WorldWideScience

Sample records for model runs vegetation

  1. Gravitational Baryogenesis in Running Vacuum models

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, V K; Nunes, Rafael C

    2016-01-01

    We study the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism for generating baryon asymmetry in the context of running vacuum models. Regardless if these models can produce a viable cosmological evolution, we demonstrate that they produce a non-zero baryon-to-entropy ratio even if the Universe is filled with conformal matter. This is a sound difference between the running vacuum gravitational baryogenesis and the Einstein-Hilbert one, since in the latter case, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We consider two running vacuum models and show that the resulting baryon-to-entropy ratio is compatible with the observational data.

  2. A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01

    In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  4. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  5. Constructing predictive models of human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Horst-Moritz; Revzen, Shai; Guckenheimer, John; Ludwig, Christian; Reger, Johann; Seyfarth, Andre

    2015-02-06

    Running is an essential mode of human locomotion, during which ballistic aerial phases alternate with phases when a single foot contacts the ground. The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) provides a starting point for modelling running, and generates ground reaction forces that resemble those of the centre of mass (CoM) of a human runner. Here, we show that while SLIP reproduces within-step kinematics of the CoM in three dimensions, it fails to reproduce stability and predict future motions. We construct SLIP control models using data-driven Floquet analysis, and show how these models may be used to obtain predictive models of human running with six additional states comprising the position and velocity of the swing-leg ankle. Our methods are general, and may be applied to any rhythmic physical system. We provide an approach for identifying an event-driven linear controller that approximates an observed stabilization strategy, and for producing a reduced-state model which closely recovers the observed dynamics. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Running vacuum cosmological models: linear scalar perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, E. L. D.; Tamayo, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    In cosmology, phenomenologically motivated expressions for running vacuum are commonly parameterized as linear functions typically denoted by Λ(H2) or Λ(R). Such models assume an equation of state for the vacuum given by bar PΛ = - bar rhoΛ, relating its background pressure bar PΛ with its mean energy density bar rhoΛ ≡ Λ/8πG. This equation of state suggests that the vacuum dynamics is due to an interaction with the matter content of the universe. Most of the approaches studying the observational impact of these models only consider the interaction between the vacuum and the transient dominant matter component of the universe. We extend such models by assuming that the running vacuum is the sum of independent contributions, namely bar rhoΛ = Σibar rhoΛi. Each Λ i vacuum component is associated and interacting with one of the i matter components in both the background and perturbation levels. We derive the evolution equations for the linear scalar vacuum and matter perturbations in those two scenarios, and identify the running vacuum imprints on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies as well as on the matter power spectrum. In the Λ(H2) scenario the vacuum is coupled with every matter component, whereas the Λ(R) description only leads to a coupling between vacuum and non-relativistic matter, producing different effects on the matter power spectrum.

  7. Modelling the Congo basin ecosystems with a dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Marie; Hambuckers, Alain; Trolliet, Franck; Huynen, Marie-Claude; Haineaux, Damien; Fontaine, Corentin M.; Fayolle, Adeline; François, Louis

    2014-05-01

    The scarcity of field observations in some parts of the world makes difficult a deep understanding of some ecosystems such as humid tropical forests in Central Africa. Therefore, modelling tools are interesting alternatives to study those regions even if the lack of data often prevents sharp calibration and validation of the model projections. Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) are process-based models that simulate shifts in potential vegetation and its associated biogeochemical and hydrological cycles in response to climate. Initially run at the global scale, DVMs can be run at any spatial scale provided that climate and soil data are available. In the framework of the BIOSERF project ("Sustainability of tropical forest biodiversity and services under climate and human pressure"), we use and adapt the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model (Dury et al., iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 4:82-99, 2011) to study the Congo basin vegetation dynamics. The field campaigns have notably allowed the refinement of the vegetation representation from plant functional types (PFTs) to individual species through the collection of parameters such as the specific leaf area or the leaf C:N ratio of common tropical tree species and the location of their present-day occurrences from literature and available database. Here, we test the model ability to reproduce the present spatial and temporal variations of carbon stocks (e.g. biomass, soil carbon) and fluxes (e.g. gross and net primary productivities (GPP and NPP), net ecosystem production (NEP)) as well as the observed distribution of the studied species over the Congo basin. In the lack of abundant and long-term measurements, we compare model results with time series of remote sensing products (e.g. vegetation leaf area index (LAI), GPP and NPP). Several sensitivity tests are presented: we assess consecutively the impacts of the level at which the vegetation is simulated (PFTs or species), the spatial resolution and the initial land

  8. Thermodynamical aspects of running vacuum models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, J.A.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Astronomia, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Basilakos, Spyros [Academy of Athens, Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Athens (Greece); Sola, Joan [Univ. de Barcelona, High Energy Physics Group, Dept. d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    The thermal history of a large class of running vacuum models in which the effective cosmological term is described by a truncated power series of the Hubble rate, whose dominant term is Λ(H) ∝ H{sup n+2}, is discussed in detail. Specifically, by assuming that the ultrarelativistic particles produced by the vacuum decay emerge into space-time in such a way that its energy density ρ{sub r} ∝ T{sup 4}, the temperature evolution law and the increasing entropy function are analytically calculated. For the whole class of vacuum models explored here we find that the primeval value of the comoving radiation entropy density (associated to effectively massless particles) starts from zero and evolves extremely fast until reaching a maximum near the end of the vacuum decay phase, where it saturates. The late-time conservation of the radiation entropy during the adiabatic FRW phase also guarantees that the whole class of running vacuum models predicts the same correct value of the present day entropy, S{sub 0} ∝ 10{sup 87}-10{sup 88} (in natural units), independently of the initial conditions. In addition, by assuming Gibbons¨CHawking temperature as an initial condition, we find that the ratio between the late-time and primordial vacuum energy densities is in agreement with naive estimates from quantum field theory, namely, ρ{sub Λ0}/ρ{sub ΛI} 10{sup -123}. Such results are independent on the power n and suggests that the observed Universe may evolve smoothly between two extreme, unstable, non-singular de Sitter phases. (orig.)

  9. A Comparison of Interactively Coupled Paleoclimate-Vegetation Models With the Vegetation Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, P.; Pollard, D.; Barron, E.

    2001-05-01

    Climate-vegetation interactions are a key ingredient in understanding Earth system history. Vegetation models used to explore past climate and past vegetation distributions are largely based on modern plant-climate relationships. This study explores the application of four such models, each built upon different assumptions and parameters, and determines how well each model reproduces past records. In addition, this approach enables an exploration of the potential influence of vegetation on paleoclimates. The four vegetation models (the BIOME 3.5 model of Haxeltine and Prentice (1996), the simple dynamic vegetation model of Cosgrove (1998), the EVE model of Bergengren et al. (2001) and the IBIS model of Foley et al. (1996)) were run interactively with a general circulation model (GCM) of the atmosphere for four time periods. The GCM utilized is GENESIS 2.0, designed for paleoclimate studies. The four time periods for which all four vegetation models are employed are the Early Miocene, Oxygen Isotope Stage Three (warm and cool phases) between 30,000 and 42,000 years ago, and the Last Glacial Maximum. Differences between parameterizations include differences in the number of vegetation types in each model, the inclusion in some models of the influence of atmospheric CO2 levels on the growth of C3 versus C4 vegetation and on stomatal conductance, and whether the models focus on the equilibrium or dynamic state of ecosystems. Preliminary results indicate only small differences in globally-averaged mean annual temperature and precipitation values, suggesting that all models have almost the same effect on the climate. There are differences, however, in how accurately each model reproduces the paleorecord. For example, in the Miocene simulations, when compared to the data of Wolfe (1985), the SDVM model underpredicts the presence of deciduous vegetation in North America, while the EVE model underpredicts the presence of coniferous forest in Eurasia. In the Last Glacial

  10. Short-run and long-run effect of oil consumption on economic growth: ECM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofyan Syahnur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of oil consumption on economic growth of Aceh in the long-run and short-run by using Error Correction Model (ECM model during the period before the world commodity prices fall of 1985–2008. Four types of oil consumption will be focused on Avtur, Gasoline, Kerosene and Diesel. The data is collected from Central Bureau of Statistics of Aceh (BPS Aceh. The result of this study shows a merely positive effect of oil consumption type diesel to economic growth in Aceh both in the short run and the long run.

  11. Effects of experimental protocol on global vegetation model accuracy: a comparison of simulated and observed vegetation patterns for Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Shafer, Sarah L.; Barlein, Patrick J.; Holman, Justin O.

    2009-01-01

    Prognostic vegetation models have been widely used to study the interactions between environmental change and biological systems. This study examines the sensitivity of vegetation model simulations to: (i) the selection of input climatologies representing different time periods and their associated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, (ii) the choice of observed vegetation data for evaluating the model results, and (iii) the methods used to compare simulated and observed vegetation. We use vegetation simulated for Asia by the equilibrium vegetation model BIOME4 as a typical example of vegetation model output. BIOME4 was run using 19 different climatologies and their associated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The Kappa statistic, Fuzzy Kappa statistic and a newly developed map-comparison method, the Nomad index, were used to quantify the agreement between the biomes simulated under each scenario and the observed vegetation from three different global land- and tree-cover data sets: the global Potential Natural Vegetation data set (PNV), the Global Land Cover Characteristics data set (GLCC), and the Global Land Cover Facility data set (GLCF). The results indicate that the 30-year mean climatology (and its associated atmospheric CO2 concentration) for the time period immediately preceding the collection date of the observed vegetation data produce the most accurate vegetation simulations when compared with all three observed vegetation data sets. The study also indicates that the BIOME4-simulated vegetation for Asia more closely matches the PNV data than the other two observed vegetation data sets. Given the same observed data, the accuracy assessments of the BIOME4 simulations made using the Kappa, Fuzzy Kappa and Nomad index map-comparison methods agree well when the compared vegetation types consist of a large number of spatially continuous grid cells. The results of this analysis can assist model users in designing experimental protocols for simulating vegetation.

  12. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOW MOTION WITH VEGETATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-tao; SU Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    A set of governing equations for turbulent flows in vegetated area were derived with the assumption that vegetation is of straight and rigid cylinder. The effect of vegetation on flow motion was represented by additional inertial and drag forces. The new model was validated by available experimental data for open channel flows passing through vegetated areas with different vegetation size, density and distribution. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the flow around a supposed isolated vegetated pile was simulated and the effects of vegetation density on the wake flow were discussed. It is found that the presence of vegetation, even at a very low density, has the pronounced influence on the dissipation of flow energy, both inside the vegetation domain and outside it in the wake flow region.

  13. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  14. Long-run properties of some Danish macroeconometric models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harck, Søren H.

    This paper provides an analytical treatment of various long-run aspects of the MONA model as well as the SMEC model of the Danish economy. More specifically, the analysis lays bare the long-run and steady-state nexus between unemployment and, respectively, inflation and the wage share implied...

  15. A regional dynamic vegetation-climate model for Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, R. S.; Cowling, S. A.; Smith, B.

    2009-12-01

    Global vegetation models simulate the distribution of vegetation as a function of climate. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are also able to simulate the vegetation shifts in response to climate change, which makes them particularly useful for addressing questions about past and future climate scenarios. However, DGVMs have been criticized for using generic plant functional types (PFTs) and running the models at a coarse grid cell resolution. Regional dynamic vegetation models are able to simulate important landscape variation, since they use a finer resolution and specific PFTs for their region. Regional studies have typically focused on boreal or temperate ecosystems in North America and Europe. We will be presenting the results of applying a dynamic regional vegetation-climate model (LPJ-GUESS) for Central America. Initially, the model was run with the described global PFTs. However, several biomes were very poorly represented. Two PFTs were added: a Tropical Needleleaf Evergreen Tree to improve the simulation of the Mixed Pine-Oak biome, and a Desert Shrub to capture the Xeric Shrublands. The overall distribution of biomes was visually similar, however the Kappa statistic indicated a poor agreement with the potential biome map (overall Kappa = 0.301). The Kappa statistic did improve as we aggregated cell sizes and simplified the biomes (overall Kappa = 0.728). Compared to remote sensing data, the model showed a strong correlation with total LAI (r = 0.75). The poor Kappa statistic is likely due to a combination of factors. The way in which biomes are defined by the author can have a large influence on the level of agreement between simulated and potential vegetation. The Kappa statistic is also limited to comparing individual grid cells and thus, cannot detect overall patterns. Examining those areas which are poorly represented will help to identify future work and improve the representation of vegetation in these ecological models. In particular, the

  16. Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, J.P.; Sucksdorff, Y. [Finnish Environment Agency, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In this study the soil/vegetation/atmosphere-model based on the formulation of Deardorff was refined to hour basis and applied to a field in Vihti. The effect of model parameters on model results (energy fluxes, temperatures) was also studied as well as the effect of atmospheric conditions. The estimation of atmospheric conditions on the soil-vegetation system as well as an estimation of the effect of vegetation parameters on the atmospheric climate was estimated. Areal surface fluxes, temperatures and moistures were also modelled for some river basins in southern Finland. Land-use and soil parameterisation was developed to include properties and yearly variation of all vegetation and soil types. One classification was selected to describe the hydrothermal properties of the soils. Evapotranspiration was verified against the water balance method

  17. Advanced overlay: sampling and modeling for optimized run-to-run control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, WoongJae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, DongSuk; Snow, Patrick; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur Nihat; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years overlay (OVL) control schemes have become more complicated in order to meet the ever shrinking margins of advanced technology nodes. As a result, this brings up new challenges to be addressed for effective run-to- run OVL control. This work addresses two of these challenges by new advanced analysis techniques: (1) sampling optimization for run-to-run control and (2) bias-variance tradeoff in modeling. The first challenge in a high order OVL control strategy is to optimize the number of measurements and the locations on the wafer, so that the "sample plan" of measurements provides high quality information about the OVL signature on the wafer with acceptable metrology throughput. We solve this tradeoff between accuracy and throughput by using a smart sampling scheme which utilizes various design-based and data-based metrics to increase model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty while avoiding wafer to wafer and within wafer measurement noise caused by metrology, scanner or process. This sort of sampling scheme, combined with an advanced field by field extrapolated modeling algorithm helps to maximize model stability and minimize on product overlay (OPO). Second, the use of higher order overlay models means more degrees of freedom, which enables increased capability to correct for complicated overlay signatures, but also increases sensitivity to process or metrology induced noise. This is also known as the bias-variance trade-off. A high order model that minimizes the bias between the modeled and raw overlay signature on a single wafer will also have a higher variation from wafer to wafer or lot to lot, that is unless an advanced modeling approach is used. In this paper, we characterize the bias-variance trade off to find the optimal scheme. The sampling and modeling solutions proposed in this study are validated by advanced process control (APC) simulations to estimate run-to-run performance, lot-to-lot and wafer-to- wafer model term monitoring to

  18. Pessimistic Predicate/Transform Model for Long Running Business Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinling; JIN Beihong; LI Jing

    2005-01-01

    Many business processes in enterprise applications are both long running and transactional in nature. However, no current transaction model can provide full transaction support for such long running business processes. This paper proposes a new transaction model, the pessimistic predicate/transform (PP/T) model, which can provide full transaction support for long running business processes. A framework was proposed on the enterprise JavaBeans platform to implement the PP/T model. The framework enables application developers to focus on the business logic, with the underlying platform providing the required transactional semantics. The development and maintenance effort are therefore greatly reduced. Simulations show that the model has a sound concurrency management ability for long running business processes.

  19. Thermoregulation and endurance running in extinct hominins: Wheeler's models revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxton, Graeme D; Wilkinson, David M

    2011-08-01

    Thermoregulation is often cited as a potentially important influence on the evolution of hominins, thanks to a highly influential series of papers in the Journal of Human Evolution in the 1980s and 1990s by Peter Wheeler. These papers developed quantitative modeling of heat balance between different potential hominins and their environment. Here, we return to these models, update them in line with new developments and measurements in animal thermal biology, and modify them to represent a running hominin rather than the stationary form considered previously. In particular, we use our modified Wheeler model to investigate thermoregulatory aspects of the evolution of endurance running ability. Our model suggests that for endurance running to be possible, a hominin would need locomotive efficiency, sweating rates, and areas of hairless skin similar to modern humans. We argue that these restrictions suggest that endurance running may have been possible (from a thermoregulatory viewpoint) for Homo erectus, but is unlikely for any earlier hominins.

  20. Regime shifts in models of dryland vegetation

    CERN Document Server

    Zelnik, Yuval R; Yizhaq, Hezi; Bel, Golan; Meron, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Drylands are pattern-forming systems showing self-organized vegetation patchiness, multiplicity of stable states and fronts separating domains of alternative stable states. Pattern dynamics, induced by droughts or disturbances, can result in desertification shifts from patterned vegetation to bare soil. Pattern-formation theory suggests various scenarios for such dynamics; an abrupt global shift involving a fast collapse to bare soil, a gradual global shift involving the expansion and coalescence of bare-soil domains, and an incipient shift to a hybrid state consisting of stationary bare-soil domains in an otherwise periodic pattern. Using models of dryland vegetation we address the question which of these scenarios can be realized. We found that the models can be split into two groups: models that exhibit multiplicity of periodic-pattern and bare-soil states, and models that exhibit, in addition, multiplicity of hybrid states. Furthermore, in all models we could not identify parameter regimes in which bare-s...

  1. Modelling surface run-off and trends analysis over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P. K.; Chauhan, S.; Oza, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    The present study is mainly concerned with detecting the trend of run-off over the mainland of India, during a time period of 35 years, from 1971-2005 (May-October). Rainfall, soil texture, land cover types, slope, etc., were processed and run-off modelling was done using the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) model with modifications and cell size of 5×5 km. The slope and antecedent moisture corrections were incorporated in the existing model. Trend analysis of estimated run-off was done by taking into account different analysis windows such as cell, medium and major river basins, meteorological sub-divisions and elevation zones across India. It was estimated that out of the average 1012.5 mm of rainfall over India (considering the study period of 35 years), 33.8% got converted to surface run-off. An exponential model was developed between the rainfall and the run-off that predicted the run-off with an R 2 of 0.97 and RMSE of 8.31 mm. The run-off trend analysed using the Mann-Kendall test revealed that a significant pattern exists in 22 medium, two major river basins and three meteorological sub-divisions, while there was no evidence of a statistically significant trend in the elevation zones. Among the medium river basins, the highest positive rate of change in the run-off was observed in the Kameng basin (13.6 mm/yr), while the highest negative trend was observed in the Tista upstream basin (-21.4 mm/yr). Changes in run-off provide valuable information for understanding the region's sensitivity to climatic variability.

  2. Modelling surface run-off and trends analysis over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Gupta; S Chauhan; M P Oza

    2016-08-01

    The present study is mainly concerned with detecting the trend of run-off over the mainland of India, during a time period of 35 years, from 1971–2005 May–October). Rainfall, soil texture, land cover types, slope, etc., were processed and run-off modelling was done using the Natural Resources ConservationService (NRCS) model with modifications and cell size of 5×5 km. The slope and antecedent moisture corrections were incorporated in the existing model. Trend analysis of estimated run-off was done by taking into account different analysis windows such as cell, medium and major river basins, meteorologicalsub-divisions and elevation zones across India. It was estimated that out of the average 1012.5 mm of rainfall over India (considering the study period of 35 years), 33.8% got converted to surface run-off. An exponential model was developed between the rainfall and the run-off that predicted the run-off with an $R^2$ of 0.97 and RMSE of 8.31 mm. The run-off trend analysed using the Mann–Kendall test revealed that a significant pattern exists in 22 medium, two major river basins and three meteorological subdivisions, while there was no evidence of a statistically significant trend in the elevation zones. Among the medium river basins, the highest positive rate of change in the run-off was observed in the Kameng basin (13.6 mm/yr), while the highest negative trend was observed in the Tista upstream basin (−21.4 mm/yr). Changes in run-off provide valuable information for understanding the region’s sensitivity to climatic variability.

  3. Constrained Run-to-Run Optimization for Batch Process Based on Support Vector Regression Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An iterative (run-to-run) optimization method was presented for batch processes under input constraints. Generally it is very difficult to acquire an accurate mechanistic model for a batch process. Because support vector machine is powerful for the problems characterized by small samples, nonlinearity, high dimension and local minima, support vector regression models were developed for the end-point optimization of batch processes. Since there is no analytical way to find the optimal trajectory, an iterative method was used to exploit the repetitive nature of batch processes to determine the optimal operating policy. The optimization algorithm is proved convergent. The numerical simulation shows that the method can improve the process performance through iterations.

  4. Terror birds on the run: a mechanical model to estimate its maximum running speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, R. Ernesto; Jones, Washington W

    2005-01-01

    ‘Terror bird’ is a common name for the family Phorusrhacidae. These large terrestrial birds were probably the dominant carnivores on the South American continent from the Middle Palaeocene to the Pliocene–Pleistocene limit. Here we use a mechanical model based on tibiotarsal strength to estimate maximum running speeds of three species of terror birds: Mesembriornis milneedwardsi, Patagornis marshi and a specimen of Phorusrhacinae gen. The model is proved on three living large terrestrial bird species. On the basis of the tibiotarsal strength we propose that Mesembriornis could have used its legs to break long bones and access their marrow. PMID:16096087

  5. Branching model for vegetation. [polarimetric remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Kong, J. A.; Jao, Jen K.; Shin, Robert T.; Le Toan, Thuy

    1992-01-01

    In the present branching model for remote sensing of vegetation, the frequency and angular responses of a two-scale cylinder cluster are calculated to illustrate the importance of vegetation architecture. Attention is given to the implementation of a two-scale branching model for soybeans, where the relative location of soybean plants is described by a pair of distribution functions. Theoretical backscattering coefficients evaluated by means of hole-correction pair distribution are in agreement with extensive data collected from soybean fields. The hole-correction approximation is found to be the more realistic.

  6. Branching model for vegetation. [polarimetric remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Kong, J. A.; Jao, Jen K.; Shin, Robert T.; Le Toan, Thuy

    1992-01-01

    In the present branching model for remote sensing of vegetation, the frequency and angular responses of a two-scale cylinder cluster are calculated to illustrate the importance of vegetation architecture. Attention is given to the implementation of a two-scale branching model for soybeans, where the relative location of soybean plants is described by a pair of distribution functions. Theoretical backscattering coefficients evaluated by means of hole-correction pair distribution are in agreement with extensive data collected from soybean fields. The hole-correction approximation is found to be the more realistic.

  7. Modeling soil water content for vegetation modeling improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfrani, Carmen; Buri, Aline; Zingg, Barbara; Vittoz, Pascal; Verrecchia, Eric; Guisan, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is known to be important for plants as it affects the physiological processes regulating plant growth. Therefore, SWC controls plant distribution over the Earth surface, ranging from deserts and grassland to rain forests. Unfortunately, only a few data on SWC are available as its measurement is very time consuming and costly and needs specific laboratory tools. The scarcity of SWC measurements in geographic space makes it difficult to model and spatially project SWC over larger areas. In particular, it prevents its inclusion in plant species distribution model (SDMs) as predictor. The aims of this study were, first, to test a new methodology allowing problems of the scarcity of SWC measurements to be overpassed and second, to model and spatially project SWC in order to improve plant SDMs with the inclusion of SWC parameter. The study was developed in four steps. First, SWC was modeled by measuring it at 10 different pressures (expressed in pF and ranging from pF=0 to pF=4.2). The different pF represent different degrees of soil water availability for plants. An ensemble of bivariate models was built to overpass the problem of having only a few SWC measurements (n = 24) but several predictors to include in the model. Soil texture (clay, silt, sand), organic matter (OM), topographic variables (elevation, aspect, convexity), climatic variables (precipitation) and hydrological variables (river distance, NDWI) were used as predictors. Weighted ensemble models were built using only bivariate models with adjusted-R2 > 0.5 for each SWC at different pF. The second step consisted in running plant SDMs including modeled SWC jointly with the conventional topo-climatic variable used for plant SDMs. Third, SDMs were only run using the conventional topo-climatic variables. Finally, comparing the models obtained in the second and third steps allowed assessing the additional predictive power of SWC in plant SDMs. SWC ensemble models remained very good, with

  8. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up: Regular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke;

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  9. Numerical Modelling of Wave Run-Up: Regular Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Wave loads are important in problems related to offshore structure, such as wave run-up, slamming. The computation of such wave problems are carried out by CFD models. This paper presents one model, NS3, which solve 3D Navier-Stokes equations and use Volume of Fluid (VOF) method to treat the free...

  10. Long-Run Properties of Large-Scale Macroeconometric Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth F. WALLIS-; John D. WHITLEY

    1987-01-01

    We consider alternative approaches to the evaluation of the long-run properties of dynamic nonlinear macroeconometric models, namely dynamic simulation over an extended database, or the construction and direct solution of the steady-state version of the model. An application to a small model of the UK economy is presented. The model is found to be unstable, but a stable form can be produced by simple alterations to the structure.

  11. Matter density perturbation and power spectrum in running vacuum model

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the matter density perturbation $\\delta_m$ and power spectrum $P(k)$ in the running vacuum model (RVM) with the cosmological constant being a function of the Hubble parameter, given by $\\Lambda = \\Lambda_0 + 6 \\sigma H H_0+ 3\

  12. Test of the classic model for predicting endurance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James E; Howley, Edward T; Bassett, David R; Thompson, Dixie L; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2010-05-01

    To compare the classic physiological variables linked to endurance performance (VO2max, %VO2max at lactate threshold (LT), and running economy (RE)) with peak treadmill velocity (PTV) as predictors of performance in a 16-km time trial. Seventeen healthy, well-trained distance runners (10 males and 7 females) underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), RE, percentage of maximal oxygen uptake at the LT (%VO2max at LT), running velocity at LT, and PTV. Velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) was calculated from RE and VO2max. Three stepwise regression models were used to determine the best predictors (classic vs treadmill performance protocols) for the 16-km running time trial. Simple Pearson correlations of the variables with 16-km performance showed vVO2max to have the highest correlation (r = -0.972) and %VO2max at the LT the lowest (r = 0.136). The correlation coefficients for LT, VO2max, and PTV were very similar in magnitude (r = -0.903 to r = -0.892). When VO2max, %VO2max at LT, RE, and PTV were entered into SPSS stepwise analysis, VO2max explained 81.3% of the total variance, and RE accounted for an additional 10.7%. vVO2max was shown to be the best predictor of the 16-km performance, accounting for 94.4% of the total variance. The measured velocity at VO2max (PTV) was highly correlated with the estimated velocity at vVO2max (r = 0.8867). Among well-trained subjects heterogeneous in VO2max and running performance, vVO2max is the best predictor of running performance because it integrates both maximal aerobic power and the economy of running. The PTV is linked to the same physiological variables that determine vVO2max.

  13. Arbitrary Symmetric Running Gait Generation for an Underactuated Biped Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Mohammad; Macnab, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates generating symmetric trajectories for an underactuated biped during the stance phase of running. We use a point mass biped (PMB) model for gait analysis that consists of a prismatic force actuator on a massless leg. The significance of this model is its ability to generate more general and versatile running gaits than the spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model, making it more suitable as a template for real robots. The algorithm plans the necessary leg actuator force to cause the robot center of mass to undergo arbitrary trajectories in stance with any arbitrary attack angle and velocity angle. The necessary actuator forces follow from the inverse kinematics and dynamics. Then these calculated forces become the control input to the dynamic model. We compare various center-of-mass trajectories, including a circular arc and polynomials of the degrees 2, 4 and 6. The cost of transport and maximum leg force are calculated for various attack angles and velocity angles. The results show that choosing the velocity angle as small as possible is beneficial, but the angle of attack has an optimum value. We also find a new result: there exist biped running gaits with double-hump ground reaction force profiles which result in less maximum leg force than single-hump profiles. PMID:28118401

  14. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; De Deurwaerder, Hannes; Brugnera, Manfredo di Procia e.; Krshna Moorthy Paravathi, Sruthi; Pausenberger, Nancy; Roels, Jana; kearsley, elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are essential components of the earth system and play a critical role for land surface feedbacks to climate change. These forests are currently experiencing large-scale structural changes, including the increase of liana abundance and biomass. This liana proliferation might have large impacts on the carbon cycle of tropical forests. However no single global vegetation model currently accounts for lianas. The TREECLIMBERS project (ERC starting grant) aims to introduce for the first time lianas into a vegetation model. The project attempts to reach this challenging goal by performing a global meta-analysis on liana data and by collecting new data in South American forests. Those new and existing datasets form the basis of a new liana plant functional type (PFT) that will be included in the Ecosystem Demography model (ED2). This presentation will show an overview of the current progress of the TREECLIMBERS project. Liana inventory data collected in French Guiana along a forest disturbance gradient show the relation between liana abundance and disturbance. Xylem water isotope analysis indicates that trees and lianas can rely on different soil water resources. New modelling concepts for liana PFTs will be presented and in-situ leaf gas exchange and sap flow data are used to parameterize water and carbon fluxes for this new PFT. Finally ongoing terrestrial LiDAR observations of liana infested forest will be highlighted.

  15. Linking Fish Habitat Modelling and Sediment Transport in Running Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; EISNER; Silke; WIEPRECHT; Matthias; SCHNEIDER

    2005-01-01

    The assessment of ecological status for running waters is one of the major issues within an integrated river basin management and plays a key role with respect to the implementation of the European Water Frame- work Directive (WFD).One of the tools supporting the development of sustainable river management is physi- cal habitat modeling,e.g.,for fish,because fish population are one of the most important indicators for the e- colngical integrity of rivers.Within physical habitat models hydromorphological ...

  16. Projected Future Vegetation Changes for the Northwest United States and Southwest Canada at a Fine Spatial Resolution Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Shafer

    Full Text Available Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0-58.0°N latitude by 136.6-103.0°W longitude. LPJ is a process-based vegetation model that mechanistically simulates the effect of changing climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations on vegetation. It was developed and has been mostly applied at spatial resolutions of 10-minutes or coarser. In this study, we used LPJ at a 30-second (~1-km spatial resolution to simulate potential vegetation changes for 2070-2099. LPJ was run using downscaled future climate simulations from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CCSM3, CGCM3.1(T47, GISS-ER, MIROC3.2(medres, UKMO-HadCM3 produced using the A2 greenhouse gases emissions scenario. Under projected future climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated vegetation changes result in the contraction of alpine, shrub-steppe, and xeric shrub vegetation across the study area and the expansion of woodland and forest vegetation. Large areas of maritime cool forest and cold forest are simulated to persist under projected future conditions. The fine spatial-scale vegetation simulations resolve patterns of vegetation change that are not visible at coarser resolutions and these fine-scale patterns are particularly important for understanding potential future vegetation changes in topographically complex areas.

  17. Projected future vegetation changes for the northwest United States and southwest Canada at a fine spatial resolution using a dynamic global vegetation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Sarah; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Gray, Elizabeth M.; Pelltier, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Future climate change may significantly alter the distributions of many plant taxa. The effects of climate change may be particularly large in mountainous regions where climate can vary significantly with elevation. Understanding potential future vegetation changes in these regions requires methods that can resolve vegetation responses to climate change at fine spatial resolutions. We used LPJ, a dynamic global vegetation model, to assess potential future vegetation changes for a large topographically complex area of the northwest United States and southwest Canada (38.0–58.0°N latitude by 136.6–103.0°W longitude). LPJ is a process-based vegetation model that mechanistically simulates the effect of changing climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations on vegetation. It was developed and has been mostly applied at spatial resolutions of 10-minutes or coarser. In this study, we used LPJ at a 30-second (~1-km) spatial resolution to simulate potential vegetation changes for 2070–2099. LPJ was run using downscaled future climate simulations from five coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (CCSM3, CGCM3.1(T47), GISS-ER, MIROC3.2(medres), UKMO-HadCM3) produced using the A2 greenhouse gases emissions scenario. Under projected future climate and atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the simulated vegetation changes result in the contraction of alpine, shrub-steppe, and xeric shrub vegetation across the study area and the expansion of woodland and forest vegetation. Large areas of maritime cool forest and cold forest are simulated to persist under projected future conditions. The fine spatial-scale vegetation simulations resolve patterns of vegetation change that are not visible at coarser resolutions and these fine-scale patterns are particularly important for understanding potential future vegetation changes in topographically complex areas.

  18. Canopy reflectance modelling of semiarid vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janet

    1994-01-01

    Three different types of remote sensing algorithms for estimating vegetation amount and other land surface biophysical parameters were tested for semiarid environments. These included statistical linear models, the Li-Strahler geometric-optical canopy model, and linear spectral mixture analysis. The two study areas were the National Science Foundation's Jornada Long Term Ecological Research site near Las Cruces, NM, in the northern Chihuahuan desert, and the HAPEX-Sahel site near Niamey, Niger, in West Africa, comprising semiarid rangeland and subtropical crop land. The statistical approach (simple and multiple regression) resulted in high correlations between SPOT satellite spectral reflectance and shrub and grass cover, although these correlations varied with the spatial scale of aggregation of the measurements. The Li-Strahler model produced estimated of shrub size and density for both study sites with large standard errors. In the Jornada, the estimates were accurate enough to be useful for characterizing structural differences among three shrub strata. In Niger, the range of shrub cover and size in short-fallow shrublands is so low that the necessity of spatially distributed estimation of shrub size and density is questionable. Spectral mixture analysis of multiscale, multitemporal, multispectral radiometer data and imagery for Niger showed a positive relationship between fractions of spectral endmembers and surface parameters of interest including soil cover, vegetation cover, and leaf area index.

  19. Modeling the Impact of Vegetation Structure on Canopy Radiative Transfer for a Global Vegetation Dynamic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni-Meister, W.; Kiang, N.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    The transmission of light through plant canopies results in vertical profiles of light intensity that affect the photosynthetic activity and gas exchange of plants, their competition for light, and the canopy energy balance. The accurate representation of the canopy light profile is then important for predicting ecological dynamics. The study presents a simple canopy radiative transfer scheme to characterize the impact of the horizontal and vertical vegetation structure heterogeneity on light profiles. Actual vertical foliage profile and a clumping factor which are functions of tree geometry, size and density and foliage density are used to characterize the vertical and horizontal vegetation structure heterogeneity. The simple scheme is evaluated using the ground and airborne lidar data collected in deciduous and coniferous forests and was also compared with the more complex Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model and the two-stream scheme currently being used to describe light interactions with vegetation canopy in most GCMs. The simple modeled PAR profiles match well with the ground data, lidar and full GORT model prediction, it performs much better than the simple Beer's&plaw used in two stream scheme. This scheme will have the same computation cost as the current scheme being used in GCMs, but provides better photosynthesis, radiative fluxes and surface albedo estimates, thus is suitable for a global vegetation dynamic model embedded in GCMs.

  20. Integrating spatio-temporal environmental models for planning ski runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeffer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of ski runs and ski lifts, the action of skiing and maintenance of ski runs may cause considerable environmental impact. Clearly, for improvements to be made in the planning of ski runs in alpine terrain a good understanding of the environmental system and the response of environme

  1. Improving the Projections of Vegetation Biogeography by Integrating Climate Envelope Models and Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, M. J.; Kim, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing changes in vegetation is increasingly important for conservation planning in the face of climate change. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are important tools for assessing such changes. DGVMs have been applied at regional scales to create projections of range expansions and contractions of plant functional types. Many DGVMs use a number of algorithms to determine the biogeography of plant functional types. One such DGVM, MC2, uses a series of decision trees based on bioclimatic thresholds while others, such as LPJ, use constraining emergent properties with a limited set of bioclimatic threshold-based rules. Although both approaches have been used widely, we demonstrate that these biogeography outputs perform poorly at continental scales when compared to existing potential vegetation maps. Specifically, we found that with MC2, the algorithm for determining leaf physiognomy is too simplistic to capture arid and semi-arid vegetation in much of the western U.S., as well as is the algorithm for determining the broadleaf and needleleaf mix in the Southeast. With LPJ, we found that the bioclimatic thresholds used to allow seedling establishment are too broad and fail to capture regional-scale biogeography of the plant functional types. In response, we demonstrate a new approach to determining the biogeography of plant functional types by integrating the climatic thresholds produced for individual tree species by a series of climate envelope models with the biogeography algorithms of MC2 and LPJ. Using this approach, we find that MC2 and LPJ perform considerably better when compared to potential vegetation maps.

  2. Oscillations in a simple climate–vegetation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rombouts

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We formulate and analyze a simple dynamical systems model for climate–vegetation interaction. The planet we consider consists of a large ocean and a land surface on which vegetation can grow. The temperature affects vegetation growth on land and the amount of sea ice on the ocean. Conversely, vegetation and sea ice change the albedo of the planet, which in turn changes its energy balance and hence the temperature evolution. Our highly idealized, conceptual model is governed by two nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, one for global temperature, the other for vegetation cover. The model exhibits either bistability between a vegetated and a desert state or oscillatory behavior. The oscillations arise through a Hopf bifurcation off the vegetated state, when the death rate of vegetation is low enough. These oscillations are anharmonic and exhibit a sawtooth shape that is characteristic of relaxation oscillations, as well as suggestive of the sharp deglaciations of the Quaternary. Our model's behavior can be compared, on the one hand, with the bistability of even simpler, Daisyworld-style climate–vegetation models. On the other hand, it can be integrated into the hierarchy of models trying to simulate and explain oscillatory behavior in the climate system. Rigorous mathematical results are obtained that link the nature of the feedbacks with the nature and the stability of the solutions. The relevance of model results to climate variability on various timescales is discussed.

  3. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  4. NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Local Model Runs in the Environmental Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Carcione, Brian; Wood, Lance; Maloney, Joseph; Estupinan, Jeral; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Blottman, Peter; Rozumalski, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed several products for its National Weather Service (NWS) partners that can be used to initialize local model runs within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Environmental Modeling System (EMS). These real-time datasets consist of surface-based information updated at least once per day, and produced in a composite or gridded product that is easily incorporated into the WRF EMS. The primary goal for making these NASA datasets available to the WRF EMS community is to provide timely and high-quality information at a spatial resolution comparable to that used in the local model configurations (i.e., convection-allowing scales). The current suite of SPoRT products supported in the WRF EMS include a Sea Surface Temperature (SST) composite, a Great Lakes sea-ice extent, a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) composite, and Land Information System (LIS) gridded output. The SPoRT SST composite is a blend of primarily the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System data for non-precipitation coverage over the oceans at 2-km resolution. The composite includes a special lake surface temperature analysis over the Great Lakes using contributions from the Remote Sensing Systems temperature data. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ice Percentage product is used to create a sea-ice mask in the SPoRT SST composite. The sea-ice mask is produced daily (in-season) at 1.8-km resolution and identifies ice percentage from 0 100% in 10% increments, with values above 90% flagged as ice.

  5. Changes in Sahelian annual vegetation growth and phenology since 1960: A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, C.; Grippa, M.; Mougin, E.; Guichard, F.; Kergoat, L.

    2016-08-01

    In semi-arid areas like the Sahel, vegetation is particularly sensitive to climate variability and can play an important role in surface-atmosphere coupling. After a wet period extending from 1950 to 1970, the Sahel experienced a severe drought in the 1970s and 1980s, followed by a partial recovery of rainfall and a "re-greening" of vegetation beginning in the 1990s. This study explores how the multidecadal variability of Sahelian rainfall and particularly the drought period have affected vegetation phenology and growth since 1960. The STEP model, which is specifically designed to simulate the Sahelian annual vegetation, including the dry season processes, is run over an area extending from 13°N to 18°N and from 20°W to 20°E. Mean values, interannual variability and phenological characteristics of the Sahelian annual grasslands simulated by STEP are in good agreement with MODIS derived production and phenology over the 2001-2014 period, which demonstrates the skill of the model and allows the analysis of vegetation changes and variability over the last 50 years. It was found that droughts in the 1970s and 1980s shortened the mean vegetation cycle and reduced its amplitude and that, despite the rainfall recovery since the 1990s, the current conditions for green and dry vegetation are still below pre-drought conditions. While the decrease in vegetation production has been largely homogeneous during droughts, vegetation recovery has been heterogeneous over the Sahel since 1990, with specific changes near the western coast and at the eastern edge of the West African monsoon area. Since 1970, the Sahel also experienced an increased interannual variability in vegetation mass and phenology. In terms of phenology, region-averaged End and Length of Season are the most variable, while maximum date and Start of Season are the least variable, although the latter displays a high variability locally.

  6. Pairwise velocities in the "Running FLRW" cosmological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiano, Antonio; Croton, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the pairwise velocity statistics from a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the "Running Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker" (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends ΛCDM with a time-evolving vacuum energy density, ρ _Λ. To enforce local conservation of matter a time-evolving gravitational coupling is also included. Our results constitute the first study of velocities in the R-FLRW cosmology, and we also compare with other dark energy simulations suites, repeating the same analysis. We find a strong degeneracy between the pairwise velocity and σ8 at z = 0 for almost all scenarios considered, which remains even when we look back to epochs as early as z = 2. We also investigate various Coupled Dark Energy models, some of which show minimal degeneracy, and reveal interesting deviations from ΛCDM which could be readily exploited by future cosmological observations to test and further constrain our understanding of dark energy.

  7. Matter density perturbation and power spectrum in running vacuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the matter density perturbation δm and power spectrum P(k) in the running vacuum model (RVM) with the cosmological constant being a function of the Hubble parameter, given by Λ = Λ0 + 6σHH0 + 3νH2, in which the linear and quadratic terms of H would originate from the QCD vacuum condensation and cosmological renormalization group, respectively. Taking the dark energy perturbation into consideration, we derive the evolution equation for δm and find a specific scale dcr = 2π/kcr, which divides the evolution of the universe into the sub and super-interaction regimes, corresponding to k ≪ kcr and k ≫ kcr, respectively. For the former, the evolution of δm has the same behavior as that in the ΛCDM model, while for the latter, the growth of δm is frozen (greatly enhanced) when ν + σ > ( matter and dark energy. It is clear that the observational data rule out the cases with ν < 0 and ν + σ < 0, while the allowed window for the model parameters is extremely narrow with ν , |σ | ≲ {O}(10^{-7}).

  8. The technique of lessons of health jogging and running at special educational department of students with vegetative-vascular dystonia complicated by sight pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatsko O.V.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with original methodology of health jogging and running. 175 students participated in experiment. Adaptive possibilities of cardiovascular system and changes in physical ability of students are assessed in the research. Index dynamics of physical state is determined in the paper. The research focuses on the fact that repetitive exercisers with aerobics alongside adjusted exercises caused the rise in health condition of students with vegetative-vascular dystonia. It is established that such use of running and jogging in the special sturdy department's program of physical exercisers can materially correct arterial pressure and improve students' feeling of feet.

  9. Cosmological models with running cosmological term and decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Marek; Stachowski, Aleksander

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the generalized ΛCDM model, which the Λ term is running with the cosmological time. On the example of the model Λ(t) =Λbare + α2/t2 we show the existence of a mechanism of the modification of the scaling law for energy density of dark matter: ρdm ∝a - 3 + λ(t). We use an approach developed by Urbanowski in which properties of unstable vacuum states are analyzed from the point of view of the quantum theory of unstable states. We discuss the evolution of Λ(t) term and pointed out that during the cosmic evolution there is a long phase in which this term is approximately constant. We also present the statistical analysis of both the Λ(t) CDM model with dark energy and decaying dark matter and the ΛCDM standard cosmological model. We use data such as Planck, SNIa, BAO, H(z) and AP test. While for the former we find the best fit value of the parameter Ωα2,0 is negative (energy transfer is from the dark matter to dark energy sector) and the parameter Ωα2,0 belongs to the interval (- 0 . 000040 , - 0 . 000383) at 2- σ level. The decaying dark matter causes to lowering a mass of dark matter particles which are lighter than CDM particles and remain relativistic. The rate of the process of decaying matter is estimated. Our model is consistent with the decaying mechanism producing unstable particles (e.g. sterile neutrinos) for which α2 is negative.

  10. Matter density perturbation and power spectrum in running vacuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the matter density perturbation δm and power spectrum P(k) in the running vacuum model, with the cosmological constant being a function of the Hubble parameter, given by Λ = Λ0 + 6σHH0 + 3νH2, in which the linear and quadratic terms of H would originate from the QCD vacuum condensation and cosmological renormalization group, respectively. Taking the dark energy perturbation into consideration, we derive the evolution equation for δm and find a specific scale dcr = 2π/kcr, which divides the evolution of the universe into the sub-interaction and super-interaction regimes, corresponding to k ≪ kcr and k ≫ kcr, respectively. For the former, the evolution of δm has the same behaviour as that in the Λ cold dark model, while for the latter, the growth of δm is frozen (greatly enhanced) when ν + σ > (extremely narrow with ν , |σ | ≲ O(10^{-7}).

  11. First evidence of running cosmic vacuum: challenging the concordance model

    CERN Document Server

    Sola, Joan; Perez, Javier de Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that a rigid $\\Lambda$-term is a fundamental building block of the concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model, we show that a large class of cosmological scenarios with dynamical vacuum energy density $\\rho_{\\Lambda}$ and/or gravitational coupling $G$, together with a possible non-conservation of matter, are capable of seriously challenging the traditional phenomenological success of the $\\Lambda$CDM. In this Letter, we discuss these "running vacuum models" (RVM's), in which $\\rho_{\\Lambda}=\\rho_{\\Lambda}(H)$ consists of a nonvanishing constant term and a series of powers of the Hubble rate. Such generic structure is potentially linked to the quantum field theoretical description of the expanding Universe. By performing an overall fit to the cosmological observables $SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB$ (in which the WMAP9, Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data are taken into account), we find that the RVM's appear definitely more favored than the $\\Lambda$CDM, namely at an unprecedented level of $\\sim 4\\sigma$, implyi...

  12. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.;

    2012-01-01

    • Over the past 30 years (1982-2011), the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), an index of green vegetation, has increased 15.5% in the North American Arctic and 8.2% in the Eurasian Arctic. In the more southern regions of Arctic tundra, the estimated aboveground plant biomass has...

  13. A fully traits-based approach to modeling global vegetation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bodegom, Peter M; Douma, Jacob C; Verheijen, Lieneke M

    2014-09-23

    Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) are indispensable for our understanding of climate change impacts. The application of traits in DGVMs is increasingly refined. However, a comprehensive analysis of the direct impacts of trait variation on global vegetation distribution does not yet exist. Here, we present such analysis as proof of principle. We run regressions of trait observations for leaf mass per area, stem-specific density, and seed mass from a global database against multiple environmental drivers, making use of findings of global trait convergence. This analysis explained up to 52% of the global variation of traits. Global trait maps, generated by coupling the regression equations to gridded soil and climate maps, showed up to orders of magnitude variation in trait values. Subsequently, nine vegetation types were characterized by the trait combinations that they possess using Gaussian mixture density functions. The trait maps were input to these functions to determine global occurrence probabilities for each vegetation type. We prepared vegetation maps, assuming that the most probable (and thus, most suited) vegetation type at each location will be realized. This fully traits-based vegetation map predicted 42% of the observed vegetation distribution correctly. Our results indicate that a major proportion of the predictive ability of DGVMs with respect to vegetation distribution can be attained by three traits alone if traits like stem-specific density and seed mass are included. We envision that our traits-based approach, our observation-driven trait maps, and our vegetation maps may inspire a new generation of powerful traits-based DGVMs.

  14. INTERCOMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVE VEGETATION DATABASES FOR REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetation cover data are used to characterize several regional air quality modeling processes, including the calculation of heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes with the Mesoscale Meteorological Model (MM5) and the estimate of biogenic volatile organic compound and nitric oxide...

  15. First Evidence of Running Cosmic Vacuum: Challenging the Concordance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà, Joan; Gómez-Valent, Adrià; de Cruz Pérez, Javier

    2017-02-01

    Despite the fact that a rigid {{Λ }}-term is a fundamental building block of the concordance ΛCDM model, we show that a large class of cosmological scenarios with dynamical vacuum energy density {ρ }{{Λ }} together with a dynamical gravitational coupling G or a possible non-conservation of matter, are capable of seriously challenging the traditional phenomenological success of the ΛCDM. In this paper, we discuss these “running vacuum models” (RVMs), in which {ρ }{{Λ }}={ρ }{{Λ }}(H) consists of a nonvanishing constant term and a series of powers of the Hubble rate. Such generic structure is potentially linked to the quantum field theoretical description of the expanding universe. By performing an overall fit to the cosmological observables SN Ia+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB (in which the WMAP9, Planck 2013, and Planck 2015 data are taken into account), we find that the class of RVMs appears significantly more favored than the ΛCDM, namely, at an unprecedented level of ≳ 4.2σ . Furthermore, the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria confirm that the dynamical RVMs are strongly preferred compared to the conventional rigid {{Λ }}-picture of the cosmic evolution.

  16. The running coupling of the minimal sextet composite Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Zoltan; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2015-01-01

    We compute the renormalized running coupling of SU(3) gauge theory coupled to N_f = 2 flavors of massless Dirac fermions in the 2-index-symmetric (sextet) representation. This model is of particular interest as a minimal realization of the strongly interacting composite Higgs scenario. A recently proposed finite volume gradient flow scheme is used. The calculations are performed at several lattice spacings with two different implementations of the gradient flow allowing for a controlled continuum extrapolation and particular attention is paid to estimating the systematic uncertainties. For small values of the renormalized coupling our results for the beta-function agree with perturbation theory. For moderate couplings we observe a downward deviation relative to the 2-loop beta-function but in the coupling range where the continuum extrapolation is fully under control we do not observe an infrared fixed point. The explored range includes the locations of the zero of the 3-loop and the 4-loop beta-functions in ...

  17. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  18. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  19. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300°C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard

  20. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300°C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard

  1. Modelling of Muscle Force Distributions During Barefoot and Shod Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research interest in barefoot running has expanded considerably in recent years, based around the notion that running without shoes is associated with a reduced incidence of chronic injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the differences in the forces produced by different skeletal muscles during barefoot and shod running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m·s-1 (± 5%. Kinematics were measured using an eight camera motion analysis system alongside ground reaction force parameters. Differences in sagittal plane kinematics and muscle forces between footwear conditions were examined using repeated measures or Freidman’s ANOVA. The kinematic analysis showed that the shod condition was associated with significantly more hip flexion, whilst barefoot running was linked with significantly more flexion at the knee and plantarflexion at the ankle. The examination of muscle kinetics indicated that peak forces from Rectus femoris, Vastus medialis, Vastus lateralis, Tibialis anterior were significantly larger in the shod condition whereas Gastrocnemius forces were significantly larger during barefoot running. These observations provide further insight into the mechanical alterations that runners make when running without shoes. Such findings may also deliver important information to runners regarding their susceptibility to chronic injuries in different footwear conditions.

  2. Modelling of Muscle Force Distributions During Barefoot and Shod Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Richards, Jim; Vincent, Hayley

    2015-09-29

    Research interest in barefoot running has expanded considerably in recent years, based around the notion that running without shoes is associated with a reduced incidence of chronic injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the differences in the forces produced by different skeletal muscles during barefoot and shod running. Fifteen male participants ran at 4.0 m·s-1 (± 5%). Kinematics were measured using an eight camera motion analysis system alongside ground reaction force parameters. Differences in sagittal plane kinematics and muscle forces between footwear conditions were examined using repeated measures or Freidman's ANOVA. The kinematic analysis showed that the shod condition was associated with significantly more hip flexion, whilst barefoot running was linked with significantly more flexion at the knee and plantarflexion at the ankle. The examination of muscle kinetics indicated that peak forces from Rectus femoris, Vastus medialis, Vastus lateralis, Tibialis anterior were significantly larger in the shod condition whereas Gastrocnemius forces were significantly larger during barefoot running. These observations provide further insight into the mechanical alterations that runners make when running without shoes. Such findings may also deliver important information to runners regarding their susceptibility to chronic injuries in different footwear conditions.

  3. Dynamical system approach to running Λ cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowski, Aleksander [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Szydlowski, Marek [Jagiellonian University, Astronomical Observatory, Krakow (Poland); Jagiellonian University, Mark Kac Complex Systems Research Centre, Krakow (Poland)

    2016-11-15

    We study the dynamics of cosmological models with a time dependent cosmological term. We consider five classes of models; two with the non-covariant parametrization of the cosmological term Λ: Λ(H)CDM cosmologies, Λ(a)CDM cosmologies, and three with the covariant parametrization of Λ: Λ(R)CDM cosmologies, where R(t) is the Ricci scalar, Λ(φ)-cosmologies with diffusion, Λ(X)-cosmologies, where X = (1)/(2)g{sup αβ}∇{sub α}∇{sub β}φ is a kinetic part of the density of the scalar field. We also consider the case of an emergent Λ(a) relation obtained from the behaviour of trajectories in a neighbourhood of an invariant submanifold. In the study of the dynamics we used dynamical system methods for investigating how an evolutionary scenario can depend on the choice of special initial conditions. We show that the methods of dynamical systems allow one to investigate all admissible solutions of a running Λ cosmology for all initial conditions. We interpret Alcaniz and Lima's approach as a scaling cosmology. We formulate the idea of an emergent cosmological term derived directly from an approximation of the exact dynamics. We show that some non-covariant parametrization of the cosmological term like Λ(a), Λ(H) gives rise to the non-physical behaviour of trajectories in the phase space. This behaviour disappears if the term Λ(a) is emergent from the covariant parametrization. (orig.)

  4. Incorporating vegetation feedbacks in regional climate modeling over West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian, A.; Wang, G.; Yu, M.; Ahmed, K. F.; Anyah, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advancements in modeling of the climate system, incorporating vegetation dynamics into climate models is still at the initial stages making it an ongoing research topic. Only few of GCMs participating in CMIP5 simulations included the vegetation dynamics component. Consideration for vegetation dynamics is even less common in RCMs. In this study, RegCM4.3.4-CLM4-CN-DV, a regional climate model synchronously coupled with a land surface component that includes both Carbon-Nitrogen (CN) and Dynamic-Vegetation (DV) processes is used to simulate and project regional climate over West Africa. Due to its unique regional features, West Africa climate is known for being susceptible to land-atmosphere interactions, enhancing the importance of including vegetation dynamics in modeling climate over this region. In this study the model is integrated for two scenarios (present-day and future) using outputs from four GCMs participating in CMIP5 (MIROC, CESM, GFDL and CCSM4) as lateral boundary conditions, which form the basis of a multi-model ensemble. Results of model validation indicates that ensemble of all models outperforms each of individual models in simulating present-day temperature and precipitation. Therefore, the ensemble set is used to analyze the impact of including vegetation dynamics in the RCM on future projection of West Africa's climate. Results from the ensemble analysis will be presented, together with comparison among individual models.

