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Sample records for model sc lipid

  1. Natural moisturizing factors (NMF) in the stratum corneum (SC). I. Effects of lipid extraction and soaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marisa; Visscher, Marty; Laruffa, Angela; Wickett, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Natural moisturizing factor (NMF) is essential for appropriate stratum corneum hydration, barrier homeostasis, desquamation, and plasticity. It is formed from filaggrin proteolysis to small, hygroscopic molecules including amino acids. We hypothesized that common lipid extraction and soaking in water would alter the level of NMF in the upper SC and its biophysical properties. A novel method of measuring and quantifying the amino acid components of NMF is presented. Adhesive tapes were used to collect samples of the stratum corneum (SC) and were extracted with 6mM perchloric acid for analysis by reverse-phase HPLC. HPLC results were standardized to the amount of protein removed by the tapes. An increase in NMF was found with increased SC depth. Also, the combination of extraction and soaking was found to increase NMF loss relative to control or to extraction or soaking alone. Our results indicate that common skin care practices significantly influence the water binding materials in the upper SC. The findings have implications for the evaluation and formulation of skin care products.

  2. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of lipid domain formation in normal and ceramide deficient stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Moore, David J; Lane, Majella E

    2012-10-01

    The current work describes thermotropic and kinetic Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of lipid dynamics and domain formation in normal and ceramide (CER) deficient lipid samples designed as simple models of the stratum corneum (SC). For the first time, this work focuses on the time dependence of lipid reorganization and domain formation in CER deficient models. By utilizing deuterated fatty acid (FA) and simultaneously monitoring the methylene vibrational modes of both CER and FA chains these experiments follow the time evolution of lipid organization in these SC lipid models following an external stress. Kinetic and thermotropic experiments demonstrate differences in both CER and FA chain fluidity and ordered domain formation with decreased levels of CER. In the CER deficient model, the formation of CER orthorhombic domains is retarded compared to the normal model. Furthermore, there is little evidence of hexongally packed (or mixed) FA domains in the CER deficient model compared to the models of normal SC. These data demonstrate that barrier lipid organization, in terms of ceramide domain formation, is altered in the ceramide deficient model. This work highlights the successful development of an experimental methodology to study time dependent changes in lipid biophysics in simple SC model membranes and suggests this approach will prove useful for understanding some of the biophysical changes that underlie impaired physiological barrier function in diseased skin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating the barrier function of skin lipid models with varying compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-10-01

    The lipids in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play an important role in the barrier function. The main lipid classes in stratum corneum are ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. In previous publications, a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and SC barrier function. In the present study, we use the SCS to study the effect of changes in lipid organization on the lipid barrier function using benzoic acid as permeation compound. First, in the SCS, we increased the level of one of the three major lipid classes keeping the ratio between the other lipid classes constant. An increased cholesterol level resulted in an increase in phase-separated cholesterol and a reduction in the permeability. An increase in ceramide or free fatty acid level resulted in the formation of additional phases, but had no significant influence on the permeability. We also examined models that mimic selected changes in lipid composition reported for dry or diseased skin. The SCS that mimics the composition in recessive X-linked ichthyosis skin displayed a twofold increase in permeability. This increase is possibly related to the formation of an additional, less ordered phase in this model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Model of Dees and Rotco for the 600 MeV SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The accelerating frequency of the 600 MeV Synchro-Cyclotron (SC) was modulated by the varying capacity of a rotating condenser ("Rotco", the most delicate component of the SC). A 1/5-scale model, dating from the design-period of the SC, was used to study improvements to the SC RF-system, and also the acceleration of ions, first Helium and, at the time of this picture, Carbon. In the middle of the picture is the case containing the Dees. To the left, at the wide end of the cone, a rotco. Reinhold Hohbach is busy with measurements. See also 7805235 (Annual Report 1978, p.110).

  5. Properties of ceramides and their impact on the stratum corneum structure. Part 2: stratum corneum lipid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, D; Ruettinger, A; Kiselev, M A; Wartewig, S; Neubert, R H H

    2008-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) represents the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, exhibits the main skin barrier and plays an important role in the water penetration pathway through the SC. Knowing the structure and properties of the SC at the molecular level is essential for studying drug penetration through the SC and for the development of new dermal drug delivery systems. Therefore, research interest is focused on the SC lipid matrix and on water diffusion through it. Thus, the ultimate aim is to design a lipid mixture that mimics the barrier properties of the human SC to a high extent and that can substitute the SC in drug delivery systems. This review summarizes various studies performed on either isolated animal or human ceramide based SC model systems, coming to the result that using synthetic lipids with a well-defined architecture allows good extrapolation to the in vivo situation. This review is the continuation of part 1 that is focused on a detailed description of the thermotropic and/or lyotropic phase behaviour of single ceramide types obtained by various experimental techniques. The objective of part 2 is to reflect the numerous studies on SC lipid model systems, namely binary, ternary and multicomponent systems, during the last decade. In this context, neutron diffraction as a prospective tool for analyzing the internal membrane structure is addressed in particular. Based on these new insights, current SC models are presented, whose validations are still under discussion. A profound knowledge about SC lipid organization at the molecular level is still missing.

  6. Establishment and characterization of Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia model medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiro; Nakahira, Kumiko; Hasegawa, Taeko; Uchida, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Takeda, Shunichi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Atsuko; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2012-06-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia (RBS/SC) are genetic autosomal recessive syndromes caused by establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2 ( ESCO 2) mutation. RBS/SC appear to have a variety of clinical features, even with the same mutation of the ESCO2 gene. Here, we established and genetically characterized a medaka model of RBS/SC by reverse genetics. The RBS/SC model was screened from a mutant medaka library produced by the Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes method. The medaka mutant carrying the homozygous mutation at R80S in the conserved region of ESCO2 exhibited clinical variety (i.e. developmental arrest with craniofacial and chromosomal abnormalities and embryonic lethality) as characterized in RBS/SC. Moreover, widespread apoptosis and downregulation of some gene expression, including notch1a, were detected in the R80S mutant. The R80S mutant is the animal model for RBS/SC and a valuable resource that provides the opportunity to extend knowledge of ESCO2. Downregulation of some gene expression in the R80S mutant is an important clue explaining non-correlation between genotype and phenotype in RBS/SC.

  7. SC-535, a Novel Oral Multikinase Inhibitor, Showed Potent Antitumor Activity in Human Melanoma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melanoma is considered as one of the most aggressive and deadliest cancers and current targeted therapies of melanoma often suffer limited efficacy or drug resistance. Discovery of novel multikinase inhibitors as anti-melanoma drug candidates is still needed. Methods: In this investigation, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo anti-melanoma activities of SC-535, which is a novel small molecule multikinase inhibitor discovered by us recently. We analyzed inhibitory effects of SC-535 on various melanoma cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC in vitro. Tumor xenografts in athymic mice were used to examine the in vivo activity of SC-535. Results: SC-535 could efficiently inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR 1/2/3, B-RAF, and C-RAF kinases. It showed significant antiangiogenic potencies both in vitro and in vivo and considerable anti-proliferative ability against several melanoma cell lines. Oral administration of SC-535 resulted in dose-dependent suppression of tumor growth in WM2664 and C32 xenograft mouse models. Studies of mechanisms of action indicated that SC-535 suppressed the tumor angiogenesis and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in human melanoma cells. SC-535 possesses favorable pharmacokinetic properties. Conclusion: All of these results support SC-535 as a potential candidate for clinical studies in patients with melanoma.

  8. Characterization of lipid model membranes designed for studying impact of ceramide species on drug diffusion and penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochalek, M; Heissler, S; Wohlrab, J; Neubert, R H H

    2012-05-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) intercellular lipid matrix plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. In the present study, lipid model membranes mimicking its phase behavior were prepared and characterized using different analytical techniques (i.a. SAXD, HPTLC, ESEM, confocal Raman imaging, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) in order to obtain well-standardized model membranes for diffusion and penetration studies. The lipid model membranes should be used in the future for studying the impact of each ceramide species on the diffusion and penetration of drugs. The SAXD study confirmed that the lipids within artificial lipid systems are arranged similarly to the lipids in the human SC. The polarization microscopic and ESEM images showed the homogenous deposition of lipids on the polycarbonate filter. Both the HPTLC and confocal Raman imaging studies proved the homogenous distribution of individual lipid classes within the lipid model membranes. First in vitro diffusion experiments (performed using an ATR-FTIR diffusion cell) of the hydrophilic compound, urea, revealed that the lipid model membrane represents even stronger diffusion barrier than the human SC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Supervising M.Sc. Students working in the 100 Gigabit Ethernet field using OPNET Modeler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert; Wessing, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with supervision methods for M.Sc. students who are using OPNET Modeler for their thesis work within the field of 100 Gigabit Ethernet. We detail how we use OPNET Modeler in our M.Sc. projects at the Technical University of Denmark. In particular, we discuss on how we teach...... students to learn OPNET independently and in a short timeframe, and we outline what students find challenging and rewarding by using OPNET Modeler. Furthermore, we show some cases on how OPNET was applied in specific projects within the field of 100 Gigabit Ethernet....

  10. Comparison of structure and organization of cutaneous lipids in a reconstructed skin model and human skin: spectroscopic imaging and chromatographic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Bonnier, Franck; Farhane, Zeineb; Libong, Danielle; Byrne, Hugh J; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2014-06-01

    The use of animals for scientific research is increasingly restricted by legislation, increasing the demand for human skin models. These constructs present comparable bulk lipid content to human skin. However, their permeability is significantly higher, limiting their applicability as models of barrier function, although the molecular origins of this reduced barrier function remain unclear. This study analyses the stratum corneum (SC) of one such commercially available reconstructed skin model (RSM) compared with human SC by spectroscopic imaging and chromatographic profiling. Total lipid composition was compared by chromatographic analysis (HPLC). Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the conformational order, lateral packing and distribution of lipids in the surface and skin/RSM sections. Although HPLC indicates that all SC lipid classes are present, significant differences are observed in ceramide profiles. Raman imaging demonstrated that the RSM lipids are distributed in a non-continuous matrix, providing a better understanding of the limited barrier function.

  11. Computational Modeling of Lipid Metabolism in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Schützhold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is essential for all major cell functions and has recently gained increasing attention in research and health studies. However, mathematical modeling by means of classical approaches such as stoichiometric networks and ordinary differential equation systems has not yet provided satisfactory insights, due to the complexity of lipid metabolism characterized by many different species with only slight differences and by promiscuous multifunctional enzymes.Here, we present a object-oriented stochastic model approach as a way to cope with the complex lipid metabolic network. While all lipid species are treated objects in the model, they can be modified by the respective converting reactions based on reaction rules, a hybrid method that integrates benefits of agent-based and classical stochastic simulation. This approach allows to follow the dynamics of all lipid species with different fatty acids, different degrees of saturation and different headgroups over time and to analyze the effect of parameter changes, potential mutations in the catalyzing enzymes or provision of different precursors. Applied to yeast metabolism during one cell cycle period, we could analyze the distribution of all lipids to the various membranes in time-dependent manner.The presented approach allows to efficiently treat the complexity of cellular lipid metabolism and to derive conclusions on the time- and location-dependent distributions of lipid species and their properties such as saturation. It is widely applicable, easily extendable and will provide further insights in healthy and diseased states of cell metabolism.

  12. Chemical enhancer solubility in human stratum corneum lipids and enhancer mechanism of action on stratum corneum lipid domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Li, S Kevin

    2010-01-04

    Previously, chemical enhancer-induced permeation enhancement on human stratum corneum (SC) lipoidal pathway at enhancer thermodynamic activities approaching unity in the absence of cosolvents (defined as Emax) was determined and hypothesized to be related to the enhancer solubilities in the SC lipid domain. The objectives of the present study were to (a) quantify enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain at saturation, (b) elucidate enhancer mechanism(s) of action, and (c) study the SC lipid phase behavior at Emax. It was concluded that direct quantification of enhancer uptake into SC lipid domain using intact SC was complicated. Therefore a liposomal model of extracted human SC lipids was used. In the liposome study, enhancer uptake into extracted human SC lipid liposomes (EHSCLL) was shown to correlate with Emax. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to evaluate lipid phase alterations in enhancer-treated intact SC. IR spectra demonstrated an increase in the lipid domain fluidity and DSC thermograms indicated a decrease in the phase transition temperature with increasing Emax. These results suggest that the enhancer mechanism of action is through enhancer intercalation into SC intercellular lipids and subsequent lipid lamellae fluidization related to enhancer lipid concentration.

  13. Model parameters for simulation of physiological lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Coarse grain simulation of proteins in their physiological membrane environment can offer insight across timescales, but requires a comprehensive force field. Parameters are explored for multicomponent bilayers composed of unsaturated lipids DOPC and DOPE, mixed‐chain saturation POPC and POPE, and anionic lipids found in bacteria: POPG and cardiolipin. A nonbond representation obtained from multiscale force matching is adapted for these lipids and combined with an improved bonding description of cholesterol. Equilibrating the area per lipid yields robust bilayer simulations and properties for common lipid mixtures with the exception of pure DOPE, which has a known tendency to form nonlamellar phase. The models maintain consistency with an existing lipid–protein interaction model, making the force field of general utility for studying membrane proteins in physiologically representative bilayers. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26864972

  14. Sucrose esters as biocompatible surfactants for penetration enhancement: An insight into the mechanism of penetration enhancement studied using stratumcorneum model lipids and Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosijević, Marija N; Brezesinski, Gerald; Savić, Snežana D; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2017-03-01

    Up to now, the molecular mechanism of the penetration enhancing effect of sucrose esters (SEs) on stratumcorneum (SC) has not been explained in details. In this study, variety of surface sensitive techniques, including surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), have been used to investigate interactions between SEs and SC intercellular lipids. A monolayer of the mixture of ceramide AS C18:18, stearic acid and cholesterol in the molar ratio of 1:1:0.7 on an aqueous subphase is a good model to mimic a single layer of intercellular SC lipids. The π-A isotherms of mixed monolayers and parameters derived from the curves demonstrated the interaction between nonionic surfactants such as SEs and SC lipids. With increasing SE concentration, the resultant monolayer films became more fluid and better compressible. IRRAS measurements showed that SEs disordered the acyl chains of SC lipids, and the BAM images demonstrated the modification of the domain structures in SC monolayers. Longer chain-SE has a stronger disordering effect and is better miscible with ceramides in comparison to SE with a shorter hydrophobic part. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the disordering effect of SEs on the biomimetic SC model, pointing out that small changes in the structure of surfactant may have a strong influence on a penetration enhancement of lipophilic drugs through intercellular lipids of skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheological Modeling with Hookean Bead-Spring Cubes (SC, BBC and FCC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denneman, A.I.M.; Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Mellema, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study a general bead-spring model is used for predicting some rheological properties of a cubic bead-spring structure of arbitrary size immersed in a Newtonian solvent. The topology of this bead-spring structure is based upon the well-known cubic crystals (SC, BCC or FCC) and it consists of

  16. Study on the lipid organization of stratum corneum lipid models by (cryo-) electron diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilgram, GSK; Pelt, AMEV; Oostergetel, GT; Koerten, HK; Bouwstra, JA

    The barrier function of the skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC), This outermost layer consists of protein-rich corneocytes and lipid-rich intercellular domains. These domains form the rate-limiting step for transepidermal water loss and the penetration of substances from the environment. To

  17. Atomic physics modeling of transmission spectra of Sc-doped aerogel foams to support OMEGA experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, H. M.; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Fontes, C. J.; Perry, T. S.; Fryer, C. L.; Brown, C. R. D.; Morton, J. W.; Hager, J. D.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2016-11-01

    We present synthetic transmission spectra generated with PrismSPECT utilizing both the ATBASE model and the Los Alamos opacity library (OPLIB) to evaluate whether an alternative choice in atomic data will impact modeling of experimental data from radiation transport experiments using Sc-doped aerogel foams (ScSi6O12 at 75 mg/cm3 density). We have determined that in the 50-200 eV Te range there is a significant difference in the 1s-3p spectra, especially below 100 eV, and for Te = 200 eV above 5000 eV in photon energy. Examining synthetic spectra generated using OPLIB with 300 resolving power reveals spectral sensitivity to Te changes of ˜3 eV.

  18. Thermodynamic modeling of the RE–Pb (RE = Sc, Dy, Gd) systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iddaoudi, A., E-mail: iddaoudi19@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et Energétique, LTE, Université Ibn-Zohr, B.P. 8106 Agadir (Morocco); Servant, C., E-mail: colette.servant@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l’Etat Solide, ICMMO, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Selhaoui, N.; Kardellass, S.; Mahdouk, K.; Bouirden, L. [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique et Energétique, LTE, Université Ibn-Zohr, B.P. 8106 Agadir (Morocco)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Rare earth (RE) and Pb alloys or compounds are interesting as magnetic materials. • The phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties of RE–Pb (RE = Sc, Dy, Gd) systems have been assessed. • The CALPHAD method was used with the Redlich–Kister model to optimize the solution phases. • A self-consistent set of thermodynamic parameters has been evaluated. • A good agreement was found between the calculation and experiments. -- Abstract: The phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties of RE–Pb (RE = Sc, Dy, Gd) systems have been assessed by means of the CALPHAD method. The solution phases (liquid, fcc, bcc and hcp) were described by the sublattice formalism and the excess term of the Gibbs energy with the Redlich–Kister equation. The stoichiometric intermetallic compounds (Sc{sub 5}Pb{sub 3}, Sc{sub 6}Pb{sub 5}, Dy{sub 5}Pb{sub 4}, DyPb, DyPb{sub 2}, DyPb{sub 3}, β-Gd{sub 5}Pb{sub 4}, α-Gd{sub 5}Pb{sub 4}, Gd{sub 11}Pb{sub 10}, Gd{sub 6}Pb{sub 7}, GdPb{sub 2} and GdPb{sub 2}) were modeled as line compounds. The non-stoichiometric Dy{sub 5}Pb{sub 3} and Gd{sub 5}Pb{sub 3} phases with a narrow homogeneity range were modeled using a two-sublattice model with substitution. A consistent set of the thermodynamic parameters leading to a reasonable agreement between the calculated results and literature data was obtained.

  19. The effect of urea and taurine as hydrophilic penetration enhancers on stratum corneum lipid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J; Oliveira, J S L; Barker, R; Trapp, M; Schroeter, A; Brezesinski, G; Neubert, R H H

    2016-09-01

    To optimize transdermal application of drugs, the barrier function of the skin, especially the stratum corneum (SC), needs to be reduced reversibly. For this purpose, penetration enhancers like urea or taurine are applied. Until now, it is unclear if this penetration enhancement is caused by an interaction with the SC lipid matrix or related to effects within the corneocytes. Therefore, the effects of both hydrophilic enhancers on SC models with different dimensionality, ranging from monolayers to multilayers, have been investigated in this study. Many sophisticated methods were applied to ascertain the mode of action of both substances on a molecular scale. The experiments reveal that there is no specific interaction when 10% urea or 5% taurine solutions are added to the SC model systems. No additional water uptake in the head group region and no decrease of the lipid chain packing density have been observed. Consequently, we suppose that the penetration enhancing effect of both substances might be based on the introduction of large amounts of water into the corneocytes, caused by the enormous water binding capacity of urea and a resulting osmotic pressure in case of taurine.

  20. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  1. Self-assembly models for lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divya; Porcar, Lionel; Butler, Paul; Perez-Salas, Ursula

    2006-03-01

    Solutions of mixed long and short (detergent-like) phospholipids referred to as ``bicelle'' mixtures in the literature, are known to form a variety of different morphologies based on their total lipid composition and temperature in a complex phase diagram. Some of these morphologies have been found to orient in a magnetic field, and consequently bicelle mixtures are widely used to study the structure of soluble as well as membrane embedded proteins using NMR. In this work, we report on the low temperature phase of the DMPC and DHPC bicelle mixture, where there is agreement on the discoid structures but where molecular packing models are still being contested. The most widely accepted packing arrangement, first proposed by Vold and Prosser had the lipids completely segregated in the disk: DHPC in the rim and DMPC in the disk. Using data from small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments, we show how radius of the planar domain of the disks is governed by the effective molar ratio qeff of lipids in aggregate and not the molar ratio q (q = [DMPC]/[DHPC] ) as has been understood previously. We propose a new quantitative (packing) model and show that in this self assembly scheme, qeff is the real determinant of disk sizes. Based on qeff , a master equation can then scale the radii of disks from mixtures with varying q and total lipid concentration.

  2. Arrangement of ceramide [EOS] in a stratum corneum lipid model matrix: new aspects revealed by neutron diffraction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessner, Doreen; Kiselev, Mikhail; Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Lersch, Peter; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2008-07-01

    The lipid matrix in stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in the barrier function of the mammalian skin. The major lipids are ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFA). Especially the unique-structured omega-acylceramide CER[EOS] is regarded to be essential for skin barrier properties by inducing the formation of a long-periodicity phase of 130 angstroms (LPP). In the present study, the arrangement of CER[EOS], either mixed with CER[AP] and CHOL or with CER[AP], CHOL and palmitic acid (PA), inside a SC lipid model membrane has been studied for the first time by neutron diffraction. For a mixed CER[EOS]/CER[AP]/CHOL membrane in a partly dehydrated state, the internal membrane nanostructure, i.e. the neutron scattering length density profile in the direction normal to the surface, was obtained by Fourier synthesis from the experimental diffraction patterns. The membrane repeat distance is equal to that of the formerly used SC lipid model system composed of CER[AP]/CHOL/PA/ChS. By comparing both the neutron scattering length density profiles, a possible arrangement of synthetic long-chain CER[EOS] molecules inside a SC lipid model matrix is suggested. The analysis of the internal membrane nanostructure implies that one CER[EOS] molecule penetrates from one membrane layer into an adjacent layer. A 130 angstroms periodicity phase could not be observed under experimental conditions, either in CER/CHOL mixtures or in CER/CHOL/FFA mixture. CER[EOS] can be arranged inside a phase with a repeat unit of 45.2 angstroms which is predominately formed by short-chain CER[AP] with distinct polarity.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Xing, Chenyue; Faller, Roland

    Cell membranes consist of a multitude of lipid molecules that serve as a framework for the even greater variety of membrane associated proteins [1-4]. As this highly complex (nonequilibrium) system cannot easily be understood and studied in a controlled way, a wide variety of model systems have been devised to understand the dynamics, structure, and thermodynamics in biological membranes. One such model system is a supported lipid bilayer (SLB), a two-dimensional membrane suspended on a surface. SLBs have been realized to be manageable experimentally while reproducing many of the key features of real biological membranes [5,6]. One of the main advantages of supported bilayers is the physical stability due to the solid support that enables a wide range of surface characterization techniques not available to free or unsupported membranes. As SLBs maintain some of the crucial structural and dynamic properties of biological membranes, they provide an important bridge to natural systems. In order to mimic cell membranes reliably, certain structural and dynamic features have to be reliably reproduced in the artificially constructed lipid bilayers. SLBs should display lateral mobility as in living cells, because many membrane activities involve transport, recruitment, or assembly of specific components. It is also critical for membranes to exhibit the correct thermodynamic phase, namely, a fluid lipid bilayer, to respond to environmental stress such as temperature and pressure changes [7]. There are several ways to fabricate supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on planar substrates. One can use vesicle fusion on solid substrates [5,8-10] as well as Langmuir-Blodgett deposition [11,12]. Proteoliposome adsorption and subsequent membrane formation on a mica surface was first demonstrated by Brian and McConnell [13]. Because of its simplicity and reproducibility, this is one of the most common approaches to prepare supported membranes. A diverse range of different solid substrates

  4. Development of a stratum corneum substitute for in vitro percutaneous penetration studies : a skin barrier model comprising synthetic stratum corneum lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Miranda Wilhelmina de

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this thesis was focused on the development of a skin barrier model, which can substitute for stratum corneum in diffusion studies. This so-called stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was prepared with reconstituted SC lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) on a por

  5. Development of a stratum corneum substitute for in vitro percutaneous penetration studies : a skin barrier model comprising synthetic stratum corneum lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Miranda Wilhelmina de

    2006-01-01

    The research outlined in this thesis was focused on the development of a skin barrier model, which can substitute for stratum corneum in diffusion studies. This so-called stratum corneum substitute (SCS) was prepared with reconstituted SC lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) on a

  6. No-Core Shell Model for 48-Ca, 48-Sc and 48-Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, S; Stoica, S; Vary, J P; Navratil, P

    2004-10-26

    The authors report the first no-core shell model results for {sup 48}Ca, {sup 48}Sc and {sup 48}Ti with derived and modified two-body Hamiltonians. We use an oscillator basis with a limited {bar h}{Omega} range around 40/A{sup 1/3} = 11 MeV and a limited model space up to 1 {bar h}{Omega}. No single-particle energies are used. They find that the charge dependence of the bulk binding energy of eight A = 48 nuclei is reasonably described with an effective Hamiltonian derived from the CD-Bonn interaction while there is an overall underbinding by about 0.4 MeV/nucleon. However, resulting spectra exhibit deficiencies that are anticipated due to: (1) basis space limitations and/or the absence of effective many-body interactions; and, (2) the absence of genuine three-nucleon interactions. They introduce phenomenological modifications to obtain fits to total binding and low-lying spectra. The resulting no-core shell model opens a path for applications to experiments such as the double-beta ({beta}{beta}) decay process.

  7. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  8. Multiscale molecular modeling of tertiary supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, Holden T.; Faller, Roland

    2015-08-01

    Ternary lipid bilayer systems assembled from mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol have been studied using coarse-grained molecular dynamics at biologically relevant temperatures (280 K to 310 K), which are between the chain melting temperatures of the pure lipid component. Free lipid bilayers were simulated using the MARTINI model (Stage I) and a variant with water-water interactions reduced to 76% (Stage II). The latter was subsequently used for preparing supported lipid bilayer simulations (Stage III). Clustering of like lipids was observed, but the simulation timescale did not yield larger phaseseparated domains.

  9. Application of simulation modeling to lipid peroxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappel, A L; Tappel, A A; Fraga, C G

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative simulation model was developed that utilized present knowledge of lipid peroxidation in biological systems. The simulation model incorporated the following features: peroxidizability of polyunsaturated lipids, activation of inducers and their initiation of lipid peroxidation, concurrent autoxidation, inhibition of lipid peroxidation by vitamin E, reduction of some of the hydroperoxides by glutathione peroxidase, and formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Simulation calculations were done using a computer spreadsheet program. When the simulation program was applied to tissue slice and microsomal peroxidizing systems, the results of the stimulation were in agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Nonlinear analysis of lipid tubules by nonlocal beam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui-Shen

    2011-05-07

    Postbuckling, nonlinear bending and nonlinear vibration analyses are presented for lipid tubules. The lipid tubule is modeled as a nonlocal micro/nano-beam which contains small scale effect. The material properties are assumed to be size-dependent. The governing equation is solved by a two-step perturbation technique. The numerical results reveal that the small scale parameter e₀a reduces the postbuckling equilibrium paths, the static large deflections and natural frequencies of lipid tubules. In contrast, it increases the nonlinear to linear frequency ratios slightly for the lipid tubule with immovable end conditions.

  11. Lipid composition and molecular interactions change with depth in the avian stratum corneum to regulate cutaneous water loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Alex M; Allen, Heather C; Williams, Joseph B

    2015-10-01

    The outermost 10-20 µm of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), consists of flat, dead cells embedded in a matrix of intercellular lipids. These lipids regulate cutaneous water loss (CWL), which accounts for over half of total water loss in birds. However, the mechanisms by which lipids are able to regulate CWL and how these mechanisms change with depth in the SC are poorly understood. We used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to measure lipid-lipid and lipid-water interactions as a function of depth in the SC of house sparrows (Passer domesticus Linnaeus) in the winter and summer. We then compared these molecular interactions at each depth with lipid composition at the same depth. We found that in both groups, water content increased with depth in the SC, and likely contributed to greater numbers of gauche defects in lipids in deeper levels of the SC. In winter-caught birds, which had lower rates of CWL than summer-caught birds, water exhibited stronger hydrogen bonding in deeper layers of the SC, and these strong hydrogen bonds were associated with greater amounts of polar lipids such as ceramides and cerebrosides. Based on these data, we propose a model by which polar lipids in deep levels of the SC form strong hydrogen bonds with water molecules to increase the viscosity of water and slow the permeation of water through the SC. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. A generic model for lipid monolayers, bilayers, and membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, F; Lenz, O; West, B

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple coarse-grained model which is suited to study lipid layers and their phase transitions. Lipids are modeled by short semiflexible chains of beads with a solvophilic head and a solvophobic tail component. They are forced to self-assemble into bilayers by a computationally cheap `phantom solvent' environment. The model reproduces the most important phases and phase transitions of monolayers and bilayers. Technical issues such as Monte Carlo parallelization schemes are briefly discussed.

  13. Building a multilevel modeling network for lipid processing systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Díaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Hukkerikar, Amol

    2011-01-01

    data collected from existing process plants, and application of validated models in design and analysis of unit operations; iv) the information and models developed are used as building blocks in the development of methods and tools for computer-aided synthesis and design of process flowsheets (CAFD......The aim of this work is to present the development of a computer aided multilevel modeling network for the systematic design and analysis of processes employing lipid technologies. This is achieved by decomposing the problem into four levels of modeling: i) pure component property modeling...... and a lipid-database of collected experimental data from industry and generated data from validated predictive property models, as well as modeling tools for fast adoption-analysis of property prediction models; ii) modeling of phase behavior of relevant lipid mixtures using the UNIFAC-CI model, development...

  14. Lipid Processing Technology: Building a Multilevel Modeling Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Díaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Mukkerikar, Amol

    2011-01-01

    in design and analysis of unit operations; iv) the information and models developed are used as building blocks in the development of methods and tools for computer-aided synthesis and design of process flowsheets (CAFD). The applicability of this methodology is highlighted in each level of modeling through......The aim of this work is to present the development of a computer aided multilevel modeling network for the systematic design and analysis of processes employing lipid technologies. This is achieved by decomposing the problem into four levels of modeling: i) pure component property modeling...... and a lipid-database of collected experimental data from industry and generated data from validated predictive property models, as well as modeling tools for fast adoption-analysis of property prediction models; ii) modeling of phase behavior of relevant lipid mixtures using the UNIFACCI model, development...

  15. Lipid domains control myelin basic protein adsorption and membrane interactions between model myelin lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Kaufman, Yair; Boggs, Joan M; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2014-02-25

    The surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscope were used to study the effects of lipid composition and concentrations of myelin basic protein (MBP) on the structure of model lipid bilayers, as well as the interaction forces and adhesion between them. The lipid bilayers had a lipid composition characteristic of the cytoplasmic leaflets of myelin from "normal" (healthy) and "disease-like" [experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE)] animals. They showed significant differences in the adsorption mechanism of MBP. MBP adsorbs on normal bilayers to form a compact film (3-4 nm) with strong intermembrane adhesion (∼0.36 mJ/m(2)), in contrast to its formation of thicker (7-8 nm) swelled films with weaker intermembrane adhesion (∼0.13 mJ/m(2)) on EAE bilayers. MBP preferentially adsorbs to liquid-disordered submicron domains within the lipid membranes, attributed to hydrophobic attractions. These results show a direct connection between the lipid composition of membranes and membrane-protein adsorption mechanisms that affects intermembrane spacing and adhesion and has direct implications for demyelinating diseases.

  16. Perfluorooctanoic acid rigidifies a model lipid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüning, B.A.; Farago, B.

    2014-01-01

    We report a combined dynamic light scattering and neutron spin-echo (NSE) study on vesicles composed of the phospholipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine under the influence of varying amounts of perfluorooctanoic acid. We study local lipid bilayer undulations using NSE on time

  17. Perfluorooctanoic acid rigidifies a model lipid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brüning, B.A.; Farago, B.

    2014-01-01

    We report a combined dynamic light scattering and neutron spin-echo (NSE) study on vesicles composed of the phospholipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine under the influence of varying amounts of perfluorooctanoic acid. We study local lipid bilayer undulations using NSE on time scale

  18. Patterns of scAAV vector insertion associated with oncogenic events in a mouse model for genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lucia E; Grieves, Jessica L; Zaraspe, Kimberly; La Perle, Krista Md; Fu, Haiyan; McCarty, Douglas M

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained an extensive record of safety and efficacy in animal models of human disease. Infrequent reports of genotoxicity have been limited to specific vectors associated with excess hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in mice. In order to understand potential mechanisms of genotoxicity, and identify patterns of insertion that could promote tumor formation, we compared a self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vector designed to promote insertional activation (scAAV-CBA-null) to a conventional scAAV-CMV-GFP vector. HCC-prone C3H/HeJ mice and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were infected with vector plus secondary treatments including partial hepatectomy (HPX) and camptothecin (CPT) to determine the effects of cell cycling and DNA damage on tumor incidence. Infection with either vector led to a significant increase in HCC incidence in male C3H/HeJ mice. Partial HPX after infection reduced HCC incidence in the cytomegalovirus-green fluorescent protein (CMV-GFP)-infected mice, but not in the cognate chicken β-actin (CBA)-null infected group. Tumors from CBA-null infected, hepatectomized mice were more likely to contain significant levels of vector DNA than tumors from the corresponding CMV-GFP-infected group. Most CBA-null vector insertions recovered from tumors were associated with known proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Specific patterns of insertion suggested read-through transcription, enhancer effects, and disruption of tumor suppressors as likely mechanisms for genotoxicity.

  19. Modelling phagosomal lipid networks that regulate actin assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz Roland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When purified phagosomes are incubated in the presence of actin under appropriate conditions, microfilaments start growing from the membrane in a process that is affected by ATP and the lipid composition of the membrane. Isolated phagosomes are metabolically active organelles that contain enzymes and metabolites necessary for lipid interconversion. Hence, addition of ATP, lipids, and actin to the system alter the steady-state composition of the phagosomal membrane at the same time that the actin nucleation is initiated. Our aim was to model all these processes in parallel. Results We compiled detailed experimental data on the effects of different lipids and ATP on actin nucleation and we investigated experimentally lipid interconversion and ATP metabolism in phagosomes by using suitable radioactive compounds. In a first step, a complex lipid network interconnected by chemical reactions catalyzed by known enzymes was modelled in COPASI (Complex Pathway Simulator. However, several lines of experimental evidence indicated that only the phosphatidylinositol branch of the network was active, an observation that dramatically reduced the number of parameters in the model. The results also indicated that a lipid network-independent ATP-consuming activity should be included in the model. When this activity was introduced, the set of differential equations satisfactorily reproduced the experimental data. On the other hand, a molecular mechanism connecting membrane lipids, ATP, and the actin nucleation process is still missing. We therefore adopted a phenomenological (black-box approach to represent the empirical observations. We proposed that lipids and ATP influence the dynamic interconversion between active and inactive actin nucleation sites. With this simple model, all the experimental data were satisfactorily fitted with a single positive parameter per lipid and ATP. Conclusion By establishing an active 'dialogue' between an

  20. Molecular dynamics study of ion capture from water by a model ionophore, tetraprotonated cryptand SC24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owenson, Brian; Macelroy, Robert D.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamics of chloride capture from water by the tetraprotonated cryptand SC24 has been studied for the cases of 19 distances between the criptand and the chloride. The chloride capture is found to be characterized by a rapid cooperative change in the conformation of the cryptand when the Cl(-) begins to enter the ligand and just as it encounters the energy barrier. The conformational transition is associated with a shift of three N-H bonds from the pure endo orientation, such that they point toward the chloride.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of ion capture from water by a model ionophore, tetraprotonated cryptand SC24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owenson, Brian; Macelroy, Robert D.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamics of chloride capture from water by the tetraprotonated cryptand SC24 has been studied for the cases of 19 distances between the criptand and the chloride. The chloride capture is found to be characterized by a rapid cooperative change in the conformation of the cryptand when the Cl(-) begins to enter the ligand and just as it encounters the energy barrier. The conformational transition is associated with a shift of three N-H bonds from the pure endo orientation, such that they point toward the chloride.

  2. The Tanita SC-240 to Assess Body Composition in Pre-School Children: An Evaluation against the Three Component Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle Nyström, Christine; Henriksson, Pontus; Alexandrou, Christina; Löf, Marie

    2016-06-16

    Quick, easy-to-use, and valid body composition measurement options for young children are needed. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of the bioelectrical impedance (BIA) device, Tanita SC-240, to measure fat mass (FM), fat free mass (FFM) and body fatness (BF%) in 40 healthy, Swedish 5.5 years old children against the three component model (3C model). Average BF%, FM, and FFM for BIA were: 19.4% ± 3.9%, 4.1 ± 1.9 kg, and 16.4 ± 2.4 kg and were all significantly different (p model (25.1% ± 5.5%, 5.3 ± 2.5 kg, and 15.2 ± 2.0 kg). Bland and Altman plots had wide limits of agreement for all body composition variables. Significant correlations ranging from 0.81 to 0.96 (p model. When dividing the children into tertiles for BF%, 60% of children were classified correctly by means of BIA. In conclusion, the Tanita SC-240 underestimated BF% in comparison to the 3C model and had wide limits of agreement. Further work is needed in order to find accurate and easy-to-use methods for assessing body composition in pre-school children.

  3. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  4. Adjuvant and immunostimulatory effects of a D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL in the mouse model of vaccination against neosporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Mariana R D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vaccination is an important control measure for neosporosis that is caused by a coccidian parasite, Neospora caninum, leading to abortion and reproductive disorders in cattle and serious economic impacts worldwide. A D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL was recently described by our group with potential immunostimulatory and adjuvant effects in the leishmaniasis model. In this study, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of ScLL in immunization of mice against neosporosis. First, we investigated in vitro cytokine production by dendritic cells stimulated with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA, ScLL or both. Each treatment induced TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 production in a dose-dependent manner, with synergistic effect of NLA plus ScLL. Next, four groups of C57BL/6 mice were immunized with NLA + ScLL, NLA, ScLL or PBS. The kinetics of antibody response showed a predominance of IgG and IgG1 for NLA + ScLL group, whereas IgG2a response was similar between NLA + ScLL and NLA groups. Ex vivo cytokine production by mouse spleen cells showed the highest IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio in the presence of NLA stimulation for mice immunized with NLA + ScLL and the lowest for those immunized with ScLL alone. After parasite challenge, mice immunized with NLA + ScLL or ScLL alone presented higher survival rates (70-80% and lower brain parasite burden as compared to PBS group, but with no significant changes in morbidity and inflammation scores. In conclusion, ScLL combined with NLA was able to change the cytokine profile induced by the antigen or lectin alone for a Th1-biased immune response, resulting in high protection of mice challenged with the parasite, but with low degree of inflammation. Both features may be important to prevent congenital neosporosis, since protection and low inflammatory response are necessary events to guide towards a successful pregnancy.

  5. Adjuvant and immunostimulatory effects of a D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL) in the mouse model of vaccination against neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mariana R D; Mota, Caroline M; Ribeiro, Dâmaso P; Noleto, Pablo G; Andrade, William B F; Souza, Maria A; Silva, Neide M; Mineo, Tiago W P; Mineo, José R; Silva, Deise A O

    2012-10-29

    Vaccination is an important control measure for neosporosis that is caused by a coccidian parasite, Neospora caninum, leading to abortion and reproductive disorders in cattle and serious economic impacts worldwide. A D-galactose-binding lectin from Synadenium carinatum latex (ScLL) was recently described by our group with potential immunostimulatory and adjuvant effects in the leishmaniasis model. In this study, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of ScLL in immunization of mice against neosporosis. First, we investigated in vitro cytokine production by dendritic cells stimulated with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA), ScLL or both. Each treatment induced TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 production in a dose-dependent manner, with synergistic effect of NLA plus ScLL. Next, four groups of C57BL/6 mice were immunized with NLA + ScLL, NLA, ScLL or PBS. The kinetics of antibody response showed a predominance of IgG and IgG1 for NLA + ScLL group, whereas IgG2a response was similar between NLA + ScLL and NLA groups. Ex vivo cytokine production by mouse spleen cells showed the highest IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio in the presence of NLA stimulation for mice immunized with NLA + ScLL and the lowest for those immunized with ScLL alone. After parasite challenge, mice immunized with NLA + ScLL or ScLL alone presented higher survival rates (70-80%) and lower brain parasite burden as compared to PBS group, but with no significant changes in morbidity and inflammation scores. In conclusion, ScLL combined with NLA was able to change the cytokine profile induced by the antigen or lectin alone for a Th1-biased immune response, resulting in high protection of mice challenged with the parasite, but with low degree of inflammation. Both features may be important to prevent congenital neosporosis, since protection and low inflammatory response are necessary events to guide towards a successful pregnancy.

  6. Altered lipid metabolism in a Drosophila model of Friedreich's ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan A; Ohmann, Elisabeth; Sanchez, Diego; Botella, José A; Liebisch, Gerhard; Moltó, María D; Ganfornina, María D; Schmitz, Gerd; Schneuwly, Stephan

    2010-07-15

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most common form of autosomal recessive ataxia caused by a deficit in the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Although demyelination is a common symptom in FRDA patients, no multicellular model has yet been developed to study the involvement of glial cells in FRDA. Using the recently established RNAi lines for targeted suppression of frataxin in Drosophila, we were able to study the effects of general versus glial-specific frataxin downregulation. In particular, we wanted to study the interplay between lowered frataxin content, lipid accumulation and peroxidation and the consequences of these effects on the sensitivity to oxidative stress and fly fitness. Interestingly, ubiquitous frataxin reduction leads to an increase in fatty acids catalyzing an enhancement of lipid peroxidation levels, elevating the intracellular toxic potential. Specific loss of frataxin in glial cells triggers a similar phenotype which can be visualized by accumulating lipid droplets in glial cells. This phenotype is associated with a reduced lifespan, an increased sensitivity to oxidative insult, neurodegenerative effects and a serious impairment of locomotor activity. These symptoms fit very well with our observation of an increase in intracellular toxicity by lipid peroxides. Interestingly, co-expression of a Drosophila apolipoprotein D ortholog (glial lazarillo) has a strong protective effect in our frataxin models, mainly by controlling the level of lipid peroxidation. Our results clearly support a strong involvement of glial cells and lipid peroxidation in the generation of FRDA-like symptoms.

  7. Insights into thermophilic archaebacterial membrane stability from simplified models of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles H.; Nie, Huifen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2007-05-01

    Lipid aggregation into fluid bilayers is an essential process for sustaining life. Simplified models of lipid structure, which allow for long time scales or large length scales not obtainable with all-atom simulations, have recently been developed and show promise for describing lipid dynamics in biological systems. Here, we describe two simplified models, a reduced-lipid model and a bola-lipid model for thermophilic bacterial membranes, developed for use with the rapid discrete molecular dynamics simulation method. In the reduced-lipid model, we represent the lipid chain by a series of three beads interacting through pairwise discrete potentials that model hydrophobic attractions between hydrocarbon tails in implicit solvent. Our phase diagram recapitulates those produced by continuous potential models with similar coarse-grained lipid representations. We also find that phase transition temperatures for our reduced-lipid model are dependent upon the flexibility of the lipid chain, giving an insight into archaebacterial membrane stability and prompting development of a bola-lipid model specific for archaebacteria lipids. With both the reduced-lipid and bola-lipid model, we find that the reduced flexibility inherent in archaebacteria lipids yields more stable bilayers as manifested by increased phase transition temperatures. The results of these studies provide a simulation methodology for lipid molecules in biological systems and show that discrete molecular dynamics is applicable to lipid aggregation and dynamics.

  8. Cardioprotective effects of aqueous Schizandra chinensis fruit extract on ovariectomized and balloon-induced carotid artery injury rat models: effects on serum lipid profiles and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Baek, In-Hee; Rhyu, Mee Ra

    2011-04-12

    The fruit from Schizandra chinensis, a member of the Magnoliaceae family, has been used to treat menopause-related symptoms. We have previously reported that an aqueous extract of Schizandra chinensis fruit (ScEx) caused vascular relaxation via the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Estrogen-like molecules are known to play a protective role in cardiovascular diseases through several mechanisms, but the cardioprotective effects of ScEx have not been clearly demonstrated. Therefore, we investigated the vasculoprotective effects of ScEx on ovariectomized (OVX) and balloon-induced carotid artery injury rat models. An aqueous extract of Schizandra chinensis (ScEx) was examined for its cardioprotective effects. To test the arterial response to injury, we applied the balloon-induced carotid artery model to OVX Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Rats were subcutaneously administered vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 0.02 or 0.2mg/kg/day), or ScEx (0.2 or 2.0mg/kg/day) over the course of the study. Vessel morphology was assessed two weeks after injury. To identify the cardioprotective effects after ScEx treatment, we measured serum lipid profiles and blood pressure levels in the OVX- and sham-operated normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Serum lipid profiles were measured in OVX rats after five weeks of treatment with vehicle, E2 (0.5mg/kg/day), or ScEx (0.5 or 5.0mg/kg/day). Tail systolic blood pressure in OVX SHR was measured weekly. In the balloon-induced carotid artery injury model, treatment with E2 (0.2mg/kg/day) or ScEx (2.0mg/kg/day) reduced the intimal area and the intima-to-media ratio compared to control animals. Injection of ScEx or E2 reduced body weight gain but did not inhibit the decrease in uterine weight. Treatment with ScEx (5.0mg/kg/day) or E2 (0.5mg/kg/day) in OVX SD rats reduced total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and TC-(HDL-C)/HDL-C compared to control

  9. Microporous device for local electric recordings on model lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufeld, Theresa; Steinem, Claudia; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    A powerful approach for characterizing lipid membranes and embedded proteins is the reconstitution of model lipid bilayers. The extreme fragility of 5 nm thick bilayers is a challenge for device design and requires a trade off of stability against accessibility. We here present a microporous lab-on-chip device that allows us to form stable, solvent-free lipid bilayers from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) in a geometry that provides a unique set of access possibilities. The device is constructed around a micro-fabricated silicon chip with clusters of 1 µm-diameter pores and provides optical access to the lipid bilayers for high-NA epifluorescence imaging. At the same time, solvent exchange is possible on both sides of the lipid bilayer. Complete coverage can be achieved with GUVs, so that voltages can be applied across the lipid bilayer and single-channel currents can be measured using external or integrated silver/silver chloride electrodes. We describe the micro-fabrication by standard cleanroom techniques and the characterization of the device by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. In proof-of-concept experiments we demonstrate that the device is capable of low-noise, single-ion-channel recordings. Electronic Supplementary Information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/b000000x/

  10. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes: streptavidin as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thanh X; Farah, Sammy J; Gast, Alice; Robertson, Channing; Carragher, Bridget; Egelman, Edward; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we use streptavidin (SA) as a model system to study helical protein array formation on lipid nanotubes, an alternative to 2D studies on lipid monolayers. We demonstrate that wild-type and a mutant form of SA form helical arrays on biotinylated lipid nanotubes. 3D maps from helical arrays of wild-type and mutant SA were reconstructed using two different approaches: Fourier-Bessel methods and an iterative single particle algorithm. The maps show that wild-type and mutant streptavidin molecules order differently. The molecular packing arrangements of SA on the surface of the lipid nanotubes differ from previously reported lattice packing of SA on biotinylated monolayers. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes presents an alternative platform to explore fundamentals of protein ordering, intermolecular protein interaction and phase behavior. We demonstrate that lipid nanotubes offer a robust and reproducible substrate for forming helical protein arrays which present a means for studying protein structure and structure-function relationships.

  11. Asparagine decarboxylation by lipid oxidation products in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Delgado, Rosa M; Navarro, José L; Zamora, Rosario

    2010-10-13

    The decarboxylation of asparagine in the presence of alkanals, alkenals, and alkadienals, among other lipid derivatives, was studied in an attempt to understand the reaction pathways by which some lipid oxidation products are able to convert asparagine into acrylamide. Asparagine was converted into 3-aminopropionamide in the presence of lipid derivatives as a function of reaction conditions (pH, water content, time, and temperature), as well as the type and amount of lipid compound involved. Alkadienals (and analogous ketodienes) were the most reactive lipids followed by hydroperoxides and alkenals. Saturated carbonyls and polyunsaturated fatty acids, or other polyunsaturated derivatives, also exhibited some reactivity. On the other hand, saturated lipids or monounsaturated alcohols did not degrade asparagine. A mechanism for the decarboxylation of asparagine in the presence of alkadienals based on the deuteration results obtained when asparagine/2,4-decadienal model systems were heated in the presence of deuterated water was proposed. The activation energy (E(a)) of asparagine decarboxylation by 2,4-decadienal was 81.0 kJ/mol, which is higher than that found for the conversion of 3-aminopropionamide into acrylamide in the presence of 2,4-decadienal. This result points to the decarboxylation step as the key step in the conversion of asparagine into acrylamide in the presence of alkadienals. Therefore, any inhibiting strategy for suppressing the formation of acrylamide by alkadienals should be mainly directed to the inhibition of this step.

  12. Simulation modeling of supported lipid membranes - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirtz, Michael; Kumar, Naresh; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    Lipid membranes are of great importance for many biological systems and biotechnological applications. One method to gain a profound understanding of the dynamics in lipid membranes and their interaction with other system components is by modeling these systems by computer simulations. Many different approaches have been undertaken in this endeavor that have led to molecular level insights into the underlying mechanisms of several experimental observations and biological processes with an extremely high temporal resolution. As compared to the free-standing lipid bilayers, there are fewer simulation studies addressing the systems of supported lipid membranes. Nevertheless, these have significantly enhanced our understanding of the behavior of lipid layers employed in applications spanning from biosensors to drug delivery and for biological processes such as the breathing cycle of lung surfactants. In this review, we give an account of the state of the art of methods and applications of the simulations of supported lipid bilayers, interfacial membranes at the air/water interface and on solid surfaces.

  13. The influence of an antitumor lipid - erucylphosphocholine - on artificial lipid raft system modeled as Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnętrzak, Anita; Łątka, Kazimierz; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Zemla, Joanna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Outer layer of cellular membrane contains ordered domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called 'lipid rafts', which play various biological roles, i.e., are involved in the induction of cell death by apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that these domains may constitute binding sites for selected drugs. For example alkylphosphocholines (APCs), which are new-generation antitumor agents characterized by high selectivity and broad spectrum of activity, are known to have their molecular targets located at cellular membrane and their selective accumulation in tumor cells has been hypothesized to be linked with the alternation of biophysical properties of lipid rafts. To get a deeper insight into this issue, interactions between representative APC: erucylphosphocholine, and artificial lipid raft system, modeled as Langmuir monolayer (composed of cholesterol and sphingomyelin mixed in 1:2 proportion) were investigated. The Langmuir monolayer experiments, based on recording surface pressure-area isotherms, were complemented with Brewster angle microscopy results, which enabled direct visualization of the monolayers structure. In addition, the investigated monolayers were transferred onto solid supports and studied with AFM. The interactions between model raft system and erucylphosphocholine were analyzed qualitatively (with mean molecular area values) as well as quantitatively (with ΔG(exc) function). The obtained results indicate that erucylphosphocholine introduced to raft-mimicking model membrane causes fluidizing effect and weakens the interactions between cholesterol and sphingomyelin, which results in phase separation at high surface pressures. This leads to the redistribution of cholesterol molecules in model raft, which confirms the results observed in biological studies.

  14. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: a lattice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; Chapman, D

    1979-04-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure-area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T(0), which locates the gel-fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a "smooth" homogeneous surface ("cholesterol-like") and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T(0) can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken "annulus" of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T(0) does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10(-7) sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed.

  15. CHARMM36 united atom chain model for lipids and surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Tran, Alan; Allsopp, Matthew; Lim, Joseph B; Hénin, Jérôme; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2014-01-16

    Molecular simulations of lipids and surfactants require accurate parameters to reproduce and predict experimental properties. Previously, a united atom (UA) chain model was developed for the CHARMM27/27r lipids (Hénin, J., et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2008, 112, 7008-7015) but suffers from the flaw that bilayer simulations using the model require an imposed surface area ensemble, which limits its use to pure bilayer systems. A UA-chain model has been developed based on the CHARMM36 (C36) all-atom lipid parameters, termed C36-UA, and agreed well with bulk, lipid membrane, and micelle formation of a surfactant. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of alkanes (heptane and pentadecane) were used to test the validity of C36-UA on density, heat of vaporization, and liquid self-diffusion constants. Then, simulations using C36-UA resulted in accurate properties (surface area per lipid, X-ray and neutron form factors, and chain order parameters) of various saturated- and unsaturated-chain bilayers. When mixed with the all-atom cholesterol model and tested with a series of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/cholesterol mixtures, the C36-UA model performed well. Simulations of self-assembly of a surfactant (dodecylphosphocholine, DPC) using C36-UA suggest an aggregation number of 53 ± 11 DPC molecules at 0.45 M of DPC, which agrees well with experimental estimates. Therefore, the C36-UA force field offers a useful alternative to the all-atom C36 lipid force field by requiring less computational cost while still maintaining the same level of accuracy, which may prove useful for large systems with proteins.

  16. Lamellar cationic lipid-DNA complexes from lipids with a strong preference for planar geometry: A Minimal Electrostatic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Angelo; Manning, Gerald S

    2014-11-01

    We formulate and analyze a minimal model, based on condensation theory, of the lamellar cationic lipid (CL)-DNA complex of alternately charged lipid bilayers and DNA monolayers in a salt solution. Each lipid bilayer, composed by a random mixture of cationic and neutral lipids, is assumed to be a rigid uniformly charged plane. Each DNA monolayer, located between two lipid bilayers, is formed by the same number of parallel DNAs with a uniform separation distance. For the electrostatic calculation, the model lipoplex is collapsed to a single plane with charge density equal to the net lipid and DNA charge. The free energy difference between the lamellar lipoplex and a reference state of the same number of free lipid bilayers and free DNAs, is calculated as a function of the fraction of CLs, of the ratio of the number of CL charges to the number of negative charges of the DNA phosphates, and of the total number of planes. At the isoelectric point the free energy difference is minimal. The complex formation, already favoured by the decrease of the electrostatic charging free energy, is driven further by the free energy gain due to the release of counterions from the DNAs and from the lipid bilayers, if strongly charged. This minimal model compares well with experiment for lipids having a strong preference for planar geometry and with major features of more detailed models of the lipoplex.

  17. Modeling the Elastic Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Edward; Gibaud, Thomas; Zakhary, Mark; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2011-03-01

    Model membranes such as lipid bilayers have been indispensable tools for our understanding of the elastic properties of biological membranes. In this talk, I will introduce a colloidal model for membranes and demonstrate that the physical properties of these colloidal membranes are identical to lipid bilayers. The model system is unique in that the constituent molecules are homogenous and non-amphiphilic, yet their self-assembly into membranes and other hierarchical assemblages, such as a lamellar type phases and chiral ribbons, proceeds spontaneously in solution. Owing to the large size of the constituent molecules, individual molecules can be directly visualized and simultaneous observations at the continuum and molecular lengthscales are used to characterize the behavior of model membranes with unprecedented detail. Moreover, once assembled in solution, molecular interactions can be controlled in situ. In particular, the strength of chiral interactions can be varied, leading to fascinating transitions in behavior that resembles the formation of starfish vesicles. These observations point towards the important role of line tension, and have potential implications for phase separated lipid mixtures or lipid rafts.

