monitoring tissue viability in brains since it enables noninvasive, real-time monitoring of morphological characteristics as well as physiological and biochemical characteristics of tissue. We previously showed that light scattering signals reflecting cellular morphological characteristics were closely related to the IOSs associated with the redox states of cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the present study, we examined the relationship between light scattering and energy metabolism. Light scattering signals were transcranially measured in rat brains after oxygen and glucose deprivation, and the results were compared with concentrations of cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence assay. Electrophysiological signal was also recorded simultaneously. After starting saline infusion, EEG activity ceased at 108+/-17s, even after which both the light scattering signal and ATP concentration remained at initial levels. However, light scattering started to change in three phases at 236+/-15s and then cerebral ATP concentration started to decrease at about 260s. ATP concentration significantly decreased during the triphasic scattering change, indicating that the start of scattering change preceded the loss of cerebral ATP. The mean time difference between the start of triphasic scattering change and the onset of ATP loss was about 24s in the present model. DC potential measurement showed that the triphasic scattering change was associated with anoxic depolarization. These findings suggest that light scattering signal can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue viability in brains.

  8. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  9. Diffusive shock acceleration with magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2012-01-01

    We explore how wave-particle interactions affect diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at astrophysical shocks by performing time-dependent kinetic simulations, in which phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA), Alfvenic drift, thermal leakage injection, Bohm-like diffusion, and a free escape boundary are implemented. If the injection fraction of cosmic-ray (CR) particles is greater than 2x10^{-4}, for the shock parameters relevant for young supernova remnants, DSA is efficient enough to develop a significant shock precursor due to CR feedback, and magnetic field can be amplified up to a factor of 20 via CR streaming instability in the upstream region. If scattering centers drift with Alfven speed in the amplified magnetic field, the CR energy spectrum can be steepened significantly and the acceleration efficiency is reduced. Nonlinear DSA with self-consistent MFA and Alfvenic drift predicts that the postshock CR pressure saturates roughly at 10 % of the shock ram pressure for strong shocks...

  10. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  11. Asymmetric and common absorption of shocks in nonlinear autoregressive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); H.P. Boswijk (Peter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA key feature of many nonlinear time series models is that they allow for the possibility that the model structure experiences changes, depending on for example the state of the economy or of the financial market. A common property of these models is that it generally is not possible to

  12. Asymmetric and common absorption of shocks in nonlinear autoregressive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); H.P. Boswijk (Peter)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA key feature of many nonlinear time series models is that they allow for the possibility that the model structure experiences changes, depending on for example the state of the economy or of the financial market. A common property of these models is that it generally is not possible to

  13. Modeling quantum mechanical scattering with continuous analogue of the newton method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Deveikis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational modelling of potential and resonant scattering for short range and Coulomb potentials was investigated in this study. The resonant scattering problem is formulated with the short range potential composed of a spherically symmetric square well and spherically symmetric square barrier. An iteration scheme of a continuous analogue of the Newton method for continuous spectral problem with correct asymptotic in uncoupled partial waves has been developed. The nonlinear representation of the scattering problem for the normalized radial Schrödinger equation is solved numerically using the difference sweep technique. The second order accuracy scheme developed allow to find scattering phases and wave functions as well as investigate their numerical evolution. The scattering phases and wave functions dependence on the scattering problem parameters have been studied.

  14. Model for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asay, J R; Bertholf, L D

    1978-10-01

    A statistical model is presented for estimating the effects of surface roughness on mass ejection from shocked surfaces. In the model, roughness is characterized by the total volume of defects, such as pits, scratches and machine marks, on a surface. The amount of material ejected from these defects during shock loading can be estimated by assuming that jetting from surface depressions is the primary mode of ejection and by making simplifying assumptions about jetting processes. Techniques are discussed for estimating the effects of distribution in defect size and shape, and results are presented for several different geometries of defects. The model is used to compare predicted and measured ejecta masses from six different materials. Surface defects in these materials range from pits and scratches on polished surfaces to prepared defects such as machined or porous surfaces. Good agreement is achieved between predicted and measured results which suggests general applicability of the model.

  15. Dynamics of shock induced ignition in Fickett's model with chain-branching kinetics: influence of $\\chi$

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The problem of shock induced ignition by a piston is addressed in the framework of Fickett's model for reactive compressible flows, i.e., the reactive form of Burgers' equation. An induction-reaction two-step chain-branching model is used to study the coupling between the energy release and the compressible hydrodynamics occurring during the shock ignition transient leading to a detonation. Owing to the model's simplicity, the ignition and acceleration mechanism is explained using the two families of characteristics admitted by the model. The energy release along the particle paths provides the amplification of forward-travelling pressure waves. These waves pre-compress the medium in the induction layer ahead of the reaction zone, therefore changing the induction delays of successive particles. The variation of the induction delay provides the modulation of the amplification of the forward travelling pressure waves by controlling the residence time of the pressure waves in the reaction zone. A closed form ana...

  16. Stochastic modeling for reliability shocks, burn-in and heterogeneous populations

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on shocks modeling, burn-in and heterogeneous populations, Stochastic Modeling for Reliability naturally combines these three topics in the unified stochastic framework and presents numerous practical examples that illustrate recent theoretical findings of the authors.  The populations of manufactured items in industry are usually heterogeneous. However, the conventional reliability analysis is performed under the implicit assumption of homogeneity, which can result in distortion of the corresponding reliability indices and various misconceptions. Stochastic Modeling for Reliability fills this gap and presents the basics and further developments of reliability theory for heterogeneous populations. Specifically, the authors consider burn-in as a method of elimination of ‘weak’ items from heterogeneous populations. The real life objects are operating in a changing environment. One of the ways to model an impact of this environment is via the external shocks occurring in accordance with some stocha...

  17. Modeling Shock Train Leading Edge Detection in Dual-Mode Scramjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng; Li, Wenhai

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to accurately model the detection of shock train leading edge (STLE) in dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) engines intended for hypersonic flight in air-breathing propulsion systems. The associated vehicles have applications in military warfare and intelligence, and there is commercial interest as well. Shock trains are of interest because they play a significant role in the inability of a DMSJ engine to develop the required propulsive force. The experimental approach to STLE detection has received some attention; as have numerical calculations. However, virtually all of the numerical work focus on mechanically- (i.e., pressure-) generated shock trains, which are much easier to model relative to the phenomenon in the real system where the shock trains are generated by combustion. A focus on combustion, as in the present studies, enables the investigation of the effects of equivalence ratio, which, together with the Mach number, constitutes an important parameter determining mode transition. The various numerical approaches implemented in our work will be reported, with result comparisons to experimental data. The development of an STLE detection procedure in an a priori manner will also be discussed.

  18. Continuum modelling of piston driven shock waves through granular gases and ensuing pattern formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2015-11-01

    Two-dimensional event-driven Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were previously completed to investigate the stability of piston driven shock waves through dilute granular gases. By considering viscoelastic collisions, allowing for finite dissipation within the shock wave, instabilities were found in the form of distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. This work is now extended to the continuum level. Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for granular gases are modelled with a modified cooling rate to include an impact threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. The shock structure predicted by the continuum formulation is found in good agreement with the structure obtained by MD. Non-linear stability analyses of the travelling wave solution are performed, showing a neutrally stable structure and responding only to fluctuations in the upstream state. Introducing strong perturbations to the incoming density field, in accordance with the spacial fluctuations in upstream state seen in MD, yields similar instabilities as those previously observed. While the inviscid model predicts a highly turbulent structure from these perturbations, the inclusion of viscosity yields comparable wavelengths of pattern formations to those seen in MD.

  19. Imaging local scatterer concentrations by the Nakagami statistical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2007-04-01

    The ultrasonic B-mode image is an important clinical tool used to examine the internal structures of the biological tissue. Due to the fact that the conventional B-scans cannot fully reflect the nature of the tissue, some useful quantitative parameters have been applied to quantify the properties of the tissue. Among various possibilities, the Nakagami parameter was demonstrated to have an outstanding ability to detect the variation of the scatterer concentration. This study is aimed to develop a scatterer concentration image based on the Nakagami parameter map to assist in the B-mode image for tissue characterization. In particular, computer simulations are carried out to generate phantoms of different scatterer concentrations and echogenicity coefficients and their B-mode and Nakagami parametric images are compared to evaluate the performance of the Nakagami image in differentiating the properties of the scatterers. The simulated results show that the B-mode image would be affected by the system settings and user operations, whereas the Nakagami parametric image provides a comparatively consistent image result when different diagnosticians use different dynamic ranges and system gains. This is largely because the Nakagami image formation is only based on the backscattered statistics of the ultrasonic signals in local tissues. Such an imaging principle allows the Nakagami image to quantify the local scatterer concentrations in the tissue and to extract the backscattering information from the regions of the weaker echoes that may be lost in the B-mode image. These findings suggest that the Nakagami image can be combined with the use of the B-mode image simultaneously to visualize the tissue structures and the scatterer properties for a better medical diagnosis.

  20. An Agent-Based Model of Mortality Shocks, Intergenerational Effects, and Urban Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Makowsky

    2006-01-01

    Rational criminals choose crime over lawfulness because it pays better; hence poverty correlates to criminal behavior. This correlation is an insufficient historical explanation. An agent-based model of urban crime, mortality, and exogenous population shocks supplements the standard economic story, closing the gap with an empirical reality that often breaks from trend. Agent decision making within the model is built around a career maximization function, with life expectancy as the key indepe...

  1. A wave-mechanical model of incoherent neutron scattering II. Role of the momentum transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Frauenfelder, Hans; Young, Robert D.; Fenimore, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently introduced a wave-mechanical model for quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) in proteins. We call the model ELM for "Energy Landscape Model". We postulate that the spectrum of the scattered neutrons consists of lines of natural width shifted from the center by fluctuations. ELM is based on two facts: Neutrons are wave packets; proteins have low-lying substates that form the free-energy landscape (FEL). Experiments suggest that the wave packets are a few hundred micrometers long....

  2. Improved Monte Carlo model for multiple scattering calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Cai; Lin Ma

    2012-01-01

    The coupling between the Monte Carlo (MC) method and geometrical optics to improve accuracy is investigated.The results obtained show improved agreement with previous experimental data,demonstrating that the MC method,when coupled with simple geometrical optics,can simulate multiple scattering with enhanced fidelity.

  3. Thermal Shock Effects Modeling On A Globe Valve Body-Bonnet Bolted Flange Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean-Philippe; Ferrari, Jerome; Hersant, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper attends to show efforts made at EDF R&D to improve comprehension of valve parts loadings during operation. Thermal shock in a globe valve is represented and modeled using EDF R&D Finite Element Analysis code (Code_Aster). Choices of modeling are discussed and balanced on the basis of "what an engineer can obtain without becoming a researcher". First simulation results are presented. Attention is focused on the evolution of Body-Bonnet Bolted Flange Joint (BBBFJ) tightening forces which are simulated during the thermal shock. An experimental setup is also presented for the studied valve, which implies thermocouple implementation for comparison of the simulated thermal field and strain measurement on each threaded rod to validate the mechanical modeling.

  4. Emergence of dispersive shocks and rarefaction waves in power-law contact models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, H.; Chong, C.; Yang, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, motivated by generalized forms of the Hertzian dynamics associated with granular crystals, we consider the possibility of such models to give rise to both dispersive shock and rarefaction waves. Depending on the value p of the nonlinearity exponent, we find that both of these possibilities are realizable. We use a quasicontinuum approximation of a generalized inviscid Burgers model in order to predict the solution profile up to times near the formation of the dispersive shock, as well as to estimate when it will occur. Beyond that time threshold, oscillations associated with the highly dispersive nature of the underlying model emerge, which cannot be captured by the quasicontinuum approximation. Our analytical characterization of the above features is complemented by systematic numerical computations.

  5. Oscillations in a Growth Model with Capital, Technology and Environment with Exogenous Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper generalizes the dynamic growth model with wealth accumulation, technological change and environmental change by Zhang (2012 by making all the parameters as time-dependent parameters. The model treats physical capital accumulation, knowledge creation and utilization, and environmental change as endogenous variables. It synthesizes the basic ideas of the neoclassical growth theory, Arrow’s learning-by-doing model and the traditional dynamic models of environmental change within a comprehensive framework. The behavior of the household is described with an alternative approach to household behavior. We simulated the model to demonstrate existence of equilibrium points, motion of the dynamic system, and oscillations due to different exogenous shocks.

  6. ATLS Hypovolemic Shock Classification by Prediction of Blood Loss in Rats Using Regression Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Beom; Choi, Joon Yul; Park, Jee Soo; Kim, Deok Won

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, our input data set consisted of 78 rats, the blood loss in percent as a dependent variable, and 11 independent variables (heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, respiration rate, temperature, perfusion index, lactate concentration, shock index, and new index (lactate concentration/perfusion)). The machine learning methods for multicategory classification were applied to a rat model in acute hemorrhage to predict the four Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) hypovolemic shock classes for triage in our previous study. However, multicategory classification is much more difficult and complicated than binary classification. We introduce a simple approach for classifying ATLS hypovolaemic shock class by predicting blood loss in percent using support vector regression and multivariate linear regression (MLR). We also compared the performance of the classification models using absolute and relative vital signs. The accuracies of support vector regression and MLR models with relative values by predicting blood loss in percent were 88.5% and 84.6%, respectively. These were better than the best accuracy of 80.8% of the direct multicategory classification using the support vector machine one-versus-one model in our previous study for the same validation data set. Moreover, the simple MLR models with both absolute and relative values could provide possibility of the future clinical decision support system for ATLS classification. The perfusion index and new index were more appropriate with relative changes than absolute values.

  7. 3D Gray Radiative Properties of a Radiation Hydrodynamic Model of a YSO Accretion Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibgui, L.; de Sá, L.; Stehlé, C.; Chièze, J.-P.; Orlando, S.; Hubeny, I.; Lanz, T.; Matsakos, T.; González, M.; Bonito, R.

    2014-09-01

    We present preliminary results of radiative properties of a 1D gray radiation hydrodynamic (RHD) model of an accretion shock on a young stellar object (YSO). This model takes into account the transition between the collisional equilibrium regime (local thermodynamic equilibrium, LTE), and the coronal equilibrium regime. Based on the 1D planar structure, we built a 3D cylindrical one. Most notably, the post-shock region obtained in our case is far less extended (by a factor of 10 000) than the typical one obtained with models that assume gray optically thin radiative losses. Moreover, we find that the column is optically thin in its longitudinal dimension, and in the transverse dimension, except over an extremely narrow region (≲ 700 m). Consequently, still under the gray assumption, the photons emitted by the hot slab can propagate through the column and escape freely in all directions, including towards the chromosphere. The radiation flux has therefore components that are perpendicular to the accretion column, which demonstrates that a multidimensional (2D or 3D) radiative model is necessary for such a cylindrical structure. This study needs to be taken forward and expanded, by improving the radiative treatment of the RHD model, through relaxation of both the gray and the LTE approximations for the calculation of opacities, in order to clarify the structure of the post-shock region, which is a major source of emission probed by observations.

  8. A pressure-transferable coarse-grained potential for modeling the shock Hugoniot of polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vipin; Peralta, Pedro; Li, Yiyang; Oswald, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the thermomechanical response of semi-crystalline polyethylene under shock compression by performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using a new coarse-graining scheme inspired by the embedded atom method. The coarse-graining scheme combines the iterative Boltzmann inversion method and least squares optimization to parameterize interactions between coarse-grained sites, including a many-body potential energy designed to improve the representability of the model across a wide range of thermodynamic states. We demonstrate that a coarse-grained model of polyethylene, calibrated to match target structural and thermodynamic data generated from isothermal MD simulations at different pressures, can also accurately predict the shock Hugoniot response. Analysis of the rise in temperature along the shock Hugoniot and comparison with analytical predictions from the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state are performed to thoroughly explore the thermodynamic consistency of the model. As the coarse-graining model affords nearly two orders of magnitude reduction in simulation time compared to all-atom MD simulations, the proposed model can help identify how nanoscale structure in semi-crystalline polymers, such as polyethylene, influences mechanical behavior under extreme loading.

  9. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  10. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  11. An SVD Investigation of Modeling Scatter in Multiple Energy Windows for Improved SPECT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    1996-08-01

    In this work singular value decomposition (SVD) techniques are used to investigate how the use of low energy photons and multiple energy windows affects the noise properties of Tc-99m SPECT imaging. We have previously shown that, when modeling scatter in the projector and backprojector of iterative reconstruction algorithms, simultaneous reconstruction from multiple energy window data can result in very different noise characteristics. Further, the properties depend upon the width and number of energy windows used. To investigate this further, we have generated photon transport matrices using models for scatter, an elliptical phantom containing cold rods of various sizes, and a number of multiple energy window acquisition schemes. Transfer matrices were also generated for the cases of perfect scatter rejection and ideal scatter subtraction. The matrices were decomposed using SVD, and signal power and projection space variance spectra were computed using the basis formed by the left singular vectors. Results indicate very different noise levels for the various energy window combinations. The perfect scatter rejection case resulted in the lowest variance spectrum, and reconstruction-based scatter compensation performed better than the scatter subtraction case. When including lower energy photons in reconstruction-based scatter compensation, using a series of multiple energy windows outperformed a single large energy window. One multiple window combination is presented which achieves a lower variance spectrum than the standard 20% energy window, indicating the potential for using low energy photons to improve the noise characteristics of SPECT images.

  12. A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these

  13. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the rig...

  14. Standard model extensions for PV electron scattering, g-2, EDM: Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2011-01-01

    I review how various extensions of the Standard Model, in particular supersymmetry and extra neutral gauge bosons, may affect low energy observables, including parity-violating electron scattering and related observables, as well as electric and magnetic dipole moments.

  15. Constraint on Parameters of Inverse Compton Scattering Model for PSR B2319+60

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H. G. Wang; M. Lv

    2011-03-01

    Using the multifrequency radio profiles of pulsar PSR B2319+60, two parameters of inverse Compton scattering model, the initial Lorentz factor and the factor of energy loss of relativistic particles are constrained.

  16. COMPLEX NONLINEAR MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR A KIND OF VEHICLE SHOCK ABSORBORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model for the shock absorber in TJ7100 is developed. The oil compressibility and the entrapped gas in the oil are considered in the model. As a result, the hysteresis in the force-velocity diagram is included. The results of computer simulation and the experiment are basically identical. The MATLAB/SIMULINK is used for the development of the simulation software. It is found that the pressure inside the cylinder is high if the inputs of velocity or displacement are big by simulation. This is certainly one of the main reasons for which the leak is appeared between the rod and the seal of the shock absorbers for a relatively short time in China.

  17. Open Market Operations as a Monetary Policy Shock Measure in a Quantitative Business Cycle Model

    OpenAIRE

    Heer, Burkhard; Schabert, Andreas

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a business cycle analysis of monetary policy shocks measured by disturbances to open market operations, i.e. the ratio of open market papers to non-borrowed reserves. We find empirical evidence for the usefulness of this policy measure, as it predicts significant declines in output, M1 growth, and prices, as well as a significant rise in interest rates after a monetary contraction. We develop a dynamic general equilibrium model with financial intermediation where monetary ...

  18. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Rakesh1 1Department of Defense Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command,DoD Biotechnology High...shock response have already been used as components of larger mathematical models for predicting inflammation in heat stroke (33) and optimizing cancer

  19. Comparison of Hydroxocobalamin Versus Norepinephrine Versus Saline in a Swine Model of Severe Septic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    intravenous HOC appears to be comparable to NOR in decreasing biomarkers associated with severe LPS-induced endotoxemic shock and significantly better compared to saline in our experimental animal model. ...research involving animals , as required by AFMAN 40-401 IP : "The experiments reported herein were conducted according to the principles set forth in...the National Institute of Health Publication No. 80-23, Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the Animal Welfare Act of 1966, as

  20. Accounting for scattering in the Landauer-Datta-Lundstrom transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юрій Олексійович Кругляк

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Scattering of carriers in the LDL transport model during the changes of the scattering times in the collision processes is considered qualitatively. The basic relationship between the transmission coefficient T and the average mean free path  is derived for 1D conductor. As an example, the experimental data for Si MOSFET are analyzed with the use of various models of reliability.

  1. Efficient Finite Element Modeling of Elastodynamic Scattering from Near Surface and Surface-Breaking Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    A robust and efficient technique for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect which is located near a free surface in an otherwise homogeneous anisotropic half-space is presented that can be implemented in a commercial FE package. The spatial size of the modeling domain around the defect is as small as possible to minimize computational expense and a minimum number of models are executed. Example results for 2D wave scattering in isotropic material are presented.

  2. High Energy Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering in Reggeon-Pomeron Exchange Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; HU Zhao-Hui; MA Wei-Xing

    2006-01-01

    We initially propose a Reggeon-Pomeron exchange model to describe proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies in this short paper. A calculation for total cross section of proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies is performed without any free parameters. Our new finding from this work is that the Reggeon-Pomeron model gives a perfect fit to experimental data of the total cross section at the whole energy region where experimental data exist.

  3. Alicki's model of scattering-induced decoherence derived from Hamiltonian dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmich, Mario [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2004-09-10

    We study a semiphenomenological model introduced by Alicki (2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 034104), describing environmental decoherence by scattering of a Brownian particle in a gas environment. For a slightly wider class of models, we prove that the semigroup describing the dynamics of the Brownian particle can be approximated by the reduced dynamics arising from a Hamiltonian interaction between the particle and an infinite fermionic thermal gas reservoir, provided the scattering process is isotropic.

  4. Spectral and Polarization Signatures of Relativistic Shocks in Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic shocks are one of the most plausible sites of the emission of strongly variable, polarized multi-wavelength emission from relativistic jet sources such as blazars, via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of relativistic particles. This paper summarizes recent results on a self-consistent coupling of diffusive shock acceleration and radiation transfer in blazar jets. We demonstrate that the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars strongly constrain the nature of hydromagnetic turbulence responsible for pitch-angle scattering by requiring a strongly energy-dependent pitch-angle mean free path. The prominent soft X-ray excess ("Big Blue Bump") in the SED of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 can be modelled as the signature of bulk Compton scattering of external radiation fields by the thermal electron population, which places additional constraints on the level of hydromagnetic turbulence. It has further been demonstrated that internal shocks propagating in a jet pervaded by a helical ma...

  5. A model for the thermal radio-continuum emission from radiative shocks in colliding stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, G.; González, R. F.; Cantó, J.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.