  5. Modelling Holocene peatland and permafrost dynamics with the LPJ-GUESS dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are an important platform to study past, present and future vegetation patterns together with associated biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks (e.g. Sitch et al. 2008, Smith et al. 2001). However, very few attempts have been made to simulate peatlands using DGVMs (Kleinen et al. 2012, Tang et al. 2015, Wania et al. 2009a). In the present study, we have improved the peatland dynamics in the state-of-the-art dynamic vegetation model (LPJ-GUESS) in order to understand the long-term evolution of northern peatland ecosystems and to assess the effect of changing climate on peatland carbon balance. We combined a dynamic multi-layer approach (Frolking et al. 2010, Hilbert et al. 2000) with soil freezing-thawing functionality (Ekici et al. 2015, Wania et al. 2009a) in LPJ-GUESS. The new model is named LPJ-GUESS Peatland (LPJ-GUESS-P) (Chaudhary et al. in prep). The model was calibrated and tested at the sub-arctic mire in Stordalen, Sweden, and the model was able to capture the reported long-term vegetation dynamics and peat accumulation patterns in the mire (Kokfelt et al. 2010). For evaluation, the model was run at 13 grid points across a north to south transect in Europe. The modelled peat accumulation values were found to be consistent with the published data for each grid point (Loisel et al. 2014). Finally, a series of additional experiments were carried out to investigate the vulnerability of high-latitude peatlands to climate change. We find that the Stordalen mire will sequester more carbon in the future due to milder and wetter climate conditions, longer growing seasons, and the carbon fertilization effect. References: - Chaudhary et al. (in prep.). Modelling Holocene peatland and permafrost dynamics with the LPJ-GUESS dynamic vegetation model - Ekici A, et al. 2015. Site-level model intercomparison of high latitude and high altitude soil thermal dynamics in tundra and barren landscapes. The Cryosphere 9: 1343

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Vegetable-Oil Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Jeppe Lindegaard

    be desirable to enhance specific properties such as shelf life, viscosity, texture, sensory aspects and physical appearance. Vegetable oils and fats constitute a considerable part of many food products such as chocolate, margarine, bread, spreads and ice cream. Several attractive properties found...

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Flow Through Vegetated Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    by Hoerner [36] obviously returns values between 0 and 2. Den Hartog and Shaw [22] performed experiments over a flexible corn canopy and estimated...Water Resources Research, 41(7):W07006, 2005. [22] G. Den Hartog and R.H. Shaw. A field study of atmospheric exchange processes within a vegetative

  8. Effects of vegetation structure on biomass accumulation in a Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of interactions exist between vegetation and local climate for arid and semi-arid regions. Vegetation function, structure and individual behavior have large impacts on carbon–water–energy balances, which consequently influence local climate variability that, in turn, feeds back to the vegetation. In this study, a conceptual vegetation structure scheme is formulated and tested in the new Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM to explore the importance of vegetation structure and vegetation adaptation to water stress on equilibrium biomass states. Surface energy, water and carbon fluxes are simulated for a range of vegetation structures across a precipitation gradient in West Africa and optimal vegetation structures that maximize biomass for each precipitation regime are determined. Two different strategies of vegetation adaptation to water stress are included. Under dry conditions vegetation tries to maximize the water use efficiency and leaf area index as it tries to maximize carbon gain. However, a negative feedback mechanism in the vegetation–soil water system is found as the vegetation also tries to minimize its cover to optimize the surrounding bare ground area from which water can be extracted, thereby forming patches of vertical vegetation. Under larger precipitation, a positive feedback mechanism is found in which vegetation tries to maximize its cover as it then can reduce water loss from bare soil while having maximum carbon gain due to a large leaf area index. The competition between vegetation and bare soil determines a transition between a "survival" state to a "growing" state.

  9. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion - GENIE, a general model-independent TCP/IP run manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffels, Christopher T.; Schreuder, Willem A.; Doherty, John E.; Karanovic, Marinko; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Hunt, Randall J.; Welter, David E.

    2012-01-01

    GENIE is a model-independent suite of programs that can be used to generally distribute, manage, and execute multiple model runs via the TCP/IP infrastructure. The suite consists of a file distribution interface, a run manage, a run executer, and a routine that can be compiled as part of a program and used to exchange model runs with the run manager. Because communication is via a standard protocol (TCP/IP), any computer connected to the Internet can serve in any of the capacities offered by this suite. Model independence is consistent with the existing template and instruction file protocols of the widely used PEST parameter estimation program. This report describes (1) the problem addressed; (2) the approach used by GENIE to queue, distribute, and retrieve model runs; and (3) user instructions, classes, and functions developed. It also includes (4) an example to illustrate the linking of GENIE with Parallel PEST using the interface routine.

  10. Predictive modelling of running and dwell times in railway traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kecman, P.; Goverde, R.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of running and dwell times is important for all levels of planning and control of railway traffic. The availability of historical track occupation data with a high degree of granularity inspired a data-driven approach for estimating these process times. In this paper we present

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of a Riparian Vegetation Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nones

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a sensitivity analysis of two main parameters used in a mathematic model able to evaluate the effects of changing hydrology on the growth of riparian vegetation along rivers and its effects on the cross-section width. Due to a lack of data in existing literature, in a past study the schematization proposed here was applied only to two large rivers, assuming steady conditions for the vegetational carrying capacity and coupling the vegetal model with a 1D description of the river morphology. In this paper, the limitation set by steady conditions is overcome, imposing the vegetational evolution dependent upon the initial plant population and the growth rate, which represents the potential growth of the overall vegetation along the watercourse. The sensitivity analysis shows that, regardless of the initial population density, the growth rate can be considered the main parameter defining the development of riparian vegetation, but it results site-specific effects, with significant differences for large and small rivers. Despite the numerous simplifications adopted and the small database analyzed, the comparison between measured and computed river widths shows a quite good capability of the model in representing the typical interactions between riparian vegetation and water flow occurring along watercourses. After a thorough calibration, the relatively simple structure of the code permits further developments and applications to a wide range of alluvial rivers.

  12. Effects of vegetation structure on biomass accumulation in a Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of interactions exist between vegetation and local climate for arid and semi-arid regions. Vegetation function, structure and individual behavior have large impacts on carbon-water-energy balances, which consequently influence local climate variability that, in turn, feeds back to the vegetation. In this study, a conceptual vegetation structure scheme is formulated and tested in a new carbon-water-energy coupled model to explore the importance of vegetation structure and vegetation adaptation to water stress on equilibrium biomass states. Surface energy, water and carbon fluxes are simulated for a range of vegetation structures across a precipitation gradient in West Africa and optimal vegetation structures that maximizes biomass for each precipitation regime are determined. Two different strategies of vegetation adaptation to water stress are included. Under dry conditions vegetation tries to maximize the Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Area Index as it tries to maximize carbon gain. However, an important negative feedback mechanism is found as the vegetation also tries to minimize its cover to optimize the surrounding bare ground area from which water can be extracted, thereby forming patches of vertical vegetation. Under larger precipitation, a positive feedback mechanism is found in which vegetation tries to maximize its cover as it then can reduce water loss from bare soil while having maximum carbon gain due to a large Leaf Area Index. The competition between vegetation and bare soil determines a transition between a "survival" state to a "growing" state.

  13. Short-run and Current Analysis Model in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Anghelache

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the short-run statistic indicators is a compulsory requirement implied in the current analysis. Therefore, there is a system of EUROSTAT indicators on short run which has been set up in this respect, being recommended for utilization by the member-countries. On the basis of these indicators, there are regular, usually monthly, analysis being achieved in respect of: the production dynamic determination; the evaluation of the short-run investment volume; the development of the turnover; the wage evolution: the employment; the price indexes and the consumer price index (inflation; the volume of exports and imports and the extent to which the imports are covered by the exports and the sold of trade balance. The EUROSTAT system of indicators of conjuncture is conceived as an open system, so that it can be, at any moment extended or restricted, allowing indicators to be amended or even removed, depending on the domestic users requirements as well as on the specific requirements of the harmonization and integration. For the short-run analysis, there is also the World Bank system of indicators of conjuncture, which is utilized, relying on the data sources offered by the World Bank, The World Institute for Resources or other international organizations statistics. The system comprises indicators of the social and economic development and focuses on the indicators for the following three fields: human resources, environment and economic performances. At the end of the paper, there is a case study on the situation of Romania, for which we used all these indicators.

  14. Short-run and Current Analysis Model in Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Mitrut

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the short-run statistic indicators is a compulsory requirement implied in the current analysis. Therefore, there is a system of EUROSTAT indicators on short run which has been set up in this respect, being recommended for utilization by the member-countries. On the basis of these indicators, there are regular, usually monthly, analysis being achieved in respect of: the production dynamic determination; the evaluation of the short-run investment volume; the development of the turnover; the wage evolution: the employment; the price indexes and the consumer price index (inflation; the volume of exports and imports and the extent to which the imports are covered by the exports and the sold of trade balance. The EUROSTAT system of indicators of conjuncture is conceived as an open system, so that it can be, at any moment extended or restricted, allowing indicators to be amended or even removed, depending on the domestic users requirements as well as on the specific requirements of the harmonization and integration. For the short-run analysis, there is also the World Bank system of indicators of conjuncture, which is utilized, relying on the data sources offered by the World Bank, The World Institute for Resources or other international organizations statistics. The system comprises indicators of the social and economic development and focuses on the indicators for the following three fields: human resources, environment and economic performances. At the end of the paper, there is a case study on the situation of Romania, for which we used all these indicators.

  15. Price Dispersion and Short Run Equilibrium in a Queuing Model

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Sattinger

    2003-01-01

    Price dispersion is analyzed in the context of a queuing market where customers enter queues to acquire a good or service and may experience delays. With menu costs, price dispersion arises and can persist in the medium and long run. The queuing market rations goods in the same way whether firm prices are optimal or not. Price dispersion reduces the rate at which customers get the good and reduces customer welfare.

  16. Modelling of vegetation-driven morphodynamics in braided rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecca, Guglielmo; Fedrizzi, Davide; Hicks, Murray; Measures, Richard; Zolezzi, Guido; Bertoldi, Walter; Tal, Michal

    2017-04-01

    River planform results from the complex interaction between flow, sediment transport and vegetation, and can evolve following a change in these controls. The braided planform of New Zealand's Lower Waitaki River, for instance, is endangered by the action of artificially-introduced alien vegetation, which spread across the braidplain following the reduction in magnitude of floods by hydropower dam construction. This vegetation, by encouraging flow concentration into the main channel, would likely promote a shift towards a single-thread morphology if it was not artificially removed within a central fairway. The purpose of this work is to study the evolution of braided rivers such as the Waitaki under different management scenarios through two-dimensional numerical modelling. The construction of a suitable model represents a task in itself, since a modelling framework coupling all the relevant processes is not yet readily available. Our starting point is the physics-based GIAMT2D numerical model, which solves two-dimensional flow and bedload transport in wet/dry domains, and recently modified by the inclusion of a rule-based bank erosion model. We have further developed this model by adding a vegetation module, which accounts in a simplified manner for time-evolving biomass density, adjusting local flow roughness, critical shear stress for sediment transport, and bank erodibility accordingly. Our goal is to use the model to study decadal-scale evolution of a reach on the Waitaki River and predict planform characteristics under different vegetation management scenarios. Here we present the results of a preliminary application of the model to reproduce the morphodynamic evolution of a braided channel in a set of flume experiments that used alfalfa as vegetation. The experiments began with a braided morphology that spontaneoulsy formed at constant flow over a bed of bare uniform sand. The planform transitioned towards single-thread when this discharge was repeatedly

  17. Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, H.E.; Walker, D.A.; Bhatt, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    increased 20-26%. • Increasing shrub growth and range extension throughout the Low Arctic are related to winter and early growing season temperature increases. Growth of other tundra plant types, including graminoids and forbs, is increasing, while growth of mosses and lichens is decreasing. • Increases...... in vegetation (including shrub tundra expansion) and thunderstorm activity, each a result of Arctic warming, have created conditions that favor a more active Arctic fire regime....

  18. Parameterization of a bucket model for soil-vegetation-atmosphere modeling under seasonal climatic regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Romano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential impact of accounting for seasonal variations in the climatic forcing and using different methods to parameterize the soil water content at field capacity on the water balance components computed by a bucket model (BM. The single-layer BM of Guswa et al. (2002 is employed, whereas the Richards equation (RE based Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP model is used as a benchmark model. The results are analyzed for two differently-textured soils and for some synthetic runs under real-like seasonal weather conditions, using stochastically-generated daily rainfall data for a period of 100 years. Since transient soil-moisture dynamics and climatic seasonality play a key role in certain zones of the World, such as in Mediterranean land areas, a specific feature of this study is to test the prediction capability of the bucket model under a condition where seasonal variations in rainfall are not in phase with the variations in plant transpiration. Reference is made to a hydrologic year in which we have a rainy period (starting 1 November and lasting 151 days where vegetation is basically assumed in a dormant stage, followed by a drier and rainless period with a vegetation regrowth phase. Better agreement between BM and RE-SWAP intercomparison results are obtained when BM is parameterized by a field capacity value determined through the drainage method proposed by Romano and Santini (2002. Depending on the vegetation regrowth or dormant seasons, rainfall variability within a season results in transpiration regimes and soil moisture fluctuations with distinctive features. During the vegetation regrowth season, transpiration exerts a key control on soil water budget with respect to rainfall. During the dormant season of vegetation, the precipitation regime becomes an important climate forcing. Simulations also highlight the occurrence of bimodality in the probability distribution of soil moisture during the season when plants are

  19. Stochastic models of cover class dynamics. [remote sensing of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, T. H.; Robinson, V. B.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations related to satellite remote sensing of vegetation have been concerned with questions of signature identification and extension, cover inventory accuracy, and change detection and monitoring. Attention is given to models of ecological succession, present directions in successional modeling and analysis, nondynamic spatial models, issues in the analysis of spatial data, and aspects of spatial modeling. Issues in time-series analysis are considered along with dynamic spatial models, and problems of model specification and identification.

  20. [Simulation of vegetation indices optimizing under retrieval of vegetation biochemical parameters based on PROSPECT + SAIL model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Liu, Xiang-Nan; Zhou, Bo-Tian; Liu, Chuan-Hao; Li, Lu-Feng

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzed the sensitivities of three vegetation biochemical parameters [chlorophyll content (Cab), leaf water content (Cw), and leaf area index (LAI)] to the changes of canopy reflectance, with the effects of each parameter on the wavelength regions of canopy reflectance considered, and selected three vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function. Then, the Cab, Cw, and LAI were estimated, based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm and PROSPECT + SAIL model. The results showed that retrieval efficiency with vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function was better than that with all spectral reflectance. The correlation coefficients (R2) between the measured and estimated values of Cab, Cw, and LAI were 90.8%, 95.7%, and 99.7%, and the root mean square errors of Cab, Cw, and LAI were 4.73 microg x cm(-2), 0.001 g x cm(-2), and 0.08, respectively. It was suggested that to adopt vegetation indices as the optimization comparison targets of cost function could effectively improve the efficiency and precision of the retrieval of biochemical parameters based on PROSPECT + SAIL model.

  1. Next generation dynamic global vegetation models: learning from community ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven; Langan, Liam

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models are a powerful tool to project the past, current and future distribution of vegetation and associated water and carbon fluxes. However, most models are limited by how they define vegetation and by their simplistic representation of competition. We discuss how concepts from community assembly theory and coexistence theory can help to improve vegetation models. We further present a new trait- and individual-based dynamic vegetation model (the aDGVM2) that allows each individual plant to adopt a unique combination of trait values. These traits define how each individual plant grows and competes with other plants under given environmental conditions. The performance of individual plants in turn drives the assembly of a plant community. A genetic optimisation algorithm is used to simulate the inheritance of traits and different levels of reproductive isolation between individuals. Together these model properties allow the assembly of plant communities that are well adapted to a site's biotic and abiotic conditions. Simulated communities can be classified into different plant functional types or biome types by using trait data bases. We illustrate that the aDGVM2 can simulate (1) how environmental conditions and changes in these conditions influence the trait spectra of assembled plant communities, (2) that fire selects for traits that enhance fire protection and reduces trait diversity, and (3) the emergence of communities dominated by life history strategies that are suggestive of colonisation-competition trade-offs. The aDGVM2 deals with functional diversity and competition fundamentally differently from current dynamic vegetation models. We argue that this approach will yield novel insights as to how vegetation may respond to climate change and we believe that it could foster fruitful collaborations between research communities that focus on plant functional traits, plant competition, plant physiology, systems ecology and earth system

  2. Effects of temperature seasonality on tundra vegetation productivity using a daily vegetation dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, H. E.; Erler, A.; Frazier, J.; Bhatt, U. S.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in the seasonality of air temperature will elicit interacting effects on the dynamics of snow cover, nutrient availability, vegetation growth, and other ecosystem properties and processes in arctic tundra. Simulation models often do not have the fine temporal resolution necessary to develop theory and propose hypotheses for the effects of daily and weekly timescale changes on ecosystem dynamics. We therefore developed a daily version of an arctic tundra vegetation dynamics model (ArcVeg) to simulate how changes in the seasonality of air temperatures influences the dynamics of vegetation growth and carbon sequestration across regions of arctic tundra. High temporal-resolution air and soil temperature data collected from field sites across the five arctic tundra bioclimate subzones were used to develop a daily weather generator operable for sites throughout the arctic tundra. Empirical relationships between temperature and soil nitrogen were used to generate daily dynamics of soil nitrogen availability, which drive the daily uptake of nitrogen and growth among twelve tundra plant functional types. Seasonal dynamics of the remotely sensed normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and remotely sensed land surface temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) GIMMS 3g dataset were used to investigate constraints on the start of the growing season, although there was no indication of any spatially consistent temperature or day-length controls on greening onset. Because of the exponential nature of the relationship between soil temperature and nitrogen mineralization, temperature changes during the peak of the growing season had greater effects on vegetation productivity than changes earlier in the growing season. However, early season changes in temperature had a greater effect on the relative productivities of different plant functional types, with potential influences on species composition.

  3. Modeling the Frequency of Cyclists’ Red-Light Running Behavior Using Bayesian PG Model and PLN Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Red-light running behaviors of bicycles at signalized intersection lead to a large number of traffic conflicts and high collision potentials. The primary objective of this study is to model the cyclists’ red-light running frequency within the framework of Bayesian statistics. Data was collected at twenty-five approaches at seventeen signalized intersections. The Poisson-gamma (PG and Poisson-lognormal (PLN model were developed and compared. The models were validated using Bayesian p values based on posterior predictive checking indicators. It was found that the two models have a good fit of the observed cyclists’ red-light running frequency. Furthermore, the PLN model outperformed the PG model. The model estimated results showed that the amount of cyclists’ red-light running is significantly influenced by bicycle flow, conflict traffic flow, pedestrian signal type, vehicle speed, and e-bike rate. The validation result demonstrated the reliability of the PLN model. The research results can help transportation professionals to predict the expected amount of the cyclists’ red-light running and develop effective guidelines or policies to reduce red-light running frequency of bicycles at signalized intersections.

  4. Integrating Geo-Spatial Data for Regional Landslide Susceptibility Modeling in Consideration of Run-Out Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J.-S.; Tsai, F.; Chiang, S.-H.

    2016-06-01

    This study implements a data mining-based algorithm, the random forests classifier, with geo-spatial data to construct a regional and rainfall-induced landslide susceptibility model. The developed model also takes account of landslide regions (source, non-occurrence and run-out signatures) from the original landslide inventory in order to increase the reliability of the susceptibility modelling. A total of ten causative factors were collected and used in this study, including aspect, curvature, elevation, slope, faults, geology, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), rivers, roads and soil data. Consequently, this study transforms the landslide inventory and vector-based causative factors into the pixel-based format in order to overlay with other raster data for constructing the random forests based model. This study also uses original and edited topographic data in the analysis to understand their impacts to the susceptibility modeling. Experimental results demonstrate that after identifying the run-out signatures, the overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient have been reached to be become more than 85 % and 0.8, respectively. In addition, correcting unreasonable topographic feature of the digital terrain model also produces more reliable modelling results.

  5. Two-Higgs-doublet model of type II confronted with the LHC run I and run II data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Han, Xiao-Fang

    2017-06-01

    We examine the parameter space of the two-Higgs-doublet model of type II after imposing the relevant theoretical and experimental constraints from the precision electroweak data, B -meson decays, and the LHC run I and run II data. We find that the searches for Higgs bosons via the τ+τ- , W W , Z Z , γ γ , h h , h Z , H Z , and A Z channels can give strong constraints on the C P -odd Higgs A and heavy C P -even Higgs H , and the parameter space excluded by each channel is respectively carved out in detail assuming that either mA or mH are fixed to 600 or 700 GeV in the scans. The surviving samples are discussed in two different regions. (i) In the standard model-like coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, mA is allowed to be as low as 350 GeV, and a strong upper limit is imposed on tan β . mH is allowed to be as low as 200 GeV for the appropriate values of tan β , sin (β -α ), and mA, but is required to be larger than 300 GeV for mA=700 GeV . (ii) In the wrong-sign Yukawa coupling region of the 125 GeV Higgs, the b b ¯→A /H →τ+τ- channel can impose the upper limits on tan β and sin (β -α ), and the A →h Z channel can give the lower limits on tan β and sin (β -α ). mA and mH are allowed to be as low as 60 and 200 GeV, respectively, but 320 GeV

  6. Dynamical vegetation-atmosphere modelling of the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hui; Stordal, Frode; Berntsen, Terje K.; Bryn, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation interacts with climate on seasonal to inter-annual time scales through albedo, roughness, evapotranspiration, CO2 sequestration and by influencing snow accumulation and ablation. The Scandinavian mountains and high latitudes is a hot spot for land-atmosphere feedback, as the future's increased winter minimum temperature supports a boreal tree line advance, lowering the surface albedo. The northern ecosystem is dominated by mires, boreal forests and alpine heaths, in addition to agricultural land. Model studies have shown that vegetation-climate feedbacks are strong enough to lead to regime shifts in vegetation and local climate in boreal regions. Biogeophysical factors, such as albedo, the Bowen ratio, and surface roughness, are all involved in these feedbacks, and they are also altered by land use change such as reforestation. For calculations of the dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and the vegetation we have used the Earth System Model NorESM, which includes several advanced features in its land surface model (CLM4.5), such as the inclusion of the radiative forcing due to black carbon and dust deposit onto snow, improved representation of fire, permafrost and its hydrological impact, a new snow cover fraction parameterization reflecting the hysteresis in fractional snow cover for a given snow depth between accumulation and melt phases, as well as dynamic vegetation coupled with carbon-nitrogen cycles. These new features improve the representation of surface albedo feedback in Arctic. We have performed experiments with coupled as well fixed ocean for the current as a quadrupled atmospheric CO2 situation. This model configuration is used to study changes in vegetation in a high end radiative forcing case. It is contrasted with an experiment where vegetation dynamics is neglected. Changes in the features of the vegetation along with surface fluxes, albedo and atmospheric temperatures are analysed, with main emphasis on the boreal zone. In

  7. Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirjol, Dan [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-08-01

    We consider the long-run growth rate of the average value of a random multiplicative process x{sub i+1} = a{sub i}x{sub i} where the multipliers a{sub i}=1+ρexp(σW{sub i}₋1/2 σ²t{sub i}) have Markovian dependence given by the exponential of a standard Brownian motion W{sub i}. The average value (x{sub n}) is given by the grand partition function of a one-dimensional lattice gas with two-body linear attractive interactions placed in a uniform field. We study the Lyapunov exponent λ=lim{sub n→∞}1/n log(x{sub n}), at fixed β=1/2 σ²t{sub n}n, and show that it is given by the equation of state of the lattice gas in thermodynamical equilibrium. The Lyapunov exponent has discontinuous partial derivatives along a curve in the (ρ, β) plane ending at a critical point (ρ{sub C}, β{sub C}) which is related to a phase transition in the equivalent lattice gas. Using the equivalence of the lattice gas with a bosonic system, we obtain the exact solution for the equation of state in the thermodynamical limit n → ∞.

  8. Vegetation pattern formation of a water-biomass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Guohong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model with diffusion and cross-diffusion is proposed to describe the interaction between the vegetation and the soil water. Based on the view of Turing pattern, we discuss the conditions of the diffusion-induced instability and the cross-diffusion-induced instability of a homogenous uniform steady state. We find that either a fast diffusion speed of water or a great hydraulic diffusivity due to the suction of roots may drive the instability of the homogenous steady state. Furthermore, we find that both the rain-fall rate and the infiltration feedback parameter can induce the transitions among the vegetation state, pattern formation and bare soil state. It is also found that the "terrain slope" may cause the instability of the homogenous steady state and drive the formation of periodic stripe pattern. Consequently, the diversity of dryland vegetation in reality can be explained as a result of pattern solutions of the model.

  9. Biases in modeled surface snow BC mixing ratios in prescribed-aerosol climate model runs

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, S. J.; C. M. Bitz; M. G. Flanner

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in snow lowers its albedo, increasing the absorption of sunlight, leading to positive radiative forcing, climate warming and earlier snowmelt. A series of recent studies have used prescribed-aerosol deposition flux fields in climate model runs to assess the forcing by black carbon in snow. In these studies, the prescribed mass deposition flux of BC to surface snow is decoupled from the mass deposition flux of snow water to the surface. Here we compare progn...

  10. Running Large-Scale Air Pollution Models on Parallel Computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, K.; Zlatev, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Proceedings of the 23rd NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held 28 September - 2 October 1998, in Varna, Bulgaria.......Proceedings of the 23rd NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held 28 September - 2 October 1998, in Varna, Bulgaria....

  11. A model for seed dispersion and vegetation growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jaqueline Maria; Vieira Kritz, Maurício

    2016-08-01

    The study of processes associated with vegetation grow is very important to understand the dynamics of flooded ecosystems and their sustainable management. We present a cell-centered individual-based probabilistic model for the dynamics of tree-populations, that is further tailored towards the environmental conditions present in the Amazon floodplains.

  12. Modeling Microwave Emission from Short Vegetation-Covered Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Xie

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the temporal and spatial variability of the emissivity spectra, problems remain in the interpretation and application of satellite passive microwave data over vegetation-covered surfaces. The commonly used microwave land emissivity model, developed by Weng et al. (2001 and implemented into the community radiative transfer model (CRTM, treats vegetation-covered surfaces as a three-layer medium. This simplification comes at the cost of accuracy. In this study, to reduce bias in the modeling of microwave emissions from short vegetation-covered surfaces, two modifications are made. First, vegetation was considered as a multilayered medium including leaves and stems to simulate volumetric absorption and scattering. The results suggest that the calculated brightness temperatures well agree with field experiments under different incidence angles for low soil moisture and sparse crop cover. On the other hand, large errors from the measurements are found for high soil moisture content and dense crop cover. Second, the advanced integral equation model (AIEM was also used to improve the simulation of reflectivity from rough soil surfaces. Comparisons with field experimental data show that the determination coefficient between the calculated and measured brightness temperatures significantly increased and the root-mean-square errors remarkably decreased. The average improvement using the proposed approach is about 80% and 59% in accuracy for the vertical and horizontal polarization, respectively.

  13. Renormalisation running of masses and mixings in UED models

    CERN Document Server

    Cornell, A S; Liu, Lu-Xin; Tarhini, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    We review the Universal Extra-Dimensional Model compactified on a S1/Z2 orbifold, and the renormalisation group evolution of quark and lepton masses, mixing angles and phases both in the UED extension of the Standard Model and of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We consider two typical scenarios: all matter fields propagating in the bulk, and matter fields constrained to the brane. The resulting renormalisation group evolution equations in these scenarios are compared with the existing results in the literature, together with their implications.

  14. A comprehensive benchmarking system for evaluating global vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Kelley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a benchmark system for global vegetation models. This system provides a quantitative evaluation of multiple simulated vegetation properties, including primary production; seasonal net ecosystem production; vegetation cover, composition and height; fire regime; and runoff. The benchmarks are derived from remotely sensed gridded datasets and site-based observations. The datasets allow comparisons of annual average conditions and seasonal and inter-annual variability, and they allow the impact of spatial and temporal biases in means and variability to be assessed separately. Specifically designed metrics quantify model performance for each process, and are compared to scores based on the temporal or spatial mean value of the observations and a "random" model produced by bootstrap resampling of the observations. The benchmark system is applied to three models: a simple light-use efficiency and water-balance model (the Simple Diagnostic Biosphere Model: SDBM, and the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ and Land Processes and eXchanges (LPX dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs. SDBM reproduces observed CO2 seasonal cycles, but its simulation of independent measurements of net primary production (NPP is too high. The two DGVMs show little difference for most benchmarks (including the inter-annual variability in the growth rate and seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2, but LPX represents burnt fraction demonstrably more accurately. Benchmarking also identified several weaknesses common to both DGVMs. The benchmarking system provides a quantitative approach for evaluating how adequately processes are represented in a model, identifying errors and biases, tracking improvements in performance through model development, and discriminating among models. Adoption of such a system would do much to improve confidence in terrestrial model predictions of climate change impacts and feedbacks.

  15. Evaluation of land surface model representation of phenology: an analysis of model runs submitted to the NACP Interim Site Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. D.; Nacp Interim Site Synthesis Participants

    2010-12-01

    Phenology represents a critical intersection point between organisms and their growth environment. It is for this reason that phenology is a sensitive and robust integrator of the biological impacts of year-to-year climate variability and longer-term climate change on natural systems. However, it is perhaps equally important that phenology, by controlling the seasonal activity of vegetation on the land surface, plays a fundamental role in regulating ecosystem processes, competitive interactions, and feedbacks to the climate system. Unfortunately, the phenological sub-models implemented in most state-of-the-art ecosystem models and land surface schemes are overly simplified. We quantified model errors in the representation of the seasonal cycles of leaf area index (LAI), gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP), and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. Our analysis was based on site-level model runs (14 different models) submitted to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) Interim Synthesis, and long-term measurements from 10 forested (5 evergreen conifer, 5 deciduous broadleaf) sites within the AmeriFlux and Fluxnet-Canada networks. Model predictions of the seasonality of LAI and GEP were unacceptable, particularly in spring, and especially for deciduous forests. This is despite an historical emphasis on deciduous forest phenology, and the perception that controls on spring phenology are better understood than autumn phenology. Errors of up to 25 days in predicting “spring onset” transition dates were common, and errors of up to 50 days were observed. For deciduous sites, virtually every model was biased towards spring onset being too early, and autumn senescence being too late. Thus, models predicted growing seasons that were far too long for deciduous forests. For most models, errors in the seasonal representation of deciduous forest LAI were highly correlated with errors in the seasonality of both GPP and NEE, indicating the importance of getting the underlying

  16. Potential climatic impacts of vegetation change: A regional modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, J.H.; Pielke, R.A.; Kittel, T.G.F.

    1996-01-01

    The human species has been modifying the landscape long before the development of modern agrarian techniques. Much of the land area of the conterminous United States is currently used for agricultural production. In certain regions this change in vegetative cover from its natural state may have led to local climatic change. A regional climate version of the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System was used to assess the impact of a natural versus current vegetation distribution on the weather and climate of July 1989. The results indicate that coherent regions of substantial changes, of both positive and negative sign, in screen height temperature, humidity, wind speed, and precipitation are a possible consequence of land use change throughout the United States. The simulated changes in the screen height quantities were closely related to changes in the vegetation parameters of albedo, roughness length, leaf area index, and fractional coverage. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Short-Run Asset Selection using a Logistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Gonçalves Junior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Investors constantly look for significant predictors and accurate models to forecast future results, whose occasional efficacy end up being neutralized by market efficiency. Regardless, such predictors are widely used for seeking better (and more unique perceptions. This paper aims to investigate to what extent some of the most notorious indicators have discriminatory power to select stocks, and if it is feasible with such variables to build models that could anticipate those with good performance. In order to do that, logistical regressions were conducted with stocks traded at Bovespa using the selected indicators as explanatory variables. Investigated in this study were the outputs of Bovespa Index, liquidity, the Sharpe Ratio, ROE, MB, size and age evidenced to be significant predictors. Also examined were half-year, logistical models, which were adjusted in order to check the potential acceptable discriminatory power for the asset selection.

  18. Improving the dynamics of northern vegetation in the ORCHIDEE ecosystem model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Processes that describe the distribution of vegetation and ecosystem succession after disturbance are an important component of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs. The vegetation dynamics module (ORC-VD within the process-based ecosystem model ORCHIDEE (Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems has not been updated and evaluated since many years and does not match the progress in modeling the rest of the physical and biogeochemical processes. Therefore, ORC-VD is known to produce unrealistic results. This study presents a new parameterization of ORC-VD for mid-to-high latitude regions in the Northern Hemisphere, including processes that influence the existence, mortality and competition between tree functional types. A new set of metrics is also proposed to quantify the performance of ORC-VD, using up to five different datasets of satellite land cover, forest biomass from remote sensing and inventories, a data-driven estimate of gross primary productivity (GPP and two gridded datasets of soil organic carbon content. The scoring of ORC-VD derived from these metrics integrates uncertainties in the observational datasets. This multi-dataset evaluation framework is a generic method that could be applied to the evaluation of other DGVM models. The results of the original ORC-VD published in 2005 for mid-to-high latitudes and of the new parameterization are evaluated against the above-described datasets. Significant improvements were found in the modeling of the distribution of tree functional types north of 40° N. Three additional sensitivity runs were carried out to separate the impact of different processes or drivers on simulated vegetation distribution, including soil freezing which limits net primary production through soil moisture availability in the root zone, elevated CO2 concentration since 1850, and the return frequency of cold climate extremes causing tree mortality during the spin-up phase of the model.

  19. Dynamical system approach to running $\\Lambda$ cosmological models

    CERN Document Server

    Stachowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We discussed the dynamics of cosmological models in which the cosmological constant term is a time dependent function through the scale factor $a(t)$, Hubble function $H(t)$, Ricci scalar $R(t)$ and scalar field $\\phi(t)$. We considered five classes of models; two non-covariant parametrization of $\\Lambda$: 1) $\\Lambda(H)$CDM cosmologies where $H(t)$ is the Hubble parameter, 2) $\\Lambda(a)$CDM cosmologies where $a(t)$ is the scale factor, and three covariant parametrization of $\\Lambda$: 3) $\\Lambda(R)$CDM cosmologies, where $R(t)$ is the Ricci scalar, 4) $\\Lambda(\\phi)$-cosmologies with diffusion, 5) $\\Lambda(X)$-cosmologies, where $X=\\frac{1}{2}g^{\\alpha\\beta}\

  20. Implementation of the ATLAS Run 2 event data model

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, Andrew; Elsing, Markus; Gillberg, Dag Ingemar; Koeneke, Karsten; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Moyse, Edward; Nowak, Marcin; Snyder, Scott; van Gemmeren, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the 2013--2014 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, ATLAS switched to a new event data model for analysis, called the xAOD. A key feature of this model is the separation of the object data from the objects themselves (the `auxiliary store'). Rather being stored as member variables of the analysis classes, all object data are stored separately, as vectors of simple values. Thus, the data are stored in a `structure of arrays' format, while the user still can access it as an `array of structures'. This organization allows for on-demand partial reading of objects, the selective removal of object properties, and the addition of arbitrary user-defined properties in a uniform manner. It also improves performance by increasing the locality of memory references in typical analysis code. The resulting data structures can be written to ROOT files with data properties represented as simple ROOT tree branches. This talk will focus on the design and implementation of the auxiliary store and its interaction with RO...

  1. mr: A C++ library for the matching and running of the Standard Model parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Pikelner, Andrey F.; Veretin, Oleg L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the C++ program library mr that allows us to reliably calculate the values of the running parameters in the Standard Model at high energy scales. The initial conditions are obtained by relating the running parameters in the MS bar renormalization scheme to observables at lower energies with full two-loop precision. The evolution is then performed in accordance with the renormalization group equations with full three-loop precision. Pure QCD corrections to the matching and running are included through four loops. We also provide a Mathematica interface for this program library.

  2. mr: a C++ library for the matching and running of the Standard Model parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kniehl, Bernd A; Veretin, Oleg L

    2016-01-01

    We present the C++ program library mr that allows us to reliably calculate the values of the running parameters in the Standard Model at high energy scales. The initial conditions are obtained by relating the running parameters in the $\\overline{\\mathrm{MS}}$ renormalization scheme to observables at lower energies with full two-loop precision. The evolution is then performed in accordance with the renormalization group equations with full three-loop precision. Pure QCD corrections to the matching and running are included through four loops. We also provide a Mathematica interface for this program library.

  3. Capturing Vegetation Diversity in the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Haralick, R. M.; Cook, B.; Aleinov, I. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present preliminary results from data mining to develop parameter sets and global vegetation structure datasets to set boundary conditions for the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM) for improved representation of diversity and to propagate uncertainty in simulations of land carbon dynamics in the 20th century and under future climate change. The Ent TBM is the only dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) developed for coupling with general circulation models (GCMs) to account for the height structure of mixed canopies, including a canopy radiative transfer scheme that accounts for foliage clumping in dynamically changing canopies. It is flexibly programmed to incorporate any number of "plant functional types" (PFTs). It is now a coupled component of the ModelE2 version of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). We demonstrate a data mining method, linear manifold clustering, to be used with several very recently compiled large databases of plant traits and phenology combined with climate and satellite data, to identify new PFT groupings, and also conduct customized parameter fits of PFT traits already defined in Ent. These parameter sets are used together with satellite-derived global forest height structure and land cover derived from a combination of satellite and inventory sources and bioclimatic relations to provide a new estimate and uncertainty bounds on vegetation biomass carbon stocks. These parameter sets will also be used to reproduce atmospheric CO2 time series over the flask observational period, to evaluate the impact of improved representation of vegetation dynamics on soil carbon stocks, and finally to produce a projection of the land carbon sink under future climate change. This research is timely in taking advantage of new, globally ranging vegetation databases, satellite-derived forest heights, and the advanced framework of the Ent TBM. It will advance understanding of and reduce uncertainty in

  4. Searching For Exotic Physics Beyond the Standard Model: Extrapolation Until the End of Run-3

    CERN Document Server

    Genest, Marie-Hel\\`ene; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The prospects of looking for exotic beyond-the-Standard-Model physics with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC in the rest of Run-2 and in Run-3 will be reviewed. A few selected analyses will be discussed, showing the gain in sensitivity that can be achieved by accumulating more data and comparing the current limits with the predicted reach. Some limiting factors will be identified, along with ideas on how to improve on the searches.

  5. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of long running landslide models through basis set expansion and meta-modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the temporal evolution of landslides is typically supported by numerical modelling. Dynamic sensitivity analysis aims at assessing the influence of the landslide properties on the time-dependent predictions (e.g., time series of landslide displacements). Yet two major difficulties arise: 1. Global sensitivity analysis require running the landslide model a high number of times (> 1000), which may become impracticable when the landslide model has a high computation time cost (> several hours); 2. Landslide model outputs are not scalar, but function of time, i.e. they are n-dimensional vectors with n usually ranging from 100 to 1000. In this article, I explore the use of a basis set expansion, such as principal component analysis, to reduce the output dimensionality to a few components, each of them being interpreted as a dominant mode of variation in the overall structure of the temporal evolution. The computationally intensive calculation of the Sobol' indices for each of these components are then achieved through meta-modelling, i.e. by replacing the landslide model by a "costless-to-evaluate" approximation (e.g., a projection pursuit regression model). The methodology combining "basis set expansion - meta-model - Sobol' indices" is then applied to the La Frasse landslide to investigate the dynamic sensitivity analysis of the surface horizontal displacements to the slip surface properties during the pore pressure changes. I show how to extract information on the sensitivity of each main modes of temporal behaviour using a limited number (a few tens) of long running simulations. In particular, I identify the parameters, which trigger the occurrence of a turning point marking a shift between a regime of low values of landslide displacements and one of high values.

  6. Biases in modeled surface snow BC mixing ratios in prescribed aerosol climate model runs

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, S. J.; C. M. Bitz; M. G. Flanner

    2014-01-01

    A series of recent studies have used prescribed aerosol deposition flux fields in climate model runs to assess forcing by black carbon in snow. In these studies, the prescribed mass deposition flux of BC to surface snow is decoupled from the mass deposition flux of snow water to the surface. Here we use a series of offline calculations to show that this approach results, on average, in a~factor of about 1.5–2.5 high bias in annual-mean surface snow BC mixing ratios in three ...

  7. Modeling driver stop/run behavior at the onset of a yellow indication considering driver run tendency and roadway surface conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhenawy, Mohammed; Jahangiri, Arash; Rakha, Hesham A; El-Shawarby, Ihab

    2015-10-01

    The ability to model driver stop/run behavior at signalized intersections considering the roadway surface condition is critical in the design of advanced driver assistance systems. Such systems can reduce intersection crashes and fatalities by predicting driver stop/run behavior. The research presented in this paper uses data collected from two controlled field experiments on the Smart Road at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) to model driver stop/run behavior at the onset of a yellow indication for different roadway surface conditions. The paper offers two contributions. First, it introduces a new predictor related to driver aggressiveness and demonstrates that this measure enhances the modeling of driver stop/run behavior. Second, it applies well-known artificial intelligence techniques including: adaptive boosting (AdaBoost), random forest, and support vector machine (SVM) algorithms as well as traditional logistic regression techniques on the data in order to develop a model that can be used by traffic signal controllers to predict driver stop/run decisions in a connected vehicle environment. The research demonstrates that by adding the proposed driver aggressiveness predictor to the model, there is a statistically significant increase in the model accuracy. Moreover the false alarm rate is significantly reduced but this reduction is not statistically significant. The study demonstrates that, for the subject data, the SVM machine learning algorithm performs the best in terms of optimum classification accuracy and false positive rates. However, the SVM model produces the best performance in terms of the classification accuracy only.

  8. Model-data integration to improve the LPJmL dynamic global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, Matthias; Thonicke, Kirsten; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Thurner, Martin; von Bloh, Werner; Dorigo, Wouter; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models show large uncertainties regarding the development of the land carbon balance under future climate change conditions. This uncertainty is partly caused by differences in how vegetation carbon turnover is represented in global vegetation models. Model-data integration approaches might help to systematically assess and improve model performances and thus to potentially reduce the uncertainty in terrestrial vegetation responses under future climate change. Here we present several applications of model-data integration with the LPJmL (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Lands) dynamic global vegetation model to systematically improve the representation of processes or to estimate model parameters. In a first application, we used global satellite-derived datasets of FAPAR (fraction of absorbed photosynthetic activity), albedo and gross primary production to estimate phenology- and productivity-related model parameters using a genetic optimization algorithm. Thereby we identified major limitations of the phenology module and implemented an alternative empirical phenology model. The new phenology module and optimized model parameters resulted in a better performance of LPJmL in representing global spatial patterns of biomass, tree cover, and the temporal dynamic of atmospheric CO2. Therefore, we used in a second application additionally global datasets of biomass and land cover to estimate model parameters that control vegetation establishment and mortality. The results demonstrate the ability to improve simulations of vegetation dynamics but also highlight the need to improve the representation of mortality processes in dynamic global vegetation models. In a third application, we used multiple site-level observations of ecosystem carbon and water exchange, biomass and soil organic carbon to jointly estimate various model parameters that control ecosystem dynamics. This exercise demonstrates the strong role of individual data streams on the

  9. Data-driven modelling of vertical dynamic excitation of bridges induced by people running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racic, Vitomir; Morin, Jean Benoit

    2014-02-01

    With increasingly popular marathon events in urban environments, structural designers face a great deal of uncertainty when assessing dynamic performance of bridges occupied and dynamically excited by people running. While the dynamic loads induced by pedestrians walking have been intensively studied since the infamous lateral sway of the London Millennium Bridge in 2000, reliable and practical descriptions of running excitation are still very rare and limited. This interdisciplinary study has addressed the issue by bringing together a database of individual running force signals recorded by two state-of-the-art instrumented treadmills and two attempts to mathematically describe the measurements. The first modelling strategy is adopted from the available design guidelines for human walking excitation of structures, featuring perfectly periodic and deterministic characterisation of pedestrian forces presentable via Fourier series. This modelling approach proved to be inadequate for running loads due to the inherent near-periodic nature of the measured signals, a great inter-personal randomness of the dominant Fourier amplitudes and the lack of strong correlation between the amplitudes and running footfall rate. Hence, utilising the database established and motivated by the existing models of wind and earthquake loading, speech recognition techniques and a method of replicating electrocardiogram signals, this paper finally presents a numerical generator of random near-periodic running force signals which can reliably simulate the measurements. Such a model is an essential prerequisite for future quality models of dynamic loading induced by individuals, groups and crowds running under a wide range of conditions, such as perceptibly vibrating bridges and different combinations of visual, auditory and tactile cues.

  10. Assessing 20th century climate-vegetation feedbacks of land-use change and natural vegetation dynamics in a fully coupled vegetation-climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strengers, B.J.; Müller, C.; Schaeffer, M.; Haarsma, R.J.; Severijns, C.; Gerten, D.; Schaphoff, S.; Houdt, Van den R.; Oostenrijk, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of the dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), Lund–Potsdam–Jena Model for managed land (LPJmL), with the general circulation model (GCM), Simplified Parameterizations primitivE Equation DYnamics model (SPEEDY), to study the feedbacks between land-use change and nat

  11. Assessing 20th century climate-vegetation feedbacks of land-use change and natural vegetation dynamics in a fully coupled vegetation-climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strengers, B.J.; Müller, C.; Schaeffer, M.; Haarsma, R.J.; Severijns, C.; Gerten, D.; Schaphoff, S.; Houdt, Van den R.; Oostenrijk, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the coupling of the dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), Lund–Potsdam–Jena Model for managed land (LPJmL), with the general circulation model (GCM), Simplified Parameterizations primitivE Equation DYnamics model (SPEEDY), to study the feedbacks between land-use change and nat

  12. Effects of Real-Time NASA Vegetation Data on Model Forecasts of Severe Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Bell, Jordan R.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA-EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT started generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States beginning 1 June 2010. A companion poster presentation (Bell et al.) primarily focuses on impact results in an offline configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) for the 2010 warm season, comparing the SPoRT/MODIS GVF dataset to the current operational monthly climatology GVF available within the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. This paper/presentation primarily focuses on individual case studies of severe weather events to determine the impacts and possible improvements by using the real-time, high-resolution SPoRT-MODIS GVFs in place of the coarser-resolution NCEP climatological GVFs in model simulations. The NASA-Unified WRF (NU-WRF) modeling system is employed to conduct the sensitivity simulations of individual events. The NU-WRF is an integrated modeling system based on the Advanced Research WRF dynamical core that is designed to represents aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and land processes at satellite-resolved scales in a coupled simulation environment. For this experiment, the coupling between the NASA Land Information System (LIS) and the WRF model is utilized to measure the impacts of the daily SPoRT/MODIS versus the monthly NCEP climatology GVFs. First, a spin-up run of the LIS is integrated for two years using the Noah LSM to ensure that the land surface fields reach an equilibrium state on the 4-km grid mesh used. Next, the spin-up LIS is run in two separate modes beginning on 1 June 2010, one continuing with the climatology GVFs while the

  13. Dynamic Model of Signal Fading due to Swaying Vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution, we use fading measurements at 2.45, 5.25, 29, and 60 GHz, and wind speed data, to study the dynamic effects of vegetation on propagating radiowaves. A new simulation model for generating signal fading due to a swaying tree has been developed by utilizing a multiple mass-spring system to represent a tree and a turbulent wind model. The model is validated in terms of the cumulative distribution function (CDF), autocorrelation function (ACF), level crossing rate (LCR...

  14. Inclusion of vegetation in the Town Energy Balance model for modeling urban green areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lemonsu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cities impact both local climate, through urban heat islands, and global climate, because they are an area of heavy greenhouse gas release into the atmosphere due to heating, air conditioning and traffic. Including more vegetation into cities is a planning strategy having possible positive impacts for both concerns. Improving vegetation representation into urban models will allow to address more accurately these questions. This paper presents an improvement of the TEB urban canopy model. Vegetation is directly included inside the canyon, allowing shadowing of grass by buildings, better representation of urban canopy form, and, a priori, a more accurate simulation of canyon air microclimate. The development is performed so that any vegetation model can be used to represent the vegetation part. Here the ISBA model is used. The model results are compared to microclimatic and evaporation measurements performed in small courtyards in a very arid region of Israel. Two experimental landscaping strategies – bare soil or irrigated grass in the courtyard – are observed and simulated. The new version of the model with integrated vegetation performs better than if vegetation is treated outside the canyon. Surface temperatures are closer to the observations, especially at night when radiative trapping is important. The integrated vegetation version simulates a more humid air inside the canyon. The microclimatic quantities are better simulated with this new version. This opens opportunities to study with better accuracy the urban microclimate, down to the micro (or canyon scale.

  15. Higher-order effects in asset-pricing models with long-run risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, W.; Schmedders, K.; Wilms, Ole

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows that the latest generation of asset pricing models with long-run risk exhibits economically significant nonlinearities, and thus the ubiquitous Campbell--Shiller log-linearization can generate large numerical errors. These errors in turn translate to considerable errors in the model

  16. Meander migration modeling accounting for the effect of riparian vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, E.; Parker, G.

    2010-12-01

    A numerical model is proposed to study the development of meandering rivers so as to reproduce patterns of both migration and spatial/temporal width variation pattern observed in nature. The model comprises of: a) a depth-averaged channel hydrodynamic/morphodynamic model developed using a two-parameter perturbation expansion technique that considers perturbations induced by curvature and spatial channel width variation and b) a bank migration model which separately considers bank erosional and depositional processes. Unlike most previous meandering river models where channel migration is characterized only in terms of bank erosion, channel dynamics are here defined at channel banks which are allowed to migrate independently via deposition/erosion based on the local flow field and bank characteristics. A bank erodes (deposits) if the near bank Shields stress computed from the flow field is greater (less) than a specified threshold. This threshold Shields number is equivalent to the formative Shields stress characterizing bankfull flow. Excessive bank erosion is controlled by means of natural armoring provided by cohesive/rooted slump blocks produced when a stream erodes into the lower non-cohesive part of a composite bank. Bank deposition is largely due to sediment trapping by vegetation; resultant channel narrowing is related to both a natural rate of vegetal encroachment and flow characteristics. This new model allows the channel freedom to vary in width both spatially and in time as it migrates, so accounting for the bi-directional coupling between vegetation and flow dynamics and reproducing more realistic planform geometries. Preliminary results based on the model are presented.

  17. Running Effects on Lepton Mixing Angles in Flavour Models with Type I Seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Y; Paris, A

    2009-01-01

    We study renormalization group running effects on neutrino mixing patterns when a (type I) seesaw model is implemented by suitable flavour symmetries. We are particularly interested in mass-independent mixing patterns to which the widely studied tribimaximal mixing pattern belongs. In this class of flavour models, the running contribution from neutrino Yukawa coupling, which is generally dominant at energies above the seesaw threshold, can be absorbed by a small shift on neutrino mass eigenvalues leaving mixing angles unchanged. Consequently, in the whole running energy range, the change in mixing angles is due to the contribution coming from charged lepton sector. Subsequently, we analyze in detail these effects in an explicit flavour model for tribimaximal neutrino mixing based on an A4 discrete symmetry group. We find that for normally ordered light neutrinos, the tribimaximal prediction is essentially stable under renormalization group evolution. On the other hand, in the case of inverted hierarchy, the d...

  18. Models of production runs for multiple products in flexible manufacturing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available How to determine economic production runs (EPR for multiple products in flexible manufacturing systems (FMS is considered in this paper. Eight different although similar, models are developed and presented. The first four models are devoted to the cases when no shortage is allowed. The other four models are some kind of generalization of the previous ones when shortages may exist. The numerical examples are given as the illustration of the proposed models.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SOLITARY WAVE RUN-UP AND OVERTOPPING USING BOUSSINESQ-TYPE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TSUNG Wen-Shuo; HSIAO Shih-Chun; LIN Ting-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    In this article,the use of a high-order Boussinesq-type model and sets of laboratory experiments in a large scale flume of breaking solitary waves climbing up slopes with two inclinations are presented to study the shoreline behavior of breaking and non-breaking solitary waves on plane slopes.The scale effect on run-up height is briefly discussed.The model simulation capability is well validated against the available laboratory data and present experiments.Then,serial numerical tests are conducted to study the shoreline motion correlated with the effects of beach slope and wave nonlinearity for breaking and non-breaking waves.The empirical formula proposed by Hsiao et al.for predicting the maximum run-up height of a breaking solitary wave on plane slopes with a wide range of slope inclinations is confirmed to be cautious.Furthermore,solitary waves impacting and overtopping an impermeable sloping seawall at various water depths are investigated.Laboratory data of run-up height,shoreline motion,free surface elevation and overtopping discharge are presented.Comparisons of run-up,run-down,shoreline trajectory and wave overtopping discharge are made.A fairly good agreement is seen between numerical results and experimental data.It elucidates that the present depth-integrated model can be used as an efficient tool for predicting a wide spectrum of coastal problems.

  20. Fire disturbance and vegetation dynamics : analysis and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonicke, Kirsten

    2003-04-01

    Studies of the role of disturbance in vegetation or ecosystems showed that disturbances are an essential and intrinsic element of ecosystems that contribute substantially to ecosystem health, to structural diversity of ecosystems and to nutrient cycling at the local as well as global level. Fire as a grassland, bush or forest fire is a special disturbance agent, since it is caused by biotic as well abiotic environmental factors. Fire affects biogeochemical cycles and plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by releasing climate-sensitive trace gases and aerosols, and thus in the global carbon cycle by releasing approximately 3.9 Gt C p.a. through biomass burning. A combined model to describe effects and feedbacks between fire and vegetation became relevant as changes in fire regimes due to land use and land management were observed and the global dimension of biomass burnt as an important carbon flux to the atmosphere, its influence on atmospheric chemistry and climate as well as vegetation dynamics were emphasized. The existing modelling approaches would not allow these investigations. As a consequence, an optimal set of variables that best describes fire occurrence, fire spread and its effects in ecosystems had to be defined, which can simulate observed fire regimes and help to analyse interactions between fire and vegetation dynamics as well as to allude to the reasons behind changing fire regimes. Especially, dynamic links between vegetation, climate and fire processes are required to analyse dynamic feedbacks and effects of changes of single environmental factors. This led us to the point, where new fire models had to be developed that would allow the investigations, mentioned above, and could help to improve our understanding of the role of fire in global ecology. In conclusion of the thesis, one can state that moisture conditions, its persistence over time and fuel load are the important components that describe global fire pattern. If time series of

  1. Parallelization and Performance of the NIM Weather Model Running on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govett, Mark; Middlecoff, Jacques; Henderson, Tom; Rosinski, James

    2014-05-01

    The Non-hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) is a global weather prediction model being developed to run on the GPU and MIC fine-grain architectures. The model dynamics, written in Fortran, was initially parallelized for GPUs in 2009 using the F2C-ACC compiler and demonstrated good results running on a single GPU. Subsequent efforts have focused on (1) running efficiently on multiple GPUs, (2) parallelization of NIM for Intel-MIC using openMP, (3) assessing commercial Fortran GPU compilers now available from Cray, PGI and CAPS, (4) keeping the model up to date with the latest scientific development while maintaining a single source performance portable code, and (5) parallelization of two physics packages used in the NIM: the operational Global Forecast System (GFS) used operationally, and the widely used Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model physics. The presentation will touch on each of these efforts, but highlight improvements in parallel performance of the NIM running on the Titan GPU cluster at ORNL, the ongong parallelization of model physics, and a recent evaluation of commercial GPU compilers using the F2C-ACC compiler as the baseline.

  2. Comparison of Particle Flow Code and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modelling of Landslide Run outs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preh, A.; Poisel, R.; Hungr, O.