  18. Magnetic moment of {sup 48}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsubo, T., E-mail: tohtsubo@np.gs.niigata-u.ac.jp; Kawamura, Y.; Ohya, S. [Niigata University, Department of Physics (Japan); Izumikawa, T. [Niigata University, Radioisotope Center (Japan); Nishimura, K. [Toyama University, Faculty of Engineering (Japan); Muto, S. [Neutron Science Laboratory, KEK (Japan); Shinozuka, T. [Tohoku University, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonances were measured for {sup 48}Sc and {sup 44m}Sc oriented at 8 mK in an Fe host metal. The magnetic hyperfine splitting frequencies at an external magnetic field of 0.2 T were determined to be 63.22(11) MHz and 64.81(1) MHz for {sup 48}Sc and {sup 44m}Sc, respectively. With the known magnetic moment of {mu}({sup 44m}Sc)=+3.88 (1) {mu}{sub N}, the magnetic moment of {sup 48}Sc is deduced as {mu}({sup 44}Sc)=+3.785(12) {mu}{sub N}. The measured magnetic moment of {sup 48}Sc is discussed in terms of the shell model using the effective interactions.

  19. Two-photon excitation spectroscopy of Cr3+:K2NaScF6 elpasolite: II. Theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, R. H.; Wein, G. R.; Hamilton, D. S.

    2001-03-01

    Two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of Cr3+:K2NaScF6, excited by a Raman-shifted, Nd:YAG-pumped tunable dye laser, exhibit several unexpected features. A weak TPE spectrum of the symmetry-forbidden 4A2g→ 4T2g transition is observed without a zero-phonon line. The symmetry-allowed TPE spectrum of the 4A2g→ 4T1ag transition has a multi-phonon side band with anomalously extended vibrational progressions, and an anomalously weak, split zero-phonon line with anomalous polarization anisotropy. These observations are explained, respectively, in terms of theoretical models involving phonon assistance, departures from the closure approximation that permit electron-lattice coupling in intermediate states and a low-temperature phase transition involving librational instability. Hypothetical line-shape simulations are compared with observed TPE spectra.

  20. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschi, Federico, E-mail: federico.boschi@univr.it [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro [Department of Medicine, Geriatric Section, University of Verona, Piazzale Stefani 1, 37126 Verona (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 8, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    catabolism (fission and the decrease through neutral lipid exit from pre-existing droplets) to reproduce their size reduction observed in lipolytic conditions. The results suggest that each single process, considered alone, can not be considered the only responsible for the size variation observed, but more than one of them, playing together, can quite well reproduce the experimental data. - Highlights: The growth and fission of the lipid droplets (LDs) were computationally simulated. To write and test the growth and fission models more than 110,000 LDs were measured. The usual processes considered alone, are not able to justify the experimental data. Some processes, playing together, can explain the growth and fission.

  1. Final Report for Award #DE-SC3956 Separating Algorithm and Implementation via programming Model Injection (SAIMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strout, Michelle [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Programming parallel machines is fraught with difficulties: the obfuscation of algorithms due to implementation details such as communication and synchronization, the need for transparency between language constructs and performance, the difficulty of performing program analysis to enable automatic parallelization techniques, and the existence of important "dusty deck" codes. The SAIMI project developed abstractions that enable the orthogonal specification of algorithms and implementation details within the context of existing DOE applications. The main idea is to enable the injection of small programming models such as expressions involving transcendental functions, polyhedral iteration spaces with sparse constraints, and task graphs into full programs through the use of pragmas. These smaller, more restricted programming models enable orthogonal specification of many implementation details such as how to map the computation on to parallel processors, how to schedule the computation, and how to allocation storage for the computation. At the same time, these small programming models enable the expression of the most computationally intense and communication heavy portions in many scientific simulations. The ability to orthogonally manipulate the implementation for such computations will significantly ease performance programming efforts and expose transformation possibilities and parameter to automated approaches such as autotuning. At Colorado State University, the SAIMI project was supported through DOE grant DE-SC3956 from April 2010 through August 2015. The SAIMI project has contributed a number of important results to programming abstractions that enable the orthogonal specification of implementation details in scientific codes. This final report summarizes the research that was funded by the SAIMI project.

  2. Modeling dispersion from toxic gas released after a train collision in Graniteville, SC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Robert L; Hunter, Charles H; Addis, Robert P; Parker, Matthew J

    2007-03-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Weather Information and Display System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies after the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for 9 fatalities and caused injuries to more than 500 others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing 2 days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Savannah River Site (SRS) Emergency Operations Center, Department of Energy headquarters, and hazard material teams dispatched from the SRS. Operational model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response. High-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration in greater detail. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 m. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher-resolution winds indicated agreement with

  3. Characterisation of the Ni/ScYSZ interface in a model solid oxide fuel cell anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion;

    2008-01-01

    A nickel point electrode setup was used as a model of an SOFC anode on three slightly different electrolytes of zirconia stabilised by co-doping with scandia and yttria. The effect of electrolyte impurities on the electrode polarisation resistance was investigated by correlating electrochemical i...

  4. Physical Modelling for Systems and Control: Lecture Notes Course sc4032, 2009-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgra, O.H.

    2010-01-01

    In these notes the formulation of models is aimed at obtaining a description of the dynamic behaviour of processes under transient conditions. This implies that we will formulate the equations of motion of the process variables that describe the evolution of the process as a function of time. Our

  5. Alteration of cellular lipids and lipid metabolism markers in RTL-W1 cells exposed to model endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Córdoba, Marlon; Navarro, Isabel; Jáuregui, Olga; Porte, Cinta

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the suitability of the rainbow trout liver cell line (RTL-W1) as an in-vitro model to study the ability of model endocrine disrupters, namely TBT, TPT, 4-NP, BPA and DEHP, to act as metabolic disrupters by altering cellular lipids and markers of lipid metabolism. Among the tested compounds, BPA and DEHP significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), while all the compounds -apart from TPT-, altered membrane lipids - phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and plasmalogen PCs - indicating a strong interaction of the toxicants with cell membranes and cell signaling. RTL-W1 expressed a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism that were modulated by exposure to BPA, TBT and TPT (up-regulation of FATP1 and FAS) and 4-NP and DEHP (down-regulation of FAS and LPL). Multiple and complex modes of action of these chemicals were observed in RTL-W1 cells, both in terms of expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular lipids. Although further characterization is needed, this might be a useful model for the detection of chemicals leading to steatosis or other diseases associated with lipid metabolism in fish.

  6. Aberrant Schwann cell lipid metabolism linked to mitochondrial deficits leads to axon degeneration and neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viader, Andreu; Sasaki, Yo; Kim, Sungsu; Strickland, Amy; Workman, Cayce S; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2013-03-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy. Much effort has been devoted to examining the role played by neuronal/axonal mitochondria, but how mitochondrial deficits in peripheral nerve glia (Schwann cells [SCs]) contribute to peripheral nerve diseases remains unclear. Here, we investigate a mouse model of peripheral neuropathy secondary to SC mitochondrial dysfunction (Tfam-SCKOs). We show that disruption of SC mitochondria activates a maladaptive integrated stress response (ISR) through the actions of heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) kinase, and causes a shift in lipid metabolism away from fatty acid synthesis toward oxidation. These alterations in SC lipid metabolism result in depletion of important myelin lipid components as well as in accumulation of acylcarnitines (ACs), an intermediate of fatty acid β-oxidation. Importantly, we show that ACs are released from SCs and induce axonal degeneration. A maladaptive ISR as well as altered SC lipid metabolism are thus underlying pathological mechanisms in mitochondria-related peripheral neuropathies.

  7. Development and application of coarse-grained models for lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    I'll discuss a number of topics that represent our efforts in developing reliable molecular models for describing chemical and physical processes involving biomembranes. This is an exciting yet challenging research area because of the multiple length and time scales that are present in the relevant problems. Accordingly, we attempt to (1) understand the value and limitation of popular coarse-grained (CG) models for lipid membranes with either a particle or continuum representation; (2) develop new CG models that are appropriate for the particular problem of interest. As specific examples, I'll discuss (1) a comparison of atomistic, MARTINI (a particle based CG model) and continuum descriptions of a membrane fusion pore; (2) the development of a modified MARTINI model (BMW-MARTINI) that features a reliable description of membrane/water interfacial electrostatics and its application to cell-penetration peptides and membrane-bending proteins. Motivated specifically by the recent studies of Wong and co-workers, we compare the self-assembly behaviors of lipids with cationic peptides that include either Arg residues or a combination of Lys and hydrophobic residues; in particular, we attempt to reveal factors that stabilize the cubic ``double diamond'' Pn3m phase over the inverted hexagonal HII phase. For example, to explicitly test the importance of the bidentate hydrogen-bonding capability of Arg to the stabilization of negative Gaussian curvature, we also compare results using variants of the BMW-MARTINI model that treat the side chain of Arg with different levels of details. Collectively, the results suggest that both the bidentate feature of Arg and the overall electrostatic properties of cationic peptides are important to the self-assembly behavior of these peptides with lipids. The results are expected to have general implications to the mechanism of peptides and proteins that stimulate pore formation in biomembranes. Work in collaboration with Zhe Wu, Leili Zhang

  8. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  9. Effects of sphingomyelin/ceramide ratio on the permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullmannová, Petra; Staňková, Klára; Pospíšilová, Markéta; Skolová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2014-08-01

    The conversion of sphingomyelin (SM) to a ceramide (Cer) by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) is an important event in skin barrier development. A deficiency in aSMase in diseases such as Niemann-Pick disease and atopic dermatitis coincides with impaired skin barrier recovery after disruption. We studied how an increased SM/Cer ratio influences the barrier function and microstructure of model stratum corneum (SC) lipid membranes. In the membranes composed of isolated human SC Cer (hCer)/cholesterol/free fatty acids/cholesteryl sulfate, partial or full replacement of hCer by SM increased water loss. Partial replacement of 25% and 50% of hCer by SM also increased the membrane permeability to theophylline and alternating electric current, while a higher SM content either did not alter or even decreased the membrane permeability. In contrast, in a simple membrane model with only one type of Cer (nonhydroxyacyl sphingosine, CerNS), an increased SM/Cer ratio provided a similar or better barrier against the permeation of various markers. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that the replacement of hCer by SM interferes with the formation of the long periodicity lamellar phase with a repeat distance of d=12.7nm. Our results suggest that SM-to-Cer processing in the human epidermis is essential for preventing excessive water loss, while the permeability barrier to exogenous compounds is less sensitive to the presence of sphingomyelin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid Processing Technology: Building a Multilevel Modeling Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Hukkerikar, Amol

    of these unit operations with respect to performance parameters such as minimum total cost, product yield improvement, operability etc., and process intensification for the retrofit of existing biofuel plants. In the fourth level the information and models developed are used as building blocks...... in the upcoming years major challenges in terms of design and development of better products and more sustainable processes. Although the oleo chemical industry is mature and based on well established processes, the complex systems that lipid compounds form, the lack of accurate predictive models...... for their physical properties and unit operation models for their processing have limited computeraided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation to be widely used for design, analysis, and optimization of these processes. In consequence, the aim of this work is to present the development...

  11. Building a Multilevel Modeling Network for Lipid Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel; Mustaffa, Azizul Azri; Hukkerikar, Amol

    for their physical properties and unit operation models for their processing have limited computer-aided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation to be widely used for design, analysis, and optimization of these processes. The world’s fats and oils production has been growing rapidly over...... limited computer-aided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation to be widely used for design, analysis, and optimization of these processes....... in the upcoming years major challenges in terms of design and development of better products and more sustainable processes. Although the oleo chemical industry is mature and based on well established processes, the complex systems that lipid compounds form, the lack of accurate predictive models...

  12. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    stabilization of lipid bilayers, i.e., the protein-tethered membrane. Our efforts in experimentally characterizing the resulting membrane functions and correlating the data with the structural details of the bilayer architectures are complemented by theoretical studies modeling the electrical and electrochemical response of functional tethered lipid bilayer membranes by extended SPICE simulations. (author)

  13. Phase behavior of skin lipid mixtures: the effect of cholesterol on lipid organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, E H; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2015-06-07

    The lipid matrix in the stratum corneum (SC), the upper layer of the skin, plays a critical role in the skin barrier. The matrix consists of ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs). In human SC, these lipids form two coexisting crystalline lamellar phases with periodicities of approximately 6 and 13 nm. In the studies reported here, we investigated the effect of CHOL on lipid organization in each of these lamellar phases separately. For this purpose, we used lipid model mixtures. Our studies revealed that CHOL is imperative for the formation of each of the lamellar phases. At low CHOL levels, the formation of the lamellar phases was dramatically changed: a minimum 0.2 CHOL level in the CER/CHOL/FFA (1 : 0.2 : 1) mixture is required for the formation of each of the lamellar phases. Furthermore, CHOL enhances the formation of the highly dense orthorhombic lateral packing. The gradual increment of CHOL increases the fraction of lipids forming the very dense orthorhombic lateral packing. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that CHOL is an indispensable component of the SC lipid matrix and is of fundamental importance for appropriate dense lipid organization and thus important for the skin barrier function.

  14. Effects of trace elements at the Ni/ScYSZ interface in a model solid oxide fuel cell anode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion

    2008-01-01

    Two ScYSZ electrolytes with different impurity levels were evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using a nickel point electrode setup. The nickel electrodes showed lower electrode polarization resistances on the pure electrolyte than on the impure electrolyte. Time-of-flight seconda...

  15. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  16. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with

  17. scBsAb1/17双特异性抗体对小鼠类风湿性关节炎模型的治疗效果%Therapeutic effect of scBsAb1/17 on rheumatoid arthritis mice models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐剑英; 李德山; 郭茉; 叶贤龙; 阚方明; 张宇; 郝智超; 徐黎明; 任桂萍; 王文飞

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较不同剂量scBsAb1/17对Ⅱ型胶原(CII)诱导类风湿性关节炎(CIA)模型小鼠的治疗效果,及scBsAb1/17双特异性抗体与单价抗体(anti-IL-1β scFv和anti-IL-17 scFv)在CIA模型小鼠中的治疗效果.方法 利用CII建立小鼠类风湿性关节炎模型,小鼠成模后开始治疗,每2 d给药1次,治疗29 d.治疗结束后对小鼠关节炎指数进行临床评分,检测各组小鼠血清中CII抗体、CII特异性刺激的脾细胞增殖指数和脾脏中IL-2、IL-1β、IFN-γ、IL-6和TNF-α等细胞因子的表达水平.结果 与CIA模型对照组相比,所有治疗组都能明显减轻CIA小鼠的临床症状,并明显降低血清中CII抗体水平、脾细胞增殖指数及脾脏中TNF-α、IL-6、IL-2、IL-1β和IFN-γ的表达量.相同剂量下scBsAb1/17治疗组的脾细胞增殖指数明显低于anti-IL-1β scFv治疗组(P<0.05);并且scBsAb1/17治疗组小鼠脾脏中IL-6、IL-2、IL-1β和IFN-γ的表达量明显低于anti-IL-1β scFv和anti-IL-17A scFv单独治疗组(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 scBsAb1/17及单价抗体对CIA模型小鼠都有治疗效果;不同剂量scBsAb1/17对CIA模型鼠的治疗效果呈剂量依赖性;相同剂量条件下,scBsAb1/17的治疗效果要优于单价抗体.%Aim To detect the therapeutic effect of the different doses of scBsAbl/17 in CIA model mice, and compare the treatment effect of the same dose of scB-sAbl/17 with the monovalent antibody ( anti-IL-1 β scFv and anti-IL-17 scFv ) in CIA model mice. Methods CIA models of mice were established. When the clinical symptoms became obvious, the mice were treated by antibodies every two days, and clinical arthritis index was scored. On the 29th day after the treatment, CⅡ antibody level in serum of each group, the spleen cell proliferation index after stimulation by CII, and the cytokine expression in the spleen were tested. Results Compared with the CIA model mice, treatment with antibodies significantly alleviated the clinical

  18. Computer-Aided Modeling of Lipid Processing Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel

    2011-01-01

    are widely used for design, analysis, and optimization of processes in the chemical and petrochemical industries. These computer-aided tools have helped the chemical industry to evolve beyond commodities toward specialty chemicals and ‘consumer oriented chemicals based products’. Unfortunately...... this is not the case for the edible oil and biodiesel industries. The oleochemical industry lags behind the chemical industry in terms of thermophysical property modeling and development of computational tools suitable for the design/analysis, and optimization of lipid-related processes. The aim of this work has been...... increase along with growing interest in biofuels, the oleochemical industry faces in the upcoming years major challenges in terms of design and development of better products and more sustainable processes to make them. Computer-aided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation...

  19. S-C Mylonites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lister, G.S.; Snoke, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    Two types of foliations are commonly developed in mylonites and mylonitic rocks: (a) S-surfaces related to the accumulation of finite strain and (b) C-surfaces related to displacement discontinuities or zones of relatively high shear strain. There are two types of S-C mylonites. Type I S-C mylonites

  20. Probing the Role of Ceramide Headgroup Polarity in Short-Chain Model Skin Barrier Lipid Mixtures by ²H Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, Sören; Lange, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Huster, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The thermoptropic phase behaviors of two stratum corneum model lipid mixtures composed of equimolar contributions of either Cer[NS18] or Cer[NP18] with stearic acid and cholesterol were compared. Each component of the mixture was specifically deuterated such that the temperature-dependent (2)H NMR spectra allowed disentanglement of the complicated phase polymorphism of these lipid mixtures. While Cer[NS] is based on the sphingosine backbone, Cer[NP] features a phytosphingosine, which introduces an additional hydroxyl group into the headgroup of the ceramide and abolishes the double bond. From the NMR spectra, the individual contributions of all lipids to the respective phases could be determined. The comparison of the two lipid mixtures reveals that Cer[NP] containing mixtures have a tendency to form more fluid phases. It is concluded that the additional hydroxyl group of the phytosphingosine-containing ceramide Cer[NP18] in mixture with chain-matched stearic acid and cholesterol creates a packing defect that destabilizes the orthorhombic phase state of canonical SC mixtures. This steric clash favors the gel phase and promotes formation of fluid phases of Cer[NP] containing lipid mixtures at lower temperature compared to those containing Cer[NS18].

  1. Reactions of {[Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd](&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))}(4).2O(C(2)H(5))(2). Crystal Structures of the Complexes [(Ph(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd(SC(6)F(5))].1.4CH(2)Cl(2) and [(Ph(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd(PPh(3))]SO(3)CF(3).2CH(2)Cl(2) and ab Initio MO Calculations on the Model Systems [(H(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-H(2)PCH(2)PH(2))(&mgr;-SH)Pd(PH(3))](+) and [(H(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-H(2)PCH(2)PH(2))Pd(PH(3))](2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón, Rafael; Forniés, Juan; Fernández Sanz, Javier; Usón, Miguel A.; Usón, Isabel; Herrero, Santiago

    1997-04-23

    {[Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd](&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))}(4) reacts 1:4 with neutral ligands L to give [LPd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd(SC(6)F(5))] or 1:8 to form [LPd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)PdL](+) (dppm = bis(diphenylphosphino)methane). These binuclear complexes retain the palladium-palladium bond and the two dissimilar bridging ligands, as demonstrated by the X-ray structural determinations carried out on [(Ph(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd(SC(6)F(5))].1.4CH(2)Cl(2) and [(Ph(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-SC(6)F(5))(&mgr;-dppm)Pd(PPh(3))]SO(3)CF(3).2CH(2)Cl(2). Ab initio calculations on the model systems [(H(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-H(2)PCH(2)PH(2))(&mgr;-SH)Pd(PH(3))](+) and [(H(3)P)Pd(&mgr;-H(2)PCH(2)PH(2))Pd(PH(3))](2+) show that the metal-metal bond arises mainly from interactions between palladium sp orbitals, which also play a predominant role in the binding with the sulfur bridge.

  2. Computer-Aided Modeling of Lipid Processing Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz Tovar, Carlos Axel

    2011-01-01

    the analysis, in terms of their design variables and their impact in the process behavior, of three lipid-related processes has been performed: the solvent recovery section of the extraction of crude soybean oil, the deodorization of palm oil, and the deacidification of soybean oil.......Vegetable oils and fats have an important role in human nutrition and in the chemical industry since they are a source of energy, fat-soluble vitamins, and now also in the production of renewable sources of energy. Nowadays as the consumer preferences for natural products and healthier foods...... increase along with growing interest in biofuels, the oleochemical industry faces in the upcoming years major challenges in terms of design and development of better products and more sustainable processes to make them. Computer-aided methods and tools for process synthesis, modeling and simulation...

  3. The important role of stratum corneum lipids for the cutaneous barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, J; Janssens, M; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-03-01

    The skin protects the body from unwanted influences from the environment as well as excessive water loss. The barrier function of the skin is located in the stratum corneum (SC). The SC consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is crucial for the lipid skin barrier function. This paper provides an overview of the reported SC lipid composition and organization mainly focusing on healthy and diseased human skin. In addition, an overview is provided on the data describing the relation between lipid modulations and the impaired skin barrier function. Finally, the use of in vitro lipid models for a better understanding of the relation between the lipid composition, lipid organization and skin lipid barrier is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous Barrier. Guest Editors: Kenneth R. Feingold and Peter Elias.

  4. Conformation of ceramide 6 molecules and chain-flip transitions in the lipid matrix of the outermost layer of mammalian skin, the stratum corneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    Neutron diffraction from oriented multilamellar model stratum corneum (SC) membranes provides information on the internal nanostructure and hydration of the lipid bilayer. The main distinguishing feature of model SC membranes based on ceramide 6 is the extremely small intermembrane space (1 Å). The role of the fully extended (FE) conformation of ceramide 6 molecules in the organization of the nanostructure of the lipid matrix is discussed. The FE conformation gives rise to extremely strong intermembrane attractions (armature reinforcement), which tighten the adjacent bilayers to form steric contacts. Chain-flip transitions in the conformation of ceramide molecules account for structural alterations in native and model SC membranes upon their hydration.

  5. Interaction of lipid nanoparticles with human epidermis and an organotypic cell culture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike; Fahr, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Various lipid nanoparticle formulations were investigated with respect to (trans)dermal drug delivery with special regard to the mechanism of their effects on human and an organotypic cell culture epidermis. Potential alterations of stratum corneum lipid domains were studied using fluorescence...... was visualized by fluorescence microscopy of cross sections of human epidermis after incubation with cubic and solid lipid nanoparticles. Corticosterone permeation was limited when applied in matrix-type lipid nanoparticles (fat emulsion, smectic and solid lipid nanoparticles). An adhesion of solid lipid...... studies and thermal analysis of human and cell culture epidermis indicate that surface lipids, which are not present to the same extent in the cell culture model than in human epidermis, seem to play an important role....

  6. Production of fungal lipids : kinetic modeling and process design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.

    2011-01-01

    Finding alternatives for fossil fuels is currently urgent. One of the new processes in this field is the production of biodiesel from lipids accumulated by microorganisms. Some yeasts and fungi accumulate lipids when a component needed for growth, usually the N-source, is limiting while the C-source

  7. Localization of methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species within the long-periodicity phase in stratum corneum lipid model membranes: A neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Adina; Sonnenberger, Stefan; Dobner, Bodo; Hauß, Thomas; Schroeter, Annett; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2016-11-01

    The outermost layer of the mammalian skin, the stratum corneum (SC), is a very thin structure and realizes simultaneously the main barrier properties. The penetration barrier for xenobiotica is mostly represented by a complex lipid matrix. There is great interest in the subject of getting information about the arrangement of the lipids, which are mainly ceramides (CER), free fatty acids (FFA) and cholesterol (CHOL). SC lipid model membranes containing synthetically derived lipids in a non-physiological ratio were investigated. To compare the study to a former experiment, a methyl-branched ceramide [EOS] species in presence of the ultra-long chain CER[AP], CHOL and behenic acid (23/10/33/33, wt%) was applied. The membrane structure was studied using the very versatile technique of neutron diffraction. We were able to identify a long-periodicity phase (LPP) with a size of 114Å or 118Å with CER[EOS]-br in a ratio of >60wt% of the ceramides. Furthermore, we figured out two additional coexisting short-periodicity phases (SPP) with repeat distances of 48Å and 45Å, respectively. Partial deuterations of CER[EOS]-br and CER[AP] enabled the localization of the molecules within the multiphase system. CER[EOS]-d3 was present in the LPP, but absent in both SPP. CER[AP]-d3 was determined in both short phases but not localized within the LPP. Besides, we revealed influences of humidity and time with respect to the long-periodicity phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Off-lattice model for the phase behavior of lipid-cholesterol bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1999-01-01

    Lipid bilayers exhibit a phase behavior that involves two distinct, but coupled, order-disorder processes, one in terms of lipid-chain crystalline packing (translational degrees of freedom) and the other in terms of lipid-chain conformational ordering (internal degrees of freedom). Experiments...... and previous approximate theories have suggested that cholesterol incorporated into lipid bilayers has different microscopic effects on lipid-chain packing and conformations and that cholesterol thereby leads to decoupling of the two ordering processes, manifested by a special equilibrium phase, "liquid......-lattice model based on a two-dimensional random triangulation algorithm and represents lipid and cholesterol molecules by hard-core particles with internal (spin-type) degrees of freedom that have nearest-neighbor interactions. The phase equilibria described by the model, specifically in terms of phase diagrams...

  9. Quercetin improves insulin resistance and hepatic lipid accumulation in vitro in a NAFLD cell model

    OpenAIRE

    LI, XIULI; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Na; Wang, XiaoHui; Liu, Qingyan; Bai, Yuqin; BAI, YIN; Liu, Zhijie; YANG, HUIMING; ZOU, JIHONG; Wang, Hongxia; SHI, TIEWEI

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases in the absence of significant alcohol consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on insulin resistance and lipid metabolic abnormalities in free fatty acid (FFA)- and insulin-induced HepG2 cell model of NAFLD, and to determine the possible underlying mechanism. Quercetin markedly improves hepatic lipid accumulation and decreases the levels of triglyceride (TG). The lipid-lower...

  10. Oleic acid disorders stratum corneum lipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guangru; VanWyck, Dina; Xiao, Xin; Mack Correa, M Catherine; Gunn, Euen; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2013-04-16

    Oleic acid (OA) is well-known to affect the function of the skin barrier. In this study, the molecular interactions between OA and model stratum corneum (SC) lipids consisting of ceramide, cholesterol, and palmitic acid (PA) were investigated with Langmuir monolayer and associated techniques. Mixtures with different OA/SC lipid compositions were spread at the air/water interface, and the phase behavior was tracked with surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms. With increasing OA levels in the monolayer, the films became more fluid and more compressible. The thermodynamic parameters derived from π-A isotherms indicated that there are preferential interactions between OA and SC lipids and that films of their mixtures were thermodynamically stable. The domain structure and lipid conformational order of the monolayers were studied through Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), respectively. Results indicate that lower concentrations of OA preferentially mix with and disorder the ceramide-enriched domains, followed by perturbation of the PA-enriched domains and disruption of SC lipid domain separation at higher OA levels.

  11. Computational and analytical modeling of cationic lipid-DNA complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Oded; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the physical properties of cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA) complexes--a promising synthetically based nonviral carrier of DNA for gene therapy. The study is based on a coarse-grained molecular model, which is used in Monte Carlo simulations of mesoscopically large systems over timescales long enough to address experimental reality. In the present work, we focus on the statistical-mechanical behavior of lamellar complexes, which in Monte Carlo simulations self-assemble spontaneously from a disordered random initial state. We measure the DNA-interaxial spacing, d(DNA), and the local cationic area charge density, sigma(M), for a wide range of values of the parameter (c) representing the fraction of cationic lipids. For weakly charged complexes (low values of (c)), we find that d(DNA) has a linear dependence on (c)(-1), which is in excellent agreement with x-ray diffraction experimental data. We also observe, in qualitative agreement with previous Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of the system, large fluctuations in the local area charge density with a pronounced minimum of sigma(M) halfway between adjacent DNA molecules. For highly-charged complexes (large (c)), we find moderate charge density fluctuations and observe deviations from linear dependence of d(DNA) on (c)(-1). This last result, together with other findings such as the decrease in the effective stretching modulus of the complex and the increased rate at which pores are formed in the complex membranes, are indicative of the gradual loss of mechanical stability of the complex, which occurs when (c) becomes large. We suggest that this may be the origin of the recently observed enhanced transfection efficiency of lamellar CL-DNA complexes at high charge densities, because the completion of the transfection process requires the disassembly of the complex and the release of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Some of the structural properties of the system are also predicted by a continuum

  12. Lipid Profiling of In Vitro Cell Models of Adipogenic Differentiation: Relationships With Mouse Adipose Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Lucy; Prudovsky, Igor; Koza, Robert A; Anunciado-Koza, Rea V; Siviski, Matthew E; Lindner, Volkhard; Friesel, Robert E; Rosen, Clifford J; Baker, Paul R S; Simons, Brigitte; Vary, Calvin P H

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to characterize lipid profiles in cell models of adipocyte differentiation in comparison to mouse adipose tissues in vivo. A novel lipid extraction strategy was combined with global lipid profiling using direct infusion and sequential precursor ion fragmentation, termed MS/MS(ALL) . Perirenal and inguinal white adipose tissue and interscapular brown adipose tissues from adult C57BL/6J mice were analyzed. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, ear mesenchymal progenitor cells, and brown adipose-derived BAT-C1 cells were also characterized. Over 3000 unique lipid species were quantified. Principal component analysis showed that perirenal versus inguinal white adipose tissues varied in lipid composition of triacyl- and diacylglycerols, sphingomyelins, glycerophospholipids and, notably, cardiolipin CL 72:3. In contrast, hexosylceramides and sphingomyelins distinguished brown from white adipose. Adipocyte differentiation models showed broad differences in lipid composition among themselves, upon adipogenic differentiation, and with adipose tissues. Palmitoyl triacylglycerides predominate in 3T3-L1 differentiation models, whereas cardiolipin CL 72:1 and SM 45:4 were abundant in brown adipose-derived cell differentiation models, respectively. MS/MS(ALL) data suggest new lipid biomarkers for tissue-specific lipid contributions to adipogenesis, thus providing a foundation for using in vitro models of adipogenesis to reflect potential changes in adipose tissues in vivo. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2182-2193, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An implicit solvent coarse-grained lipid model with correct stress profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodt, Alex J.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2010-05-01

    We develop a coarse-grained parametrization strategy for lipid membranes that we illustrate for a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. Our coarse-graining approach eliminates the high cost of explicit solvent but maintains more lipid interaction sites. We use a broad attractive tail-tail potential and extract realistic bonded potentials of mean force from all-atom simulations, resulting in a model with a sharp gel to fluid transition, a correct bending modulus, and overall very reasonable dynamics when compared with experiment. We also determine a quantitative stress profile and correct breakdown of contributions from lipid components when compared with detailed all-atom simulation benchmarks, which has been difficult to achieve for implicit membrane models. Such a coarse-grained lipid model will be necessary for efficiently simulating complex constructs of the membrane, such as protein assembly and lipid raft formation, within these nonaqueous chemical environments.

  14. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  15. Dynamical clustering and a mechanism for raft-like structures in a model lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Francis W; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F

    2014-05-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient "islands" of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid "rafts," dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. We also show that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes.

  16. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  17. Mathematical model for drug molecules encapsulated in lipid nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putthikorn, Sasipim; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-11-01

    Lipid nanotube is considered as a nanocontainer for drug and gene delivery. It is important to understand a basic idea of the encapsulation process. In this paper, we use the Lennard-Jones potential function and the continuous approximation to explain the energy behaviour of three hollow shapes of Doxorubicin (DOX) clusters that are a sphere, a cylinder, and an ellipsoid interacting with the lipid nanotube. On assuming that the surface areas of the three structures are equal, we can find the minimum size of the lipid nanotube that encapsulates DOX inside by determining the suction energy. Moreover, we find that a long cylindrical drug provides the largest suction energy among other structures studied here due to the perfect fit between the cylindrical drug and the cylindrical tube. This investigation is the first step to develop the design of nanocapsule for medical application.

  18. SC tuning fork

    CERN Multimedia

    The tuning fork used to modulate the radiofrequency system of the synchro cyclotron (SC) from 1957 to 1973. This piece is an unused spare part. The SC was the 1st accelerator built at CERN. It operated from August 1957 until it was closed down at the end of 1990. In the SC the magnetic field did not change with time, and the particles were accelerated in successive pulses by a radiofrequency voltage of some 20kV which varied in frequency as they spiraled outwards towards the extraction radius. The frequency varied from 30MHz to about 17Mz in each pulse. The tuning fork vibrated at 55MHz in vacuum in an enclosure which formed a variable capacitor in the tuning circuit of the RF system, allowing the RF to vary over the appropriate range to accelerate protons from the centre of the macine up to 600Mev at extraction radius. In operation the tips of the tuning fork blade had an amplitude of movement of over 1 cm. The SC accelerator underwent extensive improvements from 1973 to 1975, including the installation of a...

  19. SC2 dee

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Checking the positioning of the dee before its introduction into the vacuum chamber of SC2. The dee is mounted on a large cover plate which also carries the dee liner and the pump manifold. The dummy dee is fixed to the pole faces within the vacuum chamber.

  20. Buffers affect the bending rigidity of model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvrais, Hélène; Duelund, Lars; Ipsen, John H

    2014-01-14

    In biophysical and biochemical studies of lipid bilayers the influence of the used buffer is often ignored or assumed to be negligible on membrane structure, elasticity, or physical properties. However, we here present experimental evidence, through bending rigidity measurements performed on giant vesicles, of a more complex behavior, where the buffering molecules may considerably affect the bending rigidity of phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Furthermore, a synergistic effect on the bending modulus is observed in the presence of both salt and buffer molecules, which serves as a warning to experimentalists in the data interpretation of their studies, since typical lipid bilayer studies contain buffer and ion molecules.

  1. Novel preparation of intercellular lipid models of the stratum corneum containing stereoactive ceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obata, Yasuko; Onuki, Yoshinori; Ishida, Kenya; Takayama, Kozo

    2010-03-01

    The microstructure formed by intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum is important for the barrier function of the skin. However, the correlation between lipid composition and microstructure has not yet been clarified. To elucidate the microstructure of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum, an intercellular lipid model was prepared from ceramide 5 (CER5), cholesterol (CHOL), and palmitic acid (PA), considering the nonuniformity of the lipid components of the stratum corneum. A response surface method incorporating thin-plate spline interpolation (RSM-S) was employed to prepare the CER5/CHOL/PA lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers showed four distinct clusters based on Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). At the centroid formulation of those clusters, the microstructures of CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers were determined using synchrotron X-ray scattering. Three kinds of lamellar structures and two kinds of lateral packing-namely, hexagonal and orthorhombic-were formed. The microstructure of the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers was likely to be intrinsic to the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum. In conclusion, the CER5/CHOL/PA bilayers prepared based on RSM-S and SOM were useful as models of the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum.

  2. A mouse model of harlequin ichthyosis delineates a key role for Abca12 in lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Smyth

    Full Text Available Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI is a severe and often lethal hyperkeratotic skin disease caused by mutations in the ABCA12 transport protein. In keratinocytes, ABCA12 is thought to regulate the transfer of lipids into small intracellular trafficking vesicles known as lamellar bodies. However, the nature and scope of this regulation remains unclear. As part of an original recessive mouse ENU mutagenesis screen, we have identified and characterised an animal model of HI and showed that it displays many of the hallmarks of the disease including hyperkeratosis, loss of barrier function, and defects in lipid homeostasis. We have used this model to follow disease progression in utero and present evidence that loss of Abca12 function leads to premature differentiation of basal keratinocytes. A comprehensive analysis of lipid levels in mutant epidermis demonstrated profound defects in lipid homeostasis, illustrating for the first time the extent to which Abca12 plays a pivotal role in maintaining lipid balance in the skin. To further investigate the scope of Abca12's activity, we have utilised cells from the mutant mouse to ascribe direct transport functions to the protein and, in doing so, we demonstrate activities independent of its role in lamellar body function. These cells have severely impaired lipid efflux leading to intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids. Furthermore, we identify Abca12 as a mediator of Abca1-regulated cellular cholesterol efflux, a finding that may have significant implications for other diseases of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, including atherosclerosis.

  3. A mouse model of harlequin ichthyosis delineates a key role for Abca12 in lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Smyth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Harlequin Ichthyosis (HI is a severe and often lethal hyperkeratotic skin disease caused by mutations in the ABCA12 transport protein. In keratinocytes, ABCA12 is thought to regulate the transfer of lipids into small intracellular trafficking vesicles known as lamellar bodies. However, the nature and scope of this regulation remains unclear. As part of an original recessive mouse ENU mutagenesis screen, we have identified and characterised an animal model of HI and showed that it displays many of the hallmarks of the disease including hyperkeratosis, loss of barrier function, and defects in lipid homeostasis. We have used this model to follow disease progression in utero and present evidence that loss of Abca12 function leads to premature differentiation of basal keratinocytes. A comprehensive analysis of lipid levels in mutant epidermis demonstrated profound defects in lipid homeostasis, illustrating for the first time the extent to which Abca12 plays a pivotal role in maintaining lipid balance in the skin. To further investigate the scope of Abca12's activity, we have utilised cells from the mutant mouse to ascribe direct transport functions to the protein and, in doing so, we demonstrate activities independent of its role in lamellar body function. These cells have severely impaired lipid efflux leading to intracellular accumulation of neutral lipids. Furthermore, we identify Abca12 as a mediator of Abca1-regulated cellular cholesterol efflux, a finding that may have significant implications for other diseases of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, including atherosclerosis.

  4. Lipid Models for United-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukol, Andreas

    2009-03-10

    United-atom force fields for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provide a higher computational efficiency, especially in lipid membrane simulations, with little sacrifice in accuracy, when compared to all-atom force fields. Excellent united-atom lipid models are available, but in combination with depreciated protein force fields. In this work, a united-atom model of the lipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine has been built with standard parameters of the force field GROMOS96 53a6 that reproduces the experimental area per lipid of a lipid bilayer within 3% accuracy to a value of 0.623 ± 0.011 nm(2) without the assumption of a constant surface area or the inclusion of surface pressure. In addition, the lateral self-diffusion constant and deuterium order parameters of the acyl chains are in agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, models for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) result in areas per lipid of 0.625 nm(2) (DMPC), 0.693 nm(2) (POPC), and 0.700 nm(2) (POPG) from 40 ns MD simulations. Experimental lateral self-diffusion coefficients are reproduced satisfactorily by the simulation. The lipid models can form the basis for molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins with current and future versions of united-atom protein force fields.

  5. Lectins from Synadenium carinatum (ScLL) and Artocarpus heterophyllus (ArtinM) Are Able to Induce Beneficial Immunomodulatory Effects in a Murine Model for Treatment of Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliézer L. P.; Santana, Silas S.; Silva, Murilo V.; Santiago, Fernanda M.; Mineo, Tiago W. P.; Mineo, José R.

    2016-01-01

    production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, showing differential but complementary profiles. Moreover, when compared with non-treated mice, the parasite burden was significantly lower and survival rates higher in mice treated with ScLL or ScLL plus ArtinM, similarly with sulfadiazine treatment. In conclusion, the results demonstrated the suitable potential immunotherapeutic effect of ScLL and ArtinM lectins to control acute toxoplasmosis in this experimental murine model. PMID:27933277

  6. Partitioning of Lipids at Domain Boundaries in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Lars V.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2010-01-01

    Line-active molecules ("linactants") that bind to the boundary interface between different fluid lipid domains in membranes have a strong potential as regulators of the lateral heterogeneity that is important for many biological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations in combination w

  7. Self-Segregation of Myelin Membrane Lipids in Model Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurlova, Larisa; Kahya, Nicoletta; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Chiantia, Salvatore; Bakhti, Mostafa; Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Ben-David, Oshrit; Futerman, Anthony H.; Bruegger, Britta; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Rapid conduction of nerve impulses requires coating of axons by myelin sheaths, which are multilamellar, lipid-rich membranes produced by oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. To act as an insulator, myelin has to form a stable and firm membrane structure. In this study, we have analyzed t

  8. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. An experimental procedure was used based on selective quenching of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl)propane (Py-3-Py) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) by trinitrophenyl groups, and radiationless energy transfer from the tryptophans of membrane proteins to Py-3-Py. Lidocaine·HCl increased the bulk lateral and rotational mobility of neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayes, and had a greater fluidizing effect on the inner monolayer than the outer monolayer. Lidocaine·HCl increased annular lipid fluidity in SPMV lipid bilayers. It also caused membrane proteins to cluster. The most important finding of this study is that there is far greater increase in annular lipid fluidity than that in lateral and rotational mobilities by lidocaine·HCl. Lidocaine·HCl alters the stereo or dynamics of the proteins in the lipid bilayers by combining with lipids, especially with the annular lipids. In conclusion, the present data suggest that lidocaine, in addition to its direct interaction with proteins, concurrently interacts with membrane lipids, fluidizing the membrane, and thus inducing conformational changes of proteins known to be intimately associated with membrane lipid.

  9. The influence of shear-velocity heterogeneity on ScS2/ScS amplitude ratios and estimates of Q in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carlos A. M.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Regional waveforms of deep-focus Tonga-Fiji earthquakes indicate anomalous traveltime differences (ScS2-ScS) and amplitude ratios (ScS2/ScS) of the phases ScS and ScS2. The correlation between the ScS2-ScS delay time and the ScS2/ScS amplitude ratio suggests that shear wave apparent Q in the mantle below the Tonga-Fiji region is highest when shear wave velocities are lowest. This observation is unexpected if temperature variations were responsible for the seismic anomalies. Using spectral element method waveform simulations for four tomographic models, we demonstrate that focusing and scattering of shear waves by long-wavelength 3-D heterogeneity in the mantle may overwhelm the signal from intrinsic attenuation in long-period ScS2/ScS amplitude ratios. The tomographic models reproduce the trends in recorded ScS2-ScS difference times and ScS2/ScS amplitude ratios. Although they cannot be ruled out, variations in shear wave attenuation (i.e., the quality factor Q) are not necessary to explain the data.

  10. Dynamical Clustering and the Origin of Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Francis

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using simulations of a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. In the liquid-ordered (LO) phase, lipid diffusion is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, giving rise to two distinct mobility groups: low-mobility lipids which are temporarily ``caged'', and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. The lipid molecules within these distinct mobility states cluster, giving rise to transient ``islands'' of enhanced mobility having the size and time scale expected for lipid ``rafts''. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Such dynamic heterogeneity is ubiquitous in disordered condensed-phase systems. Thus, we hypothesize that rafts may originate from this universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. This perspective provides a new approach to understand membrane transport.

  11. A new in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model to evaluate the mechanisms of drug absorption from lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2016-04-01

    In vitro lipid digestion models are commonly used to screen lipid-based formulations (LBF), but in vitro-in vivo correlations are in some cases unsuccessful. Here we enhance the scope of the lipid digestion test by incorporating an absorption 'sink' into the experimental model. An in vitro model of lipid digestion was coupled directly to a single pass in situ intestinal perfusion experiment in an anaesthetised rat. The model allowed simultaneous real-time analysis of the digestion and absorption of LBFs of fenofibrate and was employed to evaluate the influence of formulation digestion, supersaturation and precipitation on drug absorption. Formulations containing higher quantities of co-solvent and surfactant resulted in higher supersaturation and more rapid drug precipitation in vitro when compared to those containing higher quantities of lipid. In contrast, when the same formulations were examined using the coupled in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model, drug flux into the mesenteric vein was similar regardless of in vitro formulation performance. For some drugs, simple in vitro lipid digestion models may underestimate the potential for absorption from LBFs. Consistent with recent in vivo studies, drug absorption for rapidly absorbed drugs such as fenofibrate may occur even when drug precipitation is apparent during in vitro digestion.

  12. Modeling Yeast Organelle Membranes and How Lipid Diversity Influences Bilayer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2015-11-17

    Membrane lipids are important for the health and proper function of cell membranes. We have improved computational membrane models for specific organelles in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the effect of lipid diversity on membrane structure and dynamics. Previous molecular dynamics simulations were performed by Jo et al. [(2009) Biophys J. 97, 50-58] on yeast membrane models having six lipid types with compositions averaged between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM). We incorporated ergosterol, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol lipids in our models to better describe the unique composition of the PM, ER, and trans-Golgi network (TGN) bilayers of yeast. Our results describe membrane structure based on order parameters (SCD), electron density profiles (EDPs), and lipid packing. The average surface area per lipid decreased from 63.8 ± 0.4 Å(2) in the ER to 47.1 ± 0.3 Å(2) in the PM, while the compressibility modulus (KA) varied in the opposite direction. The high SCD values for the PM lipids indicated a more ordered bilayer core, while the corresponding lipids in the ER and TGN models had lower parameters by a factor of at least 0.7. The hydrophobic core thickness (2DC) as estimated from EDPs is the thickest for PM, which is in agreement with estimates of hydrophobic regions of transmembrane proteins from the Orientation of Proteins in Membranes database. Our results show the importance of lipid diversity and composition on a bilayer's structural and mechanical properties, which in turn influences interactions with the proteins and membrane-bound molecules.

  13. Role of cell death in the propagation of PrP(Sc) in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenichi; Inoshima, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Naotaka

    2015-03-01

    A number of studies have suggested that macrophages, dendritic cells, and follicular dendritic cells play an important role in the propagation of PrP(Sc). Both accumulation and proteolysis of PrP(Sc) have been demonstrated in peripheral macrophages. Macrophages may act as reservoirs for PrP(Sc) particles if the cells die during transient PrP(Sc) propagation. However, whether cell death plays a role in PrP(Sc) propagation in macrophages remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the possibility of propagation and transmission of PrP(Sc) between dead immune cells and living neural cells. We found that under specific conditions, transient PrP(Sc) propagation occurs in dead cells, indicating that interaction between PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) on plasma membrane lipid rafts might be important for PrP(Sc) propagation. Co-culturing of killed donor PrP(Sc)-infected macrophages with recipient N2a-3 neuroblastoma cells accelerated PrP(Sc) transmission. Our results suggest that cell death may play an important role in PrP(Sc) propagation, whereas transient PrP(Sc) propagation in macrophages has little effect on PrP(Sc) transmission.

  14. Hydrostatic Pressure Promotes Domain Formation in Model Lipid Raft Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, David L; Weinrich, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements demonstrate that hydrostatic pressure promotes liquid-ordered (Lo) domain formation in lipid membranes prepared as both oriented multilayers and unilamellar vesicles made of a canonical ternary lipid mixture for which demixing transitions have been extensively studied. The results demonstrate an unusually large dependence of the mixing transition on hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, data at 28 °C show that the magnitude of increase in Lo caused by 10 MPa pressure is much the same as the decrease in Lo produced by twice minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) of general anesthetics such as halothane, nitrous oxide, and xenon. Therefore, the results may provide a plausible explanation for the reversal of general anesthesia by hydrostatic pressure.

  15. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease.

  16. Coarse-grained modeling of interactions of lipid bilayers with supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Deserno, Markus; Longo, Margie L.; Faller, Roland

    2008-11-01

    We characterize the differences between supported and unsupported lipid bilayer membranes using a mesoscopic simulation model and a simple particle-based realization for a flat support on to which the lipids are adsorbed. We show that the nanometer roughness of the support affects membrane binding strength very little. We then compare the lipid distributions and pressure profiles of free and supported membranes. The surface localization of the proximal leaflet breaks the symmetry seen in a free bilayer, and we quantify the entropic penalty for binding and the increased lateral compression modulus.

  17. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters.

  18. Regional groundwater flow model for C, K. L. and P reactor areas, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.P.

    2000-02-11

    A regional groundwater flow model encompassing approximately 100 mi2 surrounding the C, K, L, and P reactor areas has been developed. The reactor flow model is designed to meet the planning objectives outlined in the General Groundwater Strategy for Reactor Area Projects by providing a common framework for analyzing groundwater flow, contaminant migration and remedial alternatives within the Reactor Projects team of the Environmental Restoration Department. The model provides a quantitative understanding of groundwater flow on a regional scale within the near surface aquifers and deeper semi-confined to confined aquifers. The model incorporates historical and current field characterization data up through Spring 1999. Model preprocessing is automated so that future updates and modifications can be performed quickly and efficiently. The CKLP regional reactor model can be used to guide characterization, perform scoping analyses of contaminant transport, and serve as a common base for subsequent finer-scale transport and remedial/feasibility models for each reactor area.

  19. Hypoxia and oxidation levels of DNA and lipids in humans and animal experimental models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Risom, Lotte; Lundby, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the association between hypoxia and oxidative damage to DNA and lipids. Evaluation criteria encompassed specificity and validation status of the biomarkers, study design, strength of the association, dose-response relationship, biological plausibility,...... in subjects at high altitude. Most of the animal experimental models should be interpreted with caution because the assays for assessment of lipid peroxidation products have suboptimal validity....

  20. Competitive Adsorption between B-Casein or B-Lactoglobulin and Model Milk Membrane Lipids at Oil-Water Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waninge, R.; Walstra, P.; Bastiaans, J.; Nieuwenhuijse, H.; Nylander, T.; Paulsson, M.; Bergenstahl, B.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the competitive adsorption between milk proteins and model milk membrane lipids at the oil-water interface and its dependence on the state of the lipid dispersion and the formation of emulsions. Both protein and membrane lipid surface load were determined using a serum

  1. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox.

  2. Lipid-packing perturbation of model membranes by pH-responsive antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Dayane S; Viegas, Taisa Giordano; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2017-08-29

    The indiscriminate use of conventional antibiotics is leading to an increase in the number of resistant bacterial strains, motivating the search for new compounds to overcome this challenging problem. Antimicrobial peptides, acting only in the lipid phase of membranes without requiring specific membrane receptors as do conventional antibiotics, have shown great potential as possible substituents of these drugs. These peptides are in general rich in basic and hydrophobic residues forming an amphipathic structure when in contact with membranes. The outer leaflet of the prokaryotic cell membrane is rich in anionic lipids, while the surface of the eukaryotic cell is zwitterionic. Due to their positive net charge, many of these peptides are selective to the prokaryotic membrane. Notwithstanding this preference for anionic membranes, some of them can also act on neutral ones, hampering their therapeutic use. In addition to the electrostatic interaction driving peptide adsorption by the membrane, the ability of the peptide to perturb lipid packing is of paramount importance in their capacity to induce cell lysis, which is strongly dependent on electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In the present research, we revised the adsorption of antimicrobial peptides by model membranes as well as the perturbation that they induce in lipid packing. In particular, we focused on some peptides that have simultaneously acidic and basic residues. The net charges of these peptides are modulated by pH changes and the lipid composition of model membranes. We discuss the experimental approaches used to explore these aspects of lipid membranes using lipid vesicles and lipid monolayer as model membranes.

  3. Permeability and microstructure of model stratum corneum lipid membranes containing ceramides with long (C16) and very long (C24) acyl chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullmannová, Petra; Pavlíková, Ludmila; Kováčik, Andrej; Sochorová, Michaela; Školová, Barbora; Slepička, Petr; Maixner, Jaroslav; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    The Stratum corneum (SC) prevents water loss from the body and absorption of chemicals. SC intercellular spaces contain ceramides (Cer), free fatty acids (FFA), cholesterol (Chol) and cholesteryl sulfate (CholS). Cer with "very long" acyl chains (for example, N-lignoceroyl-sphingosine, CerNS24) are important for skin barrier function, whereas increased levels of "long" acyl Cer (for example, N-palmitoyl-sphingosine, CerNS16) occur in patients suffering from atopic eczema or psoriasis. We studied the impact of the replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 on the barrier properties and microstructure of model SC lipid membranes composed of Cer/FFA/Chol/CholS. Membranes containing the long CerNS16 were significantly more permeable to water (by 38-53%), theophylline (by 50-55%) and indomethacin (by 83-120%) than those containing the very long CerNS24 (either with lignoceric acid or a mixture of long to very long chain FFA). Langmuir monolayers with CerNS24 were more condensed than with CerNS16 and atomic force microscopy showed differences in domain formation. X-ray powder diffraction revealed that CerNS24-based membranes formed one lamellar phase and separated Chol, whereas the CerNS16-based membranes formed up to three phases and Chol. These results suggest that replacement of CerNS24 by CerNS16 has a direct negative impact on membrane structure and permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Toward Quantitative Coarse-Grained Models of Lipids with Fluids Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frink, Laura J Douglas; Frischknecht, Amalie L; Heroux, Michael A; Parks, Michael L; Salinger, Andrew G

    2012-04-10

    We describe methods to determine optimal coarse-grained models of lipid bilayers for use in fluids density functional theory (fluids-DFT) calculations. Both coarse-grained lipid architecture and optimal parametrizations of the models based on experimental measures are discussed in the context of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers in water. The calculations are based on a combination of the modified-iSAFT theory for bonded systems and an accurate fundamental measures theory (FMT) for hard sphere reference fluids. We furthermore discuss a novel approach for pressure control in the fluids-DFT calculations that facilitates both partitioning studies and zero tension control for the bilayer studies. A detailed discussion of the numerical implementations for both solvers and pressure control capabilities are provided. We show that it is possible to develop a coarse-grained lipid bilayer model that is consistent with experimental properties (thickness and area per lipid) of DPPC provided that the coarse-graining is not too extreme. As a final test of the model, we find that the predicted area compressibility moduli and lateral pressure profiles of the optimized models are in reasonable agreement with prior results.

  5. Membrane Compartmentalization Reducing the Mobility of Lipids and Proteins within a Model Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldsø, Heidi; Reddy, Tyler; Fowler, Philip W; Duncan, Anna L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-01

    The cytoskeleton underlying cell membranes may influence the dynamic organization of proteins and lipids within the bilayer by immobilizing certain transmembrane (TM) proteins and forming corrals within the membrane. Here, we present coarse-grained resolution simulations of a biologically realistic membrane model of asymmetrically organized lipids and TM proteins. We determine the effects of a model of cytoskeletal immobilization of selected membrane proteins using long time scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing compartments with varying degrees of restraints within the membrane models, we are able to reveal how compartmentalization caused by cytoskeletal immobilization leads to reduced and anomalous diffusional mobility of both proteins and lipids. This in turn results in a reduced rate of protein dimerization within the membrane and of hopping of membrane proteins between compartments. These simulations provide a molecular realization of hierarchical models often invoked to explain single-molecule imaging studies of membrane proteins.

  6. Evaluation of a model of dissertation supervision for 3rd year B.Sc. undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Donna; Cox, Georgina

    2016-03-01

    All English universities now offer an all degree undergraduate nursing programme. Many currently use an individual supervision model to support final year dissertation students, but with increased numbers and limited resources new models of supervision are needed. This study evaluated a mixed (group and individual) model of dissertation supervision to determine its effectiveness for a large group of undergraduate nursing students. A sample of 3rd year students and their supervisors were selected from one large university. An evaluation survey was conducted using anonymous internet-based questionnaires and focus groups. The data was analysed using Survey Monkey, SPSS and thematic analysis. A 51% (n = 56/110) response rate (students) and 65% (n = 24/37) for supervisors was obtained. The majority of students and supervisors were satisfied with the new model. There was a mixed response to the group workshops and supervision groups. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: engaging with the process, motivation to supervise and valuing the process. The supervision process is a struggle but both parties gained considerably from going through the process. In conclusion, a mixed model of supervision together with a range of other learning resources can be an effective approach in supporting students through the dissertation process.