    2011-07-01

    Context. In massive-star binary systems, the interaction of the strong stellar winds results in a wind collision region (WCR) between the stars, which is limited by two shock fronts. Besides the nonthermal emission resulting from the shock acceleration, these shocks emit thermal (free-free) radiation detectable at radio frequencies that increase the expected emission from the stellar winds. Observations and theoretical studies of these sources show that the shocked gas is an important, but not dominant, contributor to the total emission in wide binary systems, while it plays a very substantial role in close binaries. Aims: The interaction of two isotropic stellar winds is studied in order to calculate the free-free emission from the WCR. The effects of the binary separation and the wind momentum ratio on the emission from the wind-wind interaction region are investigated. Methods: We developed a semi-analytical model for calculating the thermal emission from colliding stellar winds. Assuming radiative shocks for the compressed layer, which are expected in close binaries, we obtained the emission measure of the thin shell. Then, we computed the total optical depth along each line of sight to obtain the emission from the whole configuration. Results: Here, we present predictions of the free-free emission at radio frequencies from analytic, radiative shock models in colliding wind binaries. It is shown that the emission from the WCR mainly arises from the optically thick region of the compressed layer and scales as ~D4/5, where D is the binary separation. The predicted flux density Sν from the WCR becomes more important as the frequency ν increases, showing higher spectral indices than the expected 0.6 value (Sν ∝ να, where α = 0.6) from the unshocked winds. We also investigate the emission from short-period WR+O systems calculated with our analytic formulation. In particular, we apply the model to the binary systems WR 98 and WR 113 and compare our results

  6. Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    Most recent extragalactic models of gamma-ray bursts consider the expansion of a relativistic blast wave, emanating from a solar-mass type progenitor, into the surrounding interstellar medium as the site for their activity. The popular perception is that the optical afterglows result from the external shock interface, while the prompt transient gamma-ray signal arises from multiple shocks internal to the expansion. This paper illustrates a number of acceleration properties of relativistic and ultrarelativistic shocks that pertain to GRB models, by way of a standard Monte Carlo simulation. Computations of the spectral shape, the range of spectral indices, and the energy gain per shock crossing are presented, as functions of the shock speed and the type of particle scattering.

  7. Modelling optical scattering artefacts for varying pathlength in a gel dosimeter phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Stephen G; Brown, Saxby; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; De Deene, Yves; Baldock, Clive

    2009-01-21

    A gelatin phantom containing an optically scattering funnel-shaped region of elevated optical density (OD) was used to examine light-scattering-induced artefacts in a cone-beam optical CT scanner used for gel dosimetry. To simulate polymer gel dosimeters, the opacity was introduced by adding a colloidal scatterer to the gelatin. Scatter results in an underestimate of OD (hence dose). In line profiles of OD taken from 3D reconstructions of the funnel, those profiles with a long pathlength through high OD regions exhibited a 'dishing' (or 'cupping') artefact, while those of short pathlength exhibited the opposite effect-'doming'. These phenomena are accounted for by a model that includes the effect of stray, scattered light.

  8. Modelling optical scattering artefacts for varying pathlength in a gel dosimeter phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosi, Stephen G [Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW 2031 (Australia); Brown, Saxby; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Baldock, Clive [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); De Deene, Yves [Division of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Ghent, de Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: s.bosi@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2009-01-21

    A gelatin phantom containing an optically scattering funnel-shaped region of elevated optical density (OD) was used to examine light-scattering-induced artefacts in a cone-beam optical CT scanner used for gel dosimetry. To simulate polymer gel dosimeters, the opacity was introduced by adding a colloidal scatterer to the gelatin. Scatter results in an underestimate of OD (hence dose). In line profiles of OD taken from 3D reconstructions of the funnel, those profiles with a long pathlength through high OD regions exhibited a 'dishing' (or 'cupping') artefact, while those of short pathlength exhibited the opposite effect-'doming'. These phenomena are accounted for by a model that includes the effect of stray, scattered light.

  9. Model Simulation and Eigen-Analysis for Polarimetric Scattering from Tree Canopy in SAR Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of multi-level, non-spherical scatterers is develotped for fully polarimetric scattering from tree canopy in SAR imaging at C band. The amplitude functions of non-spherical particles with randomly spatial orientation are derived by the generalized Rayleigh Gans (GRG) approximation. The non-diagonal extinction matrix and the Mueller matrix solution are constructed. Numerical solutions of polarimetric scattering of four Stokes parametersfrom random, non-spherical scatterers are obtained. To physically identify polarimetric scattering of the Mueller matrix solution, the coherency matrix and its eigen-analysis are discussed. Functional dependence of the coherency matrix and entropy upon various parameters are obtained. As an application, the analysis of AirSAR images at P, L, C bands is discussed.

  10. Resilience in shock and swim stress models of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Charles Drugan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of depression often entail exposing a rodent to a stressor and subsequently characterizing changes in learning and anhedonia, which may reflect symptoms of human depression. Importantly, not all people and not all laboratory rats exposed to stressors develop depressed behavior; these resilient individuals are the focus of our review. Herein we describe research from the learned helplessness and intermittent swim stress models of depression in which rats that were allowed to cope with the stressor appear to be behaviorally and neurochemically similar to rats that were not allowed to cope yet appeared resilient in behavioral tests. For example, rats exposed to inescapable tailshock, but do not develop learned helplessness, exhibit altered sensitivity to the behavioral effects of GABAA receptor antagonists and reduced in vitro benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding. This pattern suggested that resilience might involve activation of an endogenous benzodiazepine-like compound, possibly an allostatic modulator of the GABAA receptor like allopregnanolone. From the intermittent swim stress model, we have observed in resilient rats protection from stressor-induced glucocorticoid increases and immune activation. In order to identify the neural mediators of these correlates of resilience, non-invasive measures are needed to predict the resilient or vulnerable phenotype prior to analysis of neural endpoints. To this end, we found that ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs appear to predict the resilient phenotype in the intermittent swim stress paradigm. We propose that combining non-invasive predictive measures, such as USVs with biological endpoint measures, will facilitate future research into the neural correlates of resilience.

  11. Evaluation of angular scattering models for electron-neutral collisions in Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J. F. J.; Pitchford, L. C.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; van Dijk, J.

    2016-10-01

    In Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport through a neutral background gas, simplifying assumptions related to the shape of the angular distribution of electron-neutral scattering cross sections are usually made. This is mainly because full sets of differential scattering cross sections are rarely available. In this work simple models for angular scattering are compared to results from the recent quantum calculations of Zatsarinny and Bartschat for differential scattering cross sections (DCS’s) from zero to 200 eV in argon. These simple models represent in various ways an approach to forward scattering with increasing electron energy. The simple models are then used in Monte Carlo simulations of range, straggling, and backscatter of electrons emitted from a surface into a volume filled with a neutral gas. It is shown that the assumptions of isotropic elastic scattering and of forward scattering for the inelastic collision process yield results within a few percent of those calculated using the DCS’s of Zatsarinny and Bartschat. The quantities which were held constant in these comparisons are the elastic momentum transfer and total inelastic cross sections.

  12. Global effects of transmitted shock wave propagation through the Earth's inner magnetosphere: First results from 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2016-09-01

    We use a new hybrid kinetic model to simulate the response of ring current, outer radiation belt, and plasmaspheric particle populations to impulsive interplanetary shocks. Since particle distributions attending the interplanetary shock waves and in the ring current and radiation belts are non-Maxwellian, wave-particle interactions play a crucial role in energy transport within the inner magnetosphere. Finite gyroradius effects become important in mass loading the shock waves with the background plasma in the presence of higher energy ring current and radiation belt ions and electrons. Initial results show that shocks cause strong deformations in the global structure of the ring current, radiation belt, and plasmasphere. The ion velocity distribution functions at the shock front, in the ring current, and in the radiation belt help us determine energy transport through the Earth's inner magnetosphere.

  13. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoops, Harm C. M., E-mail: H.C.M.Knoops@tue.nl; Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana, E-mail: M.Creatore@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  14. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  15. Three-Component Power Decomposition for Polarimetric SAR Data Based on Adaptive Volume Scatter Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Eun Park

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the three-component power decomposition for polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data with an adaptive volume scattering model is proposed. The volume scattering model is assumed to be reflection-symmetric but parameterized. For each image pixel, the decomposition first starts with determining the adaptive parameter based on matrix similarity metric. Then, a respective scattering power component is retrieved with the established procedure. It has been shown that the proposed method leads to complete elimination of negative powers as the result of the adaptive volume scattering model. Experiments with the PolSAR data from both the NASA/JPL (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (AIRSAR and the JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency ALOS-PALSAR also demonstrate that the proposed method not only obtains similar/better results in vegetated areas as compared to the existing Freeman-Durden decomposition but helps to improve discrimination of the urban regions.

  16. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  17. Closed-form impulse response model of non-line-of-sight single-scatter propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Zhan, Yafeng

    2016-04-01

    For optical scattering communication, a closed-form expression of channel impulse response (CIR) is favorable for further system design and channel capacity analysis. Combining the mean value theorem of integrals and L'Hôpital's rule, the exact non-line-of-sight (NLOS) single-scatter propagation model is simplified to a closed-form CIR model for a laser source with a narrow beam. Based on this model, by joint geometrical and empirical approaches, a piecewise CIR expression is presented under certain system NLOS geometries. Through numerical results on CIR for various NLOS geometries, the proposed model is verified with the exact NLOS single-scatter propagation model and the previous Gamma fitting model, showing that our model agrees better with the former than the latter.

  18. Phase-field modeling of shock-induced α- γ phase transformation of RDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, -; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent continuum phase field model has been developed to investigate the role of shock-induced α- γ phase transition in the sensitivity of RDX. Dislocations and phase transformations are distinguished and modeled within a crystal plasticity framework. The Landau potential is derived for the finite elastic deformation analysis. The response of the shock loaded RDX crystal is obtained by solving the continuum momentum equation along with phase evolution equation using a Helmholtz free energy functional, which consists of elastic potential energy and local interfacial energy that follows from the Cahn-Hilliard formalism. We observe that the orientations for which there is a resolved shear stress along the slip direction, the material absorbs large shear strain through plastic deformation, allowing it to be less sensitive as less mechanical work is available for temperature rise. Therefore, plastic slip should be associated with greater shear relaxation and, hence, decreased sensitivity. For elastic orientations, large shear stress arises from steric hindrance that may provides much more mechanical work to increase the temperature and hence more sensitive to detonation. Our simulations suggest that the α- γ phase transformation in RDX may be associated with the increased temperature rise and hence the shock sensitivity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of this work through Office of Naval Research (ONR) Grants N000140810462 and N000141210527 with Dr. Clifford Bedford as the cognizant Program Manager.

  19. A neural model for chronic pain and pain relief by extracorporeal shock wave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar J

    2008-12-01

    The paper develops a new theory of chronic pain and pain relief by extracorporeal shock wave treatment. Chronic pain without underlying anatomical disorder is looked at as a pathological control function of memory. Conditioned reflexes are considered to be engraved memory traces linking sensory input of afferent signals with motor response of efferent signals. This feature can be described by associative memory functions of the nervous system. Some conditioned reflexes may cause inappropriate or pathological reactions. Consequently, a circulus vitiosus of pain sensation and muscle and/or vessel contraction is generated when pain becomes chronic (pain spiral). The key feature is a dedicated engram responsible for a pathological (painful) reaction. The pain memory may be explained by the concept of a holographic memory model published by several authors. According to this model it is shown how nervous systems may generate and recall memory contents. The paper shows how extracorporeal shock wave treatment may reorganize pathologic memory traces, thus giving cause to real and permanent pain relief. In a generalized manner, the idea of associative memory functions may help in the understanding of conditioning as a learning process and explain extracorporeal shock wave application as an efficient treatment concept for chronic pain. This concept may open the door for new treatment approaches to chronic pain and several other disorders of the nervous system.

  20. Shock-Wave Heating Model for Chondrule Formation: Prevention of Isotopic Fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, H; Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2006-01-01

    Chondrules are considered to have much information on dust particles and processes in the solar nebula. It is naturally expected that protoplanetary disks observed in present star forming regions have similar dust particles and processes, so study of chondrule formation may provide us great information on the formation of the planetary systems. Evaporation during chondrule melting may have resulted in depletion of volatile elements in chondrules. However, no evidence for a large degree of heavy-isotope enrichment has been reported in chondrules. In order to meet this observed constraint, the rapid heating rate at temperatures below the silicate solidus is required to suppress the isotopic fractionation. We have developed a new shock-wave heating model taking into account the radiative transfer of the dust thermal continuum emission and the line emission of gas molecules and calculated the thermal history of chondrules. We have found that optically-thin shock waves for the thermal continuum emission from dust ...

  1. Modeling of skin cooling, blood flow, and optical properties in wounds created by electrical shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thu T. A.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Jordan, Marion H.; Jeng, James C.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2012-02-01

    High voltage electrical injuries may lead to irreversible tissue damage or even death. Research on tissue injury following high voltage shock is needed and may yield stage-appropriate therapy to reduce amputation rate. One of the mechanisms by which electricity damages tissue is through Joule heating, with subsequent protein denaturation. Previous studies have shown that blood flow had a significant effect on the cooling rate of heated subcutaneous tissue. To assess the thermal damage in tissue, this study focused on monitoring changes of temperature and optical properties of skin next to high voltage wounds. The burns were created between left fore limb and right hind limb extremities of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by a 1000VDC delivery shock system. A thermal camera was utilized to record temperature variation during the exposure. The experimental results were then validated using a thermal-electric finite element model (FEM).

  2. Punctuated equilibrium and shock waves in molecular models of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B; Ghazaryan, Makar H; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2014-08-01

    We consider the dynamics in infinite population evolution models with a general symmetric fitness landscape. We find shock waves, i.e., discontinuous transitions in the mean fitness, in evolution dynamics even with smooth fitness landscapes, which means that the search for the optimal evolution trajectory is more complicated. These shock waves appear in the case of positive epistasis and can be used to represent punctuated equilibria in biological evolution during long geological time scales. We find exact analytical solutions for discontinuous dynamics at the large-genome-length limit and derive optimal mutation rates for a fixed fitness landscape to send the population from the initial configuration to some final configuration in the fastest way.

  3. Advanced Shock Position Control for Mode Transition in a Turbine Based Combined Cycle Engine Inlet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    A dual flow-path inlet system is being tested to evaluate methodologies for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system to perform a controlled inlet mode transition. Prior to experimental testing, simulation models are used to test, debug, and validate potential control algorithms. One simulation package being used for testing is the High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code simulation, known as HiTECC. This paper discusses the closed loop control system, which utilizes a shock location sensor to improve inlet performance and operability. Even though the shock location feedback has a coarse resolution, the feedback allows for a reduction in steady state error and, in some cases, better performance than with previous proposed pressure ratio based methods. This paper demonstrates the design and benefit with the implementation of a proportional-integral controller, an H-Infinity based controller, and a disturbance observer based controller.

  4. Pseudocompressible approximation and statistical turbulence modeling: application to shock tube flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulard, Olivier; Griffond, Jérôme; Souffland, Denis

    2012-02-01

    In this work, a pseudocompressible approximation relevant for turbulent mixing flows encountered in shock tubes is derived. The asymptotic analysis used for this purpose puts forward the role played by four dimensionless numbers on the flow compressibility, namely, the turbulent, deformation, stratification, and buoyancy force Mach numbers. The existence of rapid distortion and diffusion-dissipation regimes is also accounted for in the analysis. Some consequences of the derived pseudocompressible approximation on statistical turbulence models are discussed. In particular, the evolutions of the density variance and flux are examined, as well as the turbulent transport of energy. The different aspects of this study are assessed by performing a direct numerical simulation of a shock tube flow configuration.

  5. Optimal Design and Model Validation for Combustion Experiments in a Shock Tube

    KAUST Repository

    Long, Quan

    2014-01-06

    We develop a Bayesian framework for the optimal experimental design of the shock tube experiments which are being carried out at the KAUST Clean Combustion Center. The unknown parameters are the pre-exponential parameters and the activation energies in the reaction rate functions. The control parameters are the initial hydrogen concentration and the temperature. First, we build a polynomial based surrogate model for the observable related to the reactions in the shock tube. Second, we use a novel MAP based approach to estimate the expected information gain in the proposed experiments and select the best experimental set-ups corresponding to the optimal expected information gains. Third, we use the synthetic data to carry out virtual validation of our methodology.

  6. The Effect of Nondeterministic Parameters on Shock-Associated Noise Prediction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Engineering applications for aircraft noise prediction contain models for physical phenomenon that enable solutions to be computed quickly. These models contain parameters that have an uncertainty not accounted for in the solution. To include uncertainty in the solution, nondeterministic computational methods are applied. Using prediction models for supersonic jet broadband shock-associated noise, fixed model parameters are replaced by probability distributions to illustrate one of these methods. The results show the impact of using nondeterministic parameters both on estimating the model output uncertainty and on the model spectral level prediction. In addition, a global sensitivity analysis is used to determine the influence of the model parameters on the output, and to identify the parameters with the least influence on model output.

  7. Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: A Research Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Spyropoulos, Vaios; Koutsovasilis, Anastasios; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evaggelia; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock is challenging and usually unsuccessful. The aim of the present study is to describe our swine model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in severe sepsis and septic shock. In this prospective randomized animal study, 10 healthy female Landrace-Large White pigs with an average weight of 20 ± 1 kg (aged 19 - 21 weeks) were the study subjects. Septicemia was induced by an intravenous infusion of a bolus of 20-mL bacterial suspension in 2 min, followed by a continuous infusion during the rest of the experiment. After septic shock was confirmed, the animals were left untreated until cardiac arrest occurred. All animals developed pulseless electrical activity between the fifth and sixth hours of septicemia, whereas five (50%) of 10 animals were successfully resuscitated. Coronary perfusion pressure was statistically significantly different between surviving and nonsurviving animals. We found a statistically significant correlation between mean arterial pressure and unsuccessful resuscitation (P = 0.046), whereas there was no difference in end-tidal carbon dioxide (23.05 ± 1.73 vs. 23.56 ± 1.70; P = 0.735) between animals with return of spontaneous circulation and nonsurviving animals. During the 45-min postresuscitation monitoring, we noted a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters, although oxygenation indices and lactate clearance were constantly increased (P = 0.001). This successful basic swine model was for the first time developed and may prove extremely useful in future studies on the periarrest period in severe sepsis and septic shock.

  8. Assessment of a modified acoustic lens for electromagnetic shock wave lithotripters in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, John G; Neisius, Andreas; Smith, Nathan; Sankin, Georgy; Astroza, Gaston M; Lipkin, Michael E; Simmons, W Neal; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2013-09-01

    The acoustic lens of the Modularis electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter (Siemens, Malvern, Pennsylvania) was modified to produce a pressure waveform and focal zone more closely resembling that of the original HM3 device (Dornier Medtech, Wessling, Germany). We assessed the newly designed acoustic lens in vivo in an animal model. Stone fragmentation and tissue injury produced by the original and modified lenses of the Modularis lithotripter were evaluated in a swine model under equivalent acoustic pulse energy (about 45 mJ) at 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency. Stone fragmentation was determined by the weight percent of stone fragments less than 2 mm. To assess tissue injury, shock wave treated kidneys were perfused, dehydrated, cast in paraffin wax and sectioned. Digital images were captured every 120 μm and processed to determine functional renal volume damage. After 500 shocks, the mean ± SD stone fragmentation efficiency produced by the original and modified lenses was 48% ± 12% and 52% ± 17%, respectively (p = 0.60). However, after 2,000 shocks, the modified lens showed significantly improved stone fragmentation compared to the original lens (mean 86% ± 10% vs 72% ± 12%, p = 0.02). Tissue injury caused by the original and modified lenses was minimal at a mean of 0.57% ± 0.44% and 0.25% ± 0.25%, respectively (p = 0.27). With lens modification the Modularis lithotripter demonstrates significantly improved stone fragmentation with minimal tissue injury at a clinically relevant acoustic pulse energy. This new lens design could potentially be retrofitted to existing lithotripters, improving the effectiveness of electromagnetic lithotripters. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bio-physical modeling of time-resolved forward scattering by Listeria colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a detection system and associated protocol based on optical forward scattering where the bacterial colonies of various species and strains growing on solid nutrient surfaces produced unique scatter signatures. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a bio-physical model for the relevant phenomena. In particular, we considered time-varying macroscopic morphological properties of the growing colonies and modeled the scattering using scalar diffraction theory. For the present work we performed detailed studies with three species of Listeria; L. innocua, L. monocytogenes, and L. ivanovii. The baseline experiments involved cultures grown on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar and the scatter images were captured every six hours for an incubation period of 42 hours. The morphologies of the colonies were studied by phase contrast microscopy, including measurement of the diameter of the colony. Growth curves, represented by colony diameter as a function of time, were compared with the time-evolution of scattering signatures. Similar studies were carried out with L. monocytogenes grown on different substrates. Non-dimensionalizing incubation time in terms of the time to reach stationary phase was effective in reducing the dimensionality of the model. Bio-physical properties of the colony such as diameter, bacteria density variation, surface curvature/profile, and transmission coefficient are important parameters in predicting the features of the forward scattering signatures. These parameters are included in a baseline model that treats the colony as a concentric structure with radial variations in phase modulation. In some cases azimuthal variations and random phase inclusions were included as well. The end result is a protocol (growth media, incubation time and conditions) that produces reproducible and distinguishable scatter patterns for a variety of harmful food borne pathogens in a short period of time. Further, the bio-physical model we

  10. Monte Carlo Modeling of Computed Tomography Ceiling Scatter for Shielding Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen; Schick, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Radiation protection for clinical staff and members of the public is of paramount importance, particularly in occupied areas adjacent to computed tomography scanner suites. Increased patient workloads and the adoption of multi-slice scanning systems may make unshielded secondary scatter from ceiling surfaces a significant contributor to dose. The present paper expands upon an existing analytical model for calculating ceiling scatter accounting for variable room geometries and provides calibration data for a range of clinical beam qualities. The practical effect of gantry, false ceiling, and wall attenuation in limiting ceiling scatter is also explored and incorporated into the model. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calibrate the model for scatter from both concrete and lead surfaces. Gantry attenuation experimental data showed an effective blocking of scatter directed toward the ceiling at angles up to 20-30° from the vertical for the scanners examined. The contribution of ceiling scatter from computed tomography operation to the effective dose of individuals in areas surrounding the scanner suite could be significant and therefore should be considered in shielding design according to the proposed analytical model.