    2009-04-01

    In most continuum mechanics methods modelling the run out of landslides the moving mass is divided into a number of elements, the velocities of which can be established by numerical integration of Newtońs second law (Lagrangian solution). The methods are based on fluid mechanics modelling the movements of an equivalent fluid. In 2004, McDougall and Hungr presented a three-dimensional numerical model for rapid landslides, e.g. debris flows and rock avalanches, called DAN3D.The method is based on the previous work of Hungr (1995) and is using an integrated two-dimensional Lagrangian solution and meshless Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) principle to maintain continuity. DAN3D has an open rheological kernel, allowing the use of frictional (with constant porepressure ratio) and Voellmy rheologies and gives the possibility to change material rheology along the path. Discontinuum (granular) mechanics methods model the run out mass as an assembly of particles moving down a surface. Each particle is followed exactly as it moves and interacts with the surface and with its neighbours. Every particle is checked on contacts with every other particle in every time step using a special cell-logic for contact detection in order to reduce the computational effort. The Discrete Element code PFC3D was adapted in order to make possible discontinuum mechanics models of run outs. Punta Thurwieser Rock Avalanche and Frank Slide were modelled by DAN as well as by PFC3D. The simulations showed correspondingly that the parameters necessary to get results coinciding with observations in nature are completely different. The maximum velocity distributions due to DAN3D reveal that areas of different maximum flow velocity are next to each other in Punta Thurwieser run out whereas the distribution of maximum flow velocity shows almost constant maximum flow velocity over the width of the run out regarding Frank Slide. Some 30 percent of total kinetic energy is rotational kinetic energy in

  3. Integration of biomass data in the dynamic vegetation model ORCHIDEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbart, N.; Viovy, N.; Ciais, P.; Le Toan, T.

    2009-04-01

    Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) are aimed at estimating exchanges between the terrestrial vegetated surface and the atmosphere, and the spatial distribution of natural vegetation types. For this purpose, DVMs use the climatic data alone to feed the vegetation process equations. As dynamic models, they can also give predictions under the current and the future climatic conditions. However, they currently lack accuracy in locating carbon stocks, sinks and sources, and in getting the correct magnitude. Consequently they have been essentially used to compare the vegetation responses under different scenarii. The assimilation of external data such as remote sensing data has been shown to improve the simulations. For example, the land cover maps are used to force the correct distribution of plant functional types (PFTs), and the leaf area index data is used to force the photosynthesis processes. This study concerns the integration of biomass data within the DVM ORCHIDEE. The objective here is to have the living carbon stocks with the correct magnitude and the correct location. Carbon stocks depend on interplay of carbon assimilated by photosynthesis, and carbon lost by respiration, mortality and disturbance. Biomass data can therefore be used as one essential constraint on this interplay. In this study, we use a large database provided by in-situ measurements of carbon stocks and carbon fluxes of old growth forests to constraint this interplay. For each PFT, we first adjust the simulated photosynthesis by reducing the mean error with the in situ measurements. Then we proceed similarly to adjust the autotrophic respiration. We then compare the biomass measured, and adjust the mortality processes in the model. Second, when processes are adjusted for each PFT to minimize the mean error on the carbon stock, biomass measurements can be assimilated. This assimilation is based on the hypothesis that the main variable explaining the biomass level at a given location is the age

  4. Vegetation coupling to global climate: Trajectories of vegetation change and phenology modeling from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeremy Isaac

    Important systematic shifts in ecosystem function are often masked by natural variability. The rich legacy of over two decades of continuous satellite observations provides an important database for distinguishing climatological and anthropogenic ecosystem changes. Examples from semi-arid Sudanian West Africa and New England (USA) illustrate the response of vegetation to climate and land-use. In Burkina Faso, West Africa, pastoral and agricultural practices compete for land area, while degradation may follow intensification. The Nouhao Valley is a natural experiment in which pastoral and agricultural land uses were allocated separate, coherent reserves. Trajectories of annual net primary productivity were derived from 18 years of coarse-grain (AVHRR) satellite data. Trends suggested that pastoral lands had responded rigorously to increasing rainfall after the 1980's droughts. A detailed analysis at Landsat resolution (30m) indicated that the increased vegetative cover was concentrated in the river basins of the pastoral region, implying a riparian wood expansion. In comparison, riparian cover was reduced in agricultural regions. We suggest that broad-scale patterns of increasing semi-arid West African greenness may be indicative of climate variability, whereas local losses may be anthropogenic in nature. The contiguous deciduous forests, ocean proximity, topography, and dense urban developments of New England provide an ideal landscape to examine influences of climate variability and the impact of urban development vegetation response. Spatial and temporal patterns of interannual climate variability were examined via green leaf phenology. Phenology, or seasonal growth and senescence, is driven by deficits of light, temperature, and water. In temperate environments, phenology variability is driven by interannual temperature and precipitation shifts. Average and interannual phenology analyses across southern New England were conducted at resolutions of 30m (Landsat

  5. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in vector boson fusion and decaying to bottom quarks using the Run1 and 2015 Run2 data samples.

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavskaya, Nadezda

    2016-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson is presented in the Vector Boson Fusion production channel with decay to bottom quarks. A data sample comprising 2.2 fb$^-1$ of proton-proton collision at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV collected during the 2015 running period has been analyzed. Production upper limits at 95\\% Confidence Level are derived for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, as well as the fitted signal strength relative to the expectation for the standard model Higgs boson. Results are also combined with the ones obtained with Run1 sqrt(s) = 8 TeV data collected in 2012.

  6. Vegetation Monitoring with Gaussian Processes and Latent Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Valls, Gustau; Svendsen, Daniel; Martino, Luca; Campos, Manuel; Luengo, David

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring vegetation by biophysical parameter retrieval from Earth observation data is a challenging problem, where machine learning is currently a key player. Neural networks, kernel methods, and Gaussian Process (GP) regression have excelled in parameter retrieval tasks at both local and global scales. GP regression is based on solid Bayesian statistics, yield efficient and accurate parameter estimates, and provides interesting advantages over competing machine learning approaches such as confidence intervals. However, GP models are hampered by lack of interpretability, that prevented the widespread adoption by a larger community. In this presentation we will summarize some of our latest developments to address this issue. We will review the main characteristics of GPs and their advantages in vegetation monitoring standard applications. Then, three advanced GP models will be introduced. First, we will derive sensitivity maps for the GP predictive function that allows us to obtain feature ranking from the model and to assess the influence of examples in the solution. Second, we will introduce a Joint GP (JGP) model that combines in situ measurements and simulated radiative transfer data in a single GP model. The JGP regression provides more sensible confidence intervals for the predictions, respects the physics of the underlying processes, and allows for transferability across time and space. Finally, a latent force model (LFM) for GP modeling that encodes ordinary differential equations to blend data-driven modeling and physical models of the system is presented. The LFM performs multi-output regression, adapts to the signal characteristics, is able to cope with missing data in the time series, and provides explicit latent functions that allow system analysis and evaluation. Empirical evidence of the performance of these models will be presented through illustrative examples.

  7. GAPPARD: a computationally efficient method of approximating gap-scale disturbance in vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scherstjanoi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of vegetation dynamics that are designed for application at spatial scales larger than individual forest gaps suffer from several limitations. Typically, either a population average approximation is used that results in unrealistic tree allometry and forest stand structure, or models have a high computational demand because they need to simulate both a series of age-based cohorts and a number of replicate patches to account for stochastic gap-scale disturbances. The detail required by the latter method increases the number of calculations by two to three orders of magnitude compared to the less realistic population average approach. In an effort to increase the efficiency of dynamic vegetation models without sacrificing realism, we developed a new method for simulating stand-replacing disturbances that is both accurate and faster than approaches that use replicate patches. The GAPPARD (approximating GAP model results with a Probabilistic Approach to account for stand Replacing Disturbances method works by postprocessing the output of deterministic, undisturbed simulations of a cohort-based vegetation model by deriving the distribution of patch ages at any point in time on the basis of a disturbance probability. With this distribution, the expected value of any output variable can be calculated from the output values of the deterministic undisturbed run at the time corresponding to the patch age. To account for temporal changes in model forcing (e.g., as a result of climate change, GAPPARD performs a series of deterministic simulations and interpolates between the results in the postprocessing step. We integrated the GAPPARD method in the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and evaluated it in a series of simulations along an altitudinal transect of an inner-Alpine valley. We obtained results very similar to the output of the original LPJ-GUESS model that uses 100 replicate patches, but simulation time was reduced by approximately the factor 10

  8. Influence of vegetation on the environmental partitioning of DDT in two global multimedia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, F; Scheringer, M; Möller, M; Hungerbühler, K

    2004-03-01

    Two multimedia models are used to investigate the effect of a vegetation compartment on the environmental partitioning of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT): a steady-state unit world model using global averages of vegetation cover and land-to-sea ratio and a dynamic model with latitudinal zones and zone-specific vegetation types and annual temperature courses. The vegetation compartment represents canopies of deciduous and coniferous forests and blades of grasses; the organic carbon content of the vegetation-covered soil is higher than in the bare soil. In the steady-state model, transfer from the air to the vegetation and the underlying soil as well as revolatilization from the foliage and reduced deposition to the soil is observed, depending on the chemical's degradation rate constant in vegetation and the deposition velocities of the gaseous and particle-bound fractions. In both models, a significant effect of the organic carbon content of the vegetation-covered soil increasing the effect of the vegetation compartment is observed. In the steady-state model, the changes in the DDT concentrations in air do not exceed 7% difference between the cases with and without vegetation; the soil concentrations differ by maximally a factor of 2.7. In the spatially and temporally resolved model, however, air concentration differences up to 90% are observed, depending on the type and amount of vegetation in the latitudinal zones. Long-range transport is less pronounced in the model with vegetation.

  9. Dynamic Model of Signal Fading due to Swaying Vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Ekman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we use fading measurements at 2.45, 5.25, 29, and 60 GHz, and wind speed data, to study the dynamic effects of vegetation on propagating radiowaves. A new simulation model for generating signal fading due to a swaying tree has been developed by utilizing a multiple mass-spring system to represent a tree and a turbulent wind model. The model is validated in terms of the cumulative distribution function (CDF, autocorrelation function (ACF, level crossing rate (LCR, and average fade duration (AFD using measurements. The agreements found between the measured and simulated first- and second-order statistics of the received signals through vegetation are satisfactory. In addition, Ricean K-factors for different wind speeds are estimated from measurements. Generally, the new model has similar dynamical and statistical characteristics as those observed in measurements and can thus be used for synthesizing signal fading due to a swaying tree. The synthesized fading can be used for simulating different capacity enhancing techniques such as adaptive coding and modulation and other fade mitigation techniques.

  10. MODELING DYNAMIC VEGETATION RESPONSE TO RAPID CLIMATE CHANGE USING BIOCLIMATIC CLASSIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modeling potential global redistribution of terrestrial vegetation frequently is based on bioclimatic classifications which relate static regional vegetation zones (biomes) to a set of static climate parameters. The equilibrium character of the relationships limits our confidence...

  11. Strong Lensing Probabilities in a Cosmological Model with a Running Primordial Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, T J; Yang, Z L; He, X T; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Chen, Da-Ming; Yang, Zhi-Liang; He, Xiang-Tao

    2004-01-01

    The combination of the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data with other finer scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments (CBI and ACBAR) and two structure formation measurements (2dFGRS and Lyman $\\alpha$ forest) suggest a $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with a running spectral power index of primordial density fluctuations. Motivated by this new result on the index of primordial power spectrum, we present the first study on the predicted lensing probabilities of image separation in a spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM model with a running spectral index (RSI-$\\Lambda$CDM model). It is shown that the RSI-$\\Lambda$CDM model suppress the predicted lensing probabilities on small splitting angles of less than about 4$^{''}$ compared with that of standard power-law $\\Lambda$CDM (PL-$\\Lambda$CDM) model.

  12. Representing vegetation processes in hydrometeorological simulations using the WRF model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joakim Refslund

    -ments are still needed in the representation of the land surface variability and of some key land surface processes. This thesis explores two possibilities for improving the near-surface model predictions using the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In the _rst approach, data from satellite......For accurate predictions of weather and climate, it is important that the land surface and its processes are well represented. In a mesoscale model the land surface processes are calculated in a land surface model (LSM). These pro-cesses include exchanges of energy, water and momentum between...... the land surface components, such as vegetation and soil, and their interactions with the atmosphere. The land surface processes are complex and vary in time and space. Signi_cant e_ort by the land surface community has therefore been invested in improving the LSMs over the recent decades. However, improve...

  13. Running the running

    CERN Document Server

    Cabass, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We use the recent observations of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite experiment to place constraints on the running $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s} = \\mathrm{d}n_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ and the running of the running $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}} = \\mathrm{d}\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}} / \\mathrm{d}\\log k$ of the spectral index $n_{\\mathrm{s}}$ of primordial scalar fluctuations. We find $\\alpha_\\mathrm{s}=0.011\\pm0.010$ and $\\beta_\\mathrm{s}=0.027\\pm0.013$ at $68\\%\\,\\mathrm{CL}$, suggesting the presence of a running of the running at the level of two standard deviations. We find no significant correlation between $\\beta_{\\mathrm{s}}$ and foregrounds parameters, with the exception of the point sources amplitude at $143\\,\\mathrm{GHz}$, $A^{PS}_{143}$, which shifts by half sigma when the running of the running is considered. We further study the cosmological implications of this anomaly by including in the analysis the lensing amplitude $A_L$, the curvature parameter ...

  14. Validating a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model with Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxin Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the ability of IBIS model to capture the difference in vegetation characteristics among six major biomes in the Northeast China Transect and to calibrate the simulated LAI by IBIS, using the product of MODIS LAI (Leaf Area Index. The results showed that IBIS simulated a little lower growing season LAI over temperate evergreen conifer forest and boreal evergreen forest, while it overestimated LAI relative to MODIS in non-growing season. IBIS performed poorly on LAI over savanna, grassland and shrub land, compared with MODIS and it nearly simulated higher LAI throughout the year. Based on regression analysis, the simulating LAI by IBIS (Integrated Biosphere Simulator presented a significant linear correlation with that from MODIS over temperate evergreen conifer forest in spring and winter, boreal evergreen forest throughout the year and grassland from summer to early autumn. Therefore, it was help to adjust the model parameters over these plant functional types to calibrate the estimated LAI in a large spatial scale.

  15. The Run up Tsunami Modeling in Bengkulu using the Spatial Interpolation of Kriging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulian Fauzi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to design a tsunami hazard zone with the scenario of tsunami run-up height variation based on land use, slope and distance from the shoreline. The method used in this research is spatial modelling with GIS via Ordinary Kriging interpolation technique. Kriging interpolation method that is the best in this study is shown by Circular Kriging method with good semivariogram and RMSE values which are small compared to other RMSE kriging methods. The results shows that the area affected by the tsunami inundation run-up height, slope and land use. In the run-up to 30 meters, flooded areas are about 3,148.99 hectares or 20.7% of the total area of the city of Bengkulu.

  16. Simulating run-up on steep slopes with operational Boussinesq models; capabilities, spurious effects and instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Løvholt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsunamis induced by rock slides plunging into fjords constitute a severe threat to local coastal communities. The rock slide impact may give rise to highly non-linear waves in the near field, and because the wave lengths are relatively short, frequency dispersion comes into play. Fjord systems are rugged with steep slopes, and modeling non-linear dispersive waves in this environment with simultaneous run-up is demanding. We have run an operational Boussinesq-type TVD (total variation diminishing model using different run-up formulations. Two different tests are considered, inundation on steep slopes and propagation in a trapezoidal channel. In addition, a set of Lagrangian models serves as reference models. Demanding test cases with solitary waves with amplitudes ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 were applied, and slopes were ranging from 10 to 50°. Different run-up formulations yielded clearly different accuracy and stability, and only some provided similar accuracy as the reference models. The test cases revealed that the model was prone to instabilities for large non-linearity and fine resolution. Some of the instabilities were linked with false breaking during the first positive inundation, which was not observed for the reference models. None of the models were able to handle the bore forming during drawdown, however. The instabilities are linked to short-crested undulations on the grid scale, and appear on fine resolution during inundation. As a consequence, convergence was not always obtained. It is reason to believe that the instability may be a general problem for Boussinesq models in fjords.

  17. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions

  18. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chonggang Xu

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO(2 concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO(2 concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V(c,max (maximum carboxylation rate and J(max (maximum electron transport rate. A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO(2 concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the

  19. A model-experiment comparison of system dynamics for human walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipfert, Susanne W; Günther, Michael; Renjewski, Daniel; Grimmer, Sten; Seyfarth, Andre

    2012-01-07

    The human musculo-skeletal system comprises high complexity which makes it difficult to identify underlying basic principles of bipedal locomotion. To tackle this challenge, a common approach is to strip away complexity and formulate a reductive model. With utter simplicity a bipedal spring-mass model gives good predictions of the human gait dynamics, however, it has not been fully investigated whether center of mass motion over time of walking and running is comparable between the model and the human body over a wide range of speed. To test the model's ability in this respect, we compare sagittal center of mass trajectories of model and human data for speeds ranging from 0.5 m/s to 4 m/s. For simulations, system parameters and initial conditions are extracted from experimental observations of 28 subjects. The leg parameters stiffness and length are extracted from functional fitting to the subjects' leg force-length curves. With small variations of the touch-down angle of the leg and the vertical position of the center of mass at apex, we find successful spring-mass simulations for moderate walking and medium running speeds. Predictions of the sagittal center of mass trajectories and ground reaction forces are good, but their amplitudes are overestimated, while contact time is underestimated. At faster walking speeds and slower running speeds we do not find successful model locomotion with the extent of allowed parameter variation. We conclude that the existing limitations may be improved by adding complexity to the model.

  20. Statistical Emulation of Climate Model Projections Based on Precomputed GCM Runs*

    KAUST Repository

    Castruccio, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    The authors describe a new approach for emulating the output of a fully coupled climate model under arbitrary forcing scenarios that is based on a small set of precomputed runs from the model. Temperature and precipitation are expressed as simple functions of the past trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and a statistical model is fit using a limited set of training runs. The approach is demonstrated to be a useful and computationally efficient alternative to pattern scaling and captures the nonlinear evolution of spatial patterns of climate anomalies inherent in transient climates. The approach does as well as pattern scaling in all circumstances and substantially better in many; it is not computationally demanding; and, once the statistical model is fit, it produces emulated climate output effectively instantaneously. It may therefore find wide application in climate impacts assessments and other policy analyses requiring rapid climate projections.

  1. Can neuromuscular fatigue explain running strategies and performance in ultra-marathons?: the flush model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Guillaume Y

    2011-06-01

    While the industrialized world adopts a largely sedentary lifestyle, ultra-marathon running races have become increasingly popular in the last few years in many countries. The ability to run long distances is also considered to have played a role in human evolution. This makes the issue of ultra-long distance physiology important. In the ability to run multiples of 10 km (up to 1000 km in one stage), fatigue resistance is critical. Fatigue is generally defined as strength loss (i.e. a decrease in maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), which is known to be dependent on the type of exercise. Critical task variables include the intensity and duration of the activity, both of which are very specific to ultra-endurance sports. They also include the muscle groups involved and the type of muscle contraction, two variables that depend on the sport under consideration. The first part of this article focuses on the central and peripheral causes of the alterations to neuromuscular function that occur in ultra-marathon running. Neuromuscular function evaluation requires measurements of MVCs and maximal electrical/magnetic stimulations; these provide an insight into the factors in the CNS and the muscles implicated in fatigue. However, such measurements do not necessarily predict how muscle function may influence ultra-endurance running and whether this has an effect on speed regulation during a real competition (i.e. when pacing strategies are involved). In other words, the nature of the relationship between fatigue as measured using maximal contractions/stimulation and submaximal performance limitation/regulation is questionable. To investigate this issue, we are suggesting a holistic model in the second part of this article. This model can be applied to all endurance activities, but is specifically adapted to ultra-endurance running: the flush model. This model has the following four components: (i) the ball-cock (or buoy), which can be compared with the rate of perceived

  2. Irrigation Requirement Estimation Using Vegetation Indices and Inverse Biophysical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Franks, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    We explore an inverse biophysical modeling process forced by satellite and climatological data to quantify irrigation requirements in semi-arid agricultural areas. We constrain the carbon and water cycles modeled under both equilibrium, balance between vegetation and climate, and non-equilibrium, water added through irrigation. We postulate that the degree to which irrigated dry lands vary from equilibrium climate conditions is related to the amount of irrigation. The amount of water required over and above precipitation is considered as an irrigation requirement. For July, results show that spray irrigation resulted in an additional amount of water of 1.3 mm per occurrence with a frequency of 24.6 hours. In contrast, the drip irrigation required only 0.6 mm every 45.6 hours or 46% of that simulated by the spray irrigation. The modeled estimates account for 87% of the total reported irrigation water use, when soil salinity is not important and 66% in saline lands.

  3. Tsunami generation, propagation, and run-up with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we extend a high-order Boussinesq-type (finite difference) model, capable of simulating waves out to wavenumber times depth kh landslide-induced tsunamis. The extension is straight forward, requiring only....... The Boussinesq-type model is then used to simulate numerous tsunami-type events generated from submerged landslides, in both one and two horizontal dimensions. The results again compare well against previous experiments and/or numerical simulations. The new extension compliments recently developed run...

  4. Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model in Microwave Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yuanyuan; LI Zhaoliang

    2008-01-01

    The radiative transfer is one of the significant theories that describe the processes of scattering,emission,and absorption of electromagnetic radiant intensity through scattering medium.It is the basis of the study on the quantitative remote sensing.In this paper,the radiative characteristics of soil,vegetation,and atmosphere were described respectively.The numerical solution of radiative transfer was accomplished by Successive Orders of Scattering (SOS).A radiative transfer model for simulating microwave brightness temperature over land surfaces was constructed,designed,and implemented.Analyzing the database generated from soil-vegetation-atmosphere radiative transfer model under Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) configuration showed that the atmospheric effects on microwave brightness temperature should not be neglected,particularly for higher frequency,and can be parameterized.At the same time,the relationship between the emissivities of the different channels was developed.The study results will promote the development of algorithm to retrieve geophysical parameters from microwave remotely sensed data.

  5. Human and avian running on uneven ground: a model-based comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, A. V.; Blum, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Birds and humans are successful bipedal runners, who have individually evolved bipedalism, but the extent of the similarities and differences of their bipedal locomotion is unknown. In turn, the anatomical differences of their locomotor systems complicate direct comparisons. However, a simplifying mechanical model, such as the conservative spring–mass model, can be used to describe both avian and human running and thus, provides a way to compare the locomotor strategies that birds and humans use when running on level and uneven ground. Although humans run with significantly steeper leg angles at touchdown and stiffer legs when compared with cursorial ground birds, swing-leg adaptations (leg angle and leg length kinematics) used by birds and humans while running appear similar across all types of uneven ground. Nevertheless, owing to morphological restrictions, the crouched avian leg has a greater range of leg angle and leg length adaptations when coping with drops and downward steps than the straight human leg. On the other hand, the straight human leg seems to use leg stiffness adaptation when coping with obstacles and upward steps unlike the crouched avian leg posture. PMID:27655670

  6. Multilayer Numerical Modeling of Flows through Vegetation Using a Mixing-Length Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effects of vegetation on a fluid flow pattern. In this numerical research, we verify the applicability of a simpler turbulence model than the commonly used k-" model to predict the mean flow through vegetation. The novel characteristic of this turbulence model is that the horizontal mixing-length is explicitly calculated and coupled with a multi-layer approach for the vertical mixing-length, within a general three-dimensional eddy-viscosity formulation. This mixing-length turbulence model has been validated in previous works for different kinds of non-vegetated flows. The hydrodynamic numerical model used for simulations is based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations for shallow water flows, where a vegetation shear stress term is considered to reproduce the effects of drag forces on flow. A second-order approximation is used for spatial discretization and a semi-implicit Lagrangian–Eulerian scheme is used for time discretization. In order to validate the numerical results, we compare them against experimental data reported in the literature. The comparisons are carried out for two cases of study: submerged vegetation and submerged and emergent vegetation, both within an open channel flow.

  7. Status of the Inert Doublet Model of dark matter after Run-1 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Goudelis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Inert Doublet Model (IDM) is one of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model that can provide a viable dark matter (DM) candidate. Despite its simplicity, it predicts a versatile phenomenology both for cosmology and for the Large Hadron Collider. We briefly summarize the status of searches for IDM dark matter in direct DM detection experiments and the LHC, focusing on the impact of the latter on the model parameter space. In particular, we discuss the consequences of the Higgs boson discovery as well as those of searches for dileptons accompanied by missing transverse energy during the first LHC Run and comment on the prospects of probing some of the hardest to test regions of the IDM parameter space during the 13 TeV Run.

  8. Modeling low-height vegetation with airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-height vegetation, common in semiarid regions, is difficult to characterize with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) due to similarities, in time and space, of the point returns of vegetation and ground. Other complications may occur due to the low-height vegetation structural characteristics a...

  9. Psychometric assessment of scales for a Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices (MGDVPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetable intake has been related to lower risk of chronic illnesses in the adult years. The habit of vegetable intake should be established early in life, but many parents of preschoolers report not being able to get their child to eat vegetables. The Model of Goal Directed Behavior (MGDB) has been...

  10. Modelling Spatial Patterns of Vegetation in Desert Sand Dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A stochastic numerical approach was developed to model the actual standing biomass in the sand dunes of the northwestern Negev (Israel) and probable boundary conditions that may be responsible for the vegetation patterns investigated in detail. Our results for several variables characteristic for the prevailing climate, geomorphology, hydrology and biologicy at four measurement stations along a transect from northwest to southeast allowed for the development of a stochastic model for biomass distribution over the entire sand dune field (mesoscale) and at Nizzana experimental station (microscale). With this equation it was possible to compute andinterpolate a biomass index value for each grid point on the mesoscale and micro scale. The spatial distribution of biomass is negatively linked to distance from the sea, to rainfall and relief energy.

  11. Inclusion of vegetation in the Town Energy Balance model for modelling urban green areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lemonsu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cities impact both local climate, through urban heat islands and global climate, because they are an area of heavy greenhouse gas release into the atmosphere due to heating, air conditioning and traffic. Including more vegetation into cities is a planning strategy having possible positive impacts for both concerns. Improving vegetation representation into urban models will allow us to address more accurately these questions. This paper presents an improvement of the Town Energy Balance (TEB urban canopy model. Vegetation is directly included inside the canyon, allowing shadowing of grass by buildings, better representation of urban canopy form and, a priori, a more accurate simulation of canyon air microclimate. The surface exchanges over vegetation are modelled with the well-known Interaction Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA model that is integrated in the TEB's code architecture in order to account for interactions between natural and built-up covers. The design of the code makes possible to plug and use any vegetation scheme. Both versions of TEB are confronted to experimental data issued from a field campaign conducted in Israel in 2007. Two semi-enclosed courtyards arranged with bare soil or watered lawn were instrumented to evaluate the impact of landscaping strategies on microclimatic variables and evapotranspiration. For this case study, the new version of the model with integrated vegetation performs better than if vegetation is treated outside the canyon. Surface temperatures are closer to the observations, especially at night when radiative trapping is important. The integrated vegetation version simulates a more humid air inside the canyon. The microclimatic quantities (i.e., the street-level meteorological variables are better simulated with this new version. This opens opportunities to study with better accuracy the urban microclimate, down to the micro (or canyon scale.

  12. Repo Runs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.; Skeie, D.; von Thadden, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a model of financial institutions that borrow short- term and invest into long-term marketable assets. Because these financial intermediaries perform maturity transformation, they are subject to runs. We endogenize the profits of the intermediary and derive distinct liquidity and

  13. Simulating the vegetation response to abrupt climate changes under glacial conditions with the ORCHIDEE/IPSL models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-N. Woillez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The last glacial period has been punctuated by two types of abrupt climatic events, the Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO and Heinrich (HE events. These events, recorded in Greenland ice and in marine sediments, involved changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC and led to major changes in the terrestrial biosphere.

    Here we use the dynamical global vegetation model ORCHIDEE to simulate the response of vegetation to abrupt changes in the AMOC strength. To do so, we force ORCHIDEE off-line with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 general circulation model, in which we have forced the AMOC to change by adding freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic. We investigate the impact of a collapse and recovery of the AMOC, at different rates, and focus on Western Europe, where many pollen records are available to compare with.

    The impact of an AMOC collapse on the European mean temperatures and precipitations simulated by the GCM is relatively small but sufficient to drive an important regression of forests and expansion of grasses in ORCHIDEE, in qualitative agreement with pollen data for an HE event. On the contrary, a run with a rapid shift of the AMOC to an hyperactive state of 30 Sv, mimicking the warming phase of a DO event, does not exhibit a strong impact on the European vegetation compared to the glacial control state. For our model, simulating the impact of an HE event thus appears easier than simulating the abrupt transition towards the interstadial phase of a DO.

    For both a collapse or a recovery of the AMOC the vegetation starts to respond to climatic changes immediately but reaches equilibrium about 200 yr after the climate equilibrates, suggesting a possible bias in the climatic reconstructions based on pollen records, which assume equilibrium between climate and vegetation. However, our study does not take into account vegetation feedbacks on the atmosphere.

  14. Validation of the marine vegetation model in Forsmark. SFR-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquilonius, Karin (Studsvik Nuclear AB (Sweden)); Qvarfordt, Susanne; Borgiel, Micke (Sveriges Vattenekologer AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    A regression model implemented in GIS of the marine vegetation in Forsmark were developed by SKB /Aquilonius 2010/ based on field investigations and video surveys /Fredriksson 2005/ and from correlations of field data and physical properties /Carlen et al. 2007/. The marine vegetation model describes distribution and biomasses of the marine vegetation and is used as input data in the dose modeling within the safety assessments performed by the SKB. In this study the predictive performance of the vegetation model in the less examined parts of the marine area in Forsmark is evaluated. In general, the vegetation model works very well in predicting absence of biomass, except for Red algae. In total and for Fucus sp., the model also predicts the observed biomass fairly well. However, for phanerogams, Chara sp., filamentous algae and red algae the vegetation model works less well in predicting biomass

  15. Mapping and modeling airborne urban phenanthrene distribution using vegetation biomonitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noth, Elizabeth M.; Katharine Hammond, S.; Biging, Gregory S.; Tager, Ira B.

    2013-10-01

    To capture the spatial distribution of phenanthrene in an urban setting we used vegetation biomonitoring with Jeffrey pine trees (Pinus jeffreyi). The major challenge in characterizing spatial variation in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations within a metropolitan area has been sampling at a fine enough resolution to observe the underlying spatial pattern. However, field and chamber studies show that the primary pathway through which PAHs enter plants is from air into leaves, making vegetation biomonitoring a feasible way to examine the spatial distribution of these compounds. Previous research has shown that phenanthrene has adverse health effects and that it is one of the most abundant PAHs in urban air. We collected 99 pine needle samples from 91 locations in Fresno in the morning on a winter day, and analyzed them for PAHs in the inner needle. All 99 pine needle samples had detectable levels of phenanthrene, with mean concentration of 41.0 ng g-1, median 36.9 ng g-1, and standard deviation of 28.5 ng g-1 fresh weight. The ratio of the 90th:10th percentile concentrations by location was 3.3. The phenanthrene distribution had a statistically significant Moran's I of 0.035, indicating a high degree of spatial clustering. We implemented land use regression to fit a model to our data. Our model was able to explain a moderate amount of the variability in the data (R2 = 0.56), likely reflecting the major sources of phenanthrene in Fresno. The spatial distribution of modeled airborne phenanthrene shows the influences of highways, railroads, and industrial and commercial zones.

  16. The modeled effects of fire on carbon balance and vegetation abundance in Alaskan tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, M. C.; Davidson, C. D.; Kelly, R.; Higuera, P. E.; Hu, F.

    2012-12-01

    vegetation composition following fire within tundra. Ensembles of model runs were conducted within burned and unburned sites along the Anaktuvuk River fire scar. Modeled net ecosystem exchange at these sites were compared to the observations of flux towers. In addition, a series of simulations were performed at these sites to access the suitability of the model in simulating fire succession over a moderate time scale of 20 years. Two simulations were performed on burned and unburned tundra, as was done in the ensemble analysis. An additional set of 3 simulations were also performed on unburned tundra in which one of 3 alterations were applied that were simulated in burned tundra. Alterations reflected observations made in past studies within the Anaktuvuk River burn scar, and consisted of a reduction of aboveground biomass, a temporary reduction in surface albedo, and a reduction in the depth of the organic soil layer. Results of these simulation suggest the nature of post-fire plant composition and carbon balance within the model is driven primarily by the combustion of vegetation, with alterations to surface albedo providing an effect to a lesser degree.

  17. Running Away

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Running Away KidsHealth > For Kids > Running Away Print A ... life on the streets. continue The Reality of Running Away When you think about running away, you ...

  18. Effects of Yaw Error on Wind Turbine Running Characteristics Based on the Equivalent Wind Speed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuting Wan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural wind is stochastic, being characterized by its speed and direction which change randomly and frequently. Because of the certain lag in control systems and the yaw body itself, wind turbines cannot be accurately aligned toward the wind direction when the wind speed and wind direction change frequently. Thus, wind turbines often suffer from a series of engineering issues during operation, including frequent yaw, vibration overruns and downtime. This paper aims to study the effects of yaw error on wind turbine running characteristics at different wind speeds and control stages by establishing a wind turbine model, yaw error model and the equivalent wind speed model that includes the wind shear and tower shadow effects. Formulas for the relevant effect coefficients Tc, Sc and Pc were derived. The simulation results indicate that the effects of the aerodynamic torque, rotor speed and power output due to yaw error at different running stages are different and that the effect rules for each coefficient are not identical when the yaw error varies. These results may provide theoretical support for optimizing the yaw control strategies for each stage to increase the running stability of wind turbines and the utilization rate of wind energy.

  19. Changes in spring-mass model parameters and energy cost during track running to exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawinski, Jean; Heubert, Richard; Quievre, Jacques; Billat, Véronique; Hanon, Christine; Hannon, Christine

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exhaustion modifies the stiffness characteristics, as defined in the spring-mass model, during track running. We also investigated whether stiffer runners are also the most economical. Nine well-trained runners performed an exhaustive exercise over 2000 meters on an indoor track. This exhaustive exercise was preceded by a warm-up and was followed by an active recovery. Throughout all the exercises, the energy cost of running (Cr) was measured. Vertical and leg stiffness was measured with a force plate (Kvert and Kleg, respectively) integrated into the track. The results show that Cr increases significantly after the 2000-meter run (0.192 +/- 0.006 to 0.217 +/- 0.013 mL x kg(-1) x m(-1)). However, Kvert and Kleg remained constant (32.52 +/- 6.42 to 32.59 +/- 5.48 and 11.12 +/- 2.76 to 11.14 +/- 2.48 kN.m, respectively). An inverse correlation was observed between Cr and Kleg, but only during the 2000-meter exercise (r = -0.67; P < or = 0.05). During the warm-up or the recovery, Cr and Kleg, were not correlated (r = 0.354; P = 0.82 and r = 0.21; P = 0.59, respectively). On track, exhaustion induced by a 2000-meter run has no effect on Kleg or Kvert. The inverse correlation was only observed between Cr and Kleg during the 2000-meter run and not before or after the exercise, suggesting that the stiffness of the runner may be not associated with the Cr.

  20. Strange matter and strange stars in a thermodynamically self-consistent perturbation model with running coupling and running strange quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J F; Liu, F; Hou, D F; Chen, L W

    2015-01-01

    A quark model with running coupling and running strange quark mass, which is thermodynamically self-consistent at both high and lower densities, is presented and applied to study properties of strange quark matter and structure of compact stars. An additional term to the thermodynamic potential density is determined by meeting the fundamental differential equation of thermodynamics. It plays an important role in comparatively lower density and ignorable at extremely high density, acting as a chemical-potential dependent bag constant. In this thermodynamically enhanced perturbative QCD model, strange quark matter still has the possibility of being absolutely stable, while the pure quark star has a sharp surface with a maximum mass as large as about 2 times the solar mass and a maximum radius of about 11 kilometers.

  1. Impacts of the driver's bounded rationality on the traffic running cost under the car-following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Luo, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Kai

    2016-09-01

    The driver's bounded rationality has significant influences on the micro driving behavior and researchers proposed some traffic flow models with the driver's bounded rationality. However, little effort has been made to explore the effects of the driver's bounded rationality on the trip cost. In this paper, we use our recently proposed car-following model to study the effects of the driver's bounded rationality on his running cost and the system's total cost under three traffic running costs. The numerical results show that considering the driver's bounded rationality will enhance his each running cost and the system's total cost under the three traffic running costs.

  2. AschFlow - A dynamic landslide run-out model for medium scale hazard analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Blahut, Jan; van Asch, Theo; van Westen, Cees; Kappes, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and debris flow hazard assessments require a scale-dependent analysis in order to mitigate damage and other negative consequences at the respective scales of occurrence. Medium or large scale landslide run-out modelling for many possible landslide initiation areas has been a cumbersome task in the past. This arises from the difficulty to precisely define the location and volume of the released mass and from the inability of the run-out models to compute the displacement with a large amount of individual initiation areas (computational exhaustive). Most of the existing physically based run-out models have complications in handling such situations and therefore empirical methods have been used as a practical mean to predict landslides mobility at a medium scale (1:10,000 to 1:50,000). In this context, a simple medium scale numerical model for rapid mass movements in urban and mountainous areas was developed. The deterministic nature of the approach makes it possible to calculate the velocity, height and increase in mass by erosion, resulting in the estimation of various forms of impacts exerted by debris flows at the medium scale The established and implemented model ("AschFlow") is a 2-D one-phase continuum model that simulates, the entrainment, spreading and deposition process of a landslide or debris flow at a medium scale. The flow is thus treated as a single phase material, whose behavior is controlled by rheology (e.g. Voellmy or Bingham). The developed regional model "AschFlow" was applied and evaluated in well documented areas with known past debris flow events.

  3. Bioclimatic distribution of vegetation for general circulation model studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Katharine Culbertson

    1990-01-01

    Four global bioclimatic schemes which qualify climates on the basis of the distribution of vegetation, including the Holdridge (1947), Thornthwaite (1948), Koeppen (1936), and Troll and Paffen (1964) schemes, were applied to two global climate data sets to produce maps of global vegetation distribution: the Rand set described by Schutz and Gates (1971, 1973, and 1974) and the Shea (1986) data set. The results show that only 38 to 40 percent of the observed land surface, mapped as 31 vegetation types, could be replicated by applying the four schemes to these data sets. The simulations were significantly improved by further subdividing and regrouping the climates defined by the schemes and by regrouping the observed vegetation types. With these alterations, 77 percent of the predicted vegetative landscape coresponded with the observed distribution of vegetation.

  4. Preliminary Results of a U.S. Deep South Modeling Experiment Using NASA SPoRT Initialization Datasets for Operational National Weather Service Local Model Runs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lance; Medlin, Jeffrey M.; Case, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A joint collaborative modeling effort among the NWS offices in Mobile, AL, and Houston, TX, and NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center began during the 2011-2012 cold season, and continued into the 2012 warm season. The focus was on two frequent U.S. Deep South forecast challenges: the initiation of deep convection during the warm season; and heavy precipitation during the cold season. We wanted to examine the impact of certain NASA produced products on the Weather Research and Forecasting Environmental Modeling System in improving the model representation of mesoscale boundaries such as the local sea-, bay- and land-breezes (which often leads to warm season convective initiation); and improving the model representation of slow moving, or quasi-stationary frontal boundaries (which focus cold season storm cell training and heavy precipitation). The NASA products were: the 4-km Land Information System, a 1-km sea surface temperature analysis, and a 4-km greenness vegetation fraction analysis. Similar domains were established over the southeast Texas and Alabama coastlines, each with an outer grid with a 9 km spacing and an inner nest with a 3 km grid spacing. The model was run at each NWS office once per day out to 24 hours from 0600 UTC, using the NCEP Global Forecast System for initial and boundary conditions. Control runs without the NASA products were made at the NASA SPoRT Center. The NCAR Model Evaluation Tools verification package was used to evaluate both the positive and negative impacts of the NASA products on the model forecasts. Select case studies will be presented to highlight the influence of the products.

  5. Exploiting CMS data popularity to model the evolution of data management for Run-2 and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacorsi, D; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Neri, M; Magini, N; Kuznetsov, V; Wildish, T

    2015-01-01

    During the LHC Run-1 data taking, all experiments collected large data volumes from proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. The collisions data, together with massive volumes of simulated data, were replicated in multiple copies, transferred among various Tier levels, transformed/slimmed in format/content. These data were then accessed (both locally and remotely) by large groups of distributed analysis communities exploiting the WorldWide LHC Computing Grid infrastructure and services. While efficient data placement strategies - together with optimal data redistribution and deletions on demand - have become the core of static versus dynamic data management projects, little effort has so far been invested in understanding the detailed data-access patterns which surfaced in Run-1. These patterns, if understood, can be used as input to simulation of computing models at the LHC, to optimise existing systems by tuning their behaviour, and to explore next-generation CPU/storage/network co-scheduling solutions. This...

  6. Assessing the reduction of the hydrological connectivity of gully systems through vegetation restoration: field experiments and numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Molina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of degraded land in the Southern Ecuadorian Andes has led to alterations in the functioning of degraded catchments. Recovery of vegetation on areas affected by overgrazing, as well as the reforestation or afforestation of gully areas have given rise to modifications of hydrological connectivity within the catchments. Recent research has highlighted the ability of gully channels to trap sediment eroded from steep slopes, especially if vegetation is established along the gully bed. However, vegetation cover not only induces sediment deposition in the gully bed, but may also have a potential to reduce runoff water volume. The performance of gully beds in reducing the transfer of runoff was investigated by conducting controlled concentrated flow experiments in the field. Experimental field data for nine gullies were derived by pouring concentrated inflow into the upstream end and measuring the outflow at the downstream end of the channel. Two consecutive flow experiments per gully were carried out, so that data for dry and wet soil conditions were collected. The hydrological response to concentrated flow was estimated for each experiment by calculating its cumulative infiltration coefficient, IC (%. The results showed a great difference in IC between dry and wet soil conditions. The IC for wet soil conditions was on average 24%, whereas it was 60% for dry conditions. Gullies with more than 50% surface vegetation cover exhibit the highest cumulative infiltration coefficients (81% for dry runs, and 34% for wet runs, but runoff transmission losses were not as clearly related to vegetation cover as sediment storage as shown in Molina et al. (2009. The experimental field data of 16 experiments were used to calibrate a hydrological model developed by Fiener and Auerswald (2005 in order to simulate the transfer of concentrated flow along the gully beds. The calibrated model was able to simulate the transfer of runoff water

  7. Kinetic study of run-away burn in ICF capsule using a quasi-1D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengkun; Molvig, K.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Vold, E. L.; Kagan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of reduced fusion reactivity resulting from the loss of fuel ions in the Gamow peak in the ignition, run-away burn and disassembly stages of an inertial confinement fusion D-T capsule is investigated with a quasi-1D hybrid model that includes kinetic ions, fluid electrons and Planckian radiation photons. The fuel ion loss through the Knudsen effect at the fuel-pusher interface is accounted for by a local-loss model developed in Molvig et al.. The tail refilling and relaxation of the fuel ion distribution are evolved with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck solver. The Krokhin & Rozanov model is used for the finite alpha range beyond the fuel region, while alpha heating to the fuel ions and the fluid electrons is modeled kinetically. For an energetic pusher (40kJ), the simulation shows that the reduced fusion reactivity can lead to substantially lower ion temperature during run-away burn, while the final yield decreases more modestly. Possible improvements to the present model, including the non-Planckian radiation emission and alpha-driven fuel disassembly, are discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Work supported by the ASC TBI project at LANL.

  8. EVOLUTION OF VEGETATIVE INCOMPATIBILITY IN FILAMENTOUS ASCOMYCETES .1. DETERMINISTIC MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NAUTA, MJ; HOEKSTRA, RF

    1994-01-01

    In ascomycetes vegetative incompatibility can prevent the somatic exchange of genetic material between conspecifics. It must occur frequently in natural populations, since in all species studied many vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) are found. Using a population-genetic approach, this paper ex

  9. Modeling of state of vegetation and soil erosion over large areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A vegetation-erosion model was developed to assess the extent of soil erosion and development trend of vegetation in the context of existing and contemplated vegetation-based soil erosion controls under different climatic, topographical and soil conditions. The model recognizes four vegetation-mediated soil erosion states: (i) an expanding vegetation coverage coupled with reduced erosion (C), (ii) a deteriorating vegetation coverage coupled with increased erosion (A), (iii) two transitional states between A and C, one with increasing erosion and vegetation coverage (B) and the other with decreasing erosion and vegetation coverage (D). With the model, the vegetation-erosion state of any particular area can be quantitatively described, by way of a vegetation-erosion chart, for varying climate, soil and topographic conditions, as demonstrated for the Xishan region, the East River basin, the Wangjiagou and Anjiagou watersheds (Loess Plateau), and the Xiaojiang watersheds (hot and dry valleys in the upper Yangtze River basin) in China. This paper presents the principles and results of area-specific investigations that track the fractions of the areas covered by vegetation and experiencing soil erosion (with soil loss determined in t/km2yr). This is done within the context of local soil erosion control initiatives via re-vegetation efforts, or the lack thereof, over the course of 30 years. The effectiveness of reforestation and erosion-control measures vary under different climatic, topographical and soil conditions. The vegetation may be quickly restored in the hot and wet East River basin but is very difficult on the dry and cold Loess Plateau. In the hot and dry valleys the vegetation can be restored if erosion is controlled and intensive reforestations for small watersheds are performed.

  10. Large Scale Model Test Investigation on Wave Run-Up in Irregular Waves at Slender Piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Jorge Robert Rodriguez; Frigaard, Peter; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    2013-01-01

    from high speed video recordings. Based on the measured run-up heights different types of prediction formulae for run-up in irregular waves were evaluated. In conclusion scale effects on run-up levels seems small except for differences in spray. However, run-up of individual waves is difficult...

  11. The effect of vegetation on pesticide dissipation from ponded treatment wetlands: quantification using a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael T; Crossan, Angus N; Kennedy, Ivan R

    2008-07-01

    Field data shows that plants accelerate pesticide dissipation from aquatic systems by increasing sedimentation, biofilm contact and photolysis. In this study, a graphical model was constructed and calibrated with site-specific and supplementary data to describe the loss of two pesticides, endosulfan and fluometuron, from a vegetated and a non-vegetated pond. In the model, the major processes responsible for endosulfan dissipation were alkaline hydrolysis and sedimentation, with the former process being reduced by vegetation and the latter enhanced. Fluometuron dissipation resulted primarily from biofilm reaction and photolysis, both of which were increased by vegetation. Here, greater photolysis under vegetation arose from faster sedimentation and increased light penetration, despite shading. Management options for employing constructed wetlands to polish pesticide-contaminated agricultural runoff are discussed. The lack of easily fulfilled sub-models and data describing the effect of aquatic vegetation on water chemistry and sedimentation is also highlighted.

  12. Modeling and simulation of Cobot based on double over-running clutches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-hong; ZHANG Li-xun

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze characteristics of Cobot cooperation with a human in a shared workspacce, the model of a non-holonormic constraint joint mechanism and its control model were constructed based on double o-ver-running clutches. The simulation analysis was carried out and it validated passive and constraint features of the joint mechanism. In terms of Cobot components, the control model of Cobot following a desired trajectory was built up. The simulation studies illustrate that the Cobot can track a desired trajectory and possess passive and constraint features; a human supplies operation force that makes Cobot move, and a computer system con-trois its motion trajectory. So it can meet the requirements of Cobot collaboration with an operator. The Cobot model can be used in applications of material moving, parts assembly and some situations requiring man-ma-chine cooperation and so on.

  13. Hydraulic and Vegetative Models of Historic Environmental Conditions Isolate the Role of Riparian Vegetation in Inducing Channel Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    An enduring question in geomorphology is the role of riparian vegetation in inducing or exacerbating channel narrowing. It is typically difficult to isolate the role of vegetation in causing channel narrowing, because narrowing typically occurs where there are changes in stream flow, sediment supply, the invasion of non-native vegetation, and sometimes climate change. Therefore, linkages between changes in vegetation communities and changes in channel form are often difficult to identify. We took a mechanistic approach to isolate the role of the invasive riparian shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp) in influencing channel narrowing in the Colorado River basin. Detailed geomorphic reconstructions of two sites on the Yampa and Green Rivers, respectively, in Dinosaur National Monument show that channel narrowing has been progressive and that tamarisk encroachment has also occurred; at the same time, dams have been constructed, diversions increased, and spring snowmelt runoff has been occurring earlier in spring. We simulated hydraulic and sediment transport conditions during the two largest floods of record -- 1984 and 2011. Two-dimensional hydraulic models were built to reflect these conditions and allowed us to perform sensitivity tests to determine the dominant determinants of the observed patterns of erosion and deposition. Channel and floodplain topography were constrained through detailed stratigraphic analysis, including precise dating of deposits based on dating of buried tamarisk plants in a series of floodplain trenches and pits. We also used historical air photos to establish past channel topography. To parameterize the influence of riparian vegetation, we developed a model that links detailed terrestrial laser scan (TLS) measurements of stand structure and its corresponding hydraulic roughness at the patch scale to reach-scale riparian vegetation patterns determined from airborne LiDaR (ALS). This model, in conjunction with maps of the ages and establishment

  14. Biogeophysical feedbacks trigger shifts in the modelled vegetation-atmosphere system at multiple scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Dekker

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial vegetation influences climate by modifying the radiative-, momentum-, and hydrologic-balance. This paper contributes to the ongoing debate on the question whether positive biogeophysical feedbacks between vegetation and climate may lead to multiple equilibria in vegetation and climate and consequent abrupt regime shifts. Several modelling studies argue that vegetation-climate feedbacks at local to regional scales could be strong enough to establish multiple states in the climate system. An Earth Model of Intermediate Complexity, PlaSim, is used to investigate the resilience of the climate system to vegetation disturbance at regional to global scales. We hypothesize that by starting with two extreme initialisations of biomass, positive vegetation-climate feedbacks will keep the vegetation-atmosphere system within different attraction domains. Indeed, model integrations starting from different initial biomass distributions diverged to clearly distinct climate-vegetation states in terms of abiotic (precipitation and temperature and biotic (biomass variables. Moreover, we found that between these states there are several other steady states which depend on the scale of perturbation. From here global susceptibility maps were made showing regions of low and high resilience. The model results suggest that mainly the boreal and monsoon regions have low resiliences, i.e. instable biomass equilibria, with positive vegetation-climate feedbacks in which the biomass induced by a perturbation is further enforced. The perturbation did not only influence single vegetation-climate cell interactions but also caused changes in spatial patterns of atmospheric circulation due to neighbouring cells constituting in spatial vegetation-climate feedbacks. Large perturbations could trigger an abrupt shift of the system towards another steady state. Although the model setup used in our simulation is rather simple, our results stress that the coupling of

  15. Hydrologic and water-quality characterization and modeling of the Chenoweth Run basin, Jefferson County, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary R.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Shipp, Allison A.

    2001-01-01

    Rainfall, streamflow, and water-quality data collected in the Chenoweth Run Basin during February 1996?January 1998, in combination with the available historical sampling data, were used to characterize hydrologic conditions and to develop and calibrate a Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF) model for continuous simulation of rainfall, streamflow, suspended-sediment, and total-orthophosphate (TPO4) transport relations. Study results provide an improved understanding of basin hydrology and a hydrologic-modeling framework with analytical tools for use in comprehensive waterresource planning and management. Chenoweth Run Basin, encompassing 16.5 mi2 in suburban eastern Jefferson County, Kentucky, contains expanding urban development, particularly in the upper third of the basin. Historical water-quality problems have interfered with designated aquatic-life and recreation uses in the stream main channel (approximately 9 mi in length) and have been attributed to organic enrichment, nutrients, metals, and pathogens in urban runoff and wastewater inflows. Hydrologic conditions in Jefferson County are highly varied. In the Chenoweth Run Basin, as in much of the eastern third of the county, relief is moderately sloping to steep. Also, internal drainage in pervious areas is impeded by the shallow, fine-textured subsoils that contain abundant silts and clays. Thus, much of the precipitation here tends to move rapidly as overland flow and (or) shallow subsurface flow (interflow) to the stream channels. Data were collected at two streamflowgaging stations, one rain gage, and four waterquality- sampling sites in the basin. Precipitation, streamflow, and, consequently, constituent loads were above normal during the data-collection period of this study. Nonpoint sources contributed the largest portion of the sediment loads. However, the three wastewatertreatment plants (WWTP?s) were the source of the majority of estimated total phosphorus (TP) and TPO4 transport

  16. Dilepton constraints in the Inert Doublet Model from Run 1 of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger, G; Goudelis, A; Herrmann, B; Kraml, S; Sengupta, D

    2015-01-01

    Searches in final states with two leptons plus missing transverse energy, targeting supersymmetric particles or invisible decays of the Higgs boson, were performed during Run 1 of the LHC. Recasting the results of these analyses in the context of the Inert Doublet Model (IDM) using MadAnalysis 5, we show that they provide constraints on inert scalars that significantly extend previous limits from LEP. Moreover, these LHC constraints allow to test the IDM in the limit of very small Higgs-inert scalar coupling, where the constraints from direct detection of dark matter and the invisible Higgs width vanish.

  17. A model for estimating understory vegetation response to fertilization and precipitation in loblolly pine plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf; Ryan W. McKnight; Thomas R. Fox; H. Lee Allen

    2010-01-01

    A model form is presented, where the model contains regressors selected for inclusion based on biological rationale, to predict how fertilization, precipitation amounts, and overstory stand density affect understory vegetation biomass. Due to time, economic, and logistic constraints, datasets of large sample sizes generally do not exist for understory vegetation. Thus...

  18. Comparison of a priori calibration models for respiratory inductance plethysmography during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutheuser, Heike; Heyde, Christian; Gollhofer, Albert; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) has been introduced as an alternative for measuring ventilation by means of body surface displacement (diameter changes in rib cage and abdomen). Using a posteriori calibration, it has been shown that RIP may provide accurate measurements for ventilatory tidal volume under exercise conditions. Methods for a priori calibration would facilitate the application of RIP. Currently, to the best knowledge of the authors, none of the existing ambulant procedures for RIP calibration can be used a priori for valid subsequent measurements of ventilatory volume under exercise conditions. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a priori calibration algorithms for ambulant application of RIP data recorded in running exercise. We calculated Volume Motion Coefficients (VMCs) using seven different models on resting data and compared the root mean squared error (RMSE) of each model applied on running data. Least squares approximation (LSQ) without offset of a two-degree-of-freedom model achieved the lowest RMSE value. In this work, we showed that a priori calibration of RIP exercise data is possible using VMCs calculated from 5 min resting phase where RIP and flowmeter measurements were performed simultaneously. The results demonstrate that RIP has the potential for usage in ambulant applications.

  19. Modeling the Effect of Vegetation on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. P.; Inguva, R.; Crosson, W. L.; Coleman, T. L.; Laymon, C.; Fahsi, A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of vegetation on passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture is studied. The radiative transfer modeling work of Njoku and Kong is applied to a stratified medium of which the upper layer is treated as a layer of vegetation. An effective dielectric constant for this vegetation layer is computed using estimates of the dielectric constant of individual components of the vegetation layer. The horizontally-polarized brightness temperature is then computed as a function of the incidence angle. Model predictions are used to compare with the data obtained in the Huntsville '96, remote sensing of soil moisture experiment, and with predictions obtained using a correction procedure of Jackson and Schmugge.