  7. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  8. Validation of Cyanoacrylate Method for Collection of Stratum Corneum in Human Skin for Lipid Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, JM; Hellgren, Lars; Drachmann, Tue

    2010-01-01

    for the collection of SC in relation to lipid analysis. Methods: The results of the lipid analysis (ceramide/cholesterol and ceramide profile) of SC samples obtained by the cyanoacrylate method were compared to the results of the lipid analysis of mechanically removed SC samples. The intra- and interindividual...... removed total thickness of the SC and cyanoacrylate samples. With respect to the cyanoacrylate samples, the intraindividual variation was significantly smaller than the interindividual variation, and the results did not indicate a change in lipid profile related to the depth of SC. The results clearly......Background and Objective: Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC) are of major importance for the skin barrier function. Many different methods have been used for the collection of SC for the analysis of SC lipids. The objective of the present study was to validate the cyanoacrylate method...

  9. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  10. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Armbruster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1 under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  11. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Numerical modeling of circulation and sediment transport in Long Bay, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, J. C.; Sullivan, C.; Voulgaris, G.; Work, P.; Haas, K.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    Long Bay, South Carolina, is a heavily populated coastal region that supports a large tourism industry. Sand resources are important for both recreation and coastal habitat. Earlier geological framework studies have identified a large sand deposit oblique to the shoreline, oriented clockwise in the offshore direction. This sand feature is ~ 10 km long, 2 km wide, and in excess of 3m thick, possibly providing a source for beach nourishment material. Objectives of this study are to describe the physical processes that control the transport of sediment in Long Bay, specifically off the coast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Specifically we seek to 1) measure and model the oceanographic circulation in the region, 2) identify the processes that maintain the presence of the offshore sand feature, 3) quantify the control that the shoal exerts on the nearshore through changes in wave energy propagation, and 4) identify consequences of removal of the offshore sand feature. Both observational and numerical experiments are used to study the oceanographic circulation and transport of sediment. The observational study is described in an accompanying poster and consists of eight sites that measured tides, surface waves, currents, salinity, temperature, suspended sediment concentrations, and bed forms from October 2003 to April 2004. Numerical modeling for circulation and sediment transport in the study region uses a new version of ROMS (v2.1) that now includes transport of multiple grain sizes, coupling of sediment transport to wave bottom boundary layer models, and evolution of the bottom morphology. The SWAN model is used to compute wave propagation. Results indicate that currents in the study area are strongly influenced by both tidal motion and wind driven setup / setdown. The presence of the offshore sand feature alters the residual flows in the region. Sediment transport is more significant during periods of sustained strong winds that generate local waves. Wind direction

  12. Lipid tail protrusion in simulations predicts fusogenic activity of influenza fusion peptide mutants and conformational models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Larsson

    Full Text Available Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations.

  13. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  14. [Establishment and evaluation of a dynamic in vitro intestinal absorption model of lipid formulations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yi, Tao; Di, Huan; Xiao, Lu; He, Ji-Kui

    2011-08-01

    A new dynamic in vitro intestinal absorption model for screening and evaluating lipid formulations was established by means of the characteristics of the intestinal digestion and absorption of the lipid formulations. This model was composed of two systems, including intestinal digestion and the intestinal tissue culture, which drew the evaluation method of intestinal absorption into the in vitro lipolysis model. The influence of several important model parameters such as Ca2+, D-glucose, K+ on the two systems of this model has been investigated. The results showed that increasing of Ca2+ concentration could be significantly conductive to intestinal digestion. The increasing of D-glucose concentration could stepped significantly down the decay of the intestinal activity. K+ was able to maintain intestinal activity, but the influence of different concentration levels on the decay of the intestinal activity was of no significant difference. Thus the model parameters were set up as follows: Ca2+ for 10 mmol x L(-1), D-glucose for 15 mmol x L(-1) and K+ for 5.5 mmol x L(-1). Type I lipid formulation was evaluated with this model, and there was a significant correlation between the absorption curve in vitro and absorption curve in vivo of rats (r = 0.995 6, P lipid formulations.

  15. The role of ceramide chain length distribution on the barrier properties of the skin lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumdar, E H; Kariman, Z; van Kerckhove, L; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-10-01

    The skin barrier function is provided by the stratum corneum (SC). The lipids in the SC are composed of three lipid classes: ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs) which form two crystalline lamellar structures. In the present study, we investigate the effect of CER chain length distribution on the barrier properties of model lipid membranes mimicking the lipid composition and organization of SC. The membranes were prepared with either isolated pig CERs (PCERs) or synthetic CERs. While PCERs have a wide chain length distribution, the synthetic CERs are quite uniform in chain length. The barrier properties were examined by means of permeation studies using hydrocortisone as a model drug. Our studies revealed a reduced barrier in lipid membranes prepared with PCERs compared to synthetic CERs. Additional studies revealed that a wider chain length distribution of PCERs results in an enhanced hexagonal packing and increased conformational disordering of the lipid tails compared to synthetic CERs, while the lamellar phases did not change. This demonstrates that the chain length distribution affects the lipid barrier by reducing the lipid ordering and density within the lipid lamellae. In subsequent studies, the effect of increased levels of FFAs or CERs with a long acyl chain in the PCERs membranes was also studied. These changes in lipid composition enhanced the level of orthorhombic packing, reduced the conformational disordering and increased the barrier of the lipid membranes. In conclusion, the CER chain length distribution is an important key factor for maintaining a proper barrier. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. K2SC: K2 Systematics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigrain, Suzanne; Parviainen, Hannu; Pope, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction) models instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. It enables the user to remove both position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability (e.g., for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution timescale of the variability for periodic variables and can be run on ASCII and FITS light curve files. Written in Python, this pipeline requires NumPy, SciPy, MPI4Py, Astropy (ascl:1304.002), and George (ascl:1511.015).

  17. Lipídios em sedimentos arqueológicos: resultados preliminares do sítio arqueológico Rio do Meio, Ilha de Santa Catarina (SC Lipids in archaeological sediments: preliminary results of the archaeological site Rio do Meio, Santa Catarina Island (SC, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Augusto Hansel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a distribuição de lipídios em sedimentos arqueológicos do sítio Rio do Meio, Ilha de Santa Catarina. Nos extratos totais de lipídios, analisados por cromatografia gasosa e espectrometria de massas (CG e CG-EM, predominaram os compostos ácidos e álcoois saturados. Foram detectados pelo menos dois tipos de matéria orgânica: uma antiga e outra comparativamente recente. Na primeira, o extrato total de lipídios foi dominado por ácidos graxos de cadeias curtas ( Ac20:0 e Al20:0. Em contraste, na deposição classificada como recente, foram identificados em maiores teores os ácidos e álcoois de cadeias longas (> Ac20:0 e Al20:0. Neste estudo, foi possível observar a incorporação de material orgânico procedente de fontes de origem vegetal, bacteriana e, possivelmente, animal (gorduras nos sedimentos arqueológicos analisados.In this study the distribution of lipid compounds was evaluated in sediment samples of an archaeological site Rio do Meio, Santa Catarina Island, Brazil. In the total lipid extracts, analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC and GC-MS, saturated fatty acids and alcohols were predominant. At least two sources of organic matter were detected, an older and a more recent one. In the old deposit, the most abundant lipids were short-chain fatty acids ( Ac20:0 and Al20:0. In contrast, the fresh deposit was dominated by long-chain fatty acids and alcohols (> Ac20:0 and Al20:0. This paper described the incorporation of vegetal, bacterial and possible animal (fat sources into the archaeological sediments analyzed.

  18. Academic Training - Pulsed SC Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 2, 3, June 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mech...

  19. Detrimental effects of fluvastatin on plasma lipid metabolism in rat breast carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapinová Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From clinical practice, obvious positive effects of statins on plasma lipid metabolism are well known. On the other hand, there are several experimental rodent studies, where these beneficial effects were not confirmed. The effects of fluvastatin on selected serum lipid parameters in a rat model of experimental breast cancer were determined. The drug was dietary administered at two concentrations of 20 and 200 mg/kg. At the end of the study (experiment duration - 18 weeks the blood from each animal was collected and serum lipid parameters were evaluated. Fluvastatin in both treated groups significantly increased parameters of serum lipids (mostly in a dose dependent manner. Fluvastatin in both treated groups of animals significantly increased serum levels of triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, and LDL-, HDL-, VLDL-cholesterol when compared to the control group. Our results pointed out to the apparent harmful effects of fluvastatin on plasma lipid metabolism in rat mammary carcinogenesis. Based on our previous results, it seems that rats commonly used in cancer model studies are generally unresponsive to the hypocholesterolemic effects of statins.

  20. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Buttet

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD. By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP and blood clearance (ApoC2. These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG, while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the

  1. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  2. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttet, Marjorie; Poirier, Hélène; Traynard, Véronique; Gaire, Kévin; Tran, Thi Thu Trang; Sundaresan, Sinju; Besnard, Philippe; Abumrad, Nada A.; Niot, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL) in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD). By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP) and blood clearance (ApoC2). These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG), while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the reported

  3. Self-consistent mean-field model for palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyl sphingomyelin-cholesterol lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2011-03-01

    The connection between membrane inhomogeneity and the structural basis of lipid rafts has sparked interest in the lateral organization of model lipid bilayers of two and three components. In an effort to investigate anisotropic lipid distribution in mixed bilayers, a self-consistent mean-field theoretical model is applied to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM)-cholesterol mixtures. The compositional dependence of lateral organization in these mixtures is mapped onto a ternary plot. The model utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to estimate interaction parameters and to construct chain conformation libraries. We find that at some concentration ratios the bilayers separate spatially into regions of higher and lower chain order coinciding with areas enriched with PSM and POPC, respectively. To examine the effect of the asymmetric chain structure of POPC on bilayer lateral inhomogeneity, we consider POPC-lipid interactions with and without angular dependence. Results are compared with experimental data and with results from a similar model for mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, steroyl sphingomyelin, and cholesterol.

  4. Data, analysis and modeling of physical properties for process designof systems involving lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa; Ceriani, Roberta; Sarup, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Pure component and mixture properties are necessary for synthesis, design, and analysis of processes forthe production of edible oils, fats, biodiesel, and other lipids. The lack of measured data for these systemsmakes it necessary to develop reliable predictive models based on limited data. We...

  5. Growth and lipid production of Umbelopsis isabellina on a solid substrate - Mechanistic modeling and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwse, P.; Klok, A.J.; Haemers, S.; Tramper, J.; Rinzema, A.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial lipids are an interesting feedstock for biodiesel. Their production from agricultural waste streams by fungi cultivated in solid-state fermentation may be attractive, but the yield of this process is still quite low. In this article, a mechanistic model is presented that describes growth,

  6. Computational microscopy of cyclodextrin mediated cholesterol extraction from lipid model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Cesar A.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Beta-cyclodextrins (beta-CDs) can form inclusion complexes with cholesterol, and are commonly used to manipulate cholesterol levels of biomembranes. In this work, we have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to provide a detailed view on the interaction between beta-CDs and lipid model

  7. Dissociation between transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) infectivity and proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) levels in peripheral tissue from a murine transgenic model of TSE disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Karen; Barron, Rona

    2013-05-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) rely on the presence of proteinase K (PK)-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP-res) in postmortem tissues as an indication of TSE disease. However, a number of studies have highlighted a discrepancy between TSE infectivity and PrP-res levels in both natural and experimental cases of TSE disease. Previously, we have shown high TSE infectivity levels in the brain tissue of mice that have a clinical TSE disease with associated vacuolar pathology but little or no detectable PrP-res. Here, the levels of TSE infectivity and PrP-res within a peripheral tissue of this mouse model were investigated. Biochemical analysis showed that low levels of PrP-res were present in the spleen tissue in comparison to the levels observed in the spleen of mice infected with ME7 or 79A. However, upon subpassage of brain and spleen tissue from clinically ill mice with little or no PrP-res detectable, similar short incubation periods to disease were observed, indicating that infectivity levels were similarly high in both tissues. Thus, the discrepancy between PrP-res and TSE infectivity was also present in the peripheral tissues of this disease model. This result indicates that peripheral tissues can contain higher levels of infectivity given the correct combination of host species, PrP genotype, and TSE agent. Therefore, the assumption that the levels of peripheral infectivity are lower than those in the central nervous system is not always correct, and this could have implications for current food safety regulations.

  8. Equilibrium microphase separation in the two-leaflet model of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Ramon; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the coupling between local lipid composition and the thickness of the membrane, microphase separation in two-component lipid membranes can take place; such effects may underlie the formation of equilibrium nanoscale rafts. Using a kinetic description, this phenomenon is analytically and numerically investigated. The phase diagram is constructed through the stability analysis for linearized kinetic equations, and conditions for microphase separation are discussed. Simulations of the full kinetic model reveal the development of equilibrium membrane nanostructures with various morphologies from the initial uniform state.

  9. Understanding Detergent Effects on Lipid Membranes: A Model Study of Lysolipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær

    2010-01-01

    -phosphatidylcholine lipids (LPCs) on 1-palmitoy1-2-oleyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid membranes by use of isothermal titration calorimetry and vesicle fluctuation analysis. The membrane partition coefficient (K) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) are determined by isothermal titration calorimetry...... in terms of a phenomenological model based on continuum elastic theory, which yields information about the curvature-inducing properties of the LPC molecule. The results reveal: 1), an increase in the partition coefficient with increasing LPC acyl-chain length; and 2), that the degree of acyl...

  10. Helical crystallization on nickel-lipid nanotubes: perfringolysin O as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thanh X; Milligan, Ronald A; Tweten, Rodney K; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-11-01

    To facilitate purification and subsequent structural studies of recombinant proteins the most widely used genetically encoded tag is the histidine tag (His-tag) which specifically binds to N-nitrilotriacetic-acid-chelated nickel ions. Lipids derivatized with a nickel-chelating head group can be mixed with galactosylceramide glycolipids to prepare lipid nanotubes that bind His-tagged proteins. In this study, we use His-tagged perfringolysin O (PFO), a soluble toxin secreted by the bacterial pathogen Clostridium perfringens, as a model protein to test the utility of nickel-lipid nanotubes as a tool for structural studies of His-tagged proteins. PFO is a member of the cholesterol dependent cytolysin family (CDC) of oligomerizing, pore-forming toxins found in a variety of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. CDC pores have been difficult to study by X-ray crystallography because they are membrane associated and vary in size. We demonstrate that both a wild-type and a mutant form of PFO form helical arrays on nickel-lipid containing nanotubes. Cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis of the helical arrays were used to reconstruct a 3D density map of wild-type PFO. This study suggests that the use of nickel-lipid nanotubes may offer a general approach for structural studies of recombinant proteins and may provide insights into the molecular interactions of proteins that have a natural affinity for a membrane surface.

  11. Lipid-assisted protein transport: A diffusion-reaction model supported by kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Carmelo; Scalisi, Silvia; Lolicato, Fabio; Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The protein transport inside a cell is a complex phenomenon that goes through several difficult steps. The facilitated transport requires sophisticated machineries involving protein assemblies. In this work, we developed a diffusion-reaction model to simulate co-transport kinetics of proteins and lipids. We assume the following: (a) there is always a small lipid concentration of order of the Critical Micellar Concentration (CMC) in equilibrium with the membrane; (b) the binding of lipids to proteins modulates the hydrophobicity of the complexes and, therefore, their ability to interact and merge with the bilayer; and (c) some lipids leave the bilayer to replenish those bound to proteins. The model leads to a pair of integral equations for the time-evolution of the adsorbed proteins in the lipid bilayer. Relationships between transport kinetics, CMC, and lipid-protein binding constants were found. Under particular conditions, a perturbation analysis suggests the onset of kinks in the protein adsorption kinetics. To validate our model, we performed leakage measurements of vesicles composed by either high or low CMC lipids interacting with Islet Amyloid PolyPeptide (IAPP) and Aβ (1-40) used as sample proteins. Since the lipid-protein complex stoichiometry is not easily accessible, molecular dynamics simulations were performed using monomeric IAPP interacting with an increasing number of phospholipids. Main results are the following: (a) 1:1 lipid-protein complexes generally show a faster insertion rate proportional to the complex hydrophobicity and inversely related to lipid CMC; (b) on increasing the number of bound lipids, the protein insertion rate decreases; and (c) at slow lipids desorption rate, the lipid-assisted proteins transport might exhibit a discontinuous behavior and does non-linearly depend on protein concentration.

  12. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

  13. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  14. The ELBA force field for coarse-grain modeling of lipid membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Orsi

    Full Text Available A new coarse-grain model for molecular dynamics simulation of lipid membranes is presented. Following a simple and conventional approach, lipid molecules are modeled by spherical sites, each representing a group of several atoms. In contrast to common coarse-grain methods, two original (interdependent features are here adopted. First, the main electrostatics are modeled explicitly by charges and dipoles, which interact realistically through a relative dielectric constant of unity (ε(r = 1. Second, water molecules are represented individually through a new parametrization of the simple Stockmayer potential for polar fluids; each water molecule is therefore described by a single spherical site embedded with a point dipole. The force field is shown to accurately reproduce the main physical properties of single-species phospholipid bilayers comprising dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE in the liquid crystal phase, as well as distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC in the liquid crystal and gel phases. Insights are presented into fundamental properties and phenomena that can be difficult or impossible to study with alternative computational or experimental methods. For example, we investigate the internal pressure distribution, dipole potential, lipid diffusion, and spontaneous self-assembly. Simulations lasting up to 1.5 microseconds were conducted for systems of different sizes (128, 512 and 1058 lipids; this also allowed us to identify size-dependent artifacts that are expected to affect membrane simulations in general. Future extensions and applications are discussed, particularly in relation to the methodology's inherent multiscale capabilities.

  15. Different Modes of the Effect of 1,2-Propanediol and Azone on Stratum Corneum Lipids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王红武; 李菲; 公衍道; 董敏; 张秀芳; 赵南明

    2001-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) controls the diffusion and penetration of drugs into and through the skin. In this investigation, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the effect of two enhancers, 1,2-propanediol and azone, on lipids extracted from SC (SC lipids). The two enhancers affected the SC lipids. However, their function modes were different. The penetration enhancing mechanisms of the two enhancers are discussed based on their effects on SC lipids and on their efficiencies in arbutin permeation enhancement.

  16. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can......This thesis consists of two parts. The rst part is divided into five chapters. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction to the bio-molecular systems that have been studied. These are membrane proteins and their lipid environments in the form of phospholipid nanodiscs. Membrane proteins...

  17. Phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine ceramides in model skin lipid membranes: permeability and biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Kováčik, Andrej; Tesař, Ondřej; Opálka, Lukáš; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-05-01

    Ceramides based on phytosphingosine, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine are essential constituents of the skin lipid barrier that protects the body from excessive water loss. The roles of the individual ceramide subclasses in regulating skin permeability and the reasons for C4-hydroxylation of these sphingolipids are not completely understood. We investigated the chain length-dependent effects of dihydroceramides, sphingosine ceramides (with C4-unsaturation) and phytoceramides (with C4-hydroxyl) on the permeability, lipid organization and thermotropic behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesteryl sulfate. Phytoceramides with very long C24 acyl chains increased the permeability of the model lipid membranes compared to dihydroceramides or sphingosine ceramides with the same chain lengths. Either unsaturation or C4-hydroxylation of dihydroceramides induced chain length-dependent increases in membrane permeability. Infrared spectroscopy showed that C4-hydroxylation of the sphingoid base decreased the relative ratio of orthorhombic chain packing in the membrane and lowered the miscibility of C24 phytoceramide with lignoceric acid. The phase separation in phytoceramide membranes was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. In contrast, phytoceramides formed strong hydrogen bonds and highly thermostable domains. Thus, the large heterogeneity in ceramide structures and in their aggregation mechanisms may confer resistance towards the heterogeneous external stressors that are constantly faced by the skin barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Coarse Grained Model for a Lipid Membrane with Physiological Composition and Leaflet Asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyan Sharma

    Full Text Available The resemblance of lipid membrane models to physiological membranes determines how well molecular dynamics (MD simulations imitate the dynamic behavior of cell membranes and membrane proteins. Physiological lipid membranes are composed of multiple types of phospholipids, and the leaflet compositions are generally asymmetric. Here we describe an approach for self-assembly of a Coarse-Grained (CG membrane model with physiological composition and leaflet asymmetry using the MARTINI force field. An initial set-up of two boxes with different types of lipids according to the leaflet asymmetry of mammalian cell membranes stacked with 0.5 nm overlap, reliably resulted in the self-assembly of bilayer membranes with leaflet asymmetry resembling that of physiological mammalian cell membranes. Self-assembly in the presence of a fragment of the plasma membrane protein syntaxin 1A led to spontaneous specific positioning of phosphatidylionositol(4,5bisphosphate at a positively charged stretch of syntaxin consistent with experimental data. An analogous approach choosing an initial set-up with two concentric shells filled with different lipid types results in successful assembly of a spherical vesicle with asymmetric leaflet composition. Self-assembly of the vesicle in the presence of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptobrevin 2 revealed the correct position of the synaptobrevin transmembrane domain. This is the first CG MD method to form a membrane with physiological lipid composition as well as leaflet asymmetry by self-assembly and will enable unbiased studies of the incorporation and dynamics of membrane proteins in more realistic CG membrane models.

  19. Modeling Amyloid Beta Peptide Insertion into Lipid Bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Maddox, M W; Longo, M J; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Maddox, Michael W.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recent suggestions that the Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide (A-beta), can insert into cell membranes and form harmful ion channels, we model insertion of the peptide into cell membranes using a Monte Carlo code which is specific at the amino acid level. We examine insertion of the regular A-beta peptide as well as mutants causing familial Alzheimer's disease. We present our results and develop the hypothesis that partial insertion into the membrane, leaving the peptide in one leaflet, increases the probability of harmful channel formation. This hypothesis can partly explain why these mutations are neurotoxic simply due to peptide insertion behavior, and also explains why, normally, A-beta 42 is more toxic to some cultured cells than A-beta 40, but the E22Q mutation reverses this effect. We further apply this model to various artificial A-beta mutants which have been examined experimentally, and offer testable experimental predictions contrasting the roles of aggregation and insertion with regard ...

  20. Monitor of SC beam profiles

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    A high-resolution secondary emission grid for the measurement of SC beam profiles. Modern techniques of metal-ceramic bonding, developed for micro-electronics, have been used in its construction. (See Annual Report 1977 p. 105 Fig. 12.)

  1. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  2. Probing lipid-cholesterol interactions in DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol model lipid rafts with DSC and (13)C solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsching, Keith J; Kim, Jihyun; Holland, Gregory P

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipids in bilayers was investigated for the ternary model lipid rafts, DOPC/eSM/Chol and DOPC/DPPC/Chol, with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) solid-state NMR. The enthalpy and transition temperature (Tm) of the Lα liquid crystalline phase transition from DSC was used to probe the thermodynamics of the different lipids in the two systems as a function of Chol content. The main chain (13)C (CH2)n resonance is resolved in the (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectra for the unsaturated (DOPC) and saturated (eSM or DPPC) chain lipid in the ternary lipid raft mixtures. The (13)C chemical shift of this resonance can be used to detect differences in chain ordering and overall interactions with Chol for the different lipid constituents in the ternary systems. The combination of DSC and (13)C CP-MAS NMR results indicate that there is a preferential interaction between SM and Chol below Tm for the DOPC/eSM/Chol system when the Chol content is ≤20mol%. In contrast, no preferential interaction between Chol and DPPC is observed in the DOPC/DPPC/Chol system above or below Tm. Finally, (13)C CP-MAS NMR resolves two Chol environments in the DOPC/eSM/Chol system below Tm at Chol contents >20mol% while, a single Chol environment is observed for DOPC/DPPC/Chol at all compositions.

  3. Interplay of electrostatics and lipid packing determines the binding of charged polymer coated nanoparticles to model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nupur; Bhattacharya, Rupak; Saha, Arindam; Jana, Nikhil R; Basu, Jaydeep K

    2015-10-07

    Understanding of nanoparticle-membrane interactions is useful for various applications of nanoparticles like drug delivery and imaging. Here we report on the studies of interaction between hydrophilic charged polymer coated semiconductor quantum dot nanoparticles with model lipid membranes. Atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity measurements suggest that cationic nanoparticles bind and penetrate bilayers of zwitterionic lipids. Penetration and binding depend on the extent of lipid packing and result in the disruption of the lipid bilayer accompanied by enhanced lipid diffusion. On the other hand, anionic nanoparticles show minimal membrane binding although, curiously, their interaction leads to reduction in lipid diffusivity. It is suggested that the enhanced binding of cationic QDs at higher lipid packing can be understood in terms of the effective surface potential of the bilayers which is tunable through membrane lipid packing. Our results bring forth the subtle interplay of membrane lipid packing and electrostatics which determine nanoparticle binding and penetration of model membranes with further implications for real cell membranes.

  4. Cholesterol as a factor regulating the influence of natural (PAF and lysoPAF) vs synthetic (ED) ether lipids on model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2013-11-01

    In this work we have performed a comparative study on the effect of antineoplastic ether lipid-edelfosine (ED), its natural analogs - Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) and its precursor (lyso-PAF), both lacking anticancer properties, on cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine (Chol/PC) monolayers, serving as model membranes. Since all the above ether lipids are membrane active, it can be expected that their effect on membranes may differentiate their biological activity. Our investigations were aimed at studying potential relationship of the effect of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF on model membranes, differing in condensation. We have modified molecular packing of Chol/PC model systems either by increasing the level of sterol in the system or changing the structure of PC, while keeping the same sterol content. Additionally, we have performed a detailed comparison of the miscibility of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with various membrane lipids. The collected data evidenced that all the investigated ether lipids influence Chol/PC films in the same way; however, in a different magnitude. Moreover, the interactions of ED, PAF and lyso-PAF with model membranes were the strongest at the highest level of sterol in the system. A thorough analysis of the obtained results has proved that the effect of the investigated ether lipids on membranes is not dependent on the condensation of the system, but it is strongly determined by the concentration of cholesterol. Since ED was found to interact with model membranes stronger than PAF and lyso-PAF, we have suggested that this fact may contribute to differences in cytotoxicity of these compounds.

  5. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice.

  6. LHCb Data Replication During SC3

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, A

    2006-01-01

    LHCb's participation in LCG's Service Challenge 3 involves testing the bulk data transfer infrastructure developed to allow high bandwidth distribution of data across the grid in accordance with the computing model. To enable reliable bulk replication of data, LHCb's DIRAC system has been integrated with gLite's File Transfer Service middleware component to make use of dedicated network links between LHCb computing centres. DIRAC's Data Management tools previously allowed the replication, registration and deletion of files on the grid. For SC3 supplementary functionality has been added to allow bulk replication of data (using FTS) and efficient mass registration to the LFC replica catalog.Provisional performance results have shown that the system developed can meet the expected data replication rate required by the computing model in 2007. This paper details the experience and results of integration and utilisation of DIRAC with the SC3 transfer machinery.

  7. A Model for the Interfacial Kinetics of Phospholipase D Activity on Long-Chain Lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    outer vesicle layer scooting mode hydrolysis to analyze the interfacial kinetics, inhibition, and substrate preferences of bee venom phospholipase A2...California ABSTRACT The membrane -active enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond in phospholipids and plays a...Recently we showed that planar lipid bilayers, a previously unexplored model membrane for these kinetic studies, can be used for monitoring interfacial

  8. Interactions of amiodarone with model membranes and amiodarone-photoinduced peroxidation of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautereau, A M; Tournaire, C; Suares, M; Tocanne, J F; Paillous, N

    1992-06-23

    The potent antiarrhythmic drug, amiodarone (AMIO) exhibits phototoxicity, which is thought to be related to its interaction with biological membranes. We report here a spectroscopic study of the interactions of this drug with phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes used as membrane model systems. A linear increase in absorbance at 300 nm was observed with increasing addition of AMIO to dimyristoyl-DL-PC (DMPC) liposomes over all the drugs-lipid molar ratio (Ri)s tested. In contrast, in the dimyristoyl-DL-PG (DMPG) liposomes, there was a dramatic increase in absorbance at values of Ri above unity. Light scattering by DMPG liposomes at 350 nm increased with increasing AMIO concentration up to a Ri = 1, and then decreased with increasing drug concentration. Such changes were not observed with the DMPC liposomes. Moreover, addition of AMIO changed the fluorescence polarization rate of 1,6-diphenyl 1,3,5-hexatriene embedded in these liposomes. It reduced the rate below the phase transition temperature (Tt) of the lipid, but increased it above this temperature. These effects on the lipidic phases observed at low Ri were more pronounced on the DMPG than on the DMPC liposomes. The strong interactions of AMIO with phospholipids, especially the acidic ones, were confirmed by liposome size determinations. All these data strongly suggest that the drug was incorporated in the core of the lipid bilayers. Such a penetration would favor a drug-photoinduced peroxidation of lipids. Indeed, UV irradiation of AMIO-DOPG mixtures led to the disappearance of the unsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids, checked by gas chromatography measurements, which was correlated with the amount of oxygen consumed. This showed that AMIO did photosensitize phospholipid peroxidation.

  9. Bayesian Analysis of a Lipid-Based Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Model for a Mixture of PCBs in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. Sasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK model has been developed for a mixture of six polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in rats. The aim of this study was to apply population Bayesian analysis to a lipid PBTK model, while incorporating an internal exposure-response model linking enzyme induction and metabolic rate. Lipid-based physiologically based toxicokinetic models are a subset of PBTK models that can simulate concentrations of highly lipophilic compounds in tissue lipids, without the need for partition coefficients. A hierarchical treatment of population metabolic parameters and a CYP450 induction model were incorporated into the lipid-based PBTK framework, and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo was applied to in vivo data. A mass balance of CYP1A and CYP2B in the liver was necessary to model PCB metabolism at high doses. The linked PBTK/induction model remained on a lipid basis and was capable of modeling PCB concentrations in multiple tissues for all dose levels and dose profiles.

  10. Interaction of the human N-Ras protein with lipid raft model membranes of varying degrees of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Nikolaus, Jörg; Weise, Katrin; Triola, Gemma; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Ternary lipid mixtures composed of cholesterol, saturated (frequently with sphingosine backbone), and unsaturated phospholipids show stable phase separation and are often used as model systems of lipid rafts. Yet, their ability to reproduce raft properties and function is still debated. We investigated the properties and functional aspects of three lipid raft model systems of varying degrees of biological relevance--PSM/POPC/Chol, DPPC/POPC/Chol, and DPPC/DOPC/Chol--using 2H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. While some minor differences were observed, the general behavior and properties of all three model mixtures were similar to previously investigated influenza envelope lipid membranes, which closely mimic the lipid composition of biological membranes. For the investigation of the functional aspects, we employed the human N-Ras protein, which is posttranslationally modified by two lipid modifications that anchor the protein to the membrane. It was previously shown that N-Ras preferentially resides in liquid-disordered domains and exhibits a time-dependent accumulation in the domain boundaries of influenza envelope lipid membranes. For all three model mixtures, we observed the same membrane partitioning behavior for N-Ras. Therefore, we conclude that even relatively simple models of raft membranes are able to reproduce many of their specific properties and functions.

  11. Effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on lipid raft model at the air/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Uto, Takuhiro; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate an interfacial behavior of the aglycon of glycyrrhizin (GC), glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), with a lipid raft model consisting of equimolar ternary mixtures of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL), Langmuir monolayer techniques were systematically conducted. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms showed that the adsorbed GA at the air/water interface was desorbed into the bulk upon compression of the lipid monolayer. In situ morphological analysis by Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the raft domains became smaller as the concentrations of GA in the subphase (CGA) increased, suggesting that GA promotes the formation of fluid networks related to various cellular processes via lipid rafts. In addition, ex situ morphological analysis by atomic force microscopy revealed that GA interacts with lipid raft by lying down at the surface. Interestingly, the distinctive striped regions were formed at CGA=5.0 μM. This phenomenon was observed to be induced by the interaction of CHOL with adsorbed GA and is involved in the membrane-disrupting activity of saponin and its aglycon. A quantitative comparison of GA with GC (Sakamoto et al., 2013) revealed that GA interacts more strongly with the raft model than GC in the monolayer state. Various biological activities of GA are known to be stronger than those of GC. This fact allows us to hypothesize that differences in the interactions of GA/GC with the model monolayer correlate to their degree of exertion for numerous activities.

  12. A Hamster Model of Diet-Induced Obesity for Preclinical Evaluation of Anti-Obesity, Anti-Diabetic and Lipid Modulating Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise S Dalbøge

    Full Text Available Unlike rats and mice, hamsters develop hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Because hyperlipidemia is a hallmark of human obesity, we aimed to develop and characterize a novel diet-induced obesity (DIO and hypercholesterolemia Golden Syrian hamster model.Hamsters fed a highly palatable fat- and sugar-rich diet (HPFS for 12 weeks showed significant body weight gain, body fat accumulation and impaired glucose tolerance. Cholesterol supplementation to the diet evoked additional hypercholesterolemia. Chronic treatment with the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide (0.2 mg/kg, SC, BID, 27 days, normalized body weight and glucose tolerance, and lowered blood lipids in the DIO-hamster. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitor, linagliptin (3.0 mg/kg, PO, QD also improved glucose tolerance. Treatment with peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36, 1.0 mg/kg/day or neuromedin U (NMU, 1.5 mg/kg/day, continuously infused via a subcutaneous osmotic minipump for 14 days, reduced body weight and energy intake and changed food preference from HPFS diet towards chow. Co-treatment with liraglutide and PYY3-36 evoked a pronounced synergistic decrease in body weight and food intake with no lower plateau established. Treatment with the cholesterol uptake inhibitor ezetimibe (10 mg/kg, PO, QD for 14 days lowered plasma total cholesterol with a more marked reduction of LDL levels, as compared to HDL, indicating additional sensitivity to cholesterol modulating drugs in the hyperlipidemic DIO-hamster. In conclusion, the features of combined obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and hypercholesterolemia in the DIO-hamster make this animal model useful for preclinical evaluation of novel anti-obesity, anti-diabetic and lipid modulating agents.

  13. Genomic risk models improve prediction of longitudinal lipid levels in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan E. Wineinger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In clinical medicine, lipids are commonly measured biomarkers used to assess an individual’s risk for cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke. Accurately predicting longitudinal lipid levels based on genomic information can inform therapeutic practices and decrease cardiovascular risk by identifying high-risk patients prior to onset. Using genotyped and imputed genetic data from 523 unrelated Caucasian Americans from the Bogalusa Heart Study, surveyed on 4,026 occasions from 4 to 48 years of age, we generated various lipid genomic risk models based on previously reported markers. We observed a significant improvement in prediction over non-genetic risk models in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (increase in the squared correlation between observed and predicted values, d=0.032, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (d=0.053, total cholesterol (d=0.043, and triglycerides (d=0.031. Many of our approaches are based on an n-fold cross-validation procedure that are, by design, adaptable to a clinical environment.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  15. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties.

  16. Modelling of phase equilibria and related properties of mixtures involving lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cunico, Larissa

    Many challenges involving physical and thermodynamic properties in the production of edible oils and biodiesel are observed, such as availability of experimental data and realiable prediction. In the case of lipids, a lack of experimental data for pure components and also for their mixtures in open...... literature was observed, what makes it necessary to development reliable predictive models from limited data. One of the first steps of this project was the creation of a database containing properties of mixtures involved in tasks related to process design, simulation, and optimization as well as design...... of chemicals based products. This database was combined with the existing lipids database of pure component properties. To contribute to the missing data, measurements of isobaric vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data of two binary mixtures at two different pressures were performed using Differential Scanning...

  17. Infant digestion physiology and the relevance of in vitro biochemical models to test infant formula lipid digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poquet, Laure; Wooster, Tim J

    2016-08-01

    Lipids play an important role in the diet of preterm and term infants providing a key energy source and essential lipid components for development. While a lot is known about adult lipid digestion, our understanding of infant digestion physiology is still incomplete, the greatest gap being on the biochemistry of the small intestine, particularly the activity and relative importance of the various lipases active in the intestine. The literature has been reviewed to identify the characteristics of lipid digestion of preterm and term infants, but also to better understand the physiology of the infant gastrointestinal tract compared to adults that impacts the absorption of lipids. The main differences are a higher gastric pH, submicellar bile salt concentration, a far more important role of gastric lipases as well as differences at the level of the intestinal barrier. Importantly, the consequences of improper in vitro replication of gastric digestions conditions (pH and lipase specificity) are demonstrated using examples from the most recent of studies. It is true that some animal models could be adapted to study infant lipid digestion physiology, however the ethical relevance of such models is questionable, hence the development of accurate in vitro models is a must. In vitro models that combine up to date knowledge of digestion biochemistry with intestinal cells in culture are the best choice to replicate digestion and absorption in infant population, this would allow the adaptation of infant formula for a better digestion and absorption of dietary lipids by preterm and term infants.

  18. Lipid-Mediated Clusters of Guest Molecules in Model Membranes and Their Dissolving in the Presence of Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardash, Maria E; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2017-05-25

    The clustering of molecules is an important feature of plasma membrane organization. It is challenging to develop methods for quantifying membrane heterogeneities because of their transient nature and small size. Here, we obtained evidence that transient membrane heterogeneities can be frozen at cryogenic temperatures which allows the application of solid-state experimental techniques sensitive to the nanoscale distance range. We employed the pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the electron spin echo (ESE) technique, for spin-labeled molecules in multilamellar lipid bilayers. ESE decays were refined for pure contribution of spin-spin magnetic dipole-dipolar interaction between the labels; these interactions manifest themselves at a nanometer distance range. The bilayers were prepared from different types of saturated and unsaturated lipids and cholesterol (Chol); in all cases, a small amount of guest spin-labeled substances 5-doxyl-stearic-acid (5-DSA) or 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DChl) was added. The local concentration found of 5-DSA and DChl molecules was remarkably higher than the mean concentration in the bilayer, evidencing the formation of lipid-mediated clusters of these molecules. To our knowledge, formation of nanoscale clusters of guest amphiphilic molecules in biological membranes is a new phenomenon suggested only recently. Two-dimensional 5-DSA molecular clusters were found, whereas flat DChl molecules were found to be clustered into stacked one-dimensional structures. These clusters disappear when the Chol content is varied between the boundaries known for lipid raft formation at room temperatures. The room temperature EPR evidenced entrapping of DChl molecules in the rafts.

  19. Lipid and moisture content modeling of amphidromous Dolly Varden using bioelectrical impedance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, J.T.; Margraf, F.J.; Carlson, J.G.; Sutton, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological well-being or condition of fish is most commonly estimated from aspects of individual morphology. However, these metrics may be only weakly correlated with nutritional reserves stored as lipid, the primary form of accumulated energy in fish. We constructed and evaluated bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) models as an alternative method of assessing condition in amphidromous Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma collected from nearshore estuarine and lotic habitats of the Alaskan Arctic. Data on electrical resistance and reactance were collected from the lateral and ventral surfaces of 192 fish, and whole-body percent lipid and moisture content were determined using standard laboratory methods. Significant inverse relationships between temperature and resistance and reactance prompted the standardization of these data to a constant temperature using corrective equations developed herein. No significant differences in resistance or reactance were detected among spawning and nonspawning females after accounting for covariates, suggesting that electrical pathways do not intersect the gonads. Best-fit BIA models incorporating electrical variables calculated from the lateral and ventral surfaces produced the strongest associations between observed and model-predicted estimates of proximate content. These models explained between 6% and 20% more of the variability in laboratory-derived estimates of proximate content than models developed from single-surface BIA data and 32% more than models containing only length and weight data. While additional research is required to address the potential effects of methodological variation, bioelectrical impedance analysis shows promise as a way to provide high-quality, minimally invasive estimates of Dolly Varden lipid or moisture content in the field with only small increases in handling time.

  20. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed.

  1. The Search for a Lipid Trigger: The Effect of Salt Stress on the Lipid Profile of the Model Microalgal Species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for Biofuels Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounslow, Emily; Kapoore, Rahul Vijay; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman; Gilmour, D James; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-11-01

    Algal cells produce neutral lipid when stressed and this can be used to generate biodiesel. Salt stressed cells of the model microalgal species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were tested for their suitability to produce lipid for biodiesel. The starchless mutant of C. reinhardtii (CC-4325) was subjected to salt stress (0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 M NaCl) and transesterification and GC analysis were used to determine fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content and profile. Fatty acid profile was found to vary under salt stress conditions, with a clear distinction between 0.1 M NaCl, which the algae could tolerate, and the higher levels of NaCl (0.2 and 0.3 M), which caused cell death. Lipid content was increased under salt conditions, either through long-term exposure to 0.1 M NaCl, or short-term exposure to 0.2 and 0.3 M NaCl. Palmitic acid (C16:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n3) were found to increase significantly at the higher salinities. Salt increase can act as a lipid trigger for C. reinhardtii.

  2. Comparison of existing models to simulate anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béline, F; Rodriguez-Mendez, R; Girault, R; Bihan, Y Le; Lessard, P

    2017-02-01

    Models for anaerobic digestion of lipid-rich waste taking inhibition into account were reviewed and, if necessary, adjusted to the ADM1 model framework in order to compare them. Experimental data from anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse waste at an organic loading rate (OLR) ranging from 0.3 to 1.9kgVSm(-3)d(-1) were used to compare and evaluate models. Experimental data obtained at low OLRs were accurately modeled whatever the model thereby validating the stoichiometric parameters used and influent fractionation. However, at higher OLRs, although inhibition parameters were optimized to reduce differences between experimental and simulated data, no model was able to accurately simulate accumulation of substrates and intermediates, mainly due to the wrong simulation of pH. A simulation using pH based on experimental data showed that acetogenesis and methanogenesis were the most sensitive steps to LCFA inhibition and enabled identification of the inhibition parameters of both steps.

  3. Imaging lipid distributions in model monolayers by ToF-SIMS with selectively deuterated components and principal components analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, Mark C. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada)]. E-mail: biesingr@uwo.ca; Miller, David J. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Harbottle, Robert R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Possmayer, Fred [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); McIntyre, N. Stewart [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont., N6A 5B7 (Canada); Petersen, Nils O. [National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta W6-017 ECERF Bldg, 9107-116th Street, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2006-07-30

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides the capability to image the distribution of molecular ions and their associated fragments that are emitted from monolayer films. ToF-SIMS can be applied to the analysis of monolayers of complex lipid mixtures that act as a model to understand the organization of cell membranes into solid-like domains called lipid rafts. The ability to determine the molecular distribution of lipids using ToF-SIMS in monolayer films is also important in studies of the function of pulmonary surfactant. One of the limitations of the use of ToF-SIMS to studies of complex lipid mixtures found in biological systems, arises from the similarity of the mass fragments that are emitted from the components of the lipid mixture. The use of selectively deuterated components in a mixture overcomes this limitation and results in an unambiguous assignment of specific lipids to particular surface domains. The use of deuterium labeling to identify specific lipids in a multi-component mixture can be done by the deuteration of a single lipid or by the addition of more than one lipid with selectively deuterated components. The incorporation of deuterium into the lipid chains does not alter the miscibility or phase behavior of these systems. The use of deuterium labeling to identify lipids and determine their distribution in monolayer films will be demonstrated using two biological systems. Principal components analysis (PCA) is used to further analyze these deuterated systems checking for the origin of the various mass fragments present.

  4. Model studies on the pattern of volatiles generated in mixtures of amino acids, lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes, and glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, An; Kitrytė, Vaida; Venskutonis, Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The development of flavor and browning in thermally treated foods results mainly from the Maillard reaction and lipid degradation but also from the interactions between both reaction pathways. To study these interactions, we analyzed the volatile compounds resulting from model reactions of lysine or glycine with aldehydes originating from lipid oxidation [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, or (2E,4E)-decadienal] in the presence and absence of glucose. The main reaction products identified in these model...

  5. Effects of Leucin-Enkephalins on Surface Characteristics and Morphology of Model Membranes Composed of Raft-Forming Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanova, Asya; Jordanova, A; Lalchev, Z

    2016-06-01

    During the last decades opioid peptides, like enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) are subject to extensive studies due to their antinociceptive action in organism. According to the membrane catalysis theory, in order to adopt a proper conformation for binding to their receptors, opioid peptides interact with the lipid phase of the membrane receptor surrounding. With this regard, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of synthetic leucine-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalinamide on surface characteristics and morphology of lipid monolayers, composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol alone and with their mixtures. The lipids were chosen to represent a model of a membrane raft, since it is known that G-protein-coupled receptors, including opioid receptors, are located preferably in membrane rafts. By using Langmuir's monolayer method, the change in surface pressure of the model membranes before and after the addition of the synthetic enkephalins was studied, and the compressional moduli of the lipids and lipid-peptides monolayers were determined. In addition, by Brewster angle microscopy, the surface morphology of the lipid monolayers alone and after the injection of both enkephalins was monitored. Our results showed that both leucine-enkephalins affected the lipid monolayers surface characteristics, and led to an increase in surface density of the mixed surface lipids/enkephalins films at loose lipid packing. This effect was more pronounced for the enkephalinamide, suggesting a different mechanism of interaction for the amidated enkephalin with the lipid phase, as compared to leucine-enkephalin.

  6. Computational microscopy of cyclodextrin mediated cholesterol extraction from lipid model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Cesar A; de Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J

    2013-01-01

    Beta-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) can form inclusion complexes with cholesterol, and are commonly used to manipulate cholesterol levels of biomembranes. In this work, we have used multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to provide a detailed view on the interaction between β-CDs and lipid model membranes. We show that cholesterol can be extracted efficiently upon adsorption of β-CD dimers at the membrane/water interface. However, extraction is only observed to occur spontaneously in membranes with high cholesterol levels. Free energy calculations reveal the presence of a kinetic barrier for cholesterol extraction in the case of low cholesterol content. Cholesterol uptake is facilitated in case of (poly)unsaturated lipid membranes, which increases the free energy of the membrane bound state of cholesterol. Comparing lipid/cholesterol compositions typical of liquid-disordered (L(d)) and liquid-order (L(o)) domains, we furthermore show that cholesterol is preferentially extracted from the disordered regions, in line with recent experimental data.

  7. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  8. Modelling small-angle scattering data from complex protein-lipid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kynde, Søren Andreas Røssell

    geometric objects and the discrete approach were models are build from a large number of points. It is the basic hypothesis of this thesis, that analysis of smallangle scattering data can be approached in a way that combines the continuous and the discrete modelling methods, and that such an approach can...... the techniques very well suited for the study of the nanodisc system. Chapter 3 explains two different modelling approaches that can be used in the analysis of small-angle scattering data from lipid-protein complexes. These are the continuous approach where the system of interest is modelled as a few regular...... of bacteriorhodopsin and a continuous model of the nanodisc. The position and orientation of the membrane protein relative to the nanodisc is determined as well as the structural changes of the nanodisc. Paper II describes the use of the same approach to determine the relative position of a nanodisc and the membrane...

  9. A Linear Programming Approach for Modeling and Simulation of Growth and Lipid Accumulation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Posten

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum exhibits the ability to accumulate triacylglycerols to a high specific content when nutrients are limited in the culture medium. Therefore, the organism is a promising candidate for biodiesel production. Mathematical modeling can substantially contribute to process development and optimization of algae cultivation on different levels. In our work we describe a linear programming approach to model and simulate the growth and storage molecule accumulation of P. tricornutum. The model is based on mass and energy balances and shows that the organism realizes the inherent drive for maximization of energy to biomass conversion and growth. The model predicts that under nutrient limiting conditions both storage carbohydrates and lipids are synthesized simultaneously but at different rates. The model was validated with data gained from batch growth experiments.

  10. Fluorescence of nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids in model membranes is connected not to lipid mobility but to probe location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Filipe, Hugo A L; Prates Ramalho, J P; Hof, Martin; Loura, Luís M S

    2016-03-14

    Nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-labeled lipids are popular fluorescent membrane probes. However, the understanding of important aspects of the photophysics of NBD remains incomplete, including the observed shift in the emission spectrum of NBD-lipids to longer wavelengths following excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum (red-edge excitation shift or REES). REES of NBD-lipids in membrane environments has been previously interpreted as reflecting restricted mobility of solvent surrounding the fluorophore. However, this requires a large change in the dipole moment (Δμ) of NBD upon excitation. Previous calculations of the value of Δμ of NBD in the literature have been carried out using outdated semi-empirical methods, leading to conflicting values. Using up-to-date density functional theory methods, we recalculated the value of Δμ and verified that it is rather small (∼2 D). Fluorescence measurements confirmed that the value of REES is ∼16 nm for 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine-N-(NBD) (NBD-PS) in dioleoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles. However, the observed shift is independent of both the temperature and the presence of cholesterol and is therefore insensitive to the mobility and hydration of the membrane. Moreover, red-edge excitation leads to an increased contribution of the decay component with a shorter lifetime, whereas time-resolved emission spectra of NBD-PS displayed an atypical blue shift following excitation. This excludes restrictions to solvent relaxation as the cause of the measured REES and TRES of NBD, pointing instead to the heterogeneous transverse location of probes as the origin of these effects. The latter hypothesis was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, from which the calculated heterogeneity of the hydration and location of NBD correlated with the measured fluorescence lifetimes/REES. Globally, our combination of theoretical and experiment-based techniques has led to a considerably improved understanding of

  11. Investigating Hydrophilic Pores in Model Lipid Bilayers Using Molecular Simulations: Correlating Bilayer Properties with Pore-Formation Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-23

    Cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides show a remarkable ability to translocate across physiological membranes. Along with factors such as electric-potential-induced perturbations of membrane structure and surface tension effects, experiments invoke porelike membrane configurations during the solute transfer process into vesicles and cells. The initiation and formation of pores are associated with a nontrivial free-energy cost, thus necessitating a consideration of the factors associated with pore formation and the attendant free energies. Because of experimental and modeling challenges related to the long time scales of the translocation process, we use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations with a lipid-density-based order parameter to investigate membrane-pore-formation free energy employing Martini coarse-grained models. We investigate structure and thermodynamic features of the pore in 18 lipids spanning a range of headgroups, charge states, acyl chain lengths, and saturation. We probe the dependence of pore-formation barriers on the area per lipid, lipid bilayer thickness, and membrane bending rigidities in three different lipid classes. The pore-formation free energy in pure bilayers and peptide translocating scenarios are significantly coupled with bilayer thickness. Thicker bilayers require more reversible work to create pores. The pore-formation free energy is higher in peptide-lipid systems than in peptide-free lipid systems due to penalties to maintain the solvation of charged hydrophilic solutes within the membrane environment.

  12. Rotary condenser for SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    During 1975 the SC2 performance was improved among other things by redesigning some of the elements of the ROTCO (Annual Report 1975, p. 55). The photo shows an interior wiew of the housing of the rotary condenser and of the sixteen sets of shaped stator blades.

  13. A Coarse-grained Model of Stratum Corneum Lipids: Free Fatty Acids and Ceramide NS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Hartkamp, Remco; Bunge, Annette L.; McCabe, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Ceramide (CER)-based biological membranes are used both experimentally and in simulations as simplified model systems of the skin barrier. Molecular dynamics studies have generally focused on simulating preassembled structures using atomistically detailed models of CERs, which limit the system sizes and timescales that can practically be probed, rendering them ineffective for studying particular phenomena, including self-assembly into bilayer and lamellar superstructures. Here, we report on the development of a coarse-grained (CG) model for CER NS, the most abundant CER in human stratum corneum. Multistate iterative Boltzmann inversion is used to derive the intermolecular pair potentials, resulting in a force field that is applicable over a range of state points and suitable for studying ceramide self-assembly. The chosen CG mapping, which includes explicit interaction sites for hydroxyl groups, captures the directional nature of hydrogen bonding and allows for accurate predictions of several key structural properties of CER NS bilayers. Simulated wetting experiments allow the hydrophobicity of CG beads to be accurately tuned to match atomistic wetting behavior, which affects the whole system since inaccurate hydrophobic character is found to unphysically alter the lipid packing in hydrated lamellar states. We find that CER NS can self-assemble into multilamellar structures, enabling the study of lipid systems more representative of the multilamellar lipid structures present in the skin barrier. The coarse-grained force field derived herein represents an important step in using molecular dynamics to study the human skin barrier, which gives a resolution not available through experiment alone. PMID:27564869

  14. Lipids and skin barrier function - a clinical perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersted, J.M.; Hellgren, Lars; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2008-01-01

    and in particular, the role of barrier function in the pathogenesis of skin disease and its subsequent treatment protocols. The 3 major lipids in the SC of importance are ceramides, free fatty acids, and cholesterol. Human studies comparing levels of the major SC lipids in patients with atopic dermatitis...... and healthy controls have suggested a possible role for ceramide 1 and to some extent ceramide 3 in the pathogenesis of the disease. Therapies used in diseases involving barrier disruption have been sparely investigated from a lipid perspective. It has been suggested that ultraviolet light as a treatment......The stratum corneum (SC) protects us from dehydration and external dangers. Much is known about the morphology of the SC and penetration of drugs through it, but the data are mainly derived from in vitro and animal experiments. In contrast, only a few studies have the human SC lipids as their focus...

  15. Lifibrol as a model compound for a novel lipid-lowering mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Heiner K; Sudhop, Thomas; von Bergmann, Klaus; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2010-12-01

    Lifibrol is a potent lipid-lowering drug with an unknown mechanism of action. We investigated its effects on lipoprotein and sterol metabolism in normocholesterolemic male participants. Seven participants were treated for 4 weeks with 600 mg/d lifibrol and 9 with 40 mg/d pravastatin in a double-blind randomized parallel-group trial. Kinetic studies were performed at baseline and under acute and chronic treatment. Turnover of apolipoprotein B-100 was investigated with endogenous stable-isotope labeling, and kinetic parameters were derived by multicompartmental modeling. Lathosterol and cholesterol metabolism were investigated using mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA) after [1-(13)C]acetate labeling. Carbon metabolism was investigated by calculating the total isotope incorporation into newly formed sterols and measuring the disposal of acetate by (13)CO(2) breath analysis. Total- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol decreased by 18% and 27% under lifibrol and by 17% and 28% under pravastatin, respectively, whereas very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol did not change. Very-low-density lipoprotein apoB fractional synthesis and production increased under lifibrol but remained unchanged under pravastatin. Low-density lipoprotein apoB fractional synthesis and production increased under pravastatin but remained unchanged under lifibrol. Mass isotopomer distribution analysis indicated that both drugs decrease endogenous sterol synthesis after acute administration, but pravastatin had more powerful effects. Carbon-13 appearance in breath was higher during pravastatin than during lifibrol treatment. Mass isotopomer distribution analysis and carbon metabolism analysis indicated compartmentalization at the site of sterol synthesis, thus suggesting differential effects of the 2 drugs. Although having comparable lipid-lowering properties, lifibrol seems to have a mechanism of action

  16. Conformations of double-headed, triple-tailed phospholipid oxidation lipid products in model membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermetter, Albin; Kopec, Wojciech; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    lipid in a Schiff base reaction to form a conjugate lipid (SCH) with two head groups, and three acyl tails. We investigate the conformations and properties of this unique class of adduct lipids using molecular dynamics simulations, and show that their insertion into lipid bilayers of POPC increases...... between the two head groups of the SCH. Schiff base formation of lipids can alter the concentration, homeostasis and localizations of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanol lipids in membranes, and can therefore influence several membrane-associated processes including fusion and budding. The current...