  11. Statistical-thermodynamic model for light scattering from eye lens protein mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael M.; Ross, David S.; Bautista, Maurino P.; Shahmohamad, Hossein; Langner, Andreas; Hamilton, John F.; Lahnovych, Carrie N.; Thurston, George M.

    2017-02-01

    We model light-scattering cross sections of concentrated aqueous mixtures of the bovine eye lens proteins γB- and α-crystallin by adapting a statistical-thermodynamic model of mixtures of spheres with short-range attractions. The model reproduces measured static light scattering cross sections, or Rayleigh ratios, of γB-α mixtures from dilute concentrations where light scattering intensity depends on molecular weights and virial coefficients, to realistically high concentration protein mixtures like those of the lens. The model relates γB-γB and γB-α attraction strengths and the γB-α size ratio to the free energy curvatures that set light scattering efficiency in tandem with protein refractive index increments. The model includes (i) hard-sphere α-α interactions, which create short-range order and transparency at high protein concentrations, (ii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-γ interactions, which produce intense light scattering and liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous γ-crystallin solutions, and (iii) short-range attractive plus hard-core γ-α interactions, which strongly influence highly non-additive light scattering and phase separation in concentrated γ-α mixtures. The model reveals a new lens transparency mechanism, that prominent equilibrium composition fluctuations can be perpendicular to the refractive index gradient. The model reproduces the concave-up dependence of the Rayleigh ratio on α/γ composition at high concentrations, its concave-down nature at intermediate concentrations, non-monotonic dependence of light scattering on γ-α attraction strength, and more intricate, temperature-dependent features. We analytically compute the mixed virial series for light scattering efficiency through third order for the sticky-sphere mixture, and find that the full model represents the available light scattering data at concentrations several times those where the second and third mixed virial contributions fail. The model

  12. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Yurkin, Maxim A; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R Lee; Travis, Larry D; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of the first-principles formalism enabling accurate calculations of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic scattering by static and randomly varying multiparticle groups. We illustrate how this general framework can be coupled with state-of-the-art computer solvers of the Maxwell equations and applied to direct modeling of electromagnetic scattering by representative random multi-particle groups with arbitrary packing densities. This first-principles modeling yields general physical insights unavailable with phenomenological approaches. We discuss how the first-order-scattering approximation, the radiative transfer theory, and the theory of weak localization of electromagnetic waves ...

  13. 2D numerical modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in concrete: A parameterization study in a multiple-scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting; Chaix, Jean-François; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Garnier, Vincent; Audibert, Lorenzo; Henault, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-01

    Multiple scattering is important when ultrasounds propagate in a heterogeneous medium such as concrete, the scatterer size of which is in the order of the wavelength. The aim of this work is to build a 2D numerical model of ultrasonic wave propagation integrating the multiple scattering phenomena in SPECFEM software. The coherent field of multiple scattering could be obtained by averaging numerical wave fields, and it is used to determine the effective phase velocity and attenuation corresponding to an equivalent homogeneous medium. After the creation of numerical model under several assumptions, its validation is completed in a case of scattering by one cylinder through the comparison with analytical solution. Two cases of multiple scattering by a set of cylinders at different concentrations are simulated to perform a parametric study (of frequency, scatterer concentration, scatterer size). The effective properties are compared with the predictions of Waterman-Truell model as well, to verify its validity.

  14. A Comprehensive Propagation Prediction Model Comprising Microfacet Based Scattering and Probability Based Coverage Optimization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. M. Zahid Kausar; Ahmed Wasif Reza; Lau Chun Wo; Harikrishnan Ramiah

    2014-01-01

    Although ray tracing based propagation prediction models are popular for indoor radio wave propagation characterization, most of them do not provide an integrated approach for achieving the goal of optimum coverage, which is a key part in designing wireless network. In this paper, an accelerated technique of three-dimensional ray tracing is presented, where rough surface scattering is included for making a more accurate ray tracing technique. Here, the rough surface scattering is represented...

  15. A Comprehensive Propagation Prediction Model Comprising Microfacet Based Scattering and Probability Based Coverage Optimization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Kausar, A. S. M. Zahid; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Wo, Lau Chun; Ramiah, Harikrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Although ray tracing based propagation prediction models are popular for indoor radio wave propagation characterization, most of them do not provide an integrated approach for achieving the goal of optimum coverage, which is a key part in designing wireless network. In this paper, an accelerated technique of three-dimensional ray tracing is presented, where rough surface scattering is included for making a more accurate ray tracing technique. Here, the rough surface scattering is represented ...

  16. Effective Parameter Dimension via Bayesian Model Selection in the Inverse Acoustic Scattering Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Palafox

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a prototype inverse scattering problem in the interface of applied mathematics, statistics, and scientific computing. We pose the acoustic inverse scattering problem in a Bayesian inference perspective and simulate from the posterior distribution using MCMC. The PDE forward map is implemented using high performance computing methods. We implement a standard Bayesian model selection method to estimate an effective number of Fourier coefficients that may be retrieved from noisy data within a standard formulation.

  17. DAM-BREAK SHOCK WAVES WITH FLOATING DEBRIS: EXPERIMENTALANALYSIS AND TWO-PHASE MODELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Stefano Mambretti; Daniele De Wrachien; Enrico Larcan

    2008-01-01

    To predict floods and debris flow dynamics a numerical model, based on 1D De Saint Venant (SV) equations, was developed. The McCormack – Jameson shock capturing scheme was employed for the solution of the equations, written in a conservative law form. This technique was applied to determine both the propagation and the profile of a two – phase debris flow resulting from the instantaneous and complete collapse of a storage dam. To validate the model, comparisons have been made between its pred...

  18. Shock and rarefaction waves in a hyperbolic model of incompressible materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Ruggeri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to investigate shock and rarefaction waves in a hyperbolic model of incompressible materials. To this aim, we use the so-called extended quasi-thermal-incompressible (EQTI model, recently proposed by Gouin & Ruggeri (H. Gouin, T. Ruggeri, Internat. J. Non-Linear Mech. 47 688–693 (2012. In particular, we use as constitutive equation a variant of the well-known Bousinnesq approximation in which the specific volume depends not only on the temperature but also on the pressure. The limit case of ideal incompressibility, namely when the thermal expansion coefficient and the compressibility factor vanish, is also considered.

  19. Cardiovascular Effects of Shock and Trauma in Experimental Models. A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Rocha-e-Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Experimental models of human pathology are useful guides to new approaches towards improving clinical and surgical treatments. A systematic search through PubMed using the syntax (shock AND (trauma AND (animal model AND (cardiovascular AND ("2010/01/01"[PDat]: "2015/12/31"[PDat] found 88 articles, which were reduced by manual inspection to 43 entries. These were divided into themes and each theme is subsequently narrated and discussed conjointly. Taken together, these articles indicate that valuable information has been developed over the past 5 years concerning endothelial stability, mesenteric lymph, vascular reactivity, traumatic injuries, burn and sepsis. A surviving interest in hypertonic saline resuscitation still exists.

  20. Numerical simulation of shock wave phenomena in hydrodynamic model of semiconductor devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ning; YANG Geng

    2007-01-01

    We propose a finite element method to investigate the phenomena of shock wave and to simulate the hydrodynamic model in semiconductor devices. An introduction of this model is discussed first. Then some scaling factors and a relationship between the changing variables are discussed. And then, we use a finite element method (P1-iso-P2 element) to discrete the equations. Some boundary conditions are also discussed. Finally,a sub-micron n+-n-n+ silicon diode and Si MESFET device are simulated and the results are analyzed. Numerical results show that electronic fluids are transonic under some conditions.

  1. Development of perturbation Monte Carlo methods for polarized light transport in a discrete particle scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Hayakawa, Carole K; Mourant, Judith R; Venugopalan, Vasan; Spanier, Jerome

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-sensitive, transport-rigorous perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) method to model the impact of optical property changes on reflectance measurements within a discrete particle scattering model. The model consists of three log-normally distributed populations of Mie scatterers that approximate biologically relevant cervical tissue properties. Our method provides reflectance estimates for perturbations across wavelength and/or scattering model parameters. We test our pMC model performance by perturbing across number densities and mean particle radii, and compare pMC reflectance estimates with those obtained from conventional Monte Carlo simulations. These tests allow us to explore different factors that control pMC performance and to evaluate the gains in computational efficiency that our pMC method provides.

  2. Multi-messenger Light Curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Heinze, Jonas; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma-rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure can be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  3. Multi-messenger light curves from gamma-ray bursts in the internal shock model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustamante, Mauricio [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP); Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murase, Kohta [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Center for Particle and Gravitational Astrophysics; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy and Astrophysics; Winter, Walter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are promising as sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. In the internal shock scenario, blobs of plasma emitted from a central engine collide within a relativistic jet and form shocks, leading to particle acceleration and emission. Motivated by present experimental constraints and sensitivities, we improve the predictions of particle emission by investigating time-dependent effects from multiple shocks. We produce synthetic light curves with different variability timescales that stem from properties of the central engine. For individual GRBs, qualitative conclusions about model parameters, neutrino production efficiency, and delays in high-energy gamma rays can be deduced from inspection of the gamma-ray light curves. GRBs with fast time variability without additional prominent pulse structure tend to be efficient neutrino emitters, whereas GRBs with fast variability modulated by a broad pulse structure tend to be inefficient neutrino emitters and produce delayed high-energy gamma-ray signals. Our results can be applied to quantitative tests of the GRB origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, and have the potential to impact current and future multi-messenger searches.

  4. Confinement effects in shock/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction through wall-modeled LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Bodart, Julien; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) are used to investigate three-dimensional effects imposed by lateral confinement on the interaction of oblique shock waves impinging on turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) developed along the walls of a nearly-square duct. A constant Mach number, M = 2 . 05 , of the incoming air stream is considered, with a Reynolds number based on the incoming turbulent boundary layer momentum thickness Reθ 14 , 000 . The strength of the impinging shock is varied by increasing the height of a compression wedge located at a constant streamwise location that spans the top wall of the duct at a 20° angle. Simulation results are first validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data obtained at several vertical planes. Emphasis is placed on the study of the instantaneous and time-averaged structure of the flow for the stronger-interaction case, which shows mean flow reversal. By performing additional spanwise-periodic simulations, it is found that the structure and location of the shock system and separation bubble are significantly modified by the lateral confinement. Low-frequency unsteadiness and downstream evolution of corner flows are also investigated. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Finite element modelling of shock-induced damages on ceramic hip prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Uribe, Juliana; Geringer, Jean; 10.5402/2011/121486

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to simulate the behaviour of hip prostheses under mechanical shocks. When hip joint is replaced by prosthesis, during the swing phase of the leg, a microseparation between the prosthetic head and the cup could occur. Two different sizes of femoral heads were studied: 28 and 32 mm diameter, made, respectively, in alumina and zirconia. The shock-induced stress was determined numerically using finite element analysis (FEA), Abaqus software. The influence of inclination, force, material, and microseparation was studied. In addition, an algorithm was developed from a probabilistic model, Todinov's approach, to predict lifetime of head and cup. Simulations showed maximum tensile stresses were reached on the cup's surfaces near to rim. The worst case was the cup-head mounted at 30^{\\circ}. All simulations and tests showed bulk zirconia had a greater resistance to shocks than bulk alumina. The probability of failure could be bigger than 0.9 when a porosity greater than 0.7% vol. is present in...

  6. Gamow shell model description of proton scattering on $^{18}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Jaganathen, Y; Płoszajczak, M

    2014-01-01

    We formulate the GSM in coupled-channel (GSM-CC) representation to describe low-energy elastic and inelastic scattering of protons on $^{18}$Ne. The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally-invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. We discuss in details the GSM-CC formalism in coordinate space and give the description of the novel equivalent potential method for solving the GSM-CC system of integro-differential equations. We present the first application of the GSM-CC formalism for the calculation of excited states of $^{18}$Ne and $^{19}$Na, excitation function and the elastic/inelastic differential cross-sections in the $^{18}$Ne$(p,p')$ reaction at different energies.

  7. Machine learning for molecular scattering dynamics: Gaussian Process models for improved predictions of molecular collision observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krems, Roman; Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying

    2016-05-01

    We show how statistical learning techniques based on kriging (Gaussian Process regression) can be used for improving the predictions of classical and/or quantum scattering theory. In particular, we show how Gaussian Process models can be used for: (i) efficient non-parametric fitting of multi-dimensional potential energy surfaces without the need to fit ab initio data with analytical functions; (ii) obtaining scattering observables as functions of individual PES parameters; (iii) using classical trajectories to interpolate quantum results; (iv) extrapolation of scattering observables from one molecule to another; (v) obtaining scattering observables with error bars reflecting the inherent inaccuracy of the underlying potential energy surfaces. We argue that the application of Gaussian Process models to quantum scattering calculations may potentially elevate the theoretical predictions to the same level of certainty as the experimental measurements and can be used to identify the role of individual atoms in determining the outcome of collisions of complex molecules. We will show examples and discuss the applications of Gaussian Process models to improving the predictions of scattering theory relevant for the cold molecules research field. Work supported by NSERC of Canada.

  8. A Model with Ellipsoidal Scatterers for Polarimetric Remote Sensing of Anisotropic Layered Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a model with ellipsoidal scatterers for applications to polarimetric remote sensing of anisotropic layered media at microwave frequencies. The physical configuration includes an isotropic layer covering an anisotropic layer above a homogeneous half space. The isotropic layer consists of randomly oriented spheroids. The anisotropic layer contains ellipsoidal scatterers with a preferential vertical alignment and random azimuthal orientations. Effective permittivities of the scattering media are calculated with the strong fluctuation theory extended to account for the nonspherical shapes and the scatterer orientation distributions. On the basis of the analytic wave theory, dyadic Green's functions for layered media are used to derive polarimetric backscattering coefficients under the distorted Born approximation. The ellipsoidal shape of the scatterers gives rise to nonzero cross-polarized returns from the untilted anisotropic medium in the first-order approximation. Effects of rough interfaces are estimated by an incoherent addition method. Theoretical results and experimental data are matched at 9 GHz for thick first-year sea ice with a bare surface and with a snow cover at Point Barrow, Alaska. The model is then used to study the sensitivity of polarimetric backscattering coefficients with respect to correlation lengths representing the geometry of brine inclusions. Polarimetric signatures of bare and snow-covered sea ice are also simulated based on the model to investigate effects of different scattering mechanisms.

  9. Test of 600 and 750 MeV NN matrix on elastic scattering Glauber model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, I.

    1980-09-01

    The 600 and 750 MeV proton nucleus elastic scattering cross section and polarization calculations have been performed in the framework of the Glauber model to test the pp and pn scattering amplitudes deduced from a phase shift analysis by Bystricky, Lechanoine and Lehar. It is well known that up to now we do not possess a non-phenomenological NN scattering matrix at intermediate energies. However proton-nucleus scattering analyses are used to extract information about short range correlations1), Δ resonance2) or pion condensation presences)... etc. Most scattering calculations made at these energies have been done with phenomenological NN amplitudes having a gaussian q-dependence 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE1.gif A(q) = {kσ }/{4π }(α + i) e^{ - β ^2 q^2 /2} and 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE2.gif C(q) = {kσ }/{4π }iq(α + i) D_e - β ^2 q^2 /2 K and σ being respectively the projectile momentum and the total pN total cross section. The parameters α, β and D are badly known and are adjusted by fitting some specific reactions as p+4He elastic scattering4). Even when these amplitudes provide good fits to the data, our understanding of the dynamics of the scattering remains obscure.

  10. Understanding Shock Dynamics in the Inner Heliosphere with Modeling and Type II Radio Data: the 2010-04-03 Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong Na; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, L.; Cyr, O. C. St.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cremades, H.

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 April 03 solar event was studied using observations from STEREO SECCHI, SOHO LASCO, and Wind kilometric Type II data (kmTII) combined with WSA-Cone-ENLIL model simulations performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). In particular, we identified the origin of the coronal mass ejection (CME) using STEREO EUVI and SOHO EIT images. A flux-rope model was fit to the SECCHI A and B, and LASCO images to determine the CMEs direction, size, and actual speed. J-maps from STEREO COR2HI-1HI-2 and simulations fromCCMC were used to study the formation and evolution of the shock in the inner heliosphere. In addition, we also studied the time-distance profile of the shock propagation from kmTII radio burst observations. The J-maps together with in-situ datafrom the Wind spacecraft provided an opportunity to validate the simulation results andthe kmTII prediction. Here we report on a comparison of two methods of predictinginterplanetary shock arrival time: the ENLIL model and the kmTII method; andinvestigate whether or not using the ENLIL model density improves the kmTIIprediction. We found that the ENLIL model predicted the kinematics of shock evolutionwell. The shock arrival times (SAT) and linear-fit shock velocities in the ENLILmodel agreed well with those measurements in the J-maps along both the CME leading edge and the Sun-Earth line. The ENLIL model also reproduced most of the largescale structures of the shock propagation and gave the SAT prediction at Earth with an error of 17 hours. The kmTII method predicted the SAT at Earth with an error of 15 hours when using n0 4.16 cm3, the ENLIL model plasma density near Earth; but itimproved to 2 hours when using n0 6.64 cm3, the model density near the CMEleading edge at 1 AU.

  11. Effect of renal shock wave lithotripsy on the development of metabolic syndrome in a juvenile swine model: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Rajash K; Liu, Ziyue; Connors, Bret A; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Basile, David P; Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E

    2015-04-01

    We performed a pilot study to assess whether renal shock wave lithotripsy influences metabolic syndrome onset and severity. Three-month-old juvenile female Ossabaw miniature pigs were treated with shock wave lithotripsy (2,000 shock waves at 24 kV with 120 shock waves per minute in 2) or sham shock wave lithotripsy (no shock waves in 2). Shock waves were targeted to the upper pole of the left kidney to model treatment that would also expose the pancreatic tail to shock waves. Pigs were then instrumented to directly measure arterial blood pressure via an implanted radiotelemetry device. They later received a hypercaloric atherogenic diet for about 7 months. Metabolic syndrome development was assessed by the intravenous glucose tolerance test. Metabolic syndrome progression and severity were similar in the sham treated and lithotripsy groups. The only exception arterial blood pressure, which remained relatively constant in sham treated pigs but began to increase at about 2 months towards hypertensive levels in lithotripsy treated pigs. Metabolic data on the 2 groups were pooled to provide a more complete assessment of metabolic syndrome development and progression in this juvenile pig model. The intravenous glucose tolerance test revealed substantial insulin resistance with impaired glucose tolerance within 2 months on the hypercaloric atherogenic diet with signs of further metabolic impairment at 7 months. These preliminary results suggest that renal shock wave lithotripsy is not a risk factor for worsening glucose tolerance or diabetes mellitus onset. However, it appears to be a risk factor for early onset hypertension in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impacts into quartz sand: Crater formation, shock metamorphism, and ejecta distribution in laboratory experiments and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünnemann, Kai; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Stöffler, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the ejection mechanics by a complementary approach of cratering experiments, including the microscopic analysis of material sampled from these experiments, and 2-D numerical modeling of vertical impacts. The study is based on cratering experiments in quartz sand targets performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. In these experiments, the preimpact location in the target and the final position of ejecta was determined by using color-coded sand and a catcher system for the ejecta. The results were compared with numerical simulations of the cratering and ejection process to validate the iSALE shock physics code. In turn the models provide further details on the ejection velocities and angles. We quantify the general assumption that ejecta thickness decreases with distance according to a power-law and that the relative proportion of shocked material in the ejecta increase with distance. We distinguish three types of shock metamorphic particles (1) melt particles, (2) shock lithified aggregates, and (3) shock-comminuted grains. The agreement between experiment and model was excellent, which provides confidence that the models can predict ejection angles, velocities, and the degree of shock loading of material expelled from a crater accurately if impact parameters such as impact velocity, impactor size, and gravity are varied beyond the experimental limitations. This study is relevant for a quantitative assessment of impact gardening on planetary surfaces and the evolution of regolith layers on atmosphereless bodies.

  13. GRB060218: A Relativistic Supernova Shock Breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E; Campana, S

    2007-01-01

    We show that the prompt and afterglow X-ray emission of GRB060218, as well as its early (t<=1 d) optical-UV emission, can be explained by a model in which a radiation- mediated shock propagates through a compact progenitor star into a dense wind. The prompt thermal X-ray emission is produced in this model as the mildly relativistic shock, v/c=0.85 carrying few x 10^49 erg, reaches the wind (Thomson) photosphere, where the post-shock thermal radiation is released and the shock becomes collisionless. Adopting this interpretation of the thermal X-ray emission, a subsequent X-ray afterglow is predicted, due to synchrotron emission and inverse-Compton scattering of SN UV photons by electrons accelerated in the collisionless shock. Early optical-UV emission is also predicted, due to the cooling of the outer \\delta M ~10^{-3} M_sun envelope of the star, which was heated to high temperature during shock passage. The observed X-ray afterglow and the early optical-UV emission are both consistent with those expected ...

  14. Modelling, Testing and Analysis of a Regenerative Hydraulic Shock Absorber System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruichen Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve vehicle fuel economy whilst enhancing road handling and ride comfort, power generating suspension systems have recently attracted increased attention in automotive engineering. This paper presents our study of a regenerative hydraulic shock absorber system which converts the oscillatory motion of a vehicle suspension into unidirectional rotary motion of a generator. Firstly a model which takes into account the influences of the dynamics of hydraulic flow, rotational motion and power regeneration is developed. Thereafter the model parameters of fluid bulk modulus, motor efficiencies, viscous friction torque, and voltage and torque constant coefficients are determined based on modelling and experimental studies of a prototype system. The model is then validated under different input excitations and load resistances, obtaining results which show good agreement between prediction and measurement. In particular, the system using piston-rod dimensions of 50–30 mm achieves recoverable power of 260 W with an efficiency of around 40% under sinusoidal excitation of 1 Hz frequency and 25 mm amplitude when the accumulator capacity is set to 0.32 L with the load resistance 20 Ω. It is then shown that the appropriate damping characteristics required from a shock absorber in a heavy-haulage vehicle can be met by using variable load resistances and accumulator capacities in a device akin to the prototype. The validated model paves the way for further system optimisation towards maximising the performance of regeneration, ride comfort and handling.