  20. Exploiting CMS data popularity to model the evolution of data management for Run-2 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacorsi, D.; Boccali, T.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Neri, M.; Magini, N.; Kuznetsov, V.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-01

    During the LHC Run-1 data taking, all experiments collected large data volumes from proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. The collisions data, together with massive volumes of simulated data, were replicated in multiple copies, transferred among various Tier levels, transformed/slimmed in format/content. These data were then accessed (both locally and remotely) by large groups of distributed analysis communities exploiting the WorldWide LHC Computing Grid infrastructure and services. While efficient data placement strategies - together with optimal data redistribution and deletions on demand - have become the core of static versus dynamic data management projects, little effort has so far been invested in understanding the detailed data-access patterns which surfaced in Run-1. These patterns, if understood, can be used as input to simulation of computing models at the LHC, to optimise existing systems by tuning their behaviour, and to explore next-generation CPU/storage/network co-scheduling solutions. This is of great importance, given that the scale of the computing problem will increase far faster than the resources available to the experiments, for Run-2 and beyond. Studying data-access patterns involves the validation of the quality of the monitoring data collected on the “popularity of each dataset, the analysis of the frequency and pattern of accesses to different datasets by analysis end-users, the exploration of different views of the popularity data (by physics activity, by region, by data type), the study of the evolution of Run-1 data exploitation over time, the evaluation of the impact of different data placement and distribution choices on the available network and storage resources and their impact on the computing operations. This work presents some insights from studies on the popularity data from the CMS experiment. We present the properties of a range of physics analysis activities as seen by the data popularity, and make recommendations for

  1. Building and Running the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Model in a Quality Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.A. Kalinich; K.P. Lee; J.A. McNeish

    2005-01-09

    A Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) model has been developed to support the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository. The TSPA model forecasts repository performance over a 20,000-year simulation period. It has a high degree of complexity due to the complexity of its underlying process and abstraction models. This is reflected in the size of the model (a 27,000 element GoldSim file), its use of dynamic-linked libraries (14 DLLs), the number and size of its input files (659 files totaling 4.7 GB), and the number of model input parameters (2541 input database entries). TSPA model development and subsequent simulations with the final version of the model were performed to a set of Quality Assurance (QA) procedures. Due to the complexity of the model, comments on previous TSPAs, and the number of analysts involved (22 analysts in seven cities across four time zones), additional controls for the entire life-cycle of the TSPA model, including management, physical, model change, and input controls were developed and documented. These controls did not replace the QA. procedures, rather they provided guidance for implementing the requirements of the QA procedures with the specific intent of ensuring that the model development process and the simulations performed with the final version of the model had sufficient checking, traceability, and transparency. Management controls were developed to ensure that only management-approved changes were implemented into the TSPA model and that only management-approved model runs were performed. Physical controls were developed to track the use of prototype software and preliminary input files, and to ensure that only qualified software and inputs were used in the final version of the TSPA model. In addition, a system was developed to name, file, and track development versions of the TSPA model as well as simulations performed with the final version of the model.

  2. Hubble expansion and structure formation in the "running FLRW model" of the cosmic evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Grande, Javier; Basilakos, Spyros; Plionis, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    A new class of FLRW cosmological models with time-evolving fundamental parameters should emerge naturally from a description of the expansion of the universe based on the first principles of quantum field theory and string theory. Within this general paradigm, one expects that both the gravitational Newton's coupling, G, and the cosmological term, Lambda, should not be strictly constant but appear rather as smooth functions of the Hubble rate. This scenario ("running FLRW model") predicts, in a natural way, the existence of dynamical dark energy without invoking the participation of extraneous scalar fields. In this paper, we perform a detailed study of these models in the light of the latest cosmological data, which serves to illustrate the phenomenological viability of the new dark energy paradigm as a serious alternative to the traditional scalar field approaches. By performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent SNIa data, the CMB shift parameter, and the BAOs traced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,...

  3. Population growth and economic development in the very long run: a simulation model of three revolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, G; Komlos, J

    1988-08-01

    The authors propose an economic model capable of simulating the 4 main historical stages of civilization: hunting, agricultural, industrial, and postindustrial. An output-maximizing society to respond to changes in factor endowments by switching technologies. Changes in factor proportions arise through population growth and capital accumulation. A slow rate of exogenous technical process is assumed. The model synthesizes Malthusian and Boserupian notions of the effect of population growth on per capita output. Initially the capital-diluting effect of population growth dominates. As population density increases, however, and a threshold is reached, the Boserupian effect becomes crucial, and a technological revolution occurs. The cycle is thereafter repeated. After the second economic revolution, however, the Malthusian constraint dissolves permanently, as population growth can continue without being constrained by diminishing returns to labor. By synthesizing Malthusian and Boserupian notions, the model is able to capture the salient features of economic development in the very long run.

  4. Changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Olivier; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Millet, Grégoire P

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated fatigue-induced changes in spring-mass model characteristics during repeated running sprints. Sixteen active subjects performed 12 × 40 m sprints interspersed with 30 s of passive recovery. Vertical and anterior-posterior ground reaction forces were measured at 5-10 m and 30-35 m and used to determine spring-mass model characteristics. Contact (P Stride frequency (P  0.05) increased with time. As a result, vertical stiffness decreased (P  0.05). Changes in vertical stiffness were correlated (r > 0.7; P stride frequency. When compared to 5-10 m, most of ground reaction force-related parameters were higher (P stride frequency, vertical and leg stiffness were lower (P run-based sprints are repeated, which alters impact parameters. Maintaining faster stride frequencies through retaining higher vertical stiffness is a prerequisite to improve performance during repeated sprinting.

  5. DIFFUSION MODEL OF CREAMY- AND VEGETABLE SPREADS MIXING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary .A mathematical model of the process of mixing cream- and vegetable spread was developed. In modeling the diffusion understanding of the nature of the process were used, allowing escape from the apparatus geometry. After turning on the mixer the mixing process begins. Its duration can be determined by the behavior of the tracer particles introduced into the agitated medium in a predetermined quantity through the free liquid surface within a short period of time. If tracer particles have the same density with the surrounding bulk liquid phase, then the path of movement of the particles and the fluid are identical. The degree of homogeneity of the composition can be stirred calculated by the coefficient of variation, which is identified by the local concentrations of tracer particles in the volume of stirred medium. The task of a one-dimensional particle transport in the plane layer of the mixed liquid is solved for their calculation. The calculated ratios obtained allow us to calculate the particle concentration at any point in the volume being mixed at random times. Based on the experiment effective mixing coefficients are identified and relations for their assessment, depending on the Reynolds number of the mixer in the range studied variations of process are offered. Using the time dependence of the variation coefficient characterizing the homogenity of the system being mixed, it is possible to determine the duration of mixing to obtain the product with the desired uniformity and homogeneity of the product under the definition of a predetermined duration of the mixing process. The variation coefficient %, indicating a sufficiently good uniformity of the spread composition was found for the spread №1, being mixed with a stirrer rotating at a speed of n=150 rev / min, and the dimensionless length of the process Fo =0,0935 for obtaining estimated relations. Using the proposed calculation algorithm one can estimate the homogeneity of the

  6. Improved meteorology from an updated WRF/CMAQ modeling system with MODIS vegetation and albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realistic vegetation characteristics and phenology from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products improve the simulation for the meteorology and air quality modeling system WRF/CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecasting model and Community Multiscale Air Qual...

  7. Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.K.; Roig, L.C.; Jenter, H.L.; Visser, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydraulic data collected in a flume fitted with pans of sawgrass were analyzed to determine the vertically averaged drag coefficient as a function of vegetation characteristics. The drag coefficient is required for modeling flow through emergent vegetation at low Reynolds numbers in the Florida Everglades. Parameters of the vegetation, such as the stem population per unit bed area and the average stem/leaf width, were measured for five fixed vegetation layers. The vertically averaged vegetation parameters for each experiment were then computed by weighted average over the submerged portion of the vegetation. Only laminar flow through emergent vegetation was considered, because this is the dominant flow regime of the inland Everglades. A functional form for the vegetation drag coefficient was determined by linear regression of the logarithmic transforms of measured resistance force and Reynolds number. The coefficients of the drag coefficient function were then determined for the Everglades, using extensive flow and vegetation measurements taken in the field. The Everglades data show that the stem spacing and the Reynolds number are important parameters for the determination of vegetation drag coefficient. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, A. A.; McCall, R. T.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; van Dongeren, A. R.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic vegetation in the coastal zone attenuates wave energy and reduces the risk of coastal hazards, e.g., flooding. Besides the attenuation of sea-swell waves, vegetation may also affect infragravity-band (IG) waves and wave setup. To date, knowledge on the effect of vegetation on IG waves and wave setup is lacking, while they are potentially important parameters for coastal risk assessment. In this study, the storm impact model XBeach is extended with formulations for attenuation of sea-swell and IG waves, and wave setup effects in two modes: the sea-swell wave phase-resolving (nonhydrostatic) and the phase-averaged (surfbeat) mode. In surfbeat mode, a wave shape model is implemented to capture the effect of nonlinear wave-vegetation interaction processes on wave setup. Both modeling modes are verified using data from two flume experiments with mimic vegetation and show good skill in computing the sea-swell and IG wave transformation, and wave setup. In surfbeat mode, the wave setup prediction greatly improves when using the wave shape model, while in nonhydrostatic mode (nonlinear) intrawave effects are directly accounted for. Subsequently, the model is used for a range of coastal geomorphological configurations by varying bed slope and vegetation extent. The results indicate that the effect of wave-vegetation interaction on wave setup may be relevant for a range of typical coastal geomorphological configurations (e.g., relatively steep to gentle slope coasts fronted by vegetation).

  9. Tsunami generation, propagation, and run-up with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we extend a high-order Boussinesq-type (finite difference) model, capable of simulating waves out to wavenumber times depth kh tsunamis. The extension is straight forward, requiring only...... show that the long-time (fully nonlinear) evolution of waves resulting from an upthrusted bottom can eventually result in true solitary waves, consistent with theoretical predictions. It is stressed, however, that the nonlinearity used far exceeds that typical of geophysical tsunamis in the open ocean....... The Boussinesq-type model is then used to simulate numerous tsunami-type events generated from submerged landslides, in both one and two horizontal dimensions. The results again compare well against previous experiments and/or numerical simulations. The new extension compliments recently developed run...

  10. A two-runners model: optimization of running strategies according to the physiological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2015-01-01

    In order to describe the velocity and the anaerobic energy of two runners competing against each other for middle-distance races, we present a mathematical model relying on an optimal control problem for a system of ordinary differential equations. The model is based on energy conservation and on Newton's second law: resistive forces, propulsive forces and variations in the maximal oxygen uptake are taken into account. The interaction between the runners provides a minimum for staying one meter behind one's competitor. We perform numerical simulations and show how a runner can win a race against someone stronger by taking advantage of staying behind, or how he can improve his personal record by running behind someone else. Our simulations show when it is the best time to overtake, depending on the difference between the athletes. Finally, we compare our numerical results with real data from the men's 1500 -- m finals of different competitions.

  11. The Trick Simulation Toolkit: A NASA/Opensource Framework for Running Time Based Physics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The Trick Simulation Toolkit is a simulation development environment used to create high fidelity training and engineering simulations at the NASA Johnson Space Center and many other NASA facilities. Its purpose is to generate a simulation executable from a collection of user-supplied models and a simulation definition file. For each Trick-based simulation, Trick automatically provides job scheduling, numerical integration, the ability to write and restore human readable checkpoints, data recording, interactive variable manipulation, a run-time interpreter, and many other commonly needed capabilities. This allows simulation developers to concentrate on their domain expertise and the algorithms and equations of their models. Also included in Trick are tools for plotting recorded data and various other supporting utilities and libraries. Trick is written in C/C++ and Java and supports both Linux and MacOSX computer operating systems. This paper describes Trick's design and use at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  12. Simple, efficient allocation of modelling runs on heterogeneous clusters with MPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, David I.

    2017-01-01

    In scientific modelling and computation, the choice of an appropriate method for allocating tasks for parallel processing depends on the computational setting and on the nature of the computation. The allocation of independent but similar computational tasks, such as modelling runs or Monte Carlo trials, among the nodes of a heterogeneous computational cluster is a special case that has not been specifically evaluated previously. A simulation study shows that a method of on-demand (that is, worker-initiated) pulling from a bag of tasks in this case leads to reliably short makespans for computational jobs despite heterogeneity both within and between cluster nodes. A simple reference implementation in the C programming language with the Message Passing Interface (MPI) is provided.

  13. Effects of intermediate scales on renormalization group running of fermion observables in an SO(10) model

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Davide; Riad, Stella

    2014-01-01

    In the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models, we analyze the renormalization group equations for the fermions (including neutrinos) from the GUT energy scale down to the electroweak energy scale, explicitly taking into account the effects of an intermediate energy scale induced by a Pati--Salam gauge group. To determine the renormalization group running, we use a numerical minimization procedure based on a nested sampling algorithm that randomly generates the values of 19 model parameters at the GUT scale, evolves them, and finally constructs the values of the physical observables and compares them to the existing experimental data at the electroweak scale. We show that the evolved fermion masses and mixings present sizable deviations from the values obtained without including the effects of the intermediate scale.

  14. Effects of intermediate scales on renormalization group running of fermion observables in an SO(10) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Davide; Ohlsson, Tommy; Riad, Stella

    2014-12-01

    In the context of non-supersymmetric SO(10) models, we analyze the renormalization group equations for the fermions (including neutrinos) from the GUT energy scale down to the electroweak energy scale, explicitly taking into account the effects of an intermediate energy scale induced by a Pati-Salam gauge group. To determine the renormalization group running, we use a numerical minimization procedure based on a nested sampling algorithm that randomly generates the values of 19 model parameters at the GUT scale, evolves them, and finally constructs the values of the physical observables and compares them to the existing experimental data at the electroweak scale. We show that the evolved fermion masses and mixings present sizable deviations from the values obtained without including the effects of the intermediate scale.

  15. Minkowski space pion model inspired by lattice QCD running quark mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Clayton S.; de Melo, J. P. B. C.; Frederico, T.

    2017-03-01

    The pion structure in Minkowski space is described in terms of an analytic model of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude combined with Euclidean Lattice QCD results. The model is physically motivated to take into account the running quark mass, which is fitted to Lattice QCD data. The pion pseudoscalar vertex is associated to the quark mass function, as dictated by dynamical chiral symmetry breaking requirements in the limit of vanishing current quark mass. The quark propagator is analyzed in terms of a spectral representation, and it shows a violation of the positivity constraints. The integral representation of the pion Bethe-Salpeter amplitude is also built. The pion space-like electromagnetic form factor is calculated with a quark electromagnetic current, which satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity to ensure current conservation. The results for the form factor and weak decay constant are found to be consistent with the experimental data.

  16. PermVeg: A model to design crop sequences for permanent vegetable production systems in the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Thi Thu Huong, Huong; Everaarts, A.P.; Berg, van den W.; Neeteson, J.J.; Struik, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The constraints in current vegetable production systems in the Red River Delta, Vietnam, in which vegetables are rotated with flooded rice, called for the design of alternative systems of permanent vegetable production. The practical model, PermVeg, was developed to generate vegetable crop sequences

  17. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  18. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  19. Effects of vegetation feedback in modeling the present-day climate over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Wang, G.; Erfanian, A.; Yu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract: Proper representation of climate-vegetation interactions is important for realistic simulations of the present climate and reliable projections of the future, and dynamic vegetation is being incorporated into more and more climate models. However, coupled vegetation-climate modeling at the regional scale is still at a very early stage. Specifically, very few studies on climate over Asia have accounted for the role of dynamic vegetation feedback. In this study, the regional climate model RegCM version 4.3.4 (RCM) coupled with the Community Land Model version 4/4.5 (CLM) including models of carbon-nitrogen dynamics (CN) and vegetation dynamics (DV) is used to simulate the present day climate over China, and the role of vegetation feedback at different time scales is investigated based on a set of simulations with different treatments of vegetation. Three simulations are conducted, each using RCM-CLM, RCM-CLM-CN, and RCM-CLM-CN-DV respectively, and all simulations are driven with reanalysis data during the period of 1989 to 2009. This presentation will document the model performance in simulating vegetation and climate, and examine the role of vegetation dynamics in climate variability at different time scales. Preliminary results indicate that, when the carbon-nitrogen dynamics and dynamic vegetation feedback are included, the spatial pattern of biases remains similar, but the magnitude of the biases become larger. Model performance in simulating other aspects of the present-day climate will be examined, and the implication of this effect will be studied.

  20. Modelling of flexi-coil springs with rubber-metal pads in a locomotive running gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michálek T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, flexi-coil springs are commonly used in the secondary suspension stage of railway vehicles. Lateral stiffness of these springs is influenced by means of their design parameters (number of coils, height, mean diameter of coils, wire diameter etc. and it is often suitable to modify this stiffness in such way, that the suspension shows various lateral stiffness in different directions (i.e., longitudinally vs. laterally in the vehicle-related coordinate system. Therefore, these springs are often supplemented with some kind of rubber-metal pads. This paper deals with modelling of the flexi-coil springs supplemented with tilting rubber-metal tilting pads applied in running gear of an electric locomotive as well as with consequences of application of that solution of the secondary suspension from the point of view of the vehicle running performance. This analysis is performed by means of multi-body simulations and the description of lateral stiffness characteristics of the springs is based on results of experimental measurements of these characteristics performed in heavy laboratories of the Jan Perner Transport Faculty of the University of Pardubice.

  1. Microwave measurement and modeling of the dielectric properties of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bijay Lal

    Some of the important applications of microwaves in the industrial, scientific and medical sectors include processing and treatment of various materials, and determining their physical properties. The dielectric properties of the materials of interest are paramount irrespective of the applications, hence, a wide range of materials covering food products, building materials, ores and fuels, and biological materials have been investigated for their dielectric properties. However, very few studies have been conducted towards the measurement of dielectric properties of green vegetations, including commercially important plant crops such as alfalfa. Because of its high nutritional value, there is a huge demand for this plant and its processed products in national and international markets, and an investigation into the possibility of applying microwaves to improve both the net yield and quality of the crop can be beneficial. Therefore, a dielectric measurement system based upon the probe reflection technique has been set up to measure dielectric properties of green plants over a frequency range from 300 MHz to 18 GHz, moisture contents from 12%, wet basis to 79%, wet basis, and temperatures from -15°C to 30°C. Dielectric properties of chopped alfalfa were measured with this system over frequency range of 300 MHz to 18 GHz, moisture content from 11.5%, wet basis, to 73%, wet basis, and density over the range from 139 kg m-3 to 716 kg m-3 at 23°C. The system accuracy was found to be +/-6% and +/-10% in measuring the dielectric constant and loss factor respectively. Empirical, semi empirical and theoretical models that require only moisture content and operating frequency were determined to represent the dielectric properties of both leaves and stems of alfalfa at 22°C. The empirical models fitted the measured dielectric data extremely well. The root mean square error (RMSE) and the coefficient of determination (r2) for dielectric constant and loss factor of leaves

  2. Vegetation response to rainfall intermittency in drylands : Results from a simple ecohydrological box model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudena, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/340303867; Boni, G.; Ferraris, L.; von Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation in arid and semi-arid regions is affected by intermittent water availability. We discuss a simple stochastic model describing the coupled dynamics of soil moisture and vegetation, and study the effects of rainfall intermittency. Soil moisture dynamics is described by a ecohydrological box

  3. A fully traits-based approach to modeling global vegetation distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Douma, J.C.; Verheijen, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) are indispensable for our understanding of climate change impacts. The application of traits in DGVMs is increasingly refined. However, a comprehensive analysis of the direct impacts of trait variation on global vegetation distribution does not yet exist. Her

  4. Item response modeling: an evaluation of the children's fruit and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedur...

  5. Characterising and quantifying vegetative drought in East Africa using fuzzy modelling and NDVI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulinda, C.; Rulinda, Coco M.; Dilo, Arta; Bijker, W.; Bijker, Wietske; Stein, A.

    This study aims at improving the characterisation and quantification of vegetative drought as a vague spatial phenomenon. 10-day NOAA-AVHRR NDVI images of East Africa from September 2005 to April 2006 are used. Vegetative drought is characterised using a membership function to model the gradual

  6. Characterising and quantifying vegetative drought in East Africa using fuzzy modelling and NDVI data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulinda, Coco M.; Dilo, Arta; Bijker, Wietske; Stein, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at improving the characterisation and quantification of vegetative drought as a vague spatial phenomenon. 10-day NOAA-AVHRR NDVI images of East Africa from September 2005 to April 2006 are used. Vegetative drought is characterised using a membership function to model the gradual tran

  7. Probabilistic landslide run-out assessment with a 2-D dynamic numerical model using a Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Jose; Luna, Byron Quan; Nadim, Farrokh

    2013-04-01

    An essential component of a quantitative landslide hazard assessment is establishing the extent of the endangered area. This task requires accurate prediction of the run-out behaviour of a landslide, which includes the estimation of the run-out distance, run-out width, velocities, pressures, and depth of the moving mass and the final configuration of the deposits. One approach to run-out modelling is to reproduce accurately the dynamics of the propagation processes. A number of dynamic numerical models are able to compute the movement of the flow over irregular topographic terrains (3-D) controlled by a complex interaction between mechanical properties that may vary in space and time. Given the number of unknown parameters and the fact that most of the rheological parameters cannot be measured in the laboratory or field, the parametrization of run-out models is very difficult in practice. For this reason, the application of run-out models is mostly used for back-analysis of past events and very few studies have attempted to achieve forward predictions. Consequently all models are based on simplified descriptions that attempt to reproduce the general features of the failed mass motion through the use of parameters (mostly controlling shear stresses at the base of the moving mass) which account for aspects not explicitly described or oversimplified. The uncertainties involved in the run-out process have to be approached in a stochastic manner. It is of significant importance to develop methods for quantifying and properly handling the uncertainties in dynamic run-out models, in order to allow a more comprehensive approach to quantitative risk assessment. A method was developed to compute the variation in run-out intensities by using a dynamic run-out model (MassMov2D) and a probabilistic framework based on a Monte Carlo simulation in order to analyze the effect of the uncertainty of input parameters. The probability density functions of the rheological parameters

  8. Next-generation dynamic global vegetation models: learning from community ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Langan, Liam; Higgins, Steven I

    2013-05-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are powerful tools to project past, current and future vegetation patterns and associated biogeochemical cycles. However, most models are limited by how they define vegetation and by their simplistic representation of competition. We discuss how concepts from community assembly theory and coexistence theory can help to improve vegetation models. We further present a trait- and individual-based vegetation model (aDGVM2) that allows individual plants to adopt a unique combination of trait values. These traits define how individual plants grow and compete. A genetic optimization algorithm is used to simulate trait inheritance and reproductive isolation between individuals. These model properties allow the assembly of plant communities that are adapted to a site's biotic and abiotic conditions. The aDGVM2 simulates how environmental conditions influence the trait spectra of plant communities; that fire selects for traits that enhance fire protection and reduces trait diversity; and the emergence of life-history strategies that are suggestive of colonization-competition trade-offs. The aDGVM2 deals with functional diversity and competition fundamentally differently from current DGVMs. This approach may yield novel insights as to how vegetation may respond to climate change and we believe it could foster collaborations between functional plant biologists and vegetation modellers.

  9. Prosthetic model, but not stiffness or height, affects the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena M

    2017-07-01

    Running-specific prostheses enable athletes with lower limb amputations to run by emulating the spring-like function of biological legs. Current prosthetic stiffness and height recommendations aim to mitigate kinematic asymmetries for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations. However, it is unclear how different prosthetic configurations influence the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Consequently, we investigated how prosthetic model, stiffness, and height affect the biomechanics and metabolic cost of running. Ten athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations each performed 15 running trials at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s while we measured ground reaction forces and metabolic rates. Athletes ran using three different prosthetic models with five different stiffness category and height combinations per model. Use of an Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter prosthesis reduced metabolic cost by 4.3 and 3.4% compared with use of Freedom Innovations Catapult [fixed effect (β) = -0.177; P forces, prolonged ground contact times (β = -4.349; P = 0.012), and decreased leg stiffness (β = 0.071; P forces (β = 0.007; P = 0.003) but was unrelated to stride kinematic symmetry (P ≥ 0.636). Therefore, prosthetic recommendations based on symmetric stride kinematics do not necessarily minimize the metabolic cost of running. Instead, an optimal prosthetic model, which improves overall biomechanics, minimizes the metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The metabolic cost of running for athletes with unilateral transtibial amputations depends on prosthetic model and is associated with lower peak and stance average vertical ground reaction forces, longer contact times, and reduced leg stiffness. Metabolic cost is unrelated to prosthetic stiffness, height, and stride kinematic symmetry. Unlike nonamputees who decrease leg stiffness with increased in-series surface stiffness, biological limb stiffness for athletes with unilateral

  10. How much does weather-driven vegetation dynamics matter in land surface modelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSM) are an essential part of weather and climate models as they provide the lower boundary condition for the atmospheric models. In state-of-the-art LSMs the seasonal vegetation dynamics is "frozen". The seasonal variation of vegetation state variables, such as leaf area index or green vegetation fraction, are prescribed in lookup tables. Hence, a year-by-year variation in the development of vegetation due to changing weather conditions cannot be considered. For climate simulations, this is obviously a severe drawback. The objective of the present study was to quantify the potential error in the simulation of land surface exchange processes resulting from "frozen" vegetation dynamics. For this purpose we simulated energy and water fluxes from a winter wheat stand and a maize stand in Southwest Germany. In a first set of simulations, six years (2010 to 2015) were simulated considering weather-driven vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, we coupled the generic crop growth model GECROS with the NOAH-MP model (NOAHMP-GECROS). In a second set of simulations all vegetation-related state variables of the 2010 simulation were written to an external file and were used to overwrite the vegetation-related state variables of the simulations of the years 2011-2015. The difference between both sets was taken as a measure for the potential error introduced to the LSM due to the assumption of a "frozen" vegetation dynamics. We will present first results and discuss the impact of "frozen" vegetation dynamics on climate change simulations.

  11. Analysis of the traditional vehicle’s running cost and the electric vehicle’s running cost under car-following model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Xu, Ke-Wei; Yang, Shi-Chun; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we use car-following theory to study the traditional vehicle’s running cost and the electric vehicle’s running cost. The numerical results illustrate that the traditional vehicle’s running cost is larger than that of the electric vehicle and that the system’s total running cost drops with the increase of the electric vehicle’s proportion, which shows that the electric vehicle is better than the traditional vehicle from the perspective of the running cost.

  12. Powdered hide model for vegetable tanning II. hydrolyzable tannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegetable tannages employ both condensed and hydrolyzable tannins. As part of our exploration of tanning mechanisms, we reported last year on interactions of the condensed tannin, quebracho, with powdered hide. In this study, the interactions of chestnut extract, a hydrolyzable tannin, with powdere...

  13. Towards a numerical run-out model for quick-clay slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issler, Dieter; L'Heureux, Jean-Sébastien; Cepeda, José M.; Luna, Byron Quan; Gebreslassie, Tesfahunegn A.

    2015-04-01

    Highly sensitive glacio-marine clays occur in many relatively low-lying areas near the coasts of eastern Canada, Scandinavia and northern Russia. If the load exceeds the yield stress of these clays, they quickly liquefy, with a reduction of the yield strength and the viscosity by several orders of magnitude. Leaching, fluvial erosion, earthquakes and man-made overloads, by themselves or combined, are the most frequent triggers of quick-clay slides, which are hard to predict and can attain catastrophic dimensions. The present contribution reports on two preparatory studies that were conducted with a view to creating a run-out model tailored to the characteristics of quick-clay slides. One study analyzed the connections between the morphological and geotechnical properties of more than 30 well-documented Norwegian quick-clay slides and their run-out behavior. The laboratory experiments by Locat and Demers (1988) suggest that the behavior of quick clays can be reasonably described by universal relations involving the liquidity index, plastic index, remolding energy, salinity and sensitivity. However, these tests should be repeated with Norwegian clays and analyzed in terms of a (shear-thinning) Herschel-Bulkley fluid rather than a Bingham fluid because the shear stress appears to grow in a sub-linear fashion with the shear rate. Further study is required to understand the discrepancy between the material parameters obtained in laboratory tests of material from observed slides and in back-calculations of the same slides with the simple model by Edgers & Karlsrud (1982). The second study assessed the capability of existing numerical flow models to capture the most important aspects of quick-clay slides by back-calculating three different, well documented events in Norway: Rissa (1978), Finneidfjord (1996) and Byneset (2012). The numerical codes were (i) BING, a quasi-two-dimensional visco-plastic model, (ii) DAN3D (2009 version), and (iii) MassMov2D. The latter two are

  14. Model based control for run-of-river system. Part 2: Comparison of control structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubomyr Vytvytskyi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimal operation and control of a run-of-river hydro power plant depend on good knowledge of the elements of the plant in the form of models. Both the control architecture of the system, i.e. the choice of inputs and outputs, and to what degree a model is used, will affect the achievable control performance. Here, a model of a river reach based on the Saint Venant equations for open channel flow illustrates the dynamics of the run-of-river system. The hyperbolic partial differential equations are discretized using the Kurganov-Petrova central upwind scheme - see Part I for details. A comparison is given of achievable control performance using two alternative control signals: the inlet or the outlet volumetric flow rates to the system, in combination with a number of different control structures such as PI control, PI control with Smith predictor, and predictive control. The control objective is to keep the level just in front of the dam as high as possible, and with little variation in the level to avoid overflow over the dam. With a step change in the volumetric inflow to the river reach (disturbance and using the volumetric outflow as the control signal, PI control gives quite good performance. Model predictive control (MPC gives superior control in the sense of constraining the variation in the water level, at a cost of longer computational time and thus constraints on possible sample time. Details on controller tuning are given. With volumetric inflow to the river reach as control signal and outflow (production as disturbance, this introduces a considerable time delay in the control signal. Because of nonlinearity in the system (varying time delay, etc., it is difficult to achieve stable closed loop performance using a simple PI controller. However, by combining a PI controller with a Smith predictor based on a simple integrator + fixed time delay model, stable closed loop operation is possible with decent control performance. Still, an MPC

  15. Interception modeling with vegetation time series derived from Landsat TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, M. J.; Díaz-Gutiérrez, A.; González-Dugo, M. P.

    2011-11-01

    Rainfall interception by the vegetation may constitute a significant fraction in the water budget at local and watershed scales, especially in Mediterranean areas. Different approaches can be found to model locally the interception fraction, but a distributed analysis requires time series of vegetation along the watershed for the study period, which includes both type of vegetation and ground cover fraction. In heterogeneous watersheds, remote sensing is usually the only viable alternative to characterize medium to large size areas, but the high number of scenes necessary to capture the temporal variability during long periods, together with the sometimes extreme scarcity of data during the wet season, make it necessary to deal with a limited number of images and interpolate vegetation maps between consecutive dates. This work presents an interception model for heterogeneous watersheds which combines an interception continuous simulation derived from Gash model and their derivations, and a time series of vegetation cover fraction and type from Landsat TM data and vegetation inventories. A mountainous watershed in Southern Spain where a physical hydrological modelling had been previously calibrated was selected for this study. The dominant species distribution and their relevant characteristics regarding the interception process were analyzed from literature and digital cartography; the evolution of the vegetation cover fraction along the watershed during the study period (2002-2005) was produced by the application of a NDVI analysis on the available scenes of Landsat TM images. This model was further calibrated by field data collected in selected areas in the watershed.

  16. Non-linear structure formation in the `Running FLRW' cosmological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibiano, Antonio; Croton, Darren J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the `Running Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker' (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) with a time-evolving vacuum density, Λ(z), and time-evolving gravitational Newton's coupling, G(z). In this paper, we review the model and introduce the necessary analytical treatment needed to adapt a reference N-body code. Our resulting simulations represent the first realization of the full growth history of structure in the R-FLRW cosmology into the non-linear regime, and our normalization choice makes them fully consistent with the latest cosmic microwave background data. The post-processing data products also allow, for the first time, an analysis of the properties of the halo and sub-halo populations. We explore the degeneracies of many statistical observables and discuss the steps needed to break them. Furthermore, we provide a quantitative description of the deviations of R-FLRW from ΛCDM, which could be readily exploited by future cosmological observations to test and further constrain the model.

  17. A comparison between conventional and LANDSAT based hydrologic modeling: The Four Mile Run case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, R. M.; Jackson, T. J.; Fitch, W. N.; Shubinski, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    Models designed to support the hydrologic studies associated with urban water resources planning require input parameters that are defined in terms of land cover. Estimating the land cover is a difficult and expensive task when drainage areas larger than a few sq. km are involved. Conventional and LANDSAT based methods for estimating the land cover based input parameters required by hydrologic planning models were compared in a case study of the 50.5 sq. km (19.5 sq. mi) Four Mile Run Watershed in Virginia. Results of the study indicate that the LANDSAT based approach is highly cost effective for planning model studies. The conventional approach to define inputs was based on 1:3600 aerial photos, required 110 man-days and a total cost of $14,000. The LANDSAT based approach required 6.9 man-days and cost $2,350. The conventional and LANDSAT based models gave similar results relative to discharges and estimated annual damages expected from no flood control, channelization, and detention storage alternatives.

  18. Development of a simulation model for compression ignition engine running with ignition improved blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshkumar Ponnusamy Moranahalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Automobile Engineering, Anna University, Chennai, India. The present work describes the thermodynamic and heat transfer models used in a computer program which simulates the diesel fuel and ignition improver blend to predict the combustion and emission characteristics of a direct injection compression ignition engine fuelled with ignition improver blend using classical two zone approach. One zone consists of pure air called non burning zone and other zone consist of fuel and combustion products called burning zone. First law of thermodynamics and state equations are applied in each of the two zones to yield cylinder temperatures and cylinder pressure histories. Using the two zone combustion model the combustion parameters and the chemical equilibrium composition were determined. To validate the model an experimental investigation has been conducted on a single cylinder direct injection diesel engine fuelled with 12% by volume of 2- ethoxy ethanol blend with diesel fuel. Addition of ignition improver blend to diesel fuel decreases the exhaust smoke and increases the thermal efficiency for the power outputs. It was observed that there is a good agreement between simulated and experimental results and the proposed model requires low computational time for a complete run.

  19. Developing an algorithm for enhancement of a digital terrain model for a densely vegetated floodplain wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirosław-Świątek, Dorota; Szporak-Wasilewska, Sylwia; Michałowski, Robert; Kardel, Ignacy; Grygoruk, Mateusz

    2016-07-01

    Airborne laser scanning survey data were conducted with a scanning density of 4 points/m2 to accurately map the surface of a unique central European complex of wetlands: the lower Biebrza River valley (Poland). A method to correct a degrading effect of vegetation (so-called "vegetation effect") on digital terrain models (DTMs) was applied utilizing remotely sensed images, real-time kinematic global positioning system elevation measurements, topographical surveys, and vegetation height measurements. Geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) was performed to map vegetation within the study area that was used as categories from which vegetation height information was derived for the DTM correction. The final DTM was compared with a model obtained, where additional correction of the "vegetation effect" was neglected. A comparison between corrected and uncorrected DTMs demonstrated the importance of accurate topography through a simple presentation of the discrepancies arising in features of the flood using various DTM products. An overall map classification accuracy of 80% was attained with the use of GEOBIA. Correction factors developed for various types of the vegetation reached values from 0.08 up to 0.92 m and were dependent on the vegetation type.

  20. Short-run analysis of fiscal policy and the current account in a finite horizon model

    OpenAIRE

    Heng-fu Zou

    1995-01-01

    This paper utilizes a technique developed by Judd to quantify the short-run effects of fiscal policies and income shocks on the current account in a small open economy. It is found that: (1) a future increase in government spending improves the short-run current account; (2) a future tax increase worsens the short-run current account; (3) a present increase in the government spending worsens the short-run current account dollar by dollar, while a present increase in the income improves the cu...

  1. Equator To Pole in the Cretaceous: A Comparison of Clumped Isotope Data and CESM Model Runs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, S. V.; Tabor, C. R.; Meyer, K.; Lohmann, K. C.; Poulsen, C. J.; Carpenter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    An outstanding issue in the field of paleoclimate is the inability of models to reproduce the shallower equator-to-pole temperature gradients suggested by proxies for past greenhouse periods. Here, we focus on the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian, 72-66 Ma), when estimated CO2 levels were ~400-1000ppm. New clumped isotope temperature data from more than 10 sites spanning 65°S to 48°N are used to reconstruct the Maastrichtian equator-to-pole temperature gradient. This data is compared to CESM model simulations of the Maastrichtian, run using relevant paleogeography and atmospheric CO2 levels of 560 and 1120 ppm. Due to a reduced "proxy toolkit" this far in the past, much of our knowledge of Cretaceous climate comes from the oxygen isotope paleothermometer, which incorporates an assumption about the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater (δ18Osw), a quantity often related to salinity. With the clumped isotope paleothermometer, we can directly calculate δ18Osw. This will be used to test commonly applied assumptions about water composition, and will be compared to modeled ocean salinity. We also discuss basin-to-basin differences and their implications for paleo-circulation patterns.

  2. Non-linear structure formation in the "Running FLRW" cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Bibiano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We present a suite of cosmological N-body simulations describing the "Running Friedmann-Lema{\\"i}tre-Robertson-Walker" (R-FLRW) cosmological model. This model is based on quantum field theory in a curved space-time and extends {\\Lambda}CDM with a time-evolving vacuum density, {\\Lambda}(z), and time-evolving gravitational Newton's coupling, G(z). In this paper we review the model and introduce the necessary analytical treatment needed to adapt a reference N-body code. Our resulting simulations represent the first realisation of the full growth history of structure in the R-FLRW cosmology into the non-linear regime, and our normalisation choice makes them fully consistent with the latest cosmic microwave background data. The post-processing data products also allow, for the first time, an analysis of the properties of the halo and sub-halo populations. We explore the degeneracies of many statistical observables and discuss the steps needed to break them. Furthermore, we provide a quantitative description of the...

  3. The effects of vegetation and climate change on catchment erosion over millennial time scales: Insights from coupled dynamic vegetation and landscape evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manuel; Ehlers, Todd; Werner, Christian; Hickler, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies hypothesize that vegetation and the morphology of landscapes are strongly coupled. On a small scale, plants influence the erosivity of soil and sediments and therefore systematically impact catchment erosion and topography. Previous landscape evolution modeling studies primarily focus on changes in fluvial and hillslope erosion due to variations in climate and tectonics, without explicit consideration of vegetation effects. In this study, we complement previous work by investigating the effects of vegetation and vegetation change on hillslope and fluvial processes by combining LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic global vegetation model, with a modified version of the Landlab surface process model. The LandLab model was extended to account for vegetation-dependent sediment fluxes for both hillslope and detachment-limited fluvial erosion. The models are coupled by using predicted changes in surface vegetation from LPJ-GUESS for different climate scenarios as input for vegetation dependent erosional coefficients in Landlab. Simulations were conducted with the general climate and vegetation conditions representative between 25° and 40°S along the Coastal Cordillera of Chile. This region is the focus of the EarthShape research program (www.earthshape.net). These areas present a natural climatic and associated vegetation gradient that ranges from hyper-arid (Atacama desert) to humid-temperate conditions without a dry season and pristine temperate Araucaria forest. All study areas considered have a similar and uniform granite substrate, which minimizes lithologic variations and their effect on catchment erosion. Simulations are in progress that were designed to independently determine the climatic or vegetation controls on topography and erosion histories over the last 21 kyr. Our preliminary findings suggest that an increase in the surface vegetation results in a modulation of the mean hillslope angle and the average drainage density. In addition, we find that a

  4. On Demand Runs Of Mesoscale Models : Météo-France multi-mission, multi-support GUI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periard, C.; Pourret, V.; Chaupin, D.

    2009-09-01

    Numerous experiment campaigns have shown the interest of mesoscale models to represent weather conditions of the atmosphere as a support to various applications, from electromagnetic propagation to wind power atlas. However running mesoscale models requires high level knowledge on computing and modelling to define the different parameters for a given simulation. With the increase of the demands for mesoscale simulations, we decided to develop a GUI that enables to easily define and run type-experiments Ø at any location on the globe Ø on different types of computers (from Meteo-France Fujitsu to a PC Cluster) Ø with different choices of forcing models. The GUI developed in PHP, uses a map server to visualize the location of the experiment being defined and the different forcing models available for the simulation. The other parameters such as time steps, resolutions, sizes and number of embedded domains, etc … can be modified through checkboxes or multiple choices lists in the GUI. So far, the GUI has been used to run 3 different types of experiment : Ø for EM propagation purpose, during an experiment campaign near Toulon : the simulations were run on a PC Cluster in analyse mode. Ø for wind profiles prediction, in Afghanistan : the simulations are run on the Fujitsu in forecast mode. Ø for weather forecast, during a the F1 race in Japan : the simulations were run on a PC Cluster in forecast mode. During the presentation, I will first give some screen-prints of the different fill-in forms of the Gui and the way to define an experiment. Then I will focus on the 3 examples mentioned above showing different types of graphs and maps produced. There are tons of other applications where this tool is going to be useful especially in climatology: using weather type classification and downscaling, the Gui will help run the simulations of the different clusters representatives . The last thing to accomplish is find a name for the tool.

  5. Modelling Holocene peatland dynamics with an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are designed for the study of past, present and future vegetation patterns together with associated biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. However, most DGVMs do not yet have detailed representations of permafrost and non-permafrost peatlands, which are an important store of carbon, particularly at high latitudes. We demonstrate a new implementation of peatland dynamics in a customized Arctic version of the LPJ-GUESS DGVM, simulating the long-term evolution of selected northern peatland ecosystems and assessing the effect of changing climate on peatland carbon balance. Our approach employs a dynamic multi-layer soil with representation of freeze-thaw processes and litter inputs from a dynamically varying mixture of the main peatland plant functional types: mosses, shrubs and graminoids. The model was calibrated and tested for a sub-Arctic mire in Stordalen, Sweden, and validated at a temperate bog site in Mer Bleue, Canada. A regional evaluation of simulated carbon fluxes, hydrology and vegetation dynamics encompassed additional locations spread across Scandinavia. Simulated peat accumulation was found to be generally consistent with published data and the model was able to capture reported long-term vegetation dynamics, water table position and carbon fluxes. A series of sensitivity experiments were carried out to investigate the vulnerability of high-latitude peatlands to climate change. We found that the Stordalen mire may be expected to sequester more carbon in the first half of the 21st century due to milder and wetter climate conditions, a longer growing season, and the CO2 fertilization effect, turning into a carbon source after mid-century because of higher decomposition rates in response to warming soils.

  6. Fractional vegetation cover estimation based on an improved selective endmember spectral mixture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    Full Text Available Vegetation is an important part of ecosystem and estimation of fractional vegetation cover is of significant meaning to monitoring of vegetation growth in a certain region. With Landsat TM images and HJ-1B images as data source, an improved selective endmember linear spectral mixture model (SELSMM was put forward in this research to estimate the fractional vegetation cover in Huangfuchuan watershed in China. We compared the result with the vegetation coverage estimated with linear spectral mixture model (LSMM and conducted accuracy test on the two results with field survey data to study the effectiveness of different models in estimation of vegetation coverage. Results indicated that: (1 the RMSE of the estimation result of SELSMM based on TM images is the lowest, which is 0.044. The RMSEs of the estimation results of LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.052, 0.077 and 0.082, which are all higher than that of SELSMM based on TM images; (2 the R2 of SELSMM based on TM images, LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.668, 0.531, 0.342 and 0.336. Among these models, SELSMM based on TM images has the highest estimation accuracy and also the highest correlation with measured vegetation coverage. Of the two methods tested, SELSMM is superior to LSMM in estimation of vegetation coverage and it is also better at unmixing mixed pixels of TM images than pixels of HJ-1B images. So, the SELSMM based on TM images is comparatively accurate and reliable in the research of regional fractional vegetation cover estimation.

  7. Fractional vegetation cover estimation based on an improved selective endmember spectral mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Wang, Hong; Li, Xiao Bing

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation is an important part of ecosystem and estimation of fractional vegetation cover is of significant meaning to monitoring of vegetation growth in a certain region. With Landsat TM images and HJ-1B images as data source, an improved selective endmember linear spectral mixture model (SELSMM) was put forward in this research to estimate the fractional vegetation cover in Huangfuchuan watershed in China. We compared the result with the vegetation coverage estimated with linear spectral mixture model (LSMM) and conducted accuracy test on the two results with field survey data to study the effectiveness of different models in estimation of vegetation coverage. Results indicated that: (1) the RMSE of the estimation result of SELSMM based on TM images is the lowest, which is 0.044. The RMSEs of the estimation results of LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.052, 0.077 and 0.082, which are all higher than that of SELSMM based on TM images; (2) the R2 of SELSMM based on TM images, LSMM based on TM images, SELSMM based on HJ-1B images and LSMM based on HJ-1B images are respectively 0.668, 0.531, 0.342 and 0.336. Among these models, SELSMM based on TM images has the highest estimation accuracy and also the highest correlation with measured vegetation coverage. Of the two methods tested, SELSMM is superior to LSMM in estimation of vegetation coverage and it is also better at unmixing mixed pixels of TM images than pixels of HJ-1B images. So, the SELSMM based on TM images is comparatively accurate and reliable in the research of regional fractional vegetation cover estimation.

  8. Identifying environmental controls on vegetation greenness phenology through model-data integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Forkel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Existing dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs have a~limited ability in reproducing phenology and decadal dynamics of vegetation greenness as observed by satellites. These limitations in reproducing observations reflect a poor understanding and description of the environmental controls on phenology, which strongly influence the ability to simulate longer term vegetation dynamics, e.g. carbon allocation. Combining DGVMs with observational data sets can potentially help to revise current modelling approaches and thus to enhance the understanding of processes that control seasonal to long-term vegetation greenness dynamics. Here we implemented a~new phenology model within the LPJmL (Lund Potsdam Jena managed lands DGVM and integrated several observational data sets to improve the ability of the model in reproducing satellite-derived time series of vegetation greenness. Specifically, we optimized LPJmL parameters against observational time series of the fraction of absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (FAPAR, albedo and gross primary production to identify the main environmental controls for seasonal vegetation greenness dynamics. We demonstrated that LPJmL with new phenology and optimized parameters better reproduces seasonality, inter-annual variability and trends of vegetation greenness. Our results indicate that soil water availability is an important control on vegetation phenology not only in water-limited biomes but also in boreal forests and the arctic tundra. Whereas water availability controls phenology in water-limited ecosystems during the entire growing season, water availability co-modulates jointly with temperature the beginning of the growing season in boreal and arctic regions. Additionally, water availability contributes to better explain decadal greening trends in the Sahel and browning trends in boreal forests. These results emphasize the importance of considering water availability in a new generation of phenology modules

  9. Improving NPP availability using thermalhydraulic integral plant models. Assessment and application of turbine run back scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reventos, F. [ANACNV, l' Hospitalet de l' Infant, Tarragona (Spain)]|[Technical University of Catalonia, UPC (Spain); Llopis, C.; Pretel, C. [Technical University of Catalonia, UPC (Spain); Posada, J.M.; Moreno, P. [Pablo Moreno S.A. (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    ANAV is the utility responsible of Asco and Vandellos Nuclear Power Plants, a two-unit and a single unit 1000 MW PWR plant, respectively. Both plants, Asco and Vandellos, are in normal operation since 1983 and 1987 and have undergone different important improvements like: steam generators and turbine substitution, power up-rating... Best estimate simulation by means of the thermal-hydraulic integral models of operating nuclear power plants are today impressively helpful for utilities in their purpose of improving availability and keeping safety level. ANAV is currently using Relap5/mod3.2 models of both plants for different purposes related to safety, operation, engineering and training. Turbine run-back system is designed to avoid reactor trips, and it does so in the existing plants, when the key parameters are correctly adjusted. The fine adjustment of such parameters was traditionally performed following the results of control simulators. Such simulators used a fully developed set of control equations and a quite simplified thermal-hydraulic feed-back. Boundary scenarios were considered in order to overcome the difficulties generated by simplification. (author)

  10. A structured model for vegetative growth and sporulation in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starzak, M.; Bajpai, R.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1991-12-31

    A mathematical model has been developed for the 6-endotoxin producing Bacillus thuringiensis. The structure of the model involves the processes taking place during vegetative growth, those leading to the initiation of sporulation under conditions of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation, and the sporulation events. The key features in the model are the pools of compounds, such as PRPP, IMP, ADP/ATP, GDP/GTP, pyrimidine nucleotides, NAD/NADH{sub 2}, amino acids, nucleic acids, cell wall, and vegetative and sporulation proteins. These, along with a-factors that control the nature of RNA-polymerase during the different phases, effectively stimulate the vegetative growth and sporulation. The initiation of sporulation is controlled by the intracellular concentration of GTP. Results of simulation of vegetative growth, initiation of sporulation, spore protein formation, and production of {delta}-endotoxin under C- or N-limitation are presented.

  11. Application of a Coupled Vegetation Competition and Groundwater Simulation Model to Study Effects of Sea Level Rise and Storm Surges on Coastal Vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yean Teh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change poses challenges to areas such as low-lying coastal zones, where sea level rise (SLR and storm-surge overwash events can have long-term effects on vegetation and on soil and groundwater salinities, posing risks of habitat loss critical to native species. An early warning system is urgently needed to predict and prepare for the consequences of these climate-related impacts on both the short-term dynamics of salinity in the soil and groundwater and the long-term effects on vegetation. For this purpose, the U.S. Geological Survey’s spatially explicit model of vegetation community dynamics along coastal salinity gradients (MANHAM is integrated into the USGS groundwater model (SUTRA to create a coupled hydrology–salinity–vegetation model, MANTRA. In MANTRA, the uptake of water by plants is modeled as a fluid mass sink term. Groundwater salinity, water saturation and vegetation biomass determine the water available for plant transpiration. Formulations and assumptions used in the coupled model are presented. MANTRA is calibrated with salinity data and vegetation pattern for a coastal area of Florida Everglades vulnerable to storm surges. A possible regime shift at that site is investigated by simulating the vegetation responses to climate variability and disturbances, including SLR and storm surges based on empirical information.

  12. Application of a coupled vegetation competition and groundwater simulation model to study effects of sea level rise and storm surges on coastal vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Su Yean; Turtora, Michael; DeAngelis, Don; Jiang Jiang,; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Smith, Thomas; Koh, Hock Lye

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change poses challenges to areas such as low-lying coastal zones, where sea level rise (SLR) and storm-surge overwash events can have long-term effects on vegetation and on soil and groundwater salinities, posing risks of habitat loss critical to native species. An early warning system is urgently needed to predict and prepare for the consequences of these climate-related impacts on both the short-term dynamics of salinity in the soil and groundwater and the long-term effects on vegetation. For this purpose, the U.S. Geological Survey’s spatially explicit model of vegetation community dynamics along coastal salinity gradients (MANHAM) is integrated into the USGS groundwater model (SUTRA) to create a coupled hydrology–salinity–vegetation model, MANTRA. In MANTRA, the uptake of water by plants is modeled as a fluid mass sink term. Groundwater salinity, water saturation and vegetation biomass determine the water available for plant transpiration. Formulations and assumptions used in the coupled model are presented. MANTRA is calibrated with salinity data and vegetation pattern for a coastal area of Florida Everglades vulnerable to storm surges. A possible regime shift at that site is investigated by simulating the vegetation responses to climate variability and disturbances, including SLR and storm surges based on empirical information.

  13. Impact of droughts on the C-cycle in European vegetation: a probabilistic risk analysis using six vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Van Oijen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse how climate change may alter risks posed by droughts to carbon fluxes in European ecosystems. The approach follows a recently proposed framework for risk analysis based on probability theory. In this approach, risk is quantified as the product of hazard probability and ecosystem vulnerability. The probability of a drought hazard is calculated here from the Standardised Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index. Vulnerability is calculated from the response to drought simulated by process-based vegetation models. Here we use six different models: three for generic vegetation (JSBACH, LPJmL, ORCHIDEE and three for specific ecosystems (Scots pine forests: BASFOR; winter wheat fields: EPIC; grasslands: PASIM. The periods 1971–2000 and 2071–2100 are compared. Climate data are based on observations and on output from the regional climate model REMO using the SRES A1B scenario. The risk analysis is carried out for ∼22 000 grid cells of 0.25° × 0.25° across Europe. For each grid cell, drought vulnerability and risk are quantified for five seasonal variables: net primary and ecosystem productivity (NPP, NEP, heterotrophic respiration (RH, soil water content and evapotranspiration. Climate change is expected to lead to increased drought risks to net primary productivity in the Mediterranean area: five of the models estimate that risk will exceed 15%. The risks will increase mainly because of greater drought probability; ecosystem vulnerability will increase to lesser extent. Because NPP will be affected more than RH, future C-sequestration (NEP will also be at risk predominantly in southern Europe, with risks exceeding 0.25 g C m−2 d−1 according to most models, amounting to reductions in carbon sequestration of 20 to 80%.

  14. Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate - A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Xue, Y.; MacDonald, G. M.; Cox, P. M.; Collatz, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    This study applies a 2-D biophysical model/dynamic vegetation model (SSiB4/TRIFFID) to investigate the dominant factors affecting vegetation equilibrium conditions, to assess the model's ability to simulate seasonal to decadal variability for the past 60 years (from 1948 through 2008), to analyze vegetation spatiotemporal characteristics over North America (NA), and to identify the relationships between vegetation and climate. Satellite data are employed as constraints for this study. The optimum temperature for photosynthesis, leaf drop threshold temperatures, and competition coefficients in the Lotka-Volterra equation have major impact on the vegetation spatial distribution and reach to equilibrium status in SSiB4/TRIFFID. The phenomenon that vegetation competition coefficients affect equilibrium suggests the importance of including biotic effects in dynamical vegetation modeling. SSiB4/TRIFFID can reproduce the features of NA distributions of dominant vegetation types, the vegetation fraction, and LAI, including its seasonal, interannual, and decadal variability, well compared with satellite-derived products. The NA LAI shows an increasing trend after the 1970s in responding to warming. Meanwhile, both simulation and satellite observations reveal LAI increased in the southeastern U.S. starting from the 1980s. The effects of the severe drought during 1987-1992 and the last decade in the southwestern U.S.on vegetation are also evident from the simulated and satellite-derived LAIs.Both simulated and satellite-derived LAIs have the strongest correlations with air temperature at northern middle to high latitudes in spring through their effect on photosynthesis and phenological processes. During the summer, the areas with positive correlations retreat northward. Meanwhile, in southwestern dry lands, the negative correlations appear due to the heat stress there during the summer. Furthermore, there are also positive correlations between soil wetness and LAI, which

  15. [Application of five atmospheric correction models for Landsat TM data in vegetation remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei-wei; Guan, Dong-sheng

    2008-04-01

    Based on the Landsat TM image of northeast Guangzhou City and north Huizhou City on July 18, 2005, and compared with apparent reflectance model, five atmospheric correction models including four dark object subtraction models and 6S model were evaluated from the aspects of vegetation reflectance, surface reflectance, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The results showed that the dark object subtraction model DOS4 produced the highest accurate vegetation reflectance, and had the largest information loads for surface reflectance and NDVI, being the best for the atmospheric correction in the study areas. It was necessary to analyze and to compare different models to find out an appropriate model for atmospheric correction in the study of other areas.