  17. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  18. Self-Assembled Lipid Cubic Phase and Cubosomes for the Delivery of Aspirin as a Model Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Vishwapathi, Vinod Kumar; Quarshie, Abraham; Moinuddin, Zeinab; Page, James; Kendrekar, Pravin; Mashele, Samson S

    2017-09-05

    Three-dimensionally organized lipid cubic self-assemblies and derived oil-in-water emulsions called "cubosomes" are attractive for various biotechnological applications due to their ability to be loaded with functional molecules and their associated sustained release properties. Here, we employed both of these lipid-based systems for the delivery of a model drug, aspirin, under comparable conditions. Studies were performed by varying drug-to-lipid ratio and the type of release medium, water and phosphate buffer saline (PBS). Release rates were determined using UV-vis spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering was used to confirm the type of self-assembled nanostructures formed in these lipid systems. The release from the bulk lipid cubic phase was sustained as compared to that of dispersed cubosomes, and the release in PBS was more efficient than in water. The tortuosity of the architecture, length of the diffusion pathway, type of nanostructure, and physicochemical interaction with the release media evidently contribute to these observations. This work is particularly important as it is the first report where both of these nanostructured lipid systems have been studied together under similar conditions. This work provides important insights into understanding and therefore controlling the release behavior of lipid-based drug nanocarriers.

  19. Insulin versus Lipid Emulsion in a Rabbit Model of Severe Propranolol Toxicity: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective. Beta-blocker overdose may result in intractable cardiovascular collapse despite conventional antidotal treatments. High dose insulin/glucose (ING, and more recently intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE, have been proposed as potentially beneficial therapies in beta blocker intoxication. We compare efficacy of the novel antidotes ING, with ILE, in a rabbit model of combined enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity. Methods. Sedated, mechanically ventilated and invasively monitored New Zealand White rabbits underwent mini-laparotomy and enterostomy formation with 40 mg/kg propranolol instilled into the proximal small bowel. At 30 minutes propranolol infusion was commenced at 4 mg/kg/hr and continued to a target mean arterial pressure (MAP of 50% baseline MAP. Animals were resuscitated with insulin at 3 U/kg plus 0.5 g/kg glucose (ING group, or 10 mL/kg 20% Intralipid (ILE group. Results. Rate pressure product (RPP; RPP = heart rate × mean arterial pressure was greatest in the ING group at 60 minutes (P<.05. A trend toward greater heart rate was observed in the ING group (P=.06. No difference was observed in survival between groups (4/5 ING versus 2/5 ILE; P=.524. Conclusions. High dose insulin resulted in greater rate pressure product compared with lipid emulsion in this rabbit model of severe enteric/intravenous propranolol toxicity.

  20. 2010 ARRA Lidar: Hampton County (SC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Provide high density LiDAR elevation data map of Hampton County, SC. Provide Bare Earth DEM (vegetation removal) of Hampton County, SC.

  1. Xemilofiban: SC 54684A, xemlofiban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Xemilofiban [SC 54684, SC 54684A (HCl), xemlofiban], a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist, is an orally available prodrug of a non-peptide mimetic of the tetrapeptide RGDF. It is converted to the active metabolite, SC 54701 (the free base form of SC 54701A). Development was initiated by Searle (Monsanto). Searle became part of Pharmacia Corporation, which was acquired by, and merged into, Pfizer in April 2003. Searle had co-development and co-marketing agreements with Sankyo in Japan; these have been discontinued. In January 2003, Pharmacia donated the intellectual property for xemilofiban to Western Michigan University. In February 2003, Western Michigan University granted an exclusive worldwide licence of xemilofiban to VDDI Pharmaceuticals (formerly Virtual Drug Development Inc.). Xemilofiban was in a phase III clinical trial, the Evaluation of Xemilofiban in Controlling Thrombotic Events (EXCITE) trial, with Searle (Monsanto) in the US and Europe for the treatment of thrombosis in patients with unstable angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction undergoing angioplasty. However, as xemilofiban demonstrated no significant clinical benefit, Searle discontinued its development. In Japan, Sankyo discontinued the development of xemilofiban for thrombosis at phase II following Searle's decision to drop the project. VDDI Pharmaceuticals plans to develop xemilofiban in cardiovascular disorders following on from the phase III studies completed by Pharmacia; a restructured dosing schedule and narrowed patient selection will be used. VDDI has research facilities worldwide and will utilise facilities in Ireland for the European clinical development programme; research facilities in the Southwest Michigan Innovation Center are planned while the head office of VDDI is based in Tennessee. Xemilofiban is in phase III development for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in conjunction with percutaneous coronary intervention.

  2. Benefits of Structured and Free Monoacylglycerols to Deliver Eicosapentaenoic (EPA in a Model of Lipid Malabsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Destaillats

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we used a preclinical model of induced lipolytic enzyme insufficiency, and hypothesized that the use of monoacylglycerols (MAG will enhance their bioavailability and delivery to the tissues. Experimental diets containing 20% lipids were fed to rats for 21 days with or without Orlistat. The control diet of fish oil (FO, a source of EPA and DHA, was tested against: structured (A vanillin acetal of sn-2 MAG (Vanil + O and (B diacetyl derivative of sn-2 MAG (Acetyl + O and (C free MAG (MAG + O. FA profiles with an emphasis on EPA and DHA levels were determined in plasma, red blood cells (RBC, liver, spleen, brain and retina. We observed significant reduction of lipid absorption when rats co-consumed Orlistat. As expected, the FO groups with and without Orlistat showed the biggest difference. The Vanil + O, Acetyl + O and MAG + O groups, demonstrated higher levels of EPA (5.5 ± 1.9, 4.6 ± 1.6 and 5.6 ± 0.6, respectively in RBC compared with FO + O diets (3.3 ± 0.2, 2.6 ± 0.2. Levels of EPA incorporation, in plasma, were similar to those obtained for RBC, and similar trends were observed for the collected tissues and even with DHA levels. These observations with two MAG derivatives providing the fatty acid esterified in the sn-2 position, show that these molecules are efficient vehicles of EPA in malabsorption conditions which is in line with our hypothesis. Free MAG, characterized as having exclusively sn-1(3 isomers of EPA, demonstrated better absorption efficiencies and accretion to tissues when compared to structured MAG. The study demonstrated that structured and free MAG can be used efficiently as an enteral vehicle to supply bioactive fatty acids such as EPA and DHA in lipid malabsorption where diminished lipolytic activity is the underlying cause.

  3. Structural impact of cations on lipid bilayer models: nanomechanical properties by AFM-force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Giannotti, Marina I; Sanz, Fausto

    2014-02-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has become an invaluable tool for studying the micro- and nanoworlds. As a stand-alone, high-resolution imaging technique and force transducer, it defies most other surface instrumentation in ease of use, sensitivity and versatility. The main strength of AFM relies on the possibility to operate in an aqueous environment on a wide variety of biological samples, from single molecules - DNA or proteins - to macromolecular assemblies like biological membranes. Understanding the effect of mechanical stress on membranes is of primary importance in biophysics, since cells are known to perform their function under a complex combination of forces. In the later years, AFM-based Force-Spectroscopy (AFM-FS) has provided a new vista on membrane mechanics in a confined area within the nanometer realm, where most of the specific molecular interactions take place. Lipid membranes are electrostatically charged entities that physiologically coexist with electrolyte solutions. Thus, specific interactions with ions are a matter of considerable interest. The distribution of ions in the solution and their interaction with the membranes are factors that substantially modify the structure and dynamics of the cell membranes. Furthermore, signaling processes are modified by the membrane capability of retaining ions. Supported Lipid Bilayers (SLBs) are a versatile tool to investigate phospholipid membranes mimicking biological surfaces. In the present contribution, we review selected experiments on the mechanical stability of SLBs as models of lipid membranes by means of AFM-FS, with special focus on the effect of cations and ionic strength in the overall nanomechanical stability.

  4. Vibrational, calorimetric, and molecular conformational study on calcein interaction with model lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherani, Behnoush; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Rogalska, Ewa; Korchowiec, Beata; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Linder, Michel

    2013-07-01

    Nanoliposomes are commonly used as a carrier in controlled release drug delivery systems. Controlled release formulations can be used to reduce the amount of drug necessary to cause the same therapeutic effect in patients. One of the most noticeable factors in release profiles is the strength of the drug-carrier interaction. To adjust the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of therapeutic agents, it is necessary to optimize the drug-carrier interaction. To get a better understanding of this interaction, large unilamellar liposomes containing calcein were prepared using 1,2-dioleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and 1,2-palmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and a mixture of them; calcein was chosen as a model polar molecule of biological interest. The thermodynamic changes induced by calcein and its location in lipid bilayers were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results reveal that calcein has no significant influence on thermotropic properties of the lipid membrane, but causing the abolition of pre-transition. The decreasing of the pre-transition can be ascribed to the presence of calcein near the hydrophilic cooperative zone of the bilayer. The change in intensity of the Raman peaks represents the interaction of calcein with choline head groups. Moreover, the impact of calcein on phosphoglyceride Langmuir layers spread at the air-water interface was studied using surface pressure-area and surface potential-area isotherms, as well as polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and Brewster angle microscopy. The results obtained indicate that calcein introduce no major modification on the systems prepared with pure lipids.

  5. Performance Analysis of OFDM 60GHz System and SC-FDE 60GHz System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xueyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of 60GHz wireless communication system with SC and OFDM is studied, the models of OFDM 60GHz system and SC 60GHz frequency domain equalization (SC-FDE system are established, and the bit error rate (BER performance of OFDM 60GHz system and SC-FDE 60GHz system in 802.15.3c channels is compared. The simulation results show that SC-FDE 60GHz system has a slight advantage over OFDM system in line-of-sight (LOS channels, while OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in non-line-of-sight (NLOS channels. For 60GHz system, OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in overcoming multipath fading, but the performance of both is close whether in the LOS or NLOS case.

  6. Autotrophic growth and lipid production of Chlorella sorokiniana in lab batch and BIOCOIL photobioreactors: Experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concas, Alessandro; Malavasi, Veronica; Costelli, Cristina; Fadda, Paolo; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-07-01

    A novel mathematical model for the quantitative assessment of the effect of dissolved nitrogen on the autotrophic batch-growth and lipid accumulation of Chlorella sorokiniana, is proposed in this work. Model results have been validated through comparison with suitable experimental data performed in lab photobioreactors. Further experiments have been then performed using the BIOCOIL photobioreactor operated in fed-batch mode. The experimental results, which show that a maximum growth rate of 0.52day(-1) and a lipid content equal to 25%wt can be achieved with the BIOICOIL, have been successfully predicted through the proposed model. Therefore, the model might represent a first step toward the development of a tool for the scale-up and optimization of the operating conditions of BIOCOIL photobioreactors. Finally, the fatty acid methyl esters obtained by trans-esterification of lipids extracted from C. sorokiniana, have been analyzed in view of the assessment of their usability for producing biodiesel.

  7. Assessment of novel oral lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B using an in vitro lipolysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Gershkovich, Pavel; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Wasan, Kishor M

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the intraluminal processing of novel oral lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B using an in vitro lipolysis model. Amphotericin B (AmB) was formulated in three lipid-based formulations consisting of different lipid components: iCo-009, iCo-010 and iCo-011. Various lipid loads (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 g) were digested using the lipolysis model to assess AmB distribution among the lipolysis phases. The duration of lipolysis was comparable among the three formulations except for 2 g load of iCo-009 which had a significantly longer lipolysis than iCo-010 and iCo-011. The lipid components of iCo-009 experienced lower extent of lipolysis as compared to other formulations. Amphotericin B concentration in the aqueous phases was the highest with iCo-010 which also had the lowest sediment recovery. Amphotericin B levels in the undigested lipid layers were comparable between iCo-009 and iCo-010 and were higher than with iCo-011. Given the observation that iCo-010 had the highest aqueous micellar solubilization and the lowest sediment recovery of AmB among the tested formulations, these results could potentially be used to interpret and predict the in vivo performance of AmB- SEDDS formulations in future studies. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ceramides with a pentadecasphingosine chain and short acyls have strong permeabilization effects on skin and model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školová, Barbora; Janůšová, Barbora; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2016-02-01

    The composition and organization of stratum corneum lipids play an essential role in skin barrier function. Ceramides represent essential components of this lipid matrix; however, the importance of the individual structural features in ceramides is not fully understood. To probe the structure-permeability relationships in ceramides, we prepared analogs of N-lignoceroylsphingosine with shortened sphingosine (15 and 12 carbons) and acyl chains (2, 4 and 6 carbons) and studied their behavior in skin and in model lipid membranes. Ceramide analogs with pentadecasphingosine (15C) chains were more barrier-perturbing than 12C- and 18C-sphingosine ceramides; the greatest effects were found with 4 to 6C acyls (up to 15 times higher skin permeability compared to an untreated control and up to 79 times higher permeability of model stratum corneum lipid membranes compared to native very long-chain ceramides). Infrared spectroscopy using deuterated lipids and X-ray powder diffraction showed surprisingly similar behavior of the short ceramide membranes in terms of lipid chain order and packing, phase transitions and domain formation. The high- and low-permeability membranes differed in their amide I band shape and lamellar organization. These skin and membrane permeabilization properties of some short ceramides may be explored, for example, for the rational design of permeation enhancers for transdermal drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lipid-modified oligonucleotide conjugates: Insights into gene silencing, interaction with model membranes and cellular uptake mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Uribe, Begoña; Grijalvo, Santiago; Pertíñez, Samuel Núñez; Busto, Jon V; Martín, César; Alagia, Adele; Goñi, Félix M; Eritja, Ramón; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-01-01

    The ability of oligonucleotides to silence specific genes or inhibit the biological activity of specific proteins has generated great interest in their use as research tools and therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, their biological applications meet the limitation of their poor cellular accessibility. Developing an appropriate delivery system for oligonucleotides is essential to achieve their efficient cellular uptake. In the present work a series of phosphorothioate lipid-oligonucleotide hybrids were synthesized introducing covalently single or double lipid tails at both 3'- and 5'-termini of an antisense oligonucleotide. Gene transfections in cultured cells showed antisense luciferase inhibition without the use of a transfecting agent for conjugates modified with the double-lipid tail at 5'-termini. The effect of the double lipid-tailed modification was further studied in detail in several model membrane systems as well as in cellular uptake experiments. During these studies the spontaneous formation of self-assembled microstructures is clearly observed. Lipidation allowed the efficient incorporation of the oligonucleotide in HeLa cells by a macropinocytosis mechanism without causing cytotoxicity in cells or altering the binding properties of the oligonucleotide conjugates. In addition, both single- and double-tailed compounds showed a similar behavior in lipid model membranes, making them useful in nucleotide-based technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The protease inhibitors ritonavir and saquinavir influence lipid metabolism: a pig model for the rapid evaluation of new drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E.; Mu, Huiling; Porsgaard, Trine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Studies of the effects of antiretroviral drugs on lipid metabolism are limited by the availability of suitable models. We have thus developed an animal model utilising Gottingen mini-pigs. The normal lipid metabolism of mini-pigs closely reflects that of humans and they are expected...... to have similar reactions to antiretroviral drugs. Methods: The pigs were treated orally with high doses of the protease inhibitors ritonavir and saquinavir for 4 weeks. The model allows repeated concomitant biopsies from liver, muscle, adipose tissue and plasma samples. Results: The study showed...

  11. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    for positive values of mismatch; a dependence on the protein size appears as well. In the case of large model proteins experiencing extreme mismatch conditions, in the region next to the so-called lipid annulus, there appears an undershooting ( or overshooting) region where the bilayer hydrophobic thickness...... a small size, the main mechanism to compensate for a large hydrophobic mismatch is the tilt, whereas large proteins react to negative mismatch by causing an increase of the hydrophobic thickness of the nearby bilayer. Furthermore, for the case of small, peptidelike proteins, we found the same type...

  12. Paraoxonase and Arylesterase Activities, Lipid Profile, and Oxidative Damage in Experimental Ischemic Colitis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethem Unal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the present study, since PON1 is known as an HDL-associated antioxidant enzyme that inhibits the oxidative modification of LDL and oxidative stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of mesenteric ischemia, we investigated the changes in PON1 activity and lipid profile in an experimental ischemic colitis model. Methods. Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into two groups: the control group (N=15 and the experimental group (N=25. All animals were anesthetized with ether and ketamine anesthesia to undergo a midline laparotomy. Ischemic colitis was induced by marginal vessel ligation in the splenic flexura (devascularization process. A sham laparotomy was performed in the control group. All animals were sacrificed on the seventh postoperative day. Oxidative stress marker (malonyldialdehyde, MDA, lipid profile, and paraoxonase (PON-1 and arylesterase activities were determined. Histopathological evaluation was done under light microscopy, after sectioning and staining with hematoxyline and eosin. Statistical analysis was conducted using Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney U test, and P0.05. Conclusions. PON1 and arylesterase play an important role in the pathophysiology of ischemic colitis.

  13. Enhancing Alkane Production in Cyanobacterial Lipid Droplets: A Model Platform for Industrially Relevant Compound Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Peramuna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial lipid droplets (LDs are packed with hydrophobic energy-dense compounds and have great potential for biotechnological expression and the compartmentalization of high value compounds. Nostoc punctiforme normally accumulates LDs containing neutral lipids, and small amounts of heptadecane, during the stationary phase of growth. In this study, we further enhanced heptadecane production in N. punctiforme by introducing extrachromosomal copies of aar/adc genes, and report the discovery of a putative novel lipase encoded by Npun_F5141, which further enhanced alkane production. Extra copies of all three genes in high light conditions resulted in a 16-fold higher accumulation of heptadecane compared to the wild type strain in the exponential phase. LD accumulation during exponential phase also increased massively to accommodate the heptadecane production. A large number of small, less fluorescent LDs were observed at the cell periphery in exponential growth phase, whereas fewer number of highly fluorescent, much larger LDs were localized towards the center of the cell in the stationary phase. These advances demonstrate that cyanobacterial LDs are an ideal model platform to make industrially relevant compounds, such as alkanes, during exponential growth, and provide insight into LD formation in cyanobacteria.

  14. Viewing dynamic interactions of proteins and a model lipid membrane with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Anthony S; Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    The information covered in this chapter will present a model homogenous membrane preparation technique and dynamic imaging procedure that can be successfully applied to more than one type of lipid study and atomic force microscope (AFM) instrument setup. The basic procedural steps have been used with an Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO and the Bruker (formerly, Veeco) BioScope. The AFM imaging protocol has been supplemented by procedures (not to be presented in this chapter) of ellipsometry, standardized western blotting, and dot-blots to verify appropriate purity and activity of all experimental molecular components; excellent purity and activity level of the lipids, proteins, and drug(s) greatly influence the success of imaging experiments in the scanning probe microscopy field. The major goal of the chapter is to provide detailed procedures for sample preparation and operation of the Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO AFM. In addition, one should be cognizant that our comprehensive description in the use of the MFP-3D BIO's functions for successful image acquisitions and analyses is greatly enhanced by Asylum Research's (AR's) accompanying extensive manual(s), technical notes, and AR's users forum. Ultimately, the stepwise protocol and information will allow novice personnel to begin acquiring quality images for processing and analysis with minimal supervision.

  15. Hysteresis and the Cholesterol Dependent Phase Transition in Binary Lipid Mixtures with the Martini Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnarez, Clement; Webb, Alexis; Rouvière, Eric; Lyman, Edward

    2016-12-29

    Extensive Martini simulation data, totaling 5 ms, is presented for binary mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol. Using simulation initiated from both gel (so) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, significant and strongly cholesterol-dependent hysteresis in the enthalpy as a function of temperature is observed for cholesterol mole fractions from 0 to 20 mol %. Although the precise phase transition temperature cannot be determined due to the hysteresis, the data are consistent with a first order gel to fluid transition, which increases in temperature with cholesterol. At 30 mol % cholesterol, no hysteresis is observed, and there is no evidence for a continuous transition, in either structural parameters like the area per lipid or in the heat capacity as a function of temperature. The results are consistent with a single uniform phase above a critical cholesterol composition between 20 and 30 mol % in Martini, while highlighting the importance and difficulty of obtaining the equilibrium averages to locate phase boundaries precisely in computational models of lipid bilayers.

  16. Modeling the effect of nano-sized polymer particles on the properties of lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giulia; Monticelli, Luca

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between polymers and biological membranes has recently gained significant interest in several research areas. On the biomedical side, dendrimers, linear polyelectrolytes, and neutral copolymers find application as drug and gene delivery agents, as biocidal agents, and as platforms for biological sensors. On the environmental side, plastic debris is often disposed of in the oceans and gets degraded into small particles; therefore concern is raising about the interaction of small plastic particles with living organisms. From both perspectives, it is crucial to understand the processes driving the interaction between polymers and cell membranes. In recent times progress in computer technology and simulation methods has allowed computational predictions on the molecular mechanism of interaction between polymeric materials and lipid membranes. Here we review the computational studies on the interaction between lipid membranes and different classes of polymers: dendrimers, linear charged polymers, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and its derivatives, polystyrene, and some generic models of polymer chains. We conclude by discussing some of the technical challenges in this area and future developments.

  17. Conceptual paper for modelling protein and lipid accretion in different body parts of growing and fattening pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halas, V.; Babinszky, L.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this review is to outline those parts of modelling approaches in pig production which are not highly developed; these are the partitioning of protein and lipid accretion in different anatomical body parts. The authors introduce present models with a critical evaluation and draw some

  18. Materials Characterization of High-Temperature Epoxy Resins: SC-79 and SC-15/SC-79 Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Army composite applications. SC-15 is a toughened commercial vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding ( VARTM ) resin produced by Applied Poleramic Inc...very well in VARTM processes and has good damage resistance in structural and ballistic applications. However, the relatively low glass transition...low-viscosity, two-phase toughened, cycloaliphatic amine–cured commercial VARTM resin system designed to be easy to handle and have a long processing

  19. Xyloketal B Attenuates Fatty Acid-Induced Lipid Accumulation via the SREBP-1c Pathway in NAFLD Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youying Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to examine the effects of xyloketal B on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects in both in vivo and in vitro models. We discovered an association between xyloketal B and the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c signaling pathway, which is related to lipid metabolism. Mice were dosed with xyloketal B (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/d and atorvastatin (15 mg/kg/d via intraperitoneal injection once daily for 40 days after being fed a high fat diet plus 10% high fructose liquid (HFD+HFL for 8 weeks. Xyloketal B significantly improved HFD+HFL-induced hepatic histological lesions and attenuated lipid and glucose accumulation in the blood as well as lipid accumulation in the liver. Xyloketal B increased the expression of CPT1A, and decreased the expression of SREBP-1c and its downstream targeting enzymes such as ACC1, ACL, and FAS. Xyloketal B also significantly reduced lipid accumulation in HepG2 cells treated with free fatty acids (FFAs. These data suggested that xyloketal B has lipid-lowering effects via the SREBP-1c pathway that regulate lipid metabolism. Thus, targeting SREBP-1c activation with xyloketal B may be a promising novel approach for NAFLD treatment.

  20. Physicochemical characterization and in vivo bioluminescence imaging of nanostructured lipid carriers for targeting the brain: apomorphine as a model drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui [Department of Pharmacy, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Wen, Chih-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Animal Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Al-Suwayeh, S A; Fang, Jia-You [Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chang, Hui-Wen, E-mail: fajy@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-08

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were prepared to investigate whether the duration of brain targeting and accumulation of drugs in the brain can be improved by intravenous delivery. NLCs were developed using cetyl palmitate as the lipid matrix, squalene as the cationic surfactant, and Pluronic F68, polysorbate 80 and polyethylene glycol as the interfacial additives. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and lipid emulsions (LEs) were also prepared for comparison. An anti-Parkinson's drug, apomorphine, was used as the model drug. Nuclear magnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry showed possible interactions between the solid and liquid lipids in the inner core. The lipid nanoparticles with different compositions were characterized by mean size, zeta potential, apomorphine encapsulation and in vitro drug release. NLCs were 370-430 nm in size, which was between the sizes of the SLNs and LEs. A cationic surfactant was used to produce a positive surface charge of 42-50 mV. The base form of apomorphine was successfully entrapped by NLCs with an entrapment percentage of > 60%. The loading of apomorphine in nanoparticles resulted in a slower release behavior compared to the aqueous solution, with LEs showing the lowest release. In vivo real-time bioluminescence imaging of the rat brain revealed that NLCs could be targeted, through certain vessels, to selected brain regions. This effect was further confirmed by imaging the entire brain and brain slices. The results indicated that NLCs with moderate additives are a promising controlled-release and drug-targeting system.

  1. Simulating the digestion of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS): overview of in vitro lipolysis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolko, Katarina; Zvonar, Alenka; Gašperlin, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical science is the improvement of oral bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. Lately, one of the most attractive approaches has been formulation of lipid based drug delivery systems. However, the emerging popularity of these systems in the last decade has brought to light the need for efficient methods for their in vitro evaluation that would serve as their in vivo behaviour prediction tool. Because lipids are subject to lipid digestion and multiple absorption pathways in vivo, simple dissolution tests are not predictive enough when testing lipid based delivery systems. To assert these needs, the in vitro lipolysis model has been developed, utilizing pancreatic enzymes, bile and phospholipids in a temperature controlled chamber to simulate in vivo digestion. However, with very variable physiological conditions in gastrointestinal tract, this model has not been yet standardised and experiments vary among different laboratories. This review discusses in vivo events following oral application of lipid based delivery, in vitro lipolysis models to emulate them and their future perspectives.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Hu, Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  3. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Zhiyong; Liu, Chenfeng; Hu, Zhipeng; Hou, Yuyong

    2017-01-01

    Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  4. A Mathematical Model of Neutral Lipid Content in terms of Initial Nitrogen Concentration and Validation in Coelastrum sp. HA-1 and Application in Chlorella sorokiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are considered to be a potential major biomass feedstock for biofuel due to their high lipid content. However, no correlation equations as a function of initial nitrogen concentration for lipid accumulation have been developed for simplicity to predict lipid production and optimize the lipid production process. In this study, a lipid accumulation model was developed with simple parameters based on the assumption protein synthesis shift to lipid synthesis by a linear function of nitrogen quota. The model predictions fitted well for the growth, lipid content, and nitrogen consumption of Coelastrum sp. HA-1 under various initial nitrogen concentrations. Then the model was applied successfully in Chlorella sorokiniana to predict the lipid content with different light intensities. The quantitative relationship between initial nitrogen concentrations and the final lipid content with sensitivity analysis of the model were also discussed. Based on the model results, the conversion efficiency from protein synthesis to lipid synthesis is higher and higher in microalgae metabolism process as nitrogen decreases; however, the carbohydrate composition content remains basically unchanged neither in HA-1 nor in C. sorokiniana.

  5. Biopharmaceutical modeling of drug supersaturation during lipid-based formulation digestion considering an absorption sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillhart, Cordula; Imanidis, Georgios; Griffin, Brendan T; Kuentz, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In vitro lipolysis is widely utilized for predicting in vivo performance of oral lipid-based formulations (LBFs). However, evaluation of LBFs in the absence of an absorption sink may have limited in vivo relevance. This study aimed at employing biopharmaceutical modeling to simulate LBF digestion and drug supersaturation in a continuous absorptive environment. Three fenofibrate-loaded LBFs were characterized in vitro (dispersion and lipolysis) and drug precipitation was monitored using in-line Raman spectroscopy. In vitro data were combined with pharmacokinetic data derived from an in vivo study in pigs to simulate intestinal LBF transit. This biopharmaceutical model allowed calculation of lipolysis-triggered drug supersaturation while drug and lipolysis products are absorbed from the intestine. The biopharmaceutical model predicted that, in a continuous absorption environment, fenofibrate supersaturation was considerably lower compared to in vitro lipolysis (non-sink). Hence, the extensive drug precipitation observed in vitro was predicted to be unlikely in vivo. The absorption of lipolysis products increased drug supersaturation, but drug precipitation was unlikely for highly permeable drugs. Biopharmaceutical modeling is a valuable approach for predicting LBFs performance in vivo. In the absence of in vitro tools simulating absorptive conditions, modeling strategies should be further considered.

  6. Forensic identification of seal oils using lipid profiles and statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadwater, Margaret H; Seaborn, Gloria T; Schwacke, John H

    2013-03-01

    Seal blubber oils are used as a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Canada but prohibited in the United States and (FA) European Union. Thus, a reliable method is needed to identify oils originating from seals versus fish. Two lipid profiling methods, fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography and triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, were applied with statistical models to discriminate commercial oils and blubber samples harvested from marine fish and seals. Significant differences were observed among FA profiles, and seal samples differed from each of the fish oils (p ≤ 0.001). FA and TAG profiles were used to discriminate sample groups using a random forest classifier; all samples were classified correctly as seals versus fish using both methods. We propose a two-step method for the accurate identification of seal oils, with preliminary identification based on FA profile analysis and confirmation with TAG profiles.

  7. Ffects Of Mntnhex-2-Pyp On Markers Of Inflammation And Lipid Peroxidation In Asthma Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneta Lyubenova Shopova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Iinvestigation of the effects of MnTnHex-2-PyP on some markers of inflammation and lipid peroxidation in an asthma mice model.Methods: The experiment was carried out on 24 female mice C57Bl/6, divided into four groups: group 1, controls; group 2, injected with ovalbumin (OVA; group 3, treated with MnTnHex-2-PyP and group 4, treated with OVA and MnTnHex-2-PyP. The animals from groups 1 and 3 were injected i.p. on days 0 and 14 with a 100 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, and those from groups 2 and 4 were injected with a 100 μl ovalbumin solution, containing 20 μg OVA. On days 24, 25 and 26 the mice from groups 1 and 2 were inhaled with PBS for 30 min, and those from groups 2 and 4 were given a 1% ovalbumin solution. One hour before inhalation, and 12 hours later the animals from groups 1 and 2 were injected i.p. with 100 μl PBS, and those from groups 3 and 4 received a 100 μl MnTnHex-2-Pyp solution in PBS сontaining 0.05mg/kg.Results: Ovalbumin alone (group 2 increased the total cell number, total protein content, the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and 8-isoprostane in bronchoalveolar lavage. Elevations were observed in IgE level in serum, and the malone dialdehyde (MDA content in the lung homogenate. These markers were decreased significantly in group 4 as compared to the OVA group.Conclusions: MnTnHex-2-Pyp reduces the inflammation and lipid peroxidation in Ovalbumin-induced mice asthma model.

  8. Stratum Corneum Lipids: Their Role for the Skin Barrier Function in Healthy Subjects and Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2016-01-01

    Human skin acts as a primary barrier between the body and its environment. Crucial for this skin barrier function is the lipid matrix in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC). Two of its functions are (1) to prevent excessive water loss through the epidermis and (2) to avoid that compounds from the environment permeate into the viable epidermal and dermal layers and thereby provoke an immune response. The composition of the SC lipid matrix is dominated by three lipid classes: cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides. These lipids adopt a highly ordered, 3-dimensional structure of stacked densely packed lipid layers (lipid lamellae): the lateral and lamellar lipid organization. The way in which these lipids are ordered depends on the composition of the lipids. One very common skin disease in which the SC lipid barrier is affected is atopic dermatitis (AD). This review addresses the SC lipid composition and organization in healthy skin, and elaborates on how these parameters are changed in lesional and nonlesional skin of AD patients. Concerning the lipid composition, the changes in the three main lipid classes and the importance of the carbon chain lengths of the lipids are discussed. In addition, this review addresses how these changes in lipid composition induce changes in lipid organization and subsequently correlate with an impaired skin barrier function in both lesional and nonlesional skin of these patients. Furthermore, the effect of filaggrin and mutations in the filaggrin gene on the SC lipid composition is critically discussed. Also, the breakdown products of filaggrin, the natural moisturizing factor molecules and its relation to SC-pH is described. Finally, the paper discusses some major changes in epidermal lipid biosynthesis in patients with AD and other related skin diseases, and how inflammation has a deteriorating effect on the SC lipids and SC biosynthesis. The review ends with perspectives on future studies in relation to

  9. Bamboo Leaf Flavones and Tea Polyphenols Show a Lipid-lowering Effect in a Rat Model of Hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Yifan, L; Dan, L; Qian, Y; Ming-yan, J

    2015-12-01

    At present, most of the lipid-lowering drugs are western medicines, which have a lot of adverse reactions. Zhucha, an age-old Uyghur medicine, is made up of bamboo leaves and tea (green tea), which has good efficacy and lipid-lowering effect. The purpose of this study was to undertake a pharmacodynamic examination of the optimal proportions of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols required to achieve lipid lowering in rats. A hyperlipidemia rat model was used to examine the lipid lowering effects of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols. Wistar rats were divided into 13 groups including one hyperlipidemia model group and 2 positive drug groups as well as experimental groups (9 groups dosed with different proportions of bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols, the 3 dosages of bamboo leaf flavones were 75 mg/kg/d, 50 mg/kg/d and 25 mg/kg/d respectively, the 3 dosages of tea polyphenol were 750 mg/kg/d, 500 mg/kg/d and 250 mg/kg/d). The weight, the levels of triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) were determined. A high dose of bamboo leaf flavones (75 mg/kg/d) combined with a medium dose of tea polyphenols (500 mg/kg/d) was deemed to be optimal for achieving a lipid-lowering effect, the weight had the smallest increase and the level of TG and HDL was similar to positive control. The bamboo leaf flavones and tea polyphenols were mixed according to a certain proportion (1:6.7), and the mixture achieved a lipid-lowering effect and might prove to be useful as a natural lipid-lowering agent.

  10. Acid-base chemistry in the formation of Mackay-type icosahedral clusters: μ3-acidity analysis of Sc-rich phases of the Sc-Ir system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yiming; Stacey, Timothy E; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-05-19

    The crystal structures of intermetallic phases offer a wealth of geometrical features (helices, multishelled clusters, and host-guest motifs) whose formation has yet to be explained or predicted by chemical theory. A recently developed extension of the acid-base concept to metallic systems, the μ3-acidity model, provides an avenue for developing this understanding for intermetallics formed from transition metals. In this Article, we illustrate how this approach can be used to understand one of the most striking geometrical entities to emerge in intermetallic chemistry, the Mackay cluster of icosahedral quasicrystals. We present μ3-acidity analyses, based on DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations, for a series of Sc-Ir intermetallics: ScIr (CsCl-type), Sc2Ir (Ti2Ni-type), Sc11Ir4, and the Mackay cluster containing phases Sc57Ir13 and Sc44Ir7. We begin by illustrating that a μ3-acidity model correctly predicts that each of these phases is stable relative to disproportionation into their neighboring compounds when a common set of Hückel parameters and d-orbital occupancies is used. Next, we explain these results by developing a relationship between the distance distribution of homoatomic contacts within an atom's coordination sphere and the μ3-neutralization it experiences. For a given average homoatomic distance, the role of heteroatomic contacts is higher when the distribution of homoatomic contacts is narrower. This effect is key to the strength of the acid-base neutralization of the Sc-rich phases, where the Sc atoms find a scarcity of Ir atoms from which to obtain neutralization. Under these circumstances, Sc-Ir contacts should be maximized, whereas the number and distance variations of the Sc-Sc contacts should be minimized. These expectations are borne out by the observed crystal structures. In particular, the Mackay clusters of Sc57Ir13 and Sc44Ir7, in which a central Ir atom is icosahedrally coordinated by a pentagonal dodecahedral array of face-sharing Sc

  11. Effect of menthone and related compounds on skin permeation of drugs with different lipophilicity and molecular organization of stratum corneum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yi; Wang, Jingyan; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Yanyan; Zhao, Bochen; Wu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article was to investigate the enhancing effect of menthone, menthol and pulegone on the transdermal absorption of drugs with different lipophilicity and probe their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Five model drugs, namely osthole, tetramethylpyrazine, ferulic acid, puerarin and geniposide, which were selected based on their lipophilicity denoted by logKo/w, were tested using in vitro permeation studies in which Franz diffusion cells and rat skin were employed. Infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamic simulation were used to investigate the effect of these enhancers on the stratum corneum (SC) lipids, respectively. Three compounds could effectively promote the transdermal absorption of drugs with different lipophilicity, and the overall promoting capacities were in the following increasing order: pulegone drug lipophilicity after treatment with menthol or menthone, while the penetration enhancement effect of pulegone hardly changed with the alteration of the drug lipophilicity. The molecular mechanism studies suggested that menthone and menthol enhanced the skin permeability by disordering the ordered organization of SC lipids and extracted part of SC lipids, while pulegone appeared to promote drug transport across the skin only by extracting part of SC lipids.

  12. Effect of physical constraints on the mechanisms of membrane fusion: bolaform lipid vesicles as model systems.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Bolaform lipid vesicles were used to study the effect of physical constraints on membrane fusion. In these vesicles the membrane is organized in a single monolayer, because of the presence of covalent bonds in its middle plane. Therefore, the formation of fusion intermediates is subject to higher energy barriers and greater geometrical constraints than is usual in bilayer membranes. Bolaform lipids were extracted from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. These lipids can be divi...

  13. Normal mode gating motions of a ligand-gated ion channel persist in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Trudell, James R; Lindahl, Erik

    2010-08-18

    We have previously used molecular modeling and normal-mode analyses combined with experimental data to visualize a plausible model of a transmembrane ligand-gated ion channel. We also postulated how the gating motion of the channel may be affected by the presence of various ligands, especially anesthetics. As is typical for normal-mode analyses, those studies were performed in vacuo to reduce the computational complexity of the problem. While such calculations constitute an efficient way to model the large scale structural flexibility of transmembrane proteins, they can be criticized for neglecting the effects of an explicit phospholipid bilayer or hydrated environment. Here, we show the successful calculation of normal-mode motions for our model of a glycine α-1 receptor, now suspended in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer. Despite the almost uniform atomic density, the introduction of water and lipid does not grossly distort the overall gating motion. Normal-mode analysis revealed that even a fully immersed glycine α-1 receptor continues to demonstrate an iris-like channel gating motion as a low-frequency, high-amplitude natural harmonic vibration consistent with channel gating. Furthermore, the introduction of periodic boundary conditions allows the examination of simultaneous harmonic vibrations of lipid in synchrony with the protein gating motions that are compatible with reasonable lipid bilayer perturbations. While these perturbations tend to influence the overall protein motion, this work provides continued support for the iris-like motion model that characterizes gating within the family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  14. Lipid composition of the stratum corneum and cutaneous water loss in birds along an aridity gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Champagne, Alex M.; Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Shtayyeh, Tamer; Tieleman, B. Irene; Hegemann, Arne; Clement, Michelle E.; Williams, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular and covalently bound lipids within the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis, are the primary barrier to cutaneous water loss (CWL) in birds. We compared CWL and intercellular SC lipid composition in 20 species of birds from desert and mesic environments.

  15. The interaction of eugenol with cell membrane models at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid monolayer composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Giulia E G; de Souza, Fernanda S; Lago, João Henrique G; Caseli, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    Eugenol, a natural phenylpropanoid derivative with possible action in biological surfaces as microbicide, anesthetic and antioxidant, was incorporated in lipid monolayers of selected lipids at the air-water interface, representing cell membrane models. Interaction of eugenol with the lipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) could be inferred by means of surface pressure-area isotherms and Polarization-Modulation Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy. The interaction showed different effects on the different lipids. A higher monolayer expansion was observed for DPPS and DODAB, while more significant effects on the polar groups of the lipids were observed for DPPS and DPPC. These results pointed to the fact that the interaction of eugenol with lipid monolayers at the air-water interface is modulated by the lipid composition, which may be important to comprehend at the molecular level the interaction of this drug with biological surfaces.

  16. Kinetic Defects Induced by Melittin in Model Lipid Membranes: A Solution Atomic Force Microscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Khadka, Nawal K

    2016-05-26

    Quantitative characterization of membrane defects (pores) is important for elucidating the molecular basis of many membrane-active peptides. We study kinetic defects induced by melittin in vesicular and planar lipid bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements indicate that melittin induces time-dependent calcein leakage. Solution atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to visualize melittin-induced membrane defects. After initial equilibration, the most probable defect radius is ∼3.8 nm in 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DLPC) bilayers. Unexpectedly, defects become larger with longer incubation, accompanied by substantial shape transformation. The initial defect radius is ∼4.7 nm in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Addition of 30 mol % cholesterol to DOPC bilayers suppresses defect kinetics, although the inhibitory impact is negated by longer incubation. Overall, the kinetic rate of defect development follows DLPC > DOPC > DOPC/cholesterol. Kinetic defects are also observed when anionic lipids are present. Based on the observation that defects can occupy as large as 40% of the bilayer surface, we propose a kinetic defect growth model. We also study the effect of melittin on the phase behavior of DOPC/egg-sphingomyelin/cholesterol bilayers. We find that melittin initially suppresses or eliminates liquid-ordered (Lo) domains; Lo domains gradually emerge and become the dominant species with longer incubation; and defects in phase-coexisting bilayers have a most probable radius of ∼5 nm and are exclusively localized in the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. Our experimental data highlight that melittin-induced membrane defects are not static; conversely, spontaneous defect growth is intrinsically associated with membrane permeabilization exerted by melittin.

  17. The physics of stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Chinmay; Olmsted, Peter D

    2016-07-28

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, comprises rigid corneocytes (keratin-filled dead cells) in a specialized lipid matrix. The continuous lipid matrix provides the main barrier against uncontrolled water loss and invasion of external pathogens. Unlike all other biological lipid membranes (such as intracellular organelles and plasma membranes), molecules in the SC lipid matrix show small hydrophilic groups and large variability in the length of the alkyl tails and in the numbers and positions of groups that are capable of forming hydrogen bonds. Molecular simulations provide a route for systematically probing the effects of each of these differences separately. In this article, we present the results from atomistic molecular dynamics of selected lipid bilayers and multi-layers to probe the effect of these polydispersities. We address the nature of the tail packing in the gel-like phase, the hydrogen bond network among head groups, the bending moduli expected for leaflets comprising SC lipids and the conformation of very long ceramide lipids in multi-bilayer lipid assemblies.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  18. Improved Coarse-Grained Modeling of Cholesterol-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Michael D.; Olsen, Brett N.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-24

    In mammalian cells cholesterol is essential for membrane function, but in excess can be cytototoxic. The cellular response to acute cholesterol loading involves biophysical-based mechanisms that regulate cholesterol levels, through modulation of the “activity” or accessibility of cholesterol to extra-membrane acceptors. Experiments and united atom (UA) simulations show that at high concentrations of cholesterol, lipid bilayers thin significantly and cholesterol availability to external acceptors increases substantially. Such cholesterol activation is critical to its trafficking within cells. Here we aim to reduce the computational cost to enable simulation of large and complex systems involved in cholesterol regulation, such as those including oxysterols and cholesterol-sensing proteins. To accomplish this, we have modified the published MARTINI coarse-grained force field to improve its predictions of cholesterol-induced changes in both macroscopic and microscopic properties of membranes. Most notably, MARTINI fails to capture both the (macroscopic) area condensation and membrane thickening seen at less than 30% cholesterol and the thinning seen above 40% cholesterol. The thinning at high concentration is critical to cholesterol activation. Microscopic properties of interest include cholesterol-cholesterol radial distribution functions (RDFs), tilt angle, and accessible surface area. First, we develop an “angle-corrected” model wherein we modify the coarse-grained bond angle potentials based on atomistic simulations. This modification significantly improves prediction of macroscopic properties, most notably the thickening/thinning behavior, and also slightly improves microscopic property prediction relative to MARTINI. Second, we add to the angle correction a “volume correction” by also adjusting phospholipid bond lengths to achieve a more accurate volume per molecule. The angle + volume correction substantially further improves the quantitative

  19. Model studies on the pattern of volatiles generated in mixtures of amino acids, lipid-oxidation-derived aldehydes, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, An; Kitryté, Vaida; Venskutonis, Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2011-02-23

    The development of flavor and browning in thermally treated foods results mainly from the Maillard reaction and lipid degradation but also from the interactions between both reaction pathways. To study these interactions, we analyzed the volatile compounds resulting from model reactions of lysine or glycine with aldehydes originating from lipid oxidation [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, or (2E,4E)-decadienal] in the presence and absence of glucose. The main reaction products identified in these model mixtures were carbonyl compounds, resulting essentially from amino-acid-catalyzed aldol condensation reactions. Several 2-alkylfurans were detected as well. Only a few azaheterocyclic compounds were identified, in particular 5-butyl-2-propylpyridine from (E)-2-hexenal model systems and 2-pentylpyridine from (2E,4E)-decadienal model reactions. Although few reaction products were found resulting from the condensation of an amino acid with a lipid-derived aldehyde, the amino acid plays an important role in catalyzing the degradation and further reaction of these carbonyl compounds. These results suggest that amino-acid-induced degradations and further reactions of lipid oxidation products may be of considerable importance in thermally processed foods.

  20. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  1. Sagunja-Tang Improves Lipid Related Disease in a Postmenopausal Rat Model and HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroe Go

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Sagunja-tang on the lipid related disease in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia and lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced HepG2 cells. In in vivo study using menopausal hyperlipidemia rats, Sagunja-tang reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor, media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis score, when compared to menopausal hyperlipidemia control rats. In HepG2 cells, Sagunja-tang significantly decreased the lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density/very-low-density lipoprotein levels. Moreover, Sagunja-tang reversed the methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced decrease in the protein levels of critical molecule involved in cholesterol synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, and low-density lipoprotein receptor and inhibited protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase as well as activity. Phosphorylation level of AMP-activated protein kinase was stimulated by Sagunja-tang. These results suggest that Sagunja-tang has effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation through regulation of cholesterol synthesis and AMPK activity in vitro. These observations support the idea that Sagunja-tang is bioavailable both in vivo and in vitro and could be developed as a preventive and therapeutic agent of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal females.

  2. Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the

  3. Lipid oxidation promotes acrylamide formation in fat-rich model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Oliviero, T.; Açar, Ö.; Gökmen, V.; Fogliano, V.

    2010-01-01

    Lipid oxidation is one of the major chemical reactions occurring during food processing or storage and may have a strong impact on the final quality of foods. A significant role of carbonyl compounds derived from lipid oxidation in acrylamide formation has been recently proposed. In this work, the e

  4. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  5. Lipid Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Lipid Profile Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: Lipid Panel; Coronary Risk Panel Formal name: Lipid Profile Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Triglycerides ; ...

  6. The physical chemistry of the stratum corneum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncheva, M

    2014-12-01

    This article summarizes the current knowledge of the composition, self-assembly, and molecular organization of the stratum corneum (SC) lipids, reviews the evidence connecting these parameters and the barrier properties of human skin, and outlines the immediate issues in the field of SC lipid research. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  7. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Sc13C2 and Sc12C13C: Establishing AN Accurate Structure of ScC2 (tilde{X}2A1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Mark; Halfen, DeWayne T.; Min, Jie; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    Pure rotational spectra of Sc13C2 and Sc12C13C (tilde{X}2A1) have been obtained using Fourier Transform Microwave methods. These molecules were created from scandium vapor in combination with 13CH4 and/or 12CH4, diluted in argon, using a Discharge Assisted Laser Ablation Source (DALAS). Transitions in the frequency range of 14-30 GHz were observed for both species including hyperfine splitting due to the nuclear spin of Sc (I = 7/2) and 13C (I = 1/2). Rotational, spin-rotational, and hyperfine constants have been determined for Sc13C2 and Sc12C13C, as well as a refined structure for ScC2. In agreement with theoretical calculations and previous Sc12C2 results, these data confirm a cyclic (or T-shaped) structure for this molecule. Scandium carbides have been shown to form endohedral-doped fullerenes, which have unique electrical and magnetic properties due to electron transfer between the metal and the carbon-cage. Spectroscopy of ScC2 provides data on model systems for comparison with theory.

  8. Main: 3SC2 [RPSD[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3SC2 小麦 Bread Wheat Triticum aestivum Serine Carboxypeptidase Ii Chains A And B Nam... 1WHS; X-ray; A=6-260, B=266-418.|PDB; 1WHT; X-ray; A=5-260, B=266-418.|PDB; 3SC2; X-ray; A=1-259, B=266-417...WHDAPRSMLPIYRELIAAGLRIWVFSGDTDAVVPLTATRYSIGALGLPTTTSWYPWYDDQEVGGWSQVYKGLTLVSVRGAGHEVPLHRPRQALVLFQYFLQGKPMPGQTKNAT wheat_3SC2.jpg ...

  9. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state.

  10. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  11. Effect of Centella asiatica on Oxidative Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia and many other metabolic diseases are related to oxidative stress. Centella asiatica is a traditional Chinese medicine whose antioxidant effect in vitro has been reported. We are interested in whether it possesses this effect in vivo and hence modulates lipid metabolism. Therefore, experiments were carried out on mice and golden hamsters regarding its antioxidant and hypolipidemic effect. We observed that a fraction (CAF3 of the ethanol extract (CAE of Centella asiatica had a cholesterol decrease of 79% and a triglyceride decrease of 95% in acute mice model, so CAF3 was further investigated in high-fat-fed hamster model. It was shown that CAF3 increased SOD and GSH-Px activities and decreased MDA level, and it also improved TC, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, AST, and ALT levels. L-CAT and SR-BI gene expression in hamsters were increased. Taken together, our data suggest that the CAF3 fraction of Centella asiatica has antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties.

  12. In vivo imaging of DNA lipid nanocapsules after systemic administration in a melanoma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Stephanie; Carmoy, Nathalie; Resnier, Pauline; Denis, Caroline; Misery, Laurent; Pitard, Bruno; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Passirani, Catherine; Montier, Tristan

    2012-02-14

    The biodistribution of intravenously injected DNA lipid nanocapsules (DNA LNCs), encapsulating pHSV-tk, was analysed by in vivo imaging on an orthotopic melanoma mouse model and by a subsequent treatment with ganciclovir (GCV), using the gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) approach. Luminescent melanoma cells, implanted subcutaneously in the right flank of the mice, allowed us to follow tumour growth and tumour localisation with in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In parallel, DNA LNCs or PEG DNA LNCs (DNA LNCs recovered with PEG(2000)) encapsulating a fluorescent probe, DiD, allowed us to follow their biodistribution with in vivo biofluorescence imaging (BFI). The BF-images confirmed a prolonged circulation-time for PEG DNA LNCs as was previously observed on an ectotopic model of glioma; comparison with BL-images evidenced the colocalisation of PEG DNA LNCs and melanoma cells. After these promising results, treatment with PEG DNA LNCs and GCV on a few animals was performed and the treatment efficacy measured by BLI. The first results showed tumour growth reduction tendency and, once optimised, this therapy strategy could become a new option for melanoma treatment.

  13. Bayesian narrowband interference mitigation in SC-FDMA

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Anum

    2015-08-12

    This paper presents a novel narrowband interference (NBI) mitigation scheme for SC-FDMA systems. The proposed scheme exploits the frequency domain sparsity of the unknown NBI signal and adopts a low complexity Bayesian sparse recovery procedure. In practice, however, the sparsity of the NBI is destroyed by a grid mismatch between NBI sources and SC-FDMA system. Towards this end, an accurate grid mismatch model is presented and a sparsifying transform is utilized to restore the sparsity of the unknown signal. Numerical results are presented that depict the suitability of the proposed scheme for NBI mitigation.

  14. Safety and biodistribution assessment of sc-rAAV2.5IL-1Ra administered via intra-articular injection in a mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1 (IL-1 plays an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA, and gene transfer of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra holds promise for OA treatment. A preclinical safety and biodistribution study evaluated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral vector carrying rat IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5rIL-1Ra at 5 × 108, 5 × 109, or 5 × 1010 vg/knee, or human IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5hIL-1Ra at 5 × 1010 vg/knee, in Wistar rats with mono-iodoacetate (MIA–induced OA at days 7, 26, 91, 180, and 364 following intra-articular injection. The MIA-induced OA lesions were consistent with the published data on this model. The vector genomes persisted in the injected knees for up to a year with only limited vector leakage to systemic circulation and uptake in tissues outside the knee. Low levels of IL-1Ra expression and mitigation of OA lesions were observed in the vector-injected knees, albeit inconsistently. Neutralizing antibodies against the vector capsid developed in a dose-dependent manner, but only the human vector induced a small splenic T-cell immune response to the vector capsid. No local or systemic toxicity attributable to vector administration was identified in the rats as indicated by clinical signs, body weight, feed consumption, clinical pathology, and gross and microscopic pathology through day 364. Taken together, the gene therapy vector demonstrated a favorable safety profile.

  15. Nuclear Level Density and Gamma-Ray Strength Function of 43Sc

    CERN Document Server

    Bürger, A; Hilaire, S; Guttormsen, M; Harissopulos, S; Kmiecik, M; Konstantinopoulos, T; Krticka, M; Lagoyannis, A; Lönnroth, T; Mazurek, K; Norrby, M; Nyhus, H T; Perdikakis, G; Siem, S; Spyrou, A; Syed, N U H; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.064328

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear level density and the gamma-ray strength function have been determined for 43Sc in the energy range up to 2 MeV below the neutron separation energy using the Oslo method with the 46Ti(p,alpha)43Sc reaction. A comparison to 45Sc shows that the level density of 43Sc is smaller by an approximately constant factor of two. This behaviour is well reproduced in a microscopical/combinatorial model calculation. The gamma-ray strength function is showing an increase at low gamma-ray energies, a feature which has been observed in several nuclei but which still awaits theoretical explanation.

  16. Renewable Diesel from Algal Lipids: An Integrated Baseline for Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential from a Harmonized Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Fishman, D.; Frank, E. D.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Aden, A.; Coleman, A. M.; Pienkos, P. T.; Skaggs, R. J.; Venteris, E. R.; Wang, M. Q.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program has begun an initiative to obtain consistent quantitative metrics for algal biofuel production to establish an 'integrated baseline' by harmonizing and combining the Program's national resource assessment (RA), techno-economic analysis (TEA), and life-cycle analysis (LCA) models. The baseline attempts to represent a plausible near-term production scenario with freshwater microalgae growth, extraction of lipids, and conversion via hydroprocessing to produce a renewable diesel (RD) blendstock. Differences in the prior TEA and LCA models were reconciled (harmonized) and the RA model was used to prioritize and select the most favorable consortium of sites that supports production of 5 billion gallons per year of RD. Aligning the TEA and LCA models produced slightly higher costs and emissions compared to the pre-harmonized results. However, after then applying the productivities predicted by the RA model (13 g/m2/d on annual average vs. 25 g/m2/d in the original models), the integrated baseline resulted in markedly higher costs and emissions. The relationship between performance (cost and emissions) and either productivity or lipid fraction was found to be non-linear, and important implications on the TEA and LCA results were observed after introducing seasonal variability from the RA model. Increasing productivity and lipid fraction alone was insufficient to achieve cost and emission targets; however, combined with lower energy, less expensive alternative technology scenarios, emissions and costs were substantially reduced.

  17. Engineering and validation of a novel lipid thin film for biomembrane modeling in lipophilicity determination of drugs and xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonna Udochi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determination of lipophilicity as a tool for predicting pharmacokinetic molecular behavior is limited by the predictive power of available experimental models of the biomembrane. There is current interest, therefore, in models that accurately simulate the biomembrane structure and function. A novel bio-device; a lipid thin film, was engineered as an alternative approach to the previous use of hydrocarbon thin films in biomembrane modeling. Results Retention behavior of four structurally diverse model compounds; 4-amino-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (ADBA, naproxen (NPX, nabumetone (NBT and halofantrine (HF, representing 4 broad classes of varying molecular polarities and aqueous solubility behavior, was investigated on the lipid film, liquid paraffin, and octadecylsilane layers. Computational, thermodynamic and image analysis confirms the peculiar amphiphilic configuration of the lipid film. Effect of solute-type, layer-type and variables interactions on retention behavior was delineated by 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR. Validation of the lipid film was implemented by statistical correlation of a unique chromatographic metric with Log P (octanol/water and several calculated molecular descriptors of bulk and solubility properties. Conclusion The lipid film signifies a biomimetic artificial biological interface capable of both hydrophobic and specific electrostatic interactions. It captures the hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB in the determination of lipophilicity of molecules unlike the pure hydrocarbon film of the prior art. The potentials and performance of the bio-device gives the promise of its utility as a predictive analytic tool for early-stage drug discovery science.