  15. Numerical modeling of a glow discharge through a supersonic bow shock in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassou, S.; Packan, D.; Elias, P.-Q.; Tholin, F.; Chemartin, L.; Labaune, J.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction between a glow discharge and the bow shock of a Mach 3 air flow around a truncated conical model with a central spike is modeled, and comparison is made with prior experimental results. The KRONOS workflow for plasma modeling in flow fields, which has recently been developed at ONERA, was used for the modeling. Based on the quasi-neutral approximation, it couples hypersonic and reactive flow fields with electron chemistry, including the effect of non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function. The model used for the discharge involves 12 species and 82 reactions, including ionization, electronic and vibrational excitation, and attachment. The simulations reproduce the main features of the discharge observed experimentally well, in particular, the very recognizable topology of the discharge. It was found from the simulations that behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, the negative ion flow ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge. The influence of kinetic rates on the voltage-current characteristics is discussed.

  16. How Bad/Good Are the External Forward Shock Models of Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiang-Gao; Liang, En-Wei; Gao, He; Li, Liang; Deng, Can-Min; Qin, Song-Mei; Tang, Qing-Wen; Kann, D Alexander; Ryde, Felix; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    The external forward shock (EFS) models have been the standard paradigm to interpret the broad-band afterglow data of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). One prediction of the models is that some afterglow temporal breaks at different energy bands should be achromatic. Observations in the Swift era have revealed chromatic afterglow behaviors at least in some GRBs, casting doubts on the EFS origin of GRB afterglows. In this paper, we perform a systematic study to address the question: how bad/good are the external forward shock models? Our sample includes 85 GRBs well-monitored X-ray and optical lightcurves. Based on how well the data abide by the EFS models, we categorize them as: Gold sample: (Grade I and II) include 45/85 GRBs. They show evidence of, or are consistent with having, an achromatic break. The temporal/spectral behaviors in each afterglow segment are consistent with the predictions (closure relations) of the EFS models. Silver sample: (Grade III and IV) include 37/85 GRBs. They are also consistent with hav...

  17. An extended finite element formulation for modeling the response of polycrystalline materials to shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is a finite element based discretization technique developed originally to model dynamic crack propagation [1]. Since that time the method has been used for modeling physics ranging from static mesoscale material failure to dendrite growth. Here we adapt the recent advances of Benson et al. [2] and Belytchko et al. [3] to model shock loading of polycrystalline material. Through several demonstration problems we evaluate the method for modeling the shock response of polycrystalline materials at the mesoscale. Specifically, we use the X-FEM to model grain boundaries. This approach allows us to i) eliminate ad-hoc mixture rules for multi-material elements and ii) avoid explicitly meshing grain boundaries. ([1] N. Moes, J. Dolbow, J and T. Belytschko, 1999,``A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 46, 131-150. [2] E. Vitali, and D. J. Benson, 2006, ``An extended finite element formulation for contact in multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian calculations,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 1420-1444. [3] J-H Song, P. M. A. Areias and T. Belytschko, 2006, ``A method for dynamic crack and shear band propagation with phantom nodes,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 868-893.)

  18. Modeling Shocks Detected by Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2017-07-01

    The magnetometer (MAG) on Voyager 1 (V1) has been sampling the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) since 2012 August. The V1 MAG observations have shown draped ISMF in the very local interstellar medium disturbed occasionally by significant enhancements in magnetic field strength. Using a three-dimensional, data-driven, multi-fluid model, we investigated these magnetic field enhancements beyond the heliopause that are supposedly associated with solar transients. To introduce time-dependent effects at the inner boundary at 1 au, we used daily averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set. The model ISMF strength, direction, and proton number density are compared with V1 data beyond the heliopause. The model reproduced the large-scale fluctuations between 2012.652 and 2016.652, including major events around 2012.9 and 2014.6. The model also predicts shocks arriving at V1 around 2017.395 and 2019.502. Another model driven by OMNI data with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) removed at the inner boundary suggests that ICMEs may play a significant role in the propagation of shocks into the interstellar medium.

  19. Body-Fitted Detonation Shock Dynamics and the Pseudo-Reaction-Zone Energy Release Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Short, Mark; Chqiuete, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Programmed-burn methods are a class of models used to propagate a detonation wave, without the high resolution cost associated with a direct numerical simulation. They separate the detonation evolution calculation into two components: timing and energy release. The timing component is usually calculated with a Detonation Shock Dynamics model, a surface evolution representation that relates the normal velocity of the surface (Dn) to its local curvature. The energy release component must appropriately capture the degree of energy change associated with chemical reaction while simultaneously remaining synchronized with the timing component. The Pseudo-Reaction-Zone (PRZ) model is a reactive burn like energy release model, converting reactants into products, but with a conversion rate that is a function of the DSD surface Dn field. As such, it requires the DSD calculation produce smooth Dn fields, a challenge in complex geometries. We describe a new body-fitted approach to the Detonation Shock Dynamics calculation which produces the required smooth Dn fields, and a method for calibrating the PRZ model such that the rate of energy release remains as synced as possible with the timing component. We show results for slab, rate-stick and arc geometries.

  20. Prospective Testing and Redesign of a Temporal Biomarker Based Risk Model for Patients With Septic Shock: Implications for Septic Shock Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector R. Wong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The temporal version of the pediatric sepsis biomarker risk model (tPERSEVERE estimates the risk of a complicated course in children with septic shock based on biomarker changes from days 1 to 3 of septic shock. We validated tPERSEVERE performance in a prospective cohort, with an a priori plan to redesign tPERSEVERE if it did not perform well. Biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort (n = 168 and study subjects were classified according to tPERSEVERE. To redesign tPERSEVERE, the validation cohort and the original derivation cohort (n = 299 were combined and randomly allocated to training (n = 374 and test (n = 93 sets. tPERSEVERE was redesigned using the training set and CART methodology. tPERSEVERE performed poorly in the validation cohort, with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75. Failure analysis revealed potential confounders related to clinical characteristics. The redesigned tPERSEVERE model had an AUC of 0.83 (0.79–0.87 and a sensitivity of 93% (68–97 for estimating the risk of a complicated course. Similar performance was seen in the test set. The classification tree segregated patients into two broad endotypes of septic shock characterized by either excessive inflammation or immune suppression.

  1. Hulth$\\grave{e}$n potential models for $\\alpha−\\alpha$ and $\\alpha−He^3$ elastic scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J BHOI; U LAHA

    2017-03-01

    Simple Hulth$\\grave{e}$n-type potential models are proposed to treat the $\\alpha−\\alpha$ and $\\alpha−He^3$ elastic scattering. The merit of our approach is examined by computing elastic scattering phases through the judicious use of the phase function method. Reasonable agreements in scattering phase shifts are obtained with the standard data.

  2. Hulthén potential models for α-α and α-He 3 elastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    BHOI, J.; LAHA, U.

    2017-03-01

    Simple Hulthén-type potential models are proposed to treat the α- α and α {-} {He}3 elastic scattering. The merit of our approach is examined by computing elastic scattering phases through the judicious use of the phase function method. Reasonable agreements in scattering phase shifts are obtained with the standard data.

  3. A vehicle-to-infrastructure channel model for blind corner scattering environments

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new geometrical blind corner scattering model for vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications. The proposed model takes into account single-bounce and double-bounce scattering stemming from fixed scatterers located on both sides of the curved street. Starting from the geometrical blind corner model, the exact expression of the angle of departure (AOD) is derived. Based on this expression, the probability density function (PDF) of the AOD and the Doppler power spectrum are determined. Analytical expressions for the channel gain and the temporal autocorrelation function (ACF) are provided under non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. Moreover, we investigate the impact of the position of transmitting vehicle relatively to the receiving road-side unit on the channel statistics. The proposed channel model is useful for the design and analysis of future V2I communication systems. Copyright © 2013 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc.

  4. Resonant Raman scattering theory for Kitaev models and their Majorana fermion boundary modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Brent; Knolle, Johannes; Perkins, Natalia B.; Burnell, F. J.

    2016-09-01

    We study the inelastic light scattering response in two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Kitaev spin-liquid models with Majorana spinon band structures in the symmetry classes BDI and D leading to protected gapless surface modes. We present a detailed calculation of the resonant Raman/Brillouin scattering vertex relevant to iridate and ruthenate compounds whose low-energy physics is believed to be proximate to these spin-liquid phases. In the symmetry class BDI, we find that while the resonant scattering on thin films can detect the gapless boundary modes of spin liquids, the nonresonant processes do not couple to them. For the symmetry class D, however, we find that the coupling between both types of light-scattering processes and the low-energy surface states is strongly suppressed. Additionally, we describe the effect of weak time-reversal symmetry breaking perturbations on the bulk Raman response of these systems.

  5. Forward and inverse models of electromagnetic scattering from layered media with rough interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaeenejad, Seyed Alireza

    This work addresses the problem of electromagnetic scattering from layered dielectric structures with rough boundaries and the associated inverse problem of retrieving the subsurface parameters of the structure using the scattered field. To this end, a forward scattering model based on the Small Perturbation Method (SPM) is developed to calculate the first-order spectral-domain bistatic scattering coefficients of a two-layer rough surface structure. SPM requires the boundaries to be slightly rough compared to the wavelength, but to understand the range of applicability of this method in scattering from two-layer rough surfaces, its region of validity is investigated by comparing its output with that of a first principle solver that does not impose roughness restrictions. The Method of Moments (MoM) is used for this purpose. Finally, for retrieval of the model parameters of the layered structure using scattered field, an inversion scheme based on the Simulated Annealing method is investigated and a strategy is proposed to address convergence to local minimum.

  6. Efficient scatter model for simulation of ultrasound images from computed tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, J. P.; Lo Vercio, L.; Rubi, P.; Fernandez Vera, E.; Barbuzza, R.; Del Fresno, M.; Larrabide, I.

    2015-12-01

    Background and motivation: Real-time ultrasound simulation refers to the process of computationally creating fully synthetic ultrasound images instantly. Due to the high value of specialized low cost training for healthcare professionals, there is a growing interest in the use of this technology and the development of high fidelity systems that simulate the acquisitions of echographic images. The objective is to create an efficient and reproducible simulator that can run either on notebooks or desktops using low cost devices. Materials and methods: We present an interactive ultrasound simulator based on CT data. This simulator is based on ray-casting and provides real-time interaction capabilities. The simulation of scattering that is coherent with the transducer position in real time is also introduced. Such noise is produced using a simplified model of multiplicative noise and convolution with point spread functions (PSF) tailored for this purpose. Results: The computational efficiency of scattering maps generation was revised with an improved performance. This allowed a more efficient simulation of coherent scattering in the synthetic echographic images while providing highly realistic result. We describe some quality and performance metrics to validate these results, where a performance of up to 55fps was achieved. Conclusion: The proposed technique for real-time scattering modeling provides realistic yet computationally efficient scatter distributions. The error between the original image and the simulated scattering image was compared for the proposed method and the state-of-the-art, showing negligible differences in its distribution.

  7. Fed state prior to hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma in a porcine model results in altered liver transcriptomic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Determan

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic shock is a leading cause of trauma-related mortality in both civilian and military settings. Resuscitation often results in reperfusion injury and survivors are susceptible to developing multiple organ failure (MOF. The impact of fed state on the overall response to shock and resuscitation has been explored in some murine models but few clinically relevant large animal models. We have previously used metabolomics to establish that the fed state results in a different metabolic response in the porcine liver following hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. In this study, we used our clinically relevant model of hemorrhagic shock and polytrauma and the Illumina HiSeq platform to determine if the liver transcriptomic response is also altered with respect to fed state. Functional analysis of the response to shock and resuscitation confirmed several typical responses including carbohydrate metabolism, cytokine inflammation, decreased cholesterol synthesis, and apoptosis. Our findings also suggest that the fasting state, relative to a carbohydrate prefed state, displays decreased carbohydrate metabolism, increased cytoskeleton reorganization and decreased inflammation in response to hemorrhagic shock and reperfusion. Evidence suggests that this is a consequence of a shrunken, catabolic state of the liver cells which provides an anti-inflammatory condition that partially mitigates hepatocellar damage.

  8. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND ACCELERATION AT SHOCK WAVES IN A FOCUSED TRANSPORT MODEL: IMPLICATIONS FOR MIXED SOLAR PARTICLE EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Dröge, W. [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Würzburg, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gedalin, M. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion Unversity of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2016-03-20

    We use numerical solutions of the focused transport equation obtained by an implicit stochastic differential equation scheme to study the evolution of the pitch-angle dependent distribution function of protons in the vicinity of shock waves. For a planar stationary parallel shock, the effects of anisotropic distribution functions, pitch-angle dependent spatial diffusion, and first-order Fermi acceleration at the shock are examined, including the timescales on which the energy spectrum approaches the predictions of diffusive shock acceleration theory. We then consider the case that a flare-accelerated population of ions is released close to the Sun simultaneously with a traveling interplanetary shock for which we assume a simplified geometry. We investigate the consequences of adiabatic focusing in the diverging magnetic field on the particle transport at the shock, and of the competing effects of acceleration at the shock and adiabatic energy losses in the expanding solar wind. We analyze the resulting intensities, anisotropies, and energy spectra as a function of time and find that our simulations can naturally reproduce the morphologies of so-called mixed particle events in which sometimes the prompt and sometimes the shock component is more prominent, by assuming parameter values which are typically observed for scattering mean free paths of ions in the inner heliosphere and energy spectra of the flare particles which are injected simultaneously with the release of the shock.

  9. Time-dependent simulation of oblique MHD cosmic-ray shocks using the two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Adam; Jones, T. W.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1995-01-01

    Using a new, second-order accurate numerical method we present dynamical simulations of oblique MHD cosmic-ray (CR)-modified plane shock evolution. Most of the calculations are done with a two-fluid model for diffusive shock acceleration, but we provide also comparisons between a typical shock computed that way against calculations carried out using the more complete, momentum-dependent, diffusion-advection equation. We also illustrate a test showing that these simulations evolve to dynamical equilibria consistent with previously published steady state analytic calculations for such shocks. In order to improve understanding of the dynamical role of magnetic fields in shocks modified by CR pressure we have explored for time asymptotic states the parameter space of upstream fast mode Mach number, M(sub f), and plasma beta. We compile the results into maps of dynamical steady state CR acceleration efficiency, epsilon(sub c). We have run simulations using constant, and nonisotropic, obliquity (and hence spatially) dependent forms of the diffusion coefficient kappa. Comparison of the results shows that while the final steady states achieved are the same in each case, the history of CR-MHD shocks can be strongly modified by variations in kappa and, therefore, in the acceleration timescale. Also, the coupling of CR and MHD in low beta, oblique shocks substantially influences the transient density spike that forms in strongly CR-modified shocks. We find that inside the density spike a MHD slow mode wave can be generated that eventually steepens into a shock. A strong layer develops within the density spike, driven by MHD stresses. We conjecture that currents in the shear layer could, in nonplanar flows, results in enhanced particle accretion through drift acceleration.

  10. Proton Acceleration at Oblique Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    Acceleration at the shock waves propagating oblique to the magnetic field is studied using a recently developed theoretical/numerical model. The model assumes that resonant hydromagnetic wave-particle interaction is the most important physical mechanism relevant to motion and acceleration of particles as well as to excitation and damping of waves. The treatment of plasma and waves is self-consistent and time dependent. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped, and hence particles will be pitch-angle-scattered. The total distribution is included in the model and neither introduction of separate population of seed particles nor some ad hoc escape rate of accelerated particles is needed. Results of the study show agreement with diffusive shock acceleration models in the prediction of power spectra for accelerated particles in the upstream region. However, they also reveal the presence of spectral break in the high-energy part of the spectra. The role of the second-order Fermi-like acceleration at the initial stage of the acceleration is discussed. The test case used in the paper is based on ISEE-3 data collected for the shock of 1978 November 12.

  11. CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF MUELLER MATRIX PATTERNS FOR POLARIZATION SCATTERING MODEL OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a model to describe polarized photon scattering in biological tissues. In this model, tissues are simplified to a mixture of scatterers and surrounding medium. There are two types of scatterers in the model: solid spheres and infinitely long solid cylinders. Variables related to the scatterers include: the densities and sizes of the spheres and cylinders, the orientation and angular distribution of cylinders. Variables related to the surrounding medium include: the refractive index, absorption coefficient and birefringence. In this paper, as a development we introduce an optical activity effect to the model. By comparing experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze the backscattering Mueller matrix patterns of several tissue-like media, and summarize the different effects coming from anisotropic scattering and optical properties. In addition, we propose a possible method to extract the optical activity values for tissues. Both the experimental and simulated results show that, by analyzing the Mueller matrix patterns, the microstructure and optical properties of the medium can be obtained. The characteristic features of Mueller matrix patterns are potentially powerful tools for studying the contrast mechanisms of polarization imaging for medical diagnosis.

  12. Comparison of models and measurements of angle-resolved scatter from irregular aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Adam B.; Richardson, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and validated a method for modeling the elastic scattering properties of biological and inert aerosols of irregular shape at near- and mid-wave infrared wavelengths. The method, based on Gaussian random particles, calculates the ensemble-average optical cross section and Mueller scattering matrix, using the measured aerodynamic size distribution and previously-reported refractive index as inputs. The utility of the Gaussian particle model is that it is controlled by only two parameters (σ and Γ) which we have optimized such that the model best reproduces the full angle-resolved Mueller scattering matrices measured at λ=1.55 μm in the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST). The method has been applied to wet-generated singlet biological spore samples, dry-generated biological spore clusters, and kaolin. The scattering computation is performed using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), which requires significant computational resources, and is thus implemented on LLGrid, a large parallel grid computer. For the cases presented, the best fit Gaussian particle model is in good qualitative correspondence with microscopy images of the corresponding class of particles. The measured and computed cross sections agree well within a factor of two overall, with certain cases bearing closer correspondence. In particular, the DDA reproduces the shape of the measured scatter function more accurately than Mie predictions. The DDA-computed depolarization factors are also in good agreement with measurement.

  13. A hybrid model for the three-dimensional scattering from objects in underwater waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampolli, Mario; Burnett, David S.; Jensen, Finn B.; Schmidt, Henrik; Blottman, John B.

    2003-10-01

    The scattering from objects in underwater waveguides is a multi-scale problem, involving both near-field effects in the vicinity of the scatterer as well as long-range propagation through the waveguide. To solve this problem, 3-D Finite-Element STructural Acoustics software developed at SACLANTCEN (FESTA) and an underwater waveguide propagation model based on wavenumber integration developed at MIT (3-D OASES), are coupled into a hybrid model. In a three-step method, the propagation model is used to compute the incident acoustic field in the vicinity of the target, which may be floating, proud, partially buried or buried in the sediment. The incident field data is subsequently passed as an input to the finite-element tool to compute the target-scattered acoustic nearfield. In the final step, the scattered field is propagated through the waveguide by OASES. A second method of coupling between the two models is based on the characterization of the target scattering via spherical harmonic basis responses. The advantage of the second method is that the finite-element computations need to be performed only once for each frequency, regardless of the incident field. Results for different targets with multistatic source-receiver configurations and with focused acoustic incident fields are presented.

  14. Channel modelling and performance analysis of V2I communication systems in blind bend scattering environments

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a new geometrical blind bend scattering model for vehicle-to- infrastructure (V2I) communications. The proposed model takes into account single-bounce and double- bounce scattering stemming from fixed scatterers located on both sides of a curved street. Starting from the geometrical blind bend model, the exact expression of the angle of departure (AOD) is derived. Based on this expression, the probability density function (PDF) of the AOD and the Doppler power spectrum are determined. Analytical expressions for the channel gain and the temporal autocorrelation function (ACF) are provided under non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions. Additionally, we investigate the impact of the position of transmitting vehicle relatively to the receiving road-side unit on the channel statistics. Moreover, we study the performance of different digital modulations over a sum of singly and doubly scattered (SSDS) channel. Note that the proposed V2I channel model falls under the umbrella of SSDS channels since the transmitted signal undergoes a combination of single-bounce and double-bounce scattering. We study some characteristic quantities of SSDS channels and derive expressions for the average symbol error probability of several modulation schemes over SSDS channels with and without diversity combining. The validity of these analytical expressions is confirmed by computer-based simulations.

  15. Quantification of morphology of bacterial colonies using laser scatter measurements and solid element optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas; Bayraktar, Bülent; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Hirleman, E. Dan; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hassler, Richard; Smith, Linda; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-02-01

    Traditional biological and chemical methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Optical scattering technology has been used for identification of bacterial cells in suspension, but with only limited success. Our published reports have demonstrated that scattered light based identification of Listeria colonies growing on solid surfaces is feasible with proper pattern recognition tools. Recently we have extended this technique to classification of other bacterial genera including, Salmonella, Bacillus, and Vibrio. Our approach may be highly applicable to early detection and classification of pathogens in food-processing industry and in healthcare. The unique scattering patterns formed by colonies of different species are created through differences in colony microstructure (on the order of wavelength used), bulk optical properties, and the macroscopic morphology. While it is difficult to model the effect on scatter-signal patterns owing to the microstructural changes, the influence of bulk optical properties and overall shape of colonies can be modeled using geometrical optics. Our latest research shows that it is possible to model the scatter pattern of bacterial colonies using solid-element optical modeling software (TracePro), and theoretically assess changes in macro structure and bulk refractive indices. This study allows predicting the theoretical limits of resolution and sensitivity of our detection and classification methods. Moreover, quantification of changes in macro morphology and bulk refractive index provides an opportunity to study the response of colonies to various reagents and antibiotics.

  16. Hydrodynamic modelling of accretion impacts in classical T Tauri stars: radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Bonito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. It is generally accepted that, in classical T Tauri stars, the plasma from the circumstellar disc accretes onto the stellar surface with free-fall velocity and the impact generates a shock. The impact region is expected to contribute to emission in different spectral bands; many studies have confirmed that the X-rays arise from the post-shock plasma but, otherwise, there are no studies in the literature investigating the origin of the observed UV emission which is apparently correlated to accretion. Aims: We investigated the effect of radiative heating of the infalling material by the post-shock plasma at the base of the accretion stream, with the aim to identify in which region a significant part of the UV emission originates. Methods: We developed a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model describing the impact of an accretion stream onto the stellar surface; the model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling of an optically thin plasma, the thermal conduction, and the heating due to absorption of X-ray radiation. The latter term represents the heating of the infalling plasma due to the absorption of X-rays emitted from the post-shock region. Results: We found that the radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma plays a non-negligible role in the accretion phenomenon. In particular, the dense and cold plasma of the pre-shock accretion column is gradually heated up to a few 105K due to irradiation of X-rays arising from the shocked plasma at the impact region. This heating mechanism does not affect significantly the dynamics of the post-shock plasma. On the other hand, a region of radiatively heated gas (that we consider a precursor) forms in the unshocked accretion column and contributes significantly to UV emission. Our model naturally reproduces the luminosity of UV emission lines correlated to accretion and shows that most of the UV emission originates from the precursor.