  16. Reducing the hydrological connectivity of gully systems through vegetation restoration: combined field experiment and numerical modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Molina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of degraded land in the southern Ecuadorian Andes has led to alterations in the functioning of degraded catchments. Recovery of vegetation on areas affected by overgrazing, as well as the reforestation or afforestation of gully areas have given rise to modifications of hydrological connectivity within the catchments. Recent research has highlighted the ability of gully channels to trap sediment eroded from steep slopes, especially if vegetation is established along the gully bed. However, vegetation cover not only induces sediment deposition in the gully bed, but may also have a potential to reduce runoff water volume. The performance of gully beds in reducing the transfer of runoff water was investigated by conducting controlled concentrated flow experiments in the field. Experimental field data for 9 gullies were derived by pouring concentrated inflow into the upstream end of the gully channel and measuring the outflow at the downstream end of the channel. Two consecutive flow experiments per gully were carried out, so that data for dry and wet soil conditions were collected. The hydrological response to concentrated flow was estimated for each experiment by calculating its cumulative infiltration coefficient, IC (%. The results showed a great difference in IC between dry and wet soil conditions. The IC for wet soil conditions was on average 24%, whereas it was 60% for dry conditions. Gullies with more than 50% surface vegetation cover exhibit the highest cumulative infiltration coefficients (81% for "dry runs", and 34% for "wet runs", but runoff transmission losses were not as clearly related to vegetation cover as sediment storage. The experimental field data of 16 experiments were used to calibrate a hydrological model in order to simulate the transfer of concentrated flow along the gully beds. The model is based on (i the Philip's equation to simulate runoff water infiltration and (ii the kinematic wave approximation to

  17. Effects of vegetation structure on biomass accumulation in a Balanced Optimality Structure Vegetation Model (BOSVM v1.0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, Z.; Dekker, S. C.; van den Hurk, Bart; Dijkstra, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    A myriad of interactions exist between vegetation and local climate for arid and semi-arid regions. Vegetation function, structure and individual behavior have large impacts on carbon-water-energy balances, which consequently influence local climate variability that, in turn, feeds back to the veget

  18. Assessing the debris flow run-out frequency of a catchment in the French Alps using a parameterization analysis with the RAMMS numerical run-out model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hussin, Y.A.; Quan Luna, B.; Van Westen, C.J.; Christen, M.; Malet, J.P.; Asch, Th.W.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Debris flows occurring in the European Alps frequently cause significant damage to settlements, power-lines and transportation infrastructure which has led to traffic disruptions, economic loss and even death. Estimating the debris flow run-out extent and the parameter uncertainty related to run-out

  19. Modeling vegetation reflectance from satellite and in-situ monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoran, Maria; Florin Zoran, Liviu; Ionescu Golovanov, Carmen; Dida, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation can be distinguished using remote sensing data from most other (mainly inorganic) materials by virtue of its notable absorption in the red and blue segments of the visible spectrum, its higher green reflectance and, especially, its very strong reflectance in the near-IR. Different types of vegetation show often distinctive variability from one another owing to such parameters as leaf shape and size, overall plant shape, water content, and associated background (e.g., soil types and spacing of the plants (density of vegetative cover within the scene). Different three-dimensional numerical models explicitly represent the vegetation canopy and use numerical methods to calculate reflectance. These models are computationally intensive and are therefore not generally suited to the correction of satellite imagery containing millions of pixels. Physically based models do provide understanding and are potentially more robust in extrapolation. They consider the vegetation canopy to comprise thin layers of leaves, suspended in air like sediment particles in water forming a turbid medium. Monitoring of vegetation cover changes by remote sensing data is one of the most important applications of satellite imagery. Vegetation reflectance has variations with sun zenith angle, view zenith angle, and terrain slope angle. To provide corrections of these effects, for visible and near-infrared light, was used a three parameters model and developed a simple physical model of vegetation reflectance, by assuming homogeneous and closed vegetation canopy with randomly oriented leaves. Multiple scattering theory was used to extend the model to function for both near-infrared and visible light. This vegetation reflectance model may be used to correct satellite imagery for bidirectional and topographic effects. For two ASTER images over Cernica forested area, placed to the East of Bucharest town , Romania, acquired within minutes from one another ,a nadir and off-nadir for band 3

  20. Characterizing the dependence of vegetation model parameters on crop structure, incidence angle, and polarization at L-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneron, J-P.; Pardé, M.; Waldteufel, P.

    2004-01-01

    To retrieve soil moisture over vegetation-covered areas from microwave radiometry, it is necessary to account for vegetation effects. At L-band, many retrieval approaches are based on a simple model that relies on two vegetation parameters: the optical depth (tau) and the single-scattering albedo......, wheat, grass, and alfalfa) based on L-band experimental datasets. The results should be useful for developing more accurate forward modeling and retrieval methods over mixed pixels including a variety of vegetation types....

  1. Effects of independently altering body weight and mass on the energetic cost of a human running model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jeffrey; Seipel, Justin

    2016-03-21

    The mechanisms underlying the metabolic cost of running, and legged locomotion in general, remain to be well understood. Prior experimental studies show that the metabolic cost of human running correlates well with the vertical force generated to support body weight, the mechanical work done, and changes in the effective leg stiffness. Further, previous work shows that the metabolic cost of running decreases with decreasing body weight, increases with increasing body weight and mass, and does not significantly change with changing body mass alone. In the present study, we seek to uncover the basic mechanism underlying this existing experimental data. We find that an actuated spring-mass mechanism representing the effective mechanics of human running provides a mechanistic explanation for the previously reported changes in the metabolic cost of human running if the dimensionless relative leg stiffness (effective stiffness normalized by body weight and leg length) is regulated to be constant. The model presented in this paper provides a mechanical explanation for the changes in metabolic cost due to changing body weight and mass which have been previously measured experimentally and highlights the importance of active leg stiffness regulation during human running.

  2. The importance of volumetric canopy morphology when modelling drag around riparian vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Richard; Hardy, Richard; Warburton, Jeff; Marjoribanks, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    Riparian vegetation has a significant impact on the hydraulic functioning of river systems. The bulk of past work concerned with modelling the influence of vegetation on flow has considered vegetation to be morphologically simple, and has generally neglected the complexity and porosity of natural plants, defined herein as the volumetric canopy morphology. However, the volumetric canopy morphology can influence the mean and turbulent properties of the flow, producing spatially heterogeneous downstream velocity fields. By explicitly accounting for this in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, and representing the plant as a porous blockage, complex flow structures and drag can be modelled. For a riparian species, Hebe odora, good agreement with flume measurements are found. Plant shear layer turbulence is shown to be dominated by Kelvin-Helmholtz and Görtler-type vortices, generated through shear instability. Porous representations of the plants, that allow for flow to pass through the plant canopy interior, are compared against fully impermeable plant representations. Penetration of fluid through the canopy in the porous case resembles 'bleed-flow', and this results in a plant wake region that significantly differs from the impermeable case, which is characteristic of wake flow around a traditional bluff body. These results demonstrate the significant effect that the volumetric canopy morphology and porosity of natural plants has on the three-dimensional flow and in-stream drag, and enables a re-evaluation of vegetative flow resistance. The modelled results allow a species dependent Manning's n to be calculated, and this presents an opportunity to move away from the conventional methods of representing vegetation in hydraulic models, in favour of a more physically determined approach. Given the importance of vegetation in river corridor management, and the increasing application of UAV imagery to map riparian vegetation, the numerical scheme developed here

  3. From terrestrial to aquatic fluxes: Integrating stream dynamics within a dynamic global vegetation modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Jerad; Poulter, Benjamin; Emmett, Kristen; Cross, Molly; Al-Chokhachy, Robert; Maneta, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Integrated terrestrial ecosystem models simulate the dynamics and feedbacks between climate, vegetation, disturbance, and hydrology and are used to better understand biogeography and biogeochemical cycles. Extending dynamic vegetation models to the aquatic interface requires coupling surface and sub-surface runoff to catchment routing schemes and has the potential to enhance how researchers and managers investigate how changes in the environment might impact the availability of water resources for human and natural systems. In an effort towards creating such a coupled model, we developed catchment-based hydrologic routing and stream temperature model to pair with LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic global vegetation model. LPJ-GUESS simulates detailed stand-level vegetation dynamics such as growth, carbon allocation, and mortality, as well as various physical and hydrologic processes such as canopy interception and through-fall, and can be applied at small spatial scales, i.e., 1 km. We demonstrate how the coupled model can be used to investigate the effects of transient vegetation dynamics and CO2 on seasonal and annual stream discharge and temperature regimes. As a direct management application, we extend the modeling framework to predict habitat suitability for fish habitat within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a 200,000 km2 region that provides critical habitat for a range of aquatic species. The model is used to evaluate, quantitatively, the effects of management practices aimed to enhance hydrologic resilience to climate change, and benefits for water storage and fish habitat in the coming century.

  4. Models for calculating phreatic water evaporation on bare and Tamarix-vegetated lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shunjun; TIAN Changyan; SONG Yudong; CHEN Xiaobing; LI Yuetan

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water consumption of natural vegetation in arid regions.It is an effective approach to study ecological water demand of natural vegetation by phreatic evaporation.In order to study the ecological water demand of Tarim river basin, based on the observation data of phreatic evaporation on bare lands at the Aksu Water Balance Experimental station from 1989 to 1996, by analyzing the relationship of phreatic evaporation,depth of phreatic surface and evaporation of water,taking the limit rate of phreatic evaporation as the control condition, and based on the objective law that the relation between phreatic evaporation and evaporation of water is nonlinear, we establish models for calculating phreatic evaporation on bare land,which can fully reflect the law of phreatic evaporation in the Tarim river basin. According to the data of depth of phreatic surface and soil moisture when pheratic level decline is caused just by evapotranspiration on Tamarix-vegetated land from 2003 to 2004, we calculate the amount of phreatic evaporation and set up models for calculating phreatic evaporation on Tamarix- vegetated land. Phreatic evaporation on bare land and Tamarix-vegetated land could be transformed each other by a Tamarix vegetation conversion coefficient. The test results show that the calculation accuracy of the models is high and the models are suitable for Tarim river basin.

  5. Comparison between remote sensing and a dynamic vegetation model for estimating terrestrial primary production of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardö, Jonas

    2015-12-01

    Africa is an important part of the global carbon cycle. It is also a continent facing potential problems due to increasing resource demand in combination with climate change-induced changes in resource supply. Quantifying the pools and fluxes constituting the terrestrial African carbon cycle is a challenge, because of uncertainties in meteorological driver data, lack of validation data, and potentially uncertain representation of important processes in major ecosystems. In this paper, terrestrial primary production estimates derived from remote sensing and a dynamic vegetation model are compared and quantified for major African land cover types. Continental gross primary production estimates derived from remote sensing were higher than corresponding estimates derived from a dynamic vegetation model. However, estimates of continental net primary production from remote sensing were lower than corresponding estimates from the dynamic vegetation model. Variation was found among land cover classes, and the largest differences in gross primary production were found in the evergreen broadleaf forest. Average carbon use efficiency (NPP/GPP) was 0.58 for the vegetation model and 0.46 for the remote sensing method. Validation versus in situ data of aboveground net primary production revealed significant positive relationships for both methods. A combination of the remote sensing method with the dynamic vegetation model did not strongly affect this relationship. Observed significant differences in estimated vegetation productivity may have several causes, including model design and temperature sensitivity. Differences in carbon use efficiency reflect underlying model assumptions. Integrating the realistic process representation of dynamic vegetation models with the high resolution observational strength of remote sensing may support realistic estimation of components of the carbon cycle and enhance resource monitoring, providing suitable validation data is available.

  6. Snow modeling within a multi-layer soil-vegetation-atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, L. E.; Paw U, K. T.; Pyles, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of snow depth, extent, and melt in the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range are critical to estimating the amount of water that will be available for crops during the growing season within California's Central Valley. Numerical simulations utilizing a fourth order turbulent closure transport scheme in a multi-layer soil-vegetation-atmosphere model, Advanced Canopy-Atmosphere-Soil algorithm (ACASA), were used to explore snow model improvements in the physics-based parameterization for the Sierra Nevada Range. A set of alterations were made separately to the existing snowpack model within ACASA focusing on improvements to snow cover simulations on complex terrain slopes and over varying canopy cover. Three winter seasons were simulated; a climatological average, dry, and wet winter. The simulated output from the models are compared to observations to determine which model alterations made the largest improvements to snow simulations.

  7. Characterising Vegetation Canopies by means of optical data and Microwave Scattering models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Iñigo; Gonzalez, Constancio; Ormeño, Santiago; Morillo, Carmen; Garcia-Melendez, Eduardo

    One of the main strengths of active microwave remote sensing, in relation to frequency, is its capacity to penetrate vegetation canopies, and reach the ground surface, so that information about the vegetation and hydrological properties of the surface can be drawn. All this infor-mation is gathered in the so called backscattering coefficient (σ 0 ), and in a vegetated medium, this coefficient reveals important information on the vegetation water content, geometry and/or structure of the canopy elements, above ground biomass, and soil roughness and moisture. In the scope of microwave frequencies, modeling the backscattering coefficient of vegetated terrain, involves taking into account scattering models that simulate the soil surface contribution by means of its physical variables, and the vegetation layer, through the knowledge of its biophys-ical properties. Soil surface scattering models require describing parameters of roughness, like soil profile height displacement standard deviation and correlation length, and moisture, which determines sur-face reflective properties. The knowledge of these parameters, allows to establishing surface scattering models with different validity ranges. Some frequently used models are divided into theoretical and empirical models. The vegetation canopy is usually regarded as a homogeneous, or random layer, at a certain height above terrain surface, and it is used to compute the attenuation through this layer. This requires a geometric generalization of the vegetation layer and its constituents, specifying additionally its electromagnetic properties. The main simulation models are based on Radiative Transfer theory, which allows for different approaches and simplifications. In this sense, somo of these models, can be efficiently adapted to any vegetated medium, and the constituents can by approximated by more general variables like Leaf Area Index (LAI), or Water total Content (WTC) of Vegetation. Moreover, in the microwave region

  8. Recent updates in the aerosol component of the C-IFS model run by ECMWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Hauglustaine, Didier; Kipling, Zak; Flemming, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    The Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS) is a global atmospheric composition forecasting tool, run by ECMWF within the framework of the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service (CAMS). The aerosol model of C-IFS is a simple bulk scheme that forecasts 5 species: dust, sea-salt, black carbon, organic matter and sulfate. Three bins represent the dust and sea-salt, for the super-coarse, coarse and fine mode of these species (Morcrette et al., 2009). This talk will present recent updates of the aerosol model, and also introduce forthcoming developments. It will also present the impact of these changes as measured scores against AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Airbase PM10 observations. The next cycle of C-IFS will include a mass fixer, because the semi-Lagrangian advection scheme used in C-IFS is not mass-conservative. C-IFS now offers the possibility to emit biomass-burning aerosols at an injection height that is provided by a new version of the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS). Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production will be scaled on non-biomass burning CO fluxes. This approach allows to represent the anthropogenic contribution to SOA production; it brought a notable improvement in the skill of the model, especially over Europe. Lastly, the emissions of SO2 are now provided by the MACCity inventory instead of and older version of the EDGAR dataset. The seasonal and yearly variability of SO2 emissions are better captured by the MACCity dataset. Upcoming developments of the aerosol model of C-IFS consist mainly in the implementation of a nitrate and ammonium module, with 2 bins (fine and coarse) for nitrate. Nitrate and ammonium sulfate particle formation from gaseous precursors is represented following Hauglustaine et al. (2014); formation of coarse nitrate over pre-existing sea-salt or dust particles is also represented. This extension of the forward model improved scores over heavily populated areas such as Europe, China and Eastern

  9. Simulation modeling of vegetation effects on [sup 222]Rn transport into basements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The author developed a model of [sup 222]Rn transport through soils and into experimental basements. The model was based on current theories and data from the Radon Project experimental basements at Colorado State University were used to calibrate it to that site. Uncertainty analysis of the model showed that model predictions of indoor [sup 222]Rn concentrations come from a distribution having a CV of no greater than 0.25. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicated that the dry bulk density, the [sup 226]Ra concentration of the soil and the effective permeability of the basement wall are, perhaps, the most important parameters in the model for determining a set of output. The effective diffusion coefficient of the basement wall is also important. The model was perturbed in manners consistent with three expected mechanisms, and their combination, by which vegetation might influence indoor [sup 222]Rn concentration. The presence of vegetation, acting by any mechanism, reduces indoor [sup 222]Rn concentration. Vegetation also influences the pattern in time of indoor [sup 222]Rn. In general, indoor [sup 222]Rn concentrations tend to follow surface soil moisture, with variability added to the trend by the wind speed. This pattern was modified, however, by vegetation action. Based on these results, I developed a set of predictions which can be tested by experiment at the Radon Project experimental basements to determine which of the hypothesized mechanisms of vegetation action is supported.

  10. Investigation of North American vegetation variability under recent climate: A study using the SSiB4/TRIFFID biophysical/dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengqiu; Xue, Yongkang; MacDonald, Glen; Cox, Peter M.; Collatz, G. James

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that current dynamic vegetation models have serious weaknesses in reproducing the observed vegetation dynamics and contribute to bias in climate simulations. This study intends to identify the major factors that underlie the connections between vegetation dynamics and climate variability and investigates vegetation spatial distribution and temporal variability at seasonal to decadal scales over North America (NA) to assess a 2-D biophysical model/dynamic vegetation model's (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model version 4, coupled with the Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics Model (SSiB4/TRIFFID)) ability to simulate these characteristics for the past 60 years (1948 through 2008). Satellite data are employed as constraints for the study and to compare the relationships between vegetation and climate from the observational and the simulation data sets. Trends in NA vegetation over this period are examined. The optimum temperature for photosynthesis, leaf drop threshold temperatures, and competition coefficients in the Lotka-Volterra equation, which describes the population dynamics of species competing for some common resource, have been identified as having major impacts on vegetation spatial distribution and obtaining proper initial vegetation conditions in SSiB4/TRIFFID. The finding that vegetation competition coefficients significantly affect vegetation distribution suggests the importance of including biotic effects in dynamical vegetation modeling. The improved SSiB4/TRIFFID can reproduce the main features of the NA distributions of dominant vegetation types, the vegetation fraction, and leaf area index (LAI), including its seasonal, interannual, and decadal variabilities. The simulated NA LAI also shows a general increasing trend after the 1970s in responding to warming. Both simulation and satellite observations reveal that LAI increased substantially in the southeastern U.S. starting from the 1980

  11. Development of JPSS VIIRS Global Gridded Vegetation Index products for NOAA NCEP Environmental Modeling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Marco; Miura, Tomoaki; Csiszar, Ivan; Zheng, Weizhong; Wu, Yihua; Ek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The first Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) mission, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, was successfully launched in October, 2011, and it will be followed by JPSS-1, slated for launch in 2017. JPSS provides operational continuity of satellite-based observations and products for NOAA's Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Vegetation products derived from satellite measurements are used for weather forecasting, land modeling, climate research, and monitoring the environment including drought, the health of ecosystems, crop monitoring and forest fires. The operationally produced S-NPP VIIRS Vegetation Index (VI) Environmental Data Record (EDR) includes two vegetation indices: the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and the Top of the Canopy (TOC) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). For JPSS-1, the S-NPP Vegetation Index EDR algorithm has been updated to include the TOC NDV. The current JPSS operational VI products are generated in granule style at 375 meter resolution at nadir, but these products in granule format cannot be ingested into NOAA operational monitoring and decision making systems. For that reason, the NOAA JPSS Land Team is developing a new global gridded Vegetation Index (VI) product suite for operational use by the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The new global gridded VIs will be used in the Multi-Physics (MP) version of the Noah land surface model (Noah-MP) in NCEP NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) for plant growth and data assimilation and to describe vegetation coverage and density in order to model the correct surface energy partition. The new VI 4km resolution global gridded products (TOA NDVI, TOC NDVI and TOC EVI) are being designed to meet the needs of directly ingesting vegetation index variables without the need to develop local gridding and compositing procedures. These VI products will be consistent with the already

  12. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  13. Quantitative assessment of changes in landslide risk using a regional scale run-out model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Haydar; Chen, Lixia; Ciurean, Roxana; van Westen, Cees; Reichenbach, Paola; Sterlacchini, Simone

    2015-04-01

    The risk of landslide hazard continuously changes in time and space and is rarely a static or constant phenomena in an affected area. However one of the main challenges of quantitatively assessing changes in landslide risk is the availability of multi-temporal data for the different components of risk. Furthermore, a truly "quantitative" landslide risk analysis requires the modeling of the landslide intensity (e.g. flow depth, velocities or impact pressures) affecting the elements at risk. Such a quantitative approach is often lacking in medium to regional scale studies in the scientific literature or is left out altogether. In this research we modelled the temporal and spatial changes of debris flow risk in a narrow alpine valley in the North Eastern Italian Alps. The debris flow inventory from 1996 to 2011 and multi-temporal digital elevation models (DEMs) were used to assess the susceptibility of debris flow triggering areas and to simulate debris flow run-out using the Flow-R regional scale model. In order to determine debris flow intensities, we used a linear relationship that was found between back calibrated physically based Flo-2D simulations (local scale models of five debris flows from 2003) and the probability values of the Flow-R software. This gave us the possibility to assign flow depth to a total of 10 separate classes on a regional scale. Debris flow vulnerability curves from the literature and one curve specifically for our case study area were used to determine the damage for different material and building types associated with the elements at risk. The building values were obtained from the Italian Revenue Agency (Agenzia delle Entrate) and were classified per cadastral zone according to the Real Estate Observatory data (Osservatorio del Mercato Immobiliare, Agenzia Entrate - OMI). The minimum and maximum market value for each building was obtained by multiplying the corresponding land-use value (€/msq) with building area and number of floors

  14. Using a LIDAR Vegetation Model to Predict UHF SAR Attenuation in Coniferous Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Alan; Huang, Shengli; Crabtree, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Attenuation of radar signals by vegetation can be a problem for target detection and GPS reception, and is an important parameter in models describing vegetation backscatter. Here we first present a model describing the 3D distribution of stem and foliage structure based on small footprint scanning LIDAR data. Secondly we present a model that uses ray-tracing methodology to record detailed interactions between simulated radar beams and vegetation components. These interactions are combined over the SAR aperture and used to predict two-way attenuation of the SAR signal. Accuracy of the model is demonstrated using UHF SAR observations of large trihedral corner reflectors in coniferous forest stands. Our study showed that the model explains between 66% and 81% of the variability in observed attenuation.

  15. Investigation of North American Vegetation Variability under Recent Climate: A Study Using the SSiB4/TRIFFID Biophysical/Dynamic Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengqiu; Xue, Yongkang; MacDonald, Glen; Cox, Peter M.; Collatz, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that current dynamic vegetation models have serious weaknesses in reproducing the observed vegetation dynamics and contribute to bias in climate simulations. This study intends to identify the major factors that underlie the connections between vegetation dynamics and climate variability and investigates vegetation spatial distribution and temporal variability at seasonal to decadal scales over North America (NA) to assess a 2-D biophysical model/dynamic vegetation model's (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model version 4, coupled with the Top-down Representation of Interactive Foliage and Flora Including Dynamics Model (SSiB4/TRIFFID)) ability to simulate these characteristics for the past 60 years (1948 through 2008). Satellite data are employed as constraints for the study and to compare the relationships between vegetation and climate from the observational and the simulation data sets. Trends in NA vegetation over this period are examined. The optimum temperature for photosynthesis, leaf drop threshold temperatures, and competition coefficients in the Lotka-Volterra equation, which describes the population dynamics of species competing for some common resource, have been identified as having major impacts on vegetation spatial distribution and obtaining proper initial vegetation conditions in SSiB4/TRIFFID. The finding that vegetation competition coefficients significantly affect vegetation distribution suggests the importance of including biotic effects in dynamical vegetation modeling. The improved SSiB4/TRIFFID can reproduce the main features of the NA distributions of dominant vegetation types, the vegetation fraction, and leaf area index (LAI), including its seasonal, interannual, and decadal variabilities. The simulated NA LAI also shows a general increasing trend after the 1970s in responding to warming. Both simulation and satellite observations reveal that LAI increased substantially in the southeastern U.S. starting from the 1980

  16. Multiple-step model-experiment matching allows precise definition of dynamical leg parameters in human running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, C; Grimmer, S; Seyfarth, A; Maus, H-M

    2012-09-21

    The spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model is a well established model for describing bouncy gaits like human running. The notion of spring-like leg behavior has led many researchers to compute the corresponding parameters, predominantly stiffness, in various experimental setups and in various ways. However, different methods yield different results, making the comparison between studies difficult. Further, a model simulation with experimentally obtained leg parameters typically results in comparatively large differences between model and experimental center of mass trajectories. Here, we pursue the opposite approach which is calculating model parameters that allow reproduction of an experimental sequence of steps. In addition, to capture energy fluctuations, an extension of the SLIP (ESLIP) is required and presented. The excellent match of the models with the experiment validates the description of human running by the SLIP with the obtained parameters which we hence call dynamical leg parameters.

  17. Stressed deserts: A new vegetation/sediment-transport model for dryland environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Bailey, Richard; Wiggs, Giles

    2016-04-01

    In many drylands, vegetation is patchy and dynamic through time and space, with complex ecohydrological feedbacks and plant-plant interactions leading to the emergence of characteristic vegetation patterning. There is increasing evidence that information from the patterns themselves can be used as indicators of a dryland system's proximity to collapse. However, current models simulating the evolution of these vegetation patterns do not account for their effects on wind flow and on the entrainment, transport and redistribution of wind-blown material. Significant uncertainty therefore remains about how these vulnerable landscapes will react to increasing climate forcing and land-use pressure over the 21st century and beyond. We present the coupled Vegetation and Sediment TrAnsport model (ViSTA), a new, multi-scale cellular automaton model designed to simulate transport in vegetated dryland contexts. The model is parameterised using empirical data collected during a field campaign in Namibia that sought to investigate the impact of desert vegetation on wind speed and turbulence at the surface. A new turbulence-based model for aeolian transport is also used to drive the movement of sediment within ViSTA. We show that this coupled approach allows for realistic simulations of dynamics at both the bedform and landscape scale. It is especially important to understand the geomorphological responses of vegetated semi-arid landscapes to a variety of simulated stresses, since these regions are often heavily used for pastoralism, agriculture and habitation. In characterising possible transition scenarios between patterned and desert states, the ViSTA model therefore represents a powerful tool that has direct relevance to land management policies in highly vulnerable environments.

  18. Next generation dynamic global vegetation models: learning from community ecology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, S.; Higgins, S.; Langan, L.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models are a powerful tool to project past, current and future vegetation patterns and the associated biogeochemical cycles. However, most models are limited by their representation of vegetation by using static and pre-defined plant functional types and by their simplistic representation of competition. We discuss how concepts from community assembly theory and coexistence theory can help to improve dynamic vegetation models. We present a trait- and individual-based dynamic vegetation model, the aDGVM2, that allows individual plants to adopt a unique combination of trait values. These traits define how individual plants grow, compete and reproduce under the given biotic and abiotic conditions. A genetic optimization algorithm is used to simulate trait inheritance and reproductive isolation between individuals. These model properties allow the assembly of plant communities that are adapted to biotic and abiotic conditions. We show (1) that the aDGVM2 can simulate coarse vegetation patterns in Africa, (2) that changes in the environmental conditions and disturbances strongly influence trait diversity and the assembled plant communities by influencing traits such as leaf phenology and carbon allocation patterns of individual plants and (3) that communities do not necessarily return to the initial state when environmental conditions return to the initial state. The aDGVM2 deals with functional diversity and competition fundamentally differently from current models and allows novel insights as to how vegetation may respond to climate change. We believe that the aDGVM2 approach could foster collaborations between research communities that focus on functional plant ecology, plant competition, plant physiology and Earth system science.

  19. Modelling and Investigating Dune Transformations Driven by Vegetation and Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Despite growing perception of the significant role of vegetation in shaping distinct landscapes in aeolian systems, the complex eco-geomorphic interrelationships between vegetation and dune landforms are not well understood. Projections of future climatic change, meanwhile, in particular increased temperature and drought severity, raise concerns that widespread aeolian activity may intensify as a result of semi-stabilised dunes transforming to highly mobile forms. Computer modelling of aeolian landscapes and sand transport processes has been in wide use in the past decade, due to its capability of bridging the gap between different temporal and spatial scales. Numerical simulations serve as an important tool to investigate and explore theoretical foundations underlying distinctive landscape patterns and their response to perturbations arising from both natural and anthropogenic impacts. This research focuses on modelling and understanding the transformation of a semi-fixed parabolic dunefield with shrubs and nebkhas into a highly mobile barchanoid dunefield, and tries to clarify the fundamental mechanisms underlying dunefield reactivation and transformation driven by vegetation and environmental change in Inner Mongolia, China. Vegetation distribution and topography maps of a number of parabolic dunes on the Ordos Plateau were acquired using quadrat surveys and d-GPS. Sampling transects were established along longitudinal sections, cross sections and lee slopes. Historical trajectories of vegetation and morphologic change of two active parabolic dunes were determined by analysing three satellite RS images in 2005, 2007 and 2010. Vegetation density maps and potential sand transport rates were estimated by combining the DEM acquired from the field and the migration rate determined from the remote sensing image interpretation. Based on this fieldwork investigation, remote sensing image interpretation, and local climatic context analysis, the DECAL (Discrete Eco

  20. Impact of Spin-up Forcing on Vegetation States Simulated by a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model Coupledwith a Land Surface Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang; ZENG Xiaodong; SONG Xiang; TIAN Dongxiao; SHAO Pu; ZHANG Dongling

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) coupled with a land surface model (LSM) is generally initialized using a spin-up process to derive a physically-consistent initial condition. Spin-up forcing, which is the atmospheric forcing used to drive the coupled model to equilibrium solutions in the spin-up process,varies across earlier studies. In the present study, the impact of the spin-up forcing in the initialization stage on the fractional coverages (FCs) of plant functional type (PFT) in the subsequent simulation stage are assessed in seven classic climate regions by a modified Community Land Model's Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM). Results show that the impact of spin-up forcing is considerable in all regions except the tropical rainforest climate region (TR) and the wet temperate climate region (WM). In the tropical monsoon climate region (TM), the TR and TM transition region (TR-TM), the dry temperate climate region (DM), the highland climate region (H), and the boreal forest climate region (BF), where FCs are affected by climate non-negligibly, the discrepancies in initial FCs, which represent long-term cumulative response of vegetation to different climate anomalies, are large. Moreover, the large discrepancies in initial FCs usually decay slowly because there are trees or shrubs in the five regions. The intrinsic growth timescales of FCs for tree PFTs and shrub PFTs are long, and the variation of FCs of tree PFTs or shrub PFTs can affect that of grass PFTs.

  1. Long-term running alleviates some behavioral and molecular abnormalities in Down syndrome mouse model Ts65Dn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Elizabeth; Rabe, Ausma; Walus, Marius; Albertini, Giorgio; Golabek, Adam A

    2013-02-01

    Running may affect the mood, behavior and neurochemistry of running animals. In the present study, we investigated whether voluntary daily running, sustained over several months, might improve cognition and motor function and modify the brain levels of selected proteins (SOD1, DYRK1A, MAP2, APP and synaptophysin) in Ts65Dn mice, a mouse model for Down syndrome (DS). Ts65Dn and age-matched wild-type mice, all females, had free access to a running wheel either from the time of weaning (post-weaning cohort) or from around 7 months of age (adult cohort). Sedentary female mice were housed in similar cages, without running wheels. Behavioral testing and evaluation of motor performance showed that running improved cognitive function and motor skills in Ts65Dn mice. However, while a dramatic improvement in the locomotor functions and learning of motor skills was observed in Ts65Dn mice from both post-weaning and adult cohorts, improved object memory was seen only in Ts65Dn mice that had free access to the wheel from weaning. The total levels of APP and MAP2ab were reduced and the levels of SOD1 were increased in the runners from the post-weaning cohort, while only the levels of MAP2ab and α-cleaved C-terminal fragments of APP were reduced in the adult group in comparison with sedentary trisomic mice. Hence, our study demonstrates that Ts65Dn females benefit from sustained voluntary physical exercise, more prominently if running starts early in life, providing further support to the idea that a properly designed physical exercise program could be a valuable adjuvant to future pharmacotherapy for DS.

  2. A simple running model with rolling contact and its role as a template for dynamic locomotion on a hexapod robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jung; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2014-10-07

    We report on the development of a robot's dynamic locomotion based on a template which fits the robot's natural dynamics. The developed template is a low degree-of-freedom planar model for running with rolling contact, which we call rolling spring loaded inverted pendulum (R-SLIP). Originating from a reduced-order model of the RHex-style robot with compliant circular legs, the R-SLIP model also acts as the template for general dynamic running. The model has a torsional spring and a large circular arc as the distributed foot, so during locomotion it rolls on the ground with varied equivalent linear stiffness. This differs from the well-known spring loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model with fixed stiffness and ground contact points. Through dimensionless steps-to-fall and return map analysis, within a wide range of parameter spaces, the R-SLIP model is revealed to have self-stable gaits and a larger stability region than that of the SLIP model. The R-SLIP model is then embedded as the reduced-order 'template' in a more complex 'anchor', the RHex-style robot, via various mapping definitions between the template and the anchor. Experimental validation confirms that by merely deploying the stable running gaits of the R-SLIP model on the empirical robot with simple open-loop control strategy, the robot can easily initiate its dynamic running behaviors with a flight phase and can move with similar body state profiles to those of the model, in all five testing speeds. The robot, embedded with the SLIP model but performing walking locomotion, further confirms the importance of finding an adequate template of the robot for dynamic locomotion.

  3. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Daniel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). et al.

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  4. An integrated model to assess critical rain fall thresholds for the critical run-out distances of debris flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asch, Th.W.J.; Tang, C.; Alkema, D.; Zhu, J.; Zhou, W.

    2013-01-01

    A dramatic increase in debris flows occurred in the years after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in SW China due to the deposition of loose co-seismic landslide material. This paper proposes a preliminary integrated model, which describes the relationship between rain input and debris flow run-out in or

  5. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  6. Convergent Validity of the One-Mile Run and PACER VO2MAX Prediction Models in Middle School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D. Burns

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available FITNESSGRAM uses an equating method to convert Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER laps to One-mile run/walk (1MRW times to estimate aerobic fitness (VO2MAX in children. However, other prediction models can more directly estimate VO2MAX from PACER performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the convergent validity and relative accuracy between 1MRW and various PACER models for predicting VO2MAX in middle school students. Aerobic fitness was assessed on 134 students utilizing the 1MRW and PACER on separate testing days. Pearson correlations, Bland–Altman plots, kappa statistics, proportion of agreement, and prediction error were used to assess associations and agreement among models. Correlation coefficients were strong (r ≥ .80, p .40 and agreement > .90. The results support that PACER models contain convergent validity and strong relative accuracy with the 1MRW model.

  7. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions.

  8. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  9. Data-based modelling and environmental sensitivity of vegetation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A process-oriented niche specification (PONS model was constructed to quantify climatic controls on the distribution of ecosystems, based on the vegetation map of China. PONS uses general hypotheses about bioclimatic controls to provide a "bridge" between statistical niche models and more complex process-based models. Canonical correspondence analysis provided an overview of relationships between the abundances of 55 plant communities in 0.1° grid cells and associated mean values of 20 predictor variables. Of these, GDD (accumulated degree days above 0 °C Cramer–Prentice α (an estimate of the ratio of actual to equilibrium evapotranspiration and mGDD5 (mean temperature during the period above 5 °C showed the greatest predictive power. These three variables were used to develop generalized linear models for the probability of occurrence of 16 vegetation classes, aggregated from the original 55 types by k-means clustering according to bioclimatic similarity. Each class was hypothesized to possess a unimodal relationship to each bioclimate variable, independently of the other variables. A simple calibration was used to generate vegetation maps from the predicted probabilities of the classes. Modelled and observed vegetation maps showed good to excellent agreement (κ = 0.745. A sensitivity study examined modelled responses of vegetation distribution to spatially uniform changes in temperature, precipitation and [CO2], the latter included via an offset to α (based on an independent, data-based light use efficiency model for forest net primary production. Warming shifted the boundaries of most vegetation classes northward and westward while temperate steppe and desert replaced alpine tundra and steppe in the southeast of the Tibetan Plateau. Increased precipitation expanded mesic vegetation at the expense of xeric vegetation. The effect of [CO2] doubling was roughly equivalent to increasing precipitation

  10. Influence of vegetation dynamic modeling on the allocation of green and blue waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Guiomar; Francés, Félix

    2015-04-01

    The long history of the Mediterranean region is dominated by the interactions and co-evolution between man and its natural environment. It is important to consider that the Mediterranean region is recurrently or permanently confronted with the scarcity of the water. The issue of climate change is (and will be) aggravating this situation. This raises the question of a loss of services that ecosystems provide to human and also the amount of available water to be used by vegetation. The question of the water cycle, therefore, should be considered in an integrated manner by taking into account both blue water (water in liquid form used for the human needs or which flows into the oceans) and green water (water having the vapor for resulting from evaporation and transpiration processes). In spite of this, traditionally, very few hydrological models have incorporated the vegetation dynamic as a state variable. In fact, most of them are able to represent fairly well the observed discharge, but usually including the vegetation as a static parameter. However, in the last decade, the number of hydrological models which explicitly take into account the vegetation development as a state variable has increased substantially. In this work, we want to analyze if it is really necessary to use a dynamic vegetation model to quantify adequately the distribution of water into blue and green water. The study site is located in the Public Forest Monte de la Hunde y Palomeras (Spain). The vegetation in the study area is dominated by Aleppo pine of high tree density with scant presence of other species. Two different daily models were applied (with static and dynamic vegetation representation respectively) in three different scenarios: dry year (2005), normal year (2008) and wet year (2010). The static vegetation model simulates the evapotranspiration considering the vegetation as a stationary parameter. Contrarily, the dynamic vegetation model connects the hydrological model with a

  11. On the duality between long-run relations and common trends in the I(1) versus I(2) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina

    1994-01-01

    Long-run relations and common trends are discussed in terms of the multivariate cointegration model given in the autoregressive and the moving average form. The basic results needed for the analysis of I(1) and 1(2)processes are reviewed and the results applied to Danish monetary data. The test p......, "excess money" is estimated and its effect on the other determinants of the system is investigated. In particular, it is found that "excess money" has no effect on price inflation...... procedures reveal that nominal money stock is essentially I(2). Long-run price homogeneity is supported by the data and imposed on the system. It is found that the bond rate is weakly exogenous for the long-run parameters and therefore act as a driving trend. Using the nonstationarity property of the data...

  12. Projected vegetation changes for the American Southwest: combined dynamic modeling and bioclimatic-envelope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, Michael; Mauss, Adrien; Williams, John W

    2012-06-01

    This study focuses on potential impacts of 21st century climate change on vegetation in the Southwest United States, based on debiased and interpolated climate projections from 17 global climate models used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Among these models a warming trend is universal, but projected changes in precipitation vary in sign and magnitude. Two independent methods are applied: a dynamic global vegetation model to assess changes in plant functional types and bioclimatic envelope modeling to assess changes in individual tree and shrub species and biodiversity. The former approach investigates broad responses of plant functional types to climate change, while considering competition, disturbances, and carbon fertilization, while the latter approach focuses on the response of individual plant species, and net biodiversity, to climate change. The dynamic model simulates a region-wide reduction in vegetation cover during the 21st century, with a partial replacement of evergreen trees with grasses in the mountains of Colorado and Utah, except at the highest elevations, where tree cover increases. Across southern Arizona, central New Mexico, and eastern Colorado, grass cover declines, in some cases abruptly. Due to the prevalent warming trend among all 17 climate models, vegetation cover declines in the 21st century, with the greatest vegetation losses associated with models that project a drying trend. The inclusion of the carbon fertilization effect largely ameliorates the projected vegetation loss. Based on bioclimatic envelope modeling for the 21st century, the number of tree and shrub species that are expected to experience robust declines in range likely outweighs the number of species that are expected to expand in range. Dramatic shifts in plant species richness are projected, with declines in the high-elevation evergreen forests, increases in the eastern New Mexico prairies, and a northward shift of the

  13. Representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon in the JULES Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhavali, Mahdi; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Guenet, Bertrand; Ciais, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Current global models of the carbon cycle consider only vertical gas exchanges between terrestrial or oceanic reservoirs and the atmosphere, hence not considering lateral transport of carbon from the continent to the oceans. This also means that such models implicitly consider that all the CO2 which is not respired to the atmosphere is stored on land, hence overestimating the land sink of carbon. Moving toward a boundless carbon cycle that is integrating the whole continuum from land to ocean to atmosphere is needed in order to better understand Earth's carbon cycle and to make more reliable projection of its future. Here we present an original representation of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) processes in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). The standard version of JULES represent energy, water and carbon cycles and exchanges with the atmosphere, but only account for water run-off, not including export of carbon from terrestrial ecosystems to the aquatic environments. The aim of the project is to include in JULES a representation of DOC production in terrestrial soils, due to incomplete decomposition of organic matter, its decomposition to the atmosphere, and its export to the river network by leaching. In new developed version of JULES (JULES-DOCM), DOC pools, based on their decomposition rate, are classified into labile and recalcitrant within 3 meters of soil. Based on turnover rate, DOC coming from plant material pools and microbial biomass is directed to labile pool, while DOC from humus is directed to recalcitrant pool. Both of these pools have free (dissolved) and locked (adsorbed) form where just the free pool is subjected to decomposition and leaching. DOC production and decomposition are controlled by rate modifiers (moisture, temperature, vegetation fraction and decomposition rate) at each soil layer. Decomposed DOC is released to the atmosphere following a fixed carbon use efficiency. Leaching accounts for both surface (runoff) and

  14. Modelling spatial and temporal vegetation variability with the Climate Constrained Vegetation Index: evidence of CO2 fertilisation and of water stress in continental interiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Los

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A model was developed to simulate spatial, seasonal and interannual variations in vegetation in response to temperature, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations; the model addresses shortcomings in current implementations. The model uses the minimum of 12 temperature and precipitation constraint functions to simulate NDVI. Functions vary based on the Köppen–Trewartha climate classification to take adaptations of vegetation to climate into account. The simulated NDVI, referred to as the climate constrained vegetation index (CCVI, captured the spatial variability (0.82 r r = 0.83 and interannual variability (median global r = 0.24 in NDVI. The CCVI simulated the effects of adverse climate on vegetation during the 1984 drought in the Sahel and during dust bowls of the 1930s and 1950s in the Great Plains in North America. A global CO2 fertilisation effect was found in NDVI data, similar in magnitude to that of earlier estimates (8 % for the 20th century. This effect increased linearly with simple ratio, a transformation of the NDVI. Three CCVI scenarios, based on climate simulations using the representative concentration pathway RCP4.5, showed a greater sensitivity of vegetation towards precipitation in Northern Hemisphere mid latitudes than is currently implemented in climate models. This higher sensitivity is of importance to assess the impact of climate variability on vegetation, in particular on agricultural productivity.

  15. Holocene vegetation and biomass changes on the Tibetan Plateau – a model-pollen data comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dallmeyer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Results of a transient numerical experiment, performed in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation model with orbital forcing alone, are compared to pollen-based vegetation reconstructions from four representative sites on the Tibetan Plateau, covering the last 6000 years. Causes of the vegetation change and consequences for the biomass storage are analysed.

    In general, simulated and reconstructed vegetation trends at each site are in good agreement. Both methods reveal a general retreat of the biomass-rich vegetation that is particularly manifested in a strong decrease of forests. However, model and reconstructions differ with regard to the climatic factors causing this vegetation change. The reconstructions primarily identify decreasing summer monsoon precipitation as the responsible mechanism for the vegetation shift. In the model, the land cover change originates from differences in near-surface air temperature arising out of orbitally-induced insolation changes.

    According to the model results, the averaged forest fraction on the Plateau is shrinking by almost one-third from mid-Holocene (41.4% to present-day (28.3%. Shrubs, whose fraction is quadrupled at present-day (12.3%, replace most of this forest. Gras fraction increases from 38.9% during the mid-Holocene to 42.3% at present-day. This land cover change results in a decrease of living biomass by 0.62 kgC m−2. Total biomass on the Tibetan Plateau decreases by 1.9 kgC m−2, i.e. approx. 6.64 PgC are released due to the natural land cover change.

  16. Holocene vegetation and biomass changes on the Tibetan Plateau – a model-pollen data comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dallmeyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of a transient numerical experiment performed in a coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation model with orbital forcing alone are compared to pollen-based vegetation reconstructions covering the last 6000 yr from four representative sites on the Tibetan Plateau. Causes of the vegetation change and consequences of the biomass storage are analysed.

    In general, simulated and reconstructed vegetation trends at each site are in good agreement. Both methods reveal a general retreat of the biomass-rich vegetation that is particularly manifested in a strong decrease of forests. However, model and reconstructions often differ with regard to the climatic factors causing the vegetation change at each site. The reconstructions primarily identify decreasing summer monsoon precipitation and changes in the temperature of the warm season as the responsible mechanisms for the vegetation shift. In the model, the land cover change mainly originates from differences in warm/cold seasonal temperatures and only to a lesser extent from precipitation changes.

    According to the model results, the averaged forest fraction on the Plateau shrinks by almost one-third from mid-Holocene (41.4 % to present-day (28.3 %. Shrubs, whose fraction is quadrupled at present-day (12.3 %, replace most of this forest. Grass fraction increases from 38.1 % during the mid-Holocene to 42.3 % at present-day. This land cover change results in a decrease of living biomass by 0.62 kgC m−2. Total biomass on the Tibetan Plateau decreases by 1.9 kgC m−2, i.e. approx. 6.64 PgC are released due to the natural land cover change.

  17. Fire emissions simulated by prescribing burned area observations in a global vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Wilkenskjeld, Stiig; Kloster, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of trace gases and aerosols from large vegetation fires into the atmosphere have an important climate impact. In this study we integrate observed burned area into a global vegetation model to derive global fire emissions. A global continuous burned area products provided by GFED (Global Fire Emissions Dataset) were obtained from MODIS (and pre-MODIS) satellites and are available for the time period 1997-2011. We integrate the global burned area product into the global vegetation model JSBACH, a land part of the Earth-System model developed at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology. JSBACH simulates land biomass in terms of carbon, which can be combined with the satellite burned area information to derive fire carbon emissions. Some assumptions on fire fuel consumptions have to be made during the integration of satellite burned area into the JSBACH. This includes processes such as tree mortality and combustion completeness, i.e. how much of the vegetation biomass gets combusted during a fire. Partially, this information can be also obtained from measurements. In this study we follow closely the approach of GFED, incorporating also GFED supplemental information, to simulate fuel consumption in JSBACH. And we compare simulated by this approach fire carbon emissions with the fire emissions from GFED. Global vegetation models often use prescribed land cover maps. The simulated in the JSBACH vegetation biomass and thus the simulated fire carbon emissions critically depend on the land cover distribution. In our study we derive fire carbon emissions using two different land cover parameterizations, based on two different satellite datasets. We will present the results obtained from simulations using the JSBACH standard MODIS based vegetation distribution and compare them to the results derived using the recently released ESA CCI land cover satellite product to demonstrate the sensitivity of simulated fire carbon emissions to the underlying land cover

  18. Predicting the impact of water demand and river flow regulation over riparian vegetation through mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Arias, A.; Pons, C.; Frances, F.

    2013-12-01

    The vegetation of the riversides is a main part of the complex riparian ecosystems and has an important role maintaining the fluvial ecosystems. Biotic and abiotic interactions between the river and the riverbank are essential for the subsistence and the development of both ecosystems. In semi-arid Mediterranean areas, the riparian vegetation growth and distribution is especially controlled by the water accessibility, determining the limit between the lush riparian bands and the sparse upland. Human intervention can alter the river hydrology determining the riparian vegetation wellbeing and its distribution and, in consequence, affecting both riparian and fluvial ecosystems. Predictive models are necessary decision support tools for adequate river management and restoration initiatives. In this context, the RibAV model is useful to predict the impact of water demand and river flow regulation on the riparian vegetation. RibAV is able to reproduce the vegetation performance on the riverside allowing the scenarios analysis in terms of vegetation distribution and wellbeing. In this research several flow regulation and water demand scenarios are proposed and the impacts over three plant functional types (PFTs) are analyzed. The PFTs group the herbaceous riparian plants, the woody riparian plants and the terrestrial vegetation. The study site is the Terde reach at the Mijares River, a 539m length reach located in a semi-arid Mediterranean area in Spain. The scenarios represent river flow alterations required to attend different human demands. These demands encompass different seasonality, magnitude and location. The seasonality is represented as hydroelectric (constant all over the year), urban (increased during the summer period) and agricultural demands (monthly seasonality). The magnitude is varied considering the 20%, the 40% and the 80% of the mean daily flow. Two locations are considered, upstream or downstream the study site. To attend the demands located

  19. DYNAMICS OF CHANGES IN VEGETATION OF A MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz H. Dyguś

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the evaluation of the reclamation efficiencyon coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge. Based on multiannual studies, the dynamics of changes in vegetation in the performed experiment have been shown. The firstphase of the experiment concerning the reclamation efficiencyof the employed fertilizers was carried out from 2006 to 2007. The second phase was carried out between 2011 and 2012. In order to show a broader spectrum of dynamics of changes in vegetation, the floristicobservation was repeated in 2013 and this paper is the presentation of its outcome. Based on the observation (2011–2013 and its results it was found that apart from plants cultivated in experimental containers also a self-sown florahas had a significantcontribution in shap-ing the vegetation cover. The results of floristic and ecological research have proven that composts and sewage sludge constitute a favorable environment for the development of spontaneous vegetation cover on coal combustion waste deposits. Based on the evaluation of the vegetation cover level in particular models it was shown that models with Complex composts (kC and Radiowo ones (kRa as well as the model with sewage sludge have pre-sented the highest reclamation efficienc. The lowest efficiencyhas been shown in models with ZUSOK composts (kZ and the plant ones (kr. The conclusions have highlighted the share of ecological, systematic and syntaxonomic plant groups in the process of reclamation of combustion waste deposits.

  20. Modeling mechanisms of vegetation change due to fire in a semi-arid ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.D.; Gutzwiller, K.J.; Barrow, W.C.; Randall, L.J.; Swint, P.

    2008-01-01

    Vegetation growth and community composition in semi-arid environments is determined by water availability and carbon assimilation mechanisms specific to different plant types. Disturbance also impacts vegetation productivity and composition dependent on area affected, intensity, and frequency factors. In this study, a new spatially explicit ecosystem model is presented for the purpose of simulating vegetation cover type changes associated with fire disturbance in the northern Chihuahuan Desert region. The model is called the Landscape and Fire Simulator (LAFS) and represents physiological activity of six functional plant types incorporating site climate, fire, and seed dispersal routines for individual grid cells. We applied this model for Big Bend National Park, Texas, by assessing the impact of wildfire on the trajectory of vegetation communities over time. The model was initialized and calibrated based on landcover maps derived from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper data acquired in 1986 and 1999 coupled with plant biomass measurements collected in the field during 2000. Initial vegetation cover change analysis from satellite data showed shrub encroachment during this time period that was captured in the simulated results. A synthetic 50-year climate record was derived from historical meteorological data to assess system response based on initial landcover conditions. This simulation showed that shrublands increased to the detriment of grass and yucca-ocotillo vegetation cover types indicating an ecosystem-level trajectory for shrub encroachment. Our analysis of simulated fires also showed that fires significantly reduced site biomass components including leaf area, stem, and seed biomass in this semi-arid ecosystem. In contrast to other landscape simulation models, this new model incorporates detailed physiological responses of functional plant types that will allow us to simulated the impact of increased atmospheric CO2 occurring with climate change coupled with fire

  1. Evaluation of a Linear Mixing Model to Retrieve Soil and Vegetation Temperatures of Land Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Jia, L.; Cui, Y.; Zhou, J.; Menenti, M.

    2014-01-01

    A simple linear mixing model of heterogeneous soil-vegetation system and retrieval of component temperatures from directional remote sensing measurements by inverting this model is evaluated in this paper using observations by a thermal camera. The thermal camera was used to obtain multi-angular TIR

  2. Integrated modeling of long-term vegetation and hydrologic dynamics in Rocky Mountain watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Steven Ahl

    2007-01-01

    Changes in forest structure resulting from natural disturbances, or managed treatments, can have negative and long lasting impacts on water resources. To facilitate integrated management of forest and water resources, a System for Long-Term Integrated Management Modeling (SLIMM) was developed. By combining two spatially explicit, continuous time models, vegetation...

  3. A predictive model for floating leaf vegetation in the St. Louis River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    In July 2014, USEPA staff was asked by MPCA to develop a predictive model for floating leaf vegetation (FLV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). The existing model (Host et al. 2012) greatly overpredicts FLV in St. Louis Bay probably because it was based on a limited number of...

  4. Microwave dielectric spectrum of vegetation. I - Experimental observations. II - Dual-dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rayes, Mohamed A.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation materials is examined as a function of water content, microwave frequency, and temperature. Dielectric spectra for various types of vegetation, such as leaves, stalks, and trunks at various moisture conditions, were measured using a coaxial probe technique. The basic features and operation of the coaxial probe system are described. Examples of dielectric measurements for the vegetation materials are presented, and the relation between temperature and the dielectric constant is studied. The development of a dual-dispersion model that accounts for the dielectric properties of water in both free and bound conditions is described. The applicability of the model is evaluated by comparing it with the dielectric data; good correlation is observed between the model and the data over a wide range of moisture conditions and over the 0.2-20 GHz range.

  5. A Forward GPS Multipath Simulator Based on the Vegetation Radiative Transfer Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen; Xia, Junming

    2017-06-05

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have been widely used in navigation, positioning and timing. Nowadays, the multipath errors may be re-utilized for the remote sensing of geophysical parameters (soil moisture, vegetation and snow depth), i.e., GPS-Multipath Reflectometry (GPS-MR). However, bistatic scattering properties and the relation between GPS observables and geophysical parameters are not clear, e.g., vegetation. In this paper, a new element on bistatic scattering properties of vegetation is incorporated into the traditional GPS-MR model. This new element is the first-order radiative transfer equation model. The new forward GPS multipath simulator is able to explicitly link the vegetation parameters with GPS multipath observables (signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), code pseudorange and carrier phase observables). The trunk layer and its corresponding scattering mechanisms are ignored since GPS-MR is not suitable for high forest monitoring due to the coherence of direct and reflected signals. Based on this new model, the developed simulator can present how the GPS signals (L1 and L2 carrier frequencies, C/A, P(Y) and L2C modulations) are transmitted (scattered and absorbed) through vegetation medium and received by GPS receivers. Simulation results show that the wheat will decrease the amplitudes of GPS multipath observables (SNR, phase and code), if we increase the vegetation moisture contents or the scatters sizes (stem or leaf). Although the Specular-Ground component dominates the total specular scattering, vegetation covered ground soil moisture has almost no effects on the final multipath signatures. Our simulated results are consistent with previous results for environmental parameter detections by GPS-MR.

  6. Method of Running Sines: Modeling Variability in Long-Period Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Andronov, Ivan L

    2013-01-01

    We review one of complementary methods for time series analysis - the method of "Running Sines". "Crash tests" of the method include signals with a large period variation and with a large trend. The method is most effective for "nearly periodic" signals, which exhibit "wavy shape" with a "cycle length" varying within few dozen per cent (i.e. oscillations of low coherence). This is a typical case for brightness variations of long-period pulsating variables and resembles QPO (Quasi-Periodic Oscillations) and TPO (Transient Periodic Oscillations) in interacting binary stars - cataclysmic variables, symbiotic variables, low-mass X-Ray binaries etc. General theory of "running approximations" was described by Andronov (1997A &AS..125..207A), one of realizations of which is the method of "running sines". The method is related to Morlet-type wavelet analysis improved for irregularly spaced data (Andronov, 1998KFNT...14..490A, 1999sss..conf...57A), as well as to a classical "running mean" (="moving average"). The ...