  18. Cross-talk between lipid and protein carbonylation in a dynamic cardiomyocyte model of mild nitroxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Griesser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS play an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Increase in ROS/RNS concentration results in lipid and protein oxidation and is often associated with onset and/or progression of many cardiovascular disorders. However, interplay between lipid and protein modifications has not been simultaneously studied in detail so far. Biomolecule carbonylation is one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using a dynamic model of nitroxidative stress we demonstrated rapid changes in biomolecule carbonylation in rat cardiomyocytes. Levels of carbonylated species increased as early as 15 min upon treatment with the peroxynitrite donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, and decreased to values close to control after 16 h. Total (lipids+proteins vs. protein-specific carbonylation showed different dynamics, with a significant increase in protein-bound carbonyls at later time points. Treatment with SIN-1 in combination with inhibitors of proteasomal and autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways allowed confirmation of a significant role of the proteasome in the degradation of carbonylated proteins, whereas lipid carbonylation increased in the presence of autophagy/lysosomal inhibitors. Electrophilic aldehydes and ketones formed by lipid peroxidation were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. Molecular identity of reactive species was used for data-driven analysis of their protein targets. Combination of different enrichment strategies with LC-MS/MS analysis allowed identification of more than 167 unique proteins with 332 sites modified by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. Gene ontology analysis of modified proteins demonstrated enrichment of several functional categories including proteins involved in cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, ion channels and their regulation. Using calcium mobilization assays, the effect of nitroxidative stress on the activity of several ion

  19. Comprehensive modeling and investigation of the effect of iron on the growth rate and lipid accumulation of Chlorella vulgaris cultured in batch photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concas, Alessandro; Steriti, Alberto; Pisu, Massimo; Cao, Giacomo

    2014-02-01

    Recent works have shown that specific strains of microalgae are capable to simultaneously increase their growth rate and lipid content when cultured under suitable concentrations of iron. While these results are promising in view of the exploitation of microalgae for producing biofuels, to the best of our knowledge, no mathematical model capable to describe the effect of iron on lipid accumulation in microalgae, has been so far proposed. A comprehensive mathematical model describing the effect of iron on chlorophyll synthesis, nitrogen assimilation, growth rate and lipid accumulation in a freshwater strain of Chlorella vulgaris is then proposed in this work. Model results are successfully compared with experimental data which confirm the positive effect of growing iron concentrations on lipid productivity of C. vulgaris. Thus, the proposed model might represent a useful tool to optimize iron-based strategies to improve the lipid productivity of microalgal cultures.

  20. 46 CFR 7.70 - Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. 7.70 Section... BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.70 Folly Island, SC to Hilton Head Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity of Folly Island to latitude 32°35′ N. longitude 79°58.2′ W. (Stono Inlet Lighted...

  1. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  2. Lipid-Core Nanocapsules Improved Antiedematogenic Activity of Tacrolimus in Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Rossana B; Coradini, Karine; Fonseca, Francisco N; Guterres, Silvia S; Beck, Ruy C R; Pohlmann, Adriana R

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant technological advances, rheumatoid arthritis remains an incurable disease with great impact on the life quality of patients. We studied the encapsulation of tacrolimus in lipidcore nanocapsules (TAC-LNC) as a strategy to enhance its systemic anti-arthritic properties. TAC-LNC presented unimodal distribution of particles with z-average diameter of 212 +/- 11, drug content close to the theoretical value (0.80 mg mL(-1)), and 99.43% of encapsulation efficiency. An in vitro sustained release was determined for TAC-LNC with anomalous transport mechanism (n = 0.61). In vivo studies using an arthritis model induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant demonstrated that the animals treated with TAC-LNC presented a significantly greater inhibition of paw oedema after intraperitoneal administration. Furthermore, the encapsulation of TAC in lipid-core nanocapsules was potentially able to prevent hyperglycemia in the animals. In conclusion, TAC-LNC was prepared with 100% yield of nanoscopic particles having satisfactory characteristics for systemic use. This formulation represents a promising strategy to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future.

  3. Probing lipid mobility of raft-exhibiting model membranes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahya, N; Scherfeld, D; Bacia, K; Poolman, B; Schwille, P

    2003-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) have been employed to investigate the lipid spatial and dynamic organization in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) prepared from ternary mixtures of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin/ cholesterol. For a certain

  4. Growth Mechanism of Lipid-Based Nanodiscs -- a Model Membrane for Studying Kinetics of Particle Coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieh, Mu-Ping; Dizon, Anthony; Li, Ming; Hu, Andrew; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2012-02-01

    Lipid-based nanodiscs composed of long- and short- chain lipids [namely, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC)] constantly form at high lipid concentrations and at low temperatures (i.e., below the melting transition temperature of DMPC, TM). The initial size of these nanodiscs (at high total lipid concentration, CL> 20 wt.%) is relatively uniform and of similar dimension (according to dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering experiments), seemingly independent of thermal history. Upon dilution, the nanodiscs slowly coalesce and grow in size with time irreversibly. Our preliminary result shows that the growth rate strongly depends on several parameters such as charge density, CL and temperature. We have also found that the nanodisc coalescence is a reaction limit instead of diffusion limit process through a time-resolved study.

  5. Coarse-grain Modeling of Lipid Membrane Adsorption on Nanopatterned Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Matthew; Longo, Marjorie; Faller, Roland

    2009-03-01

    Substrate interactions with adsorbed membranes modify the intrinsic mechanics of supported lipid bilayers. Coarse-graining of the membrane lipids and surface allow for the larger system size necessary for membrane shape studies. Supported lipid bilayers (SLB) continue to be an important means of measuring the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of phospholipid membranes, which are the basis of compartmentalization in living cells. Understanding SLB systems with respect to their substrates enhances the understanding of the measurements taken thereon and promotes design of new substrates to expand the usefulness of these systems. We present data for the interaction of coarse-grained lipid membranes with nanopatterned surfaces, showing the effect of the balance between bending energy and adsorption energy on membrane topology.

  6. rotor of the SC rotating condenser

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The rotor of the rotating condenser was installed instead of the tuning fork as the modulating element of the radiofrequency system, when the SC accelerator underwent extensive improvements between 1973 to 1975 (see object AC-025). The SC was the first accelerator built at CERN. It operated from August 1957 until it was closed down at the end of 1990.

  7. Radiation Protection Section (SC/SL/RP)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to inform you that the Radiation Protection Section (SC/SL/RP) located on the Prévessin site has moved from Building 865 (ground floor) to new premises in Wing A of Building 892 (second floor). Telephone numbers remain the same. SC/SL/RP section

  8. Equilibrium microphase separation in the two-leaflet model of lipid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Reigada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    A novel two-leaflet description of lipid membranes is proposed. Within its framework, phase separation phenomena in multicomponent biological membranes are analyzed. As we show, interactions between the leaflets tend to suppress macroscopic phase segregation (i.e., complete demixing of lipids) in such systems. Instead, microphase separation characterized by formation of equilibrium nanoscale domains can take place. The phase diagram is constructed and numerical simulations revealing nanostructures of different morphology are performed.

  9. Comparative SAXS and DSC study on stratum corneum structural organization in an epidermal cell culture model (ROC): impact of cultivation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Herre, Angela; Fahr, Alfred; Funari, Sérgio S; Garidel, Patrick

    2013-12-18

    Cell cultured skin equivalents present an alternative for dermatological in vitro evaluations of drugs and excipients as they provide the advantage of availability, lower variability and higher assay robustness compared to native skin. For penetration/permeation studies, an adequate stratum corneum barrier similar to that of human stratum corneum is, however, a prerequisite. In this study, the stratum corneum lipid organization in an epidermal cell culture model based on rat epidermal keratinocytes (REK organotypic culture, ROC) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in dependence on ROC cultivation time and in comparison to native human and rat stratum cornea. In addition, the thermal phase behavior was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and barrier properties were checked by measurements of the permeability of tritiated water. The development of the barrier of ROC SC obtained at different cultivation times (7, 14 and 21 days at the air-liquid interface) was connected with an increase in structural order of the SC lipids in SAXS measurements: Already cultivation for 14 days at the air-liquid interface resulted overall in a competent SC permeability barrier and SC lipid organization. Cultivation for 21 days resulted in further minor changes in the structural organization of ROC SC. The SAXS patterns of ROC SC had overall large similarities with that of human SC and point to the presence of a long periodicity phase with a repeat distance of about 122Å, e.g. slightly smaller than that determined for human SC in the present study (127Å). Moreover, SAXS results also indicate the presence of covalently bound ceramides, which are crucial for a proper SC barrier, although the corresponding thermal transitions were not clearly detectable by DSC. Due to the competent SC barrier properties and high structural and organizational similarity to that of native human SC, ROC presents a promising alternative for in vitro studies, particularly as

  10. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.

  11. Interactions between HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies and Model Lipid Membranes imaged with AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauscher, Stefan; Hardy, Gregory; Alam, Munir; Shapter, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Lipid membrane interactions with rare, broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), 2F5 and 4E10, play a critical role in HIV-1 neutralization. Our research is motivated by recent immunization studies that have shown that induction of antibodies that avidly bind the gp41-MPER antigen is not sufficient for neutralization. Rather, it is required that antigen designs induce polyreactive antibodies that recognize MPER antigens as well as the viral lipid membrane. However, the mechanistic details of how membrane properties influence NAb-lipid and NAb-antigen interactions remain unknown. Furthermore, it is well established that the native viral membrane is heterogeneous, representing a mosaic of lipid rafts and protein clustering. However, the size, physical properties, and dynamics of these regions are poorly characterized and their potential roles in HIV-1 neutralization are also unknown. To understand how membrane properties contribute to 2F5/4E10 membrane interactions, we have engineered biomimetic supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and use atomic force microscopy to visualize membrane domains, antigen clustering, and antibody-membrane interactions at sub-nanometer z-resolution. Our results show that localized binding of HIV-1 antigens and NAbs occur preferentially with the most fluid membrane domain. This supports the theory that NAbs may interact with regions of low lateral lipid forces that allow antibody insertion into the bilayer.

  12. Role of Unsaturated Lipid and Ergosterol in Ethanol Tolerance of Model Yeast Biomembranes

    KAUST Repository

    Vanegas, Juan M.

    2012-02-07

    We present a combined atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy study of the behavior of a ternary supported lipid bilayer system containing a saturated lipid (DPPC), an unsaturated lipid (DOPC), and ergosterol in the presence of high ethanol (20 vol %). We find that the fluorescent probe Texas Red DHPE preferentially partitions into the ethanol-induced interdigitated phase, which allows the use of fluorescence imaging to investigate the phase behavior of the system. Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence images of samples with the same lipid mixture show good agreement in sample morphology and area fractions of the observed phases. Using area fractions obtained from fluorescence images over a broad range of compositions, we constructed a phase diagram of the DPPC/DOPC/ergosterol system at 20 vol % ethanol. The phase diagram clearly shows that increasing unsaturated lipid and/or ergosterol protects the membrane by preventing the formation of the interdigitated phase. This result supports the hypothesis that yeast cells increase ergosterol and unsaturated lipid content to prevent interdigitation and maintain an optimal membrane thickness as ethanol concentration increases during anaerobic fermentations. Changes in plasma membrane composition provide an important survival factor for yeast cells to deter ethanol toxicity.

  13. Cs3ScCl6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Ward

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of tricaesium scandium(III hexachloride were obtained as a side product from the reaction of U, SnCl2, Sc, and S in a CsCl flux at 1073 K. Cs3ScCl6 crystallizes in the Rb3YCl6 structure type. The asymmetric unit comprises three Cs sites, two Sc sites, and six Cl sites, all of which have site symmetry 1, except for the two Sc sites that have site symmetries of 2 and -1, respectively. The structure is composed of isolated [ScCl6]3− octahedra that are surrounded by Cs+ cations. Two Cs+ cations have interactions with eight Cl− anions, while the third has interactions with ten Cl− anions.

  14. Final Technical Report of ASR project entitled “ARM Observations for the Development and Evaluation of Models and Parameterizations of Cloudy Boundary Layers” (DE-SC0000825)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ping [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-02-22

    This project aims to elucidate the processes governing boundary layer clouds and improve the treatment of cloud processes in Global Climate Models (GCMs). Specifically, we have made research effort in following areas: (1) Developing novel numerical approach of using multiple scale Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model simulations for boundary layer cloud research; (2) Addressing issues of PDF schemes for parameterizing sub-grid scale cloud radiative properties; (3) Investigating the impact of mesoscale cloud organizations on the evolution of boundary layer clouds; (4) Evaluating parameterizations of the cumulus induced vertical transport; (5) Limited area model (LAM) intercomparison study of TWP-ICE convective case; (6) Investigating convective invigoration processes at shallow cumulus cold poll boundaries; and (7) Investigating vertical transport processes in moist convection.

  15. Molecular dynamics of leucine and dopamine transporter proteins in a model cell membrane lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Indarte, Martín; Surratt, Christopher K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2010-03-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) operates via facilitated diffusion, harnessing an inward Na(+) gradient to drive dopamine from the extracellular synaptic cleft to the neuron interior. The DAT is relevant to central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and is the primary site of action for the abused psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Crystallization of a DAT homolog, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, provided the first reliable 3-D DAT template. Here, the LeuT crystal structure and the DAT molecular model have been combined with their respective substrates, leucine and dopamine, in lipid bilayer molecular dynamics simulations toward tracking substrate movement along the protein's substrate/ion permeation pathway. Specifically, movement of residue pairs that comprise the "external gate" was followed as a function of substrate presence. The transmembrane (TM) 1 arginine-TM 10 aspartate strut formed less readily in DAT compared with LeuT, with or without substrate present. For LeuT but not DAT, the addition of substrate enhanced the chances of forming the TM 1-10 bridge. Also, movement of the fourth extracellular loop EL-4 in the presence of substrate was more pronounced for DAT, the EL-4 unwinding to a degree. The overall similarity between the LeuT and DAT molecular dynamics simulations indicated that LeuT was a legitimate model to guide DAT structure-function predictions. There were, nevertheless, differences significant enough to allow for DAT-unique insights, which may include how cocaine, methylphenidate (Ritalin, NIDA Drug Supply, Rockville, MD), and other DAT blockers are not recognized as substrates even though they can access the primary substrate binding pocket. Proteins 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Correlation between the properties of the lipid matrix and the degrees of integrity and cohesion in healthy human Stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaud, Fabienne; Boncheva, Mila

    2011-03-01

    The correlation between the degrees of integrity and cohesion in healthy human Stratum corneum (SC) and the properties of the SC lipid matrix could be examined non-invasively in vivo using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and measurements of pH, conductance, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) taken in the course of tape-stripping. The change of TEWL following the removal of a SC layer with a predefined thickness served as a measure for the SC integrity, and the amount of protein removed by predefined number of tapes - as a measure for the SC cohesion. The extent of lipids organized in orthorhombic lattices and the pH in the inner SC emerged as the main factors that determine the degree of integrity. The amounts and molecular organization of the SC lipids did not correlate with the degree of cohesion, while the pH and the hydration of SC correlated well with the degree of cohesion in the superficial but not in the inner SC layers. This study evidenced the variability of SC integrity and cohesion existing in healthy human skin, demonstrated the importance of the lipid molecular organization for the SC integrity, and illustrated the limitations in the determination the degree of corneodesmolysis in SC based only on the protein content of tape-strips.

  17. Final report for Texas A&M University Group Contribution to DE-FG02-09ER25949/DE-SC0002505: Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data (and ASCR-funded collaboration between Sandia National Labs, Texas A&M University and University of Utah)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, Joseph Maurice [Texas A& M University

    2013-02-27

    We summarize the contributions of the Texas A\\&M University Group to the project (DE-FG02-09ER25949/DE-SC0002505: Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data - an ASCR-funded collaboration between Sandia National Labs, Texas A\\&M U, and U Utah) during 6/9/2011 -- 2/27/2013.

  18. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  19. Antioxidant activity and inhibitory effects of lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed extracts against lipid oxidation in model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjakul, Soottawat; Kittiphattanabawon, Phanat; Shahidi, Fereidoon; Maqsood, Sajid

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidant activity of brown lead (Leucaena leucocephala) seed extracts with and without prior chlorophyll removal was studied in comparison with mimosine. Both extracts showed similar hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging activity, singlet oxygen inhibition and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) scavenging capacity (p > 0.05). Nevertheless, the extract without prior chlorophyll removal had higher oxygen radical absorbance capacity than that with prior chlorophyll removal (p < 0.05). Generally, lead seed extracts with and without prior chlorophyll removal possessed a lower antioxidant activity, compared with mimosine. When lead seed extract without prior chlorophyll removal (100 and 200 ppm) was used in different lipid oxidation model systems, including β-carotene-linoleic acid and lecithin liposome systems, the preventive effect toward lipid oxidation was dose-dependent. At the same level of use, mimosine exhibited a higher efficacy in prevention of lipid oxidation in both systems as indicated by the lower increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. A similar result was obtained in minced mackerel. Therefore, lead seed extract containing mimosine could act as a natural antioxidant to prevent lipid oxidation in foods.

  20. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES OF A POORLY WATER SOLUBLE MODEL DRUG, IBUPROFEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Pintu Kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 40% of lipophilic drug candidates fail to comply the commercial requirements of solubility and formulation stability, prompting significant research activity in advanced lipophile delivery technologies. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN technology represents a promising new approach to lipophile drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles typically are spherical with average diameters between 1 to 1000 nanometers. SLNs possess a solid lipid core matrix that can solubilize lipophilic molecules. The lipid core is stabilized by surfactants. Primary objective of this study is to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of Ibuprofen by formulation into SLN using hot homogenization method. Further, this study also investigates the effect of various formulation parameters like stabilizer concentration, surfactant ratio, Lipid ratio and drug loading. SLNs were characterized for size distribution, entrapment efficiency, drug release and stability. SLN of Ibuprofen was prepared using stearic acid (lipid Phospholipon 80 H (surfactant and Tween-80 as stabilizer. The FTIR study shows no major interaction of Ibuprofen with other formulation ingredients, and the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC study revealed that the drug is molecularly dispersed into the lipid. The particle size determinations confirm the particle size distribution in the nanoparticular range (27% Volume to 56% volume. In-vitro drug release through the dialysis membrane from the prepared SLNs is much higher than the pure drug. The stability study indicates the stability of the formulations without changing its performance on storage. Hence formulation of Ibuprofen in SLN enhances the dissolution rate as well as it will enhance the bioavailability of the drug which could be stabilized during storage.

  1. Detergents modify proteinase K resistance of PrP Sc in different transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Johanna; Wemheuer, Wiebke M; Wrede, Arne; Graham, Catherine; Benestad, Sylvie L; Brenig, Bertram; Richt, Jürgen A; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J

    2012-05-25

    Prion diseases are diagnosed by the detection of their proteinase K-resistant prion protein fragment (PrP(Sc)). Various biochemical protocols use different detergents for the tissue preparation. We found that the resistance of PrP(Sc) against proteinase K may vary strongly with the detergent used. In our study, we investigated the influence of the most commonly used detergents on eight different TSE agents derived from different species and distinct prion disease forms. For a high throughput we used a membrane adsorption assay to detect small amounts of prion aggregates, as well as Western blotting. Tissue lysates were prepared using DOC, SLS, SDS or Triton X-100 in different concentrations and these were digested with various amounts of proteinase K. Detergents are able to enhance or diminish the detectability of PrP(Sc) after proteinase K digestion. Depending on the kind of detergent, its concentration - but also on the host species that developed the TSE and the disease form or prion type - the detectability of PrP(Sc) can be very different. The results obtained here may be helpful during the development or improvement of a PrP(Sc) detection method and they point towards a detergent effect that can be additionally used for decontamination purposes. A plausible explanation for the detergent effects described in this article could be an interaction with the lipids associated with PrP(Sc) that may stabilize the aggregates.

  2. Using ASCEM Modeling and Visualization to Inform Stakeholders of Contaminant Plume Evolution and Remediation Efficacy at F-Basin Savannah River, SC – 15156

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Molins, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Arora, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Krishnan, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Denham, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Eddy-Dilek, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lipnikov, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gable, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-28

    Communication with stakeholders, regulatory agencies, and the public is an essential part of implementing different remediation and monitoring activities, and developing site closure strategies at contaminated sites. Modeling of contaminant plume evolution plays a critical role in estimating the benefit, cost, and risk of particular options. At the same time, effective visualization of monitoring data and modeling results are particularly important for conveying the significance of the results and observations. In this paper, we present the results of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project, including the discussion of the capabilities of newly developed ASCEM software package, along with its application to the F-Area Seepage Basins located in the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). ASCEM software includes state-of-the-art numerical methods for simulating complex flow and reactive transport, as well as various toolsets such as a graphical user interface (GUI), visualization, data management, uncertainty quantification, and parameter estimation. Using this software, we have developed an advanced visualization of tritium plume migration coupled with a data management system, and simulated a three-dimensional model of flow and plume evolution on a high-performance computing platform. We evaluated the effect of engineered flow barriers on a nonreactive tritium plume, through advanced plume visualization and modeling of tritium plume migration. In addition, we developed a geochemical reaction network to describe complex geochemical processes at the site, and evaluated the impact of coupled hydrological and geochemical heterogeneity. These results are expected to support SRS’s monitoring activities and operational decisions.

  3. HuCNS-SC Human NSCs Fail to Differentiate, Form Ectopic Clusters, and Provide No Cognitive Benefits in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Marsh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs can improve cognition in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, AD is a protracted disorder, and prior studies have examined only short-term effects. We therefore used an immune-deficient model of AD (Rag-5xfAD mice to examine long-term transplantation of human NSCs (StemCells Inc.; HuCNS-SCs. Five months after transplantation, HuCNS-SCs had engrafted and migrated throughout the hippocampus and exhibited no differences in survival or migration in response to β-amyloid pathology. Despite robust engraftment, HuCNS-SCs failed to terminally differentiate and over a quarter of the animals exhibited ectopic human cell clusters within the lateral ventricle. Unlike prior short-term experiments with research-grade HuCNS-SCs, we also found no evidence of improved cognition, no changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and no increase in synaptic density. These data, while disappointing, reinforce the notion that individual human NSC lines need to be carefully assessed for efficacy and safety in appropriate long-term models.

  4. Final Technical Report for "Ice nuclei relation to aerosol properties: Data analysis and model parameterization for IN in mixed-phase clouds" (DOE/SC00002354)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenni, Anthony [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kreidenweis, Sonia M. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2012-09-28

    Clouds play an important role in weather and climate. In addition to their key role in the hydrologic cycle, clouds scatter incoming solar radiation and trap infrared radiation from the surface and lower atmosphere. Despite their importance, feedbacks involving clouds remain as one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate models. To better simulate cloud processes requires better characterization of cloud microphysical processes, which can affect the spatial extent, optical depth and lifetime of clouds. To this end, we developed a new parameterization to be used in numerical models that describes the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentrations active to form ice crystals in mixed-phase (water droplets and ice crystals co-existing) cloud conditions as these depend on existing aerosol properties and temperature. The parameterization is based on data collected using the Colorado State University continuous flow diffusion chamber in aircraft and ground-based campaigns over a 14-year period, including data from the DOE-supported Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The resulting relationship is shown to more accurately represent the variability of ice nuclei distributions in the atmosphere compared to currently used parameterizations based on temperature alone. When implemented in one global climate model, the new parameterization predicted more realistic annually averaged cloud water and ice distributions, and cloud radiative properties, especially for sensitive higher latitude mixed-phase cloud regions. As a test of the new global IN scheme, it was compared to independent data collected during the 2008 DOE-sponsored Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). Good agreement with this new data set suggests the broad applicability of the new scheme for describing general (non-chemically specific) aerosol influences on IN number concentrations feeding mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds. Finally, the parameterization was implemented into a regional

  5. Intercellular skin barrier lipid composition and organization in Netherton syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Janssens, Michelle; Boiten, Walter A; van Drongelen, Vincent; Furio, Laetitia; Vreeken, Rob J; Hovnanian, Alain; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-05-01

    Netherton syndrome (NTS) is a rare genetic skin disease caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 gene, which encodes the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor. NTS patients have profoundly impaired skin barrier function. As stratum corneum (SC) lipids have a crucial role in the skin barrier function, we investigated the SC lipid composition and organization in NTS patients. We studied the SC lipid composition by means of mass spectrometry, and the lipid organization was examined by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Decreased free fatty acid (FFA) chain length and increased levels of monounsaturated FFAs were observed in the SC of NTS patients compared with controls. Furthermore, the level of short-chain ceramides (CERs) was enhanced in NTS patients and a strong reduction in long-chain CER levels was seen in several patients. The changes in lipid composition modified the lipid organization leading to an increased disordering of the lipids compared with the controls. In addition, in a subgroup of patients the organization of the lipid layers changed dramatically. The altered FFA and CER profiles in NTS patients corresponded to changes in the expression of enzymes involved in SC lipid processing. The observed changes in lipid composition, lipid organization, and enzyme expression are likely to contribute to the barrier dysfunction in NTS.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  7. RNA-Seq transcriptomic analysis with Bag2D software identifies key pathways enhancing lipid yield in a high lipid-producing mutant of the non-model green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lina; Tan, Tin Wee; Ng, Yi-Kai; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Shen, Hui; Lin, Huixin; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2015-01-01

    For many years, increasing demands for fossil fuels have met with limited supply. As a potential substitute and renewable source of biofuel feedstock, microalgae have received significant attention. However, few of the current algal species produce high lipid yields to be commercially viable. To discover more high yielding strains, next-generation sequencing technology is used to elucidate lipid synthetic pathways and energy metabolism involved in lipid yield. When subjected to manipulation by genetic and metabolic engineering, enhancement of such pathways may further enhance lipid yield. In this study, transcriptome profiling of a random insertional mutant with enhanced lipid production generated from a non-model marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta is presented. D9 mutant has a lipid yield that is 2- to 4-fold higher than that of wild type. Using novel Bag2D-workflow scripts developed and reported here, the non-redundant transcripts from de novo assembly were annotated based on the best hits in five model microalgae, namely Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Volvox carteri, Chlorella variabilis NC64A and a high plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. The assembled contigs (~181 Mb) includes 481,381 contigs, covering 10,185 genes. Pathway analysis showed that a pathway from inositol phosphate metabolism to fatty acid biosynthesis is the most significantly correlated with higher lipid yield in this mutant. Herein, we described a pipeline to analyze RNA-Seq data without pre-existing transcriptomic information. The draft transcriptome of D. tertiolecta was constructed and annotated, which offered useful information for characterizing high lipid-producing mutants. D. tertiolecta mutant was generated with an enhanced photosynthetic efficiency and lipid production. RNA-Seq data of the mutant and wild type were compared, providing biological insights into the expression patterns of contigs associated with energy

  8. Delivery of kinesin spindle protein targeting siRNA in solid lipid nanoparticles to cellular models of tumor vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Bo; Campbell, Robert B., E-mail: robert.campbell@mcphs.edu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • siRNA-lipid nanoparticles are solid particles not lipid bilayers with aqueous core. • High, but not low, PEG content can prevent nanoparticle encapsulation of siRNA. • PEG reduces cellular toxicity of cationic nanoparticles in vitro. • PEG reduces zeta potential while improving gene silencing of siRNA nanoparticles. • Kinesin spindle protein can be an effective target for tumor vascular targeting. - Abstract: The ideal siRNA delivery system should selectively deliver the construct to the target cell, avoid enzymatic degradation, and evade uptake by phagocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the importance of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on lipid-based carrier systems for encapsulating, and delivering, siRNA to tumor vessels using cellular models. Lipid nanoparticles containing different percentage of PEG were evaluated based on their physical chemical properties, density compared to water, siRNA encapsulation, toxicity, targeting efficiency and gene silencing in vitro. siRNA can be efficiently loaded into lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) when DOTAP is included in the formulation mixture. However, the total amount encapsulated decreased with increase in PEG content. In the presence of siRNA, the final formulations contained a mixed population of particles based on density. The major population which contains the majority of siRNA exhibited a density of 4% glucose, and the minor fraction associated with a decreased amount of siRNA had a density less than PBS. The inclusion of 10 mol% PEG resulted in a greater amount of siRNA associated with the minor fraction. Finally, when kinesin spindle protein (KSP) siRNA was encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles containing a modest amount of PEG, the proliferation of endothelial cells was inhibited due to the efficient knock down of KSP mRNA. The presence of siRNA resulted in the formation of solid lipid nanoparticles when prepared using the thin film and hydration method. LNPs with a relatively modest amount of

  9. Enhancement of lipid productivity in oleaginous Colletotrichum fungus through genetic transformation using the yeast CtDGAT2b gene under model-optimized growth condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabuddha Dey

    Full Text Available Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization.

  10. Enhancement of lipid productivity in oleaginous Colletotrichum fungus through genetic transformation using the yeast CtDGAT2b gene under model-optimized growth condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Prabuddha; Mall, Nikunj; Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Chakraborty, Monami; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2014-01-01

    Oleaginous fungi are of special interest among microorganisms for the production of lipid feedstocks as they can be cultured on a variety of substrates, particularly waste lingocellulosic materials, and few fungal strains are reported to accumulate inherently higher neutral lipid than bacteria or microalgae. Previously, we have characterized an endophytic filamentous fungus Colletotrichum sp. DM06 that can produce total lipid ranging from 34% to 49% of its dry cell weight (DCW) upon growing with various carbon sources and nutrient-stress conditions. In the present study, we report on the genetic transformation of this fungal strain with the CtDGAT2b gene, which encodes for a catalytically efficient isozyme of type-2 diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) from oleaginous yeast Candida troplicalis SY005. Besides the increase in size of lipid bodies, total lipid titer by the transformed Colletotrichum (lipid content ∼73% DCW) was found to be ∼1.7-fold more than the wild type (lipid content ∼38% DCW) due to functional activity of the CtDGAT2b transgene when grown under standard condition of growth without imposition of any nutrient-stress. Analysis of lipid fractionation revealed that the neutral lipid titer in transformants increased up to 1.8-, 1.6- and 1.5-fold compared to the wild type when grown under standard, nitrogen stress and phosphorus stress conditions, respectively. Lipid titer of transformed cells was further increased to 1.7-fold following model-based optimization of culture conditions. Taken together, ∼2.9-fold higher lipid titer was achieved in Colletotrichum fungus due to overexpression of a rate-limiting crucial enzyme of lipid biosynthesis coupled with prediction-based bioprocess optimization.

  11. An antagonist of lipid A action in mammals has complex effects on lipid A induction of defence responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs, Gitte; Jensen, Tina Tandrup; Silipo, Alba;

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, the ubiquitous part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and their derivatives are recognised by plants to trigger or potentiate particular defence responses such as induction of genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. The molecular mechanisms of LPS...... perception that underpin these effects in plants are, however, unknown. Here, lipid A from Halomonas magadiensis, which is an antagonist of lipid A action in human cells, was used to investigate lipid A action in plants. Our findings offer an insight into the different structural requirements for direct...

  12. Atomistic simulations of anionic Au-144(SR)(60) nanoparticles interacting with asymmetric model lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observations indicate that the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid membranes varies according to the nanoparticle charge and the chemical nature of their protecting side groups. We report atomistic simulations of an anionic Au nanoparticle (AuNP-) interacting with membranes...... clearly show that AuNP- attaches to the extracellular membrane surface within a few tens of nanoseconds, while it avoids contact with the membrane on the cytosolic side. This behavior stems from several factors. In essence, when the nanoparticle interacts with lipids in the extracellular compartment......, it forms relatively weak contacts with the zwitterionic head groups (in particular choline) of the phosphatidylcholine lipids. Consequently, AuNP- does not immerse deeply in the leaflet, enabling, e.g., lateral diffusion of the nanoparticle along the surface. On the cytosolic side, AuNP- remains...

  13. Self-assembly of lamellar lipid-DNA complexes simulated by explicit solvent counterion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lianghui; Cao, Jun; Fang, Weihai

    2010-06-03

    The dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit solvent and counterions are used to mimic the self-assembly of lamellar cationic lipid-DNA (CL-DNA)complexes. We found that the formation of the complexes is associated with the releasing of 70% DNA counterions and 90% lipid counterions. The trapped DNA and CL charges together with their counterions inside the complex still keep the interior neutral, which stabilized the structure. Simulations in constant pressure ensemble following the self-assembly show that the DNA interaxial spacing as a function of the inversed CL concentrations 1/phi(c) is linear at low phi(c) and nonlinear at high phi(c). The attraction between the DNA and the CLs as well as the repulsion between the DNA strands impose stretching stress on the membrane so that the averaged area per lipid is dependent on the CL concentration, which in turn determines the behavior of the DNA spacing.

  14. SC-FDMA for mobile communications

    CERN Document Server

    Abd El-Samie, Fathi E

    2013-01-01

    SC-FDMA for Mobile Communications examines Single-Carrier Frequency Division Multiple Access (SC-FDMA). Explaining this rapidly evolving system for mobile communications, it describes its advantages and limitations and outlines possible solutions for addressing its current limitations. The book explores the emerging trend of cooperative communication with SC-FDMA and how it can improve the physical layer security. It considers the design of distributed coding schemes and protocols for wireless relay networks where users cooperate to send their data to the destination. Supplying you with the re

  15. Effect of ceramide acyl chain length on skin permeability and thermotropic phase behavior of model stratum corneum lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janůšová, Barbora; Zbytovská, Jarmila; Lorenc, Petr; Vavrysová, Helena; Palát, Karel; Hrabálek, Alexandr; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2011-03-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides play an essential role in the barrier properties of skin. However, their structure-activity relationships are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of acyl chain length in the non-hydroxy acyl sphingosine type (NS) ceramides on the skin permeability and their thermotropic phase behavior. Neither the long- to medium-chain ceramides (8-24 C) nor free sphingosine produced any changes of the skin barrier function. In contrast, the short-chain ceramides decreased skin electrical impedance and increased skin permeability for two marker drugs, theophylline and indomethacin, with maxima in the 4-6C acyl ceramides. The thermotropic phase behavior of pure ceramides and model stratum corneum lipid membranes composed of ceramide/lignoceric acid/cholesterol/cholesterol sulfate was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. Differences in thermotropic phase behavior of these lipids were found: those ceramides that had the greatest impact on the skin barrier properties displayed the lowest phase transitions and formed the least dense model stratum corneum lipid membranes at 32°C. In conclusion, the long hydrophobic chains in the NS-type ceramides are essential for maintaining the skin barrier function. However, this ability is not shared by their short-chain counterparts despite their having the same polar head structure and hydrogen bonding ability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Towards better modelling of drug-loading in solid lipid nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics, docking experiments and Gaussian Processes machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathout, Rania M; Metwally, Abdelkader A

    2016-11-01

    This study represents one of the series applying computer-oriented processes and tools in digging for information, analysing data and finally extracting correlations and meaningful outcomes. In this context, binding energies could be used to model and predict the mass of loaded drugs in solid lipid nanoparticles after molecular docking of literature-gathered drugs using MOE® software package on molecularly simulated tripalmitin matrices using GROMACS®. Consequently, Gaussian processes as a supervised machine learning artificial intelligence technique were used to correlate the drugs' descriptors (e.g. M.W., xLogP, TPSA and fragment complexity) with their molecular docking binding energies. Lower percentage bias was obtained compared to previous studies which allows the accurate estimation of the loaded mass of any drug in the investigated solid lipid nanoparticles by just projecting its chemical structure to its main features (descriptors). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. z206sc_video_observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents video observations from cruise Z206SC for the Santa Barbara Channel region and beyond in southern California. The vector data file is...

  18. z107sc_video_observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents video observations from cruise Z107SC for the Santa Barbara Channel region and beyond in southern California. The vector data file is...

  19. z206sc_video_observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents video observations from cruise Z206SC for the Santa Barbara Channel region and beyond in southern California. The vector data file is...

  20. z107sc_video_observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents video observations from cruise Z107SC for the Santa Barbara Channel region and beyond in southern California. The vector data file is...

  1. Bandwidth challenge teams at SC2003 conference

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Results from the fourth annual High-Performance Bandwidth Challenge, held in conjunction with SC2003, the international conference on high-performance computing and networking which occurred last week in Phoenix, AZ (1 page).

  2. Recrystallization of Al-Sc alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drits, M.E.; Toropova, L.S.; Bykov, Yu.G.; Ber, L.B.

    Scandium effect on the temperature range of aluminium recrystallization was investigated. Al-Sc alloys were studied under cold rolled and hot pressed conditions. It is found that the temperature range of Al-Sc alloy recrystallization depends on ScAl/sub 3/ particle dispersion during recrystallization heats. During heating in quenched alloys at 200-300 deg C decomposition occurs which prevents recrystallization, In the alloys with scandium contents less 0.2% decomposition and recrystallization processes pass simultaneously. In quenched alloys with scandium contents over 0.2% and in aged alloys the initiation and subsequent development of recrystallization are determined by the processes of coalescence and solution of ScAl/sub 3/ phase particles.

  3. Nutritional Systems Biology of Fat : integration and modeling of transcriptomics datasets related to lipid homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohid Ullah, M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids, in the form of triglycerides, are the main constituent of the class of dietary lipids. They not only serve as a source of energy but can also act as potent regulators of gene transcription. It is well accepted that an energy rich diet characterized by high intakes of dietary fat is link

  4. Influence of lipids in the generation of phenylacetaldehyde in wort-related model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Emerenciana; De Schutter, David P; Zamora, Rosario; Derdelinckx, Guy; Delvaux, Freddy R; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2008-05-14

    The effect of lipids on the formation of the Strecker aldehyde phenylacetaldehyde during wort boiling was studied to determine the role that small changes in the lipid content of the wort have in the production of significant flavor compounds in beer. Wort was treated with 0-2.77 mmol per liter of glucose, linoleic acid, or 2,4-decadienal and heated at 60-98 degrees C for 1 h. After this time, the amount of the Strecker aldehyde phenylacetaldehyde increased in the samples treated with linoleic acid or decadienal but not in the samples treated with glucose. Thus, the amount of phenylacetaldehyde produced in the presence of linoleic acid was 1.1-2.5 times the amount of the Strecker aldehyde produced in the control wort, and this amount increased to 3.6-4.6 times when decadienal was employed. The higher reactivity of decadienal than linoleic acid for this reaction decreased with temperature and was related to the oxidation of linoleic acid that occurred to a higher extent at higher temperatures. The above results suggest that lipids can contribute to the formation of Strecker aldehydes during wort boiling and that changes in the lipid content of the wort will produce significant changes in the formation of Strecker aldehydes in addition to other well-known consequences in beer quality and yeast metabolism. On the other hand, because of the high glucose content in wort, small changes in its content are not expected to affect the amount of Strecker aldehydes produced.

  5. Investigation of the interaction between modified ISCOMs and stratum corneum lipid model systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henriette Baun; Arboe-Andersen, Helle M.; Rozlosnik, Noemi;

    2010-01-01

    Transfer (FRET), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) it was shown that application of nanoparticles to the SCL bilayers results in lipid disturbance. Investigation of this interaction by means of Isothermal...

  6. A New Look at Genetic and Environmental Architecture on Lipids Using Non-Normal Structural Equation Modeling in Male Twins: The NHLBI Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; Ozaki, Koken; Reed, Terry; Krasnow, Ruth E; Dai, Jun

    2017-07-01

    This study examined genetic and environmental influences on the lipid concentrations of 1028 male twins using the novel univariate non-normal structural equation modeling (nnSEM) ADCE and ACE models. In the best fitting nnSEM ADCE model that was also better than the nnSEM ACE model, additive genetic factors (A) explained 4%, dominant genetic factors (D) explained 17%, and common (C) and unique (E) environmental factors explained 47% and 33% of the total variance of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The percentage of variation explained for other lipids was 0% (A), 30% (D), 34% (C) and 37% (E) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C); 30, 0, 31 and 39% for total cholesterol; and 0, 31, 12 and 57% for triglycerides. It was concluded that additive and dominant genetic factors simultaneously affected HDL-C concentrations but not other lipids. Common and unique environmental factors influenced concentrations of all lipids.

  7. Improvement and modeling of culture parameters to enhance biomass and lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus grown on acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béligon, Vanessa; Poughon, Laurent; Christophe, Gwendoline; Lebert, André; Larroche, Christian; Fontanille, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The improvement of culture parameters for lipid production from acetate as carbon source was investigated using the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus. A new pH regulation system dispensing acetate was developed for fed-batch culture and allowed obtaining nearly 80 g/L biomass within 60 h with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h(-1). A biological model was developed from experimental data. The influence of three C/N ratios of 300, 500 and 900 were tested during a multi-phases process on lipid accumulation. The C/N ratio of 300 was reported to be the most suitable for lipid storage. No significant increase of lipids content was obtained with higher value. A maximal content of 60% DCW of lipid was obtained. The determination of fatty acids profiles of the microbial oils has confirmed that the valorization of acetate by microbial oils production was a promising perspective.

  8. Combined LC/MS-platform for analysis of all major stratum corneum lipids, and the profiling of skin substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Boiten, Walter A; Hankemeier, Thomas; Rissmann, Robert; Bouwstra, Joke A; Vreeken, Rob J

    2014-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs), cholesterol, and free fatty acids (FFAs) are the main lipid classes in human stratum corneum (SC, outermost skin layer), but no studies report on the detailed analysis of these classes in a single platform. The primary aims of this study were to 1) develop an LC/MS method for (semi-)quantitative analysis of all main lipid classes present in human SC; and 2) use this method to study in detail the lipid profiles of human skin substitutes and compare them to human SC lipids. By applying two injections of 10μl, the developed method detects all major SC lipids using RPLC and negative ion mode APCI-MS for detection of FFAs, and NPLC using positive ion mode APCI-MS to analyze CERs and cholesterol. Validation showed this lipid platform to be robust, reproducible, sensitive, and fast. The method was successfully applied on ex vivo human SC, human SC obtained from tape strips and human skin substitutes (porcine SC and human skin equivalents). In conjunction with FFA profiles, clear differences in CER profiles were observed between these different SC sources. Human skin equivalents more closely mimic the lipid composition of human stratum corneum than porcine skin does, although noticeable differences are still present. These differences gave biologically relevant information on some of the enzymes that are probably involved in SC lipid processing. For future research, this provides an excellent method for (semi-)quantitative, 'high-throughput' profiling of SC lipids and can be used to advance the understanding of skin lipids and the biological processes involved. © 2013.

  9. Major Alterations of Phosphatidylcholine and Lysophosphotidylcholine Lipids in the Substantia Nigra Using an Early Stage Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Farmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal pathway, where patients do not manifest motor symptoms until >50% of neurons are lost. Thus, it is of great importance to determine early neuronal changes that may contribute to disease progression. Recent attention has focused on lipids and their role in pro- and anti-apoptotic processes. However, information regarding the lipid alterations in animal models of PD is lacking. In this study, we utilized high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and novel HPLC solvent methodology to profile phosphatidylcholines and sphingolipids within the substantia nigra. The ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta was collected from rats 21 days after an infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, or vehicle into the anterior dorsal striatum. We identified 115 lipid species from their mass/charge ratio using the LMAPS Lipid MS Predict Database. Of these, 19 lipid species (from phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphotidylcholine lipid classes were significantly altered by 6-OHDA, with most being down-regulated. The two lipid species that were up-regulated were LPC (16:0 and LPC (18:1, which are important for neuroinflammatory signalling. These findings provide a first step in the characterization of lipid changes in early stages of PD-like pathology and could provide novel targets for early interventions in PD.

  10. Sc3N and Sc2C2 encapsulated B40: Smarter than its carbon analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha V.; Roy, Debesh R.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed comparative investigation on the recently synthesised B40 and C40 along with their metal nitride (Sc3N)and carbide (Sc2C2) encapsulated endohedral fullerenes, is performed under density functional theory for the first time. The structures, electronic, thermodynamic and magnetic properties of all the considered compounds are explored in detail. The present study identifies borospherene (B40) and its encapsulated nitride (Sc3N@B40) and carbide (Sc2C2@B40) endohedral borofullerenes as the better candidates for future novel nano-applications compared to their carbon bucky ball analogues.

  11. Size-dependent, stochastic nature of lipid exchange between nano-vesicles and model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaei, Seyed R.; Gillissen, Jurriaan J. J.; Vafaei, Setareh; Groves, Jay T.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-07-01

    The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed in this work may enable measuring of the probability of stalk formation in a controlled manner, which is of fundamental importance in membrane biology, offering a new tool to understand nanoscale phenomena in the context of biological sciences.The interaction of nanoscale lipid vesicles with cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the design and development of vesicular drug delivery systems. Here, we introduce a novel approach to study vesicle-membrane interactions whereby we are able to probe the influence of nanoscale membrane properties on the dynamic adsorption, exchange, and detachment of vesicles. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we monitor these processes in real-time upon the electrostatically tuned attachment of individual, sub-100 nm vesicles to a supported lipid bilayer. The observed exponential vesicle detachment rate depends strongly on the vesicle size, but not on the vesicle charge, which suggests that lipid exchange occurs during a single stochastic event, which is consistent with membrane stalk formation. The fluorescence microscopy assay developed

  12. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-07

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  13. 3,5-Diiodo-L-Thyronine Modifies the Lipid Droplet Composition in a Model of Hepatosteatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grasselli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fatty acids are the main energy stores and the major membrane components of the cells. In the hepatocyte, fatty acids are esterified to triacylglycerols (TAGs and stored in lipid droplets (LDs. The lipid lowering action of 3,5-diiodo-L-thyronine (T2 on an in vitro model of hepatosteatosis was investigated in terms of fatty acid and protein content of LDs, lipid oxidation and secretion. Methods: FaO cells were exposed to oleate/palmitate, then treated with T2. Results: T2 reduced number and size of LDs, and modified their acyl composition by decreasing the content of saturated (SFA vs monounsaturated (MUFA fatty acids thus reversing the SFA/MUFA ratio. The expression of the LD-associated proteins adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP, oxidative tissue-enriched PAT protein (OXPAT, and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL was increased in ‘steatotic' cells and further up-regulated by T2. Moreover, T2 stimulated the mitochondrial oxidation by up-regulating carnitine-palmitoyl-transferase (CPT1, uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 and very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (VLCAD. Conclusions: T2 leads to mobilization of TAGs from LDs and stimulates mitochondrial oxidative metabolism of fatty acids, in particular of SFAs, and thus enriches of MUFAs the LDs. This action may protect the hepatocyte from excess of SFAs that are more toxic than MUFAs.

  14. Atopic eczema : the role of stratum corneum lipids in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The skin barrier function strongly relies on the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of dead corneocytes embedded in a highly organized extracellular lipid matrix. The lipids are thought to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. This lipid matrix consists

  15. Atopic eczema : the role of stratum corneum lipids in the skin barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The skin barrier function strongly relies on the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which consists of dead corneocytes embedded in a highly organized extracellular lipid matrix. The lipids are thought to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. This lipid matrix consists

  16. Continuous flow atomic force microscopy imaging reveals fluidity and time-dependent interactions of antimicrobial dendrimer with model lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Zielińska, Paulina; Wacklin, Hanna Pauliina; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Cárdenas, Marité

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, an amphiphilic peptide dendrimer with potential applications against multi-resistant bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus was synthesized and studied on model cell membranes. The combination of quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy imaging during continuous flow allowed for in situ monitoring of the very initial interaction processes and membrane transformations on longer time scales. We used three different membrane compositions of low and high melting temperature phospholipids to vary the membrane properties from a single fluid phase to a pure gel phase, while crossing the phase coexistence boundaries at room temperature. The interaction mechanism of the dendrimer was found to be time-dependent and to vary remarkably with the fluidity and coexistence of liquid-solid phases in the membrane. Spherical micelle-like dendrimer-lipid aggregates were formed in the fluid-phase bilayer and led to partial solubilization of the membrane, while in gel-phase membranes, the dendrimers caused areas of local depressions followed by redeposition of flexible lipid patches. Domain coexistence led to a sequence of events initiated by the formation of a ribbon-like network and followed by membrane solubilization via spherical aggregates from the edges of bilayer patches. Our results show that the dendrimer molecules were able to destroy the membrane integrity through different mechanisms depending on the lipid phase and morphology and shed light on their antimicrobial activity. These findings could have an impact on the efficacy of the dendrimers since lipid membranes in certain bacteria have transition temperatures very close to the host body temperature.

  17. Disposition of Ceramide in Model Lipid Membranes Determined by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, D.; Gooris, G.S.; Barlow, D.J.; Lawrence, M.J.; van Mechelen, J.B.; Demé, B.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The lipid matrix present in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipids are organized into two lamellar phases. To gain more insight into the molecular organization of one of these lamellar phases, we performed neutron diffraction studies. In the diffraction pattern, five diffraction orders were observed attributed to a lamellar phase with a repeat distance of 5.4 nm. Using contrast variation, the scattering length density profile could be calculated showing a typical bilayer arrangement. To obtain information on the arrangement of ceramides in the unit cell, a mixture that included a partly deuterated ceramide was also examined. The scattering length density profile of the 5.4-nm phase containing this deuterated ceramide demonstrated a symmetric arrangement of the ceramides with interdigitating acyl chains in the center of the unit cell. PMID:21402030

  18. Disposition of ceramide in model lipid membranes determined by neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, D; Gooris, G S; Barlow, D J; Lawrence, M J; van Mechelen, J B; Demé, B; Bouwstra, J A

    2011-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, plays a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipids are organized into two lamellar phases. To gain more insight into the molecular organization of one of these lamellar phases, we performed neutron diffraction studies. In the diffraction pattern, five diffraction orders were observed attributed to a lamellar phase with a repeat distance of 5.4 nm. Using contrast variation, the scattering length density profile could be calculated showing a typical bilayer arrangement. To obtain information on the arrangement of ceramides in the unit cell, a mixture that included a partly deuterated ceramide was also examined. The scattering length density profile of the 5.4-nm phase containing this deuterated ceramide demonstrated a symmetric arrangement of the ceramides with interdigitating acyl chains in the center of the unit cell.

  19. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, a...

  20. Molecular modeling of lipid probes and their influence on the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Roland

    2016-10-01

    In this review a number of Molecular Dynamics simulation studies are discussed which focus on the understanding of the behavior of lipid probes in biomembranes. Experiments often use specialized probe moieties or molecules to report on the behavior of a membrane and try to gain information on the membrane as a whole from the probe lipids as these probes are the only things an experiment sees. Probes can be used to make NMR, EPR and fluorescence accessible to the membrane and use fluorescent or spin-active moieties for this purpose. Clearly membranes with and without probes are not identical which makes it worthwhile to elucidate the differences between them with detailed atomistic simulations. In almost all cases these differences are confined to the local neighborhood of the probe molecules which are sparsely used and generally present as single molecules. In general, the behavior of the bulk membrane lipids can be qualitatively understood from the probes but in most cases their properties cannot be directly quantitatively deduced from the probe behavior. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  1. A new PAMPA model using an in-house brain lipid extract for screening the blood-brain barrier permeability of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Falcão, Amílcar

    2016-03-30

    The determination of the permeability of drug candidates across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a fundamental step during drug discovery programs. The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high throughput screening tool applied to evaluate the passive permeability and adapted to predict BBB penetration. Herein, a new PAMPA model was developed using an in-house brain lipid extract capable of discriminating BBB permeable from non-permeable compounds. The apparent permeability (Papp) of 18 reference molecules and 10 test compounds was assessed and compared with phosphatidylcholine and commercial porcine polar brain lipid (PBL). The physicochemical selectivity of the in-house brain lipid extract was demonstrated by correlating Papp values with physicochemical properties and its predictive capacity estimated by establishing in vitro-in vivo correlations. The strong correlations achieved between 2% (w/v) in-house lipid extract and PBL for reference (r(2)=0.77) and test compounds (r(2)=0.94) support an equivalent discriminatory capacity and validate the presented model. Moreover, PAMPA studies performed with PBL and in-house lipid extract exhibited a higher correlation with the in vivo parameter logBB (r(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.72, respectively) than phosphatidylcholine (r(2)=0.51). Overall, the applied lipid extraction process was reproducible, economical and provided lipid extracts that can be used to reliably assess BBB permeation.

  2. Unraveling the impact of hydroxylation on interactions of bile acid cationic lipids with model membranes by in-depth calorimetry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manish; Bajaj, Avinash

    2014-09-28

    We used eight bile acid cationic lipids differing in the number of hydroxyl groups and performed in-depth differential scanning calorimetry studies on model membranes doped with different percentages of these cationic bile acids. These studies revealed that the number and positioning of free hydroxyl groups on bile acids modulate the phase transition and co-operativity of membranes. Lithocholic acid based cationic lipids having no free hydroxyl groups gel well with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes. Chenodeoxycholic acid lipids having one free hydroxyl group at the 7'-carbon position disrupt the membranes and lower their co-operativity. Deoxycholic acid and cholic acid based cationic lipids have free hydroxyl groups at the 12'-carbon position, and at 7'- and 12'-carbon positions respectively. Doping of these lipids at high concentrations increases the co-operativity of membranes suggesting that these lipids might induce self-assembly in DPPC membranes. These different modes of interactions between cationic lipids and model membranes would help in future for exploring their use in DNA/drug delivery.

  3. Rationalizing the selection of oral lipid based drug delivery systems by an in vitro dynamic lipolysis model for improved oral bioavailability of poorly water soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Hoffman, Amnon

    2008-07-02

    As a consequence of modern drug discovery techniques, there has been a consistent increase in the number of new pharmacologically active lipophilic compounds that are poorly water soluble. A great challenge facing the pharmaceutical scientist is making these molecules into orally administered medications with sufficient bioavailability. One of the most popular approaches to improve the oral bioavailability of these molecules is the utilization of a lipid based drug delivery system. Unfortunately, current development strategies in the area of lipid based delivery systems are mostly empirical. Hence, there is a need for a simplified in vitro method to guide the selection of a suitable lipidic vehicle composition and to rationalize the delivery system design. To address this need, a dynamic in vitro lipolysis model, which provides a very good simulation of the in vivo lipid digestion process, has been developed over the past few years. This model has been extensively used for in vitro assessment of different lipid based delivery systems, leading to enhanced understanding of the suitability of different lipids and surfactants as a delivery system for a given poorly water soluble drug candidate. A key goal in the development of the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model has been correlating the in vitro data of various drug-lipidic delivery system combinations to the resultant in vivo drug profile. In this paper, we discuss and review the need for this model, its underlying theory, practice and limitations, and the available data accumulated in the literature. Overall, the dynamic in vitro lipolysis model seems to provide highly useful initial guidelines in the development process of oral lipid based drug delivery systems for poorly water soluble drugs, and it predicts phenomena that occur in the pre-enterocyte stages of the intestinal absorption cascade.