  17. Study of light scattering by a granulated coated sphere - a model of granulated blood cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Yurkin; D. de Kanter; A.G. Hoekstra

    2008-01-01

    We performed extensive simulations of light scattering by granulated coated sphere model using the discrete dipole approximation and varying model parameters in the ranges of sizes and refractive indices of granulated blood cells. We compared these results with predictions of Maxwell-Garnett effecti

  18. Quark-diquark model for p(\\bar p)-p elastic scattering at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Grichine, V M; Zotov, N P

    2012-01-01

    A model for elastic scattering of protons at high energies based on the quark-diquark representation of the proton is discussed. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data for the differential elastic cross-sections from available databases

  19. Quark-diquark model for p(anti p) -p elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grichine, V.M.; Starkov, N.I. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zotov, N.P. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    A model for elastic scattering of protons at high energies based on the quark-diquark representation of the proton is discussed. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data for the differential elastic cross-sections from available databases. (orig.)

  20. Modeling of laser light scattering in a medium with spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, Nadezhda L.; Maksimova, Irina L.

    2001-05-01

    Laser light radiation scattered by the system of spheres with various parameters was theoretically investigated by using of the Mie theory of electromagnetic scattering by a single sphere. The calculations were performed for systems of particles whose coordinates were specifically realized in random fashion according to the specified probabilities defined by the approximation of hard spheres. The parameters of model are the same as in the eye lense biotissue and were carried out by using of medical data about internal structure of men lens and some animals. In general the studied model presents the system of homogeneous spherical particles which are randomly distributed in the layer of thickness. We study the optical properties such as scattering effective cross-section and function of correlation in different models.

  1. Simulation of shock-induced melting of Ni using molecular dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koči, L.; Bringa, E. M.; Ivanov, D. S.; Hawreliak, J.; McNaney, J.; Higginbotham, A.; Zhigilei, L. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ahuja, R.

    2006-07-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we study shock-induced melting in Ni with an embedded atom method (EAM). Dynamic melting is probed by the pair correlation function, and we find a melting lattice temperature of Tmelt=6400±300K for a melting pressure of Pmelt=275±10GPa . When a combined MD+TTM (two-temperature model) approach is used to include electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling, Pmelt and Tmelt change. For a given pressure, the temperature behind the shock decreases due to electronic heat diffusion into the cold, unshocked material. This cooling of the material behind the shock slightly increases the melting pressure compared to simulations without electronic heat conduction and electron-phonon coupling. The decrease in the temperature behind the shock front is enhanced if the electron-phonon coupling is artificially made larger. We also explore the feasibility of using x-ray diffraction to detect melting.

  2. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  3. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  4. MODELING BRIGHT γ-RAY AND RADIO EMISSION AT FAST CLOUD SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-5210 (Japan); Patnaude, Daniel J.; Raymond, John C.; Slane, Patrick O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Nagataki, Shigehiro [RIKEN, Astrophysical Big Bang Laboratory and Interdisciplinary Theoretical Science Research Group, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ellison, Donald C., E-mail: slee@astro.isas.jaxa.jp, E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jraymond@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu, E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp [Physics Department, North Carolina State University, Box 8202, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite have revealed bright γ-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenario can explain the observed broadband spectral properties. The NLDSA scenario also succeeds in explaining the γ-ray spectrum but fails to reproduce the radio spectral index. Efficient NLDSA also results in a significant post-shock non-thermal pressure that limits the compression during cooling and prevents the formation of a prominent dense shell. Some other interesting differences between the two models in hydrodynamical behavior and resulting spectral features are illustrated.

  5. Mechanical behaviors and damage constitutive model of ceramics under shock compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Ning; Huilan Ren; Ping Li

    2008-01-01

    One-stage light gas gun was utilized to study the dynamic mechanical properties of AD90 alumina subjected to the shock loading. Manganin gauges were adopted to obtain the stress-time histories. The velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was used to obtain the free surface velocity profile and determine the Hugoniot elastic limit. The Hugoniot curves were fitted with the experimental data. From Hugoniot curves the compressive behaviors of AD90 alumina were found to change typically from elastic to "plastic". The dynamic mechanical behaviors for alumina under impact loadings were analyzed by using the path line principle of Lagrange analysis, including the nonlinear characteristics, the strain rate dependence, the dispersion and declination of shock wave in the material. A damage model applicable to ceramics subjected to dynamic compressive loading has been developed. The model was based on the damage micromechanics and wing crack nucleation and growth. The effects of parameters of both the micro-cracks nucleation and the initial crack size on the dynamic fracture strength were discussed. The results of the dynamic damage evolution model were compared with the experimental results and a good agreement was found.

  6. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bodin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rg is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies, simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model was developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU. However, compared to more complex models, this model's realism is limited by its lack of explicit treatment of radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  7. Efficient modeling of sun/shade canopy radiation dynamics explicitly accounting for scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bodin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The separation of global radiation (Rg into its direct (Rb and diffuse constituents (Rd is important when modeling plant photosynthesis because a high Rd:Rg ratio has been shown to enhance Gross Primary Production (GPP. To include this effect in vegetation models, the plant canopy must be separated into sunlit and shaded leaves, for example using an explicit 3-dimensional ray tracing model. However, because such models are often too intractable and computationally expensive for theoretical or large scale studies simpler sun-shade approaches are often preferred. A widely used and computationally efficient sun-shade model is a model originally developed by Goudriaan (1977 (GOU, which however does not explicitly account for radiation scattering.

    Here we present a new model based on the GOU model, but which in contrast explicitly simulates radiation scattering by sunlit leaves and the absorption of this radiation by the canopy layers above and below (2-stream approach. Compared to the GOU model our model predicts significantly different profiles of scattered radiation that are in better agreement with measured profiles of downwelling diffuse radiation. With respect to these data our model's performance is equal to a more complex and much slower iterative radiation model while maintaining the simplicity and computational efficiency of the GOU model.

  8. Systemic Inflammatory Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury, Femur Fracture, and Shock: An Experimental Murine Polytrauma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Probst

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite broad research in neurotrauma and shock, little is known on systemic inflammatory effects of the clinically most relevant combined polytrauma. Experimental investigation in an animal model may provide relevant insight for therapeutic strategies. We describe the effects of a combined injury with respect to lymphocyte population and cytokine activation. Methods. 45 male C57BL/6J mice (mean weight 27 g were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Animals were subjected to a weight drop closed traumatic brain injury (WD-TBI, a femoral fracture and hemorrhagic shock (FX-SH. Animals were subdivided into WD-TBI, FX-SH and combined trauma (CO-TX groups. Subjects were sacrificed at 96 h. Blood was analysed for cytokines and by flow cytometry for lymphocyte populations. Results. Mortality was 8%, 13% and 47% for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX groups (P<0.05. TNFα (11/13/139 for FX-SH/WD-TBI/CO-TX; P<0.05, CCL2 (78/96/227; P<0.05 and IL-6 (16/48/281; P=0.05 showed significant increases in the CO-TX group. Lymphocyte populations results for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX were: CD-4 (31/21/22; P= n.s., CD-8 (7/28/34, P<0.05, CD-4-CD-8 (11/12/18; P= n.s., CD-56 (36/7/8; P<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that a combination of closed TBI and femur-fracture/ shock results in an increase of the humoral inflammation. More attention to combined injury models in inflammation research is indicated.

  9. Mesenteric lymph duct ligation improves survival in a lethal shock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badami, Chirag D; Senthil, Maheswari; Caputo, Francis J; Rupani, Bobby J; Doucet, Danielle; Pisarenko, Vadim; Xu, Da-Zhong; Lu, Qi; Feinman, Rena; Deitch, Edwin A

    2008-12-01

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that factors released from the gut and carried in the mesenteric lymph contribute to mortality in a lethal gut I/R model. To test this hypothesis, a lethal splanchnic artery occlusion (SAO) shock model was used in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first set of experiments, ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct (LDL), which prevents gut-derived factors carried in the intestinal lymphatics from reaching the systemic circulation, significantly improved 24-h survival after a 20-min SAO insult (0% vs. 60% survival; P < 0.05). This increase in survival in the LDL-treated rats was associated with a blunted hypotensive response. Because increased iNOS-induced NO levels have been implicated in SAO-induced shock, we measured plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and liver iNOS protein levels in a second group of animals. Ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct significantly abrogated the SAO-induced increase in plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and the induction of hepatic iNOS (P < 0.05). In an additional series of studies, we documented that LDL increased not only 24-h but also long-term 7-day survival. During the course of these studies, we made the unexpected finding that Sprague-Dawley rats from different animal vendors had differential resistance to SAO, and that the time of the year that the experiments were carried out also influenced the results. Nonetheless, in conclusion, these studies support the hypothesis that factors carried in the mesenteric lymph significantly contribute to the development of irreversible shock after SAO.

  10. An Application of the Stereoscopic Self-Similar-Expansion Model to the Determination of CME-Driven Shock Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Volpes, L

    2015-01-01

    We present an application of the stereoscopic self-similar-expansion model (SSSEM) to Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) observations of the 03 April 2010 CME and its associated shock. The aim is to verify whether CME-driven shock parameters can be inferred from the analysis of j-maps. For this purpose we use the SSSEM to derive the CME and the shock kinematics. Arrival times and speeds, inferred assuming either propagation at constant speed or with uniform deceleration, show good agreement with Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) measurements. The shock standoff distance $[\\Delta]$, the density compression $[\\frac{\\rho_d}{\\rho_u}]$ and the Mach number $[M]$ are calculated combining the results obtained for the CME and shock kinematics with models for the shock location. Their values are extrapolated to $\\textrm{L}_1$ and compared to in-situ data. The in-situ standoff distance is obtained from ACE solar-wind measurements, and t...

  11. Valproic acid attenuates the multiple-organ dysfunction in a rat model of septic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG You; JIANG Yuan-xu; Ding Ze-jun; Shen Ai-ling; XU San-peng; YUAN Shi-ying; YAO Shang-long

    2010-01-01

    Background Valproic acid (VPA) improves early survival and organ function in a highly lethal poly-trauma and hemorrhagic shock model or other severe insults. We assessed whether VPA could improve organ function in a rat model of septic shock and illustrated the possible mechanisms.Methods Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n=10): control group, VPA group, LPS group, and LPS+VPA group. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 mg/kg) was injected intravenously to replicate the experimental model of septic shock. Rats were treated with VPA (300 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline. Six hours after LPS injection,blood was sampled for gas analysis, measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase,urine nitrogen, creatinine and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Lung, liver and kidney were collected for histopathological assessment. In addition, myeloperoxidase activity and tumor necrosis factor-α in pulmonary tissue were measured.Acetylation of histone H3 in lung was also evaluated by Western blotting.Results LPS resulted in a significant decrease in PaO2, which was increased by VPA administration followed LPS injection. In addition, LPS also induced an increase in the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, urine nitrogen, creatinine, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, these increases were attenuated in the LPS+VPA group. The lungs, liver and kidneys from the LPS group were significantly damaged compared with the control group. However, the damage was attenuated in the LPS+VPA group. Myeloperoxidase activity and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels in pulmonary tissue increased significantly in the LPS group compared with the control group. These increases were significantly inhibited in the LPS+VPA group. Acetylation of histone H3 in lung tissue in the LPS group was inhibited compared with the control. However, the level of acetylation of histone H3 in the LPS+VPA group was markedly elevated in contrast to the

  12. Micro-Doppler Effect of Extended Streamlined Targets Based on Sliding Scattering Centre Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The scattering center of extended streamlined targets can slide when the direction of radiation is changed. The sliding scattering center has influence on the micro-Doppler effect of micro-motion of the extended streamlined target. This paper focused on the micro-Doppler of the extended streamlined target for the bistatic radar. Based on the analysis, the analytical expressions of the micro-Doppler of coning motion with sliding scattering center model were given for bistatic radar. And the results were validated by the simulated results of the scattering field based on the full-wave method of the electromagnetic computation. The results showed that the sliding of the scattering center can make the micro-Doppler be less and distorted, and the influence of the sliding is different for two different types of the sliding scattering centers: sliding on the surface and sliding on the bottom circle. The analytical expressions of the micro-Doppler are helpful to analyze the time-frequency presentations (TFR of the coning motion of the extended streamlined target and to estimate the parameters of the target.

  13. Excitation function of elastic $pp$ scattering from a unitarily extended Bialas-Bzdak model

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F.; Csanád, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Bialas-Bzdak model of elastic proton-proton scattering assumes a purely imaginary forward scattering amplitude, which consequently vanishes at the diffractive minima. We extended the model to arbitrarily large real parts in a way that constraints from unitarity are satisfied. The resulting model is able to describe elastic $pp$ scattering not only at the lower ISR energies but also at $\\sqrt{s}=$7~TeV in a statistically acceptable manner, both in the diffractive cone and in the region of the first diffractive minimum. The total cross-section as well as the differential cross-section of elastic proton-proton scattering is predicted for the future LHC energies of $\\sqrt{s}=$13, 14, 15~TeV and also to 28~TeV. A non-trivial, significantly non-exponential feature of the differential cross-section of elastic proton-proton scattering is analyzed and the excitation function of the non-exponential behavior is predicted. The excitation function of the shadow profiles is discussed and related to saturation at small ...

  14. Efficient methods to model the scattering of ultrasonic guided waves in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, L.; Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-03-01

    The propagation of ultrasonic guided waves and their interaction with a defect is of interest to the nondestructive testing community. There is no general solution to the scattering problem and it is still an ongoing research topic. Due to the complexity of guided wave scattering problems, most existing models are related to the 2D case. However, thanks to the increase in computer calculation power, specific 3D problems can also be studied, with the help of numerical or semi-analytical methods. This paper describes two efficient methods aimed at modeling 3D scattering problems. The first method is the use of the Huygens' principle to reduce the size of finite element models. This principle allows the area of interest to be restricted to the very near field of the defect, for both the generation of the incident field and the modal decomposition of the scattered field. The second method consists of separating the 3D problem into two 2D problems for which the solutions are calculated and used to approximate the 3D solution. This can be used at low frequency-thickness products, where Lamb waves have a similar behavior to bulk waves. These two methods are presented briefly and compared on simple scattering cases.

  15. Excitation function of elastic $pp$ scattering from a unitarily extended Bialas-Bzdak model

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F; Csanád, M

    2014-01-01

    The Bialas-Bzdak model of elastic proton-proton scattering assumes a purely imaginary forward scattering amplitude, which consequently vanishes at the diffractive minima. We extended the model to arbitrarily large real parts in a way that constraints from unitarity are satisfied. The resulting model is able to describe elastic $pp$ scattering not only at the lower ISR energies but also at $\\sqrt{s}=$7 TeV in a statistically acceptable manner, both in the diffractive cone and in the region of the first diffractive minimum. The total cross-section as well as the differential cross-section of elastic proton-proton scattering is predicted for the future LHC energies of $\\sqrt{s}=$8, 13, 14, 15 TeV and also to 28 TeV. A non-trivial, significantly non-exponential feature of the differential cross-section of elastic proton-proton scattering is analyzed and the excitation function of the non-exponential behavior is predicted. The excitation function of the shadow profiles is discussed and related to saturation at sma...

  16. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Bi, Lei; Cairns, Brian; Liu, Li; Panetta, R. Lee; Travis, Larry D.; Yang, Ping; Zakharova, Nadezhda T.

    2016-05-01

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell's equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell-Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell-Lorentz equations, we trace the development of

  17. First-principles modeling of electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, Michael I., E-mail: michael.i.mishchenko@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Dlugach, Janna M. [Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 27 Zabolotny Str., 03680, Kyiv (Ukraine); Yurkin, Maxim A. [Voevodsky Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, SB RAS, Institutskaya str. 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bi, Lei [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Cairns, Brian [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Liu, Li [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Columbia University, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Panetta, R. Lee [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Travis, Larry D. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Yang, Ping [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Zakharova, Nadezhda T. [Trinnovim LLC, 2880 Broadway, New York, NY 10025 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    A discrete random medium is an object in the form of a finite volume of a vacuum or a homogeneous material medium filled with quasi-randomly and quasi-uniformly distributed discrete macroscopic impurities called small particles. Such objects are ubiquitous in natural and artificial environments. They are often characterized by analyzing theoretically the results of laboratory, in situ, or remote-sensing measurements of the scattering of light and other electromagnetic radiation. Electromagnetic scattering and absorption by particles can also affect the energy budget of a discrete random medium and hence various ambient physical and chemical processes. In either case electromagnetic scattering must be modeled in terms of appropriate optical observables, i.e., quadratic or bilinear forms in the field that quantify the reading of a relevant optical instrument or the electromagnetic energy budget. It is generally believed that time-harmonic Maxwell’s equations can accurately describe elastic electromagnetic scattering by macroscopic particulate media that change in time much more slowly than the incident electromagnetic field. However, direct solutions of these equations for discrete random media had been impracticable until quite recently. This has led to a widespread use of various phenomenological approaches in situations when their very applicability can be questioned. Recently, however, a new branch of physical optics has emerged wherein electromagnetic scattering by discrete and discretely heterogeneous random media is modeled directly by using analytical or numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations. Therefore, the main objective of this Report is to formulate the general theoretical framework of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media rooted in the Maxwell–Lorentz electromagnetics and discuss its immediate analytical and numerical consequences. Starting from the microscopic Maxwell–Lorentz equations, we trace the development

  18. High Energy (-p)p and pp Elastic Scatterings in QCD Inspired Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Juan; MA Wei-Xing; HE Xiao-Rong

    2007-01-01

    We propose QCD inspired model to calculate (p)p and pp elastic scatterings at high energies in this paper.A calculation for total cross section of (p)p and pp is performed in which the contributions from gluon-gluon,quark-quark,and gluon-quark interactions are included.Our results show that the QCD inspired model gives a perfect fit to experimental data of total cross section both for (p)p and pp elastic scatterings at the whole energy region where experimental data existed at FNAL and CERN.

  19. Rail Shock and Vibration Pre-Test Modeling of a Used Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Steven B.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; McConnell, Paul E.; Orchard, John

    2015-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and HLW generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation staff within the UFDC is responsible for addressing issues regarding the long-term or extended storage (ES) of UNF and its subsequent transportation. Available information is not sufficient to determine the ability of ES UNF, including high-burnup fuel, to withstand shock and vibration forces that could occur when the UNF is shipped by rail from nuclear power plant sites to a storage or disposal facility. There are three major gaps in the available information – 1) the forces that UNF assemblies would be subjected to when transported by rail, 2) the mechanical characteristics of fuel rod cladding, which is an essential structure for controlling the geometry of the UNF, a safety related feature, and 3) modeling methodologies to evaluate multiple possible degradation or damage mechanisms over the UNF lifetime. In order to address the first gap, options for tests to determine the physical response of surrogate UNF assemblies subjected to shock and vibration forces that are expected to be experienced during normal conditions of transportation (NCT) by rail must be identified and evaluated. The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to obtain data that will help researchers understand the mechanical loads that ES UNF assemblies would be subjected to under normal conditions of transportation and to fortify the computer modeling that will be necessary to evaluate the impact

  20. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  1. When Do Internal Shocks End and External Shocks Begin? Early-Time Broadband Modelling of GRB 051111

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, N R; Perley, D; Huang, K Y; Urata, Y; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Kocevski, D; Chen, H W; Qiu, Y; Kuo, P H; Huang, F Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Tashiro, M; Makishima, K; Nishihara, S; Sarugaku, Y

    2006-01-01

    Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, and supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken 10^21 cm^-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible over-abundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (R_V~ 2) and time constancy of both optical and X-ray spectra argue against dust destruction by the GRB itself.

  2. PROMSAR: a multiple scattering atmospheric model for the analysis of DOAS remote sensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, E.; Premuda, M.; Petritoli, A.; Giovanelli, G.; Kostadinov, I.; Ravegnani, F.; Bortoli, D.

    A correct interpretation of diffuse solar radiation measurements made by DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) remote sensors, requires the use of radiative transfer models of the atmosphere. The simplest models, the geometrical ones, consider radiation scattering in the atmosphere as a single scattering process. This means that the photons collected by the receiver have changed their direction from the sun only once. More realistic atmospheric models are those which consider multiple scattering: their application is useful and essential for the analysis of zenith and off-axis measurements regarding the lowest layers of the atmosphere, characterized by the highest values of air density and quantities of particles and aerosols acting as scattering nuclei. A new atmospheric model, called PROMSAR (PROcessing of Multi-Scattered Atmospheric Radiation), including multiple Rayleigh and Mie scattering, has recently been developed at the ISAC-CNR institute. It is based on a backward Monte Carlo technique, very suitable for studying the various interactions taking place in a complex and non-homogeneous system like the terrestrial atmosphere. PROMSAR code calculates the mean path of the radiation within each layer into which the atmosphere is sub-divided, taking into account the large variety of processes which solar radiation undergoes during propagation through the atmosphere. This quantity is then employed to work out the Air Mass Factor (AMF) of several trace gases, to simulate, both in zenith and off-axis configurations, their slant column amounts and to calculate the weighting functions from which information about the gas vertical distribution is obtained using inversion methods. Results from the model, simulations and comparisons with slant column measurements are presented and discussed.