  7. Simulation of nonlinear wave run-up with a high-order Boussinesq model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    cases involving long wave resonance in a parabolic basin, solitary wave evolution in a triangular channel, and solitary wave run-up on a circular conical island are considered. In each case the computed results compare well against available analytical solutions or experimental measurements. The ability...

  8. Modeling the milling tool wear by using an evolutionary SVM-based model from milling runs experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; Robleda, Abraham Segade

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research work is to build a new practical hybrid regression model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut as well as entry cut and exit cut of a milling tool. The model was based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in combination with support vector machines (SVMs). This optimization mechanism involved kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Bearing this in mind, a PSO-SVM-based model, which is based on the statistical learning theory, was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset represents experiments from runs on a milling machine under various operating conditions. In this way, data sampled by three different types of sensors (acoustic emission sensor, vibration sensor and current sensor) were acquired at several positions. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Firstly, this hybrid PSO-SVM-based regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the flank wear (output variable) and input variables (time, depth of cut, feed, etc.). Indeed, regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.95 was obtained. The agreement of this model with experimental data confirmed its good performance. Secondly, the main advantages of this PSO-SVM-based model are its capacity to produce a simple, easy-to-interpret model, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, the main conclusions of this study are exposed.

  9. Integrated Model for the Hydro-Mechanical Effects of Vegetation Against Shallow Landslides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro González-Ollauri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Shallow landslides are instability events that lead to dramatic soil mass wasting in sloping areas and are commonly triggered by intense rainfall episodes. Vegetation may reduce the likelihood of slope failure through different hydro-mechanical mechanisms that take place at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. However, while vegetation’s mechanical contribution has been widely recognized, its hydrological effects have been poorly quantified. In addition, most of the existing models lack a holistic approach, require difficult to measure parameters or are commercially based, making them hardly transferable to land planners and other researchers.In this paper an integrated, robust and reproducible model framework is proposed and evaluated with the aim of assessing the hydro-mechanical effects of different vegetation types on slope stability using easily measureable and quantifiable input parameters. The output shows that the model framework is able to simulate the hydro-mechanical effects of vegetation in a realistic manner and that it can be readily applied to any vegetation, soil and climate types. It also demonstrates that vegetation has positive hydro-mechanical effects against shallow landslides, where plant biomass and evapotranspiration play an important role.

  10. [Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation models on vegetation coverage of natural grassland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanyu; Huang, Jingfeng; Wu, Xinhong; Dong, Yongping; Wang, Fumin; Liu, Pengtao

    2006-06-01

    By using ASD FieldSpec Pro FR spectroradiometer, the spectral measurement of natural grassland in Xilingole Leaguer of Inner Mongolia was performed, with the vegetation coverage of natural grassland calculated, and the correlation of 25 hyperspectral feature variables with the vegetation coverage of natural grassland was analyzed. The results showed that there were 17 variables correlated significantly with the vegetation coverage of natural grassland, among which, the correlation coefficient between vegetation coverage and the area of red edge peak calculated as the sum of the amplitudes between 680 nm and 780 nm (sigma dr 680 - 780 nm) was the highest, with the value of 0.781. The basic experimental data including the vegetation coverage and canopy reflectance of natural grassland were classified into two groups. One group was used as the training sample to build the regression models with one-sample linear method, nonlinear method, and stepwise analysis method, while the other was used as the testing sample to test the precision of regression models. It was suggested that the variable of the area of red edge peak calculated as the sum of amplitudes between 680 nm and 780 nm (sigma dr 680 - 780 nm) was the best one to univariate general linear model, with a standard deviation of 10.4% and an estimation precision of 83.99%, while the stepwise regression technique was not effective to estimate the grassland coverage with raw hyperspectral canopy reflectance.

  11. a Radiative Transfer Equation/phase Function Approach to Vegetation Canopy Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Marion Herbert

    Vegetation canopy reflectance models currently in use differ considerably in their treatment of the radiation scattering problem, and it is this fundamental difference which stimulated this investigation of the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach. The primary objective of this thesis is the development of vegetation canopy phase functions which describe the probability of radiation scattering within a canopy in terms of its biological and physical characteristics. In this thesis a technique based upon quadrature formulae is used to numerically generate a variety of vegetation canopy phase functions. Based upon leaf inclination distribution functions, phase functions are generated for plagiophile, extremophile, erectophile, spherical, planophile, blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and soybean canopies. The vegetation canopy phase functions generated are symmetric with respect to the incident and exitant angles, and hence satisfy the principle of reciprocity. The remaining terms in the radiative transfer equation are also derived in terms of canopy geometry and optical properties to complete the development of the radiative transfer equation/phase function description for vegetation canopy reflectance modeling. In order to test the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach the iterative discrete ordinates method for solving the radiative transfer equation is implemented. In comparison with field data, the approach tends to underestimate the visible reflectance and overestimate infrared reflectance. The approach does compare well, however, with other extant canopy reflectance models; for example, it agrees to within ten to fifteen percent of the Suits model (Suits, 1972). Sensitivity analysis indicates that canopy geometry may influence reflectance as much as 100 percent for a given wavelength. Optical thickness produces little change in reflectance after a depth of 2.5 (Leaf area index of 4.0) is reached, and reflectance generally increases

  12. Effects of soil freezing and thawing on vegetation carbon density in Siberia: A modeling analysis with the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, C.; Lucht, W.; Gerten, D.; Thonicke, K.; Schmullius, C.

    2007-03-01

    The current latitudinal gradient in biomass suggests a climate-driven limitation of biomass in high latitudes. Understanding of the underlying processes, and quantification of their relative importance, is required to assess the potential carbon uptake of the biosphere in response to anticipated warming and related changes in tree growth and forest extent in these regions. We analyze the hydrological effects of thawing and freezing of soil on vegetation carbon density (VCD) in permafrost-dominated regions of Siberia using a process-based biogeochemistry-biogeography model, the Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ-DGVM). The analysis is based on spatially explicit simulations of coupled daily thaw depth, site hydrology, vegetation distribution, and carbon fluxes influencing VCD subject to climate, soil texture, and atmospheric CO2 concentration. LPJ represents the observed high spring peak of runoff of large Arctic rivers, and simulates a realistic fire return interval of 100 to 200 years in Siberia. The simulated VCD changeover from taiga to tundra is comparable to inventory-based information. Without the consideration of freeze-thaw processes VCD would be overestimated by a factor of 2 in southern taiga to a factor of 5 in northern forest tundra, mainly because available soil water would be overestimated with major effects on fire occurrence and net primary productivity. This suggests that forest growth in high latitudes is not only limited by temperature, radiation, and nutrient availability but also by the availability of liquid soil water.

  13. Vegetation and land carbon feedbacks in the high-resolution transient Holocene simulations using the MPI Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Lorenz, Stephan; Raddatz, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Plants influence climate through changes in the land surface biophysics (albedo, transpiration) and concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases. One of the interesting periods to investigate a climatic role of terrestrial biosphere is the Holocene, when, despite of the relatively steady global climate, the atmospheric CO2 grew by about 20 ppm from 7 kyr BP to pre-industrial. We use a new setup of the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model MPI-ESM1 consisting of the latest version of the atmospheric model ECHAM6, including the land surface model JSBACH3 with carbon cycle and vegetation dynamics, coupled to the ocean circulation model MPI-OM, which includes the HAMOCC model of ocean biogeochemistry. The model has been run for several simulations over the Holocene period of the last 8000 years under the forcing data sets of orbital insolation, atmospheric greenhouse gases, volcanic aerosols, solar irradiance and stratospheric ozone, as well as land-use changes. In response to this forcing, the land carbon storage increased by about 60 PgC between 8 and 4 kyr BP, stayed relatively constant until 2 kyr BP, and decreased by about 90 PgC by 1850 AD due to land use changes. Vegetation and soil carbon changes significantly affected atmospheric CO2 during the periods of strong volcanic eruptions. In response to the eruption-caused cooling, the land initially stores more carbon as respiration decreases, but then it releases even more carbon due to productivity decrease. This decadal- scale variability helps to quantify the vegetation and land carbon feedbacks during the past periods when the temporal resolution of the ice-core CO2 record is not sufficient to capture fast CO2 variations. From a set of Holocene simulations with prescribed or interactive atmospheric CO2, we get estimates of climate-carbon feedback useful for future climate studies. Members of the Hamburg Holocene Team: Jürgen Bader1, Sebastian Bathiany2, Victor Brovkin1, Martin Claussen1,3, Traute Cr

  14. Improving the Vegetation Dynamic Simulation in a Land Surface Model by Using a Statistical-dynamic Canopy Interception Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Miaoling; XIE Zhenghui

    2008-01-01

    Canopy interception of incident precipitation, as a critical component of a forest's water budget, can affect the amount of water available to the soil, and ultimately vegetation distribution and function. In this paper, a statistical-dynamic approach based on leaf area index and statistical canopy interception is used to parameterize the canopy interception process. The statistical-dynamic canopy interception scheme is implemented into the Community Land Model with dynamic global vegetation model (CLM-DGVM) to improve its dynamic vegetation simulation. The simulation for continental China by the land surface model with the new canopy interception scheme shows that the new one reasonably represents the precipitation intercepted by the canopy. Moreover, the new scheme enhances the water availability in the root zone for vegetation growth, especially in the densely vegetated and semi-arid areas, and improves the model's performance of potential vegetation simulation.

  15. Running and addiction: precipitated withdrawal in a rat model of activity-based anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Kanarek, Robin B.; D'Anci, Kristen E.; Jurdak, Nicole; Mathes, Wendy Foulds

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity improves cardiovascular health, strengthens muscles and bones, stimulates neuroplasticity, and promotes feelings of well-being and self-esteem. However, when taken to extremes, exercise can develop into an addictive-like behavior. To further assess the addictive potential of physical activity, the present experiments assessed whether running wheel activity in rats would lead to physical dependence similar to that observed after chronic morphine administration. Active male an...

  16. MathRun: An Adaptive Mental Arithmetic Game Using A Quantitative Performance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, L.; Tang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pedagogy and the way children learn are changing rapidly with the introduction of widely accessible computer technologies, from mobile apps to interactive educational games. Digital games have the capacity to embed many learning supports using the widely accredited VARK (visual, auditory, reading, and kinaesthetic) learning style. In this paper, we present a mathematics educational game MathRun for children age between 7-11 years old to practice mental arithmetic. We build the game as an inte...

  17. Treadmill running improves spatial memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoveida, Reihaneh; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem; Reisi, Parham

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by a decline in cognitive function and severe neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex and certain subcortical regions of the brain including nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) that play an important role in learning and memory. There are few therapeutic regimens that influence the underlying pathogenic phenotypes of AD, however, of the currently available therapies, exercise training is considered to be one of the best strategies for attenuating the pathological phenotypes of AD for people with AD. Here, we sought to investigate the effect of treadmill running on spatial memory in Alzheimer-induced rats. Male Wistar rats were split into two groups namely shams (n=7) and lesions with the lesion group subdivided further into the lesion-rest (n=7) and lesion-exercise (n=7). The lesion-exercise and shams were subjected to treadmill running at 17 meters per minute (m/min) for 60 min per day (min/day), 7 days per week (days/wk), for 60 days. Spatial memory was investigated using the Morris Water Maze test in the rats after 60 days of Alzheimer induction and the exercise. Our data demonstrated that spatial memory was indeed impaired in the lesion group compared with the shams. However, exercise notably improved spatial memory in the lesion-exercised rats compared to lesion-rested group. The present results suggest that spatial memory is affected under Alzheimer conditions and that treadmill running improves these effects. Our data suggested that treadmill running contributes to the alleviation of the cognitive decline in AD.

  18. A comparison of nonlinear mixing models for vegetated areas using simulated and real hyperspectral data

    CERN Document Server

    Dobigeon, Nicolas; Somers, Ben; Altmann, Yoann; Coppin, Pol

    2013-01-01

    Spectral unmixing is a crucial processing step when analyzing hyperspectral data. In such analysis, most of the work in the literature relies on the widely acknowledged linear mixing model to describe the observed pixels. Unfortunately, this model has been shown to be of limited interest for specific scenes, in particular when acquired over vegetated areas. Consequently, in the past few years, several nonlinear mixing models have been introduced to take nonlinear effects into account. These models have been proposed empirically, however without any thorough validation. In this paper, the authors take advantage of two sets of real and physical-based simulated data to validate the accuracy of various nonlinear models in vegetated areas. These physics-based and analysis models, and their corresponding unmixing algorithms, are evaluated with respect to their ability of fitting the measured spectra and of providing an accurate estimation of the abundance coefficients, considered as the spatial distribution of the ...

  19. Voluntary Running Attenuates Memory Loss, Decreases Neuropathological Changes and Induces Neurogenesis in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Aranguiz, Florencia; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of memory and cognitive abilities, and the appearance of amyloid plaques composed of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles formed of tau protein. It has been suggested that exercise might ameliorate the disease; here, we evaluated the effect of voluntary running on several aspects of AD including amyloid deposition, tau phosphorylation, inflammatory reaction, neurogenesis and spatial memory in the double transgenic APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD. We report that voluntary wheel running for 10 weeks decreased Aβ burden, Thioflavin-S-positive plaques and Aβ oligomers in the hippocampus. In addition, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed fewer phosphorylated tau protein and decreased astrogliosis evidenced by lower staining of GFAP. Further, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed increased number of neurons in the hippocampus and exhibited increased cell proliferation and generation of cells positive for the immature neuronal protein doublecortin, indicating that running increased neurogenesis. Finally, runner APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice showed improved spatial memory performance in the Morris water maze. Altogether, our findings indicate that in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, voluntary running reduced all the neuropathological hallmarks of AD studied, reduced neuronal loss, increased hippocampal neurogenesis and reduced spatial memory loss. These findings support that voluntary exercise might have therapeutic value on AD.

  20. Running Exercise Alleviates Pain and Promotes Cell Proliferation in a Rat Model of Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Luan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain accompanied by intervertebral disk degeneration is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Physical exercise, which is clinically recommended by international guidelines, has proven to be effective for degenerative disc disease (DDD patients. However, the mechanism underlying the analgesic effects of physical exercise on DDD remains largely unclear. The results of the present study showed that mechanical withdrawal thresholds of bilateral hindpaw were significantly decreased beginning on day three after intradiscal complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA injection and daily running exercise remarkably reduced allodynia in the CFA exercise group beginning at day 28 compared to the spontaneous recovery group (controls. The hindpaw withdrawal thresholds of the exercise group returned nearly to baseline at the end of experiment, but severe pain persisted in the control group. Histological examinations performed on day 70 revealed that running exercise restored the degenerative discs and increased the cell densities of the annulus fibrosus (AF and nucleus pulposus (NP. Furthermore, immunofluorescence labeling revealed significantly higher numbers of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU-positive cells in the exercise group on days 28, 42, 56 and 70, which indicated more rapid proliferation compared to the control at the corresponding time points. Taken together, these results suggest that running exercise might alleviate the mechanical allodynia induced by intradiscal CFA injection via disc repair and cell proliferation, which provides new evidence for future clinical use.

  1. Dual-use tools and systematics-aware analysis workflows in the ATLAS Run-2 analysis model

    CERN Document Server

    FARRELL, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration; Calafiura, Paolo; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Elsing, Markus; Koeneke, Karsten; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Krumnack, Nils; Lancon, Eric; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lei, Xiaowen; Strandberg, Sara Kristina; Verkerke, Wouter; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Woudstra, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS analysis model has been overhauled for the upcoming run of data collection in 2015 at 13 TeV. One key component of this upgrade was the Event Data Model (EDM), which now allows for greater flexibility in the choice of analysis software framework and provides powerful new features that can be exploited by analysis software tools. A second key component of the upgrade is the introduction of a dual-use tool technology, which provides abstract interfaces for analysis software tools to run in either the Athena framework or a ROOT-based framework. The tool interfaces, including a new interface for handling systematic uncertainties, have been standardized for the development of improved analysis workflows and consolidation of high-level analysis tools. This paper will cover the details of the dual-use tool functionality, the systematics interface, and how these features fit into a centrally supported analysis environment.

  2. Modelling effects of acid deposition and climate change on soil and run-off chemistry at Risdalsheia, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Mol-Dijkstra

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevated carbon dioxide levels, caused by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, and higher temperature may lead to increased plant growth and uptake of nitrogen, but increased temperature may lead to increased nitrogen mineralisation causing enhanced nitrogen leaching. The overall result of both counteracting effects is largely unknown. To gain insight into the long-term effects, the geochemical model SMART2 was applied using data from the catchment-scale experiments of the RAIN and CLIMEX projects, conducted on boreal forest ecosystems at Risdalsheia, southern Norway. These unique experiments at the ecosystem scale provide information on the short-term effects and interactions of nitrogen deposition and increased temperature and carbon dioxide on carbon and nitrogen cycling and especially the run-off chemistry. To predict changes in soil processes in response to climate change, the model was extended by including the temperature effect on mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, aluminium dissolution and mineral weathering. The extended model was tested on the two manipulated catchments at Risdalsheia and long-term effects were evaluated by performing long-time runs. The effects of climate change treatment, which resulted in increased nitrogen fluxes at both catchments, were slightly overestimated by SMART2. The temperature dependency of mineralisation was simulated adequately but the temperature effect on nitrification was slightly overestimated. Monitored changes in base cation concentrations and pH were quite well simulated with SMART2. The long-term simulations indicate that the increase in nitrogen run-off is only a temporary effect; in the long-term, no effect on total nitrogen leaching is predicted. At higher deposition levels the temporary increase in nitrogen leaching lasts longer than at low deposition. Contrary to nitrogen leaching, temperature increase leads to a permanent decrease in aluminium

  3. Using FLUXNET data to improve models of springtime vegetation activity onset in forest ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melaas, E.; Richardson, A.; Friedl, M.; Dragoni, D.; Gough, C.; Herbst, M.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation phenology is sensitive to climate change and variability, and is a first order control on the carbon budget of forest ecosystems. Robust representation of phenology is therefore needed to support model-based projections of how climate change will affect ecosystem function. A variety of mo

  4. SPITFIRE-2: an improved fire module for Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pfeiffer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fire is the primary disturbance factor in many terrestrial ecosystems. Wildfire alters vegetation structure and composition, affects carbon storage and biogeochemical cycling, and results in the release of climatically relevant trace gases, including CO2, CO, CH4, NOx, and aerosols. Assessing the impacts of global wildfire on centennial to multi-millennial timescales requires the linkage of process-based fire modeling with vegetation modeling using Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs. Here we present a new fire module, SPITFIRE-2, and an update to the LPJ-DGVM that includes major improvements to the way in which fire occurrence, behavior, and the effect of fire on vegetation is simulated. The new fire module includes explicit calculation of natural ignitions, the representation of multi-day burning and coalescence of fires and the calculation of rates of spread in different vegetation types, as well as a simple scheme to model crown fires. We describe a new representation of anthropogenic biomass burning under preindustrial conditions that distinguishes the way in which the relationship between humans and fire are different between hunter-gatherers, obligate pastoralists, and farmers. Where and when available, we evaluate our model simulations against remote-sensing based estimates of burned area. While wildfire in much of the modern world is largely influenced by anthropogenic suppression and ignitions, in those parts of the world where natural fire is still the dominant process, e.g. in remote areas of the boreal forest, our results demonstrate a significant improvement in simulated burned area over previous models. With its unique properties of being able to simulate preindustrial fire, the new module we present here is particularly well suited for the investigation of climate-human-fire relationships on multi-millennial timescales.

  5. SPITFIRE-2: an improved fire module for Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, M.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2012-08-01

    Fire is the primary disturbance factor in many terrestrial ecosystems. Wildfire alters vegetation structure and composition, affects carbon storage and biogeochemical cycling, and results in the release of climatically relevant trace gases, including CO2, CO, CH4, NOx, and aerosols. Assessing the impacts of global wildfire on centennial to multi-millennial timescales requires the linkage of process-based fire modeling with vegetation modeling using Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs). Here we present a new fire module, SPITFIRE-2, and an update to the LPJ-DGVM that includes major improvements to the way in which fire occurrence, behavior, and the effect of fire on vegetation is simulated. The new fire module includes explicit calculation of natural ignitions, the representation of multi-day burning and coalescence of fires and the calculation of rates of spread in different vegetation types, as well as a simple scheme to model crown fires. We describe a new representation of anthropogenic biomass burning under preindustrial conditions that distinguishes the way in which the relationship between humans and fire are different between hunter-gatherers, obligate pastoralists, and farmers. Where and when available, we evaluate our model simulations against remote-sensing based estimates of burned area. While wildfire in much of the modern world is largely influenced by anthropogenic suppression and ignitions, in those parts of the world where natural fire is still the dominant process, e.g. in remote areas of the boreal forest, our results demonstrate a significant improvement in simulated burned area over previous models. With its unique properties of being able to simulate preindustrial fire, the new module we present here is particularly well suited for the investigation of climate-human-fire relationships on multi-millennial timescales.

  6. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches: Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Abercrombie, Daniel; Akilli, Ece; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Allen, Brandon; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Andrea, Jeremy; Arbey, Alexandre; Azuelos, Georges; Azzi, Patrizia; Backovic, Mihailo; Bai, Yang; Banerjee, Swagato; Beacham, James; Belyaev, Alexander; Boveia, Antonio; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Buchmueller, Oliver; Buckley, Matthew R.; Busoni, Giorgio; Buttignol, Michael; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Caputo, Regina; Carpenter, Linda; Filipe Castro, Nuno; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Cheng, Yangyang; Chou, John Paul; Cortes Gonzalez, Arely; Cowden, Chris; D'Eramo, Francesco; De Cosa, Annapaola; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; De Simone, Andrea; Deandrea, Aldo; Demiragli, Zeynep; DiFranzo, Anthony; Doglioni, Caterina; du Pree, Tristan; Erbacher, Robin; Erdmann, Johannes; Fischer, Cora; Flaecher, Henning; Fox, Patrick J.; Fuks, Benjamin; Genest, Marie-Helene; Gomber, Bhawna; Goudelis, Andreas; Gramling, Johanna; Gunion, John; Hahn, Kristian; Haisch, Ulrich; Harnik, Roni; Harris, Philip C.; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Hoh, Siew Yan; Hsu, Dylan George; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Iiyama, Yutaro; Ippolito, Valerio; Jacques, Thomas; Ju, Xiangyang; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Khoze, Valentin V.; Khurana, Raman; Kotov, Khristian; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Kulkarni, Suchita; Kunori, Shuichi; Kutzner, Viktor; Lee, Hyun Min; Lee, Sung-Won; Liew, Seng Pei; Lin, Tongyan; Lowette, Steven; Madar, Romain; Malik, Sarah; Maltoni, Fabio; Martinez Perez, Mario; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mawatari, Kentarou; McCabe, Christopher; Megy, Theo; Morgante, Enrico; Mrenna, Stephen; Narayanan, Siddharth M.; Nelson, Andy; Novaes, Sergio F.; Padeken, Klaas Ole; Pani, Priscilla; Papucci, Michele; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph; Pazzini, Jacopo; Penning, Bjorn; Peskin, Michael E.; Pinna, Deborah; Procura, Massimiliano; Qazi, Shamona F.; Racco, Davide; Re, Emanuele; Riotto, Antonio; Rizzo, Thomas G.; Roehrig, Rainer; Salek, David; Sanchez Pineda, Arturo; Sarkar, Subir; Schmidt, Alexander; Schramm, Steven Randolph; Shepherd, William; Singh, Gurpreet; Soffi, Livia; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Sung, Kevin; Tait, Tim M.P.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothee; Thomas, Marc; Tosi, Mia; Trocino, Daniele; Undleeb, Sonaina; Vichi, Alessandro; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Lian-Tao; Wang, Ren-Jie; Whallon, Nikola; Worm, Steven; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yong; Yu, Shin-Shan; Zaldivar, Bryan; Zanetti, Marco; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zucchetta, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report also addresses how to apply the Effective Field Theory formalism for collider searches and present the results of such interpretations.

  7. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches: Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Abercrombie, Daniel; Akchurin, Nural; Akilli, Ece; Maestre, Juan Alcaraz; Allen, Brandon; Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez; Andrea, Jeremy; Arbey, Alexandre; Azuelos, Georges; Azzi, Patrizia; Backović, Mihailo; Bai, Yang; Banerjee, Swagato; Beacham, James; Belyaev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This document is the final report of the ATLAS-CMS Dark Matter Forum, a forum organized by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations with the participation of experts on theories of Dark Matter, to select a minimal basis set of dark matter simplified models that should support the design of the early LHC Run-2 searches. A prioritized, compact set of benchmark models is proposed, accompanied by studies of the parameter space of these models and a repository of generator implementations. This report als...

  8. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Constitutive Model for Vegetated Soils: Validation and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switala, Barbara Maria; Veenhof, Rick; Wu, Wei; Askarinejad, Amin

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, that presence of vegetation influences stability of the slope. However, the quantitative assessment of this contribution remains challenging. It is essential to develop a numerical model, which combines mechanical root reinforcement and root water uptake, and allows modelling rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes. Therefore a novel constitutive formulation is proposed, which is based on the modified Cam-clay model for unsaturated soils. Mechanical root reinforcement is modelled introducing a new constitutive parameter, which governs the evolution of the Cam-clay failure surface with the degree of root reinforcement. Evapotranspiration is modelled in terms of the root water uptake, defined as a sink term in the water flow continuity equation. The original concept is extended for different shapes of the root architecture in three dimensions, and combined with the mechanical model. The model is implemented in the research finite element code Comes-Geo, and in the commercial software Abaqus. The formulation is tested, performing a series of numerical examples, which allow validation of the concept. The direct shear test and the triaxial test are modelled in order to test the performance of the mechanical part of the model. In order to validate the hydrological part of the constitutive formulation, evapotranspiration from the vegetated box is simulated and compared with the experimental results. Obtained numerical results exhibit a good agreement with the experimental data. The implemented model is capable of reproducing results of basic geotechnical laboratory tests. Moreover, the constitutive formulation can be used to model rainfall induced landslides of vegetated slopes, taking into account the most important factors influencing the slope stability (root reinforcement and evapotranspiration).

  9. Thermal model for discrete vegetation and its solution on pixel scale using computer graphics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏红波; 张仁华; 唐新斋; 孙晓敏; 朱治林

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss how the multi-reflection of thermal emission affects the calculation of radiation balance. With the help of computer graphics, the four components of discrete vegetation are analyzed in detail and the curves of BRDF for the discrete vegetation can be obtained as well. A new model is put forward to inverse the temperatures of four components. The solution obtained by using computer graphics is consistent with observations in the field experiment in Yucheng Remote Sensing Comprehensive Site of CAS. Furthermore, the method can be used to retrieve land surface temperature based on multi-angle thermal infrared remotely sensed data.

  10. Thermal model for discrete vegetation and its solution on pixel scale using computer graphics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss how the multi-reflection of thermal emission affects the calculation of radiation balance.With the help of computer graphics,the four components of discrete vegetation are analyzed in detail and the curves of BRDF for the discrete vegetation can be obtained as well.A new model is put forward to inverse the temperatures of four components.The solution obtained by using computer graphics is consistent with observations in the field experiment in Yucheng Remote Sensing Comprehensive Site of CAS.Furthermore,the method can be used to retrieve land surface temperature based on multi-angle thermal infrared remotely sensed data.

  11. Prediction and Research on Vegetable Price Based on Genetic Algorithm and Neural Network Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Considering the complexity of vegetables price forecast,the prediction model of vegetables price was set up by applying the neural network based on genetic algorithm and using the characteristics of genetic algorithm and neural work.Taking mushrooms as an example,the parameters of the model are analyzed through experiment.In the end,the results of genetic algorithm and BP neural network are compared.The results show that the absolute error of prediction data is in the scale of 10%;in the scope that the absolute error in the prediction data is in the scope of 20% and 15%.The accuracy of genetic algorithm based on neutral network is higher than the BP neutral network model,especially the absolute error of prediction data is within the scope of 20%.The accuracy of genetic algorithm based on neural network is obviously better than BP neural network model,which represents the favorable generalization capability of the model.

  12. Wind erosion in semiarid landscapes: Predictive models and remote sensing methods for the influence of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. Brad

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: to develop and test predictive relations for the quantitative influence of vegetation canopy structure on wind erosion of semiarid rangeland soils, and to develop remote sensing methods for measuring the canopy structural parameters that determine sheltering against wind erosion. The influence of canopy structure on wind erosion will be investigated by means of wind-tunnel and field experiments using structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments using model roughness elements to simulate plant canopies. The canopy structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments as important in determining vegetative sheltering against wind erosion will then be measured at a number of naturally vegetated field sites and compared with estimates of these variables derived from analysis of remotely sensed data.

  13. The impact of geoengineering on vegetation in experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Peter; Glienke, Susanne; Lawrence, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Solar Radiation Management (SRM) has been proposed as a means to partly counteract global warming. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) simulated the climate consequences of a number of SRM techniques, but the effects on vegetation have not yet been thoroughly studied. Here, the vegetation response to the idealized GeoMIP G1 experiment is analyzed, in which a reduction of the solar constant counterbalances the radiative effects of quadrupled atmospheric CO2 concentrations; the results from eight fully coupled earth system models (ESMs) are included. For most models and regions, changes in net primary productivity (NPP) are dominated by the increase in CO2, via the CO2 fertilization effect. As SRM will lower temperatures, in high latitudes this will reverse gains in NPP from the lifting of temperature limitations. In low latitudes this cooling relative to the 4xCO2 simulation decreases plant respiration whilst having little effect on gross primary productivity, increasing NPP. Despite reductions in precipitation in most regions in response to SRM, runoff and NPP increase in many regions including those previously highlighted as potentially being at risk of drought under SRM. This is due to simultaneous reductions in evaporation and increases in water use efficiency by plants due to higher CO2 concentrations. The relative differences between models in the vegetation response are substantially larger than the differences in their climate responses. The largest differences between models are for those with and without a nitrogen-cycle, with a much smaller CO2 fertilization effect for the former. These results suggest that until key vegetation processes are integrated into ESM predictions, the vegetation response to SRM will remain highly uncertain.

  14. Physical modeling of long-wave run-up mitigation using submerged breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Ting; Wu, Yun-Ta; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2016-04-01

    Natural hazard due to tsunami inundation inland has been viewed as a crucial issue for coastal engineering community. The 2004 India Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami were caused by mega scale earthquakes that brought tremendous catastrophe in the disaster regions. It is thus of great importance to develop innovative approach to achieve the reduction and mitigation of tsunami hazards. In this study, new experiments have been carried out in a laboratory-scale to investigate the physical process of long-wave through submerged breakwaters built upon a mild slope. Solitary-wave is employed to represent the characteristic of long-wave with infinite wavelength and wave period. Our goal is twofold. First of all, through changing the positions of single breakwater and multiple breakwaters upon a mild slope, the optimal locations of breakwaters can be pointed out by means of maximum run-up reduction. Secondly, through using a state-of-the-art measuring technique Bubble Image Velocimetry, which features non-intrusive and image-based measurement, the wave kinematics in the highly aerated region due to solitary-wave shoaling, breaking and uprush can be quantitated. Therefore, the mitigation of long-wave due to the construction of submerged breakwaters built upon a mild slope can be evaluated not only for imaging run-up and run-down characteristics but also for measuring turbulent velocity fields due to breaking wave. Although we understand the most devastating tsunami hazards cannot be fully mitigated with impossibility, this study is to provide quantitated information on what kind of artificial coastal structure that can withstand which level of wave loads.

  15. Classical running and symmetry breaking in models with two extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Papineau, C

    2007-01-01

    We consider a codimension two scalar theory with brane-localised Higgs type potential. The six-dimensional field has Dirichlet boundary condition on the bounds of the transverse compact space. The regularisation of the brane singularity yields renormalisation group evolution for the localised couplings at the classical level. In particular, a tachyonic mass term grows at large distances and hits a Landau pole. We exhibit a peculiar value of the bare coupling such that the running mass parameter becomes large precisely at the compactification scale, and the effective four-dimensional zero mode is massless. Above the critical coupling, spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs and there is a very light state.

  16. Up and running with AutoCAD 2014 2D and 3D drawing and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gindis, Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Get ""Up and Running"" with AutoCAD using Gindis's combination of step-by-step instruction, examples, and insightful explanations. The emphasis from the beginning is on core concepts and practical application of AutoCAD in architecture, engineering and design. Equally useful in instructor-led classroom training, self-study, or as a professional reference, the book is written with the user in mind by a long-time AutoCAD professional and instructor based on what works in the industry and the classroom. Strips away complexities, both real and perceived, and reduces AutoCAD t

  17. Running Linux

    CERN Document Server

    Dalheimer, Matthias Kalle

    2006-01-01

    The fifth edition of Running Linux is greatly expanded, reflecting the maturity of the operating system and the teeming wealth of software available for it. Hot consumer topics such as audio and video playback applications, groupware functionality, and spam filtering are covered, along with the basics in configuration and management that always made the book popular.

  18. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  19. Integrated Modeling of Solutions in the System of Distributing Logistics of a Fruit and Vegetable Cooperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Velychko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism of preparing rationalistic solutions in the system of distributing logistics of a fruit and vegetable cooperative has been studied considering possible alternatives and existing limitations. Belonging of separate operations of the fruit and vegetable cooperative to technological, logistical or marketing business processes has been identified. Expediency of the integrated use of logistical concept DRP, decision tree method and linear programming in management of the cooperative has been grounded. The model for preparing decisions on organizing sales of vegetables and fruit which is focused on minimization of costs of cooperative services and maximization of profits for members of the cooperation has been developed. The necessity to consider integrated model of differentiation on levels of post gathering processing and logistical service has been revealed. Methodology of representation in the economical-mathematical model of probabilities in the tree of decisions concerning the expected amount of sales and margin for members of the cooperative using different channels has been processed. A formula which enables scientists to describe limitations in linear programming concerning critical duration of providing harvest of vegetables and fruit after gathering towards a customer has been suggested.

  20. The Tourism Market of Australia – A Model of Managerial Performance in Running an Exotic Tourist Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Daniela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the performance management that government decision-making bodies involve in organizing tourism in Australia. The proposed quantitative indicators evaluate the managerial performance in running this system: macroeconomic indicators of domestic and international tourist flows and their impact on the Australian economy. The conclusion is that the national tourism development strategy adopted in Australia, through its objectives and identified strategic options, offers the potential to enhance the competitiveness of the tourism industry. The interim results of its implementation demonstrate its effectiveness: in Australia, tourism has become the real driver of socioeconomic progress, thus a model of performance management in running a potentially valuable tourist destinations.

  1. A branch scale analytical model for predicting the vegetation collection efficiency of ultrafine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Katul, G. G.; Khlystov, A.

    2012-05-01

    The removal of ultrafine particles (UFP) by vegetation is now receiving significant attention given their role in cloud physics, human health and respiratory related diseases. Vegetation is known to be a sink for UFP, prompting interest in their collection efficiency. A number of models have tackled the UFP collection efficiency of an isolated leaf or a flat surface; however, up-scaling these theories to the ecosystem level has resisted complete theoretical treatment. To progress on a narrower scope of this problem, simultaneous experimental and theoretical investigations are carried out at the “intermediate” branch scale. Such a scale retains the large number of leaves and their interaction with the flow without the heterogeneities and added geometric complexities encountered within ecosystems. The experiments focused on the collection efficiencies of UFP in the size range 12.6-102 nm for pine and juniper branches in a wind tunnel facility. Scanning mobility particle sizers were used to measure the concentration of each diameter class of UFP upstream and downstream of the vegetation branches thereby allowing the determination of the UFP vegetation collection efficiencies. The UFP vegetation collection efficiency was measured at different wind speeds (0.3-1.5 m s-1), packing density (i.e. volume fraction of leaf or needle fibers; 0.017 and 0.040 for pine and 0.037, 0.055 for juniper), and branch orientations. These measurements were then used to investigate the performance of a proposed analytical model that predicts the branch-scale collection efficiency using conventional canopy properties such as the drag coefficient and leaf area density. Despite the numerous simplifications employed, the proposed analytical model agreed with the wind tunnel measurements mostly to within 20%. This analytical tractability can benefit future air quality and climate models incorporating UFP.

  2. Modeling Fall Run Chinook Salmon Populations in the San Joaquin River Basin Using an Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyantash, J.; Quinn, N. W.; Hidalgo, H. G.; Dracup, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The number of chinook salmon returning to spawn during the fall run (September-November) were separately modeled for three San Joaquin River tributaries-the Stanislaus, Tuolumne, and Merced Rivers-to determine the sensitivity of salmon populations to hydrologic alterations associated with potential climate change. The modeling was accomplished using a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) with error backpropagation. Inputs to the ANN included modeled monthly river temperature and streamflow data for each tributary, and were lagged multiple years to include the effects of antecedent environmental conditions upon populations of salmon throughout their life histories. Temperature and streamflow conditions at downstream locations in each tributary were computed using the California Dept. of Water Resources' DSM-2 model. Inputs to the DSM-2 model originated from regional climate modeling under a CO2 doubling scenario. Annual population data for adult chinook salmon (1951-present) were provided by the California Dept. of Fish and Game, and were used for supervised training of the ANN. It was determined that Stanislaus, Tuolumne and Merced River chinook runs could be impacted by alterations to the hydroclimatology of the San Joaquin basin.

  3. Palaeodistribution modelling of European vegetation types at the Last Glacial Maximum using modern analogues from Siberia: Prospects and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janská, Veronika; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja; Chytrý, Milan; Divíšek, Jan; Anenkhonov, Oleg; Korolyuk, Andrey; Lashchinskyi, Nikolai; Culek, Martin

    2017-03-01

    We modelled the European distribution of vegetation types at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) using present-day data from Siberia, a region hypothesized to be a modern analogue of European glacial climate. Distribution models were calibrated with current climate using 6274 vegetation-plot records surveyed in Siberia. Out of 22 initially used vegetation types, good or moderately good models in terms of statistical validation and expert-based evaluation were computed for 18 types, which were then projected to European climate at the LGM. The resulting distributions were generally consistent with reconstructions based on pollen records and dynamic vegetation models. Spatial predictions were most reliable for steppe, forest-steppe, taiga, tundra, fens and bogs in eastern and central Europe, which had LGM climate more similar to present-day Siberia. The models for western and southern Europe, regions with a lower degree of climatic analogy, were only reliable for mires and steppe vegetation, respectively. Modelling LGM vegetation types for the wetter and warmer regions of Europe would therefore require gathering calibration data from outside Siberia. Our approach adds value to the reconstruction of vegetation at the LGM, which is limited by scarcity of pollen and macrofossil data, suggesting where specific habitats could have occurred. Despite the uncertainties of climatic extrapolations and the difficulty of validating the projections for vegetation types, the integration of palaeodistribution modelling with other approaches has a great potential for improving our understanding of biodiversity patterns during the LGM.

  4. Spectral Running and Non-Gaussianity from Slow-Roll Inflation in Generalised Two--Field Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ki-Young; van de Bruck, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Theories beyond the standard model such as string theory motivate low energy effective field theories with several scalar fields which are not only coupled through a potential but also through their kinetic terms. For such theories we derive the general formulae for the running of the spectral indices for the adiabatic, isocurvature and correlation spectra in the case of two field inflation. We also compute the expected non-Gaussianity in such models for specific forms of the potentials. We find that the coupling has little impact on the level of non-Gaussianity during inflation.

  5. Sustainable crop models for fruit, vegetable and flower quality productions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elia Antonio

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a paradigm that has evolved over the time, since the ideas of socially acceptable and compatible development, on which it was originally based, are now supported by the more recent notions of ecological equilibria and production process economy, both of which need to be also preserved. Environmental and health safety, rational use of the natural resources and technological tools, upkeep of high social growth rates and respect of a social equity are the basis of the sustainability for any production process, including the agriculture. The new globalization framework has penalized small farms and, at the same time, has put serious constraints to the development of stronger economic systems (medium/large farms, as well. As consequence, the EU has outlined several strategic programs to support small agricultural systems in marginal areas by: 1 strengthening all the quality- related aspects of agricultural production, including nutritional and cultural traits associated to local, typical and in some cases to neglected crops; 2 improving traditional cultural practices by adapting the cropping cycles and fomenting new partnerships between the different parts of the production chain, as for example; promotion of small horticultural chains. Specific political actions for the horticultural production sector have also been developed. Some of these policies are specifically addressed to preserve the biodiversity and to create quality labels certifying typical and/or organic products. All of these are possible strategies that may counteract and cope with the globalization process and increase the competitiveness of many production systems especially those performed by local and small entrepreneurs. New sustainable development models are required by both the market and the implicit requirements of the production system, inside a context on which Europe must face with new emerging economies with lower production costs, by increasing

  6. Sustainable crop models for fruit, vegetable and flower quality productions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inglese Paolo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development is a paradigm that has evolved over the time, since the ideas of socially acceptable and compatible development, on which it was originally based, are now supported by the more recent notions of ecological equilibria and production process economy, both of which need to be also preserved. Environmental and health safety, rational use of the natural resources and technological tools, upkeep of high social growth rates and respect of a social equity are the basis of the sustainability for any production process, including the agriculture. The new globalization framework has penalized small farms and, at the same time, has put serious constraints to the development of stronger economic systems (medium/large farms, as well. As consequence, the EU has outlined several strategic programs to support small agricultural systems in marginal areas by: 1 strengthening all the quality- related aspects of agricultural production, including nutritional and cultural traits associated to local, typical and in some cases to neglected crops; 2 improving traditional cultural practices by adapting the cropping cycles and fomenting new partnerships between the different parts of the production chain, as for example; promotion of small horticultural chains. Specific political actions for the horticultural production sector have also been developed. Some of these policies are specifically addressed to preserve the biodiversity and to create quality labels certifying typical and/or organic products. All of these are possible strategies that may counteract and cope with the globalization process and increase the competitiveness of many production systems especially those performed by local and small entrepreneurs. New sustainable development models are required by both the market and the implicit requirements of the production system, inside a context on which Europe must face with new emerging economies with lower production costs, by increasing

  7. A graphical user interface for numerical modeling of acclimation responses of vegetation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phong V. V.; Kumar, Praveen; Drewry, Darren T.; Quijano, Juan C.

    2012-12-01

    Ecophysiological models that vertically resolve vegetation canopy states are becoming a powerful tool for studying the exchange of mass, energy, and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere. A mechanistic multilayer canopy-soil-root system model (MLCan) developed by Drewry et al. (2010a) has been used to capture the emergent vegetation responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 for both C3 and C4 plants under various climate conditions. However, processing input data and setting up such a model can be time-consuming and error-prone. In this paper, a graphical user interface that has been developed for MLCan is presented. The design of this interface aims to provide visualization capabilities and interactive support for processing input meteorological forcing data and vegetation parameter values to facilitate the use of this model. In addition, the interface also provides graphical tools for analyzing the forcing data and simulated numerical results. The model and its interface are both written in the MATLAB programming language. Finally, an application of this model package for capturing the ecohydrological responses of three bioenergy crops (maize, miscanthus, and switchgrass) to local environmental drivers at two different sites in the Midwestern United States is presented.

  8. Effects of different vegetation restoration models on soil microbial biomass in eroded hilly Loess Plateau, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Sha; LIU Guobin; DAI Quanhou; LAN Xue; YU Na

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation restoration is a key measure to improve the eco-environment in Loess Plateau,China.In order to find the effect of soil microbial biomass under different vegetation restoration models in this region,six trial sites located in Zhifanggou watershed were selected in this study.Results showed that soil microbial biomass,microbial respiration and physical and chemical properties increased apparently.After 30 years of vegetation restoration,soil microbial biomass C,N,P(SMBC,SMBN,SMBP)and microbial respiration,increased by 109.01%-144.22%,34.17%-117.09%,31.79%-79.94% and 26.78%-87.59% respectively,as compared with the farmland.However,metabolic quotient declined dramatically by 57.45%-77.49%.Effects of different models of vegetation restoration are different on improving the properties of soil.In general,mixed stands of Pinus tabulaeformisAmorpha fruticosa and Robinia pseudoacacia-A,fruticosa had the most remarkable effect,followed by R.pseudoacacia and Caragana korshinkii,fallow land and P.tabulaeformis was the lowest.Restoration of mixed forest had greater effective than pure forest in eroded Hilly Loess Plateau.The significant relationships were observed among SMBC,SMBP,microbial respiration,and physical and chemical properties of soil.It was concluded that microbial biomass can be used as indicators of soil quality.

  9. High resolution climate and vegetation simulations of the Late Pliocene, a model-data comparison over western Europe and the Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jost

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Here we perform a detailed comparison between climate model results and climate reconstructions in western Europe and the Mediterranean area for the mid-Piacenzian warm interval (ca 3 Myr ago of the Late Pliocene epoch. This region is particularly well suited for such a comparison as several quantitative climate estimates from local pollen records are available. They show evidence for temperatures significantly warmer than today over the whole area, mean annual precipitation higher in northwestern Europe and equivalent to modern values in its southwestern part. To improve our comparison, we have performed high resolution simulations of the mid-Piacenzian climate using the LMDz atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM with a stretched grid which allows a finer resolution over Europe. In a first step, we applied the PRISM2 (Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping boundary conditions except that we used modern terrestrial vegetation. Second, we simulated the vegetation for this period by forcing the ORCHIDEE (Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamic Ecosystems dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM with the climatic outputs from the AGCM. We then supplied this simulated terrestrial vegetation cover as an additional boundary condition in a second AGCM run. This gives us the opportunity to investigate the model's sensitivity to the simulated vegetation changes in a global warming context.

    Model results and data show a great consistency for mean annual temperatures, indicating increases by up to 4°C in the study area, and some disparities, in particular in the northern Mediterranean sector, as regards winter and summer temperatures. Similar continental mean annual precipitation and moisture patterns are predicted by the model, which broadly underestimates the wetter conditions indicated by the data in northwestern Europe. The biogeophysical effects due to the changes in vegetation simulated by ORCHIDEE are weak

  10. Modeling of vegetation dynamics in hydrological models for the assessment of the effects of climate change on evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wegehenkel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation affects water balance of the land surface by e.g. storage of precipitation water in the canopy and soil water extraction by transpiration. Therefore, it is essential to consider the role of vegetation in affecting water balance by taking into account the temporal dynamics of e.g. leaf area index, rooting depth and stomatal conductance in hydrological models. However until now, most conceptual hydrological models do not treat vegetation as a dynamic component. This paper presents an analysis of the effects of the application of two different complex vegetation models combined with a hydrological model on the model outputs evapotranspiration and groundwater recharge. Both model combinations were used for the assessment of the effects of climate change on water balance in a mesoscale catchment loctated in the Northeastern German Lowlands. One vegetation model assumes a static vegetation development independent from environmental conditions. The other vegetation model calculates dynamic development of vegetation based on photosynthesis, respiration, allocation, and phenology. The analysis of the results obtained from both model combinations indicated the importance of taking into account vegetation dynamics in hydrological models especially if such models are used for the assessment of the impacts of climate change on water balance components.

  11. A mechanistic model on the role of "radially-running" collagen fibers on dissection properties of human ascending thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Siladitya; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Pasta, Salvatore; D'Amore, Antonio; Gleason, Thomas G; Vorp, David A; Maiti, Spandan

    2014-03-21

    Aortic dissection (AoD) is a common condition that often leads to life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. From a biomechanics viewpoint, AoD involves failure of load-bearing microstructural components of the aortic wall, mainly elastin and collagen fibers. Delamination strength of the aortic wall depends on the load-bearing capacity and local micro-architecture of these fibers, which may vary with age, disease and aortic location. Therefore, quantifying the role of fiber micro-architecture on the delamination strength of the aortic wall may lead to improved understanding of AoD. We present an experimentally-driven modeling paradigm towards this goal. Specifically, we utilize collagen fiber micro-architecture, obtained in a parallel study from multi-photon microscopy, in a predictive mechanistic framework to characterize the delamination strength. We then validate our model against peel test experiments on human aortic strips and utilize the model to predict the delamination strength of separate aortic strips and compare with experimental findings. We observe that the number density and failure energy of the radially-running collagen fibers control the peel strength. Furthermore, our model suggests that the lower delamination strength previously found for the circumferential direction in human aorta is related to a lower number density of radially-running collagen fibers in that direction. Our model sets the stage for an expanded future study that could predict AoD propagation in patient-specific aortic geometries and better understand factors that may influence propensity for occurrence.

  12. Application of a plane-stratified emission model to predict the effects of vegetation in passive microwave radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lee

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the application to vegetation canopies of a coherent model for the propagation of electromagnetic radiation through a stratified medium. The resulting multi-layer vegetation model is plausibly realistic in that it recognises the dielectric permittivity of the vegetation matter, the mixing of the dielectric permittivities for vegetation and air within the canopy and, in simplified terms, the overall vertical distribution of dielectric permittivity and temperature through the canopy. Any sharp changes in the dielectric profile of the canopy resulted in interference effects manifested as oscillations in the microwave brightness temperature as a function of canopy height or look angle. However, when Gaussian broadening of the top and bottom of the canopy (reflecting the natural variability between plants was included within the model, these oscillations were eliminated. The model parameters required to specify the dielectric profile within the canopy, particularly the parameters that quantify the dielectric mixing between vegetation and air in the canopy, are not usually available in typical field experiments. Thus, the feasibility of specifying these parameters using an advanced single-criterion, multiple-parameter optimisation technique was investigated by automatically minimizing the difference between the modelled and measured brightness temperatures. The results imply that the mixing parameters can be so determined but only if other parameters that specify vegetation dry matter and water content are measured independently. The new model was then applied to investigate the sensitivity of microwave emission to specific vegetation parameters. Keywords: passive microwave, soil moisture, vegetation, SMOS, retrieval

  13. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2011-01-01

    The cross country running season has started well this autumn with two events: the traditional CERN Road Race organized by the Running Club, which took place on Tuesday 5th October, followed by the ‘Cross Interentreprises’, a team event at the Evaux Sports Center, which took place on Saturday 8th October. The participation at the CERN Road Race was slightly down on last year, with 65 runners, however the participants maintained the tradition of a competitive yet friendly atmosphere. An ample supply of refreshments before the prize giving was appreciated by all after the race. Many thanks to all the runners and volunteers who ensured another successful race. The results can be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/default.aspx CERN participated successfully at the cross interentreprises with very good results. The teams succeeded in obtaining 2nd and 6th place in the Mens category, and 2nd place in the Mixed category. Congratulations to all. See results here: http://www.c...

  14. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Chamizo

    2012-01-01

      On 17th January, as soon as the services were restored after the technical stop, sub-systems started powering on. Since then, we have been running 24/7 with reduced shift crew — Shift Leader and DCS shifter — to allow sub-detectors to perform calibration, noise studies, test software upgrades, etc. On 15th and 16th February, we had the first Mid-Week Global Run (MWGR) with the participation of most sub-systems. The aim was to bring CMS back to operation and to ensure that we could run after the winter shutdown. All sub-systems participated in the readout and the trigger was provided by a fraction of the muon systems (CSC and the central RPC wheel). The calorimeter triggers were not available due to work on the optical link system. Initial checks of different distributions from Pixels, Strips, and CSC confirmed things look all right (signal/noise, number of tracks, phi distribution…). High-rate tests were done to test the new CSC firmware to cure the low efficiency ...

  15. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  16. A model investigation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions on a millennial timescale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Devaraju

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A terrestrial biosphere model with dynamic vegetation capability, Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS2, coupled to the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM2 is used to investigate the multiple climate-forest equilibrium states of the climate system. A 1000-year control simulation and another 1000-year land cover change simulation that consisted of global deforestation for 100 years followed by re-growth of forests for the subsequent 900 years were performed. After several centuries of interactive climate-vegetation dynamics, the land cover change simulation converged to essentially the same climate state as the control simulation. However, the climate system takes about a millennium to reach the control forest state. In the absence of deep ocean feedbacks in our model, the millennial time scale for converging to the original climate state is dictated by long time scales of the vegetation dynamics in the northern high latitudes. Our idealized modeling study suggests that the equilibrium state reached after complete global deforestation followed by re-growth of forests is unlikely to be distinguishable from the control climate. The real world, however, could have multiple climate-forest states since our modeling study is unlikely to have represented all the essential ecological processes (e.g. altered fire regimes, seed sources and seedling establishment dynamics for the re-establishment of major biomes.

  17. Evaluating the Impacts of NASA/SPoRT Daily Greenness Vegetation Fraction on Land Surface Model and Numerical Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jordan R.; Case, Jonathan L.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a Greenness Vegetation Fraction (GVF) dataset, which is updated daily using swaths of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data aboard the NASA EOS Aqua and Terra satellites. NASA SPoRT began generating daily real-time GVF composites at 1-km resolution over the Continental United States (CONUS) on 1 June 2010. The purpose of this study is to compare the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) climatology GVF product (currently used in operational weather models) to the SPoRT-MODIS GVF during June to October 2010. The NASA Land Information System (LIS) was employed to study the impacts of the SPoRT-MODIS GVF dataset on a land surface model (LSM) apart from a full numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. For the 2010 warm season, the SPoRT GVF in the western portion of the CONUS was generally higher than the NCEP climatology. The eastern CONUS GVF had variations both above and below the climatology during the period of study. These variations in GVF led to direct impacts on the rates of heating and evaporation from the land surface. In the West, higher latent heat fluxes prevailed, which enhanced the rates of evapotranspiration and soil moisture depletion in the LSM. By late Summer and Autumn, both the average sensible and latent heat fluxes increased in the West as a result of the more rapid soil drying and higher coverage of GVF. The impacts of the SPoRT GVF dataset on NWP was also examined for a single severe weather case study using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two separate coupled LIS/WRF model simulations were made for the 17 July 2010 severe weather event in the Upper Midwest using the NCEP and SPoRT GVFs, with all other model parameters remaining the same. Based on the sensitivity results, regions with higher GVF in the SPoRT model runs had higher evapotranspiration and

  18. REAL STOCK PRICES AND THE LONG-RUN MONEY DEMAND FUNCTION IN MALAYSIA: Evidence from Error Correction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naziruddin Abdullah

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study adopts the error correction model to empirically investigate the role of real stock prices in the long run-money demand in the Malaysian financial or money market for the period 1977: Q1-1997: Q2. Specifically, an attempt is made to check whether the real narrow money (M1/P is cointegrated with the selected variables like industrial production index (IPI, one-year T-Bill rates (TB12, and real stock prices (RSP. If a cointegration between the variables, i.e., the dependent and independent variables, is found to be the case, it may imply that there exists a long-run co-movement among these variables in the Malaysian money market. From the empirical results it is found that the cointegration between money demand and real stock prices (RSP is positive, implying that in the long run there is a positive association between real stock prices (RSP and demand for real narrow money (M1/P. The policy implication that can be extracted from this study is that an increase in stock prices is likely to necessitate an expansionary monetary policy to prevent nominal income or inflation target from undershooting.

  19. Modeling the flow resistance of woody vegetation using physically based properties of the foliage and stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Västilä, Kaisa; Järvelä, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Both the foliage and stem essentially influence the flow resistance of woody plants, but their different biomechanical properties complicate the parameterization of foliated vegetation for modeling. This paper investigates whether modeling of flow resistance caused by natural woody vegetation can be improved using explicit description of both the foliage and stem. For this purpose, we directly measured the drag forces of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, Salix viminalis, and Salix x rubens twigs in a laboratory flume at four foliation levels, parameterized with the leaf-area-to-stem-area ratio AL/AS. The species differed in the foliage drag but had approximately equal stem drag. For the foliated twigs, increasing AL/AS was found to increase the reconfiguration and the share of the foliage drag to the total drag. The experiments provided new insight into the factors governing the flow resistance of natural woody vegetation and allowed us to develop a model for estimating the vegetative friction factor using the linear superposition of the foliage and stem drag. The model is novel in that the foliage and stem are separately described with physically based parameters: drag coefficients, reconfiguration parameters, and leaf area and frontal-projected stem area per ground area. The model could satisfactorily predict the flow resistance of twig to sapling-sized specimens of the investigated species at velocities of 0.05-1 m/s. As a further benefit, the model allows exploring the variability in drag and reconfiguration associated with differing abundance of the foliage in relation to the stem.