  4. Fabrication, appraisal, and transdermal permeation of sildenafil citrate-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers versus solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Yosra S R; El-Massik, Magda A; Abdallah, Ossama Y

    2011-01-01

    Although sildenafil citrate (SC) is used extensively for erectile dysfunction, oral delivery of SC encounters many obstacles. Furthermore, the physicochemical characteristics of this amphoteric drug are challenging for delivery system formulation and transdermal permeation. This article concerns the assessment of the potential of nanomedicine for improving SC delivery and transdermal permeation. SC-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were fabricated using a modified high-shear homogenization technique. Nanoparticle optimization steps included particle size analysis, entrapment efficiency (EE) determination, freeze-drying and reconstitution, differential scanning calorimetry, in vitro release, stability study and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Transdermal permeation of the nanocarriers compared with SC suspension across human skin was assessed using a modified Franz diffusion cell assembly. Results revealed that SLNs and NLCs could be optimized in the nanometric range (180 and 100 nm, respectively) with excellent EE (96.7% and 97.5%, respectively). Nanoparticles have significantly enhanced in vitro release and transdermal permeation of SC compared with its suspensions. Furthermore, transdermal permeation of SC exhibited higher initial release from both SLN and NLC formulations followed by controlled release, with promising implications for faster onset and longer drug duration. Nanomedicines prepared exhibited excellent physical stability for the study period. Solid nanoparticles optimized in this study successfully improved SC characteristics, paving the way for an efficient topical Viagra® product.

  5. Sc20C60: a volleyballene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Hong-Man; Liu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    An exceptionally stable hollow cage containing 20 scandium atoms and 60 carbon atoms has been identified. This Sc20C60 molecular cluster has a Th point group symmetry and a volleyball-like shape that we refer to below as ``Volleyballene''. Electronic structure analysis shows that the formation of delocalized π bonds between Sc atoms and the neighboring pentagonal rings made of carbon atoms is crucial for stabilizing the cage structure. A relatively large HOMO-LUMO gap (~1.4 eV) was found. The results of vibrational frequency analysis and molecular dynamics simulations both demonstrate that this Volleyballene molecule is exceptionally stable.An exceptionally stable hollow cage containing 20 scandium atoms and 60 carbon atoms has been identified. This Sc20C60 molecular cluster has a Th point group symmetry and a volleyball-like shape that we refer to below as ``Volleyballene''. Electronic structure analysis shows that the formation of delocalized π bonds between Sc atoms and the neighboring pentagonal rings made of carbon atoms is crucial for stabilizing the cage structure. A relatively large HOMO-LUMO gap (~1.4 eV) was found. The results of vibrational frequency analysis and molecular dynamics simulations both demonstrate that this Volleyballene molecule is exceptionally stable. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sc20C60: a Volleyballene_SI. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07784b

  6. Therapeutic efficiency of synthokine SC-55494, a human IL-3 receptor agonist, in a nonhuman primate model of HIGH dose, sublethal, radiation-induced marrow aplasia; Efficacite therapeutique d`un variant d`interleukine-3 chez des macaques irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herodin, F.; Farese, A.; Grab, L.; McKearn, J.P.; Mestries, J.C.; McVittie, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    The synthetic cytokine (Synthokine) SC-55494 is a high affinity IL-3 receptor ligand. The therapeutic administration of Synthokine to total body irradiated (TBI) monkeys (7 Gy gamma) from day 1 post TBI for 23 days, significantly enhanced platelet recovery and modulated aneutrophil nadir. (author). 6 refs.

  7. Co-digestion of municipal sewage sludge and solid waste: modelling of carbohydrate, lipid and protein content influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielfa, A; Cano, R; Pérez, A; Fdez-Polanco, M

    2015-03-01

    Solid wastes from industrial, commercial and community activities are of growing concern as the total volume of waste produced continues to increase. The knowledge of the specific composition and characteristics of the waste is an important tool in the correct development of the anaerobic digestion process. The problems derived from the anaerobic digestion of sole substrates with high lipid, carbohydrate or protein content lead to the co-digestion of these substrates with another disposed waste, such as sewage sludge. The kinetic of the anaerobic digestion is especially difficult to explain adequately, although some mathematical models are able to represent the main aspects of a biological system, thus improving understanding of the parameters involved in the process. The aim of this work is to evaluate the experimental biochemical methane potential on the co-digestion of sewage sludge with different solid wastes (grease; spent grain and cow manure) through the implementation of four kinetic models. The co-digestion of grease waste and mixed sludge obtained the best improvements from the sole substrates, with additional positive synergistic effects. The Gompertz model fits the experimental biochemical methane potential to an accuracy of 99%, showing a correlation between the percentage of lipid in the substrates and co-digestions and the period of lag phase.

  8. Diets enriched in trans-11 vaccenic acid alleviate ectopic lipid accumulation in a rat model of NAFLD and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacome-Sosa, M Miriam; Borthwick, Faye; Mangat, Rabban; Uwiera, Richard; Reaney, Martin J; Shen, Jianheng; Quiroga, Ariel D; Jacobs, René L; Lehner, Richard; Proctor, Spencer D; Nelson, Randal C

    2014-07-01

    Trans11-18:1 (vaccenic acid, VA) is one of the most predominant naturally occurring trans fats in our food chain and has recently been shown to exert hypolipidemic effects in animal models. In this study, we reveal new mechanism(s) by which VA can alter body fat distribution, energy utilization and dysfunctional lipid metabolism in an animal model of obesity displaying features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Obese JCR:LA-cp rats were assigned to a control diet that included dairy-derived fat or the control diet supplemented with 1% VA. VA reduced total body fat (-6%), stimulated adipose tissue redistribution [reduced mesenteric fat (-17%) while increasing inguinal fat mass (29%)] and decreased adipocyte size (-44%) versus control rats. VA supplementation also increased metabolic rate (7%) concomitantly with an increased preference for whole-body glucose utilization for oxidation and increased insulin sensitivity [lower HOMA-IR (-59%)]. Further, VA decreased nonalcoholic fatty liver disease activity scores (-34%) and reduced hepatic (-27%) and intestinal (-39%) triglyceride secretion relative to control diet, while exerting differential transcriptional regulation of SREBP1 and FAS amongst other key genes in the liver and the intestine. Adding VA to dairy fat alleviates features of MetS potentially by remodeling adipose tissue and attenuating ectopic lipid accumulation in a rat model of obesity and MetS. Increasing VA content in the diet (naturally or by fortification) may be a useful approach to maximize the health value of dairy-derived fats.

  9. AAZTA: an ideal chelating agent for the development of {sup 44}Sc PET imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Gabor; Szikra, Dezso; Trencsenyi, Gyoergy [Scanomed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); University of Debrecen, Medical Imaging Clinic (Hungary); Fekete, Aniko [University of Debrecen, Medical Imaging Clinic (Hungary); Garai, Ildiko [Scanomed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Giani, Arianna M.; Negri, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); Masciocchi, Norberto [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia e To.Sca.Lab, Universita degli Studi dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); Maiocchi, Alessandro; Uggeri, Fulvio [Bracco Imaging spa, Bracco Research Centre, Colleretto Giacosa (Italy); Toth, Imre [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary); Aime, Silvio [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Molecolari e Scienze della Salute, Centro di Imaging Molecolare e Preclinico, Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy); Giovenzana, Giovanni B. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); CAGE Chemicals srl, Novara (Italy); Baranyai, Zsolt [Bracco Imaging spa, Bracco Research Centre, Colleretto Giacosa (Italy); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-02-13

    Unprecedented fast and efficient complexation of Sc{sup III} was demonstrated with the chelating agent AAZTA (AAZTA=1,4-bis(carboxymethyl)-6-[bis(carboxymethyl)] amino-6-methylperhydro-1,4-d iazepine) under mild experimental conditions. The robustness of the {sup 44}Sc(AAZTA){sup -} chelate and conjugated biomolecules thereof is further shown by in vivo PET imaging in healthy and tumor mice models. The new results pave the way towards development of efficient Sc-based radiopharmaceuticals using the AAZTA chelator. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Amelioration of lipid profile and level of antioxidant activities by epigallocatechin-gallate in a rat model of atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuelian; Pan, Jianxing; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2014-12-01

    Improperly balanced, highly processed diets rich in calories, carbohydrates and fat are considered to contribute to oxidative stress induced hypercholesterolaemic atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to test whether the antioxidant component epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) may ameliorate the atherosclerotic effect of high fat diet in rats. A disease model for atherosclerosis was designed by formulating atherogenic diet and fed to Wistar rats for 30 days. The treatment trial was made by administration of EGCG (100 mg/kg) for six or 12 days. The lipid profile, antioxidant status and tissue morphometric analysis were performed. A significant increase in serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoprotein cholesterol fractions and cardiac risk ratio were observed in atherogenic diet fed rats than that of normal diet-fed rats. EGCG treated atherogenic diet fed rats resulted a reduction in total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fractions, and an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to untreated-atherogenic diet fed rats. A significant decrease in lipid peroxidation, increased mean levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants and enzymatic antioxidants was measured in EGCG administered rats, compared with those in untreated-disease model. Morphometric analysis and the activity of cardiac marker enzymes demonstrated that EGCG was effective in limiting atherogenic tissue damage in aortic layers, and ameliorated the lipid profile. This preliminary study suggests EGCG may be useful as a novel therapeutic component for treating atherosclerosis and thus warrants further detailed investigation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effects of Erxian decoction, a Chinese medicinal formulation, on serum lipid profile in a rat model of menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Stephen CW

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and risk of cardiovascular disease increase after menopause in correlation with the progression of abnormality in the serum lipid profile and the deprivation of estrogen. Erxian decoction (EXD, a Chinese medicinal formulation for treating menopausal syndrome, stimulates ovarian estrogen biosynthesis. This study investigates whether EXD improves the serum lipid profile in a menopausal rat model. Methods Twenty-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats were treated with EXD and its constituent fractions. Premarin was administered for comparison. After eight weeks of treatment, rats were sacrificed and the serum levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol were determined. The hepatic protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density-lipoprotein receptor were assessed with Western blot. Results The serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly lower in the EXD-treated group than in the constituent fractions of EXD or premarin groups. However, the serum levels of triglyceride and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol were not significantly different from the control groups. Results from Western blot suggest that EXD significantly down-regulated the protein level of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase and up-regulated low-density-lipoprotein receptor. Conclusion EXD improves serum lipid profile in a menopausal rat model through the suppression of the serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol, possibly through the down-regulation of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA and up-regulation of the low-density-lipoprotein receptor.

  12. Statistical analysis and modeling of pelletized cultivation of Mucor circinelloides for microbial lipid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chunjie; Wei, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2014-04-01

    Microbial oil accumulation via oleaginous fungi has some potential benefits because filamentous fungi can form pellets during cell growth and these pellets are easier to harvest from the culture broth than individual cells. This research studied the effect of various culture conditions on the pelletized cell growth of Mucor circinelloides and its lipid accumulation. The results showed that cell pelletization was positively correlated to biomass accumulation; however, pellet size was negatively correlated to the oil content of the fungal biomass, possibly due to the mass transfer barriers generated by the pellet structure. How to control the size of the pellet is the key to the success of the pelletized microbial oil accumulation process.

  13. Recrystallization and Morphology of Microstructure in Al-Sc Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun; Zhang Zonghua

    2007-01-01

    Minor addition of Sc to aluminum results in the rapid precipitation of homogeneously distributed Al3Sc dispersoids. The presence of Al3Sc dispersoids is more effective recrystallization inhibitors. Our work established the precipitation of homogeneously distributed Al3Sc dispersoids, which are coherent with the matrix, have the L12 structure. It was also established that the addition of Sc was effective in improving the recrystallization resistance.

  14. Radiolabeling of DOTATOC with the long-lived positron emitter {sup 44}Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruszynski, Marek; Majkowska-Pilip, Agnieszka [Centre of Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warszawa (Poland); Loktionova, Natalia S.; Eppard, Elisabeth [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Roesch, Frank, E-mail: frank.roesch@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The positron-emitting radionuclide {sup 44}Sc with a half-life of 3.97 h and a {beta}{sup +} branching of 94.3% is of potential interest for clinical PET. As so far it is available from a {sup 44}Ti/{sup 44}Sc generator in Mainz, where long-lived {sup 44}Ti decays to no-carrier-added (nca) {sup 44}Sc. The {sup 44}Sc is a trivalent metal cation and should be suitable for complexation with many well established bifunctional chelators conjugated to peptides or other molecular targeting vectors. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate the potential of {sup 44}Sc for labeling of DOTA-conjugated peptides. DOTA-D-Phe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide (DOTATOC) was used as a model molecule to study and optimize labeling procedure. Reaction parameters such as buffer conditions, concentration of peptide, pH range, reaction temperature and time were optimized. Addition of 21 nmol of DOTATOC to {sup 44}Sc in ammonium acetate buffer pH 4.0 provided labeling yields >98% within 25 min of heating in an oil-bath at 95 Degree-Sign C. This time can be reduced to 3 min only by applying microwave supported heating. {sup 44}Sc-DOTATOC was found to be stable in 0.9% NaCl, PBS pH 7.4, fetal calf and human serums, and also in the presence of competing metal cations (Fe{sup 3+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}), as well as other ligand competitors, like EDTA and DTPA, even after almost 25 h incubation at 37 Degree-Sign C. Present study shows that nca {sup 44}Sc forms stable complexes with the macrocyclic ligand DOTA and that {sup 44}Sc-DOTATOC and analog targeting vectors may be synthesized for further preclinical and clinical investigations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Labeling of somatostatin analouges with positron emitter {sup 44}Sc was tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DOTATOC was labeled with {sup 44}Sc isotope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimal conditions for {sup 44}Sc-DOTATOC synthesis were found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stability of {sup 44}Sc

  15. Norma Audio Revo SC-/PA-150

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Norma audio是意大利一间顶级HI-Fi音响器材生产商。这款IRevo SC-2/PA-150为正是公司旗下的一款高端型号产品。其中,Revo SC-2前置放大器的放大电路以低噪音、高速和宽频作为设计重点,能反映出音频信号中的每一个细节。

  16. Correlation of HIFs/PPAR signaling pathway activation degree and lipid metabolism in liver tissue of alcoholic fatty liver rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Guo; Ya-Min Li; Qing-Chun Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation of HIFs/PPAR signaling pathway activation degree and lipid metabolism in liver tissue of alcoholic fatty liver rat model.Methods:Adult SD rats were selected and alcoholic fatty liver rat models were established by alcohol administration and high-fat diet feeding. Liver tissue was collected and contents of HIF-1α, PPARγ and lipid metabolism-related enzymes were detected; serum was collected and contents of lipid metabolism indexes and liver cell damage indexes were detected.Results:(1) one week, two weeks, three weeks and four weeks after models were established, HIF-1αα in livers of the model group showed an increasing trend and PPARγ showed a decreasing trend; HIF-1α content was higher than that of the control group and PPARγ content was lower than that of the control group; (2) contents of apoCII, apoCIII,α-GST and GLDH in serum as well as levels of FAT, FABP1, FAS, ACC and ACAT-2 in liver tissue of the model group all significantly increased, and were positively correlated with HIF-1α and negatively correlated with PPARγ.Conclusion:Transcription factor HIF-1α content abnormally increases and PPARγ content abnormally decreases in liver tissue of alcoholic fatty liver rat models; it results in abnormal lipid metabolism and liver cell damage through increasing the expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes in the liver.

  17. Lipid Metabolic Versatility in Malassezia spp. Yeasts Studied through Metabolic Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Sergio; de Cock, Hans; Ohm, Robin A; Danies, Giovanna; Wösten, Han A B; Restrepo, Silvia; González Barrios, Andrés F; Celis, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia species are lipophilic and lipid-dependent yeasts belonging to the human and animal microbiota. Typically, they are isolated from regions rich in sebaceous glands. They have been associated with dermatological diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor, atopic dermatitis, and folliculitis. The genomes of Malassezia globosa, Malassezia sympodialis, and Malassezia pachydermatis lack the genes related to fatty acid synthesis. Here, the lipid-synthesis pathways of these species, as well as of Malassezia furfur, and of an atypical M. furfur variant were reconstructed using genome data and Constraints Based Reconstruction and Analysis. To this end, the genomes of M. furfur CBS 1878 and the atypical M. furfur 4DS were sequenced and annotated. The resulting Enzyme Commission numbers and predicted reactions were similar to the other Malassezia strains despite the differences in their genome size. Proteomic profiling was utilized to validate flux distributions. Flux differences were observed in the production of steroids in M. furfur and in the metabolism of butanoate in M. pachydermatis. The predictions obtained via these metabolic reconstructions also suggested defects in the assimilation of palmitic acid in M. globosa, M. sympodialis, M. pachydermatis, and the atypical variant of M. furfur, but not in M. furfur. These predictions were validated via physiological characterization, showing the predictive power of metabolic network reconstructions to provide new clues about the metabolic versatility of Malassezia.

  18. Liposomal nanocontainers as models for viral infection: monitoring viral genomic RNA transfer through lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Gerhard; Matscheko, Nena M; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kenndler, Ernst; Blaas, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    After uptake into target cells, many nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes in the low-pH environment of the endocytic compartment. This results in exposure of amphipathic viral peptides and/or hydrophobic protein domains that are inserted into and either disrupt or perforate the vesicular membranes. The viral nucleic acids thereby gain access to the cytosol and initiate replication. We here demonstrate the in vitro transfer of the single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of human rhinovirus 2 into liposomes decorated with recombinant very-low-density lipoprotein receptor fragments. Membrane-attached virions were exposed to pH 5.4, mimicking the in vivo pH environment of late endosomes. This triggered the release of the RNA whose arrival in the liposomal lumen was detected via in situ cDNA synthesis by encapsulated reverse transcriptase. Subsequently, cDNA was PCR amplified. At a low ratio between virions and lipids, RNA transfer was positively correlated with virus concentration. However, membranes became leaky at higher virus concentrations, which resulted in decreased cDNA synthesis. In accordance with earlier in vivo data, the RNA passes through the lipid membrane without causing gross damage to vesicles at physiologically relevant virus concentrations.

  19. Neutron diffraction studies of the interaction between amphotericin B and lipid-sterol model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Lawrence, M. Jayne; Demeė, Bruno; Fragneto, Giovanna; Barlow, David

    2012-10-01

    Over the last 50 years or so, amphotericin has been widely employed in treating life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Its usefulness in the clinic, however, has always been circumscribed by its dose-limiting side-effects, and it is also now compromised by an increasing incidence of pathogen resistance. Combating these problems through development of new anti-fungal agents requires detailed knowledge of the drug's molecular mechanism, but unfortunately this is far from clear. Neutron diffraction studies of the drug's incorporation within lipid-sterol membranes have here been performed to shed light on this problem. The drug is shown to disturb the structures of both fungal and mammalian membranes, and co-localises with the membrane sterols in a manner consistent with trans-membrane pore formation. The differences seen in the membrane lipid ordering and in the distributions of the drug-ergosterol and drug-cholesterol complexes within the membranes are consistent with the drug's selectivity for fungal vs. human cells.

  20. An in vitro model to test relative antioxidant potential: Ultraviolet-induced lipid peroxidation in liposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelle, E.; Maes, D.; Padulo, G.A.; Kim, E.K.; Smith, W.P. (Estee Lauder Research and Development, Melville, NY (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since antioxidants have been shown to play a major role in preventing some of the effects of aging and photoaging in skin, it is important to study this phenomenon in a controlled manner. This was accomplished by developing a simple and reliable in vitro technique to assay antioxidant efficacy. Inhibition of peroxidation by antioxidants was used as a measure of relative antioxidant potential. Liposomes, high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), were dispersed in buffer and irradiated with ultraviolet (UV) light. Irradiated liposomes exhibited a significantly higher amount of hydroperoxides than liposomes containing antioxidants in a dose- and concentration-dependent manner. Lipid peroxidation was determined spectrophotometrically by an increase in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. To further substantiate the production of lipid peroxides, gas chromatography was used to measure a decrease in PUFA substrate. In order of decreasing antioxidant effectiveness, the following results were found among lipophilic antioxidants: BHA greater than catechin greater than BHT greater than alpha-tocopherol greater than chlorogenic acid. Among hydrophilic antioxidants, ascorbic acid and dithiothreitol were effective while glutathione was ineffective. In addition, ascorbic acid was observed to act synergistically with alpha-tocopherol, which is in agreement with other published reports on the interaction of these two antioxidants. Although peroxyl radical scavengers seem to be at a selective advantage in this liposomal/UV system, these results demonstrate the validity of this technique as an assay for measuring an antioxidant's potential to inhibit UV-induced peroxidation.

  1. Stratum corneum lipid removal by surfactants: relation to in vivo irritation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froebe, C L; Simion, F A; Rhein, L D; Cagan, R H; Kligman, A

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the in vivo irritation potential of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) and the ability of these two surfactants to remove lipid from the stratum corneum (SC) in vitro were investigated. Either surfactant removes detectable levels of lipids only above its critical micelle concentration (CMC). At high concentrations the surfactants removed only very small amounts of cholesterol, free fatty acid, the esters of those materials, and possibly squalene. SLS and LAS have been shown, below the CMC, to bind to and irritate the SC. Thus, clinical irritation provoked by SLS or LAS is unlikely to be directly linked with extraction of SC lipid. The milder forms of irritation--dryness, tightness, roughness--may involve both surfactant binding to and denaturation of keratin as well as disruption of lipid. Our findings challenge earlier assumptions that surfactants' degreasing of the SC is involved in the induction of erythema.

  2. Therapeutic effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices and their mixture on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a rat model of chronic alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otunola, Gloria Aderonke; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2016-07-01

    The protective effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices, garlic, (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale) and pepper (Capsicum frutescens) singly and combined was investigated using a rat model of chronic alcohol intake. Rats were given 30% ethanol, with or without aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or mixture of the three administered at 200mg/kg body weight by oral gavage for 28 days. Lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, oxidative and antioxidative profiles of serum, faecal, liver, kidney, heart and brain tissues of the rats were analyzed. Alcohol treatment significantly elevated liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation, depleted antioxidant system and induced histopathological changes in the liver. These alterations were markedly ameliorated by treatment with aqueous extracts of the three spices singly or mixed at 200mg/kg body weight. These results suggest that aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or a blend of the three protects against alcohol- induced hypercholesterolemia, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress and liver damage.

  3. The interaction of mefloquine hydrochloride with cell membrane models at the air-water interface is modulated by the monolayer lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Thiago Eichi; Caseli, Luciano

    2014-10-01

    The antiparasitic properties of antiparasitic drugs are believed to be associated with their interactions with the protozoan membrane, encouraging research on the identification of membrane sites capable of drug binding. In this study, we investigated the interaction of mefloquine hydrochloride, known to be effective against malaria, with cell membrane models represented by Langmuir monolayers of selected lipids. It is shown that even small amounts of the drug affect the surface pressure-area isotherms as well as surface vibrational spectra of some lipid monolayers, which points to a significant interaction. The effects on the latter depend on the electrical charge of the monolayer-forming molecules, with the drug activity being particularly distinctive for negatively charged lipids. Therefore, the lipid composition of the monolayer modulates the interaction with the lipophilic drug, which may have important implications in understanding how the drug acts on specific sites of the protozoan membrane.

  4. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  5. Comparison of Effects of Separate and Combined Sugammadex and Lipid Emulsion Administration on Hemodynamic Parameters and Survival in a Rat Model of Verapamil Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulgar, Serkan; Kose, Halil Cihan; Demir Piroglu, Isılay; Karakilic, Evvah; Ates, Nagihan Gozde; Demir, Ahmet; Gergerli, Ruken; Guven, Selin; Piroglu, Mustafa Devrim

    2016-03-25

    Toxicity of calcium channel blockers leads to high patient mortality and there is no effective antidote. The benefit of using 20% lipid emulsion and sugammadex has been reported. The present study measured the effect of sugammadex and 20% lipid emulsion on hemodynamics and survival in a rat model of verapamil toxicity. In this single-blinded randomized control study, rats were separated into 4 groups of 7 rats each: Sugammadex (S), Sugammadex plus 20% lipid emulsion (SL), 20% lipid emulsion (L), and control (C). Heart rates and mean arterial pressures were monitored and noted each minute until death. Average time to death was 21.0±9.57 minutes for group C, 35.57±10.61 minutes for group S, 37.14±16.6 minutes for group L and 49.86±27.56 minutes for group SL. Time to death was significantly longer in other groups than in the control group (psugammadex and lipid emulsion had a positive effect on survival in patients with calcium channel blocker toxicity. Sugammadex and intralipid increased survival in a rat model of verapamil toxicity. The combination of both drugs may decrease cardiotoxicity. Sugammadex alone or combined with 20% lipid emulsion reduce the need for inotropic agents. The mechanism requires clarification with larger studies.

  6. Influence of lipids with hydroxyl-containing head groups on Fe2+ (Cu2+)/H2O2-mediated transformation of phospholipids in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshyk, Viktoriya N; Melsitova, Inna V; Yurkova, Irina L

    2014-01-01

    Under condition of ROS formation in lipid membranes, free radical reactions can proceed in both hydrophobic (peroxidation of lipids, POL) and polar (free radical fragmentation) parts of the bilayer. Free-radical fragmentation is typical for the lipids containing a hydroxyl group in β-position with respect to an ester or amide bond. The present study has been undertaken to investigate free-radical transformations of phospholipids in model membranes containing lipids able to undergo fragmentation in their polar part. Liposomes from egg yolk lecithin containing saturated or monounsaturated glycero- and sphingolipids were subjected to the action of an HO* - generating system - Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc, and the POL products were investigated. In parallel with this, the effects of monoacylglycerols and scavengers of reactive species on Fe(2+)(Cu(2+))/H2O2/Asc - mediated free-radical fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerols were studied. Hydroxyl-containing sphingolipids and glycerolipids, which undergo free-radical fragmentation under such conditions, manifested antioxidant properties in the model membranes. In the absence of HO groups in the lipid structure, the effect was either pro-oxidant or neutral. Monoacylglycerols slowed down the rate of both peroxidation in the hydrophobic part and free-radical fragmentation in the hydrophilic part of phospholipid membrane. Scavengers of reactive species inhibited the fragmentation of phosphatidylglycerol substantially. Thus, the ability of hydroxyl-containing lipids to undergo free-radical fragmentation in polar part apparently makes a substantial contribution to the mechanism of their protector action.

  7. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support divers...

  8. Die 3SC Trendforschung : ein kontinuierliches Programm zur Beobachtung des soziokulturellen Wandels von Sinus Sociovision

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Cornelia

    2003-01-01

    Die 3SC Trendforschung ist neben der Lebensweltforschung und dem daraus hervorgegangenen Modell der Sinus-Milieus ein zentraler Forschungsansatz des Heidelberger Instituts Sinus Sociovision. Sinus Sociovision, Mitglied des ADM (Arbeitskreis Deutscher Markt- und Sozialforschungsinstitute e.V.), ist eines der führenden Institute für angewandte soziokulturelle Forschung in Deutschland. Die 3SC Trendforschung ist eine von drei Säulen des Forschungs- und Beratungsangebotes von Sinus Sociovision. H...

  9. Radiolabeling of DOTATOC with the long-lived positron emitter 44Sc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszyński, Marek; Majkowska-Pilip, Agnieszka; Loktionova, Natalia S; Eppard, Elisabeth; Roesch, Frank

    2012-06-01

    The positron-emitting radionuclide (44)Sc with a half-life of 3.97 h and a β(+) branching of 94.3% is of potential interest for clinical PET. As so far it is available from a (44)Ti/(44)Sc generator in Mainz, where long-lived (44)Ti decays to no-carrier-added (nca) (44)Sc. The (44)Sc is a trivalent metal cation and should be suitable for complexation with many well established bifunctional chelators conjugated to peptides or other molecular targeting vectors. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate the potential of (44)Sc for labeling of DOTA-conjugated peptides. DOTA-D-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide (DOTATOC) was used as a model molecule to study and optimize labeling procedure. Reaction parameters such as buffer conditions, concentration of peptide, pH range, reaction temperature and time were optimized. Addition of 21 nmol of DOTATOC to (44)Sc in ammonium acetate buffer pH 4.0 provided labeling yields >98% within 25 min of heating in an oil-bath at 95°C. This time can be reduced to 3 min only by applying microwave supported heating. (44)Sc-DOTATOC was found to be stable in 0.9% NaCl, PBS pH 7.4, fetal calf and human serums, and also in the presence of competing metal cations (Fe(3+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+)), as well as other ligand competitors, like EDTA and DTPA, even after almost 25 h incubation at 37°C. Present study shows that nca (44)Sc forms stable complexes with the macrocyclic ligand DOTA and that (44)Sc-DOTATOC and analog targeting vectors may be synthesized for further preclinical and clinical investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Age-related changes to human stratum corneum lipids detected using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry following in vivo sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Nichola J.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Wibawa, Judata; Marlow, Ian; Bell, Mike; David A Barrett; Scurr, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the ability to detect changes in both quantity and spatial distribution of human stratum corneum (SC) lipids from samples collected in vivo. The SC functions as the predominant barrier to the body, protecting against the penetration of xenobiotic substances. Changes to the SC lipid composition have been associated with barrier impairment and consequent skin disorders and it is therefore important to monitor and quantify changes to this structure. This work demonstrates ...

  11. Age-related changes to human stratum corneum lipids detected\\ud using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry following in vivo sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Nichola J.; Johnson, Daniel J.; Wibawa, Judata; Marlow, Ian; Bell, Mike; David A Barrett; Scurr, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the ability to detect changes in both quantity and spatial distribution of human stratum corneum (SC) lipids from samples collected in vivo. The SC functions as the predominant barrier to the body, protecting against the penetration of xenobiotic substances. Changes to the SC lipid composition have been associated with barrier impairment and consequent skin disorders and it is therefore important to monitor and quantify changes to this structure. This work demonstrates ...

  12. Measurement of the SC magnetic field

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    The 3.5-metre-arm carrying 100 Hall plates used for the measurmeent of the SC magnetic field. The arm rotates in a horizontal plane, its positioning and the data read-out are controlled by an on-line computer.

  13. Magnet measuring equipment of SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    Checking the positioning of the magnet measuring equipment installed between the poles of SC2. The steel structure in front of the magnet is designed to house the rotary condenser and to shield it from the stray magnetic field of the accelerator.

  14. Magnet measuring equipment of SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Checking the positioning of the magnet measuring equipment installed between the poles of SC2. The steel structure in front of the magnet is designed to house the rotary condenser and to shield it from the stray magnetic field of the accelerator. On the left, Marinus van Gulik. (See Photo Archive 7402005 and Annual Report 1974, p. 44.)

  15. The Synchrocyclotron (SC) in building 300

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    The red magnet of CERN's first accelerator, the Synchrocyclotron (SC), has occupied a large part of Hall 300 since it was installed in the late 1950s. The remaining part of the 300-square-metre building has been used as a storage room since the accelerator was shut down in 1990. Now a public exhibition will breathe new life into the hall.

  16. Knowledge insufficient: the management of haemoglobin SC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecker, Lydia H; Schaefer, Beverly A; Luchtman-Jones, Lori

    2017-02-01

    Although haemoglobin SC (HbSC) accounts for 30% of sickle cell disease (SCD) in the United States and United Kingdom, evidence-based guidelines for genotype specific management are lacking. The unique pathology of HbSC disease is complex, characterized by erythrocyte dehydration, intracellular sickling and increased blood viscosity. The evaluation and treatment of patients with HbSC is largely inferred from studies of SCD consisting mostly of haemoglobin SS (HbSS) patients. These studies are underpowered to allow definitive conclusions about HbSC. We review the pathophysiology of HbSC disease, including known and potential differences between HbSS and HbSC, and highlight knowledge gaps in HbSC disease management. Clinical and translational research is needed to develop targeted treatments and to validate management recommendations for efficacy, safety and impact on quality of life for people with HbSC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cell wall lipids from Mycobacterium bovis BCG are inflammatory when inoculated within a gel matrix: characterization of a new model of the granulomatous response to mycobacterial components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Elizabeth R; Geisel, Rachel E; Butcher, Barbara A; McDonough, Sean; Russell, David G

    2005-05-01

    The chronic inflammatory response to Mycobacterium generates complex granulomatous lesions that balance containment with destruction of infected tissues. To study the contributing factors from host and pathogen, we developed a model wherein defined mycobacterial components and leukocytes are delivered in a gel, eliciting a localized response that can be retrieved and analysed. We validated the model by comparing responses to the cell wall lipids from Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) to reported activities in other models. BCG lipid-coated beads and bone marrow-derived macrophages (input macrophages) were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice. Input macrophages and recruited peritoneal exudate cells took up fluorescently tagged BCG lipids, and matrix-associated macrophages and neutrophils produced tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1alpha, and interleukin-6. Leukocyte numbers and cytokine levels were greater in BCG lipid-bearing matrices than matrices containing non-coated or phosphatidylglycerol-coated beads. Leukocytes arrived in successive waves of neutrophils, macrophages and eosinophils, followed by NK and T cells (CD4(+), CD8(+), or gammadelta) at 7 days and B cells within 12 days. BCG lipids also predisposed matrices for adherence and vascularization, enhancing cellular recruitment. We submit that the matrix model presents pertinent features of the murine granulomatous response that will prove to be an adaptable method for study of this complex response.

  18. Pretreatment with Fish Oil-Based Lipid Emulsion Modulates Muscle Leukocyte Chemotaxis in Murine Model of Sublethal Lower Limb Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Shih, Juey-Ming; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Li, Cheng-Che

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a fish oil- (FO-) based lipid emulsion on muscle leukocyte chemotaxis and inflammatory responses in a murine model of limb ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Mice were assigned randomly to 1 sham (sham) group, 2 ischemic groups, and 2 IR groups. The sham group did not undergo the ischemic procedure. The mice assigned to the ischemic or IR groups were pretreated intraperitoneally with either saline or FO-based lipid emulsion for 3 consecutive days. The IR procedure was induced by applying a 4.5 oz orthodontic rubber band to the left thigh above the greater trochanter for 120 min and then cutting the band to allow reperfusion. The ischemic groups were sacrificed immediately while the IR groups were sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. Blood, IR-injured gastrocnemius, and lung tissues were collected for analysis. The results showed that FO pretreatment suppressed the local and systemic expression of several IR-induced proinflammatory mediators. Also, the FO-pretreated group had lower blood Ly6ChiCCR2hi monocyte percentage and muscle M1/M2 ratio than the saline group at 24 h after reperfusion. These findings suggest that FO pretreatment may have a protective role in limb IR injury by modulating the expression of proinflammatory mediators and regulating the polarization of macrophage. PMID:28182087

  19. Statistical evaluation and modeling of cheap substrate-based cultivation medium of Chlorella vulgaris to enhance microalgae lipid as new potential feedstock for biolubricant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Mirzaie, M A; Kalbasi, M; Mousavi, S M; Ghobadian, B

    2016-05-18

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) microalga was investigated as a new potential feedstock for the production of biodegradable lubricant. In order to enhance microalgae lipid for biolubricant production, mixotrophic growth of C. vulgaris was optimized using statistical analysis of Plackett-Burman (P-B) and response surface methodology (RSM). A cheap substrate-based medium of molasses and corn steep liquor (CSL) was used instead of expensive mineral salts to reduce the total cost of microalgae production. The effects of molasses and CSL concentration (cheap substrates) and light intensity on the growth of microalgae and their lipid content were analyzed and modeled. Designed models by RSM showed good compatibility with a 95% confidence level when compared to the cultivation system. According to the models, optimal cultivation conditions were obtained with biomass productivity of 0.123 g L(-1) day(-1) and lipid dry weight of 0.64 g L(-1) as 35% of dry weight of C. vulgaris. The extracted microalgae lipid presented useful fatty acid for biolubricant production with viscosities of 42.00 cSt at 40°C and 8.500 cSt at 100°C, viscosity index of 185, flash point of 185°C, and pour point of -6°C. These properties showed that microalgae lipid could be used as potential feedstock for biolubricant production.

  20. Lipid domains in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo Soon; Dominick, Johnna L; Spence, Megan M

    2010-07-22

    We have created a stable bicelle system capable of forming micrometer-scale lipid domains that orient in a magnetic field, suitable for structural biology determination in solid-state NMR. The bicelles consisted of a mixture of cholesterol, saturated lipid (DMPC), and unsaturated lipid (POPC), a mixture commonly used to create domains in model membranes, along with a short chain lipid (DHPC) that allows formation of the bicelle phase. While maintaining a constant molar ratio of long to short chain lipids, q = ([POPC]+[DMPC])/[DHPC] = 3, we varied the concentrations of the unsaturated lipid, POPC, and cholesterol to observe the effects of the components on bicelle stability. Using (31)P solid-state NMR, we observed that unsaturated lipids (POPC) greatly destabilized the alignment of the membranes in the magnetic field, while cholesterol stabilized their alignment. By combining cholesterol and unsaturated lipids in the bicelles, we created membranes aligning uniformly in the magnetic field, despite very high concentrations of unsaturated lipids. These bicelles, with high concentrations of both cholesterol and unsaturated lipid, showed similar phase behavior to bicelles commonly used in structural biology, but aligned over a wider temperature range (291-314 K). Domains were observed by measuring time-dependent diffusion constants reflecting restricted diffusion of the lipids within micrometer-scale regions of the bicelles. Micron-scale domains have never been observed in POPC/DMPC/cholesterol vesicles, implying that bilayers in bicelles show different phase behavior than their counterparts in vesicles, and that bilayers in bicelles favor domain formation.

  1. Acute Toxicity Study of Zerumbone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier on BALB/c Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshu Sulaiman Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zerumbone- (ZER- loaded nanostructure lipid carrier (NLC (ZER-NLC prepared for its antileukemia effect in vitro was evaluated for its toxicological effects by observing changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow stem cells. The acute toxicity study for ZER-NLC was conducted by orally treating BALB/c mice with a single dose with either water, olive oil, ZER, NLC, or ZER-NLC for 14 days. The animals were observed for clinical and behavioral abnormalities, toxicological symptoms, feed consumption, and gross appearance. The liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and brain tissues were assessed histologically. Total haemogram was counted by hemocytometry and microhematocrit reader. Bone marrow examination in terms of cellular morphology was done by Wright staining with bone marrow smear. Furthermore, serum biochemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Grossly all treated mice, their investigated tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow were normal. At oral doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg ZER-NLC there was no sign of toxicity or mortality in BALB/c mice. This study suggests that the 50% lethal dose (LD50 of ZER-NLC is higher than 200 mg/kg, thus, safe by oral administration.

  2. Effects of melatonin on liver function and lipid peroxidation in a rat model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen-Sheng; Xu, Qing; Liu, Y E; Jiang, Chun-Hui; Zhou, Hong; Gu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of melatonin (MT) on liver function and lipid peroxidation following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). A total of 66 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Normal control (N) group, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group and the MT-treated group. A hepatic IRI model was developed by blocking the first porta hepatis, and subsequently restoring hepatic blood inflow after 35 min. Following reperfusion, changes in the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were detected by a chemical method at various time points. In the MT group, the MDA levels were significantly reduced (PLDH were significantly reduced in the MT group at each time point, as compared with that of the IR group (Pfunction following IRI.

  3. Precipitation hardening in ternary alloys of the Al-Sc-Cu and Al-Sc-Si systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharakterova, M.L.; Eskin, D.G.; Toropova, L.S. (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). A.A. Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy)

    1994-07-01

    The processes of precipitation hardening in cast ternary alloys of the Al-Sc-Cu and Al-Sc-Si systems were studied in the temperature range of aging from 100 to 450 C and at exposures to 200 h. It was shown that the CuAl[sub 2] and ScAl[sub 3] phases were involved in the process of aging in ternary Al-Sc-Cu alloys, and the Si and V (AlSiSc) phases, in ternary Al-Sc-Si alloys with excess silicon in a supersaturated solid solution. The V phase was for the first time revealed as the hardening phase in aluminum alloys.

  4. Reduced-Latency SC Polar Decoder Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chuan; Parhi, Keshab K

    2011-01-01

    Polar codes have become one of the most favorable capacity achieving error correction codes (ECC) along with their simple encoding method. However, among the very few prior successive cancellation (SC) polar decoder designs, the required long code length makes the decoding latency high. In this paper, conventional decoding algorithm is transformed with look-ahead techniques. This reduces the decoding latency by 50%. With pipelining and parallel processing schemes, a parallel SC polar decoder is proposed. Sub-structure sharing approach is employed to design the merged processing element (PE). Moreover, inspired by the real FFT architecture, this paper presents a novel input generating circuit (ICG) block that can generate additional input signals for merged PEs on-the-fly. Gate-level analysis has demonstrated that the proposed design shows advantages of 50% decoding latency and twice throughput over the conventional one with similar hardware cost.

  5. Single chain Fab (scFab fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Mariam

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The connection of the variable part of the heavy chain (VH and and the variable part of the light chain (VL by a peptide linker to form a consecutive polypeptide chain (single chain antibody, scFv was a breakthrough for the functional production of antibody fragments in Escherichia coli. Being double the size of fragment variable (Fv fragments and requiring assembly of two independent polypeptide chains, functional Fab fragments are usually produced with significantly lower yields in E. coli. An antibody design combining stability and assay compatibility of the fragment antigen binding (Fab with high level bacterial expression of single chain Fv fragments would be desirable. The desired antibody fragment should be both suitable for expression as soluble antibody in E. coli and antibody phage display. Results Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of a polypeptide linker between the fragment difficult (Fd and the light chain (LC, resulting in the formation of a single chain Fab fragment (scFab, can lead to improved production of functional molecules. We tested the impact of various linker designs and modifications of the constant regions on both phage display efficiency and the yield of soluble antibody fragments. A scFab variant without cysteins (scFabΔC connecting the constant part 1 of the heavy chain (CH1 and the constant part of the light chain (CL were best suited for phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. Beside the expression system E. coli, the new antibody format was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Monovalent and divalent fragments (DiFabodies as well as multimers were characterised. Conclusion A new antibody design offers the generation of bivalent Fab derivates for antibody phage display and production of soluble antibody fragments. This antibody format is of particular value for high throughput proteome binder generation projects, due to the avidity effect and the possible use of

  6. Single-component solid lipid nanocarriers prepared with ultra-long chain amphiphilic lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Lu, Xiaonan; Wang, Zegao

    2017-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: Synthetic sugar alcohol mono-behenates with high melting points, surface activity and resistance to enzymatic lipolysis, are expected to form stable single-component solid lipid nanocarriers (SC-SLNs). The preparation methods and the polar head group of the molecules should affect...... the smallest mean size (∼100nm with PdI of 0.26). In addition, they displayed high entrapment efficiency of fenofibrate (95%) and long term drug release. Nanocarriers prepared by emulsification-diffusion method entrapped fenofibrate into lipid bilayers. In contrast, Nanocarriers prepared by melting......-probe sonication method had a micelle structure with fenofibrate incorporated into a lipid monolayer. This study provides an insight into the systematic development of novel amphiphilic lipids for solid lipid-based drug delivery system....

  7. The SC gets ready for visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Hall 300, which houses the Synchrocyclotron (SC), CERN’s first accelerator, is getting ready to host a brand-new exhibition. The site will be one of the stops on the new visit itineraries that will be inaugurated for the 2013 CERN Open Day.   The Synchrocyclotron through the years. Just as it did in the late 1950s, when the accelerator was first installed, the gigantic red structure of the Synchrocyclotron's magnet occupies a large part of the 300-square-metre hall. “We have completed the first phase of the project that will give the SC a new lease of life,” says Marco Silari, the project leader and a member of CERN’s Radiation Protection Group. “We have removed all the equipment that was not an integral part of the accelerator. The hall is now ready for the civil-engineering work that will precede the installation of the exhibition.” The SC was witness to a big part of the history of CERN. The accelerator produced ...

  8. Lipid emulsion pretreatment has different effects on mepivacaine and bupivacaine cardiac toxicity in an isolated rat heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumeier, C; Kasdorf, B; Gruber, M; Busse, H; Wiese, C H; Zink, W; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2014-04-01

    The use of lipid emulsions to reduce cardiac toxicity of local anaesthetics (LAs) has shown success in experimental studies and some clinical cases, and thus has been implemented in clinical practice. However, lipid treatment is usually given after the occurrence of neurological or cardiovascular symptoms of systemic intoxication. The aim of this study was to determine if pretreatment with lipid emulsion reduces cardiac toxicity produced by bupivacaine or mepivacaine. Isolated rat hearts were perfused with or without lipid emulsion (0.25 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) before administration of equipotent doses of bupivacaine (250 µM) or mepivacaine (1000 µM). Haemodynamic parameters and times from start of perfusion LA to a 1 min period of asystole and recovery were determined. Pretreatment with lipid emulsion extended the time until occurrence of asystole and decreased times to recovery in bupivacaine-induced cardiac toxicity but not in mepivacaine-induced cardiac toxicity compared with control. Lipid pretreatment impaired rate-pressure product recovery in mepivacaine-intoxicated hearts. This study confirms that pretreatment with a lipid emulsion reduces cardiac toxicity of LAs. The efficacy of pretreatment with lipid emulsion was LA-dependent, so pharmacokinetic properties, such as lipophilicity, might influence the effects of lipid emulsion pretreatment.

  9. Development of a high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model for rapid screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis (HTP) model, without any means of pH-stat-titration, to enable a fast evaluation of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). MATERIAL AND METHOD: The HTP model was compared to the traditionally used dynamic in vitro lipolysis...... (DIVL) model with regard to the extent of lipid digestion and drug distribution of two poorly soluble model drugs (cinnarizine and danazol), during digestion of three LbDDS (LbDDS I-III). RESULT: The HTP model was able to maintain pH around 6.5 during digestion, without the addition of Na......OH to neutralize the free fatty acids (FFAs), due to an increased buffer capacity. Cinnarizine was primarily located in the aqueous phase during digestion of all three LbDDS and did not differ significantly between the two models. The distribution of danazol varied from formulation to formulation...

  10. The effects of processing and mastication on almond lipid bioaccessibility using novel methods of in vitro digestion modelling and micro-structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandalari, Giuseppina; Grundy, Myriam M-L; Grassby, Terri; Parker, Mary L; Cross, Kathryn L; Chessa, Simona; Bisignano, Carlo; Barreca, Davide; Bellocco, Ersilia; Laganà, Giuseppina; Butterworth, Peter J; Faulks, Richard M; Wilde, Peter J; Ellis, Peter R; Waldron, Keith W

    2014-11-14

    A number of studies have demonstrated that consuming almonds increases satiety but does not result in weight gain, despite their high energy and lipid content. To understand the mechanism of almond digestion, in the present study, we investigated the bioaccessibility of lipids from masticated almonds during in vitro simulated human digestion, and determined the associated changes in cell-wall composition and cellular microstructure. The influence of processing on lipid release was assessed by using natural raw almonds (NA) and roasted almonds (RA). Masticated samples from four healthy adults (two females, two males) were exposed to a dynamic gastric model of digestion followed by simulated duodenal digestion. Between 7·8 and 11·1 % of the total lipid was released as a result of mastication, with no significant differences between the NA and RA samples. Significant digestion occurred during the in vitro gastric phase (16·4 and 15·9 %) and the in vitro duodenal phase (32·2 and 32·7 %) for the NA and RA samples, respectively. Roasting produced a smaller average particle size distribution post-mastication; however, this was not significant in terms of lipid release. Light microscopy showed major changes that occurred in the distribution of lipid in all cells after the roasting process. Further changes were observed in the surface cells of almond fragments and in fractured cells after exposure to the duodenal environment. Almond cell walls prevented lipid release from intact cells, providing a mechanism for incomplete nutrient absorption in the gut. The composition of almond cell walls was not affected by processing or simulated digestion.

  11. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Carine C; Fiel, Luana A; Bexiga, Celina G; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Uchiyama, Mayara K; Cogliati, Bruno; Araki, Koiti; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra P

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs), prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone), capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC) on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva(®) microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18-90×10(9) particles/mL; 1 hour) induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3-18×10(9) particles/mL; 48 hours) treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and AcE-LNC, which were not dependent on nitric oxide synthase expressions. Daily intraperitoneal or oral treatment (days 3-10 after tumor injection) with LNC or AcE-LNC (1×10(12) particles/day), but not with AcE (50 mg/kg/day, same dose as AcE-LNC), reduced the volume of the tumor; nevertheless, intraperitoneal treatment caused toxicity. Oral LNC treatment was more efficient than AcE-LNC treatment. Moreover, oral treatment with nonencapsulated capric/caprylic triglyceride did not inhibit tumor development, implying that nanocapsule supramolecular structure is important to the therapeutic effects. Together, data herein presented highlight the relevance of the supramolecular structure of LNCs to toxicity on SK-Mel-28 cells and to the therapeutic efficacy on melanoma development in mice, conferring novel therapeutic mechanisms to LNC further than a drug delivery system.

  12. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Carine C; Fiel, Luana A; Bexiga, Celina G; Asbahr, Ana Carolina C; Uchiyama, Mayara K; Cogliati, Bruno; Araki, Koiti; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Farsky, Sandra P

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs), prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone), capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC) on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva® microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18–90×109 particles/mL; 1 hour) induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3–18×109 particles/mL; 48 hours) treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and AcE-LNC, which were not dependent on nitric oxide synthase expressions. Daily intraperitoneal or oral treatment (days 3–10 after tumor injection) with LNC or AcE-LNC (1×1012 particles/day), but not with AcE (50 mg/kg/day, same dose as AcE-LNC), reduced the volume of the tumor; nevertheless, intraperitoneal treatment caused toxicity. Oral LNC treatment was more efficient than AcE-LNC treatment. Moreover, oral treatment with nonencapsulated capric/caprylic triglyceride did not inhibit tumor development, implying that nanocapsule supramolecular structure is important to the therapeutic effects. Together, data herein presented highlight the relevance of the supramolecular structure of LNCs to toxicity on SK-Mel-28 cells and to the therapeutic efficacy on melanoma development in mice, conferring novel therapeutic mechanisms to LNC further than a drug delivery system. PMID:27099491

  13. Phase structure of liposome in lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianxi; Li, Yuzhuo; Mueller, Anja

    2011-11-01

    Gas microbubbles present in ultrasound imaging contrast agents are stabilized by lipid aggregates that typically contain a mixture of lipids. In this study, the phase structure of the lipid mixtures that contained two or three lipids was investigated using three different methods: dynamic light scattering, (1)H NMR, and microfluidity measurements with fluorescence probes. Three lipids that are commonly present in imaging agents (DPPC, DPPE-PEG, and DPPA) were used. Two types of systems, two-lipid model systems and simulated imaging systems were investigated. The results show that liposomes were the dominant aggregates in all the samples studied. The polar PEG side chains from the PEGylated lipid lead to the formation of micelles and micellar aggregates in small sizes. In the ternary lipid systems, almost all the lipids were present in bilayers with micelles absent and free lipids at very low concentration. These results suggest that liposomes, not micelles, contribute to the stabilization of microbubbles in an ultrasound imaging contrast agent.

  14. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Fathi-Azarbayjani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes, were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05. FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p < 0.01. Low skin permeability of drug from the other lipid suspensions could be due to the entrapment of diclofenac within these vesicles which decreased the solubility of the hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively.

  15. Lipid Vesicles for the Skin Delivery of Diclofenac: Cerosomes vs. Other Lipid Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi-Azarbayjani, Anahita; Ng, Kai Xin; Chan, Yew Weng; Chan, Sui Yung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lipid suspensions as drug carriers, including conventional liposomes, ethosomes, transferosomes, proniosomes, niosomes, PEG-PPG-PEG niosomes and stratum corneum liposomes (cerosomes), were formulated and compared. Methods: Lipid vesicles were formulated and assessed with regards to enhancement of skin permeation of diclofenac and stability profiles of the formulations. Formulation-induced changes of the biophysical structure of excised human skin were monitored using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results: The stability profiles of these suspensions over 12 weeks did not show any significant drug leakage from the vesicles of interest (p > 0.05). FTIR observations indicated that the vesicles increased stratum corneum (SC) lipid fluidization and altered protein conformation. Skin permeability experiments showed that the free unencapsulated drug in the cerosomal formulations caused significant increase in drug permeation across the skin (p < 0.01). Low skin permeability of drug from the other lipid suspensions could be due to the entrapment of diclofenac within these vesicles which decreased the solubility of the hydrophilic drug in the skin lipids and the partition coefficient of the drug from these vesicles into the SC. Conclusion: Optimal drug entrapment in vesicles or alteration of the skin structure may not necessarily enhance the permeation of hydrophilic drugs across the human skin. These lipid vesicles may be further developed into carriers of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for topical and transdermal delivery, respectively. PMID:25789216

  16. Novel therapeutic mechanisms determine the effectiveness of lipid-core nanocapsules on melanoma models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewes CC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carine C Drewes,1,* Luana A Fiel,2,* Celina G Bexiga,1 Ana Carolina C Asbahr,3 Mayara K Uchiyama,4 Bruno Cogliati,5 Koiti Araki,4 Sílvia S Guterres,2,3 Adriana R Pohlmann,2,3,6 Sandra P Farsky1 1Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, 2Postgraduate Program in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 3Postgraduate Program in Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 4Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, 5Department of Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, 6Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Melanoma is a severe metastatic skin cancer with poor prognosis and no effective treatment. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches using nanotechnology have been proposed to improve therapeutic effectiveness. Lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs, prepared with poly(ε-caprolactone, capric/caprylic triglyceride, and sorbitan monostearate and stabilized by polysorbate 80, are efficient as drug delivery systems. Here, we investigated the effects of acetyleugenol-loaded LNC (AcE-LNC on human SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells and its therapeutic efficacies on melanoma induced by B16F10 in C57B6 mice. LNC and AcE-LNC had z-average diameters and zeta potential close to 210 nm and -10.0 mV, respectively. CytoViva® microscopy images showed that LNC and AcE-LNC penetrated into SK-Mel-28 cells, and remained in the cytoplasm. AcE-LNC in vitro treatment (18–90×109 particles/mL; 1 hour induced late apoptosis and necrosis; LNC and AcE-LNC (3–18×109 particles/mL; 48 hours treatments reduced cell proliferation and delayed the cell cycle. Elevated levels of nitric oxide were found in supernatant of LNC and Ac

  17. Lipid rafts control P2X3 receptor distribution and function in trigeminal sensory neurons of a transgenic migraine mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabbretti Elsa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A genetic knock-in mouse model expressing the R192Q mutation of the α1-subunit of the CaV2.1 channels frequently found in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine shows functional upregulation of ATP-sensitive P2X3 receptors of trigeminal sensory neurons that transduce nociceptive inputs to the brainstem. In an attempt to understand the basic mechanisms linked to the upregulation of P2X3 receptor activity, we investigated the influence of the lipid domain of these trigeminal sensory neurons on receptor compartmentalization and function. Results Knock-in neurons were strongly enriched with lipid rafts containing a larger fraction of P2X3 receptors at membrane level. Pretreatment with the CaV2.1 channel blocker ω-agatoxin significantly decreased the lipid raft content of KI membranes. After pharmacologically disrupting the cholesterol component of lipid rafts, P2X3 receptors became confined to non-raft compartments and lost their functional potentiation typically observed in KI neurons with whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Following cholesterol depletion, all P2X3 receptor currents decayed more rapidly and showed delayed recovery indicating that alteration of the lipid raft milieu reduced the effectiveness of P2X3 receptor signalling and changed their desensitization process. Kinetic modeling could reproduce the observed data when slower receptor activation was simulated and entry into desensitization was presumed to be faster. Conclusions The more abundant lipid raft compartment of knock-in neurons was enriched in P2X3 receptors that exhibited stronger functional responses. These results suggest that the membrane microenvironment of trigeminal sensory neurons is an important factor in determining sensitization of P2X3 receptors and could contribute to a migraine phenotype by enhancing ATP-mediated responses.