  3. Re-evaluation of model-based light-scattering spectroscopy for tissue spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Condon; Šćepanović, Obrad; Mirkovic, Jelena; McGee, Sasha; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Fulghum, Stephen; Wallace, Michael; Tunnell, James; Bechtel, Kate; Feld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Model-based light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) seemed a promising technique for in-vivo diagnosis of dysplasia in multiple organs. In the studies, the residual spectrum, the difference between the observed and modeled diffuse reflectance spectra, was attributed to single elastic light scattering from epithelial nuclei, and diagnostic information due to nuclear changes was extracted from it. We show that this picture is incorrect. The actual single scattering signal arising from epithelial nuclei is much smaller than the previously computed residual spectrum, and does not have the wavelength dependence characteristic of Mie scattering. Rather, the residual spectrum largely arises from assuming a uniform hemoglobin distribution. In fact, hemoglobin is packaged in blood vessels, which alters the reflectance. When we include vessel packaging, which accounts for an inhomogeneous hemoglobin distribution, in the diffuse reflectance model, the reflectance is modeled more accurately, greatly reducing the amplitude of the residual spectrum. These findings are verified via numerical estimates based on light propagation and Mie theory, tissue phantom experiments, and analysis of published data measured from Barrett’s esophagus. In future studies, vessel packaging should be included in the model of diffuse reflectance and use of model-based LSS should be discontinued. PMID:19405760

  4. Quantum-statistical equation-of-state models of dense plasmas: high-pressure Hugoniot shock adiabats

    CERN Document Server

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two self-consistent equation-of-state models which differ from their electronic contribution: the atom in a spherical cell and the atom in a jellium of charges. It is shown that both models are well suited for the calculation of Hugoniot shock adiabats in the high pressure range (1 Mbar-10 Gbar), and that the atom-in-a-jellium model provides a better treatment of pressure ionization. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. Shell effects on shock adiabats are reviewed in the light of these models. They lead to additional features not only in the variations of pressure versus density, but also in the variations of shock velocity versus particle velocity. Moreover, such effects are found to be responsible for enhancement of the electronic specific heat.

  5. Deeply virtual Compton scattering in a relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzenberg, T.

    2007-09-15

    This thesis is mainly concerned with a model calculation for generalized parton distributions (GPDs). We calculate vectorial- and axial GPDs for the N{yields}N and N{yields}{delta} transition in the framework of a light front quark model. This requires the elaboration of a connection between transition amplitudes and GPDs. We provide the first quark model calculations for N{yields}{delta} GPDs. The examination of transition amplitudes leads to various model independent consistency relations. These relations are not exactly obeyed by our model calculation since the use of the impulse approximation in the light front quark model leads to a violation of Poincare covariance. We explore the impact of this covariance breaking on the GPDs and form factors which we determine in our model calculation and find large effects. The reference frame dependence of our results which originates from the breaking of Poincare covariance can be eliminated by introducing spurious covariants. We extend this formalism in order to obtain frame independent results from our transition amplitudes. (orig.)

  6. Non-Boltzmann Modeling for Air Shock-Layer Radiation at Lunar-Return Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Hollis, Brian R.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the non-Boltzmann modeling of the radiating atomic and molecular electronic states present in lunar-return shock-layers. The Master Equation is derived for a general atom or molecule while accounting for a variety of excitation and de-excitation mechanisms. A new set of electronic-impact excitation rates is compiled for N, O, and N2+, which are the main radiating species for most lunar-return shock-layers. Based on these new rates, a novel approach of curve-fitting the non-Boltzmann populations of the radiating atomic and molecular states is developed. This new approach provides a simple and accurate method for calculating the atomic and molecular non-Boltzmann populations while avoiding the matrix inversion procedure required for the detailed solution of the Master Equation. The radiative flux values predicted by the present detailed non-Boltzmann model and the approximate curve-fitting approach are shown to agree within 5% for the Fire 1634 s case.

  7. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  8. A model for the thermal radio-continuum emission from radiative shocks in colliding stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Montes, G; Canto, J; Perez-Torres, M A; Alberdi, A

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The interaction of two isotropic stellar winds is studied in order to calculate the free-free emission from the wind collision region. The effects of the binary separation and the wind momentum ratio on the emission from the wind-wind interaction region are investigated. Methods. We developed a semi-analytical model for calculating the thermal emission from colliding stellar winds. Assuming radiative shocks for the compressed layer, which are expected in close binaries, we obtained the emission measure of the thin shell. Then, we computed the total optical depth along each line of sight to obtain the emission from the whole configuration. Results. Here, we present predictions of the free-free emission at radio frequencies from analytic, radiative shock models in colliding wind binaries. It is shown that the emission from the wind collision region mainly arises from the optically thick region of the compressed layer and scales as ~ D^{4/5}, where D is the binary separation. The predicted flux density fro...

  9. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  10. The small heat shock proteins from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans: gene expression, phylogenetic analysis, and structural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Daniela A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that has been successfully used in metal bioleaching. In this study, an analysis of the A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 genome revealed the presence of three sHSP genes, Afe_1009, Afe_1437 and Afe_2172, that encode proteins from the HSP20 family, a class of intracellular multimers that is especially important in extremophile microorganisms. Results The expression of the sHSP genes was investigated in A. ferrooxidans cells submitted to a heat shock at 40°C for 15, 30 and 60 minutes. After 60 minutes, the gene on locus Afe_1437 was about 20-fold more highly expressed than the gene on locus Afe_2172. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses showed that the sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are possible non-paralogous proteins, and are regulated by the σ32 factor, a common transcription factor of heat shock proteins. Structural studies using homology molecular modeling indicated that the proteins encoded by Afe_1009 and Afe_1437 have a conserved α-crystallin domain and share similar structural features with the sHSP from Methanococcus jannaschii, suggesting that their biological assembly involves 24 molecules and resembles a hollow spherical shell. Conclusion We conclude that the sHSPs encoded by the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes are more likely to act as molecular chaperones in the A. ferrooxidans heat shock response. In addition, the three sHSPs from A. ferrooxidans are not recent paralogs, and the Afe_1437 and Afe_1009 genes could be inherited horizontally by A. ferrooxidans.

  11. Finite difference time domain modeling of steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Deirdre A.; Langdon, H. Scott; Beggs, John H.; Steich, David J.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1992-01-01

    The approach chosen to model steady state scattering from jet engines with moving turbine blades is based upon the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method is a numerical electromagnetic program based upon the direct solution in the time domain of Maxwell's time dependent curl equations throughout a volume. One of the strengths of this method is the ability to model objects with complicated shape and/or material composition. General time domain functions may be used as source excitations. For example, a plane wave excitation may be specified as a pulse containing many frequencies and at any incidence angle to the scatterer. A best fit to the scatterer is accomplished using cubical cells in the standard cartesian implementation of the FDTD method. The material composition of the scatterer is determined by specifying its electrical properties at each cell on the scatterer. Thus, the FDTD method is a suitable choice for problems with complex geometries evaluated at multiple frequencies. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the FDTD method.

  12. Laboratory light scattering from regolith surface and simulation of data by Hapke model

    CERN Document Server

    Deb, S

    2015-01-01

    The small atmosphereless objects of our solar system, such as asteroids, the moon are covered by layer of dust particles known as regolith, formed by meteoritic impact. The light scattering studies of such dust layer by laboratory experiment and numerical simulation are two important tools to investigate their physical properties. In the present work, the light scattered from a layer of dust particles, containing 0.3{\\mu}m Al2O3 at wavelength 632.8 nm is analysed. This work has been performed by using a light scattering instrument 'ellipsometer', at the Department of Physics, Assam Universiy, Silchar, India. Through this experiment, we generated in laboratory the photometric and polarimetric phase curves of light scattered from such a layer. In order to numerically simulate this data, we used Hapke's model combined with Mie's single particle scattering properties. The perpendicular and parallel components of single particle albedo and the phase function were derived from Mie theory. By using the Hapke's model...

  13. Simulation and experimental validation of vehicle dynamic characteristics for displacement-sensitive shock absorber using fluid-flow modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon-Tae; Moon, Byung-Young

    2006-02-01

    In this study, a new mathematical dynamic model of shock absorber is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristics of an automotive system. The performance of shock absorber is directly related to the car behaviours and performance, both for handling and ride comfort. Damping characteristics of automotive can be analysed by considering the performance of displacement-sensitive shock absorber (DSSA) for the ride comfort. The proposed model of the DSSA is considered as two modes of damping force (i.e. soft and hard) according to the position of piston. For the simulation validation of vehicle-dynamic characteristics, the DSSA is mathematically modelled by considering the fluid flow in chamber and valve in accordance with the hard, transient and soft zone. And the vehicle dynamic characteristic of the DSSA is analysed using quarter car model. To show the effectiveness of the proposed damper, the analysed results of damping characteristics were compared with the experimental results, which showed similar behaviour with the corresponding experimental one. The simulation results of frequency response are compared with the ones of passive shock absorber. From the simulation results of the DSSA, it can be concluded that the ride comfort of the DSSA increased at the low-amplitude road condition and the driving safety was increased partially at the high-amplitude road condition. The results reported herein will provide a better understanding of the shock absorber. Moreover, it is believed that those properties of the results can be utilised in the dynamic design of the automotive system.

  14. Design of Wideband MIMO Car-to-Car Channel Models Based on the Geometrical Street Scattering Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurilla Avazov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a wideband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO car-to-car (C2C channel model based on the geometrical street scattering model. Starting from the geometrical model, a MIMO reference channel model is derived under the assumption of single-bounce scattering in line-of-sight (LOS and non-LOS (NLOS propagation environments. The proposed channel model assumes an infinite number of scatterers, which are uniformly distributed in two rectangular areas located on both sides of the street. Analytical solutions are presented for the space-time-frequency cross-correlation function (STF-CCF, the two-dimensional (2D space CCF, the time-frequency CCF (TF-CCF, the temporal autocorrelation function (ACF, and the frequency correlation function (FCF. An efficient sum-of-cisoids (SOCs channel simulator is derived from the reference model. It is shown that the temporal ACF and the FCF of the SOC channel simulator fit very well to the corresponding correlation functions of the reference model. To validate the proposed channel model, the mean Doppler shift and the Doppler spread of the reference model have been matched to real-world measurement data. The comparison results demonstrate an excellent agreement between theory and measurements, which confirms the validity of the derived reference model. The proposed geometry-based channel simulator allows us to study the effect of nearby street scatterers on the performance of C2C communication systems.

  15. Spatial distribution of mineral dust single scattering albedo based on DREAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Ničković, Slobodan; Ilić, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust comprises a significant part of global aerosol burden. There is a large uncertainty in estimating role of dust in Earth's climate system, partly due to poor characterization of its optical properties. Single scattering albedo is one of key optical properties determining radiative effects of dust particles. While it depends on dust particle sizes, it is also strongly influenced by dust mineral composition, particularly the content of light-absorbing iron oxides and the mixing state (external or internal). However, an assumption of uniform dust composition is typically used in models. To better represent single scattering albedo in dust atmospheric models, required to increase accuracy of dust radiative effect estimates, it is necessary to include information on particle mineral content. In this study, we present the spatial distribution of dust single scattering albedo based on the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) with incorporated particle mineral composition. The domain of the model covers Northern Africa, Middle East and the European continent, with horizontal resolution set to 1/5°. It uses eight particle size bins within the 0.1-10 μm radius range. Focusing on dust episode of June 2010, we analyze dust single scattering albedo spatial distribution over the model domain, based on particle sizes and mineral composition from model output; we discuss changes in this optical property after long-range transport. Furthermore, we examine how the AERONET-derived aerosol properties respond to dust mineralogy. Finally we use AERONET data to evaluate model-based single scattering albedo. Acknowledgement We would like to thank the AERONET network and the principal investigators, as well as their staff, for establishing and maintaining the AERONET sites used in this work.

  16. Quasi-one-dimensional scattering in a discrete model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valiente, Manuel; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    that more than one confinement-induced resonances appear due to the nonseparability of the center-of-mass and relative coordinates on the lattice. This is done by solving its corresponding Lippmann-Schwinger-like equation. We characterize the effective one-dimensional interaction and compare it with a model...

  17. Simple Regge pole model for Compton scattering of protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1978-08-01

    It is shown that by a phenomenological choice of the residue functions, the differential cross section for ..gamma.. p ..-->.. ..gamma.. p, including the very recent measurements up to /sup -/t=4.3 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, can be explained at all measured energies greater than 2 GeV with simple Regge pole model.

  18. Evaluation of a Two-Length Scale Turbulence Model with Experiments on Shock-Driven Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Gore, Rob; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-11-01

    A new second moment turbulence model which uses separate transport and decay length scales is used to model the shock-driven instability. The ability of the model to capture the evolution of turbulence statistics and mixing is discussed. Evaluation is based on comparison to the Georgia Tech shock tube experiments. In the experiments a membraneless light-over-heavy interface is created. There is a long-wavelength perturbation which exists due to inclination of the entire shock tube. By limiting calculations to one dimension, there is not a geometric description of the incline, and the ability of the transport length scale alone to capture the effect of the long-wavelength perturbation is tested.

  19. On the Relationship between Pearson Correlation Coefficient and Kendall’s Tau under Bivariate Homogeneous Shock Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jiantian Wang

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between Kendall's tau and Pearson correlation coefficient under the so-called bivariate homogeneous shock (BHS) model. We find Capéraà-Genest-type inequality may not hold for general BHS model. Computational simulations suggest that the Denials' inequality is likely to be true.

  20. Small-angle neutron scattering from multilamellar lipid bilayers: Theory, model, and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1996-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering data obtained from fully hydrated, multilamellar phospholipid bilayers with deuterated acyl chains of different length are presented and analyzed within a paracrystalline theory and a geometric model that permit the bilayer structure to be determined under condition...

  1. A Path Loss Model for Non-Line-of-Sight Ultraviolet Multiple Scattering Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    relevant model parameters. 2.3. Elementary Events for Photon RandomMigration. Gener- ally, it is impossible to predict with certainty the trajectory of a...Witt, “Multiple scattering in reflection nebulae—I: a Monte Carlo approach,” The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, vol. 35, pp. 1–6, 1977. [22] D

  2. Distinguishing among models of strong WL WL scattering at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilgore, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Using a multi-channel analysis of strong W{sub L} W{sub L} scattering signals, I study the LHC`s ability to distinguish among various models of strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sectors. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Van der Waals Type Model for Neutron-Proton Elastic Scattering at High Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, F.

    1980-12-01

    The most recent measurements of the angular distribution and total cross-section for neutron-proton elastic scattering between 70< pL <400 GeV/c with squared four momentum transfer -t ≤ 3.6 (GeV/c)2 have been explained using Van der Waals type model.

  4. Simple Regge pole model for proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1979-06-01

    It is shown that by a phenomemological choice of residue functions, the angular distribution in pp elastic scattering at high energies, including the most recent measurement at ..sqrt..s = 27.4 GeV with squared 4-momentum transfer, -t, extending up to 14 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, can be explained with simple Regge pole model.

  5. Reorganization of pathological control functions of memory-A neural model for tissue healing by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar

    2005-04-01

    Since 1980 shock waves have proven effective in the field of extracorporeal lithotripsy. More than 10 years ago shock waves were successfully applied for various indications such as chronic pain, non-unions and, recently, for angina pectoris. These fields do not profit from the disintegration power but from stimulating and healing effects of shock waves. Increased metabolism and neo-vascularization are reported after shock wave application. According to C. J. Wang, a biological cascade is initiated, starting with a stimulating effect of physical energy resulting in increased circulation and metabolism. Pathological memory of neural control patterns is considered the reason for different pathologies characterized by insufficient metabolism. This paper presents a neural model for reorganization of pathological reflex patterns. The model acts on associative memory functions of the brain based on modification of synaptic junctions. Accordingly, pathological memory effects of the autonomous nervous system are reorganized by repeated application of shock waves followed by development of normal reflex patterns. Physiologic control of muscle and vascular tone is followed by increased metabolism and tissue repair. The memory model may explain hyper-stimulation effects in pain therapy.

  6. Modelling Thermal Shock in Functionally Graded Plates with Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav N. Burlayenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermomechanical behavior and crack propagation in a functionally graded metal/ceramic plate undergoing thermal shock are analyzed by using the finite element method. A two-dimensional plane strain functionally graded finite element has been developed within the ABAQUS software environment for this purpose. An actual material gradation has been accomplished by sampling material quantities directly at the Gauss points of the element via programming appropriate user-defined subroutines. The virtual crack closure technique is used to model a crack growth under thermal loading. Contact possible between crack lips during the crack advance is taken into account in thermomechanical simulations as well. The paper shows that the presented finite element model can be applied to provide an insight into the thermomechanical respond and failure of the metal/ceramic plate.

  7. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can...... the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... of bacteriorhodopsin and a continuous model of the nanodisc. The position and orientation of the membrane protein relative to the nanodisc is determined as well as the structural changes of the nanodisc. Paper II describes the use of the same approach to determine the relative position of a nanodisc and the membrane...

  8. Universal Quantum Computation by Scattering in the Fermi-Hubbard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Ning; Salton, Grant; Thomas, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    The Hubbard model may be the simplest model of particles interacting on a lattice, but simulation of its dynamics remains beyond the reach of current numerical methods. In this article, we show that general quantum computations can be encoded into the physics of wave packets propagating through a planar graph, with scattering interactions governed by the fermionic Hubbard model. Therefore, simulating the model on planar graphs is as hard as simulating quantum computation. We give two different arguments, demonstrating that the simulation is difficult both for wave packets prepared as excitations of the fermionic vacuum, and for hole wave packets at filling fraction one-half in the limit of strong coupling. In the latter case, which is described by the t-J model, there is only reflection and no transmission in the scattering events, as would be the case for classical hard spheres. In that sense, the construction provides a quantum mechanical analog of the Fredkin-Toffoli billiard ball computer.

  9. Design, Modeling, and Analysis of a Novel Hydraulic Energy-Regenerative Shock Absorber for Vehicle Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce energy consumption or improve energy efficiency, the regenerative devices recently have drawn the public’s eyes. In this paper, a novel hydraulic energy-regenerative shock absorber (HERSA is developed for vehicle suspension to regenerate the vibration energy which is dissipated by conventional viscous dampers into heat waste. At first, the schematic of HERSA is presented and a mathematic model is developed to describe the characteristic of HERSA. Then the parametric sensitivity analysis of the vibration energy is expounded, and the ranking of their influences is k1≫m2>m1>k2≈cs. Besides, a parametric study of HERSA is adopted to research the influences of the key parameters on the characteristic of HERSA. Moreover, an optimization of HERSA is carried out to regenerate more power as far as possible without devitalizing the damping characteristic. To make the optimization results more close to the actual condition, the displacement data of the shock absorber in the road test is selected as the excitation in the optimization. The results show that the RMS of regenerated energy is up to 107.94 W under the actual excitation. Moreover it indicates that the HERSA can improve its performance through the damping control.

  10. Salvianolate increases heat shock protein expression in a cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinnan Zhang; Wei Lu; Qiang Lei; Xi Tao; Hong You; Pinghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Stroke remains a worldwide health problem. Salvianolate exerts a protective effect in various mi-crocirculatory disturbance-related diseases, but studies of the mechanisms underlying its protective action have mainly focused on the myocardium, whereas little research has been carried out in brain tissue fol owing ischemia-reperfusion. We assessed the neuroprotective effects of salvianolate in a rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury induced using the suture method. At onset and 24 and 48 hours after reperfusion, rats were intraperitoneal y injected with salvianolate (18 mg/kg) or saline. Neurological deficit scores at 72 hours showed that the neurological functions of rats that had received salvianolate were significantly better than those of the rats that had received saline. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride was used to stain cerebral tissue to determine the extent of the infarct area. A significantly smal er infarct area and a significantly lower number of apoptotic cel s were observed after treatment with salvianolate compared with the saline treatment. Expression of heat shock protein 22 and phosphorylated protein kinase B in ischemic brain tissue was significantly greater in rats treated with salvianolate compared with rats treated with saline. Our findings suggest that salvianolate provides neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury by upregulating heat shock protein 22 and phosphorylated protein kinase B expression.

  11. A multiple shock tube and chemical kinetic modeling study of diethyl ether pyrolysis and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, K; Gillespie, F; Simmie, J M; Curran, H J; Kuraguchi, Y; Hoshikawa, H; Yamane, M; Hidaka, Y

    2010-09-02

    The pyrolysis and oxidation of diethyl ether (DEE) has been studied at pressures from 1 to 4 atm and temperatures of 900-1900 K behind reflected shock waves. A variety of spectroscopic diagnostics have been used, including time-resolved infrared absorption at 3.39 mum and time-resolved ultraviolet emission at 431 nm and absorption at 306.7 nm. In addition, a single-pulse shock tube was used to measure reactant, intermediate, and product species profiles by GC samplings at different reaction times varying from 1.2 to 1.8 ms. A detailed chemical kinetic model comprising 751 reactions involving 148 species was assembled and tested against the experiments with generally good agreement. In the early stages of reaction the unimolecular decomposition and hydrogen atom abstraction of DEE and the decomposition of the ethoxy radical have the largest influence. In separate experiments at 1.9 atm and 1340 K, it is shown that DEE inhibits the reactivity of an equimolar mixture of hydrogen and oxygen (1% of each).

  12. Pulse transit time variability analysis in an animal model of endotoxic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Collin H H; Chan, Gregory S H; Middleton, Paul M; Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Javed, Faizan; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-invasively measured pulse transit time (PTT) to monitor the cardiovascular systems in critically ill patients, like sepsis, can be of significant clinical value. In this study, the potential of PTT and its variability in cardiovascular system monitoring in a mechanically ventilated and anesthetized rabbit model of endotoxic shock was assessed. Eight adult New Zealand white rabbits, which were treated with endotoxin bolus infusion, were studied. Measurements of PTT, pre-ejection period (PEP), and vascular transit time (VTT) were obtained in pre- and post-intervention stages (before and 90 minutes after the administration of endotoxin). The decrease in mean PTT (p VTT (p VTT (R(2) ≥ 0.84 with positive slope). Computation of coherence and phase shift in the ventilating frequency band (HF: 0.50 - 0.75 Hz) showed that the respiratory variation in PTT was synchronized with both PEP and VTT (coherence > 0.84 with phase shift less than one cardiac beat). These results highlighted the potential value of PTT and its respiratory variation in characterizing the pathophysioloigcal hemodynamic change in endotoxic shock.

  13. Experimental models of acute infection and Toll-like receptor driven septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferstl, Ruth; Spiller, Stephan; Fichte, Sylvia; Dreher, Stefan; Kirschning, Carsten J

    2009-01-01

    Mainly Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections, but also other infections such as with fungal or viral pathogens, can cause the life-threatening clinical condition of septic shock. Transgression of the host immune response from a local level limited to the pathogen's place of entry to the systemic level is recognised as a major mode of action leading to sepsis. This view has been established upon demonstration of the capacity of specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) to elicit symptoms of septic shock upon systemic administration. Immune stimulatory PAMPs are agonists of soluble, cytoplasmic, as well as/or cell membrane-anchored and/or -spanning pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, reflection of pathogen-host crosstalk triggering sepsis pathogenesis upon an infection by a host response to challenge with an isolated PAMP is incomplete. Therefore, an experimental model more reflective of pathogen-host interaction requires experimental host confrontation with a specific pathogen in its viable form resulting in a collective stimulation of a variety of specific PRRs. This chapter describes methods to analyse innate pathogen sensing by the host on both a cellular and systemic level.