  20. Phreatophytic vegetation and groundwater fluctuations: a review of current research and application of ecosystem response modeling with an emphasis on great basin vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumburg, Elke; Mata-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Hunter, Rachael G; McLendon, Terry; Martin, David W

    2005-06-01

    Although changes in depth to groundwater occur naturally, anthropogenic alterations may exacerbate these fluctuations and, thus, affect vegetation reliant on groundwater. These effects include changes in physiology, structure, and community dynamics, particularly in arid regions where groundwater can be an important water source for many plants. To properly manage ecosystems subject to changes in depth to groundwater, plant responses to both rising and falling groundwater tables must be understood. However, most research has focused exclusively on riparian ecosystems, ignoring regions where groundwater is available to a wider range of species. Here, we review responses of riparian and other species to changes in groundwater levels in arid environments. Although decreasing water tables often result in plant water stress and reduced live biomass, the converse is not necessarily true for rising water tables. Initially, rising water tables kill flooded roots because most species cannot tolerate the associated low oxygen levels. Thus, flooded plants can also experience water stress. Ultimately, individual species responses to either scenario depend on drought and flooding tolerance and the change in root system size and water uptake capacity. However, additional environmental and biological factors can play important roles in the severity of vegetation response to altered groundwater tables. Using the reviewed information, we created two conceptual models to highlight vegetation dynamics in areas with groundwater fluctuations. These models use flow charts to identify key vegetation and ecosystem properties and their responses to changes in groundwater tables to predict community responses. We then incorporated key concepts from these models into EDYS, a comprehensive ecosystem model, to highlight the potential complexity of predicting community change under different fluctuating groundwater scenarios. Such models provide a valuable tool for managing vegetation and

  1. The 14 TeV LHC Takes Aim at SUSY: A No-Scale Supergravity Model for LHC Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Walker, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    The Supergravity model named No-Scale ${\\cal F}$-$SU(5)$, which is based upon the flipped $SU$(5) Grand Unified Theory (GUT) with additional TeV-scale vector-like flippon multiplets, has been partially probed during the LHC Run 1 at 7-8 TeV, though the majority of its model space remains viable and should be accessible by the 13-14 TeV LHC during Run 2. The model framework possesses the rather unique capacity to provide a light CP-even Higgs boson mass in the favored 124-126 GeV window while simultaneously retaining a testably light supersymmetry (SUSY) spectrum. We summarize the outlook for No-Scale ${\\cal F}$-$SU(5)$ at the 13-14 TeV LHC and review a promising methodology for the discrimination of its long-chain cascade decay signature. We further show that proportional dependence of all model scales upon the unified gaugino mass $M_{1/2}$ minimizes electroweak fine-tuning, allowing the $Z$-boson mass $M_Z$ to be expressed as an explicit function of $M_{1/2}$, $M_Z^2 = M_Z^2 (M_{1/2}^2)$, with implicit depe...

  2. Aboveground Biomass and Dynamics of Forest Attributes using LiDAR Data and Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    V V L, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, biomass estimation for tropical forests has received much attention because of the fact that regional biomass is considered to be a critical input to climate change. Biomass almost determines the potential carbon emission that could be released to the atmosphere due to deforestation or conservation to non-forest land use. Thus, accurate biomass estimation is necessary for better understating of deforestation impacts on global warming and environmental degradation. In this context, forest stand height inclusion in biomass estimation plays a major role in reducing the uncertainty in the estimation of biomass. The improvement in the accuracy in biomass shall also help in meeting the MRV objectives of REDD+. Along with the precise estimate of biomass, it is also important to emphasize the role of vegetation models that will most likely become an important tool for assessing the effects of climate change on potential vegetation dynamics and terrestrial carbon storage and for managing terrestrial ecosystem sustainability. Remote sensing is an efficient way to estimate forest parameters in large area, especially at regional scale where field data is limited. LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) provides accurate information on the vertical structure of forests. We estimated average tree canopy heights and AGB from GLAS waveform parameters by using a multi-regression linear model in forested area of Madhya Pradesh (area-3,08,245 km2), India. The derived heights from ICESat-GLAS were correlated with field measured tree canopy heights for 60 plots. Results have shown a significant correlation of R2= 74% for top canopy heights and R2= 57% for stand biomass. The total biomass estimation 320.17 Mt and canopy heights are generated by using random forest algorithm. These canopy heights and biomass maps were used in vegetation models to predict the changes biophysical/physiological characteristics of forest according to the changing climate. In our study we have

  3. Utilizing observations of vegetation patterns to infer ecosystem parameters and test model predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, G.; Daniels, K. E.; Thompson, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic vegetation patterns arise globally in arid and semi-arid environments, and are believed to indicate competing positive and negative feedbacks between resource availability and plant uptake at different length scales. The patterns have become the object of two separate research themes, one focusing on observation of ecosystem properties and vegetation morphology, and another focusing on the development of theoretical models and descriptions of pattern behavior. Given the growing body of work in both directions, there is a compelling need to unify both strands of research by bringing together observations of large-scale pattern morphology with predictions made by various models. Previous attempts have employed spectral analysis on pattern images and inverse modeling on one-dimensional transects of patterns images, yet have not made a concerted effort to rigorously confront predictions with observational data in two dimensions. This study makes the first steps towards unification, utilizing high resolution landscape-scale images of vegetation patterns over multiple years at five different locations, including Niger, Central Mexico, Baja California, Texas, and Australia. Initial analyses of the observed patterns reveal considerable departures from the idealized morphologies predicted by models. Pattern wavelengths, while clustered around a local average, vary through space and are frequently altered by pattern defects such as missing or broken bands. While often locally homogeneous, pattern orientation also varies through space, allowing the correlations between landscape features and changes in local pattern morphology to be explored. Stationarity of the pattern can then be examined by comparing temporal changes in morphology with local climatic fluctuations. Ultimately, by identifying homogeneous regions of coherent pattern, inversion approaches can be applied to infer model parameters and build links between observable pattern and landscape features and the

  4. Uncertainty of Coupled Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Modelling Methods for Estimating Groundwater Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Cook, P. G.; Simmons, C. T.; Partington, D.; Crosbie, R.; Batelaan, O.

    2016-12-01

    Coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere models have become increasingly popular for estimating groundwater recharge, because of the integration of carbon, energy and water balances. The carbon and energy balances act to constrain the water balance and as a result should reduce the uncertainty of groundwater recharge estimates. However, the addition of carbon and energy balances also introduces a large number of plant physiological parameters which complicates the estimation of groundwater recharge. Moreover, this method often relies on existing pedotransfer functions to derive soil water retention curve parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity from soil attribute data. The choice of a pedotransfer function is usually subjective and several pedotransfer functions may be fit for the purpose. These different pedotransfer functions (and thus the uncertainty of soil water retention curve parameters and saturated hydraulic conductivity) are likely to increase the prediction uncertainty of recharge estimates. In this study, we aim to assess the potential uncertainty of groundwater recharge when using a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere modelling method. The widely used WAter Vegetation Energy and Solute (WAVES) modelling code was used to perform simulations of different water balances in order to estimate groundwater recharge in the Campaspe catchment in southeast Australia. We carefully determined the ranges of the vegetation parameters based upon a literature review. We also assessed a number of existing pedotransfer functions and selected the four most appropriate. Then the Monte Carlo analysis approach was employed to examine potential uncertainties introduced by different types of errors. Preliminary results suggest that for a mean rainfall of about 500 mm/y and annual pasture vegetation, the estimated recharge may range from 10 to 150 mm/y due to the uncertainty in vegetation parameters. This upper bound of the recharge range may double to 300 mm/y if different

  5. [Estimation models of vegetation fractional coverage (VFC) based on remote sensing image at different radiometric correction levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhu-Jun; Zeng, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Xue-Zheng; Yu, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Zhen-Long; Hu, Zi-Fu

    2008-06-01

    The images of post atmospheric correction reflectance (PAC), top of atmosphere reflectance (TOA), and digital number (DN) of a SPOT5 HRG remote sensing image of Nanjing, China were used to derive four vegetation indices (VIs), i. e., normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), transformed vegetation index (TVI), soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI), and modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI), and 36 VI-VFC relationship models were established based on these VIs and the VFC data obtained from ground measurement. The results showed that among the models established, the cubic polynomial models based on NDVI and TVI from PAC were the best, followed by those based on SAVI and MSAVI from DN, with the accuracy being slightly higher than that of the former two models when VFC > 0.8. The accuracy of these four models was higher in middle-densely vegetated areas (VFC = 0.4-0.8) than in sparsely vegetated areas (VFC = 0-0.4). All the established models could be used in other places via the introduction of calibration models. In VI-VFC modeling, using VIs derived from different radiometric correction levels of remote sensing image could help mining valuable information from remote sensing image, and thus, improving the accuracy of VFC estimation.

  6. Simulation and modeling of vegetable market wastes pyrolysis under progressive deactivation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.; Bhattacharya, P.; Chowdhury, R. [Jadavpur University, Chemical Engineering Dept., Kolkata (India)

    2004-06-01

    Pyrolytic behaviour of sun-dried vegetable market waste was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis within the temperature range of 523 to 923 K under inert atmosphere. Results were compared with other lignocellulosic materials in order to highlight the difference between the pyrolysis of nearly homogenous and perfectly mixed homogenous biomass. The vegetable waste analysis indicated a structural change of the biomass, which ultimately led to the deactivation phenomenon. When compared to the pyrolysis behaviour of other nearly pure lignocellulosic materials, the conversion rate of the reacting materials was appreciably lower. This was attributed to the low concentration of active material in the vegetable waste. Simulation and modelling have been carried out to explain the kinetic behaviour of pyrolysis reaction. A reaction mechanism involving two parallel first order reactions evolving gaseous products, lumped as volatiles and solid products lumped as char, has been proposed for prediction of rate constants as a function of normalized fractional change. Four kinetic models incorporating the effect of deactivation have been used for this purpose, however, no single set of model equations was found to be adequate to explain the entire pyrolysis process. At the same time, separating the pyrolysis operation into two temperature segments -- one at low to moderate, and one at higher temperatures -- satisfactory correspondence (segment-wise) can be established between experimental results and model equations. 15 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  7. Global terrestrial isoprene emission models: sensitivity to variability in climate and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to its effects on the atmospheric lifetime of methane, the burdens of tropospheric ozone and growth of secondary organic aerosol, isoprene is central among the biogenic compounds that need to be taken into account for assessment of anthropogenic air pollution-climate change interactions. Lack of process-understanding regarding leaf isoprene production as well as of suitable observations to constrain and evaluate regional or global simulation results add large uncertainties to past, present and future emissions estimates. Focusing on contemporary climate conditions, we compare three global isoprene models that differ in their representation of vegetation and isoprene emission algorithm. We specifically aim to investigate the between- and within model variation that is introduced by varying some of the models' main features, and to determine which spatial and/or temporal features are robust between models and different experimental set-ups. In their individual standard configurations, the models broadly agree with respect to the chief isoprene sources and emission seasonality, with maximum monthly emission rates around 20–25 Tg C, when averaged by 30-degree latitudinal bands. They also indicate relatively small (approximately 5 to 10 % around the mean interannual variability of total global emissions. The models are sensitive to changes in one or more of their main model components and drivers (e.g., underlying vegetation fields, climate input which can yield increases or decreases in total annual emissions of cumulatively by more than 30 %. Varying drivers also strongly alters the seasonal emission pattern. The variable response needs to be interpreted in view of the vegetation emission capacities, as well as diverging absolute and regional distribution of light, radiation and temperature, but the direction of the simulated emission changes was not as uniform as anticipated. Our results highlight the need for modellers to evaluate their

  8. A numerical study of tsunami wave impact and run-up on coastal cliffs using a CIP-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xizeng; Chen, Yong; Huang, Zhenhua; Hu, Zijun; Gao, Yangyang

    2017-05-01

    There is a general lack of understanding of tsunami wave interaction with complex geographies, especially the process of inundation. Numerical simulations are performed to understand the effects of several factors on tsunami wave impact and run-up in the presence of gentle submarine slopes and coastal cliffs, using an in-house code, a constrained interpolation profile (CIP)-based model. The model employs a high-order finite difference method, the CIP method, as the flow solver; utilizes a VOF-type method, the tangent of hyperbola for interface capturing/slope weighting (THINC/SW) scheme, to capture the free surface; and treats the solid boundary by an immersed boundary method. A series of incident waves are arranged to interact with varying coastal geographies. Numerical results are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained. The influences of gentle submarine slope, coastal cliff and incident wave height are discussed. It is found that the tsunami amplification factor varying with incident wave is affected by gradient of cliff slope, and the critical value is about 45°. The run-up on a toe-erosion cliff is smaller than that on a normal cliff. The run-up is also related to the length of a gentle submarine slope with a critical value of about 2.292 m in the present model for most cases. The impact pressure on the cliff is extremely large and concentrated, and the backflow effect is non-negligible. Results of our work are highly precise and helpful in inverting tsunami source and forecasting disaster.

  9. Improving wildlife habitat model performance: Sensitivity to the scale and detail of vegetation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lance Jay, Jr.

    Monitoring the impacts of resource use and landscape change on wildlife habitat over large areas is a daunting assignment. Forest land managers could benefit from linking the frequent decisions of resource use (timber harvesting) with a system of wildlife habitat accounting, but to date these tools are not widely available. I examined aspects of wildlife habitat modeling that: (in Chapter 2) could potentially lead to the establishment of wildlife habitat accounting within a resource decision support tool, (in Chapter 3) improve our theoretical understanding and methods to interpret the accuracy of wildlife habitat models, (in Chapter 4) explore the effects of vegetation classification systems on wildlife habitat model results, and (in Chapter 5) show that forest structural estimates from satellite imagery can improve potential habitat distribution models (GAP) for forest bird species. The majority of the analyses in this dissertation were done using a forest resource inventory developed by the State of Michigan (IFMAP). Paired with field vegetation and bird samples from sites across the lower peninsula of Michigan, we compared the relative accuracy of wildlife habitat relationship models built with plot-scale vegetation samples and stand-scale forest inventory maps. Recursive partitioning trees were used to build wildlife habitat models for 30 bird species. The habitat distribution maps from the Michigan Gap Analysis (MIGAP) were used as a baseline for comparison of model accuracy results. Both the plot and stand-scale measurements achieved high accuracy and there were few large differences between plot and stand-scale models for any individual species. Where the plot and stand-scale models were different, they tended to be species associated with mixed habitats. This may be evidence that scale of vegetation measurement has a larger influence on species associated with edges and ecotones. Habitat models that were built solely with land cover data were less accurate

  10. [Prediction of PCBs uptake by vegetable in a representative area and evaluation of the human health risk by Trapp model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shao-Po; Luo, Yong-Ming; Song, Jing; Teng, Ying; Chen, Yong-Shan

    2010-12-01

    Air, soil and vegetable samples were collected from an e-waste disassembly site and analyzed for characteristic contaminants PCBs. Based on the measured PCBs concentrations in soil and air, PCBs concentration in leafy vegetables was predicted by Trapp Model and the sources, composition of PCBs in vegetable and influencing factors were analyzed. By using human health risk assessment model of USEPA, risk to human health from consumption of vegetable that take up PCBs from environment was evaluated. The results showed that the Trapp Model could give good prediction of PCBs concentrations in leafy vegetables based on PCBs concentration in the soil and air. For instance, the measured sum of seven PCBs in vegetable was 51.2 microg x kg(-1) and the predicted value was 39.9 microg x kg(-1). So the predicted value agrees well with the measured value. The gaseous PCBs were the main source of PCBs in leafy vegetables, and the model predicting results indicated that the contribution rate was as high as 98.8%. The uptake pathway, n-octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and the n-octanol/air partition coefficient (K(oa)) of PCBs determine the concentration and composition of PCBs in vegetables. The duration needed for PCBs uptake to reach equilibrium was in good correlation with lgK(ow) and lgK(oa). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that lgK(oa) was more important. Carcinogenic risk from consumption of PCBs contaminated vegetables was 10 000 times higher than that of gaseous PCBs, and the no-carcinogenic risk was increased by approximately 200 times. The main reasons are firstly the vegetables take up and accumulate more toxic PCBs with high-chloride substitutes and consequently the oral toxic factors of PCBs increase dramatically. Secondly, an adult takes 71 times more PCBs via consumption of vegetables than via inhalation of air.

  11. Climate-vegetation interactions in the coupled RegCM4 - CLM4.5 CNDV model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, Luca; Giuliani, Graziano; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    We use the latest version of International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4) coupled with the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) including a dynamic vegetation model to study biogeophysical feedbacks in the climate system related to vegetation composition and structure. Sets of parallel experiments are conducted over the Africa and South America CORDEX domains using the RegCM4-CLM4.5 in its standard configuration and with the CNDV activated (CLM 4.5 with both the Carbon Nitrogen and the Dynamic Vegetation Model activated). The potential role of regional vegetation feedbacks within the climate system and the impact of climate variability and change on the ecosystem dynamics is assessed for both domains. In addition, the sensitivity to initial vegetation conditions and different idealized climate forcings is investigated. Preliminary results show that the changes in the climate forcing can have substantial effects on the dynamics and evolution of different vegetation types over both domains, and that the vegetation coupling can have a substantial effect on the simulated regional climate regimes. Our results thus indicate on the one hand that climate change can have profound effects on the evolution of important ecosystems for the two regions, and on the other that vegetation dynamics can indeed affect the climate response at the regional scale.

  12. Influence of forest roads standards and networks on water yield as predicted by the distributed hydrology-soil-vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salli F. Dymond; W. Michael Aust; Steven P. Prisley; Mark H. Eisenbies; James M. Vose

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the country, foresters are continually looking at the effects of logging and forest roads on stream discharge and overall stream health. In the Pacific Northwest, a distributed hydrology-soil-vegetation model (DHSVM) has been used to predict the effects of logging on peak discharge in mountainous regions. DHSVM uses elevation, meteorological, vegetation, and...

  13. Parallel runs of a large air pollution model on a grid of Sun computers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandrov, V.N.; Owczarz, W.; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2004-01-01

    Large -scale air pollution models can successfully be used in different environmental studies. These models are described mathematically by systems of partial differential equations. Splitting procedures followed by discretization of the spatial derivatives leads to several large systems of ordin...

  14. Accounting for the influence of vegetation and landscape improves model transferability in a tropical savannah region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongkai; Hrachowitz, Markus; Sriwongsitanon, Nutchanart; Fenicia, Fabrizio; Gharari, Shervan; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding which catchment characteristics dominate hydrologic response and how to take them into account remains a challenge in hydrological modeling, particularly in ungauged basins. This is even more so in nontemperate and nonhumid catchments, where—due to the combination of seasonality and the occurrence of dry spells—threshold processes are more prominent in rainfall runoff behavior. An example is the tropical savannah, the second largest climatic zone, characterized by pronounced dry and wet seasons and high evaporative demand. In this study, we investigated the importance of landscape variability on the spatial variability of stream flow in tropical savannah basins. We applied a stepwise modeling approach to 23 subcatchments of the Upper Ping River in Thailand, where gradually more information on landscape was incorporated. The benchmark is represented by a classical lumped model (FLEXL), which does not account for spatial variability. We then tested the effect of accounting for vegetation information within the lumped model (FLEXLM), and subsequently two semidistributed models: one accounting for the spatial variability of topography-based landscape features alone (FLEXT), and another accounting for both topographic features and vegetation (FLEXTM). In cross validation, each model was calibrated on one catchment, and then transferred with its fitted parameters to the remaining catchments. We found that when transferring model parameters in space, the semidistributed models accounting for vegetation and topographic heterogeneity clearly outperformed the lumped model. This suggests that landscape controls a considerable part of the hydrological function and explicit consideration of its heterogeneity can be highly beneficial for prediction in ungauged basins in tropical savannah.

  15. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  16. Incorporating vegetation dynamics in regional climate change projections over the Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alo, C. A.; Anagnostou, E. N.

    2009-09-01

    Recent projections of climate change over the Mediterranean region based on general circulation models (e.g. IPCC AR4 GCMs) and regional climate models (e.g. PRUDENCE RCMs) generally show strong warming and pronounced decrease in precipitation, especially in the summer. While the role of vegetation in modulating the regional climate is widely recognized, most, if not all, of these GCM and RCM climate change projections do not account for the response of the dynamic biosphere to potential climate changes. Here, we present preliminary results from ongoing 15-year simulations over the Mediterranean region with a regional climate model (RegCM3) asynchronously coupled to a dynamic vegetation model (CLM-DGVM). Three experiments are performed in order to explore the impact of vegetation feedback on simulated changes in mean climate, climate variability and extreme climatic events (i.e., flood-inducing storms, droughts, heat waves, and extreme winds). This includes 1) a present day climate run with dynamic vegetation, 2) a future climate run with dynamic vegetation, and 3) a future climate run with static vegetation (i.e. vegetation fixed at the present day state). RegCM3 and CLM-DGVM are both run at a horizontal grid spacing of 20 km over a region covering the Mediterranean basin and parts of Central Europe and Northern Africa. Results illustrate the importance of including vegetation feedback in predictions of climate change impacts on Mediterranean climate variability, extreme climatic events and storms.

  17. Logistic Equation and its Application as Forecasting Model of Vegetables Production in Greenhouses in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA SHEHU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct forecasting is of a great importance for the business and economy of the country. To comprehend the market and the economic system, mathematical models are used to describe and predict the future of situation. Agriculture is the spinal column of Albania’s economic activity and the last 20 years free market experience has given a demonstration of the high correlation between agricultural progress and the economic development. Producing greenhouse-grown vegetables can result a beneficial activity, but it is a hard and complicated investment. The greenhouse technology is one of great innovation in agriculture. Agricultures methods must be combined with technical knowledge, marketing must be planned before harvest, and every phase of process should be well-managed. In this paper it is studied and applied the logistic growth model for forecasting the production of vegetables in greenhouse. The results of this paper show that the logistic S-shaped curve is a mathematical model to characterize the progress of innovation in agriculture. Also, the logistic equation can be used to describe and predict the production of vegetables in greenhouses in Albania.

  18. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOW THROUGH SUBMERGED VEGETATION REGIONS IN A SHALLOW LAKE*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Pei-fang; WANG Chao

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic vegetation has a significant impact on water currents. To evaluate the effects of changes in the aquatic vegetation on water currents of different velocity, a 3-D hydrodynamic model was then developed by taking into consideration of the additional hydraulic resistance of the aquatic plants. The Navier- Stokes equations were then solved using the SIMPLE method and the k- ε turbulence model. Calculations using the established models were used to forecast the vertical distribution of the horizontal velocity and horizontal flow under the transmission conditions of the South-North Water Diversion in the Nansi Lake. And comparative calculation for the flow velocity was also performed using the simplified method of assigning a high roughness coefficient to the lake bed in the same area. Results suggest that adding additional hydraulic resistance of the aquatic plants is feasible. The calculation errors between simulation result and the field observed data are smaller than 15%, while, those errors are up to 35% if the influence of aquatic vegetation is dealt with the simplified method.

  19. Landscape evolution in tidal embayments: Modeling the interplay of erosion, sedimentation, and vegetation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alpaos, Andrea; Lanzoni, Stefano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2007-03-01

    We propose an ecomorphodynamic model which conceptualizes the chief land-forming processes operating on the intertwined, long-term evolution of marsh platforms and embedded tidal networks. The rapid network incision (previously addressed by the authors) is decoupled from the geomorphological dynamics of intertidal areas, governed by sediment erosion and deposition and crucially affected by the presence of vegetation. This allows us to investigate the response of tidal morphologies to different scenarios of sediment supply, colonization by halophytes, and changing sea level. Different morphological evolutionary regimes are shown to depend on marsh ecology. Marsh accretion rates, enhanced by vegetation growth, and the related platform elevations tend to decrease with distance from the creek, measured along suitably defined flow paths. The negative feedback between surface elevation and its inorganic accretion rate is reinforced by the relation between plant productivity and soil elevation in Spartina-dominated marshes and counteracted by positive feedbacks in multispecies-vegetated marshes. When evolving under constant sea level, unvegetated and Spartina-dominated marshes asymptotically tend to mean high water level (MHWL), different from multiple vegetation species marshes, which can make the evolutionary transition to upland. Equilibrium configurations below MHWL can be reached under constant rates of sea level rise, depending on sediment supply and vegetation productivity. Our analyses on marine regressions and transgressions show that when the system is in a supply-limited regime, network retreat and expansion (associated with regressions and transgressions, respectively) tend to be cyclic. Conversely, in a transport-limited regime, network reexpansion following a regression tends to take on a new configuration, showing a hysteretic behavior.

  20. How To Assess The Future Tree-Cover Potential For Reforestation Planning In Semi-Arid Regions? An Attempt Using The Vegetation Model ORCHIDEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaud, A.; De Noblet-Ducoudré, N.

    2015-12-01

    More and more reforestation projects are undertaken at local to continental scales to fight desertification, to address development challenges, and to improve local living conditions in tropical semi-arid regions. These regions are very sensitive to climatic changes and the potential for maintaining tree-covers will be altered in the next decades. Therefore, reforestation planning needs predicting the future "climatic tree-cover potential": the optimum tree-fraction sustainable in future climatic states. Global circulation models projections provide possible future climatologies for the 21st century. These can be used at the global scale to force a land-surface model, which in turn simulates the vegetation development under these conditions. The tree cover leading to an optimum development may then be identified. We propose here to run a state-of-the-art model and to assess the span and the relevance of the answers that can be obtained for reforestation planning. The ORCHIDEE vegetation model is chosen here to allow a multi-criteria evaluation of the optimum cover, as it returns surface climate state variables as well as vegetation functioning and biomass products. It is forced with global climate data (WFDEI and CRU) for the 20th century and models projections (CMIP5 outputs) for the 21st century. At the grid-cell resolution of the forcing climate data, tree-covers ranging from 0 to 100% are successively prescribed. A set of indicators is then derived from the model outputs, meant for modulating reforestation strategies according to the regional priorities (e.g. maximize the biomass production or decrease the surface air temperature). The choice of indicators and the relevance of the final answers provided will be collectively assessed by the climate scientists and reforestation project management experts from the KINOME social enterprise (http://en.kinome.fr). Such feedback will point towards the model most urging needs for improvement.

  1. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Rakness.

    2013-01-01

    After three years of running, in February 2013 the era of sub-10-TeV LHC collisions drew to an end. Recall, the 2012 run had been extended by about three months to achieve the full complement of high-energy and heavy-ion physics goals prior to the start of Long Shutdown 1 (LS1), which is now underway. The LHC performance during these exciting years was excellent, delivering a total of 23.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, 6.2 fb–1 at 7 TeV, and 5.5 pb–1 at 2.76 TeV. They also delivered 170 μb–1 lead-lead collisions at 2.76 TeV/nucleon and 32 nb–1 proton-lead collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon. During these years the CMS operations teams and shift crews made tremendous strides to commission the detector, repeatedly stepping up to meet the challenges at every increase of instantaneous luminosity and energy. Although it does not fully cover the achievements of the teams, a way to quantify their success is the fact that that...

  2. Coupled models of heat transfer and phase transformation for the run-out table in hot rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-xuan CHEN; Jun ZOU; Xin FU

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models are been proposed to simulate the thermal and metallurgical behaviors of the strip occurring on the run-out table (ROT) in a hot strip mill. A variational method is utilized for the discretization of the governing transient conduction-convection equation, with heat transfer coefficients adaptively determined by the actual mill data. To consider the thermal effect of phase transformation during cooling, a constitutive equation for describing austenite decomposition kinetics of steel in air and water cooling zones is coupled with the heat transfer model. As the basic required inputs in the numerical simulations, thermal material properties are experimentally measured for three carbon steels and the least squares method is used to statistically derive regression models for the properties, including specific heat and thermal conductivity. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the setup accuracy of the temperature prediction system of ROT is effectively improved.

  3. Uncertainties in modelling CH4 emissions from northern wetlands in glacial climates: the role of vegetation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van Huissteden

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3 interstadials are marked by a sharp increase in the atmospheric methane (CH4 concentration, as recorded in ice cores. Wetlands are assumed to be the major source of this CH4, although several other hypotheses have been advanced. Modelling of CH4 emissions is crucial to quantify CH4 sources for past climates. Vegetation effects are generally highly generalized in modelling past and present-day CH4 fluxes, but should not be neglected. Plants strongly affect the soil-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and the net primary production of the vegetation supplies organic matter as substrate for methanogens. For modelling past CH4 fluxes from northern wetlands, assumptions on vegetation are highly relevant since paleobotanical data indicate large differences in Last Glacial (LG wetland vegetation composition as compared to modern wetland vegetation. Besides more cold-adapted vegetation, Sphagnum mosses appear to be much less dominant during large parts of the LG than at present, which particularly affects CH4 oxidation and transport. To evaluate the effect of vegetation parameters, we used the PEATLAND-VU wetland CO2/CH4 model to simulate emissions from wetlands in continental Europe during LG and modern climates. We tested the effect of parameters influencing oxidation during plant transport (fox, vegetation net primary production (NPP, parameter symbol Pmax, plant transport rate (Vtransp, maximum rooting depth (Zroot and root exudation rate (fex. Our model results show that modelled CH4 fluxes are sensitive to fox and Zroot in particular. The effects of Pmax, Vtransp and fex are of lesser relevance. Interactions with water table modelling are significant for Vtransp. We conducted experiments with different wetland vegetation types for Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3 stadial and interstadial climates and the present-day climate, by coupling PEATLAND-VU to high resolution climate model simulations for Europe. Experiments assuming

  4. Predicting Use of Ineffective Responsive, Structure and Control Vegetable Parenting Practices with the Model of Goal Directed Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Tom; Beltran, Alicia; Chen, Tzu-An; Thompson, Debbe; O'Connor, Teresia; Hughes, Sheryl; Diep, Cassandra; Baranowski, Janice C

    This study reports the modeling of three categories of ineffective vegetable parenting practices (IVPP) separately (responsive, structure, and control vegetable parenting practices). An internet survey was employed for a cross sectional assessment of parenting practices and cognitive-emotional variables. Parents (n=307) of preschool children (3-5 years old) were recruited through announcements and postings. Models were analyzed with block regression and backward deletion procedures using a composite IVPP scale as the dependent variable. The independent variables included validated scales from a Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices (MGDVPP), including: intention, habit, perceived barriers, desire, competence, autonomy, relatedness, attitudes, norms, perceived behavioral control, and anticipated emotions. The available scales accounted for 26.5%, 16.7% and 44.6% of the variance in the IVPP responsive, structure and control subscales, respectively. Different sets of diverse variables predicted the three IVPP constructs. Intentions, Habits and Perceived Behavioral Control were strong predictors for each of the IVPP constructs, but the subscales were specific to each IVPP construct. Parent emotional responses, an infrequently investigated variable, was an important predictor of ineffective responsive vegetable parenting practices and ineffective structure vegetable parenting practices, but not ineffective control vegetable parenting practices. An Attitude subscale and a Norms subscale predicted ineffective responsive vegetable parenting practices alone. This was the first report of psychometrically tested scales to predict use of IVPP subscales. Further research is needed to verify these findings in larger longitudinal cohorts. Interventions to increase child vegetable intake may have to reduce IVPP.

  5. Using Distributed-Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model to Study Road Effects on Stream flow and Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuo, L.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Ziegler, A. D.; Nullet, M. A.

    2003-12-01

    The distributed-hydrology-soil-vegetation model (DHSVM) was applied in Pang Khum Experimental Watershed (PKEW), located near 19.05\\deg N, 98.65\\deg E in the mountainous region of northern Thailand, headwaters of the Chao Phraya River system. PKEW has a highly seasonal rainfall regime, with 90% of the annual 1200-1400 mm rainfall occurring during the southwest summer monsoon. The elevation of PKEW ranges from approximately 1100 to 1500 m. Total road area including road banks is about 1.2% of the basin area. About 57% of the road area occurs on slopes steeper than 10%. All roads are unpaved. Land cover in PKEW is affected by swidden agriculture. Six land cover and nine soil classes are identified in the basin. We have been working in the area since 1997 as part of the Thailand Roads Project (TRP). Within the basin, we are monitoring microclimate at two sites, soil moisture at four sites, and rainfall at five sites. Streamflow is measured at the outlet. Based on digital elevation data, DHSVM explicitly accounts for the spatial distribution of the stream and road networks, soil depth, soil and vegetation types. The model run period, including warm up, calibration and validation, is from August 1997 to January 2001. Field measurements provide forcing data, calibration data, and guidance in parameter selection. Model calibration and validation were done by aggregating simulated hourly soil moisture and stream flow into daily values and comparing them with aggregated daily measurements. For the calibration period, RMSEs of soil moisture and streamflow were lower than the observed variability as represented by the standard deviation, median absolute deviation, and (for stream flow) interquartile range. Model performance drops in validation period, but RMSEs remain near or lower than observed variability. We ran DHSVM with and without roads to examine their effects. Significant effects of roads were found despite the very low proportion of the watershed covered by roads

  6. Fuzzy rule-based macroinvertebrate habitat suitability models for running waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhoven, Van E.; Adriaenssens, V.; Baets, De B.; Verdonschot, P.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    A fuzzy rule-based approach was applied to a macroinvertebrate habitat suitability modelling problem. The model design was based on a knowledge base summarising the preferences and tolerances of 86 macroinvertebrate species for four variables describing river sites in springs up to small rivers in t

  7. How will climate change affect the vegetation cycle over France? A generic modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Laanaia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of adaptation strategies of agriculture and forestry to climate change is conditioned by the knowledge of the impacts of climate change on the vegetation cycle and of the associated uncertainties. Using the same generic Land Surface Model (LSM to simulate the response of various vegetation types is more straightforward than using several specialized crop and forestry models, as model implementation differences are difficult to assess. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of a LSM to address this issue. Using the SURFEX (“Surface Externalisée” modeling platform, we produced and analyzed 150-yr (1950–2100 simulations of the biomass of four vegetation types (rainfed straw cereals, rainfed grasslands, broadleaf and needleleaf forests and of the soil water content associated to each of these vegetation types over France. Statistical methods were used to quantify the impact of climate change on simulated phenological dates. The duration of soil moisture stress periods increases everywhere in France, especially for grasslands with, on average, an increase of 9 days per year in near-future (NF conditions and 36 days per year in distant-future (DF conditions. For all the vegetation types, leaf onset and the annual maximum LAI occur earlier. For straw cereals in the Languedoc-Provence-Corsica area, NF leaf onset occurs 18 days earlier and 37 days earlier in DF conditions, on average. On the other hand, local discrepancies are simulated for the senescence period (e.g. earlier in western and southern France for broadleaf forests, slightly later in mountainous areas of eastern France for both NF and DF. Changes in phenological dates are more uncertain in DF than in NF conditions in relation to differences in climate models, especially for forests. Finally, it is shown that while changes in leaf onset are mainly driven by air temperature, longer soil moisture stress periods trigger earlier leaf senescence

  8. From Dynamic Global Vegetation Modelling to Real-World regional and local Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, J.; Forrest, M.; Kamm, K.; Leiblein-Wild, M.; Pachzelt, A.; Werner, C.; Hickler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic (global) vegetation models (DGVM) can be applied to any spatial resolution on the local, national, continental and global scale given suitable climatic and geographic input forcing data. LPJ-GUESS, the main DGVM applied in our research group, uses the plant functional type (PFT) concept in the global setup with typically about 10-20 tree PFTs (subdivided into tropical, temperate and boreal) and two herbaceous PFTs by default. When modelling smaller spatial extents, such as continental (e.g. Europe/North America) national domains, or individual sites (e.g. Frankfurt, Germany), i.e. the scale of decision making, it becomes necessary to refine the PFT representation, the model initialization and validation and, in some case, to include additional processes. I will present examples of LPJ-GUESS applications at the continental to local scale performed by our working group including i.) a European simulation representing the main tree species and Mediterranean shrubs, ii.) a climate impact study for Turkey, iii.) coupled dynamic large grazer-vegetation modelling across Africa and, iv.) modelling an allergenic and in Europe invasive shrub (Ambrosia artemisiifolia), iv.) simulating water usage by an oak-pine forest stand near Frankfurt, and v.) stand specific differences in modelling at the FACE sites. Finally, I will present some thoughts on how to advance the models in terms of more detailed and realistic PFT or species parameterizations accounting for adaptive functional trait responses also within species.

  9. Modeling Soil and Woody Vegetation in the Senegalese Sahel in the Context of Environmental Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Brandt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Climatic stress and anthropogenic disturbances have caused significant environmental changes in the Sahel. In this context, the importance of soil is often underrepresented. Thus, we analyze and discuss the interdependency of soil and vegetation by classifying soil types and its woody cover for a region in the Senegalese Ferlo. Clustering of 28 soil parameters led to four soil types which correspond with local Wolof denotations: Dek, Bowel, Dior and Bardial. The soil types were confirmed by a Non-metric Multidimensional-Scaling (NMDS ordination and extrapolated via a Random Forest classifier using six significant variables derived from Landsat imagery and a digital elevation model (out-of-bag error rate: 7.3%. In addition, canopy cover was modeled using Landsat and a Reduced-Major-Axis (RMA regression (R2 = 0.81. A woody vegetation survey showed that every soil type has its own species composition. However, 29% of Bowel regions are deforested (i.e., degraded and interviews revealed extensive environmental changes and a strong decline and local extinction of woody species. The differences between the soil types are significant, showing that vegetation changes (i.e., degradation and greening, resilience to climatic stress and human activities largely depend on soil properties. We highlight that spatial heterogeneity is an important aspect when dealing with environmental changes in the Sahel, and local knowledge can be well used to classify spatial units by means of public Earth observation data.

  10. Modeling Agricultural Crop Production in China using AVHRR-based Vegetation Health Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Kogan, F.; Guo, W.; Zhiyuan, P.; Xianfeng, J.

    Weather related crop losses have always been a concern for farmers On a wider scale it has always influenced decision of Governments traders and other policy makers for the purpose of balanced food supplies trade and distribution of aid to the nations in need Therefore national policy and decision makers are giving increasing importance to early assessment of crop losses in response to weather fluctuations This presentation emphasizes utility of AVHRR-based Vegetation health index VHI for early warning of drought-related losses of agricultural production in China The VHI is a three-channel index characterizing greenness vigor and temperature of land surface which can be used as proxy for estimation of how healthy and potentially productive could be vegetation China is the largest in the world producer of grain including wheat and rice and cotton In the major agricultural areas China s crop production is very dependent on weather The VHI being a proxy indicator of weather impact on vegetation showed some correlation with productivity of agricultural crops during the critical period of their development The periods of the strongest correlation were investigated and used to build regression models where crop yield deviation from technological trend was accepted as a dependent and VHI as independent variables The models were developed for several major crops including wheat corn and soybeans

  11. MODEL TESTS OF HYDRAULIC FLOW CONDITIONS IN THE VEGETATION BUILD-UP FISHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tymiński

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our engineering activity aiming at keeping ecological corridors in rivers are a difficult and complex issue that requires specialist knowledge in many disciplines. One of the installations for ensuring ecological continuum river are fishways, particularly their “near-natural” designs. They resemble mountain streams and creeks. Natural materials, such as wood, vegetation, gravel, stones and rocks are used for their construction. Design of hydraulic fishways based solely on the criteria of maximum speed vmax and parameter of unitary energy of water E, it does not give complete information about the effectiveness of these devices. In order to produce the optimal flow conditions for ichthyofauna, very useful are spatial structure research of hydraulic parameters, such as disorders of flow velocity field or distributions of the turbulence number Tu. The article presents an example of such a study, which the authors carried out on the model seminatural fishway in the water laboratory in Institute of Environmental Engineering in Wrocław. The results were used to assess the accuracy of the functioning of the fishway. The tested combination of “vegetated baffles” and “pools” in the fishway model was found to be optimal for the ichthyofauna. Vegetation build-up in fishways is an interesting and proecological alternative for “heavy” technical build-up.

  12. Large-Scale Variation in Forest Carbon Turnover Rate and its Relation to Climate - Remote Sensing vs. Global Vegetation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhais, N.; Thurner, M.; Beer, C.; Forkel, M.; Rademacher, T. T.; Santoro, M.; Tum, M.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-12-01

    While vegetation productivity is known to be strongly correlated to climate, there is a need for an improved understanding of the underlying processes of vegetation carbon turnover and their importance at a global scale. This shortcoming has been due to the lack of spatially extensive information on vegetation carbon stocks, which we recently have been able to overcome by a biomass dataset covering northern boreal and temperate forests originating from radar remote sensing. Based on state-of-the-art products on biomass and NPP, we are for the first time able to study the relation between carbon turnover rate and a set of climate indices in northern boreal and temperate forests. The implementation of climate-related mortality processes, for instance drought, fire, frost or insect effects, is often lacking or insufficient in current global vegetation models. In contrast to our observation-based findings, investigated models from the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP), including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT, are able to reproduce spatial climate - turnover rate relationships only to a limited extent. While most of the models compare relatively well to observation-based NPP, simulated vegetation carbon stocks are severely biased compared to our biomass dataset. Current limitations lead to considerable uncertainties in the estimated vegetation carbon turnover, contributing substantially to the forest feedback to climate change. Our results are the basis for improving mortality concepts in global vegetation models and estimating their impact on the land carbon balance.

  13. Improved simulation of fire-vegetation interactions in the Land surface Processes and eXchanges dynamic global vegetation model (LPX-Mv1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. I.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2014-10-01

    The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) model is a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model that performs well globally but has problems representing fire regimes and vegetative mix in savannas. Here we focus on improving the fire module. To improve the representation of ignitions, we introduced a reatment of lightning that allows the fraction of ground strikes to vary spatially and seasonally, realistically partitions strike distribution between wet and dry days, and varies the number of dry days with strikes. Fuel availability and moisture content were improved by implementing decomposition rates specific to individual plant functional types and litter classes, and litter drying rates driven by atmospheric water content. To improve water extraction by grasses, we use realistic plant-specific treatments of deep roots. To improve fire responses, we introduced adaptive bark thickness and post-fire resprouting for tropical and temperate broadleaf trees. All improvements are based on extensive analyses of relevant observational data sets. We test model performance for Australia, first evaluating parameterisations separately and then measuring overall behaviour against standard benchmarks. Changes to the lightning parameterisation produce a more realistic simulation of fires in southeastern and central Australia. Implementation of PFT-specific decomposition rates enhances performance in central Australia. Changes in fuel drying improve fire in northern Australia, while changes in rooting depth produce a more realistic simulation of fuel availability and structure in central and northern Australia. The introduction of adaptive bark thickness and resprouting produces more realistic fire regimes in Australian savannas. We also show that the model simulates biomass recovery rates consistent with observations from several different regions of the world characterised by resprouting vegetation. The new model (LPX-Mv1) produces an improved simulation of observed

  14. Modeling wave effects on limits of woody vegetation in Catahoula Lake, LA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B. L.; Curcic, M.; Keim, R.

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to water waves in lakes is an important control on the structure and distribution of both submerged and shoreline vegetative communities. Wave exposure incident on the shoreline limits the distribution of shrubs on both lake and coastal margins by preventing establishment of seedlings via bed disturbance and uprooting. The goal of this study is to investigate the relationship between bed stress due to wave action and the spatial distribution of woody seedling establishment in Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, USA. The lake bed consists of a broad, seasonally inundated flat bordered by a band of woody shrubs. Annual summer de-watering of the lake allows the lake bed to support a moist-soil herbaceous vegetation community, but recent encroachment by woody shrubs over the past ~70 years threatens ecosystem conversion. We use the University of Miami Wave Model (UMWM) to simulate surface wave evolution and bed shear stress for a range of dominant wind conditions and water levels. UMWM is a 3rdgeneration ocean wave model that solves the wave energy balance equation given wind forcing input. While the model has been previously validated in deep water and coastal ocean applications, this study validates the model in very shallow water where bed-induced wave dissipation is a significant process. Model results show that waves of sufficient energy to prevent establishment or to uproot seedlings are common in areas of the lake that are experiencing the least woody encroachment. Areas of the lake bed that are experiencing encroachment are often sheltered from the strongest waves due to the lakes orientation with respect to dominant winds and prior establishment of woody growth, which dissipates wave energy significantly. Results are consistent with some otherwise-unexplained conditions at the lake such as spatially inconsistent relationships between elevation and vegetation communities. We use model results to investigate feedbacks between woody encoachment (both new and

  15. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Run-to-Failure Simulation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are...

  16. Impact of treadmill running and sex on hippocampal neurogenesis in the mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Ma

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ of dentate gyrus (DG occurs throughout life and is regulated by pathological and physiological processes. The role of oxidative stress in hippocampal neurogenesis and its response to exercise or neurodegenerative diseases remains controversial. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of oxidative stress, treadmill exercise and sex on hippocampal neurogenesis in a murine model of heightened oxidative stress (G93A mice. G93A and wild type (WT mice were randomized to a treadmill running (EX or a sedentary (SED group for 1 or 4 wk. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU labeled proliferating cells, surviving cells, and their phenotype, as well as for determination of oxidative stress (3-NT; 8-OHdG. BDNF and IGF1 mRNA expression was assessed by in situ hybridization. Results showed that: (1 G93A-SED mice had greater hippocampal neurogenesis, BDNF mRNA, and 3-NT, as compared to WT-SED mice. (2 Treadmill running promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF mRNA content and lowered DNA oxidative damage (8-OHdG in WT mice. (3 Male G93A mice showed significantly higher cell proliferation but a lower level of survival vs. female G93A mice. We conclude that G93A mice show higher hippocampal neurogenesis, in association with higher BDNF expression, yet running did not further enhance these phenomena in G93A mice, probably due to a 'ceiling effect' of an already heightened basal levels of hippocampal neurogenesis and BDNF expression.

  17. Comparing the performance of SIMD computers by running large air pollution models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on these computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gained detailed insight about the performance of the computers involved when used to solve large-scale scientific...... problems that involve several types of numerical computations. The computers used in our study are the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5, and the MasPar MP-2216...

  18. runmlwin : A Program to Run the MLwiN Multilevel Modeling Software from within Stata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Leckie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate how to fit multilevel models in the MLwiN package seamlessly from within Stata using the Stata program runmlwin. We argue that using MLwiN and Stata in combination allows researchers to capitalize on the best features of both packages. We provide examples of how to use runmlwin to fit continuous, binary, ordinal, nominal and mixed response multilevel models by both maximum likelihood and Markov chain Monte Carlo estimation.

  19. Successful modeling of the environmental changes' influence on forests' vegetation over North Eurasia

    CERN Document Server

    Khabarova, O; Medvedeva, M

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of forests' vegetation in North Eurasia has been performed for 1982-2006 on the basis of remote sensing data. Four meteorological parameters and one parameter, characterizing geomagnetic field disturbance level, were used for this aim. It was found out that revealed formula is adequate both for coniferous evergreen and coniferous deciduous forests for accuracy to a coefficient. The most proper parameters' combination gives the correlation coefficients ~ 0.9 between modeling parameter and original data rows. These results could solve problems of climate-forests feedbacks' investigations and be useful for dendrological aims.

  20. A description of the FAMOUS (version XDBUA climate model and control run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osprey

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS is an ocean-atmosphere general circulation model of low resolution, capable of simulating approximately 120 years of model climate per wallclock day using current high performance computing facilities. It uses most of the same code as HadCM3, a widely used climate model of higher resolution and computational cost, and has been tuned to reproduce the same climate reasonably well. FAMOUS is useful for climate simulations where the computational cost makes the application of HadCM3 unfeasible, either because of the length of simulation or the size of the ensemble desired. We document a number of scientific and technical improvements to the original version of FAMOUS. These improvements include changes to the parameterisations of ozone and sea-ice which alleviate a significant cold bias from high northern latitudes and the upper troposphere, and the elimination of volume-averaged drifts in ocean tracers. A simple model of the marine carbon cycle has also been included. A particular goal of FAMOUS is to conduct millennial-scale paleoclimate simulations of Quaternary ice ages; to this end, a number of useful changes to the model infrastructure have been made.

  1. Addressing Thermal Model Run Time Concerns of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume; Guerrero, Sergio; Hawk, John; Rodriguez, Juan; McDonald, Carson; Jackson, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope using Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) utilizes an existing 2.4 m diameter Hubble sized telescope donated from elsewhere in the federal government for near-infrared sky surveys and Exoplanet searches to answer crucial questions about the universe and dark energy. The WFIRST design continues to increase in maturity, detail, and complexity with each design cycle leading to a Mission Concept Review and entrance to the Mission Formulation Phase. Each cycle has required a Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) analysis to ensure the design can meet the stringent pointing and stability requirements. As such, the models have also grown in size and complexity leading to increased model run time. This paper addresses efforts to reduce the run time while still maintaining sufficient accuracy for STOP analyses. A technique was developed to identify slews between observing orientations that were sufficiently different to warrant recalculation of the environmental fluxes to reduce the total number of radiation calculation points. The inclusion of a cryocooler fluid loop in the model also forced smaller time-steps than desired, which greatly increases the overall run time. The analysis of this fluid model required mitigation to drive the run time down by solving portions of the model at different time scales. Lastly, investigations were made into the impact of the removal of small radiation couplings on run time and accuracy. Use of these techniques allowed the models to produce meaningful results within reasonable run times to meet project schedule deadlines.

  2. Leaf and stem economics spectra drive diversity of functional plant traits in a dynamic global vegetation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakschewski, B.; Bloh, von W.; Boit, A.; Rammig, A.; Kattge, J.; Poorter, L.; Peñualeas, J.; Thonicke, K.

    2015-01-01

    Functional diversity is critical for ecosystem dynamics, stability and productivity. However, dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) which are increasingly used to simulate ecosystem functions under global change, condense functional diversity to plant functional types (PFTs) with constant paramet

  3. Determination of strength behaviour of slope supported by vegetated crib walls using centrifuge model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    The crib retaining structures made of wooden/bamboo logs with live plants inside are called vegetative crib walls which are now becoming popular due to their advantages over conventional civil engineering walls. Conventionally, wooden crib walls were dimensioned based on past experiences. At present, there are several guidelines and design standards for machine finished wooden crib walls, but only few guidelines for the design and construction of vegetative log crib walls are available which are generally not sufficient for an economic engineering design of such walls. Analytical methods are generally used to determine the strength of vegetated crib retaining walls. The crib construction is analysed statically by satisfying the condition of static equilibrium with acceptable level of safety. The crib wall system is checked for internal and external stability using conventional monolithic and silo theories. Due to limitations of available theories, the exact calculation of the strength of vegetated wooden/bamboo crib wall cannot be made in static calculation. Therefore, experimental measurements are generally done to verify the static analysis. In this work, a model crib construction (1:20) made of bamboo elements is tested in the centrifuge machine to determine the strength behaviour of the slope supported by vegetated crib retaining wall. A geotechnical centrifuge is used to conduct model tests to study geotechnical problems such as the strength, stiffness and bearing capacity of different structures, settlement of embankments, stability of slopes, earth retaining structures etc. Centrifuge model testing is particularly well suited to modelling geotechnical events because the increase in gravitational force creates stresses in the model that are equivalent to the much larger prototype and hence ensures that the mechanisms of ground movements observed in the tests are realistic. Centrifuge model testing provides data to improve our understanding of basic mechanisms

  4. Renormalization group running of fermion observables in an extended non-supersymmetric SO(10) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Davide; Ohlsson, Tommy; Riad, Stella

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the renormalization group evolution of fermion masses, mixings and quartic scalar Higgs self-couplings in an extended non-supersymmetric SO(10) model, where the Higgs sector contains the 10 H, 120 H, and 126 H representations. The group SO(10) is spontaneously broken at the GUT scale to the Pati-Salam group and subsequently to the Standard Model (SM) at an intermediate scale M I. We explicitly take into account the effects of the change of gauge groups in the evolution. In particular, we derive the renormalization group equations for the different Yukawa couplings. We find that the computed physical fermion observables can be successfully matched to the experimental measured values at the electroweak scale. Using the same Yukawa couplings at the GUT scale, the measured values of the fermion observables cannot be reproduced with a SM-like evolution, leading to differences in the numerical values up to around 80%. Furthermore, a similar evolution can be performed for a minimal SO(10) model, where the Higgs sector consists of the 10 H and 126 H representations only, showing an equally good potential to describe the low-energy fermion observables. Finally, for both the extended and the minimal SO(10) models, we present predictions for the three Dirac and Majorana CP-violating phases as well as three effective neutrino mass parameters.

  5. Measuring Short- and Long-run Promotional Effectiveness on Scanner Data Using Persistence Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); D.M. Hanssens (Dominique); V.R. Nijs; J-B.E.M. Steenkamp (Jan-Benedict)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe use of price promotions to stimulate brand and firm performance is increasing. We discuss how (i) the availability of longer scanner data time series, and (ii) persistence modeling, have lead to greater insights into the dynamic effects of price promotions, as one can now quantify th

  6. IPSL-CM5A2. An Earth System Model designed to run long simulations for past and future climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulchre, Pierre; Caubel, Arnaud; Marti, Olivier; Hourdin, Frédéric; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Boucher, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    The IPSL-CM5A model was developed and released in 2013 "to study the long-term response of the climate system to natural and anthropogenic forcings as part of the 5th Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5)" [Dufresne et al., 2013]. Although this model also has been used for numerous paleoclimate studies, a major limitation was its computation time, which averaged 10 model-years / day on 32 cores of the Curie supercomputer (on TGCC computing center, France). Such performances were compatible with the experimental designs of intercomparison projects (e.g. CMIP, PMIP) but became limiting for modelling activities involving several multi-millenial experiments, which are typical for Quaternary or "deeptime" paleoclimate studies, in which a fully-equilibrated deep-ocean is mandatory. Here we present the Earth-System model IPSL-CM5A2. Based on IPSL-CM5A, technical developments have been performed both on separate components and on the coupling system in order to speed up the whole coupled model. These developments include the integration of hybrid parallelization MPI-OpenMP in LMDz atmospheric component, the use of a new input-ouput library to perform parallel asynchronous input/output by using computing cores as "IO servers", the use of a parallel coupling library between the ocean and the atmospheric components. Running on 304 cores, the model can now simulate 55 years per day, opening new gates towards multi-millenial simulations. Apart from obtaining better computing performances, one aim of setting up IPSL-CM5A2 was also to overcome the cold bias depicted in global surface air temperature (t2m) in IPSL-CM5A. We present the tuning strategy to overcome this bias as well as the main characteristics (including biases) of the pre-industrial climate simulated by IPSL-CM5A2. Lastly, we shortly present paleoclimate simulations run with this model, for the Holocene and for deeper timescales in the Cenozoic, for which the particular continental configuration

  7. A model investigation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions on a millennial timescale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Devaraju

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A terrestrial biosphere model with dynamic vegetation capability, Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS, coupled to the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM2 is used to investigate the multiple climate-forest equilibrium states of the climate system. A 1000-yr control simulation and another 1000-yr land cover change simulation that consisted of global deforestation for 100 yr followed by re-growth of forests for the subsequent 900 yr were performed. After several centuries of interactive climate-vegetation dynamics, the land cover change simulation converged to essentially the same climate state as the control simulation. However, the climate system takes about a millennium to reach the control forest state. In the absence of deep ocean feedbacks in our model, the millennial time scale for converging to the original climate state is dictated by long time scales of the terrestrial carbon stocks, biomass and soil carbon. Our idealized modeling study suggests that the equilibrium state reached after complete global deforestation followed by re-growth of forests is unlikely to be distinguishable from the control climate. The real world, however, could have multiple climate-forest states since our modeling study is unlikely to have represented all the essential ecological processes (e.g. altered fire regimes, seed sources and seedling establishment dynamics for the re-establishment of major biomes.