  18. Salmon Protamine Decreases Serum and Liver Lipid Contents by Inhibiting Lipid Absorption in an In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion Model and in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Ryota; Miyauchi, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Daiki; Arai, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro; Fukunaga, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    Protamine has been used as an antiheparin drug and a natural preservative in various food products. However, limited studies have evaluated the physicochemical and functional properties of protamine. Hence, we assessed the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of lipid absorption following salmon protamine intake in in vitro and in vivo studies. In initial experiments, a salmon protamine hydrolyzate (PH) was prepared using in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion suppressed pancreatic lipase activity and micellar cholesterol solubility. This PH had higher bile acid-binding capacity and emulsion breakdown activity than casein hydrolyzate and l-arginine. However, the hypolipidemic functions of protamine were dramatically reduced by pancreatin digestion. In further experiments, groups of male Wistar rats were fed an AIN-93G diet containing 5% (wt/wt) salmon protamine or a protamine amino acid mixture. After 4 wk of feeding with experimental diets, reductions in serum and liver triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesterol contents were observed in the presence of protamine, reflecting inhibition of TAG, cholesterol, and bile acid absorption. These data suggest that the formation of insoluble PH-bile acid complexes is critical before the bile acid-binding capacity is reduced. Therefore, dietary salmon protamine may ameliorate lifestyle-related diseases such as hyperlipidemia and obesity.

  19. Comparative SAXS and DSC study on stratum corneum structural organization in an epidermal cell culture model (ROC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Herre, Angela; Fahr, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Cell cultured skin equivalents present an alternative for dermatological in vitro evaluations of drugs and excipients as they provide the advantage of availability, lower variability and higher assay robustness compared to native skin. For penetration/permeation studies, an adequate stratum corneum...... barrier similar to that of human stratum corneum is, however, a prerequisite. In this study, the stratum corneum lipid organization in an epidermal cell culture model based on rat epidermal keratinocytes (REK organotypic culture, ROC) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) in dependence...... of ROC SC obtained at different cultivation times (7, 14 and 21days at the air-liquid interface) was connected with an increase in structural order of the SC lipids in SAXS measurements: Already cultivation for 14days at the air-liquid interface resulted overall in a competent SC permeability barrier...

  20. Electron diffraction study of lipids in non-lesional stratum corneum of atopic eczema patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, M.; Mulder, A.A.W.; Smeden, J. van; Pilgram, G.S.; Wolterbeek, R..; Lavrijsen, A.P.M.; Koning, R.I.; Koster, A.J.; Bouwstra, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Skin barrier impairment is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema (AE). The skin barrier is located in the stratum corneum (SC), consisting of corneocytes embedded in lipids. Ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids are the major lipid classes and are crucial for

  1. Final Technical Report for Award SC0008613

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, Daniel A. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    Discovering how aerosol particles, present in the atmosphere in sizes of a few nanometers to hundred micrometers, initiate ice crystal formation represents a great challenge. Atmospheric ice nucleation is important because ice crystals alter the radiative properties of clouds and thus climate, and impact precipitation and thus the hydrological cycle. The difficulty in predicting atmospheric ice formation is attributable at least in part, to the diversity of ice nucleation pathways, the physical and chemical complexity of the ice nucleating particles (INPs), and the relatively small numbers of INPs (compared with all other aerosol particles), sometimes less than one in 100000. These factors in turn makes constraining ice nucleation parameterizations for modeling applications challenging. The majority of airborne particles are known to be organic in nature or contain organic biogenic material. The presence of organic material adds to the complexity of the particles and therefore the predictability of ice nucleation events since the organic species can display different phase states, e.g. liquid or solid, in response to temperature and humidity. The award DE-SC0008613 to PI Prof. Daniel Knopf at Stony Brook University, “Relating the Chemical and Physical Properties of Aerosols to the Water Uptake and Ice Nucleation Potential of Particles Collected During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)”, allowed examination of laboratory generated aerosol particles and field-collected particles for their propensity to nucleate ice under typical tropospheric conditions and relate ice nucleation to the physicochemical properties of the particles including their morphology and chemical composition. This in turn allowed for development of ice nucleation parameterizations for implementation in cloud models. The award resulted in 10 peer-reviewed publications and more than 20 seminar and conference presentations. We demonstrated that the rate of immersion

  2. ViSC Social Competence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, Dagmar; Hoffmann, Christine; Schiller, Eva-Maria; Stefanek, Elisabeth; Spiel, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The ViSC Social Competence Program has been implemented in Austrian schools within the scope of a national strategy plan, Together Against Violence. The program is a primary preventive program designed for grades 5 to 8. The prevention of aggression and bullying is defined as a school development task, and the initial implementation of the program lasts one school year. The program consists of universal and specific actions that are implemented through in-school teacher training and a class project for students. The program was evaluated with a randomized intervention control group design. Data were collected from teachers and students. Results suggest that the program reduces aggression in schools.

  3. Micron-scale assessment of molecular lipid organization in human stratum corneum using microprobe X-ray diffraction[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jean; Potter, Anne; Baltenneck, Carine; Domanov, Yegor A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid and protein components of the stratum corneum (SC) are organized in complex supramolecular arrangements. Exploring spatial relations between various possible substructures is important for understanding the barrier function of this uppermost layer of epidermis. Here, we report the first study where micro-focus X-ray scattering was used for assessing fine structural variations of the human skin barrier with micrometer resolution. We found that the scattering profiles were unchanged when scanning in the direction parallel to the SC surface. Furthermore, small-angle scattering profiles did not change as a function of depth in the SC, confirming that the lipid lamellar spacings remained the same throughout the SC. However, the wide-angle scattering data showed that the orthorhombic phase was more abundant in the middle layers of the SC, whereas the hexagonal phase dominated in the surface layers both at the external and the lowest part of the SC; i.e., the lipids were most tightly packed in the middle region of the SC. Taken together, our results demonstrate that microprobe X-ray diffraction provides abundant information about spatial variations of the SC lipid structure and thus may be a promising tool for assessing the effects of topical formulations on the barrier function of skin. PMID:25180243

  4. Micron-scale assessment of molecular lipid organization in human stratum corneum using microprobe X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Jean; Potter, Anne; Baltenneck, Carine; Domanov, Yegor A

    2014-11-01

    Lipid and protein components of the stratum corneum (SC) are organized in complex supramolecular arrangements. Exploring spatial relations between various possible substructures is important for understanding the barrier function of this uppermost layer of epidermis. Here, we report the first study where micro-focus X-ray scattering was used for assessing fine structural variations of the human skin barrier with micrometer resolution. We found that the scattering profiles were unchanged when scanning in the direction parallel to the SC surface. Furthermore, small-angle scattering profiles did not change as a function of depth in the SC, confirming that the lipid lamellar spacings remained the same throughout the SC. However, the wide-angle scattering data showed that the orthorhombic phase was more abundant in the middle layers of the SC, whereas the hexagonal phase dominated in the surface layers both at the external and the lowest part of the SC; i.e., the lipids were most tightly packed in the middle region of the SC. Taken together, our results demonstrate that microprobe X-ray diffraction provides abundant information about spatial variations of the SC lipid structure and thus may be a promising tool for assessing the effects of topical formulations on the barrier function of skin.

  5. Small-angle neutron scattering from multilamellar lipid bilayers: Theory, model, and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1996-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering data obtained from fully hydrated, multilamellar phospholipid bilayers with deuterated acyl chains of different length are presented and analyzed within a paracrystalline theory and a geometric model that permit the bilayer structure to be determined under condition...

  6. A genome-scale metabolic model of the lipid-accumulating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loira Nicolas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast which has emerged as an important microorganism for several biotechnological processes, such as the production of organic acids, lipases and proteases. It is also considered a good candidate for single-cell oil production. Although some of its metabolic pathways are well studied, its metabolic engineering is hindered by the lack of a genome-scale model that integrates the current knowledge about its metabolism. Results Combining in silico tools and expert manual curation, we have produced an accurate genome-scale metabolic model for Y. lipolytica. Using a scaffold derived from a functional metabolic model of the well-studied but phylogenetically distant yeast S. cerevisiae, we mapped conserved reactions, rewrote gene associations, added species-specific reactions and inserted specialized copies of scaffold reactions to account for species-specific expansion of protein families. We used physiological measures obtained under lab conditions to validate our predictions. Conclusions Y. lipolytica iNL895 represents the first well-annotated metabolic model of an oleaginous yeast, providing a base for future metabolic improvement, and a starting point for the metabolic reconstruction of other species in the Yarrowia clade and other oleaginous yeasts.

  7. Measurement of (43)Sc and (44)Sc production cross-section with an 18MeV medical PET cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Tommaso Stefano; Auger, Martin; Braccini, Saverio; Bunka, Maruta; Ereditato, Antonio; Nesteruk, Konrad Pawel; Scampoli, Paola; Türler, Andreas; van der Meulen, Nicholas

    2017-11-01

    (43)Sc and (44)Sc are positron emitter radionuclides that, in conjunction with the β(-) emitter (47)Sc, represent one of the most promising possibilities for theranostics in nuclear medicine. Their availability in suitable quantity and quality for medical applications is an open issue and their production with medical cyclotrons represents a scientific and technological challenge. For this purpose, an accurate knowledge of the production cross sections is mandatory. In this paper, we report on the cross section measurement of the reactions (43)Ca(p,n)(43)Sc, (44)Ca(p,2n) (43)Sc, (46)Ti(p,α)(43)Sc, and (44)Ca(p,n)(44)Sc at the Bern University Hospital cyclotron. A study of the production yield and purity performed by using commercially available enriched target materials is also presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. L-Arginine ethylester enhances in vitro amplification of PrP(Sc) in macaques with atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy and enables presymptomatic detection of PrP(Sc) in the bodily fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Y; Ono, F; Shimozaki, N; Shibata, H

    2016-02-12

    Protease-resistant, misfolded isoforms (PrP(Sc)) of a normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) in the bodily fluids, including blood, urine, and saliva, are expected to be useful diagnostic markers of prion diseases, and nonhuman primate models are suited for performing valid diagnostic tests for human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We developed an effective amplification method for PrP(Sc) derived from macaques infected with the atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) prion by using mouse brain homogenate as a substrate in the presence of polyanions and L-arginine ethylester. This method was highly sensitive and detected PrP(Sc) in infected brain homogenate diluted up to 10(10) by sequential amplification. This method in combination with PrP(Sc) precipitation by sodium phosphotungstic acid is capable of amplifying very small amounts of PrP(Sc) contained in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), saliva, urine, and plasma of macaques that have been intracerebrally inoculated with the L-BSE prion. Furthermore, PrP(Sc) was detectable in the saliva or urine samples as well as CSF samples obtained at the preclinical phases of the disease. Thus, our novel method may be useful for furthering the understanding of bodily fluid leakage of PrP(Sc) in nonhuman primate models.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Assessing Sc1 for GCSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, H.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that investigations that `fit' the National Curriculum or examination board criteria are few in number. The fair testing emphasis means that pupils all over the country are finding out what affects the rate of a chemical reaction, the rate of photosynthesis or, in the case of Physics, the resistance of a wire. This book focuses on nine of the most common Sc1 investigations and how to prepare for them, manage and assess them. The author, a GCSE examiner, has turned his expertise into a handbook for improving Sc1 performance in the classroom. He has produced a book that would be extremely useful to both newly qualified teachers and experienced teachers. The first aim of the book, however, is to explain the requirements of Sc1. This is done comprehensively with examples of what the jargon means in practice. By breaking down the elements of planning, obtaining evidence, analysing evidence and evaluating, it is easy to see the subtleties of the mark descriptors. At first glance there seems to be little difference between the type of scientific knowledge needed for planning at level 6 and level 8. However, the level 8 statement specifies `detailed' scientific knowledge and understanding, which would mean a student should use equations from physics or symbolic chemical equations to support their arguments. One of the most useful sections in the book details the marking problems that can arise with some investigations. For example, in an investigation into electromagnets it is difficult for students to provide sufficient relevant scientific theory to satisfy the requirements of planning at level 6. One of the problems with Sc1 is that certain requirements, such as graph plotting, are difficult for many students. This book provides exercises that can be given to students to improve those skills. Each of the nine investigations is covered in great detail. Each investigation begins with an introduction detailing the rationale for choosing it, whether students

  10. A molecular dynamics model of rhodamine-labeled phospholipid incorporated into a lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipids, labeled covalently by a fluorescent dye, are commonly applied in membrane biophysics. In this work, a molecular dynamics model of sulforhodamine attached covalently to a headgroup of 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine is developed. It is found that the incorporation of rhodamine-labeled phospholipids into a DPPC bilayer at the low concentration results in small perturbation of the bilayer. In the dye-labeled membrane, the sulforhodamine moiety binds favorably to a polar membrane interface, forming the tilt angle 44° ± 8° to the bilayer normal. The deep location and binding of a bulk sulforhodamine fluorophore lead, therefore, to some 'softening' of the membrane structure.

  11. Experimental Models of Foamy Macrophages and Approaches for Dissecting the Mechanisms of Lipid Accumulation and Consumption during Dormancy and Reactivation of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Pierre; Bouzid, Feriel; Smichi, Nabil; Poncin, Isabelle; Kremer, Laurent; De Chastellier, Chantal; Drancourt, Michel; Canaan, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Despite a slight decline since 2014, tuberculosis (TB) remains the major deadly infectious disease worldwide with about 1.5 million deaths each year and with about one-third of the population being latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of TB. During primo-infection, the recruitment of immune cells leads to the formation of highly organized granulomas. Among the different cells, one outstanding subpopulation is the foamy macrophage (FM), characterized by the abundance of triacylglycerol-rich lipid bodies (LB). M. tuberculosis can reside in FM, where it acquires, from host LB, the neutral lipids which are subsequently processed and stored by the bacilli in the form of intracytosolic lipid inclusions (ILI). Although host LB can be viewed as a reservoir of nutrients for the pathogen during latency, the molecular mechanisms whereby intraphagosomal mycobacteria interact with LB and assimilate the LB-derived lipids are only beginning to be understood. Past studies have emphasized that these physiological processes are critical to the M. tuberculosis infectious-life cycle, for propagation of the infection, establishment of the dormancy state and reactivation of the disease. In recent years, several animal and cellular models have been developed with the aim of dissecting these complex processes and of determining the nature and contribution of their key players. Herein, we review some of the in vitro and in vivo models which allowed to gain significant insight into lipid accumulation and consumption in M. tuberculosis, two important events that are directly linked to pathogenicity, granuloma formation/maintenance and survival of the tubercle bacillus under non-replicative conditions. We also discuss the advantages and limitations of each model, hoping that this will serve as a guide for future investigations dedicated to persistence and innovative therapeutic approaches against TB. PMID:27774438

  12. Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

    2011-03-31

    The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

  13. Construction of multiform scFv antibodies using linker peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihua Wang; Cengjie Zheng; Ying Liu; Huirong Zheng; Zonghua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Multiform single chain variable fragments (acFvs) including different length linker scFvs and bispecific seFv were constructed. The linker lengths of 0, 3, 5, 8, 12, and 15 amino acids between VH and VL of antideoxynivalenol (anti-DON) scFv were used to analyze the affinities of scFvs. The affinity constants of these scFvs increased when the linker was lower than 12 amino acids. The affinity constant would not change when the linker was longer than 12 amino acids. Fusion gene of anti-DON seFv and antizearalenone (anti-ZEN) scFv was also constructed through eormection by a short peptide tinker DNA to express a bispecific scFv. The affinity constants assay showed that the two scFvs of fusion bispecific scFv remained their own affinity compared to their parental scFvs. Competitive direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect DON and ZEN in contaminated wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) samples, and the results indicated that this bispecifie acFv was applicable in DON and ZEN detection. This work confirmed that bispecific scFv could be successfully obtained, and might also have an application in diagnosing fungal infection, and breeding transgertic plants.

  14. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ceccatelli Berti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases.

  15. Solid lipid nanoparticle loaded with paromomycin: in vivo efficacy against Leishmania tropica infection in BALB/c mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari-Kharaji, Maryam; Taheri, Tahereh; Doroud, Delaram; Habibzadeh, Sima; Rafati, Sima

    2016-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease transmitted through the bite of an infected phlebotomine sand fly and caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. There is no available vaccine for leishmaniasis in human, and the current chemotherapy approaches are hampered by different clinical problems. Most of available drugs are confined to a limited number of toxic chemical compounds, which some parasite strains have evolved drug resistance against. Hence, drug discovery and production of a new anti leishmanial compound is essential. One promising strategy is using the nanoparticle delivery systems with the aim of accelerating the efficacy of the available treatments. In the present study, paromomycin sulfate (PM) was formulated in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and the in vivo efficacy was investigated against Leishmania tropica in BALB/c mice model. To do so, the increase in footpad thickness was measured and real-time PCR was performed to quantify the parasite load after infectious challenge. The level of nitric oxide and cytokines including interleukin-4 (IL-4) and gamma interferon (IFN -γ) were assessed. Altogether, the results show that PM loaded into SLN is significantly more effective than PM alone in inhibiting the parasite propagation and switching towards Th1 response.

  16. Quantitative image cytometry measurements of lipids, DNA, CD45 and cytokeratin for circulating tumor cell identification in a model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futia, Gregory L.; Qamar, Lubna; Behbakht, Kian; Gibson, Emily A.

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) identification has applications in both early detection and monitoring of solid cancers. The rarity of CTCs, expected at ~1-50 CTCs per million nucleated blood cells (WBCs), requires identifying methods based on biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for accurate identification. Discovery of biomarkers with ever higher sensitivity and specificity to CTCs is always desirable to potentially find more CTCs in cancer patients thus increasing their clinical utility. Here, we investigate quantitative image cytometry measurements of lipids with the biomarker panel of DNA, Cytokeratin (CK), and CD45 commonly used to identify CTCs. We engineered a device for labeling suspended cell samples with fluorescent antibodies and dyes. We used it to prepare samples for 4 channel confocal laser scanning microscopy. The total data acquired at high resolution from one sample is ~ 1.3 GB. We developed software to perform the automated segmentation of these images into regions of interest (ROIs) containing individual cells. We quantified image features of total signal, spatial second moment, spatial frequency second moment, and their product for each ROI. We performed measurements on pure WBCs, cancer cell line MCF7 and mixed samples. Multivariable regressions and feature selection were used to determine combination features that are more sensitive and specific than any individual feature separately. We also demonstrate that computation of spatial characteristics provides higher sensitivity and specificity than intensity alone. Statistical models allowed quantification of the required sensitivity and specificity for detecting small levels of CTCs in a human blood sample.

  17. Targeted delivery of a model immunomodulator to the lymphatic system: comparison of alkyl ester versus triglyceride mimetic lipid prodrug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sifei; Quach, Tim; Hu, Luojuan; Wahab, Anisa; Charman, William N; Stella, Valentino J; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Simpson, Jamie S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-03-10

    A lipophilic prodrug approach has been used to promote the delivery of a model immunomodulator, mycophenolic acid (MPA), to the lymphatic system after oral administration. Lymphatic transport was employed to facilitate enhanced drug uptake into lymphocytes, as recent studies demonstrate that targeted drug delivery to lymph resident lymphocytes may enhance immunomodulatory effects. Two classes of lymph-directing prodrugs were synthesised. Alkyl chain derivatives (octyl mycophenolate, MPA-C8E; octadecyl mycophenolate, MPA-C18E; and octadecyl mycophenolamide, MPA-C18AM), to promote passive partitioning into lipids in lymphatic transport pathways, and a triglyceride mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) to facilitate metabolic integration into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. Lymphatic transport, lymphocyte uptake and plasma pharmacokinetics were assessed in mesenteric lymph and carotid artery cannulated rats following intraduodenal infusion of lipid-based formulations containing MPA or MPA prodrugs. Patterns of prodrug hydrolysis in rat digestive fluid, and cellular re-esterification in vivo, were evaluated to examine the mechanisms responsible for lymphatic transport. Poor enzyme stability and low absorption appeared to limit lymphatic transport of the alkyl derivatives, although two of the three alkyl chain prodrugs - MPA-C18AM (6-fold) and MPA-C18E (13-fold) still increased lymphatic drug transport when compared to MPA. In contrast, 2-MPA-TG markedly increased lymphatic drug transport (80-fold) and drug concentrations in lymphocytes (103-fold), and this was achieved via biochemical incorporation into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. The prodrug was hydrolysed rapidly to 2-mycophenoloyl glycerol (2-MPA-MG) in the presence of rat digestive fluid, and 2-MPA-MG was subsequently re-esterified in the enterocyte with oleic acid (most likely originating from the co-administered formulation) prior to accessing the

  18. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ling Yuan,1 Congyan Liu,2 Yan Chen,2 Zhenhai Zhang,2 Lei Zhou,1 Ding Qu2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 2Key Laboratory of New Drug Delivery System of Chinese Materia Medica, Jiangsu Provincial Academy of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods: CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC, and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3 and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1 were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results: CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 µg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 µg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content

  19. Effect of Severe Plastic Deformation on Structure and Properties of Al-Sc-Ta and Al-Sc-Ti Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, Alla; Monastyrska, Tetiana; Davydenko, Olexandr; Molebny, Oleh; Polishchuk, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    The comparative analysis of the effect of monotonous and non-monotonous severe plastic deformations (SPD) on the structure and properties of aluminum alloys has been carried out. Conventional hydrostatic extrusion (HE) with a constant deformation direction and equal-channel angular hydroextrusion (ECAH) with an abrupt change in the deformation direction were chosen for the cases of monotonous and non-monotonous SPD, respectively. Model cast hypoeutectic Al-0.3%Sc alloys and hypereutectic Al-0.6%Sc alloys with Ta and Ti additives were chosen for studying. It was demonstrated that SPD of the alloys resulted in the segregation of the material into active and inactive zones which formed a banded structure. The active zones were shown to be bands of localized plastic deformation. The distance between zones was found to be independent of the accumulated strain degree and was in the range of 0.6-1 μm. Dynamic recrystallization in the active zones was observed using TEM. The dynamic recrystallization was accompanied by the formation of disclinations, deformation bands, low-angle, and high-angle boundaries, i.e., rotational deformation modes developed. The dynamic recrystallization was more intense during the non-monotonous deformation as compared with the monotonous one, which was confirmed by the reduction of texture degree in the materials after ECAH.

  20. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  1. Fabrication, appraisal, and transdermal permeation of sildenafil citrate-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers versus solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaggar YS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Yosra SR Elnaggar1, Magda A El-Massik2, Ossama Y Abdallah11Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Drug Manufacturing, Pharos University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Although sildenafil citrate (SC is used extensively for erectile dysfunction, oral delivery of SC encounters many obstacles. Furthermore, the physicochemical characteristics of this amphoteric drug are challenging for delivery system formulation and transdermal permeation. This article concerns the assessment of the potential of nanomedicine for improving SC delivery and transdermal permeation. SC-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs were fabricated using a modified high-shear homogenization technique. Nanoparticle optimization steps included particle size analysis, entrapment efficiency (EE determination, freeze-drying and reconstitution, differential scanning calorimetry, in vitro release, stability study and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Transdermal permeation of the nanocarriers compared with SC suspension across human skin was assessed using a modified Franz diffusion cell assembly. Results revealed that SLNs and NLCs could be optimized in the nanometric range (180 and 100 nm, respectively with excellent EE (96.7% and 97.5%, respectively. Nanoparticles have significantly enhanced in vitro release and transdermal permeation of SC compared with its suspensions. Furthermore, transdermal permeation of SC exhibited higher initial release from both SLN and NLC formulations followed by controlled release, with promising implications for faster onset and longer drug duration. Nanomedicines prepared exhibited excellent physical stability for the study period. Solid nanoparticles optimized in this study successfully improved SC characteristics, paving the way for an efficient topical Viagra® product.Keywords: nanomedicine, transdermal drug

  2. Long-term feeding of red algae (Gelidium amansii ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism in a high fructose diet-impaired glucose tolerance rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hshuan-Chen Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of Gelidium amansii (GA on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in rats with high fructose (HF diet (57.1% w/w. Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a HF diet to induce glucose intolerance and hyperlipidemia. The experiment was divided into three groups: (1 control diet group (Con; (2 HF diet group (HF; and (3 HF with GA diet group (HF + 5% GA. The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 23 weeks. The results showed that GA significantly decreased retroperitoneal fat mass weight of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of GA caused a decrease in plasma glucose, insulin, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin. HF diet increased hepatic lipid content. However, intake of GA reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids including total cholesterol (TC and triglyceride contents. GA elevated the excretion of fecal lipids and bile acid in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, GA significantly decreased plasma TC, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein plus very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and TC/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio in HF diet-fed rats. HF diet induced an in plasma glucose and an impaired glucose tolerance, but GA supplementation decreased homeostasis model assessment equation-insulin resistance and improved impairment of glucose tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation of GA can improve the impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism in an HF diet-fed rat model.

  3. NMR structure of rALF-Pm3, an anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from shrimp: model of the possible lipid A-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinshan; Boze, Hélène; Chemardin, Patrick; Padilla, André; Moulin, Guy; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Pugnière, Martine; Roquet, Françoise; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachère, Evelyne; Aumelas, André

    2009-03-01

    The anti-lipopolysaccharide factor ALF-Pm3 is a 98-residue protein identified in hemocytes from the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. It was expressed in Pichia pastoris from the constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter as a folded and (15)N uniformly labeled rALF-Pm3 protein. Its 3D structure was established by NMR and consists of three alpha-helices packed against a four-stranded beta-sheet. The C(34)-C(55) disulfide bond was shown to be essential for the structure stability. By using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrated that rALF-Pm3 binds to LPS, lipid A and to OM-174, a soluble analogue of lipid A. Biophysical studies of rALF-Pm3/LPS and rALF-Pm3/OM-174 complexes indicated rather high molecular sized aggregates, which prevented us to experimentally determine by NMR the binding mode of these lipids to rALF-Pm3. However, on the basis of striking structural similarities to the FhuA/LPS complex, we designed an original model of the possible lipid A-binding site of ALF-Pm3. Such a binding site, located on the ALF-Pm3 beta-sheet and involving seven charged residues, is well conserved in ALF-L from Limulus polyphemus and in ALF-T from Tachypleus tridentatus. In addition, our model is in agreement with experiments showing that beta-hairpin synthetic peptides corresponding to ALF-L beta-sheet bind to LPS. Delineating lipid A-binding site of ALFs will help go further in the de novo design of new antibacterial or LPS-neutralizing drugs.

  4. SC83288 is a clinical development candidate for the treatment of severe malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Stefano; Duffey, Maëlle; Otto, Thomas D; Wang, Yulin; Rösemann, Roman; Baumgartner, Roland; Fehler, Stefanie K; Lucantoni, Leonardo; Avery, Vicky M; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique; Vial, Henri J; Strobl, Stefan; Sanchez, Cecilia P; Lanzer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Severe malaria is a life-threatening complication of an infection with the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which requires immediate treatment. Safety and efficacy concerns with currently used drugs accentuate the need for new chemotherapeutic options against severe malaria. Here we describe a medicinal chemistry program starting from amicarbalide that led to two compounds with optimized pharmacological and antiparasitic properties. SC81458 and the clinical development candidate, SC83288, are fast-acting compounds that can cure a P. falciparum infection in a humanized NOD/SCID mouse model system. Detailed preclinical pharmacokinetic and toxicological studies reveal no observable drawbacks. Ultra-deep sequencing of resistant parasites identifies the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ transporting PfATP6 as a putative determinant of resistance to SC81458 and SC83288. Features, such as fast parasite killing, good safety margin, a potentially novel mode of action and a distinct chemotype support the clinical development of SC83288, as an intravenous application for the treatment of severe malaria. PMID:28139658

  5. The salt and lipid composition of model cheeses modifies in-mouth flavour release and perception related to the free sodium ion content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisard, Lauriane; Andriot, Isabelle; Martin, Christophe; Septier, Chantal; Boissard, Vanessa; Salles, Christian; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2014-02-15

    Reducing salt and lipid levels in foodstuffs without any effect on acceptability is a major challenge, particularly because of their interactions with other ingredients. This study used a multimodal approach to understand the effects of changes to the composition of model cheeses (20/28, 24/24, 28/20 lipid/protein ratios, 0% and 1% added NaCl) on sodium ion mobility ((23)Na NMR), in-mouth sodium release and flavour perception. An increase in the salt content decreased cheese firmness and perceived hardness, and increased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release and both saltiness and aroma perception. With the same amount of salt, a lower lipid/protein ratio increased the firmness of the cheeses, perceived hardness, and decreased sodium ion mobility, in vivo sodium release, saltiness and aroma perception. These findings suggest on one hand that it could be possible to increase saltiness perception by varying cheese composition, thus inducing differences in sodium ion mobility and in free sodium ion concentration, leading to differences in in-mouth sodium release and saltiness perception, and on the other hand that the reformulation of foods in line with health guidelines needs to take account of both salt content and the lipid/protein ratio.

  6. Yeast lipid metabolism at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Lisa; Daum, Günther

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, lipids have gained much attention due to their involvement in health and disease. Lipids are required for the formation of membranes and contribute to many different processes such as cell signaling, energy supply, and cell death. Various organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and lipid droplets are involved in lipid metabolism. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a reliable model organism to study biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology of lipids. The availability of mutants bearing defects in lipid metabolic pathways and the ease of manipulation by culture conditions facilitated these investigations. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about lipid metabolism in yeast. We grouped this large topic into three sections dealing with (1) fatty acids; (2) membrane lipids; and (3) storage lipids. Fatty acids serve as building blocks for the synthesis of membrane lipids (phospholipids, sphingolipids) and storage lipids (triacylglycerols, steryl esters). Phospholipids, sterols, and sphingolipids are essential components of cellular membranes. Recent investigations addressing lipid synthesis, degradation, and storage as well as regulatory aspects are presented. The role of enzymes governing important steps of the different lipid metabolic pathways is described. Finally, the link between lipid metabolic and dynamic processes is discussed.

  7. Effect of Acylglycerol Composition and Fatty Acyl Chain Length on Lipid Digestion in pH-Stat Digestion Model and Simulated In Vitro Digestion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jin F; Jia, Cai H; Shin, Jung A; Woo, Jeong M; Wang, Xiang Y; Park, Jong T; Hong, Soon T; Lee, K-T

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a pH-stat digestion model and a simulated in vitro digestion model were employed to evaluate the digestion degree of lipids depending on different acylglycerols and acyl chain length (that is, diacylglycerol [DAG] compared with soybean oil representing long-chain triacylglycerol compared with medium-chain triacylglycerol [MCT]). In the pH-stat digestion model, differences were observed among the digestion degrees of 3 oils using digestion rate (k), digestion half-time (t1/2 ), and digestion extent (Φmax). The results showed the digestion rate order was MCT > soybean oil > DAG. Accordingly, the order of digestion half-times was MCT digestion model, digestion rates (k') and digestion half-times (t'1/2 ) were also obtained and the results showed a digestion rate order of MCT (k' = 0.068 min(-1) ) > soybean oil (k' = 0.037 min(-1) ) > DAG (k' = 0.024 min(-1) ). Consequently, the order of digestion half-times was MCT (t'1/2 = 10.20 min) digested faster than soybean oil, and that soybean oil was digested faster than DAG.

  8. SC response characteristics of two kinds of coagulant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨万东; 宋爽; 史惠祥

    2002-01-01

    Automatic coagulant dosage control with streaming current (SC) technique is introduced in this paper. Aluminum and ferric coagulants are widely used in surface water treatment. The SC response characteristics of P-AlCl3 aluminum coagulant and P-FeCl3 ferric coagulant were investigated in this work. Bench-scale water treatment results were obtained from jar tests including rapid mixing, flocculation and undisturbed sedimentation. Results showed that aluminum coagulant is more sensitive than ferric coagulant to SC response.

  9. SC response characteristics of two kinds of coagulant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨万东; 宋爽; 史惠祥

    2002-01-01

    Automatic coagulant dosage control with streaming current (SC) technique is in troduced inthis paper. Aluminum and ferric coagulants are widely used in surface water treatment. The SC response characteristics of P-AiCI3 aluminum coagulant and P-FeCI3 ferric coagulant were investigated in this work. Bench-scale water treatment results were obtained from jar tests including rapid mixing,flocculation and undisturbed sedimentation. Results showed that aluminum coagulant is more sensitive than ferric coagulant to SC response.

  10. Final Scientific Report: DE-SC0002194

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidler, Gerald [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-04-07

    We provide the final scientific report for DE-SC0002194. During the term of this grant, 28 publications spanning a variety of topics were addressed under the rubric of advanced x-ray methods and their application to extreme conditions of time-resolution or x-ray intensities. Notable accomplishments include a new observation of XANES features associated with f-shell reconfiguration in lanthanides, size-dependent x-ray heating effects under XFEL illumination conditions, theoretical development of improved treatments of inelastic x-ray scattering for 'warm dense matter' conditions, and several new instrument develop efforts for atomic, molecular, and condensed phase studies in the lab and at major facility lightsources.

  11. Myoglobin-induced lipid oxidation : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Andersen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of myoglobin-initiated lipid oxidation in simple model systems, muscle, and muscle-based foods is presented. The potential role of myoglobin spin and redox states in initiating lipid oxidation is reviewed. Proposed mechanisms for myoglobin- initiated lipid oxidation in muscle tissue (p...

  12. Effects of Western, Vegetarian, and Japanese dietary fat model diets with or without green tea extract on the plasma lipids and glucose, and liver lipids in mice. A long-term feeding experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of three model diets containing different fats, with or without a small amount of green tea extract (GTE), on plasma lipids and glucose, and liver lipids in mice. Male mice (2 months old) fed 10% fat diets with Western (W), Vegetarian (V), and Japanese (J) fat compositions with or without 0.03% GTE for 7 months. The concentrations of plasma and liver total cholesterol in animals fed the W diet were not significantly different from those fed the J diet. Plasma triacylglycerol (TG) concentrations were significantly different from one another in the following order: V > J > W diet groups. GTE supplementation significantly reduced plasma and liver TG content only in V diet group. Plasma glucose (Glu) concentrations were in the following order: W > V > J diet groups, and the GTE supplementation reduced the concentration of Glu in each diet group. The ratios of plasma n-6 to n-3 fatty acids were in the following order: V > W > J diet groups, regardless of GTE supplementation. These findings show the possibility that Japanese eating habits combined with drinking green tea might be a factor in preventing the onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Normal-2SC mixed phase of quark matter in compact stars for large coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilera, D N; Grigorian, H

    2004-01-01

    We study the consequences of changing the ratio $\\eta$ between the coupling constant in the diquark channel and the coupling constant in the messon channel to a quark matter equation of state under compact stars constraints. A nonlocal chiral quark model is used and the quark interaction is represented via formfactor functions. We found that a mixed phase of 2SC quark matter and normal quark matter (N-2SC) is likely to occur for rather large $\\eta$, 0.86 $\\leq \\eta \\leq$ 1.1 in the interior of compact stars for Gaussian formfactor. For the two other formfactors the range of the mixed phase is shifted to lower values of $\\eta$. This result leads us to suggest that, if the coupling is not so large, spin-1 channels may be more likely to occur rather than the 2SC phase for intermediate densities in the interior of compact stars.

  14. Anomalous Halo Formation in an Arc-Melted ScNi-Sc2Ni Off-Eutectic Binary Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diverse non-equilibrium eutectic structures have attracted numerous experimental and theoretical studies. One special type is the formation of a halo of one phase around a primary dendrite of another phase. In our experiments, it was occasionally observed that ScNi halos grow as dendritic morphology around the primary Sc 2 Ni dendrites in an arc-melted ScNi-Sc 2 Ni off-eutectic binary alloy. The formation of this anomalous halo structure was then well reproduced by employing quantitative phase-field simulations. Based on the phase-field simulation, It was found that (i the large undercooling and growth velocity of the ScNi phase during solidification causes the formation of halos; and (ii the released latent heat induces the recalescence phenomenon, and changes the solidification sequence largely, resulting in the anomalous halo structure in the Sc-34 at % Ni alloy.

  15. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu‐Han; Linden, Melissa A.; Gordon, Alicia; Scott Rector, R.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long‐Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long‐Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L‐Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O‐Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O‐EndEx). O‐Sed rats developed hyperphagia‐induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L‐Sed rats. O‐EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O‐Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up‐regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25602012

  16. Domain structure and phase transition in Sc-doped zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunauer, G.; Boysen, H.; Frey, F.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the domain structure associated with the ferroelastic phase transition (Fm↔R bar 3 m) in ZrO2 doped with 11% Sc2O3 has been determined from a peak shape analysis of high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction data. In the temperature region of coexisting phases the observed characteristic anisotropic broadening and asymmetry of the lines is modelled by three different phases: a main rhombohedral phase, a distorted rhombohedral phase with a smaller c/a ratio, and a cubic phase. The latter two are assigned to the internal structure of the domain walls between two adjacent twin domains. The size and amount of the cubic phase show an initially slow increase with temperature followed by a very steep increase and a slow one after that. The size of the (main) rhombohedral domains remains nearly constant, while (micro-) strain in the distorted regions gradually decreases.

  17. M.Sc. in Civil and Structural Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Johan Christian

    The following pages contain a list of project ideas proposed by the scientific staff at the Department of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University, and a number of companies. Most of the project ideas in this catalogue may form the basis for long and short master projects as well as regular 3rd...... semester projects at the M.Sc. programme in Civil and Structural Engineering. Each project description provides a brief overview of the purpose as well as the main activities. Further, a weighting between theoretical analysis, experimental work and computer modelling has been proposed. Usually...... page. Furthermore, other ideas for projects may be discussed with a potential supervisor. Many private engineering companies have a homepage on which they state that they would like to collaborate with students on a master project....

  18. Mean pion multiplicities in Ar+Sc collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Naskręt, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary results for mean negatively charged pion multiplicities $\\langle \\pi^- \\rangle$ using the $h^-$ method are presented for central Ar+Sc collisions at 13, 19, 30, 40, 75 and 150\\textit{A} GeV/c beam momentum. The data were recorded by the NA61/SHINE detector at the CERN SPS. Starting with rapidity distributions ${dn}/{dy}$ the procedure of obtaining total multiplicities is presented. The mean number of wounded nucleons $\\langle W\\rangle$ extracted from the Glissando MC model is used to calculate the ratio $\\langle \\pi^- \\rangle/\\langle W\\rangle.$ The results are compared to those from other experiments and their dependence on colliding systems and collision energy is discussed.

  19. Porphyrin lipid nanoparticles for enhanced photothermal therapy in a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft cancer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.; Ding, Lili; Jin, Cheng; Cao, Pingjiang; Siddiqui, Iram; Hwang, David M.; Chen, Juan; Wilson, Brian C.; Zheng, Gang; Hedley, David W.

    2016-03-01

    Local disease control is a major problem in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, because curative-intent surgery is only possible in a minority of patients, and radiotherapy cannot be delivered in curative doses. Despite the promise of photothermal therapy (PTT) for ablation of pancreatic tumors, this approach remains under investigated. Using photothermal sensitizers in combination with laser light for PTT can result in more efficient conversion of light energy to heat, and confinement of thermal destruction to the tumor, thus sparing adjacent organs and vasculature. Porphyrins have been previously employed as photosensitizers for PDT and PTT, however their incorporation in to "porphysomes", lipid-based nanoparticles each containing ~80,000 porphyrins through conjugation of pyropheophorbide to phospholipids, carries two distinct advantages: 1) high-density porphyrin packing imparts the nanoparticles with enhanced photonic properties for imaging and phototherapy; 2) the enhanced permeability and retention effect may be exploited for optimal delivery of porphysomes to the tumor region thus high payload porphyrin delivery. The feasibility of porphysome-enhanced PTT for pancreatic cancer treatment was investigated using a patient-derived orthotopic pancreas xenograft tumor model. Uptake of porphysomes at the orthotopic tumor site was validated using ex vivo fluorescence imaging of intact organs of interest. The accumulation of porphysomes in orthotopic tumor microstructure was also confirmed by fluorescence imaging of excised tissue slices. PTT progress was monitored as changes in tumor surface temperature using IR optical imaging. Histological analyses were conducted to examine microstructure changes in tissue morphology, and the viability of remaining tumor tissues following exposure to heat. These studies may also provide insight as to the contribution of heat sink in application of thermal therapies to highly vascularized pancreatic tumors.

  20. IEC SC15E: Report on liaison activities of CIGRÉ-SC15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    WG’s activities under CIGRÉ SC15:WG 15.01 - Fluid impregnated systems.WG 15.02 - Dielectric Liquids.WG 15.03 - Gas Insulation.WG 15.04 - Outdoor Insulation.WG 15.05 - Capacitors.WG 15.07 - Solid Insulating Materials for Rotating Machines.WG 15/33.08 - Insulation Monitoring and Life Estimation. WG...

  1. Energy dependence of deformation parameters in the SC(p,p') SC reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Glashausser, C.; de Swiniarski, R.; Nanda, S.; Carey, T.A.; Cornelius, W.; Moss, J.M.; McClelland, J.B.; Comfort, J.R.; Escudie, J.

    1986-01-01

    Values of deformation parameters have been extracted from macroscopic coupled-channels analyses of inelastic proton scattering to the first 2 , 3 , and 4 states of SC over the energy range from 200 to 700 MeV. The apparent deformations are almost unchanged over this energy interval; they agree also with nucleon scattering data at much lower energies and at 800 MeV and 1 GeV.

  2. A depth-dependent profile of the lipid conformation and lateral packing order of the stratum corneum in vivo measured using Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, ChunSik; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-03-21

    The intercellular lipid structure of the stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in skin barrier function. A depth profile of the intercellular lipid conformation and the lipid lateral packing order were measured in vivo in the human SC using confocal Raman microscopy. The depth profiles of the 2880 cm(-1)/2850 cm(-1) peak ratio intensity, which represent the C-H stretching and lateral packing order of lipids, and the 1080 cm(-1)/(1130 cm(-1) + 1060 cm(-1)) peak ratio, which represents the C-C skeleton vibration and trans-gauche conformation order of lipids, were investigated. The influence of keratin on the lipid peaks at 2850 cm(-1) and 2880 cm(-1) was excluded by the developed mathematical algorithm. The results show that the trans-conformation and lateral packing order of the intercellular lipids reach their maximum value in the SC at 20-40% of its depth and then decrease towards the stratum granulosum. These results show that at a depth of 20-40% (normally corresponding to a depth of 4-8 μm) the SC exhibits the most ordered lipids and therefore the highest skin barrier function. The lateral packing of lipids is more disordered on the surface and in the deeper parts of the SC, which may be associated with a reduced skin barrier function.

  3. Inoculation with Metal-Mobilizing Plant-Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus sp. SC2b and Its Role in Rhizoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Oliveira, Rui S; Wu, Longhua; Luo, Yongming; Rajkumar, Mani; Rocha, Inês; Freitas, Helena

    2015-01-01

    A plant growth-promoting bacterial (PGPB) strain SC2b was isolated from the rhizosphere of Sedum plumbizincicola grown in lead (Pb)/zinc (Zn) mine soils and characterized as Bacillus sp. based on (1) morphological and biochemical characteristics and (2) partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing analysis. Strain SC2b exhibited high levels of resistance to cadmium (Cd) (300 mg/L), Zn (730 mg/L), and Pb (1400 mg/L). This strain also showed various plant growth-promoting (PGP) features such as utilization of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, solubilization of phosphate, and production of indole-3-acetic acid and siderophore. The strain mobilized high concentration of heavy metals from soils and exhibited different biosorption capacity toward the tested metal ions. Strain SC2b was further assessed for PGP activity by phytagar assay with a model plant Brassica napus. Inoculation of SC2b increased the biomass and vigor index of B. napus. Considering such potential, a pot experiment was conducted to assess the effects of inoculating the metal-resistant PGPB SC2b on growth and uptake of Cd, Zn and Pb by S. plumbizincicola in metal-contaminated agricultural soils. Inoculation with SC2b elevated the shoot and root biomass and leaf chlorophyll content of S. plumbizincicola. Similarly, plants inoculated with SC2b demonstrated markedly higher Cd and Zn accumulation in the root and shoot system, indicating that SC2b enhanced Cd and Zn uptake by S. plumbizincicola through metal mobilization or plant-microbial mediated changes in chemical or biological soil properties. Data demonstrated that the PGPB Bacillus sp. SC2b might serve as a future biofertilizer and an effective metal mobilizing bioinoculant for rhizoremediation of metal polluted soils.

  4. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosicek, Marko, E-mail: marko.kosicek@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Malnar, Martina, E-mail: martina.malnar@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Goate, Alison, E-mail: goate@icarus.wustl.edu [Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Hecimovic, Silva, E-mail: silva.hecimovic@irb.hr [Division of Molecular Medicine, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  5. Lipid metabolism in Drosophila: development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Liu; Xun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Proteins,nucleic acids,and lipids are three major components of the cell.Despite a few basic metabolic pathways,we know very little about lipids,compared with the explosion of knowledge about proteins and nucleic acids.How many different forms of lipids are there? What are the in vivo functions of individual lipid? How does lipid metabolism contribute to normal development and human health? Many of these questions remain unanswered.For over a century,the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to study basic biological questions.In recent years,increasing evidences proved that Drosophila models are highly valuable for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis researches.Some recent progresses of lipid metabolic regulation during Drosophila development and in Drosophila models of human diseases will be discussed in this review.

  6. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor protein diffusion by actin corrals and lipid raft domains receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Yu; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2015-03-01

    To faithfully estimate a signal that varies in both space and time, the optimization strategy used by a live cell is to organize a collection of distributed and mobile receptors into a mobile active clustering. However, living eukaryotic cells are highly heterogeneous and stochastically dynamic. It is therefore important to develop an energetic model based on fundamental laws to verify that the underlying processes are energetically favorable. We developed an energetic model based on the generalized Langevin equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane with a hierarchical structure of actin corrals, lipid domains, and receptor proteins. Single-molecule tracking data of EGFR acquired on live HeLa cells agrees with the simulation results. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method captures both the sensitivity of single-molecule processes, statistic accuracy of data analysis, and the hierarchical structure of plasma membranes.

  7. Recent Advances in Analytical Methods on Lipoprotein Subclasses: Calculation of Particle Numbers from Lipid Levels by Gel Permeation HPLC Using "Spherical Particle Model".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Mitsuyo; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed an analytical method for determining the lipid levels and particle numbers in lipoprotein subclasses covering a wide size range from chylomicrons to small high density lipoproteins, by using gel permeation high-performance liquid chromatography (GP-HPLC). The challenges in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses have been addressed from 1980 by Hara and Okazaki using commercial TSK gel permeation columns. Later, the improvements in the hardware, separation and detection of lipoproteins, and the data processing software, using a Gaussian distribution approximation to calculate lipid levels of lipoprotein subclasses, have been extensively utilized in these analytical methods for over thirty years. In this review, we describe on the recent advances in analytical methods on lipoprotein subclasses based on various techniques, and the calculation of particle numbers from lipid levels by GPHPLC using the "spherical particle model". Free/ester ratio of cholesterol in particular lipoprotein subclass was accurately estimated from triglyceride, total cholesterol (free and esterified) and the size of the particle based on this model originally proposed by Shen and Kezdy.

  8. Human bulbar conjunctival hemodynamics in hemoglobin SS and SC disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanek, Justin; Gaynes, Bruce; Lim, Jennifer I; Molokie, Robert; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2013-08-01

    The known biophysical variations of hemoglobin (Hb) S and Hb C may result in hemodynamic differences between subjects with SS and SC disease. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare conjunctival hemodynamics between subjects with Hb SS and SC hemoglobinopathies. Image sequences of the conjunctival microcirculation were acquired in 9 healthy control subjects (Hb AA), 24 subjects with SC disease, and 18 subjects with SS disease, using a prototype imaging system. Diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) measurements were obtained in multiple venules of each subject. Data were categorized according to venule caliber by averaging V and D for venules with diameters less than (vessel size 1) or greater than (vessel size 2) 15 µm. V in vessel size 2 was significantly greater than V in vessel size 1 in the AA and SS groups (P ≥ 0.009), but not in the SC group (P = 0.1). V was significantly lower in the SC group as compared to the SS group (P = 0.03). In AA and SS groups, V correlated with D (P ≤ 0.005), but the correlation was not statistically significant in the SC group (P = 0.08). V was inversely correlated with hematocrit in the SS group for large vessels (P = 0.03); however, no significant correlation was found in the SC group (P ≥ 0.2). Quantitative assessment of conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics in SS and SC disease may advance understanding of sickle cell disease pathophysiology and thereby improve therapeutic interventions.

  9. 76 FR 58401 - Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 38586). We received no... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC... temporary moving safety zone during the Swim Around Charleston, a swimming race occurring on waters of...

  10. Sorafenib analogue SC-60 induces apoptosis through the SHP-1/STAT3 pathway and enhances docetaxel cytotoxicity in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Su, Jung-Chen; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Chu, Pei-Yi; Huang, Chun-Teng; Wang, Wan-Lun; Lee, Chia-Han; Lau, Ka-Yi; Tsai, Wen-Chun; Yang, Hsiu-Ping; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Recurrent triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) needs new therapeutic targets. Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) can act as a tumor suppressor by dephosphorylating oncogenic kinases. One major target of SHP-1 is STAT3, which is highly activated in TNBC. In this study, we tested a sorafenib analogue SC-60, which lacks angiokinase inhibition activity, but acts as a SHP-1 agonist, in TNBC cells. SC-60 inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis by dephosphorylating STAT3 in both a dose- and time-dependent manner in TNBC cells (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and HCC1937). By contrast, ectopic expression of STAT3 rescued the anticancer effect induced by SC-60. SC-60 also increased the SHP-1 activity, but this effect was inhibited when the N-SH2 domain (DN1) was deleted or with SHP-1 point mutation (D61A), implying that SHP-1 is the major target of SC-60 in TNBC. The use of SC-60 in combination with docetaxel synergized the anticancer effect induced by SC-60 through the SHP-1/STAT3 pathway in TNBC cells. Importantly, SC-60 also displayed a significant antitumor effect in an MDA-MB-468 xenograft model by modulating the SHP-1/STAT3 axis, indicating the anticancer potential of SC-60 in TNBC treatment. Targeting SHP-1/p-STAT3 and the potential combination of SHP-1 agonist with chemotherapeutic docetaxel is a feasible therapeutic strategy for TNBC.

  11. Relationships between flavour, lipid composition and antioxidants in organic, free-range and conventional chicken breasts from modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Kishowar; Paterson, Alistair; Spickett, Corinne M

    2006-01-01

    Consumers expect organic, free-range and corn-fed chicken to be nutritionally wholesome and have premium flavour characters. Interrelationships between flavour, fatty acids and antioxidants of retailed breasts were explored using simple correlations and chemometrics. Saturated fatty acid C16:0, and n-6 polyunsaturated C20:4 and C22:4 contents were correlated with lipid oxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and in partial least-squares regression (PLS1) with 32 high-resonance gas chromatography (flame ionization) flavour components (r2>0.90), and also linked (r2>0.80) to antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol, glutathione and catalase). A further 10 high-resonance gas chromatography nitrogen phosphorus detector flavour components were correlated (r2>0.85) with C18:3(n-3) content. Chicken character was correlated with C18:3(n-3), and C18:3(n-6) inversely with oily, off-flavour and lipid oxidation. Sweet, fruity and oily aromas were linked in PLS1 with 13 specific fatty acids (r2>0.6), and bland taste with total summed (six) fatty acid fractions (r2>0.81). Specific antioxidants were correlated with sweet, fruity and chicken aromas, and alpha-tocopherol inversely with lipid oxidation. PLS2 confirmed relationships between fatty acid composition, antioxidants and the subsets of 32 and 10 flavour components. Clear relationships were thus observed between lipid and antioxidant compositions and flavour in chicken breast meat.

  12. Continuous administration of enteral lipid- and protein-rich nutrition limits inflammation in a human endotoxemia model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, T.; Kox, M.; Haan, J.J. de; Greve, J.W.; Pompe, J.C.; Ramakers, B.P.C.; Pickkers, P.; Buurman, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : An overzealous inflammatory response is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical, trauma, and critically ill patients. Enteral administration of lipid-rich nutrition was previously shown to attenuate inflammation and reduce organ damage via a cholecystokinin-1 receptor-

  13. Aberrant Lipid Metabolism in the Forebrain Niche Suppresses Adult Neural Stem Cell Proliferation in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Laura K; Dufresne, Martin; Joppé, Sandra E; Petryszyn, Sarah; Aumont, Anne; Calon, Frédéric; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie; Furtos, Alexandra; Parent, Martin; Chaurand, Pierre; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2015-10-01

    Lipid metabolism is fundamental for brain development and function, but its roles in normal and pathological neural stem cell (NSC) regulation remain largely unexplored. Here, we uncover a fatty acid-mediated mechanism suppressing endogenous NSC activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We found that postmortem AD brains and triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD) mice accumulate neutral lipids within ependymal cells, the main support cell of the forebrain NSC niche. Mass spectrometry and microarray analyses identified these lipids as oleic acid-enriched triglycerides that originate from niche-derived rather than peripheral lipid metabolism defects. In wild-type mice, locally increasing oleic acid was sufficient to recapitulate the AD-associated ependymal triglyceride phenotype and inhibit NSC proliferation. Moreover, inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme of oleic acid synthesis rescued proliferative defects in both adult neurogenic niches of 3xTg-AD mice. These studies support a pathogenic mechanism whereby AD-induced perturbation of niche fatty acid metabolism suppresses the homeostatic and regenerative functions of NSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  15. General aspects of peptide selectivity towards lipid bilayers and cell membranes studied by variation of the structural parameters of amphipathic helical model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Margitta; Meyer, Jana; Beyermann, Michael; Maul, Björn; Hoischen, Christian; Bienert, Michael

    2002-02-01

    Model compounds of modified hydrophobicity (Eta), hydrophobic moment (mu) and angle subtended by charged residues (Phi) were synthesized to define the general roles of structural motifs of cationic helical peptides for membrane activity and selectivity. The peptide sets were based on a highly hydrophobic, non-selective KLA model peptide with high antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Variation of the investigated parameters was found to be a suitable method for modifying peptide selectivity towards either neutral or highly negatively charged lipid bilayers. Eta and mu influenced selectivity preferentially via modification of activity on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, while the size of the polar/hydrophobic angle affected the activity against 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidyl-DL-glycerol (POPG). The influence of the parameters on the activity determining step was modest in both lipid systems and the activity profiles were the result of the parameters' influence on the second less pronounced permeabilization step. Thus, the activity towards POPC vesicles was determined by the high permeabilizing efficiency, however, changes in the structural parameters preferentially influenced the relatively moderate affinity. In contrast, intensive peptide accumulation via electrostatic interactions was sufficient for the destabilization of highly negatively charged POPG lipid membranes, but changes in the activity profile, as revealed by the modification of Phi, seem to be preferentially caused by variation of the low permeabilizing efficiency. The parameters proved very effective also in modifying antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. However, their influence on cell selectivity was limited. A threshold value of hydrophobicity seems to exist which restricted the activity modifying potential of mu and Phi on both lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  16. Thermal stability of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei-tao; YAN De-sheng; RONG Li-jian

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability of Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitates in the cold worked Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy after elevated temperature exposure was investigated. The evaluation was conducted using room temperature tensile, Vicker's hardness, optical metallography and scanning electron microscope (SEM) with the backscatter. The results show that the Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitates and mechanical properties have no obvious change, and the grains keep elongated along the working direction as that in cold worked sample after exposure at 300 ℃ for 1 000 h. The coarsening of Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitates occurs and is no longer effective on the recrystallization resistance, and partial recrystallization is observed after 400 ℃ exposure. In particular, after 500 ℃ exposure, the hardness decreases drastically and the alloy has fully recrystallized due to the obvious coarsening of Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitates.