  14. Cardiogenic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  15. Renormalized scattering series for frequency-domain waveform modelling of strong velocity contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, M.; Wu, R. S.

    2016-08-01

    An improved description of scattering and inverse scattering processes in reflection seismology may be obtained on the basis of a scattering series solution to the Helmoltz equation, which allows one to separately model primary and multiple reflections. However, the popular scattering series of Born is of limited seismic modelling value, since it is only guaranteed to converge if the global contrast is relatively small. For frequency-domain waveform modelling of realistic contrasts, some kind of renormalization may be required. The concept of renormalization is normally associated with quantum field theory, where it is absolutely essential for the treatment of infinities in connection with observable quantities. However, the renormalization program is also highly relevant for classical systems, especially when there are interaction effects that act across different length scales. In the scattering series of De Wolf, a renormalization of the Green's functions is achieved by a split of the scattering potential operator into fore- and backscattering parts; which leads to an effective reorganization and partially re-summation of the different terms in the Born series, so that their order better reflects the physics of reflection seismology. It has been demonstrated that the leading (single return) term in the De Wolf series (DWS) gives much more accurate results than the corresponding Born approximation, especially for models with high contrasts that lead to a large accumulation of phase changes in the forward direction. However, the higher order terms in the DWS that are associated with internal multiples have not been studied numerically before. In this paper, we report from a systematic numerical investigation of the convergence properties of the DWS which is based on two new operator representations of the DWS. The first operator representation is relatively similar to the original scattering potential formulation, but more global and explicit in nature. The second

  16. A spectral domain approach to modelling of EM scattering for Synthetic Aperture Radar target recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.; Vachon, P. W.

    2005-08-01

    A Fourier-based technique for electromagnetic (EM) wave reconstruction with application to polarimetric airborne and spaceborne radar data exploitation is presented. The method is different from conventional modelling techniques for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications as a result of the full electromagnetic treatment of field interactions with the scatterer, the possibility of introducing new and controllable feature classes for target classification, and accurate decomposition of the source impulse response function that avoids potential errors (e.g. loss of coherent information) associated with the spherical phase approximations. The capability of extracting scatterer information such as the coherent radar cross section (RCS) is explored.

  17. Inelastic scattering in a local polaron model with quadratic coupling to bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the inelastic scattering probabilities in the wide band limit of a local polaron model with quadratic coupling to bosons. The central object is a two-particle Green's function which is calculated exactly using a purely algebraic approach. Compared with the usual linear interaction term...... a quadratic interaction term gives higher probabilities for inelastic scattering involving a large number of bosons. As an application we consider the problem hot-electron-mediated energy transfer at surfaces and use the delta self-consistent field extension of density-functional theory to calculate...

  18. SAR Automatic Target Recognition Based on Numerical Scattering Simulation and Model-based Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a model-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR automatic target recognition algorithm. Scattering is computed offline using the laboratory-developed Bidirectional Analytic Ray Tracing software and the same system parameter settings as the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR datasets. SAR images are then created by simulated electromagnetic scattering data. Shape features are extracted from the measured and simulated images, and then, matches are searched. The algorithm is verified using three types of targets from MSTAR data and simulated SAR images, and it is shown that the proposed approach is fast and easy to implement with high accuracy.

  19. An analytic model for acoustic scattering from an impedance cylinder placed normal to an impedance plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Michelle Elaine

    2003-10-01

    This thesis is a presentation of an analytic model, developed in cylindrical coordinates, for the scattering of a spherical wave off a semi infinite right cylinder placed normal to a ground surface. The model is developed to simulate a single tree and is developed as a first piece to creating a model for estimating attenuation in a forest based on scattering from individual tree trunks. Comparisons are made to the plane wave case, the transparent cylinder case, and the rigid and soft ground cases as a method of theoretically verifying the model. Agreement is excellent for these benchmark cases. Model sensitivity to five parameters is determined, which aids in error analysis, particularly when comparing the model results to experimental data, and offers insight into the inner workings of the model. An experiment was performed to collect real-world data on scattering from a cylinder normal to a ground surface. The data from the experiment is analyzed with a transfer function method into frequency and impulse responses. The model results are compared to the experimental data.

  20. Falsifying models of new physics via WW scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distler, Jacques; Grinstein, Benjamin; Porto, Rafael A; Rothstein, Ira Z

    2007-01-26

    We show that the coefficients of operators in the electroweak chiral Lagrangian can be bounded if the underlying theory obeys the usual assumptions of Lorentz invariance, analyticity, unitarity, and crossing to arbitrarily short distances. Violations of these bounds can be explained by either the existence of new physics below the naive cutoff of the effective theory, or by the breakdown of one of these assumptions in the short distance theory. As a corollary, if no light resonances are found, then a measured violation of the bound would falsify generic models of string theory.

  1. Shock-acceleration of a pair of gas inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Nunez, Jose Alonso; Reese, Daniel; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, David; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    A shock wave moving through the interstellar medium distorts density inhomogeneities through the deposition of baroclinic vorticity. This process is modeled experimentally in a shock tube for a two-bubble interaction. A planar shock wave in nitrogen traverses two soap-film bubbles filled with argon. The two bubbles share an axis that is orthogonal to the shock wave and are separated from one another by a distance of approximately one bubble diameter. Atomization of the soap-film by the shock wave results in dispersal of droplets that are imaged using Mie scattering with a laser sheet through the bubble axis. Initial condition images of the bubbles in free-fall (no holder) are taken using a high-speed camera and then two post-shock images are obtained with two laser pulses and two cameras. The first post-shock image is of the early time compression stage when the sphere has become ellipsoidal, and the second image shows the emergence of vortex rings which have evolved due to vorticity depostion by the shock wave. Bubble morphology is characterized with length scale measurements.

  2. Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Zachary; Paz, Gil; Roy, Joydeep

    2014-10-01

    We combine constraints from analyticity with experimental electron-proton scattering data to determine the proton magnetic radius without model-dependent assumptions on the shape of the form factor. We also study the impact of including electron-neutron scattering data, and ππ→NN ¯ data. Using representative data sets we find for a cut of Q2≤0.5 GeV2, rMp=0.91-0.06+0.03±0.02 fm using just proton scattering data; rMp=0.87-0.05+0.04±0.01 fm adding neutron data; and rMp=0.87-0.02+0.02 fm adding ππ data. We also extract the neutron magnetic radius from these data sets obtaining rMn=0.89-0.03+0.03 fm from the combined proton, neutron, and ππ data.

  3. Comment on "More on Heisenberg's model for high energy nucleon-nucleon scattering"

    CERN Document Server

    Block, Martin M; Ha, Phuoc; Halzen, Francis

    2016-01-01

    We comment on the treatment of asymptotic black-disk scattering in a recent paper of Nastase and Sonnenschein, Phys.\\ Rev.\\ D\\ {\\bf 92}, 015028 (2015), on scattering in an updated version of the Heisenberg model which gives $pp$ and $\\bar{p}p$ cross sections which increase at very high energies as $\\ln^2s$. We show that the total cross section they define does not correspond to that measured in experiments, with the result that their limit for the ratio $\\sigma_{\\rm elas}/\\sigma_{\\rm tot}$ is too small by a factor 2. The correct ratio for black-disk scattering, $\\sigma_{\\rm elas}/\\sigma_{\\rm tot} \\rightarrow 1/2$ for $s\\rightarrow\\infty$, is strongly supported by experiment.

  4. Fourier-transform-based model for carrier transport in semiconductor heterostructures: Longitudinal optical phonon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lü, X.; Schrottke, L.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-07

    We present scattering rates for electrons at longitudinal optical phonons within a model completely formulated in the Fourier domain. The total intersubband scattering rates are obtained by averaging over the intrasubband electron distributions. The rates consist of the Fourier components of the electron wave functions and a contribution depending only on the intersubband energies and the intrasubband carrier distributions. The energy-dependent part can be reproduced by a rational function, which allows for the separation of the scattering rates into a dipole-like contribution, an overlap-like contribution, and a contribution which can be neglected for low and intermediate carrier densities of the initial subband. For a balance between accuracy and computation time, the number of Fourier components can be adjusted. This approach facilitates an efficient design of complex heterostructures with realistic, temperature- and carrier density-dependent rates.

  5. Challenging shock models with SOFIA OH observations in the high-mass star-forming region Cepheus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusdorf, A.; Güsten, R.; Menten, K. M.; Flower, D. R.; Pineau des Forêts, G.; Codella, C.; Csengeri, T.; Gómez-Ruiz, A. I.; Heyminck, S.; Jacobs, K.; Kristensen, L. E.; Leurini, S.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Wampfler, S. F.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-01-01

    Context. OH is a key molecule in H2O chemistry, a valuable tool for probing physical conditions, and an important contributor to the cooling of shock regions around high-mass protostars. OH participates in the re-distribution of energy from the protostar towards the surrounding Interstellar Medium. Aims: Our aim is to assess the origin of the OH emission from the Cepheus A massive star-forming region and to constrain the physical conditions prevailing in the emitting gas. We thus want to probe the processes at work during the formation of massive stars. Methods: We present spectrally resolved observations of OH towards the protostellar outflows region of Cepheus A with the GREAT spectrometer onboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope. Three triplets were observed at 1834.7 GHz, 1837.8 GHz, and 2514.3 GHz (163.4 μm, 163.1 μm between the 2Π1/2 J = 1/2 states, and 119.2 μm, a ground transition between the 2Π3/2 J = 3/2 states), at angular resolutions of 16.̋3, 16.̋3, and 11.̋9, respectively. We also present the CO (16-15) spectrum at the same position. We compared the integrated intensities in the redshifted wings to the results of shock models. Results: The two OH triplets near 163 μm are detected in emission, but with blending hyperfine structure unresolved. Their profiles and that of CO (16-15) can be fitted by a combination of two or three Gaussians. The observed 119.2 μm triplet is seen in absorption, since its blending hyperfine structure is unresolved, but with three line-of-sight components and a blueshifted emission wing consistent with that of the other lines. The OH line wings are similar to those of CO, suggesting that they emanate from the same shocked structure. Conclusions: Under this common origin assumption, the observations fall within the model predictions and within the range of use of our model only if we consider that four shock structures are caught in our beam. Overall, our comparisons suggest that

  6. Evaluating model parameterizations of submicron aerosol scattering and absorption with in situ data from ARCTAS 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Matthew J.; Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Macintyre, Helen L.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Ridley, David A.; Heald, Colette L.; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Cubison, Michael J.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K.; Dibb, Jack E.; Wang, Chien

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the scattering and absorption of ultraviolet and visible radiation by aerosols is essential for accurate simulations of atmospheric chemistry and climate. Closure studies using in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption can be used to evaluate and improve models of aerosol optical properties without interference from model errors in aerosol emissions, transport, chemistry, or deposition rates. Here we evaluate the ability of four externally mixed, fixed size distribution parameterizations used in global models to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption at three wavelengths using in situ data gathered during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. The four models are the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Combo model, GEOS-Chem v9-02, the baseline configuration of a version of GEOS-Chem with online radiative transfer calculations (called GC-RT), and the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC v3.1) package. We also use the ARCTAS data to perform the first evaluation of the ability of the Aerosol Simulation Program (ASP v2.1) to simulate submicron aerosol scattering and absorption when in situ data on the aerosol size distribution are used, and examine the impact of different mixing rules for black carbon (BC) on the results. We find that the GMI model tends to overestimate submicron scattering and absorption at shorter wavelengths by 10-23 %, and that GMI has smaller absolute mean biases for submicron absorption than OPAC v3.1, GEOS-Chem v9-02, or GC-RT. However, the changes to the density and refractive index of BC in GC-RT improve the simulation of submicron aerosol absorption at all wavelengths relative to GEOS-Chem v9-02. Adding a variable size distribution, as in ASP v2.1, improves model performance for scattering but not for absorption, likely due to the assumption in ASP v2.1 that BC is present at a constant mass fraction

  7. Superradiant Forward Scattering in Multiple Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Chabe, Julien; Bienaime, Tom; Bachelard, Romain; Piovella, Nicola; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We report on an interference effect in multiple scattering by resonant scatterers resulting in enhanced forward scattering, violating Ohm's law for photons. The underlying mechanism of this wave effect is superradiance, which we have investigated using cold atoms as a toy model. We present numerical and experimental evidences for this superradiant forward scattering, which is robust against disorder and configuration averaging.

  8. Quantum statistics of Raman scattering model with Stokes mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanatar, Bilal; Shumovsky, Alexander S.

    1994-01-01

    The model describing three coupled quantum oscillators with decay of Rayleigh mode into the Stokes and vibration (phonon) modes is examined. Due to the Manley-Rowe relations the problem of exact eigenvalues and eigenstates is reduced to the calculation of new orthogonal polynomials defined both by the difference and differential equations. The quantum statistical properties are examined in the case when initially: the Stokes mode is in the vacuum state; the Rayleigh mode is in the number state; and the vibration mode is in the number of or squeezed states. The collapses and revivals are obtained for different initial conditions as well as the change in time the sub-Poisson distribution by the super-Poisson distribution and vice versa.

  9. Optical scatter imaging of cellular and mitochondrial swelling in brain tissue models of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee James

    2001-08-01

    The severity of brain edema resulting from a stroke can determine a patient's survival and the extent of their recovery. Cellular swelling is the microscopic source of a significant part of brain edema. Mitochondrial swelling also appears to be a determining event in the death or survival of the cells that are injured during a stroke. Therapies for reducing brain edema are not effective in many cases and current treatments of stroke do not address mitochondrial swelling at all. This dissertation is motivated by the lack of a complete understanding of cellular swelling resulting from stroke and the lack of a good method to begin to study mitochondrial swelling resulting from stroke in living brain tissue. In this dissertation, a novel method of detecting mitochondrial and cellular swelling in living hippocampal slices is developed and validated. The system is used to obtain spatial and temporal information about cellular and mitochondrial swelling resulting from various models of stroke. The effect of changes in water content on light scatter and absorption are examined in two models of brain edema. The results of this study demonstrate that optical techniques can be used to detect changes in water content. Mie scatter theory, the theoretical basis of the dual- angle scatter ratio imaging system, is presented. Computer simulations based on Mie scatter theory are used to determine the optimal angles for imaging. A detailed account of the early systems is presented to explain the motivations for the system design, especially polarization, wavelength and light path. Mitochondrial sized latex particles are used to determine the system response to changes in scattering particle size and concentration. The dual-angle scatter ratio imaging system is used to distinguish between osmotic and excitotoxic models of stroke injury. Such distinction cannot be achieved using the current techniques to study cellular swelling in hippocampal slices. The change in the scatter ratio is

  10. Quantitative endoscopic imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy: model system/tissue phantom validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, E. H.; Farkas, D. L.

    2008-02-01

    We have designed and built an imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy endoscopic instrument for the purpose of detecting cancer in vivo. As part of our testing and validation of the system, known targets representing potential disease states of interest were constructed using polystyrene beads of known average diameter and TiO II crystals embedded in a two-layer agarose gel. Final construction geometry was verified using a dissection microscope. The phantoms were then imaged using the endoscopic probe at a known incident angle, and the results compared to model predictions. The mathematical model that was used combines classic ray-tracing optics with Mie scattering to predict the images that would be observed by the probe at a given physical distance from a Mie-regime scattering media. This model was used generate the expected observed response for a broad range of parameter values, and these results were then used as a library to fit the observed data from the phantoms. Compared against the theoretical library, the best matching signal correlated well with known phantom material dimensions. These results lead us to believe that imaging elastic scattering can be useful in detection/diagnosis, but further refinement of the device will be necessary to detect the weak signals in a real clinical setting.

  11. Measurements and modelling of aerosol single-scattering albedo: progress, problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintzenberg, J. [Institut fuer Troposphaerenforschung e.V. (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Charlson, R.J.; Clarke, A.D.; Liousse, C.; Ramaswamy, V.; Shine, K.P.; Wendisch, M.; Helas, G.

    1997-11-01

    The net effect of atmospheric aerosols in the radiation balance is determined by both their scattering and absorption of solar radiation. The combined optical effect is expressed in the single scatter albedo, {omega}, of the particles. Currently available data on {omega} are insufficient for definitive use in climate models because most of them are not corrected for the method-dependent effect of the scattering portion of the aerosol on the measured absorption, most refer to the dry state of the aerosol, and the coverage of the globe is far from being complete. Standardisation and calibration of the measurements is needed. Modelling exercises using currently available data on {omega} should clearly state that corrections are required. The purpose of this review is not to suggest a particular range of values for single scatter albedo. Rather, it is to illustrate that the uncertainties are currently imbedded in various data sets because of the lack of calibration, the possibility that many of the extant methods systematically overestimate light absorption coefficients, and the necessity of including the influence of humidity in models. (orig.) 95 refs.

  12. Modeling of dissociation and energy transfer in shock-heated nitrogen flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munafò, A., E-mail: munafo@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Liu, Y., E-mail: yen.liu@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); Panesi, M., E-mail: mpanesi@illinois.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Talbot Laboratory, 104 S. Wright St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This work addresses the modeling of dissociation and energy transfer processes in shock heated nitrogen flows by means of the maximum entropy linear model and a newly proposed hybrid bin vibrational collisional model. Both models aim at overcoming two of the main limitations of the state of the art non-equilibrium models: (i) the assumption of equilibrium between rotational and translational energy modes of the molecules and (ii) the reliance on the quasi-steady-state distribution for the description of the population of the internal levels. The formulation of the coarse-grained models is based on grouping the energy levels into bins, where the population is assumed to follow a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at its own temperature. Different grouping strategies are investigated. Following the maximum entropy principle, the governing equations are obtained by taking the zeroth and first-order moments of the rovibrational master equations. The accuracy of the proposed models is tested against the rovibrational master equation solution for both flow quantities and population distributions. Calculations performed for free-stream velocities ranging from 5 km/s to 10 km/s demonstrate that dissociation can be accurately predicted by using only 2-3 bins. It is also shown that a multi-temperature approach leads to an under-prediction of dissociation, due to the inability of the former to account for the faster excitation of high-lying vibrational states.

  13. Shock structure simulation using hyperbolic moment models in partially-conservative form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koellermeier, Julian; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The Boltzmann equation is often used to model rarefied gas flow in the transition or kinetic regime for moderate to large Knudsen numbers. However, standard moment methods like Grad's approach lack hyperbolicity of the equations. We point out the failure of Grad's method and overcome the deficiencies with the help of the new hyperbolic moment models called QBME and HME, derived by an operator projection framework. The new model equations are in partially-conservative form meaning that a subset of the equations cannot be written in conservative form due to some changes in these equations. This leads to additional numerical difficulties. The influence of the partially-conservative terms on the solution is analyzed and we present a numerical scheme for the solution of the partially-conservative PDE systems, namely the PRICE-C scheme by Canestrelli. Furthermore, a shock structure test case is used to compare the accuracy of the different hyperbolic moment models to a discrete velocity reference solution. The results show that the new hyperbolic models achieve higher accuracy than the standard Grad model despite the fact that the model equations cannot be fully written in conservative form.

  14. Efficacy of Methylene Blue in an Experimental Model of Calcium Channel Blocker Induced Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, David H.; Donovan, Sean; Nelson, Lewis S.; Bania, Theodore C.; Hoffman, Robert S.; Chu, Jason

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Calcium channel blocker poisonings account for a substantial number of reported deaths from cardiovascular drugs. While supportive care is the mainstay of treatment, experimental therapies such as high dose insulin-euglycemia and lipid emulsion have been studied in animal models and used in humans. In the most severe cases even aggressive care is inadequate and deaths occur. In both experimental models and clinical cases of vasodilatory shock, methylene blue improves hemodynamic measures. Methylene blue acts as both a nitric oxide scavenger and inhibits guanylate cyclase that is responsible for the production of cGMP. Excessive cGMP production is associated with refractory vasodilatory shock in sepsis and anaphylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of methylene blue in an animal model of amlodipine-induced shock. METHODS Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, ventilated and instrumented for continuous blood pressure and heart rate monitoring. The dose of amlodipine that produced death within 60 minutes was 17 mg/kg/hour (LD50). Rats were divided into 2 groups: amlodipine followed by methylene blue or amlodipine followed by normal saline (NS) with 15 rats in each group. Rats received methylene blue at 2 mg/kg over 5 mins or an equivalent amount of NS in three intervals from the start of the protocol: Minute 5, 30, and 60. The animals were observed for a total of 2 hours after the start of the protocol. Mortality risk and survival time were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test and Kaplan Meier survival analysis with the log rank test. RESULTS Overall, 1/15 (7%) rats in the saline-treated group survived to 120 minutes compared with 5/15 (33%) rats in the methylene blue-treated group (difference −26%, 95% CI –54%, 0.3%). The median survival time for the NS group was 42 min (95% CI, 28.1,55.9) and the methylene blue group was 109 min (95% CI, 93.9,124.1). Heart rate and MAP differences between groups were analyzed until 60 minutes

  15. A scattering model for nano-textured interfaces and its application in opto-electrical simulations of thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, K.; Fischer, M.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a scattering model based on the scalar scattering theory that allows estimating far field scattering properties in both transmission and reflection for nano-textured interfaces. We first discuss the theoretical formulation of the scattering model and validate it for nano-textures with dif

  16. A washboard with moment of inertia model of gas-surface scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tianying; Hase, William L; Tully, John C

    2004-01-08

    A washboard with moment of inertia (WBMI) model for gas atom scattering from a flexible surface is proposed and applied. This model is a direct extension of the washboard model [J. Chem. Phys. 92, 680 (1990)] proposed for gas atom scattering from relatively rigid, corrugated surfaces. In addition, a moment of inertia is incorporated in the original washboard model to describe the flexibility of softer, more highly corrugated surfaces such as polymer or liquid surfaces. The moment of inertia of the effective surface object introduces a dependence of the efficiency of energy transfer on the position and direction of impact, a feature that has been shown to be critical by molecular dynamics simulations. The WBMI model is solved numerically by Monte Carlo integration, which makes the implementation of multiple impacts between a colliding atom and the surface very efficient. The model is applied to Ne and Ar atoms scattering from an alkylthiolate self-assembled monolayer surface and reproduces the major results obtained by classical trajectory simulation of the same system, i.e., a bimodal translation energy distribution P(E(f)) with the low-energy component well-fit with a Boltzmann distribution, but with a temperature that may (Ar) or may not (Ne) be the same as the surface temperature. This indicates that the WBMI model, with well-motivated physical assumptions and simplified interaction, reveals many of the major aspects of the gas-surface collision dynamics, though it does not take into account the real-time dynamics explicitly.

  17. Propagation modeling of ocean-scattered low-elevation GPS signals for maritime tropospheric duct inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Zhao, Zhen-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The maritime tropospheric duct is a low-altitude anomalous refractivity structure over the ocean surface, and it can significantly affect the performance of many shore-based/shipboard radar and communication systems. We propose the idea that maritime tropospheric ducts can be retrieved from ocean forward-scattered low-elevation global positioning system (GPS) signals. Retrieval is accomplished by matching the measured power patterns of the signals to those predicted by the forward propagation model as a function of the modified refractivity profile. On the basis of a parabolic equation method and bistatic radar equation, we develop such a forward model for computing the trapped propagation characteristics of an ocean forward-scattered GPS signal within a tropospheric duct. A new GPS scattering initial field is defined for this model to start the propagation modeling. A preliminary test on the performance of this model is conducted using measured data obtained from a 2009-experiment in the South China Sea. Results demonstrate that this model can predict GPS propagation characteristics within maritime tropospheric ducts and serve as a forward model for duct inversion.

  18. Propagation modeling of ocean-scattered low-elevation GPS signals for maritime tropospheric duct inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Peng; Wu Zhen-Sen; Zhao Zhen-Wei; Zhang Yu-Sheng; Wang Bo

    2012-01-01

    The maritime tropospheric duct is a low-altitude anomalous refractivity structure over the ocean surface,and it can significantly affect the performance of many shore-based/shipboard radar and communication systems. We propose the idea that maritime tropospheric ducts can be retrieved from ocean forward-scattered low-elevation global positioning system (GPS) signals.Retrieval is accomplished by matching the measured power patterns of the signals to those predicted by the forward propagation model as a function of the modified refractivity profile.On the basis of a parabolic equation method and bistatic radar equation,we develop such a forward model for computing the trapped propagation characteristics of an ocean forward-scattered GPS signal within a tropospheric duct.A new GPS scattering initial field is defined for this model to start the propagation modeling.A preliminary test on the performance of this model is conducted using measured data obtained from a 2009-experiment in the South China Sea.Results demonstrate that this model can predict GPS propagation characteristics within maritime tropospheric ducts and serve as a forward model for duct inversion.

  19. Hypertonic saline resuscitation maintains a more balanced profile of T-lymphocyte subpopulations in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Yuan-qiang; CAI Xiu-jun; GU Lin-hui; MU Han-zhou; HUANG Wei-dong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential and early effect of hypertonic saline resuscitation on T-lymphocyte subpopulations in rats with hemorrhagic shock. Methods: A model of rat with severe hemorrhagic shock was established in 18 Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The rats were randomly divided into Sham group, HTS group (hypertonic saline resuscitation group)and NS group (normal saline resuscitation group). Each group contained 6 rats. The CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations of T-lymphocytes in peripheral blood were detected respectively before shock and after resuscitation by double antibody labelling and flow cytometry. Results: In the early stage after hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation and emergency treatment, the CD4+ lymphocytes of peripheral blood in HTS and NS groups markedly increased. Small volume resuscitation with HTS also induced peripheral CD8+ lymphocytes to a certain extent, whereas NS resuscitation showed no effect in this respect. Consequently,compared with Sham and HTS groups, CD4+/CD8+ ratio of peripheral blood in NS group was obviously increased, and showed statistically differences. Conclusion: In this model of rat with severe hemorrhagic shock, small volume resuscitation with HTS is more effective than NS in reducing immunologic disorders and promoting a more balanced profile of T-lymphocyte subpopulations regulating network.

  20. Comparison of Geant4 multiple Coulomb scattering models with theory for radiotherapy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Makarova, Anastasia; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Usually, Monte Carlo models are validated against experimental data. However, models of multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) in the Gaussian approximation are exceptional in that we have theories which are probably more accurate than the experiments which have, so far, been done to test them. In problems directly sensitive to the distribution of angles leaving the target, the relevant theory is the Moliere/Fano/Hanson variant of Moliere theory. For transverse spreading of the beam in the target itself, the theory of Preston and Koehler holds. Therefore, in this paper we compare Geant4 simulations, using the Urban and Wentzel models of MCS, with theory rather than experiment, revealing trends which would otherwise be obscured by experimental scatter. For medium-energy (radiotherapy) protons, and low-Z (water-like) target materials, Wentzel appears to be better than Urban in simulating the distribution of outgoing angles. For beam spreading in the target itself, the two models are essentially equal.

  1. A Multiple Scattering Polarized Radiative Transfer Model: Application to HD 189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Swain, Mark R; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model which produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet's atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partial...

  2. Modeling and measuring the transport and scattering of energetic debris in an extreme ultraviolet plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporre, John R.; Elg, Daniel T.; Kalathiparambil, Kishor K.; Ruzic, David N.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model for describing the propagation and scattering of energetic species in an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light lithography source is presented. An EUV light emitting XTREME XTS 13-35 Z-pinch plasma source is modeled with a focus on the effect of chamber pressure and buffer gas mass on energetic ion and neutral debris transport. The interactions of the energetic debris species, which is generated by the EUV light emitting plasma, with the buffer gas and chamber walls are considered as scattering events in the model, and the trajectories of the individual atomic species involved are traced using a Monte Carlo algorithm. This study aims to establish the means by which debris is transported to the intermediate focus with the intent to verify the various mitigation techniques currently employed to increase EUV lithography efficiency. The modeling is compared with an experimental investigation.

  3. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can......This thesis consists of two parts. The rst part is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction to the bio-molecular systems that have been studied. These are membrane proteins and their lipid environments in the form of phospholipid nanodiscs. Membrane proteins...

  4. A General Model of the Atmospheric Scattering in the Wavelength Interval 300 - 1100nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dimitrov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have presented and developed new theoretic-empirical models of the extinction coefficients of the molecular scattering in the lower, close to the ground troposphere. We have included the indicatrices of backscattering. The models have been presented using general analytical functions valid for the whole wavelength interval 300-1100 nm and for the whole interval of visibility from 0.1 km up to 50 km. The results have been compared in quantity with the model and experimental data of other authors. The modeling of troposphere scattering is necessary for the analysis and design of all optoelectronic free space systems: atmospheric optical communication systems, location systems for atmospheric research (LIDAR, optical radiometric systems.

  5. Simulation of ultrasonic scattering from a fractal model of the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Daniel Brian

    The liver has been particularly resistant to ultrasonic tissue characterization of diffuse pathological processes. This may be due, in part, to the difficulty in determining the scattering contribution of a complex structure comprised of components that span a size range from sub-resolveable to many times larger than the insonating wavelength. Due to the inherent random nature of scattering from such a complex structure, statistical evaluation of the backscattered signals has been pursued by a number of investigators in order to gain a better understanding of their relationship to the underlying scattering sources within a liver which contains an intricate network of vascular components with significant collagen content. This study maintains that the collagenous structures represented by the vessels associated with the portal vasculature, including how they are spatially organized, is a major source of the observed features of backscattered ultrasound signals from the liver. To that end, a three dimensional geometric computer model of the human portal vascular system has been constructed based on accepted anatomical and physiological information and utilizing a fractal generation algorithm. The fractal methodology is used to determine the branching characteristics of the model, such as vessel numbers, locations and dimensions. This complex, three dimensional data set is used as a source for producing simulated ultrasound B-scans which are subsequently subjected to statistical analysis and evaluation in order to (1) verify that the model produced data with characteristics similar to those from actual backscattered signals from human liver, and (2) attempt to understand the relationship between the characteristics of the modeled vasculature and the resulting backscattered signals. The fractal implementation of the vasculature model will be discussed and results will be presented which indicate that simple variations in the characteristics of the model can produce

  6. Mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates: Shock tube ignition delay time measurements and chemical kinetic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    AlRamadan, Abdullah S.

    2015-10-01

    The demand for fuels with high anti-knock quality has historically been rising, and will continue to increase with the development of downsized and turbocharged spark-ignition engines. Butanol isomers, such as 2-butanol and tert-butanol, have high octane ratings (RON of 105 and 107, respectively), and thus mixed butanols (68.8% by volume of 2-butanol and 31.2% by volume of tert-butanol) can be added to the conventional petroleum-derived gasoline fuels to improve octane performance. In the present work, the effect of mixed butanols addition to gasoline surrogates has been investigated in a high-pressure shock tube facility. The ignition delay times of mixed butanols stoichiometric mixtures were measured at 20 and 40bar over a temperature range of 800-1200K. Next, 10vol% and 20vol% of mixed butanols (MB) were blended with two different toluene/n-heptane/iso-octane (TPRF) fuel blends having octane ratings of RON 90/MON 81.7 and RON 84.6/MON 79.3. These MB/TPRF mixtures were investigated in the shock tube conditions similar to those mentioned above. A chemical kinetic model was developed to simulate the low- and high-temperature oxidation of mixed butanols and MB/TPRF blends. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data with some deviations at low temperatures. The effect of mixed butanols addition to TPRFs is marginal when examining the ignition delay times at high temperatures. However, when extended to lower temperatures (T < 850K), the model shows that the mixed butanols addition to TPRFs causes the ignition delay times to increase and hence behaves like an octane booster at engine-like conditions. © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  7. Generalized Chou-Yang model for p(antip)p and. lambda. (anti. lambda. )p elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem; Azhar, I.A.

    1988-06-01

    The various characteristics of pp and antipp elastic scattering at high energies are explained by using the generalized Chou-Yang model which takes into consideration the anisotropic scattering of objects constituting colliding particles. The model is also used to extract the form factor and radius of the ..lambda.. particle.

  8. A model-based scatter artifacts correction for cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei 430074 (China); Vernekohl, Don; Xing, Lei, E-mail: lei@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Due to the increased axial coverage of multislice computed tomography (CT) and the introduction of flat detectors, the size of x-ray illumination fields has grown dramatically, causing an increase in scatter radiation. For CT imaging, scatter is a significant issue that introduces shading artifact, streaks, as well as reduced contrast and Hounsfield Units (HU) accuracy. The purpose of this work is to provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods: The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profiles for a set of CBCT data in either image domain or projection domain. A denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signals is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations using thorax and abdomen phantoms with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental Catphan phantom data, and in vivo human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Scatter correction in both projection domain and image domain was conducted and the influences of segmentation method, mismatched attenuation coefficients, and spectrum model as well as parameter selection were also investigated. Results: Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU in either projection domain or image domain. For the MC thorax phantom study, four-components segmentation yields the best results, while the results of three-components segmentation are still acceptable. The parameters (iteration number K and weight β) affect the accuracy of the scatter correction and the results get improved as K and β increase. It was found that variations in attenuation coefficient accuracies only slightly impact the performance of the proposed processing. For the Catphan phantom data, the mean value over all pixels in the residual image is reduced from −21.8 to −0.2 HU and 0.7 HU for projection

  9. Neutrino scattering and flavor transformation in supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, John F; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times, but could be inadequate in the crucial shock revival/explosion epoch of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new paradigm in supernova modeling.

  10. Coloration of the Chilean Bellflower, Nolana paradoxa, interpreted with a scattering and absorbing layer stack model

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenga, Doekele G; van der Kooi, Casper J.

    2015-01-01

    Main conclusion An absorbing-layer-stack model allows quantitative analysis of the light flux in flowers and the resulting reflectance spectra. It provides insight in how plants can optimize their flower coloration for attracting pollinators. The coloration of flowers is due to the combined effect of pigments and light-scattering structures. To interpret flower coloration, we applied an optical model that considers a flower as a stack of layers, where each layer can be treated with the Kubelk...

  11. Scattering resonances and two-particle bound states of the extended Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiente, M; Petrosyan, D [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, FORTH, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2009-06-28

    We present a complete derivation of two-particle states of the one-dimensional extended Bose-Hubbard model involving attractive or repulsive on-site and nearest-neighbour interactions. We find that this system possesses scattering resonances and two families of energy-dependent interaction-bound states which are not present in the Hubbard model with the on-site interaction alone. (fast track communication)

  12. Simulation of a multi-spacecraft detected gradual SEP event by using a shock-and-particle model starting at 4 solar radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Gasen, Rosa; Jacobs, Carla; Aran, Angels; Sanahuja, Blai; Poedts, Stefaan

    Particle intensity-time profiles of a gradual SEP event observed by spacecraft located a different heliolongitudes close to the ecliptic plane, even being at a similar distance from the Sun, have shown different shapes. To model this variability we present the simulation of an event observed by the Helios 1 and 2 and IMP8/ISEE-3 spacecraft. We have developed under the Solar Energetic Particle Event Modeling (SEPEM) project a new shock-and-particle model that combines a 2D MHD code (in the ecliptic plane) and a particle transport code. With this model we can track the traveling shock from 4 solar radii. This allows us to determine the injection rate of shock accelerated particles from close to the Sun, where the bulk of high energy particles often are accelerated. We have simulated the shock propagation by fitting the time of shock arrivals and jumps in plasma observed at each of the spacecraft and we have reproduced the proton intensities measured by these vantage observers. We draw conclusions on the influence of the relative position of the observer (with respect to the leading direction of the traveling shock), on the injection rate of shock-accelerated particles, and on the particles transport conditions found for each spacecraft. We also discuss the forecasting capability of the relation between the injection rate of shock accelerated particles and the jump in speed across the shock front that we have found in SEP events previously modeled.

  13. Snowpack Microstructure Characterization and Partial Coherent and Fully Coherent Forward Scattering Models in Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Ding, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we describe partial coherent model and fully coherent snowpack scattering model based on numerical simulation of Maxwell's equation. In medium characterization, we derive the correlation functions from the pair distribution functions of sticky spheres and multiple-size spheres used in QCA. We show that both the Percus-Yevick pair functions and the bicontinuous model have tails in the correlation functions that are distinctly different from the traditional exponential correlation functions. The methodologies of using ground measurements of grain size distributions and correlation functions to obtain model parameters are addressed. The DMRT theory has been extended to model the backscattering enhancement. We developed the methodology of cyclical corrections beyond first order to all orders of multiple scattering. This enables the physical modeling of combined active and passive microwave remote sensing of snow over the same scene. The bicontinuous /DMRT is applied to compare with data acquired in the NoSREx campaign, and the model results are validated against coincidental active and passive measurements using the same set of physical parameters of snow in all frequency and polarization channels. The DMRT is a partially coherent approach that one accounts for the coherent wave interaction only within few wavelengths as represented by phase matrix. However, the phase information of field is lost in propagating the specific intensity via RT and this hinders the use of DMRT in coherent synthetic aperture radar (SAR) analysis, including InSAR, PolInSAR and Tomo-SAR. One can alternatively calculate the scattering matrix of the terrestrial snowpack above ground by solving the volume integral equations directly with half space Green's function. The scattering matrix of the snowpack is computed for each realization giving rise to the speckle statistics. The resulting bistatic scattering automatically includes the backscattering enhancement effects. Tomograms of

  14. Characterising Vegetation Canopies by means of optical data and Microwave Scattering models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Iñigo; Gonzalez, Constancio; Ormeño, Santiago; Morillo, Carmen; Garcia-Melendez, Eduardo

    One of the main strengths of active microwave remote sensing, in relation to frequency, is its capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies, and reach the ground surface, so that information about the vegetation and hydrological properties of the surface can be drawn. All this infor-mation is gathered in the so called backscattering coefficient (σ 0 ), and in a vegetated medium, this coefficient reveals important information on the vegetation water content, geometry and/or structure of the canopy elements, above ground biomass, and soil roughness and moisture. In the scope of microwave frequencies, modeling the backscattering coefficient of vegetated terrain, involves taking into account scattering models that simulate the soil surface contribution by means of its physical variables, and the vegetation layer, through the knowledge of its biophys-ical properties. Soil surface scattering models require describing parameters of roughness, like soil profile height displacement standard deviation and correlation length, and moisture, which determines sur-face reflective properties. The knowledge of these parameters, allows to establishing surface scattering models with different validity ranges. Some frequently used models are divided into theoretical and empirical models. The vegetation canopy is usually regarded as a homogeneous, or random layer, at a certain height above terrain surface, and it is used to compute the attenuation through this layer. This requires a geometric generalization of the vegetation layer and its constituents, specifying additionally its electromagnetic properties. The main simulation models are based on Radiative Transfer theory, which allows for different approaches and simplifications. In this sense, somo of these models, can be efficiently adapted to any vegetated medium, and the constituents can by approximated by more general variables like Leaf Area Index (LAI), or Water total Content (WTC) of Vegetation. Moreover, in the microwave region

  15. Ground moving target signal model and power calculation in forward scattering micro radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Teng; HU Cheng; MIKHAIL Cherniakov

    2009-01-01

    Forward scattering micro radar is used for situation awareness;its operational range is relatively short because of the battery power and local horizon,the free space propagation model is not appropriate.The ground moving targets,such as humans,cars and tanks,have only comparable size with the transmitted signal wavelength;the point target model and the linear change of observation angle are not applicable.In this paper,the signal model of ground moving target is developed based on the case of forward scattering micro radar,considering the two-ray propagation model and area target model,and nonlinear change of observation angle as well as high order phase error.Furthermore,the analytical form of the received power from moving target has been obtained.Using the simulated forward scattering radar cross section,the received power of theoretical calculation is near to that of measured data.In addition,the simulated signal model of ground moving target is perfectly matched with the experimented data.All these results show the correctness of analytical calculation completely.

  16. A MULTIPLE SCATTERING POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL: APPLICATION TO HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Natraj, Vijay; Swain, Mark R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, Xi [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., E-mail: pkk@gps.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model that produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet’s atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partially covered by clouds or hazes, exhibit larger contrasts in polarized light when compared to clear atmospheres. This effect can potentially be used to identify patchy clouds in exoplanets. Given a set of full phase polarimetric measurements, this model can constrain the geometric albedo, properties of scattering particles in the atmosphere, and the longitude of the ascending node of the orbit. The model is used to interpret new polarimetric observations of HD 189733b in a companion paper.

  17. Modelling of thermal shock experiments of carbon based materials in JUDITH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Pestchanyi, S.; Koza, Y.; Linke, J.

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of hot plasma with material in fusion devices can result in material erosion and irreversible damage. Carbon based materials are proposed for ITER divertor armour. To simulate carbon erosion under high heat fluxes, electron beam heating in the JUDITH facility has been used. In this paper, carbon erosion under energetic electron impact is modeled by the 3D thermomechanics code 'PEGASUS-3D'. The code is based on a crack generation induced by thermal stress. The particle emission observed in thermal shock experiments is a result of breaking bonds between grains caused by thermal stress. The comparison of calculations with experimental data from JUDITH shows good agreement for various incident power densities and pulse durations. A realistic mean failure stress has been found. Pre-heating of test specimens results in earlier onset of brittle destruction and enhanced particle loss in agreement with experiments.

  18. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  19. Light scattering by complex particles in the Moon's exosphere: Toward a taxonomy of models for the realistic simulation of the scattering behavior of lunar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, D. T.; Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Davis, S. S.; Colaprete, A.

    2011-11-01

    It is suspected that the lunar exosphere has a dusty component dispersed above the surface by various physical mechanisms. Most of the evidence for this phenomenon comes from observations of "lunar horizon glow" (LHG), which is thought to be produced by the scattering of sunlight by this exospheric dust. The characterization of exospheric dust populations at the Moon is key to furthering our understanding of fundamental surface processes, as well as a necessary requirement for the planning of future robotic and human exploration. We present a model to simulate the scattering of sunlight by complex lunar dust grains (i.e. grains that are non-spherical and can be inhomogeneous in composition) to be used in the interpretation of remote sensing data from current and future lunar missions. We numerically model lunar dust grains with several different morphologies and compositions and compute their individual scattering signatures using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA). These scattering properties are then used in a radiative transfer code to simulate the light scattering due to a dust size distribution, as would likely be observed in the lunar exosphere at high altitudes 10's of km. We demonstrate the usefulness and relevance of our model by examining mode: irregular grains, aggregate of spherical monomers and spherical grains with nano-phase iron inclusions. We subsequently simulate the scattering by two grain size distributions ( 0.1 and 0.3μm radius), and show the results normalized per-grain. A similar methodology can also be applied to the analysis of the LHG observations, which are believed to be produced by scattering from larger dust grains within about a meter of the surface. As expected, significant differences in scattering properties are shown between the analyses employing the widely used Mie theory and our more realistic grain geometries. These differences include large variations in intensity as well as a positive polarization of scattered

  20. Reynolds stress turbulence model applied to two-phase pressurized thermal shocks in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Laviéville, Jérôme; Mimouni, Stéphane; Guingo, Mathieu; Baudry, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS. • k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results but also highlights some weaknesses. • A more advanced turbulence model has been developed, validated and applied for PTS. • Coupled with LIM, the first results confirmed the increased accuracy of the approach. - Abstract: Nuclear power plants are subjected to a variety of ageing mechanisms and, at the same time, exposed to potential pressurized thermal shock (PTS) – characterized by a rapid cooling of the internal Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) surface. In this context, NEPTUNE-CFD is used to model two-phase PTS and give an assessment on the structural integrity of the RPV. The first available choice was to use standard first order turbulence model (k-ε) to model high-Reynolds number flows encountered in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary circuits. In a first attempt, the use of k-ε model did produce some satisfactory results in terms of condensation rate and temperature field distribution on integral experiments, but also highlights some weaknesses in the way to model highly anisotropic turbulence. One way to improve the turbulence prediction – and consequently the temperature field distribution – is to opt for more advanced Reynolds Stress turbulence Model. After various verification and validation steps on separated effects cases – co-current air/steam-water stratified flows in rectangular channels, water jet impingements on water pool free surfaces – this Reynolds Stress turbulence Model (R{sub ij}-ε SSG) has been applied for the first time to thermal free surface flows under industrial conditions on COSI and TOPFLOW-PTS experiments. Coupled with the Large Interface Model, the first results confirmed the adequacy and increased accuracy of the approach in an industrial context.