  17. The microstructure of the stratum corneum lipid barrier: mid-infrared spectroscopic studies of hydrated ceramide:palmitic acid:cholesterol model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Fölting, Bettina; Schaller, Ingrid; Kerth, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The current mid-infrared spectroscopic study is a systematic investigation of hydrated stratum corneum lipid barrier model systems composed of an equimolar mixture of a ceramide, free palmitic acid and cholesterol. Four different ceramide molecules (CER NS, CER NP, CER NP-18:1, CER AS) were investigated with regard to their microstructure arrangement in a stratum corneum lipid barrier model system. Ceramide molecules were chosen from the sphingosine and phytosphingosine groups. The main differences in the used ceramide molecules result from their polar head group architecture as well as hydrocarbon chain properties. The mixing properties with cholesterol and palmitic acid are considered. This is feasible by using perdeuterated palmitic acid and proteated ceramides. Both molecules can be monitored separately, within the same experiment, using mid-infrared spectroscopy; no external label is necessary. At physiological relevant temperatures, between 30 and 35 degrees C, orthorhombic as well as hexagonal chain packing of the ceramide molecules is observed. The formation of these chain packings are extremely dependent on lipid hydration, with a decrease in ceramide hydration favouring the formation of orthorhombic hydrocarbon chain packing, as well as temperature. The presented data suggest in specific cases phase segregation in ceramide and palmitic acid rich phases. However, other ceramides like CER NP-18:1 show a rather high miscibility with palmitic acid and cholesterol. For all investigated ternary systems, more or less mixing of palmitic acid with cholesterol is observed. The investigated stratum corneum mixtures exhibit a rich polymorphism from crystalline domains with heterogeneous lipid composition to a "fluid" homogeneous phase. Thus, a single gel phase is not evident for the presented stratum corneum model systems. The study shows, that under skin physiological conditions (pH 5.5, hydrated, 30-35 degrees C) ternary systems composed of an equimolar ratio of

  18. Effect of Sc and Zr on the in-plane anisotropy of Al-Mg-Mn alloy sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yongyi; YIN Zhimin; YANG Jin; DU Yuxuan

    2005-01-01

    The Al-Mg-Mn alloy sheets with and without trace Sc and Zr were investigated by means of tensile test, X-ray diffraction, optical microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The indexes of in-plane anisotropy (IIPA) of their tensile mechanical properties were calculated and their inverse pole figures were obtained by Harris method. The two alloy sheets have the same law of in-plane anisotropy and remarkable in-plane anisotropy of mechanical properties, and the IIPA of the alloy sheet with Sc and Zr is bigger than that of the alloy sheet without Sc and Zr. The relationships of the in-plane anisotropy and the anisotropy of the crystallographic texture were analyzed based on the model of monocrystal. It is the common action of the anisotropy of crystallography and microstructures that causes the in-plane anisotropy of their mechanical sotropy of the alloy sheet containing trace Sc and Zr.

  19. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the alteration of cell membrane's properties. Here we used as model systems multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) made of the first two products in the oxidative cascade of linoleoyl lecithin, namely 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (Hp......PLPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (OHPLPC), exhibiting a hydroperoxide or a hydroxy group at position 13, respectively. The two oxidized lipids were used either pure or in a 1:1 molar ratio mixture with untreated 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-lecithin (PLPC). The model membranes...... were doped with spin-labeled lipids to study bilayer alterations by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Two different spin-labeled lipids were used, bearing the doxyl ring at position (n) 5 or 16: γ-palmitoyl-β-(n-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin (n-DSPPC) and n-doxylstearic acid (n-DSA). Small...

  20. Cyclotron production of (44)Sc: From bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Bunka, Maruta; Domnanich, Katharina A; Müller, Cristina; Haller, Stephanie; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2015-09-01

    (44)Sc, a PET radionuclide, has promising decay characteristics (T1/2 = 3.97 h, Eβ(+)av = 632 keV) for nuclear imaging and is an attractive alternative to the short-lived (68)Ga (T1/2 = 68 min, Eβ(+)av = 830 keV). The aim of this study was the optimization of the (44)Sc production process at an accelerator, allowing its use for preclinical and clinical PET imaging. (44)CaCO3 targets were prepared and irradiated with protons (~11 MeV) at a beam current of 50 μA for 90 min. (44)Sc was separated from its target material using DGA extraction resin and concentrated using SCX cation exchange resin. Radiolabeling experiments at activities up to 500 MBq and stability tests were performed with DOTANOC by investigating different scavengers, including gentisic acid. Dynamic PET of an AR42J tumor-bearing mouse was performed after injection of (44)Sc-DOTANOC. The optimized chemical separation method yielded up to 2 GBq (44)Sc of high radionuclidic purity. In the presence of gentisic acid, radiolabeling of (44)Sc with DOTANOC was achieved with a radiochemical yield of ~99% at high specific activity (10 MBq/nmol) and quantities which would allow clinical application. The dynamic PET images visualized increasing uptake of (44)Sc-DOTANOC into AR42J tumors and excretion of radioactivity through the kidneys of the investigated mouse. The concept "from-bench-to-bedside" was clearly demonstrated in this extended study using cyclotron-produced (44)Sc. Sufficiently high activities of (44)Sc of excellent radionuclidic purity are obtainable for clinical application, by irradiation of enriched calcium at a cyclotron. This work demonstrates a promising basis for introducing (44)Sc to clinical routine of nuclear imaging using PET. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. LipidFrag: Improving reliability of in silico fragmentation of lipids and application to the Caenorhabditis elegans lipidome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Steffen; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Lipid identification is a major bottleneck in high-throughput lipidomics studies. However, tools for the analysis of lipid tandem MS spectra are rather limited. While the comparison against spectra in reference libraries is one of the preferred methods, these libraries are far from being complete. In order to improve identification rates, the in silico fragmentation tool MetFrag was combined with Lipid Maps and lipid-class specific classifiers which calculate probabilities for lipid class assignments. The resulting LipidFrag workflow was trained and evaluated on different commercially available lipid standard materials, measured with data dependent UPLC-Q-ToF-MS/MS acquisition. The automatic analysis was compared against manual MS/MS spectra interpretation. With the lipid class specific models, identification of the true positives was improved especially for cases where candidate lipids from different lipid classes had similar MetFrag scores by removing up to 56% of false positive results. This LipidFrag approach was then applied to MS/MS spectra of lipid extracts of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Fragments explained by LipidFrag match known fragmentation pathways, e.g., neutral losses of lipid headgroups and fatty acid side chain fragments. Based on prediction models trained on standard lipid materials, high probabilities for correct annotations were achieved, which makes LipidFrag a good choice for automated lipid data analysis and reliability testing of lipid identifications. PMID:28278196

  2. Hydride vapor phase epitaxy growth of GaN, InGaN, ScN, and ScAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohnen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD); hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE); gallium nitride (GaN); indium gallium nitride (InGaN); scandium nitride (ScN); scandium aluminum nitride (ScAlN); semiconductors; thin films; nanowires; III nitrides; crystal growth - We studied the HVPE growth of different III ni

  3. Effective single chain antibody (scFv) concentrations in vivo via adenoviral vector mediated expression of secretory scFv

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, WO; Gomez-Navarro, J; Buchsbaum, DJ; Xiang, J; Casado, E; Barker, SD; Mahasreshti, PJ; Haisma, HJ; Barnes, MN; Siegal, GP; Alvarez, RD; Hemminki, A; Nettelbeck, DM; Curiel, DT

    2002-01-01

    Single chain antibodies (scFv) represent powerful interventional agents for the achievement of targeted therapeutics. The practical utility of these agents have been limited, however, by difficulties related to production of recombinant scFv and the achievement of effective and sustained levels of s

  4. K2SC: flexible systematics correction and detrending of K2 light curves using Gaussian process regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigrain, S.; Parviainen, H.; Pope, B. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present K2SC (K2 Systematics Correction), a PYTHON pipeline to model instrumental systematics and astrophysical variability in light curves from the K2 mission. K2SC uses Gaussian Process regression to model position-dependent systematics and time-dependent variability simultaneously, enabling the user to remove both (e.g. for transit searches) or to remove systematics while preserving variability (for variability studies). For periodic variables, K2SC automatically computes estimates of the period, amplitude and evolution time-scale of the variability. We apply K2SC to publicly available K2 data from Campaigns 3-5 showing that we obtain photometric precision approaching that of the original Kepler mission. We compare our results to other publicly available K2 pipelines, showing that we obtain similar or better results, on average. We use transit injection and recovery tests to evaluate the impact of K2SC on planetary transit searches in K2 Pre-search Data Conditioning data, for planet-to-star radius ratios down to Rp/R* = 0.01 and periods up to P = 40 d, and show that K2SC significantly improves the ability to distinguish between true and false detections, particularly for small planets. K2SC can be run automatically on many light curves, or manually tailored for specific objects such as pulsating stars or large amplitude eclipsing binaries. It can be run on ASCII and FITS light-curve files, regardless of their origin. Both the code and the processed light curves are publicly available, and we provide instructions for downloading and using them. The methodology used by K2SC will be applicable to future transit search missions such as TESS and PLATO.

  5. The high-temperature modification of ScRuSi - Structure, 29Si and 45Sc solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Haverkamp, Sandra; Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Heying, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2017-10-01

    A polycrystalline sample of the TiNiSi type low-temperature (LT) modification of ScRuSi was synthesized by arc-melting. Longer annealing in a sealed silica tube (6 weeks at 1270 K) followed by quenching led to the high-temperature (HT) phase. HT-ScRuSi adopts the ZrNiAl structure type: P 6 bar 2 m , a = 688.27(9), c = 336.72(5) pm, wR2 = 0.0861, 260 F2 values, 14 variables. The striking structural building units are regular, tricapped trigonal prisms Si1@Ru3Sc6 and Si2@Ru6Sc3. Both polymorphs have been characterized by 29Si and 45Sc MAS-NMR spectroscopy. The local scandium environments in the two polymorphs are easily distinguished by their electric field gradient tensor values, in agreement with theoretically calculated values.

  6. Cyclotron production of {sup 43}Sc for PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walczak, Rafał [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Krajewski, Seweryn [Synektik S.A., Research and Development Center, Warsaw (Poland); Szkliniarz, Katarzyna [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Sitarz, Mateusz [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Abbas, Kamel [Nuclear Security Unit, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, European Commission, Ispra (Italy); Choiński, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Andrzej; Jastrzębski, Jerzy [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Majkowska, Agnieszka [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Simonelli, Federica [Nuclear Decommissioning Unit, Joint Research Centre, Ispra Site Management Directorate, European Commission, Ispra (Italy); Stolarz, Anna; Trzcińska, Agnieszka [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Zipper, Wiktor [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Bilewicz, Aleksander [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-12-04

    Recently, significant interest in {sup 44}Sc as a tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been observed. Unfortunately, the co-emission by {sup 44}Sc of high-energy γ rays (E{sub γ} = 1157, 1499 keV) causes a dangerous increase of the radiation dose to the patients and clinical staff. However, it is possible to produce another radionuclide of scandium—{sup 43}Sc—having properties similar to {sup 44}Sc but is characterized by much lower energy of the concurrent gamma emissions. This work presents the production route of {sup 43}Sc by α irradiation of natural calcium, its separation and purification processes, and the labeling of [DOTA,Tyr3] octreotate (DOTATATE) bioconjugate. Natural CaCO{sub 3} and enriched [{sup 40}Ca]CaCO{sub 3} were irradiated with alpha particles for 1 h in an energy range of 14.8–30 MeV at a beam current of 0.5 or 0.25 μA. In order to find the optimum method for the separation of {sup 43}Sc from irradiated calcium targets, three processes previously developed for {sup 44}Sc were tested. Radiolabeling experiments were performed with DOTATATE radiobioconjugate, and the stability of the obtained {sup 43}Sc-DOTATATE was tested in human serum. Studies of {sup nat}CaCO{sub 3} target irradiation by alpha particles show that the optimum alpha particle energies are in the range of 24–27 MeV, giving 102 MBq/μA/h of {sup 43}Sc radioactivity which creates the opportunity to produce several GBq of {sup 43}Sc. The separation experiments performed indicate that, as with {sup 44}Sc, due to the simplicity of the operations and because of the chemical purity of the {sup 43}Sc obtained, the best separation process is when UTEVA resin is used. The DOTATATE conjugate was labeled by the obtained {sup 43}Sc with a yield >98 % at elevated temperature. Tens of GBq activities of {sup 43}Sc of high radionuclidic purity can be obtainable for clinical applications by irradiation of natural calcium with an alpha beam.

  7. Electroacupuncture at Acupoints Reverses Plasma Glutamate, Lipid, and LDL/VLDL in an Acute Migraine Rat Model: A1H NMR-Based Metabolomic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zishan Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The objective of this study was to identify potential biomarkers of electroacupuncture (EA on relieving acute migraine through metabolomic study. Methods. EA treatments were performed on both acupoints and nonacupoints on the nitroglycerin (NTG-induced migraine rat model. NMR experiments and multivariate analysis were used for metabolomic analysis. Results. The number of head-scratching, the main ethology index of migraine rat model, was significantly increased P<0.01 after NTG injection. The plasma metabolic profile of model group was distinct from that of the control group. Glutamate was significantly increased P<0.01, whereas lipids were significantly decreased P<0.01 in model rats. After EA at acupoints, the metabolic profile of model rats was normalized, with decreased glutamate P<0.05 and increased lipids P<0.01. In contrast, EA at nonacupoints did not restore the metabolic profile, but with six metabolites significantly different from acupoints group. Interestingly, the number of head-scratching and glutamate level were significantly decreased P<0.05 after receiving EA at both acupoints and nonacupoints. Conclusions. EA at acupoints may relieve acute migraine by restoring the plasma metabolic profile and plasma glutamate, while EA at nonacupoints may modestly relieve acute migraine by decreasing plasma glutamate.

  8. Alligator pepper/Grain of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta) modulates Angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity, lipid profile and oxidative imbalances in a rat model of hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefegha, Stephen A; Oboh, Ganiyu; Adefegha, Omowunmi M; Henle, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Alligator pepper [Aframomum melegueta Roscoe K. (Zingiberaceae)] seeds have been reportedly used in folkloric medicine in the management of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension with limited scientific basis for their action. This study was conducted to characterize the amino acids in Alligator pepper seeds (APS), assess their effects on lipid profile and enzyme linked to blood pressure regulation in hypercholesterolemic rat (rats fed 2% cholesterol diet) model. Free and total amino acids of APS were extracted and their various constituents were analyzed using the amino acid analyzer and ultra-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of dietary inclusion of APS (2-4%) on the lipid profile, angiotensin I-enzyme (ACE) activity and antioxidant status in hypercholesterolemic rats (HCR) for 30days was assessed. The results suggest that APS may modulate blood lipid profile, ameliorate blood pressure, attenuate hepatotoxicity and exert antihypercholesterolemic effect. γ - amino butyric acid (GABA), tyrosine, phenylalanine and tryptophan that were subsequently detected in APS. The observed salutary effects of APS may be attributed to the synergistic or/and additive actions of the amino acids present with other antioxidant phytoconstituents. These findings may therefore provide pharmacological basis for APS use in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia and hypertension.

  9. 2D-ELDOR using full Sc- fitting and absorption lineshapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio; Freed, Jack H.

    2007-10-01

    Recent progress in developing 2D-ELDOR (2D electron-electron double resonance) techniques to better capture molecular dynamics in complex fluids, particularly in model and biological membranes, is reported. The new "full Sc- method", which corrects the spectral analysis for the phase distortion effects present in the experiments, is demonstrated to enhance the sensitivity of 2D-ELDOR in reporting on molecular dynamics in complex membrane environments. That is, instead of performing spectral fitting in the magnitude mode, our new method enables simultaneous fitting of both the real and imaginary components of the Sc- signal. The full Sc- fitting not only corrects the phase distortions in the experimental data but also more accurately determines instrumental dead times. The phase corrections applied to the Sc- spectrum enable the extraction of the pure absorption-mode spectrum, which is characterized by much better resolution than the magnitude-mode spectrum. In the absorption mode, the variation of homogeneous broadening, which reports on the dynamics of the spin probe, can even be observed by visual inspection. This new method is illustrated with results from model membranes of dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-cholesterol binary mixtures, as well as with results from plasma membrane vesicles of mast cells. In addition to the dynamic parameters, which provide quantitative descriptions for membranes at the molecular level, the high-resolution absorption spectra themselves may be used as a "fingerprint" to characterize membrane phases and distinguish coexisting components in biomembranes. Thus we find that 2D-ELDOR is greatly improved with the new "full Sc- method" especially for exploring the complexity of model and biological membranes.

  10. 2D-ELDOR using full S(c-) fitting and absorption lineshapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio; Freed, Jack H

    2007-10-01

    Recent progress in developing 2D-ELDOR (2D electron-electron double resonance) techniques to better capture molecular dynamics in complex fluids, particularly in model and biological membranes, is reported. The new "full S(c-) method", which corrects the spectral analysis for the phase distortion effects present in the experiments, is demonstrated to enhance the sensitivity of 2D-ELDOR in reporting on molecular dynamics in complex membrane environments. That is, instead of performing spectral fitting in the magnitude mode, our new method enables simultaneous fitting of both the real and imaginary components of the S(c-) signal. The full S(c-) fitting not only corrects the phase distortions in the experimental data but also more accurately determines instrumental dead times. The phase corrections applied to the S(c-) spectrum enable the extraction of the pure absorption-mode spectrum, which is characterized by much better resolution than the magnitude-mode spectrum. In the absorption mode, the variation of homogeneous broadening, which reports on the dynamics of the spin probe, can even be observed by visual inspection. This new method is illustrated with results from model membranes of dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-cholesterol binary mixtures, as well as with results from plasma membrane vesicles of mast cells. In addition to the dynamic parameters, which provide quantitative descriptions for membranes at the molecular level, the high-resolution absorption spectra themselves may be used as a "fingerprint" to characterize membrane phases and distinguish coexisting components in biomembranes. Thus we find that 2D-ELDOR is greatly improved with the new "full S(c-) method" especially for exploring the complexity of model and biological membranes.

  11. Lipid signaling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, T.

    2010-01-01

    This book highlights the current status of plant lipid signaling. Written by leading researchers in the field, the chapters include detailed information on the measurement, regulation and function of phospholipases, lipid kinases, lipid phosphatases, inositolpolyphosphates, polyphosphoinositides, ph

  12. Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Lipid metabolism disorders, such as Gaucher disease and Tay-Sachs disease, involve lipids. Lipids are fats or fat-like substances. They ...

  13. Plant lipid signaling protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, T.; Heilmann, I.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by membranes consisting of various lipids, including sterols, sphingolipids, glycolipids, and phospholipids. Besides structural functions, membranes also contain lipids with regulatory and signaling roles. Such lipids include polyphosphoinositides, the low-abundant

  14. Effects of cooling rate on solidification behavior of dilute Al-Sc and Al-Sc-Zr solid solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金头男; 聂祚仁; 徐国富; 阮海琼; 杨军军; 付静波; 左铁镛

    2004-01-01

    Six alloys with different compositions of Al-0.1%Sc, Al-0.3%Sc, Al-0.3%Zr, Al-0.1% Sc-0. 1%Zr,Al-0.3%Sc-0.1%Zr and Al-0.3%Sc-0.3%Zr were prepared by casting in a wedge shaped copper mould. The hardness test, microstructure observation, and DSC thermal analysis were applied to fully investigate the solidification behavior of the wedge tip (whose cooling rate is 1 000 K/s) and the top surface (cooling rate 100 K/s) of each casting. The results show that the cast structures in the hypoeutectic region of Al-Sc alloys are slightly affected by cooling rates during the solidification. In the case of hypereutectic alloy of Al-0.3%Sc-0.3%Zr , the cast grains were remarkably refined under the condition of a 100 K/s cooling rate, however, under a 1 000 K/s cooling rate condition,solute atoms contribute nothing to the grain-refinement, due to the eutectic concentration becomes higher. The hardness can be improved to a greater degree by Sc single addition, compared to single Zr addition, but it can be improved even greater when Sc added together with Zr. It is sensitive to cooling rate, the higher the cooling rate, the greater the hardness. By combining the results of TEM examination and DSC analysis, it can be seen that a supersaturated Al solid solution forms during the solidification, and the solubility of Sc in Al solution can be improved by increasing the cooling rate.

  15. Probing the role of the ceramide acyl chain length and sphingosine unsaturation in model skin barrier lipid mixtures by (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlberg, Sören; Školová, Barbora; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K; Vogel, Alexander; Vávrová, Kateřina; Huster, Daniel

    2015-05-05

    We investigated equimolar mixtures of ceramides with lignoceric acid and cholesterol as models for the human stratum corneum by differential scanning calorimetry and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Our reference system consisted of lignoceroyl sphingosine (Cer[NS24]), which represents one of the ceramides in the human stratum corneum. Furthermore, the effect of ceramide acyl chain truncation to 16 carbons as in Cer[NS16] and the loss of the C4 trans double bond as in dihydroceramide Cer[NDS24] were studied. Fully relaxed (2)H NMR spectra were acquired for each deuterated component of each mixture separately, allowing the quantitative determination of the individual lipid phases. At skin temperature, the reference system containing Cer[NS24] is characterized by large portions of each component of the mixture in a crystalline phase, which largely restricts the permeability of the skin lipid barrier. The loss of the C4 trans double bond in Cer[NDS24] leads to the replacement of more than 25% of the crystalline phase by an isotropic phase of the dihydroceramide that shows the importance of dihydroceramide desaturation in the formation of the skin lipid barrier. The truncated Cer[NS16] is mostly found in the gel phase at skin temperature, which may explain its negative effect on the transepidermal water loss in atopic dermatitis patients. These significant alterations in the phase behavior of all lipids are further reflected at elevated temperatures. The molecular insights of our study may help us to understand the importance of the structural parameters of ceramides in healthy and compromised skin barriers.

  16. Streptozotocin-Treated High Fat Fed Mice: A New Type 2 Diabetes Model Used to Study Canagliflozin-Induced Alterations in Lipids and Lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Sungelo, Mitchell J; Goldberg, Ira J; Wang, Hong; Eckel, Robert H

    2017-05-01

    The pharmacological effects of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) medications on lipoprotein metabolism are difficult to assess in preclinical models because those created failure to replicate the human condition in which insulin deficiency is superimposed on obesity-related insulin resistance. To create a better model, we fed mice with high fat (HF) diet and treated the animals with low dose streptozotocin (STZ) to mimic T2DM. We used this model to evaluate the effects of canagliflozin (CANA), a drug that reduces plasma glucose by inhibiting the sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2), which mediates ~90% of renal glucose reabsorption] on lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. After 6 weeks of CANA (30 mg/kg/day) treatment, the increase in total plasma cholesterol in HF-STZ diabetic mice was reversed, but plasma triglycerides were not affected. Lipoprotein fractionation and cholesterol distribution analysis showed that CANA kept HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol, and IDL-Cholesterol levels steady while these lipoprotein species were increased in placebo- and insulin-treated control groups. CANA treatment of HF-STZ mice reduced post-heparin plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity at 2 (-40%) and 5 (-30%) weeks compared to placebo. Tissue-specific LPL activity following CANA treatment showed similar reduction. In summary, CANA prevented the total cholesterol increase in HF-STZ mice without effects on plasma lipids or lipoproteins, but did decrease LPL, implying a potential role of LPL-dependent lipoprotein metabolism in CANA action. These effects did not recapitulate the effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on lipids and lipoproteins in human, suggesting that a better murine T2DM model (such as the ApoB100 humanized CETP-overexpressing mouse) is needed next. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. LC/MS analysis of stratum corneum lipids: ceramide profiling and discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Hoppel, Louise; van der Heijden, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    Ceramides (CERs) in the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play a key role in the skin barrier function. In human SC, the literature currently reports 11 CER subclasses that have been identified. In this paper, a novel quick and robust LC/MS method is presented that allows the separation and analysis of all known human SC CER subclasses using only limited sample preparation. Besides all 11 known and identified subclasses, a 3D multi-mass chromatogram shows the presence of other lipid subclasses. Using LC/MS/MS with an ion trap (IT) system, a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance system, and a triple quadrupole system, we were able to identify one of these lipid subclasses as a new CER subclass: the ester-linked ω-hydroxy fatty acid with a dihydrosphingosine base (CER [EOdS]). Besides the identification of a new CER subclass, this paper also describes the applicability and robustness of the developed LC/MS method by analyzing three (biological) SC samples: SC from human dermatomed skin, human SC obtained by tape stripping, and SC from full-thickness skin explants. All three biological samples showed all known CER subclasses and slight differences were observed in CER profile.

  18. LC/MS analysis of stratum corneum lipids: ceramide profiling and discovery[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Hoppel, Louise; van der Heijden, Rob; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vreeken, Rob J.; Bouwstra, Joke A.

    2011-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs) in the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play a key role in the skin barrier function. In human SC, the literature currently reports 11 CER subclasses that have been identified. In this paper, a novel quick and robust LC/MS method is presented that allows the separation and analysis of all known human SC CER subclasses using only limited sample preparation. Besides all 11 known and identified subclasses, a 3D multi-mass chromatogram shows the presence of other lipid subclasses. Using LC/MS/MS with an ion trap (IT) system, a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance system, and a triple quadrupole system, we were able to identify one of these lipid subclasses as a new CER subclass: the ester-linked ω-hydroxy fatty acid with a dihydrosphingosine base (CER [EOdS]). Besides the identification of a new CER subclass, this paper also describes the applicability and robustness of the developed LC/MS method by analyzing three (biological) SC samples: SC from human dermatomed skin, human SC obtained by tape stripping, and SC from full-thickness skin explants. All three biological samples showed all known CER subclasses and slight differences were observed in CER profile. PMID:21444759

  19. Study of PEGylated lipid layers as a model for PEGylated liposome surfaces: molecular dynamics simulation and Langmuir monolayer studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepniewski, Michał; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz; Danne, Reinis; Orlowski, Adam; Karttunen, Mikko; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Vuorimaa, Elina; Bunker, Alex

    2011-06-21

    We have combined Langmuir monolayer film experiments and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a bilayer to study the surface structure of a PEGylated liposome and its interaction with the ionic environment present under physiological conditions. Lipids that form both gel and liquid-crystalline membranes have been used in our study. By varying the salt concentration in the Langmuir film experiment and including salt at the physiological level in the simulation, we have studied the effect of salt ions present in the blood plasma on the structure of the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) layer. We have also studied the interaction between the PEG layer and the lipid bilayer in both the liquid-crystalline and gel states. The MD simulation shows two clear results: (a) The Na(+) ions form close interactions with the PEG oxygens, with the PEG chains forming loops around them and (b) PEG penetrates the lipid core of the membrane for the case of a liquid-crystalline membrane but is excluded from the tighter structure of the gel membrane. The Langmuir monolayer results indicate that the salt concentration affects the PEGylated lipid system, and these results can be interpreted in a fashion that is in agreement with the results of our MD simulation. We conclude that the currently accepted picture of the PEG surface layer acting as a generic neutral hydrophilic polymer entirely outside the membrane, with its effect explained through steric interactions, is not sufficient. The phenomena we have observed may affect both the interaction between the liposome and bloodstream proteins and the liquid-crystalline-gel transition and is thus relevant to nanotechnological drug delivery device design.

  20. Improvement of lipid profile by probiotic/protective cultures: study in a non-carcinogenic small intestinal cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenjak, Mario; Gradišnik, Lidija; Trapečar, Martin; Pistello, Mauro; Kozmus, Carina Pinto; Škorjanc, Dejan; Skok, Pavel; Langerholc, Tomaž; Cencič, Avrelija

    2014-01-01

    Plasma lipid levels are important risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Previous findings have shown that probiotic bacteria exert positive effects on hypercholesterolemia by lowering serum cholesterol and improving lipid profile that, in turn, leads to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. Most of these studies were carried out with tumoral cell lines that have a metabolism quite different from that of normal cells and may thus respond differently to various stimuli. Here, we demonstrate the beneficial effects of some probiotics on cholesterol levels and pathways in normal small intestinal foetal epithelial tissue cells. The results show that Lactobacillus plantarum strain PCS 26 efficiently removes cholesterol from media, exhibits bile salt hydrolase activity, and up-regulates several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. This study suggests that Lactobacillus plantarum PCS 26 might act as a liver X receptor agonist and help to improve lipid profiles in hypercholesterolemic patients or even dislipidemias in complex diseases such as the metabolic syndrome.

  1. Effects of Low Concentrations of Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Structure and Phase Behavior of Model Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Lor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an X-ray diffraction study on the phase behavior of binary lipid mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHA-PE and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC at low concentrations below 5.0 mol% DHA-PE. Our results show that DHA-PE induces phase separation into a DHA rich liquid crystalline (Lα phase and a DHA poor gel (Lβ′ phase at overall DHA-PE concentrations as low as 0.1 mol%. In addition, we find that the structure of the Lβ′ phase, from which the DHA-PE molecules are largely excluded, is modified in the phase-separated state at low DHA-PE concentrations, with a decrease in bilayer thickness of 1.34 nm for 0.1 mol% at room temperature, compared to pure DPPC bilayers. This result is contrary to that seen in similar studies on mono-unsaturated lipids where an increase in bilayer thickness is observed. The surprising effect of such low DHA-PE concentrations on membrane structure may be important in understanding the role of highly polyunsaturated lipids in biological membrane-based structures and similar artificial surfactant systems.

  2. Bullying prevention in schools by targeting cognitions, emotions, and behavior: Evaluating the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Simona; Bora, Carmen; Sipos-Gug, Sebastian; Tocai, Ioana; Gradinger, Petra; Yanagida, Takuya; Strohmeier, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of a class-based antibullying prevention program on cognitions, emotions, and behaviors was investigated. The program consists of a cognitive-behavioral (Rational Emotive Behavioral Education; REBE) and a behavioral (Viennese Social Competence; ViSC) component. The REBE program is based on rational emotive behavioral theory and contains 9 student lessons. The ViSC program is based on social learning theory and comprises 10 student lessons. The order of the programs was experimentally manipulated. The REBE-ViSC program was implemented in 5 schools (14 classes), the ViSC-REBE program was implemented in 3 schools (9 classes), and 3 schools (11 classes) served as an untreated control group. Data were collected during 1 school year at pretest, midpoint, and posttest. Emotions (overt and internalizing anger), cognitions (learning and entitlement), and behaviors (bullying perpetration and bullying victimization) were measured with self-assessments. To examine the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC/ViSC-REBE program, multilevel growth models were applied (time points at Level 1, individuals at Level 2, and classes at Level 3). The analyses revealed that the program effects differed depending on the order of the programs. The REBE-ViSC condition was more effective in changing negative emotions than the ViSC-REBE condition; both experimental conditions were effective in reducing dysfunctional cognitions, whereas no behavioral change was found in the 2 experimental groups when compared with the control group. To improve program effectiveness regarding behavioral changes, a multilevel whole-school approach including a teacher component is recommended. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Experimental, numerical, and analytical studies on the seismic response of steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epackachi, Siamak

    The seismic performance of rectangular steel-plate concrete (SC) composite shear walls is assessed for application to buildings and mission-critical infrastructure. The SC walls considered in this study were composed of two steel faceplates and infill concrete. The steel faceplates were connected together and to the infill concrete using tie rods and headed studs, respectively. The research focused on the in-plane behavior of flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. An experimental program was executed in the NEES laboratory at the University at Buffalo and was followed by numerical and analytical studies. In the experimental program, four large-size specimens were tested under displacement-controlled cyclic loading. The design variables considered in the testing program included wall thickness, reinforcement ratio, and slenderness ratio. The aspect ratio (height-to-length) of the four walls was 1.0. Each SC wall was installed on top of a re-usable foundation block. A bolted baseplate to RC foundation connection was used for all four walls. The walls were identified to be flexure- and flexure-shear critical. The progression of damage in the four walls was identical, namely, cracking and crushing of the infill concrete at the toes of the walls, outward buckling and yielding of the steel faceplates near the base of the wall, and tearing of the faceplates at their junctions with the baseplate. A robust finite element model was developed in LS-DYNA for nonlinear cyclic analysis of the flexure- and flexure-shear-critical SC walls. The DYNA model was validated using the results of the cyclic tests of the four SC walls. The validated and benchmarked models were then used to conduct a parametric study, which investigated the effects of wall aspect ratio, reinforcement ratio, wall thickness, and uniaxial concrete compressive strength on the in-plane response of SC walls. Simplified analytical models, suitable for preliminary analysis and design of SC walls, were

  4. Pascal-SC a computer language for scientific computation

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlender, Gerd; von Gudenberg, Jürgen Wolff; Rheinboldt, Werner; Siewiorek, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Perspectives in Computing, Vol. 17: Pascal-SC: A Computer Language for Scientific Computation focuses on the application of Pascal-SC, a programming language developed as an extension of standard Pascal, in scientific computation. The publication first elaborates on the introduction to Pascal-SC, a review of standard Pascal, and real floating-point arithmetic. Discussions focus on optimal scalar product, standard functions, real expressions, program structure, simple extensions, real floating-point arithmetic, vector and matrix arithmetic, and dynamic arrays. The text then examines functions a

  5. III-V compound SC for optoelectronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Mokkapati

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available III-V compound semiconductors (SC have played a crucial role in the development of optoelectronic devices for a broad range of applications. Major applications of InP or GaAs based III-V compound SC are devices for optical fiber communications, infrared and visible LEDs/LDs and high efficiency solar cells. GaN based compounds are extremely important for short wavelength light emitters used in solid state lighting systems. We review the important device applications of various III-V compound SC materials.

  6. SC-System of convergence theory and foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. De los Cobos Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel system of convergence (SC is presented as well as its fundamentals and computing experience. An implementation using a novel mono-objetive particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm with three phases (PSO-3P: stabilization, generation with broad-ranging exploration and generation with in-depth exploration, is presented and tested in a diverse benchmark problems. Evidence shows that the three-phase PSO algoritm along with the SC criterion (SC-PSO-3Pcan converge to the global optimum in several difficult test functions for multiobjective optimization problems, constrained optimization problems and unconstrained optimization problems with 2 until 120,000 variables.

  7. Gadolinium scandium germanide, Gd2Sc3Ge4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumohan Misra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Gd2Sc3Ge4 adopts the orthorhombic Pu5Rh4-type structure. The crystal structure contains six sites in the asymmetric unit: two sites are statistically occupied by rare-earth atoms with Gd:Sc ratios of 0.967 (4:0.033 (4 and 0.031 (3:0.969 (3, one site (.m. symmetry is occupied by Sc atoms, and three distinct sites (two of which with .m. symmetry are occupied by Ge atoms. The rare-earth atoms form two-dimensional slabs with Ge atoms occupying the trigonal-prismatic voids.

  8. Characterization of Water and a Model Lipophilic Compound in Human Stratum Corneum by NMR Spectroscopy and Equilibrium Sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodiweera, Chandana; Romonchuk, Wayne J; Yang, Yuan; Bunge, Annette L

    2016-11-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the outermost skin layer in humans and other mammals and the primary barrier to water loss and environmental exposure to chemicals and microorganisms. It consists of flattened, keratin-filled corneocytes surrounded by well-organized lipid layers. Human SC at varying degrees of hydration with and without addition of a model lipophilic compound, 2-(trifluoromethyl) benzonitrile (TFMB), was studied using proton ((1)H) and fluorine ((19)F) nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Proton spectral analyses revealed that water mainly occupies the corneocytes in agreement with prior studies. Observations from (19)F spectral and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) analyses showed that TFMB is primarily present in the lipids with small amounts in water, which is located within the corneocytes. This is consistent with TFMB sorption, which was measured in SC with and without lipid extraction. The presence of TFMB within the corneocytes supports the hypothesis that transcellular diffusion of a lipophilic compound like TFMB may contribute to SC permeation.

  9. Atomic structure and phason modes of the Sc-Zn icosahedral quasicrystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tsunetomo; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Euchner, Holger; Pay Gómez, Cesar; Bosak, Alexei; Fertey, Pierre; de Boissieu, Marc

    2016-07-01

    The detailed atomic structure of the binary icosahedral (i) ScZn7.33 quasicrystal has been investigated by means of high-resolution synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction and absolute scale measurements of diffuse scattering. The average atomic structure has been solved using the measured Bragg intensity data based on a six-dimensional model that is isostructural to the i-YbCd5.7 one. The structure is described with a quasiperiodic packing of large Tsai-type rhombic triacontahedron clusters and double Friauf polyhedra (DFP), both resulting from a close-packing of a large (Sc) and a small (Zn) atom. The difference in chemical composition between i-ScZn7.33 and i-YbCd5.7 was found to lie in the icosahedron shell and the DFP where in i-ScZn7.33 chemical disorder occurs on the large atom sites, which induces a significant distortion to the structure units. The intensity in reciprocal space displays a substantial amount of diffuse scattering with anisotropic distribution, located around the strong Bragg peaks, that can be fully interpreted as resulting from phason fluctuations, with a ratio of the phason elastic constants K 2/K 1 = -0.53, i.e. close to a threefold instability limit. This induces a relatively large perpendicular (or phason) Debye-Waller factor, which explains the vanishing of 'high-Q perp' reflections.

  10. Hybrid lipid-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayani, Yasaman

    Biological membranes serve several important roles, such as structural support of cells and organelles, regulation of ionic and molecular transport, barriers to non-mediated transport, contact between cells within tissues, and accommodation of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins and other vital biomolecules incorporated into the membrane need a lipid membrane to function. Due to importance of lipid bilayers and their vital function in governing many processes in the cell, the development of various models as artificial lipid membranes that can mimic cell membranes has become a subject of great interest. Using different models of artificial lipid membranes, such as liposomes, planar lipid bilayers and supported or tethered lipid bilayers, we are able to study many biophysical processes in biological membranes. The ability of different molecules to interact with and change the structure of lipid membranes can be also investigated in artificial lipid membranes. An important application of lipid bilayer-containing interfaces is characterization of novel membrane proteins for high throughput drug screening studies to investigate receptor-drug interactions and develop biosensor systems. Membrane proteins need a lipid bilayer environment to preserve their stability and functionality. Fabrication of materials that can interact with biomolecules like proteins necessitates the use of lipid bilayers as a mimic of cell membranes. The objective of this research is to develop novel hybrid lipid-based nanostructures mimicking biological membranes. Toward this aim, two hybrid biocompatible structures are introduced: lipid bilayer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and hydrogel-anchored liposomes with double-stranded DNA anchors. These structures have potential applications in biosensing, drug targeting, drug delivery, and biophysical studies of cell membranes. In the first developed nanostructure, lipid molecules are covalently attached to the surfaces of MWCNTs, and

  11. Infectivity-associated PrP(Sc) and disease duration-associated PrP(Sc) of mouse BSE prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Disease-related prion protein (PrP(Sc)), which is a structural isoform of the host-encoded cellular prion protein, is thought to be a causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, the specific role of PrP(Sc) in prion pathogenesis and its relationship to infectivity remain controversial. A time-course study of prion-affected mice was conducted, which showed that the prion infectivity was not simply proportional to the amount of PrP(Sc) in the brain. Centrifugation (20,000 ×g) of the brain homogenate showed that most of the PrP(Sc) was precipitated into the pellet, and the supernatant contained only a slight amount of PrP(Sc). Interestingly, mice inoculated with the obtained supernatant showed incubation periods that were approximately 15 d longer than those of mice inoculated with the crude homogenate even though both inocula contained almost the same infectivity. Our results suggest that a small population of fine PrP(Sc) may be responsible for prion infectivity and that large, aggregated PrP(Sc) may contribute to determining prion disease duration.

  12. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2 that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7 isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a

  13. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  14. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls for safety related nuclear facilities: Design for in-plane forces and out-of-plane moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Sener, Kadir C., E-mail: ksener@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lai, Zhichao, E-mail: laiz@purdue.edu [Bowen Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Steel-concrete (SC) composite walls being considered and used as an alternative to conventional reinforced concrete (RC) walls in safety-related nuclear facilities due to their construction economy and structural efficiency. However, there is a lack of standardized codes for SC structures, and design guidelines and approaches are still being developed. This paper presents the development and verification of: (a) mechanics based model, and (b) detailed nonlinear finite element model for predicting the behavior and failure of SC wall panels subjected to combinations of in-plane forces. The models are verified using existing test results, and the verified models are used to explore the behavior of SC walls subjected to combinations of in-plane forces and moments. The results from these investigations are used to develop an interaction surface in principle force (S{sub p1}–S{sub p2}) space that can be used to design or check the adequacy of SC wall panels. The interaction surface is easy to develop since it consists of straight line segments connecting anchor points defined by the SC wall section strengths in axial tension, in-plane shear, and compression. Both models and the interaction surface (for design) developed in this paper are recommended for future work. However, in order to use these approaches, the SC wall section should be detailed with adequate shear connector and tie bar strength and spacing to prevent non-ductile failure modes.

  15. Spectroscopy of the odd-odd fp-shell nucleus 52Sc from secondary fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, A; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Carpenter, M P; Cook, J M; Deacon, A N; Dinca, D C; Freeman, S J; Glasmacher, T; Janssens, R V F; Kay, B P; Mantica, P F; Müller, W F; Terry, J R; Zhu, S

    2006-01-01

    The odd-odd fp-shell nucleus 52Sc was investigated using in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy following secondary fragmentation of a 55V and 57Cr cocktail beam. Aside from the known gamma-ray transition at 674(5)keV, a new decay at E_gamma=212(3) keV was observed. It is attributed to the depopulation of a low-lying excited level. This new state is discussed in the framework of shell-model calculations with the GXPF1, GXPF1A, and KB3G effective interactions. These calculations are found to be fairly robust for the low-lying level scheme of 52Sc irrespective of the choice of the effective interaction. In addition, the frequency of spin values predicted by the shell model is successfully modeled by a spin distribution formulated in a statistical approach with an empirical, energy-independent spin-cutoff parameter.

  16. Precipitation in cold-rolled Al-Sc-Zr and Al-Mn-Sc-Zr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    KAUST Repository

    Vlach, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The effects of cold-rolling on thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, microstructure and recrystallization behaviour of the AlScZr and AlMnScZr alloys prepared by powder metallurgy were studied. The powder was produced by atomising in argon with 1% oxygen and then consolidated by hot extrusion at 350 C. The electrical resistometry and microhardness together with differential scanning calorimetry measurements were compared with microstructure development observed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction. Fine (sub)grain structure developed and fine coherent Al3Sc and/or Al3(Sc,Zr) particles precipitated during extrusion at 350 C in the alloys studied. Additional precipitation of the Al3Sc and/or Al3(Sc,Zr) particles and/or their coarsening was slightly facilitated by the previous cold rolling. The presence of Sc,Zr-containing particles has a significant antirecrystallization effect that prevents recrystallization at temperatures minimally up to 420 C. The precipitation of the Al6Mn- and/or Al 6(Mn,Fe) particles of a size ~ 1.0 μm at subgrain boundaries has also an essential antirecrystallization effect and totally suppresses recrystallization during 32 h long annealing at 550 C. The texture development of the alloys seems to be affected by high solid solution strengthening by Mn. The precipitation of the Mn-containing alloy is highly enhanced by a cold rolling. The apparent activation energy of the Al3Sc particles formation and/or coarsening and that of the Al6Mn and/or Al 6(Mn,Fe) particle precipitation in the powder and in the compacted alloys were determined. The cold deformation has no effect on the apparent activation energy values of the Al3Sc-phase and the Al 6Mn-phase precipitation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Long-Term Feeding of Chitosan Ameliorates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a High-Fructose-Diet-Impaired Rat Model of Glucose Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Cai, Fang-Ying; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2015-12-10

    glucose and lipid metabolism in a HF-diet-fed rat model.

  18. Design of SC walls and slabs for impulsive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Amit H. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-11

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures have historically been the preferred choice for blast resistant structures because of their mass and the ductility provided by steel reinforcement. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls are a viable alternative to RC for protecting the infrastructure against explosive threats. SC structures consist of two steel faceplates with a plain concrete core between them. The steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete using stud anchors and connected to each other using tie bars. SC structures provide mass from the concrete infill and ductility from the continuous external steel faceplates. This dissertation presents findings and recommendations from experimental and analytical investigations of the performance of SC walls subjected to far-field blast loads.

  19. The data acquisition system (DAS) for the improved CERN SC

    CERN Document Server

    Beger, H; Fiebig, A; Schroot, H

    1975-01-01

    A digital data acquisition system (DAS) based on a minicomputer is described which registers the failure sequences in various equipment areas of the CERN synchrocyclotron (henceforward referred to as the SC). The avalanches of failure signals which occur from time to time are tapped from the alarm/security systems, time-resolved to 10 msec and recorded on a printer in order to aid SC failure diagnosis. The mechanisms of the DAS and its relation to the SC equipment are explained in some detail. All programs were constructed at assembler language level for speed and for ease of on-line program maintenance. The alarm sequences recorded have been of considerable help during the running in of the new radiofrequency system. Now that the new SC is operational, the DAS furnishes useful data from several equipment areas to the operators and engineers.

  20. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE),...

  1. Aging of Al-0,3 at. % Sc alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drits, M.E.; Ber, L.B.; Bykov, L.S.; Toropova, L.S.; Anastas' eva, G.K. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Metallurgii)

    1984-06-01

    Method of measuring electric conductivity, hardness and yield limit was used to study the kinetics of aging of Al-0.3 at.%Sc alloy in 20-450 deg c range. It was established by X-ray methods of monocrystal investigation and diffraction electron microscopy that coherent precipitations of equilibrium ScAl/sub 3/ pha se with li/sub 2/ type structure and 0.41 nm lattice parameter represent the product of decomposition of supersaturated solid solution. Characteristic features and the kinetics of ScAl/sub 3/ phase particle growth were studied by the electron microscopic method. The activation energy of scandium and aluminium diffusion equal to 3.81 MJ/kg was determined. The analysis of deformation hardening of Al-0.3 at.%Sc alloy at different stages of aging was conducted.

  2. Abca12-mediated lipid transport and Snap29-dependent trafficking of lamellar granules are crucial for epidermal morphogenesis in a zebrafish model of ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    2011-11-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio can serve as a model system to study heritable skin diseases. The skin is rapidly developed during the first 5–6 days of embryonic growth, accompanied by expression of skin-specific genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM of wild-type zebrafish at day 5 reveals a two-cell-layer epidermis separated from the underlying collagenous stroma by a basement membrane with fully developed hemidesmosomes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveals an ordered surface contour of keratinocytes with discrete microridges. To gain insight into epidermal morphogenesis, we have employed morpholino-mediated knockdown of the abca12 and snap29 genes, which are crucial for secretion of lipids and intracellular trafficking of lamellar granules, respectively. Morpholinos, when placed on exon-intron junctions, were >90% effective in preventing the corresponding gene expression when injected into one- to four-cell-stage embryos. By day 3, TEM of abca12 morphants showed accumulation of lipid-containing electron-dense lamellar granules, whereas snap29 morphants showed the presence of apparently empty vesicles in the epidermis. Evaluation of epidermal morphogenesis by SEM revealed similar perturbations in both cases in the microridge architecture and the development of spicule-like protrusions on the surface of keratinocytes. These morphological findings are akin to epidermal changes in harlequin ichthyosis and CEDNIK syndrome, autosomal recessive keratinization disorders due to mutations in the ABCA12 and SNAP29 genes, respectively. The results indicate that interference of independent pathways involving lipid transport in the epidermis can result in phenotypically similar perturbations in epidermal morphogenesis, and that these fish mutants can serve as a model to study the pathomechanisms of these keratinization disorders.

  3. Magnetic properties of the Sc-H system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkenshtein, N.V.; Galoshina, E.V. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Ural' skij Nauchnyj Tsentr); Kost, M.E. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii); Shubina, T.S. (Ural' skij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1983-05-01

    The magnetic susceptibility in the ..cap alpha..-phase region of the Sc-H system and in scandium hydrides ScH/sub 2/ is investigated. The temperature dependence of the susceptibility was measured from liquid-helium temperature to room temperature in a magnetic field of 10 kOe. The influence of hydrogenation and of band structure parameters (density of states at the Fermi level, spin-relaxation time, and Fermi energy) on the susceptibility is shown and discussed.

  4. Homogenization of alloys in the system Al-Mg-Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drits, M. E.; Toropova, L. S.; Bykov, Yu. G.

    1983-07-01

    A reduction in homogenizing anneal temperature and a reduction in soaking time leads to an increase in yield point for alloys of the system Al-Mg-Sc. The optimum homogenizing schedule for alloys of this system is heating to 400°C and soaking for up to 10 h. This homogenizing schedule provides an alloy structure of fine coherent ScAl3-phase precipitates and dissolution of excess β-phase precipitates.

  5. Effect of Tamarindus indica fruits on blood pressure and lipid-profile in human model: an in vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekhar, A S M Maruf; Rayhan, Israt; Quadir, Mohiuddin Abdul; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif; Hasnat, Abul

    2006-04-01

    Fruits of Tamarindus indica were evaluated for their effects on lipid profile, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body weight in human subjects. Dried and pulverized pulp of T. indica fruits, at a dose of 15 mg/kg body weight, was found to reduce total cholesterol level (p = 0.031) and LDL-cholesterol level (p = 0.004) to a significant extent. Though the fruits exerted no conspicuous effect on body weight and systolic blood pressure, it significantly reduced the diastolic pressure as confirmed by independent sample t-test at 5% significance level.

  6. Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Ceylon cinnamon on blood glucose and lipids in a diabetic and healthy rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanga Ranasinghe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate short- and long-term effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum on food consumption, body weight, glycemic control, and lipids in healthy and diabetes-induced rats. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two phases (Phase I and Phase II, using Sprague-Dawley rats in four groups. Phase I evaluated acute effects on fasting blood glucose (FBG (Groups 1 and 2 and on post-oral glucose (Groups 3 and 4 blood glucose. Groups 1 and 3 received distilled-water and Groups 2 and 4 received cinnamon-extracts. Phase II evaluated effects on food consumption, body weight, blood glucose, and lipids over 1 month. Group A (n = 8, distilled-water and Group B (n = 8, cinnamon-extracts were healthy rats, while Group C (n = 5, distilled-water and Group D (n = 5, cinnamon-extracts were diabetes-induced rats. Serum lipid profile and HbA1c were measured on D-0 and D-30. FBG, 2-h post-prandial blood glucose, body weight, and food consumption were measured on every fifth day. Results: Phase I: There was no significant difference in serial blood glucose values in cinnamon-treated group from time 0 (P > 0.05. Following oral glucose, the cinnamon group demonstrated a faster decline in blood glucose compared to controls (P < 0.05. Phase II: Between D0 and D30, the difference in food consumption was shown only in diabetes-induced rats (P < 0.001. Similarly, the significant difference following cinnamon-extracts in FBG and 2-h post-prandial blood glucose from D0 to D30 was shown only in diabetes-induced rats. In cinnamon-extracts administered groups, total and LDL cholesterol levels were lower on D30 in both healthy and diabetes-induced animals (P < 0.001. Conclusions: C. zeylanicum lowered blood glucose, reduced food intake, and improved lipid parameters in diabetes-induced rats.

  7. Comparison of lipid membrane-water partitioning with various organic solvent-water partitions of neutral species and ionic species: Uniqueness of cerasome as a model for the stratum corneum in partition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keda; Fahr, Alfred; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Tobin, Desmond J; Liu, Xiangli

    2015-10-15

    Lipid membrane-water partitions (e.g., immobilized artificial membrane systems where the lipid membrane is a neutral phospholipid monolayer bound to gel beads) were compared to various organic solvent-water partitions using linear free energy relationships. To this end, we also measured the retention factors of 36 compounds (including neutral and ionic species) from water to liposomes made up of 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine and 3-sn-phosphatidyl-l-serine (80:20, mol/mol), employing liposome electrokinetic chromatography in this work. The results show that lipid membranes exhibit a considerably different chemical environment from those of organic solvents. For both neutral species and ionic species, partitions into the more polar hydroxylic solvents are chemically closer to partition into the lipid membrane as compared to partitions into the less polar hydroxylic solvents and into aprotic solvents. This means that solutes partition into the polar parts of lipid membranes, regardless of whether they are charged or not. In addition, cerasome (i.e., liposome composed mainly of stratum corneum lipids) was compared with regular phospholipid liposomes as a possible model for human stratum corneum in partitions. It was found that the cerasome-water partition exhibits a better chemical similarity to skin permeation. This is probably due to the unique structures of ceramides that occur in cerasome and in the stratum corneum lipid domain. We further show that membranes in membrane-water partitions exhibit very different properties.

  8. Theoretical studies of the low-lying states of ScO, ScS, VO, and VS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1986-01-01

    Bonding in the low-lying states of ScO, ScS, VO, and VS is theoretically studied. Excellent agreement is obtained with experimental spectroscopic constants for the low-lying states of ScO and VO. The results for VS and ScS show that the bonding in the oxides and sulfides is similar, but that the smaller electronegativity in S leads to a smaller ionic component in the bonding. The computed D0 of the sulfides are about 86 percent of the corresponding oxides, and the low-lying excited states are lower in the sulfides than in the corresponding oxides. The CPF method is shown to be an accurate and cost-effective method for obtaining reliable spectroscopic constants for these systems.

  9. Effect of homogenizing heatings on the properties of Al-Sc and Al-Mg-Sc alloy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drits, M.E.; Toropova, L.S.; Anastas' eva, G.K.; Nagornichnykh, G.L.

    Effect of annealing on hardness and electric conductivity of cast alloys of Al-Mg-Sc and Al-Sc systems has been studied. Magnesium content in studied alloys was changed in the range of 0-6.5%, scandium content was chosen to be constant -0.4%. It has been revealed that homogenizing heatings of Al-Sc alloys lead to a decomposition of abnormally saturated solid solution during crystallization at temperatures >250 deg C. Maximum hardness values are achieved after annealing at 300 deg C during 1h. Homogenizing of Al-Mg--- Sc alloys at 350 deg C during 24h leads to practically full solubility of a nonequilibrium ..beta..-phase (Mg/sub 2/Al/sub 3/) and also to a decomposition of a solid solution abnormally saturated with scandium. Maximum values of hardness are achieved after annealing at 35O deg C during 0.5-1h.

  10. Differing modes of interaction between monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides and model lipid membranes: an AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Khizar; Giordani, Cristiano; McManus, Jennifer J; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Jarvis, Suzanne P

    2012-02-01

    Membrane interactions with β-amyloid peptides are implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cholesterol has been shown to be key modulator of this interaction, yet little is known about the mechanism of this interaction. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the interaction of monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides with planar mica-supported bilayers composed of DOPC and DPPC containing varying concentrations of cholesterol. We show that below the bilayer melting temperature, Aβ monomers adsorb to, and assemble on, the surface of DPPC bilayers to form layers that grow laterally and normal to the bilayer plane. Above the bilayer melting temperature, we observe protofibril formation. In contrast, in DOPC bilayers, Aβ monomers exhibit a detergent-like action, forming defects in the bilayer structure. The kinetics of both modes of interaction significantly increases with increasing membrane cholesterol content. We conclude that the mode and rate of the interaction of Aβ monomers with lipid bilayers are strongly depend