  8. Advances in modelling the coevolving soils, landforms and vegetation in semiarid regions: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco, Patricia M.; Moreno-de las Heras, Mariano; Willgoose, Garry R.

    2014-05-01

    Semiarid landscapes exhibit highly nonlinear interactions between coevolving physical and biological processes. Coevolution in these systems leads to the emergence of remarkable soil, landform and vegetation patterns. Growing concern over ecosystem resilience to climate and land use perturbations that could result in irreversible degradation imposes a pressing need for research, aiming at elucidating the processes, feedbacks, and dynamics leading to these coevolving patterns. This is particularly important since degradation in drylands has been frequently linked to feedback effects between soils, biota and erosion processes. In many dryland regions, feedbacks are responsible for the emergence of areas with low infiltration in unvegetated soil patches (due to surface crusting) and high infiltration rates in the vegetated soil patches (due to improved soil aggregation and macroporosity). This variable infiltration field gives rise to runoff-runon redistribution which determines areas of soil erosion and deposition. We have combined a coupled landform-soil-vegetation model with remote sensing and field data to capture these feedbacks and improve our knowledge of these coevolving biotic-abiotic processes. We discuss and present results showing that the dynamics of the individual processes and their response to climatic and anthropic disturbances cannot be fully understood or predicted if nonlinear feedbacks and coevolution are not considered. Implications for management and restoration efforts are illustrated using data and observations from agricultural sites in central Australia and reclaimed mining sites in Spain.

  9. Geoinformation modeling system for analysis of atmosphere pollution impact on vegetable biosystems using space images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polichtchouk, Yuri; Ryukhko, Viatcheslav; Tokareva, Olga; Alexeeva, Mary

    2002-02-01

    Geoinformation modeling system structure for assessment of the environmental impact of atmospheric pollution on forest- swamp ecosystems of West Siberia is considered. Complex approach to the assessment of man-caused impact based on the combination of sanitary-hygienic and landscape-geochemical approaches is reported. Methodical problems of analysis of atmosphere pollution impact on vegetable biosystems using geoinformation systems and remote sensing data are developed. Landscape structure of oil production territories in southern part of West Siberia are determined on base of processing of space images from spaceborn Resource-O. Particularities of atmosphere pollution zones modeling caused by gas burning in torches in territories of oil fields are considered. For instance, a pollution zones were revealed modeling of contaminants dispersal in atmosphere by standard model. Polluted landscapes areas are calculated depending on oil production volume. It is shown calculated data is well approximated by polynomial models.

  10. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. Taking into account the constraints from [Formula: see text] processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours [Formula: see text], which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in [Formula: see text] decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the [Formula: see text] constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for [Formula: see text] with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of [Formula: see text]. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of indirect measurements and

  11. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  12. Run off-on-out method and models for soil infiltrability on hill-slope under rainfall conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The soil infiltrability of hill-slope is important to such studies and practices as hydrological process, crop water supply, irrigation practices, and soil erosion. A new method for measuring soil infiltrability on hill-slope under rainfall condition with run off-on-out was advanced. Based on water (mass) balance, the mathematic models for soil infiltrability estimated from the advances of runoff on soil surface and the water running out of the slope were derived. Experiments of 2 cases were conducted. Case I was done under a rainfall intensity of 20 mm/h, at a slope gradient of about 0° with a runoff/on length (area) ratio of 1 : 1. Case II was under a rainfall intensity of 60 mm/h and a slope of 20° with a runoff/on length (area) ratio of 1 : 1. Double ring method was also used to measure the infiltrability for comparison purposes. The experiments were done with soil moisture of 10%. Required data were collected from laboratory experiments. The infiltrability curves were computed from the experimental data. The results indicate that the method can well conceptually represent the transient infiltrability process, with capability to simulate the very high initial soil infiltrability. The rationalities of the method and the models were validated. The errors of the method for the two cases were 1.82%/1.39% and 4.49%/3.529% (Experimental/Model) respectively, as estimated by comparing the rainfall amount with the infiltrated volume, to demonstrate the accuracy of the method. The transient and steady infiltrability measured with double ring was much lower than those with this new method, due to water supply limit and soil aggregates breaking down at initial infiltration stage. The method can overcome the short backs of the traditional sprinkler method and double ring method for soil infiltraility. It can be used to measure the infiltrability of sloped surface under rainfall-runoff-erosion conditions, in the related studies.

  13. Influential factors of red-light running at signalized intersection and prediction using a rare events logistic regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilong; Wang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xinkai; Yu, Guizhen; Ding, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Red light running (RLR) has become a major safety concern at signalized intersection. To prevent RLR related crashes, it is critical to identify the factors that significantly impact the drivers' behaviors of RLR, and to predict potential RLR in real time. In this research, 9-month's RLR events extracted from high-resolution traffic data collected by loop detectors from three signalized intersections were applied to identify the factors that significantly affect RLR behaviors. The data analysis indicated that occupancy time, time gap, used yellow time, time left to yellow start, whether the preceding vehicle runs through the intersection during yellow, and whether there is a vehicle passing through the intersection on the adjacent lane were significantly factors for RLR behaviors. Furthermore, due to the rare events nature of RLR, a modified rare events logistic regression model was developed for RLR prediction. The rare events logistic regression method has been applied in many fields for rare events studies and shows impressive performance, but so far none of previous research has applied this method to study RLR. The results showed that the rare events logistic regression model performed significantly better than the standard logistic regression model. More importantly, the proposed RLR prediction method is purely based on loop detector data collected from a single advance loop detector located 400 feet away from stop-bar. This brings great potential for future field applications of the proposed method since loops have been widely implemented in many intersections and can collect data in real time. This research is expected to contribute to the improvement of intersection safety significantly.

  14. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs Model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. We present a new analysis of quark observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare $K$ and $B$ decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes $K^+\\to\\pi^+\

  15. Running Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 29th September at 18h. The 5.5km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at http://cern.ch/club...

  16. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Christophe Delaere

    2012-01-01

      On Wednesday 14 March, the machine group successfully injected beams into LHC for the first time this year. Within 48 hours they managed to ramp the beams to 4 TeV and proceeded to squeeze to β*=0.6m, settings that are used routinely since then. This brought to an end the CMS Cosmic Run at ~Four Tesla (CRAFT), during which we collected 800k cosmic ray events with a track crossing the central Tracker. That sample has been since then topped up to two million, allowing further refinements of the Tracker Alignment. The LHC started delivering the first collisions on 5 April with two bunches colliding in CMS, giving a pile-up of ~27 interactions per crossing at the beginning of the fill. Since then the machine has increased the number of colliding bunches to reach 1380 bunches and peak instantaneous luminosities around 6.5E33 at the beginning of fills. The average bunch charges reached ~1.5E11 protons per bunch which results in an initial pile-up of ~30 interactions per crossing. During the ...

  17. RUN COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Delaere

    2012-01-01

      With the analysis of the first 5 fb–1 culminating in the announcement of the observation of a new particle with mass of around 126 GeV/c2, the CERN directorate decided to extend the LHC run until February 2013. This adds three months to the original schedule. Since then the LHC has continued to perform extremely well, and the total luminosity delivered so far this year is 22 fb–1. CMS also continues to perform excellently, recording data with efficiency higher than 95% for fills with the magnetic field at nominal value. The highest instantaneous luminosity achieved by LHC to date is 7.6x1033 cm–2s–1, which translates into 35 interactions per crossing. On the CMS side there has been a lot of work to handle these extreme conditions, such as a new DAQ computer farm and trigger menus to handle the pile-up, automation of recovery procedures to minimise the lost luminosity, better training for the shift crews, etc. We did suffer from a couple of infrastructure ...

  18. The Effect of Treadmill Running on Passive Avoidance Learning in Animal Model of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Hosseini; Hojjatallah Alaei; Parham Reisi; Maryam Radahmadi

    2013-01-01

    Background : Alzheimer′s disease was known as a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly and is characterized by dementia and severe neuronal loss in the some regions of brain such as nucleus basalis magnocellularis. It plays an important role in the brain functions such as learning and memory. Loss of cholinergic neurons of nucleus basalis magnocellularis by ibotenic acid can commonly be regarded as a suitable model of Alzheimer′s disease. Previous studies reported that exercise...

  19. Forests, savannas and grasslands: bridging the knowledge gap between ecology and Dynamic Global Vegetation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baudena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The forest, savanna, and grassland biomes, and the transitions between them, are expected to undergo major changes in the future, due to global climate change. Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs are very useful to understand vegetation dynamics under present climate, and to predict its changes under future conditions. However, several DGVMs display high uncertainty in predicting vegetation in tropical areas. Here we perform a comparative analysis of three different DGVMs (JSBACH, LPJ-GUESS-SPITFIRE and aDGVM with regard to their representation of the ecological mechanisms and feedbacks that determine the forest, savanna and grassland biomes, in an attempt to bridge the knowledge gap between ecology and global modelling. Model outcomes, obtained including different mechanisms, are compared to observed tree cover along a mean annual precipitation gradient in Africa. Through these comparisons, and by drawing on the large number of recent studies that have delivered new insights into the ecology of tropical ecosystems in general, and of savannas in particular, we identify two main mechanisms that need an improved representation in the DGVMs. The first mechanism includes water limitation to tree growth, and tree-grass competition for water, which are key factors in determining savanna presence in arid and semi-arid areas. The second is a grass-fire feedback, which maintains both forest and savanna occurrences in mesic areas. Grasses constitute the majority of the fuel load, and at the same time benefit from the openness of the landscape after fires, since they recover faster than trees. Additionally, these two mechanisms are better represented when the models also include tree life stages (adults and seedlings, and distinguish between fire-prone and shade-tolerant savanna trees, and fire-resistant and shade-intolerant forest trees. Including these basic elements could improve the predictive ability of the DGVMs, not only under current climate

  20. Classically conformal U(1)' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)' extension of the Standard Model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly free U(1)' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1)' gauge symmetry is broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1)' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1)' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1)' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark ($m_t=173.34$ GeV) and the Higgs boson ($m_h=125.09$ GeV), we perform parameter scans t...

  1. Global terrestrial isoprene emission models: sensitivity to variability in climate and vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to its effects on the atmospheric lifetime of methane, the burdens of tropospheric ozone and growth of secondary organic aerosol, isoprene is central among the biogenic compounds that need to be taken into account for assessment of anthropogenic air pollution. There is a great interest in better understanding the geographic distribution of isoprene emission, and the interaction of the drivers that underlie its seasonal, interannual and long-term variation. Lack of process-understanding on the scale of the leaf as well as of suitable observations to constrain and evaluate regional or even global simulation results add large uncertainties to past, present and future estimates of quantity and variability of isoprene emissions. Model intercomparison experiments, which for isoprene have not been performed before, can help to identify areas of largest uncertainty as well as important commonalities. Focusing on present-day climate conditions, we compare three global isoprene models that differ in their representation of vegetation and isoprene emission algorithm, with the aim to investigate the degree of between- vs. within model variation that is introduced by varying some of the models' main features, and to determine which spatial and/or temporal features are robust between models and different experimental set-ups. In their individual standard configurations, the models broadly agree with respect to the chief isoprene sources, emission seasonality, and interannual variability. However, the models are all quite sensitive to changes in one or more of their main model components and drivers (e.g., underlying vegetation fields, climate input which can yield a strong increase or decrease in total annual emissions and seasonal patterns to a degree that cannot be reconciled with today's understanding of isoprene atmospheric chemistry. A careful adaptation of individual isoprene model components is therefore required when simulations are to be

  2. Running climate model on a commercial cloud computing environment: A case study using Community Earth System Model (CESM) on Amazon AWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuhong; Huang, Xianglei; Jiao, Chaoyi; Flanner, Mark G.; Raeker, Todd; Palen, Brock

    2017-01-01

    The suites of numerical models used for simulating climate of our planet are usually run on dedicated high-performance computing (HPC) resources. This study investigates an alternative to the usual approach, i.e. carrying out climate model simulations on commercially available cloud computing environment. We test the performance and reliability of running the CESM (Community Earth System Model), a flagship climate model in the United States developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), on Amazon Web Service (AWS) EC2, the cloud computing environment by Amazon.com, Inc. StarCluster is used to create virtual computing cluster on the AWS EC2 for the CESM simulations. The wall-clock time for one year of CESM simulation on the AWS EC2 virtual cluster is comparable to the time spent for the same simulation on a local dedicated high-performance computing cluster with InfiniBand connections. The CESM simulation can be efficiently scaled with the number of CPU cores on the AWS EC2 virtual cluster environment up to 64 cores. For the standard configuration of the CESM at a spatial resolution of 1.9° latitude by 2.5° longitude, increasing the number of cores from 16 to 64 reduces the wall-clock running time by more than 50% and the scaling is nearly linear. Beyond 64 cores, the communication latency starts to outweigh the benefit of distributed computing and the parallel speedup becomes nearly unchanged.

  3. A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Li

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity has been developed for global simulations in the framework of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM in an Earth System Model (ESM. Burned area in a grid cell is estimated by the product of fire counts and average burned area of a fire. The scheme comprises three parts: fire occurrence, fire spread, and fire impact. In the fire occurrence part, fire counts rather than fire occurrence probability are calculated in order to capture the observed high burned area fraction in areas of high fire frequency and realize parameter calibration based on MODIS fire counts product. In the fire spread part, post-fire region of a fire is assumed to be elliptical in shape. Mathematical properties of ellipses and some mathematical derivations are applied to improve the equation and assumptions of an existing fire spread parameterization. In the fire impact part, trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning are estimated, which offers an interface with atmospheric chemistry and aerosol models in ESMs. In addition, flexible time-step length makes the new fire parameterization easily applied to various DGVMs.

    Global performance of the new fire parameterization is assessed by using an improved version of the Community Land Model version 3 with the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM. Simulations are compared against the latest satellite-based Global Fire Emission Database version 3 (GFED3 for 1997–2004. Results show that simulated global totals and spatial patterns of burned area and fire carbon emissions, regional totals and spreads of burned area, global annual burned area fractions for various vegetation types, and interannual variability of burned area are reasonable, and closer to GFED3 than CLM-DGVM simulations with the commonly used Glob-FIRM fire parameterization and the old fire module of CLM-DGVM. Furthermore, average error of simulated trace gas and aerosol

  4. A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity in a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Zeng, X. D.; Levis, S.

    2012-07-01

    A process-based fire parameterization of intermediate complexity has been developed for global simulations in the framework of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (DGVM) in an Earth System Model (ESM). Burned area in a grid cell is estimated by the product of fire counts and average burned area of a fire. The scheme comprises three parts: fire occurrence, fire spread, and fire impact. In the fire occurrence part, fire counts rather than fire occurrence probability are calculated in order to capture the observed high burned area fraction in areas of high fire frequency and realize parameter calibration based on MODIS fire counts product. In the fire spread part, post-fire region of a fire is assumed to be elliptical in shape. Mathematical properties of ellipses and some mathematical derivations are applied to improve the equation and assumptions of an existing fire spread parameterization. In the fire impact part, trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning are estimated, which offers an interface with atmospheric chemistry and aerosol models in ESMs. In addition, flexible time-step length makes the new fire parameterization easily applied to various DGVMs. Global performance of the new fire parameterization is assessed by using an improved version of the Community Land Model version 3 with the Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM-DGVM). Simulations are compared against the latest satellite-based Global Fire Emission Database version 3 (GFED3) for 1997-2004. Results show that simulated global totals and spatial patterns of burned area and fire carbon emissions, regional totals and spreads of burned area, global annual burned area fractions for various vegetation types, and interannual variability of burned area are reasonable, and closer to GFED3 than CLM-DGVM simulations with the commonly used Glob-FIRM fire parameterization and the old fire module of CLM-DGVM. Furthermore, average error of simulated trace gas and aerosol emissions due to biomass burning

  5. Fast Atmosphere-Ocean Model Runs with Large Changes in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gary L.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Rind, David H.; Colose, Christopher; Opstbaum, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    How does climate sensitivity vary with the magnitude of climate forcing? This question was investigated with the use of a modified coupled atmosphere-ocean model, whose stability was improved so that the model would accommodate large radiative forcings yet be fast enough to reach rapid equilibrium. Experiments were performed in which atmospheric CO2 was multiplied by powers of 2, from 1/64 to 256 times the 1950 value. From 8 to 32 times, the 1950 CO2, climate sensitivity for doubling CO2 reaches 8 C due to increases in water vapor absorption and cloud top height and to reductions in low level cloud cover. As CO2 amount increases further, sensitivity drops as cloud cover and planetary albedo stabilize. No water vapor-induced runaway greenhouse caused by increased CO2 was found for the range of CO2 examined. With CO2 at or below 1/8 of the 1950 value, runaway sea ice does occur as the planet cascades to a snowball Earth climate with fully ice covered oceans and global mean surface temperatures near 30 C.

  6. Using natural selection and optimization for smarter vegetation models - challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Oskar; Han, Wang; Dieckmann, Ulf; Cramer, Wolfgang; Brännström, Åke; Pietsch, Stephan; Rovenskaya, Elena; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are now indispensable for understanding the biosphere and for estimating the capacity of ecosystems to provide services. The models are continuously developed to include an increasing number of processes and to utilize the growing amounts of observed data becoming available. However, while the versatility of the models is increasing as new processes and variables are added, their accuracy suffers from the accumulation of uncertainty, especially in the absence of overarching principles controlling their concerted behaviour. We have initiated a collaborative working group to address this problem based on a 'missing law' - adaptation and optimization principles rooted in natural selection. Even though this 'missing law' constrains relationships between traits, and therefore can vastly reduce the number of uncertain parameters in ecosystem models, it has rarely been applied to DGVMs. Our recent research have shown that optimization- and trait-based models of gross primary production can be both much simpler and more accurate than current models based on fixed functional types, and that observed plant carbon allocations and distributions of plant functional traits are predictable with eco-evolutionary models. While there are also many other examples of the usefulness of these and other theoretical principles, it is not always straight-forward to make them operational in predictive models. In particular on longer time scales, the representation of functional diversity and the dynamical interactions among individuals and species presents a formidable challenge. Here we will present recent ideas on the use of adaptation and optimization principles in vegetation models, including examples of promising developments, but also limitations of the principles and some key challenges.

  7. Vmax estimate from three-parameter critical velocity models: validity and impact on 800 m running performance prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosquet, Laurent; Duchene, Antoine; Lecot, François; Dupont, Grégory; Leger, Luc

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of maximal velocity (Vmax) estimated from three-parameter systems models, and to compare the predictive value of two- and three-parameter models for the 800 m. Seventeen trained male subjects (VO2max=66.54+/-7.29 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) performed five randomly ordered constant velocity tests (CVT), a maximal velocity test (mean velocity over the last 10 m portion of a 40 m sprint) and a 800 m time trial (V 800 m). Five systems models (two three-parameter and three two-parameter) were used to compute V max (three-parameter models), critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running capacity (ARC) and V800m from times to exhaustion during CVT. Vmax estimates were significantly lower than (0.19Critical velocity (CV) alone explained 40-62% of the variance in V800m. Combining CV with other parameters of each model to produce a calculated V800m resulted in a clear improvement of this relationship (0.83models had a better association (0.93models (0.83models appear to have a better predictive value for short duration events such as the 800 m, the fact the Vmax is not associated with the ability it is supposed to reflect suggests that they are more empirical than systems models.

  8. Combining vegetation index and model inversion methods for theextraction of key vegetation biophysical parameters using Terra and Aqua MODIS reflectance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Rasmus Møller; Søgaard, Henrik; Bøgh, Eva

    2007-01-01

    change. The present study explores the benefits of combining vegetation index and physically based approaches for the spatial and temporal mapping of green leaf area index (LAI), total chlorophyll content (TCab), and total vegetation water content (VWC). A numerical optimization method was employed...... and computationally efficient VI approach makes the combined retrieval scheme for LAI, TCab, and VWC suitable for large-scale mapping operations. In order to facilitate application of the canopy reflectance model to heterogeneous forested areas, a simple correction scheme was elaborated, which was found to improve...... constituents without utilizing calibration measurements. Preliminary LAI validation results for the Island of Zealand, Denmark (57°N, 12°E) provided confidence in the approach with root mean square (RMS) deviations between estimates and in-situ measurements of 0.62, 0.46, and 0.63 for barley, wheat...

  9. Regional adaptation of a dynamic global vegetation model using a remote sensing data derived land cover map of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostikov, S.; Venevsky, S.; Bartalev, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) SEVER has been regionally adapted using a remote sensing data-derived land cover map in order to improve the reconstruction conformity of the distribution of vegetation functional types over Russia. The SEVER model was modified to address noticeable divergences between modelling results and the land cover map. The model modification included a light competition method elaboration and the introduction of a tundra class into the model. The rigorous optimisation of key model parameters was performed using a two-step procedure. First, an approximate global optimum was found using the efficient global optimisation (EGO) algorithm, and afterwards a local search in the vicinity of the approximate optimum was performed using the quasi-Newton algorithm BFGS. The regionally adapted model shows a significant improvement of the vegetation distribution reconstruction over Russia with better matching with the satellite-derived land cover map, which was confirmed by both a visual comparison and a formal conformity criterion.

  10. INTEGRATION OF NPP SEMI MECHANISTIC - MODELLING, REMOTE SENSING AND CIS IN ESTIMATING CO 2 ABSORPTION OF FOREST VEGETATION IN LORE LINDU NATIONAL PARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GODE GRAVENHORsr

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Net Primary Production, NPP, is one of the most important variables characterizing the performance of an ecosystem. It is the difference between the total carbon uptake from the air through photosynthesis and the carbon loss due to respiration by living plants. However, field measurements of NPP are time-consuming and expensive. Current techniques are therefore not useful for obtaining NPP estimates over large areas. By combining the remote sensing and GIS technology and modelling, we can estimate NPP of a large ecosystem with a little ease. This paper discusses the use of a process based physiological sunshade canopy models in estimating NPP of Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP. The discussion includes on how to parameterize the models and how to scale up from leaf to the canopy. The version documented in this manuscript is called NetPro Model, which is a potential NPP model where water effect is not included yet. The model integrates CIS and the use of Remote Sensing, and written in Visual Basic 6.0 programming language and Map Objects 2.1. NetPro has the capability of estimating NPP of Cs vegetation under present environmental condition and under future scenarios (increasing [CO2], increasing temperature and increasing or decreasing leaf nitrogen level. Based on site-measured parameterisation of VaM* (Photosynthetic capacity, /Jj (Respiration and leaf nitrogen ONi, the model was run under increasing CO2 level and temperature and varied leaf nitrogen. The output of the semi-mechanistic modelling is radiation use efficiency (?. Analysis of remote sensing data give Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and related Leaf Area Index (LAI and traction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (/M > AK. Climate data are obtained from 12 meteorological stations around die parks, which includes global radiations, minimum and maximum temperature. CO2 absorbed by vegetation (Gross Primary Production, GPP is then calculated using the above

  11. D Recording and Modelling of Middle-Age Fortress in Dense Vegetation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, M.; Courtois, Y.; Guillemin, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Schwartzenbourg castle is a Middle-Ages fortress which was built in 1261. It is situated above the valley of Munster in Alsace, France. It was mainly used as a fortified place and a jail. In the early 15th century, the structure has deteriorated. Even after some repairs, it fell into ruins during the Thirty Years' war (1618-1648) and stayed uninhabited. During World War I, the German army used the place as a vantage point and also built a blockhouse inside the ruins. Nowadays, the ruins are gradually collapsing and the remains of the old walls are completely covered by thick plants. The goal of this project was to create a 3D-model of the site before closing its access, which became too dangerous for people. This modelling is divided into two elements: on one hand, a digital terrain model (DTM) of the site in order to replace the castle and to analyze the background of its original environment; on the other hand, a 3D modelling of the ruins of the castle invaded by the vegetation. Indeed, the main difficulty of the measurement is obviously the dense vegetation which hides the castle. Held back for years outside the castle, it has now become an integral part of the ruins. This vegetation is finally today usually the first threat of heritage buildings. After a preliminary inspection of the site as well as difficulties of the project, the first step consisted of the survey of the whole environment of the site. We will therefore describe the different phases of the survey with the initial implementation of a georeferenced network on site. We will present the terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) surveys, then complementary surveys carried out by aerial photogrammetry. To be implemented, we had to wait for an advanced autumn in order to have as few leaves on trees as possible. The major step of processing of point clouds described in this paper is then the extraction of a DTM by using techniques to pass through the vegetation, or better to segment the points into

  12. 3D RECORDING AND MODELLING OF MIDDLE-AGE FORTRESS IN DENSE VEGETATION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koehl

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Schwartzenbourg castle is a Middle-Ages fortress which was built in 1261. It is situated above the valley of Munster in Alsace, France. It was mainly used as a fortified place and a jail. In the early 15th century, the structure has deteriorated. Even after some repairs, it fell into ruins during the Thirty Years’ war (1618-1648 and stayed uninhabited. During World War I, the German army used the place as a vantage point and also built a blockhouse inside the ruins. Nowadays, the ruins are gradually collapsing and the remains of the old walls are completely covered by thick plants. The goal of this project was to create a 3D-model of the site before closing its access, which became too dangerous for people. This modelling is divided into two elements: on one hand, a digital terrain model (DTM of the site in order to replace the castle and to analyze the background of its original environment; on the other hand, a 3D modelling of the ruins of the castle invaded by the vegetation. Indeed, the main difficulty of the measurement is obviously the dense vegetation which hides the castle. Held back for years outside the castle, it has now become an integral part of the ruins. This vegetation is finally today usually the first threat of heritage buildings. After a preliminary inspection of the site as well as difficulties of the project, the first step consisted of the survey of the whole environment of the site. We will therefore describe the different phases of the survey with the initial implementation of a georeferenced network on site. We will present the terrestrial laser scanning (TLS surveys, then complementary surveys carried out by aerial photogrammetry. To be implemented, we had to wait for an advanced autumn in order to have as few leaves on trees as possible. The major step of processing of point clouds described in this paper is then the extraction of a DTM by using techniques to pass through the vegetation, or better to segment the

  13. An improved Peronnet-Thibault mathematical model of human running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2002-04-01

    Using an improved Peronnet-Thibault model to analyse the maximal power available during exercise, it was found that a 3rd-order relaxation process for the decreasing dynamics of aerobic power can describe accurately the data available for world track records and aerobic-to-total energy ratio (ATER). It was estimated that the time-scales for the decreasing dynamics are around 25 s for anaerobic power output and that they range from 2.12 h to 7.8 days for aerobic power output. In agreement with experimental evidence, the ATER showed a rapid increase during the first 300 s of exercise duration, to achieve an asymptote close to 100% after 1,000 s. In addition, the transition time when the ATER rose above 50% was found to be at a race duration of about 100 s, which would correspond to race distances of about 800 m. The results suggest that the aerobic power output achieves its maximal value at 300-400 s, and reaches a plateau at 26-28 W.kg(-1) that lasts about 5,000 s. After this period, the aerobic power output decreases slowly due to the contribution of long time-scale metabolic processes having smaller energy contributions (about 30% to 40% of the total aerobic power output).

  14. Regional on-road vehicle running emissions modeling and evaluation for conventional and alternative vehicle technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H Christopher; Zhai, Haibo; Rouphail, Nagui M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a methodology for estimating high-resolution, regional on-road vehicle emissions and the associated reductions in air pollutant emissions from vehicles that utilize alternative fuels or propulsion technologies. The fuels considered are gasoline, diesel, ethanol, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, hydrogen, and electricity. The technologies considered are internal combustion or compression engines, hybrids, fuel cell, and electric. Road link-based emission models are developed using modal fuel use and emission rates applied to facility- and speed-specific driving cycles. For an urban case study, passenger cars were found to be the largest sources of HC, CO, and CO(2) emissions, whereas trucks contributed the largest share of NO(x) emissions. When alternative fuel and propulsion technologies were introduced in the fleet at a modest market penetration level of 27%, their emission reductions were found to be 3-14%. Emissions for all pollutants generally decreased with an increase in the market share of alternative vehicle technologies. Turnover of the light duty fleet to newer Tier 2 vehicles reduced emissions of HC, CO, and NO(x) substantially. However, modest improvements in fuel economy may be offset by VMT growth and reductions in overall average speed.

  15. Characterization of a Field Spectroradiometer for Unattended Vegetation Monitoring. Key Sensor Models and Impacts on Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pacheco-Labrador

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Field spectroradiometers integrated in automated systems at Eddy Covariance (EC sites are a powerful tool for monitoring and upscaling vegetation physiology and carbon and water fluxes. However, exposure to varying environmental conditions can affect the functioning of these sensors, especially if these cannot be completely insulated and stabilized. This can cause inaccuracy in the spectral measurements and hinder the comparison between data acquired at different sites. This paper describes the characterization of key sensor models in a double beam spectroradiometer necessary to calculate the Hemispherical-Conical Reflectance Factor (HCRF. Dark current, temperature dependence, non-linearity, spectral calibration and cosine receptor directional responses are modeled in the laboratory as a function of temperature, instrument settings, radiation measured or illumination angle. These models are used to correct the spectral measurements acquired continuously by the same instrument integrated outdoors in an automated system (AMSPEC-MED. Results suggest that part of the instrumental issues cancel out mutually or can be controlled by the instrument configuration, so that changes induced in HCFR reached about 0.05 at maximum. However, these corrections are necessary to ensure the inter-comparison of data with other ground or remote sensors and to discriminate instrumentally induced changes in HCRF from those related with vegetation physiology and directional effects.

  16. Mapping the land surface for global atmosphere-biosphere models: Toward continuous distributions of vegetation's functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defries, Ruth S.; Field, Christopher B.; Fung, Inez; Justice, Christopher O.; Los, Sietse; Matson, Pamela A.; Matthews, Elaine; Mooney, Harold A.; Potter, Christopher S.; Prentice, Katharine; Sellers, Piers J.; Townshend, John R. G.; Tucker, Compton J.; Ustin, Susan L.; Vitousek, Peter M.

    1995-10-01

    Global land surface characteristics are important boundary conditions for global models that describe exchanges of water, energy, and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and biosphere. Existing data sets of global land cover are based on classification schemes that characterize each grid cell as a discrete vegetation type. Consequently, parameter fields derived from these data sets are dependent on the particular scheme and the number of vegetation types it includes. The functional controls on exchanges of water, energy, and carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and biosphere are now well enough understood that it is increasingly feasible to model these exchanges using a small number of vegetation characteristics that either are related to or closely related to the functional controls. Ideally, these characteristics would be mapped as continuous distributions to capture mixtures and gradients in vegetation within the cell size of the model. While such an approach makes it more difficult to build models from detailed observations at a small number of sites, it increases the potential for capturing functionally important variation within, as well as between, vegetation types. Globally, the vegetation characteristics that appear to be most important in controlling fluxes of water, energy, and carbon dioxide include (1) growth form (tree, shrub, herb), (2) seasonality of woody vegetation (deciduous, evergreen), (3) leaf type (broadleaf, coniferous), (4) photosynthetic pathway of nonwoody vegetation (C3, C4), (5) longevity (annual, perennial), and (6) type and intensity of disturbance (e.g., cultivation, fire history). Many of these characteristics can be obtained through remote sensing, though some require ground-based information. The minimum number and the identity of the required land surface characteristics almost certainly vary with the intended objective, but the philosophy of driving models with continuous distributions of a small number of land surface

  17. Remote sensing Penman-Monteith model to estimate catchment evapotranspiration considering the vegetation diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fawen; Cao, Runxiang; Zhao, Yong; Mu, Dongjing; Fu, Changfeng; Ping, Feng

    2017-01-01

    A new method for calculating evaporation is proposed, using the Penman-Monteith (P-M) model with remote sensing. This paper achieved the effective estimation to daily evapotranspiration in the Ziya river catchment by using the P-M model based on MODIS remote sensing leaf area index and respectively estimated plant transpiration and soil evaporation by using coefficient of soil evaporation. This model divided catchment into seven different sub-regions which are prairie, meadow, grass, shrub, broad-leaved forest, cultivated vegetation, and coniferous forest through thoroughly considering the vegetation diversity. Furthermore, optimizing and calibrating parameters based on each sub-region and analyzing spatio-temporal variation rules of the model main parameters which are coefficient of soil evaporation f and maximum stomatal conductance g sx . The results indicate that f and g sx calibrated by model are basically consistent with measured data and have obvious spatio-temporal distribution characteristics. The monthly average evapotranspiration value of simulation is 37.96 mm/mon which is close to the measured value with 33.66 mm/mon and the relative error of simulation results in each subregion are within 11 %, which illustrates that simulated values and measured values fit well and the precision of model is high. In addition, plant transpiration and soil evaporation account for about 84.64 and 15.36 % respectively in total evapotranspiration, which means the difference between values of them is large. What is more, this model can effectively estimate the green water resources in basin and provide effective technological support for water resources estimation.

  18. Study of the ion kinetic effects in ICF run-away burn using a quasi-1D hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.-K.; Molvig, K.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Vold, E. L.; Kagan, G.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2017-02-01

    The loss of fuel ions in the Gamow peak and other kinetic effects related to the α particles during ignition, run-away burn, and disassembly stages of an inertial confinement fusion D-T capsule are investigated with a quasi-1D hybrid volume ignition model that includes kinetic ions, fluid electrons, Planckian radiation photons, and a metallic pusher. The fuel ion loss due to the Knudsen effect at the fuel-pusher interface is accounted for by a local-loss model by Molvig et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 095001 (2012)] with an albedo model for ions returning from the pusher wall. The tail refilling and relaxation of the fuel ion distribution are captured with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck solver. Alpha heating of the fuel ions is modeled kinetically while simple models for finite alpha range and electron heating are used. This dynamical model is benchmarked with a 3 T hydrodynamic burn model employing similar assumptions. For an energetic pusher (˜40 kJ) that compresses the fuel to an areal density of ˜1.07 g/cm 2 at ignition, the simulation shows that the Knudsen effect can substantially limit ion temperature rise in runaway burn. While the final yield decreases modestly from kinetic effects of the α particles, large reduction of the fuel reactivity during ignition and runaway burn may require a higher Knudsen loss rate compared to the rise time of the temperatures above ˜25 keV when the broad D-T Gamow peak merges into the bulk Maxwellian distribution.

  19. Modelling trends in woody vegetation structure in semi-arid Australia as determined from aerial photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensham, Roderick John; Low Choy, Sama J; Fairfax, Russell James; Cavallaro, Paul C

    2003-08-01

    Accounting of carbon stocks in woody vegetation for greenhouse purposes requires definition of medium term trends with accurate error assessment. Tree and shrub cover was sampled through time at randomly located sites over a large area of central Queensland, Australia using aerial photography from 1945 to 1999. Calibration models developed from field data for the same land types as those represented within the study area allowed for the extrapolation of overstorey and understorey cover, basal area and biomass values and these were modelled as trends over the latter half of the 20th century. These structural attributes have declined over the region because of land clearing with values for biomass changing from a mean of 58.0(+/-1.2)t/ha in 1953 to 41.1(+/-1.0)t/ha in 1991. The biomass of Acacia on clay and Eucalypt on texture contrast soils land types has declined most dramatically. Within uncleared vegetation there was an overall trend of increase from 56.1(+/-1.2)t/ha in 1951 to 67.6(+/-1.3)t/ha in 1995. The increase in structural attributes within uncleared vegetation was most pronounced for the Eucalypt on texture contrast soils and Eucalypt on clay land types. It was demonstrated that the sites sampled were representative of their land types and that spatial bias of the photography, undetected tree-killing, sampling error, inherent variability of structural attributes and measurement error should not have impacted greatly on bias or precision of trend estimates for well-sampled land types. Certainly the errors are not likely to be substantial for trends averaged over all land types and they provide an accurate assessment of the magnitude and direction of change. The technique presented here would appear to be a robust means of accounting for the above-ground woody component of woodlands and open forests and will also contribute to a broader understanding of savanna dynamics.

  20. [Comparison and analysis of hyperspectral remote sensing identifiable models for different vegetation under waterlogging stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Bao; Steven, Michael D; He, Ru-Yan; Cai, Qing-Kong

    2013-11-01

    With the global climate warming, flooding disasters frequently occurred and its influence scope constantly increased in China. The objective of the present paper was to study the leaf spectral features of vegetation (maize and beetroot) under waterlogging stress and design a hyperspectral remote sensing model to monitor the flooding disasters through a field simulated experiment. The experiment was carried out in the Sutton Bonington Campus of University of Nottingham (52.8 degrees N, 1. 2 degrees W) from May to August in 2008, and samples were collected one time every week and spectra were measured in the laboratory. The result showed that the reflectance of the maize and beetroot decreased in the 550 and 800-1 300 nm region, and the reflectance slightly increased in the 680 nm region. This paper chose NDVI, SIPI, PRI, SRPI, GNDVI and R800 * R550/R680 to identify the vegetation under waterlogging stress, respectively. The result suggested that the SIPI and R800 * R550/R680 was sensitive for maize under waterlogging stress, and then SIPI and PRI and R800 * R550/R680 was sensitive for beetroot under waterlogging stress. In order to seek the best identifiable model, the normalized distances between means of control and stressed vegetation indices were calculated and analyzed, the result indicated that the distance of R800 * R550/R680 is more than that of indices' in the early stress stage, illustrated that the index identifiable ability for waterlogging stress is better than other indices, then the index has the strong sensitivity and stability. Therefore, the index R800 * R550/R680 could be used to quickly extract flooding disaster area by using hyperspectral remote sensing, and would provide information support for disaster relief decisions.

  1. Large Differences in Terrestrial Vegetation Production Derived from Satellite-Based Light Use Efficiency Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Cai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial gross primary production (GPP is the largest global CO2 flux and determines other ecosystem carbon cycle variables. Light use efficiency (LUE models may have the most potential to adequately address the spatial and temporal dynamics of GPP, but recent studies have shown large model differences in GPP simulations. In this study, we investigated the GPP differences in the spatial and temporal patterns derived from seven widely used LUE models at the global scale. The result shows that the global annual GPP estimates over the period 2000–2010 varied from 95.10 to 139.71 Pg C∙yr−1 among models. The spatial and temporal variation of global GPP differs substantially between models, due to different model structures and dominant environmental drivers. In almost all models, water availability dominates the interannual variability of GPP over large vegetated areas. Solar radiation and air temperature are not the primary controlling factors for interannual variability of global GPP estimates for most models. The disagreement among the current LUE models highlights the need for further model improvement to quantify the global carbon cycle.

  2. A mathematical model for lake ontogeny in terms of filling with sediments and macrophyte vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Biology and Environmental Science

    2004-05-01

    A mathematical model for simulation of lake basin filling processes in areas with positive shore displacement was constructed. The model was calibrated using sediment and catchments data from eight existing lake basins situated in the northern coastal area of the province of Uppland, Sweden. The lake basin filling processes were separated into three phases: basin filling with wave-washed material (silt, silty sand or sand), filling with fine-grained material during the shallow gulf and lake stages, respectively, and filling with vegetation during the lake stage. The basin filling rates for wave-washed material were generally low but varied considerably both between and within lakes. The mean basin filling rate of wave-washed material was 4.1%. The volume of inorganic sediments produced, and basin filling rates during the shallow gulf and lake phases were determined for all the eight lakes. The relationship between basin filling rate and parameters describing the catchments, the former postglacial basins and the lakes, respectively, was determined using multiple regression analysis. The basin filling rate with inorganic sediments was best described by parameters related to former postglacial basin morphometry and current lake morphometry, e.g. basin volume, lake volume, and lake area. The goodness of fit turned out to be 0.99 for a simple regression with basin volume as the sole independent variable. The basin filling with vegetation (Phragmites australis followed by Sphagnum spp.) was treated as a 2-dimensional process. A dataset with 84 bogs was selected from a digital soil map. The ages of the bogs were calculated using a digital elevation map and an equation for shore displacement. The choke-up rate was then calculated by dividing the area of the bogs with their age. A strong exponential relationship exists between areas of the bogs and choke-up rat, and this relationship was then used in the model. The resulting model starts by filling the former coastal basin

  3. Adaptation of a canopy reflectance model for sub-aqueous vegetation: Definition and sensitivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, S.E. [NERC/RSADU, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Malthus, T.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Clark, C.D. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    1997-06-01

    Seagrass meadows are a key component of shallow coastal environments acting as a food resource, nursery and contributing to water oxygenation. Given the importance of these meadows and their susceptibility to anthropogenic disturbance, it is vital that the extent and growth of seagrass is monitored. Remote sensing techniques offer the potential to determine biophysical characteristics of seagrass. This paper presents observations on the development and testing of an invertible model of seagrass canopy reflectance. The model is an adaptation of a land surface reflectance model to incorporate the effects of attenuation and scattering of incoming radiative flux in water. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the subsurface reflectance is strongly dependent on the water depth, vegetation amount, the parameter which we wish to determine, and turbidity respectively. By contrast the chlorophyll concentration of water and gelbstoff are relatively unimportant. Water depth and turbidity need to be known or accommodated in any inversion as free parameters.

  4. Mathematic Modeling for Vegetal Coal Activation in a Rotating Cylindrical Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zalazar-Oliva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The activation of vegetal coal by applying physical or thermal methods is carried out under an atmosphere containing air, carbon dioxide or water vapor at temperatures ranging from 800 °C and 900 °C. This investigation was completed based on the mathematical modeling for the coal activation process in order to estimate the gas distribution and coal temperatures inside a rotating cylindrical kiln. The model consists of a system of non-lineal differential equations and equations to calculate the temperature of the cylinder internal wall and heat transfer coefficients. The 4th order Runge–Kutta method was used for the calculations. The comparison of the results obtained from modeling gas temperatures in the interior of the cylinder and the experimental data indicated that the variation is insignificant with an error margin below 5 %.

  5. Estimation of Fractional Vegetation Cover Based on Digital Camera Survey Data and a Remote Sensing Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhen-qi; HE Fen-qin; YIN Jian-zhong; LU Xia; TANG Shi-lu; WANG Lin-lin; LI Xiao-jing

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to improve the monitoring speed and precision of fractional vegetation cover (fc). It mainly focuses onfc estimation when fcmax andfcmin are not approximately equal to 100% and 0%, respectively due to using remote sensing image with medium or low spatial resolution. Meanwhile, we present a new method offc estimation based on a random set offc maximum and minimum values from digital camera (DC) survey data and a dimidiate pixel model. The results show that this is a convenient, efficient and accurate method forfc monitoring, with the maximum error -0.172 and correlation coefficient of 0.974 between DC survey data and the estimated value of the remote sensing model. The remaining DC survey data can be used as verification data for the precision of thefc estimation. In general, the estimation offc based on DC survey data and a remote sensing model is a brand-new development trend and deserves further extensive utilization.

  6. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  7. Predictive vegetation modeling for conservation: impact of error propagation from digital elevation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Niel, Kimberly P; Austin, Mike P

    2007-01-01

    The effect of digital elevation model (DEM) error on environmental variables, and subsequently on predictive habitat models, has not been explored. Based on an error analysis of a DEM, multiple error realizations of the DEM were created and used to develop both direct and indirect environmental variables for input to predictive habitat models. The study explores the effects of DEM error and the resultant uncertainty of results on typical steps in the modeling procedure for prediction of vegetation species presence/absence. Results indicate that all of these steps and results, including the statistical significance of environmental variables, shapes of species response curves in generalized additive models (GAMs), stepwise model selection, coefficients and standard errors for generalized linear models (GLMs), prediction accuracy (Cohen's kappa and AUC), and spatial extent of predictions, were greatly affected by this type of error. Error in the DEM can affect the reliability of interpretations of model results and level of accuracy in predictions, as well as the spatial extent of the predictions. We suggest that the sensitivity of DEM-derived environmental variables to error in the DEM should be considered before including them in the modeling processes.

  8. Monitoring the hydrologic and vegetation dynamics of arid land with satellite remote sensing and mathematic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiwu; Gao, Wei; Pan, Xiaoling; Ma, Yingjun

    2003-07-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems, in which carbon is retained in live biomass, play an important role in the global carbon cycling. Among these ecological systems, vegetation and soils in deserts and semi deserts control significant proportions in the total carbon stocks on the land surface and the carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere (IPCC special report: Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry, June 2000). Therefore, accurate assessment of the carbon stocks and fluxes of the desert and semi desert areas at regional scales is required in global carbon cycle studies. In addition, vegetative ecosystem in semi-arid and arid land is strongly dependent on the water resources. Monitoring the hydrologic processes of the land is thus also required. This work explores the methodology for the sequential continuous estimation of the carbon stocks, CO2 flux, evapotranspiration, and sensible heat fluxes over desert and semidesert area using data from the Jornada desert in New Mexico, USA. A CO2 and energy flux coupled model is used to estimate CO2, water vapor and sensible heat fluxes over the desert area. The model is driven by the observed meteorological data. Its input land surface parameters are derived from satellite images. Simulated energy fluxes are validated for specific sites with eddy covariance observations. Based on the output of spatially distributed CO2 fluxes, carbon accumulations over the desert area during a period of time is calculated and the contribution of the desert ecosystem to the atmospheric carbon pool is discussed.

  9. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Parameters for Modeling Coastal Marsh Response to Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, K. B.; Windham-Myers, L.; Warzecha, B.; Crowe, R.; Vasey, M. C.; Ferner, M.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal planners are seeking ways to prepare for the potential impacts of future climate change, particularly sea level rise though management of future risks is complicated by uncertainty in the timing, distribution and extent of these impacts. Sea level rise impacts will be most evident at the regional level where decisions related to climate change adaptation including those related to land use planning and habitat management typically occur. To aid coastal managers with decision-making we are integrating remote sensing data with the marsh equilibrium model (MEM3) to project coastal marsh habitat response to future sea level rise. MEM3 is a 1-dimentional, calibrated Excel-based model that incorporates both physical and biological feedbacks to changing relative elevations. Modeled future elevations are then distributed at the regional scale with LiDAR DEMs to project changes to coastal habitats and dependent wildlife. Because plant biomass and structure influence both organic and inorganic accretion, MEM3 includes multiple vegetation input variables. Deriving these variables, including maximum and minimum elevations of marsh vegetation, peak aboveground biomass, and elevation at peak biomass from remote sensing will enable the model to have spatially variable inputs across sites. We are evaluating 30m Landsat 8 and 2m World View-2 (WV2) satellite data for mapping peak biomass at Rush Ranch, a highly diverse brackish marsh in the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. The high spatial resolution of WV2 produces greater variability in plant reflectance at the pixel scale than Landsat 8. Initial results show the need for plant community-specific biomass models with WV2 to account for differences in plant structure and canopy architecture. When removing plots dominated by Salicornia pacifica and Lepidium latifolium, peak biomass is best estimated with an NDVI-type vegetation index based on WV2 near infrared bands 7 and 8 (R2 = 0.21, RMSE = 318 g/m2

  10. Integration of vegetation indices into a water balance model to estimate evapotranspiration of wheat and corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L. M. Padilla

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation indices (VIs have been traditionally used for quantitative monitoring of vegetation. Remotely sensed radiometric measurements of visible and infrared solar energy, which is reflected or emitted by plant canopies, can be used to obtain rapid, non-destructive estimates of certain canopy attributes and parameters. One parameter of special interest for water management applications, is the crop coefficient employed by the FAO-56 model to derive actual crop evapotranspiration (ET. The aim of this study was to evaluate a methodology that combines the basal crop coefficient derived from VIs with a daily soil water balance in the root zone to estimate daily evapotranspiration rates for corn and wheat crops at field scale. The ability of the model to trace water stress in these crops was also assessed. Vegetation indices were first retrieved from field hand-held radiometer measurements and then from Landsat 5 and 7 satellite images. The results of the model were validated using two independent measurement systems for ET and regular soil moisture monitoring, in order to evaluate the behavior of the soil and atmosphere components of the model. ET estimates were compared with latent heat flux measured by an eddy covariance system and with weighing lysimeter measurements. Average overestimates of daily ET of 8 and 11% were obtained for corn and wheat, respectively, with good agreement between the estimated and measured root-zone water deficit for both crops when field radiometry was employed. Satellite remote-sensing inputs overestimated ET by 4 to 9%, showing a non-significant lost of accuracy when the satellite sensor data replaced the field radiometry data. The model was also used to monitor the water stress during the 2009 growing season, detecting several periods of water stress in both crops. Some of these stresses occurred during stages like grain filling, when the water stress is know to have a negative effect on yield. This fact could

  11. Comparative adaptations in oxidative and glycolytic muscle fibers in a low voluntary wheel running rat model performing three levels of physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Hayden W; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Ruegsegger, Greg; Mobley, C Brooks; Fox, Carlton D; McGinnis, Graham R; Quindry, John C; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2015-11-01

    A unique polygenic model of rat physical activity has been recently developed where rats were selected for the trait of low voluntary wheel running. We utilized this model to identify differences in soleus and plantaris muscles of sedentary low voluntary wheel running rats and physically active low voluntary wheel running rats exposed to moderate amounts of treadmill training. Three groups of 28-day-old male Wistar rats were used: (1) rats without a running wheel (SEDENTARY, n = 7), (2) rats housed with a running wheel (WHEEL, n = 7), and (3) rats housed with a running wheel and exercised on the treadmill (5 days/week for 20 min/day at 15.0 m/min) (WHEEL + TREADMILL, n = 7). Animals were euthanized 5 weeks after the start of the experiment and the soleus and plantaris muscles were excised and used for analyses. Increases in skeletal muscle gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha and fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 in WHEEL + TREADMILL group were observed. Also, WHEEL + TREADMILL had higher protein levels of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreased levels of oxidative damage. Our data demonstrate that the addition of treadmill training induces beneficial muscular adaptations compared to animals with wheel access alone. Furthermore, our data expand our understanding of differential muscular adaptations in response to exercise in mitochondrial, antioxidant, and metabolic markers.

  12. Trajectory and Concentration PM10 on Forest and Vegetation Peat-Fire HYSPLIT Model Outputs and Observations (Period: September - October 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairullah; Effendy, S.; Makmur, E. E. S.

    2017-03-01

    Forest and vegetation peat-fire is one of the main sources of air pollution in Kalimantan, predominantly during the dry period. In 2015, forest and vegetation fire in Central Kalimantan and South Kalimantan emit large quantities of smoke leading to poor air quality. Haze is a phenomenon characterized by high concentration of particulate matter. This research objective is to analyze trajectory and dispersion of concentration particulate matter, PM10 in Banjarbaru and Palangka Raya. Dynamics of PM10 (Particulate matter less than or 10 µm in size) on vegetation peat-fire is done using GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System) output with a horizontal resolution 1º which corresponds to 100 km × 100 km for input model. Climate conditions in the period September to October 2015 at generally during dry season of El Nino year. The Hybrid-single Langrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to investigate concentration and long-range movement of this pollutant from the source to the receptor area. We used time-series data on PM10 readings obtained from two stations Banjarbaru (South Kalimantan) and Palangka Raya (Central Kalimantan) belonging to Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG). We also used weather parameter such as wind speed and direction. We investigated trajectory run from hotspots information MoF (Sipongi Output Programs) and HYSPLIT. We compared concentration obtained from PM10 observation and its concentrations trend. The dispersion pattern, as simulated by HYSPLIT showed that the distribution of PM10 was greatly influenced by the wind direction and topography. There is a large difference between the concentration of PM10 Palangka Raya and Banjarbaru.

  13. Interception of wet deposited atmospheric pollutants by herbaceous vegetation: Data review and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonze, M.-A., E-mail: marc-andre.gonze@irsn.fr; Sy, M.M.

    2016-09-15

    Better understanding and predicting interception of wet deposited pollutants by vegetation remains a key issue in risk assessment studies of atmospheric pollution. We develop different alternative models, following either empirical or semi-mechanistic descriptions, on the basis of an exhaustive dataset consisting of 440 observations obtained in controlled experiments, from 1970 to 2014, for a wide variety of herbaceous plants, radioactive substances and rainfall conditions. The predictive performances of the models and the uncertainty/variability of the parameters are evaluated under Hierarchical Bayesian modelling framework. It is demonstrated that the variability of the interception fraction is satisfactorily explained and quite accurately modelled by a process-based alternative in which absorption of ionic substances onto the foliage surfaces is determined by their electrical valence. Under this assumption, the 95% credible interval of the predicted interception fraction encompasses 81% of the observations, including situations where either plant biomass or rainfall intensity are unknown. This novel approach is a serious candidate to challenge existing empirical relationships in radiological or chemical risk assessment tools. - Highlights: • Literature data on the interception of atmospheric pollutants by herbs were reviewed • Predictive models were developed and evaluated in the Bayesian modelling framework • Sensitivity of interception to environmental conditions was satisfactorily explained • 81% of the observations were satisfactorily predicted by a semi-mechanistic model • This model challenges empirical relationships currently used in risk assessment tools.

  14. Multi-objective assessment of three remote sensing vegetation products for streamflow prediction in a conceptual ecohydrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Bushra; Ajami, Hoori; Liu, Yi; Cordery, Ian; Sharma, Ashish

    2016-12-01

    This study assesses the implications of using three alternate remote sensing vegetation products in the simulation of streamflow using a conceptual ecohydrologic model. Vegetation is represented as a dynamic component in this model which simulates two response variables, streamflow and one of the following three vegetation attributes: Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), Leaf Area Index (LAI) or Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD). Model simulations are performed across 50 catchments with areas ranging between 50 and 1600 km2 in the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI and GPP products, passive microwave observations of VOD and streamflow are used for model calibration and/or validation. Single-objective model calibration based on one of the vegetation products (GPP, LAI and VOD) shows that GPP is the best vegetation simulating product. On the contrary, LAI produces the best streamflow during validation when the optimized parameters are applied for streamflow estimation. To obtain the best compromise solution for simultaneous simulation of streamflow and a vegetation product, a multi-objective optimization is applied on GPP and streamflow, VOD and streamflow and LAI and streamflow. Results show that LAI and then VOD are the two best products in simulating streamflow across these catchments. Improved simulation of VOD and LAI in a multi-objective setting is partly related to the higher temporal resolution of these datasets and inclusion of processes for converting GPP to net primary productivity and biomass. It is suggested that further development of these remote sensing products at finer spatial and temporal resolutions may lead to improved streamflow prediction, as well as a better simulation capability of the ecohydrological system being modeled.

  15. Assessing global climate-terrestrial vegetation feedbacks on carbon and nitrogen cycling in the earth system model EC-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wårlind, David; Miller, Paul; Nieradzik, Lars; Söderberg, Fredrik; Anthoni, Peter; Arneth, Almut; Smith, Ben

    2017-04-01

    There has been great progress in developing an improved European Consortium Earth System Model (EC-Earth) in preparation for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) and the next Assessment Report of the IPCC. The new model version has been complemented with ocean biogeochemistry, atmospheric composition (aerosols and chemistry) and dynamic land vegetation components, and has been configured to use the recommended CMIP6 forcing data sets. These new components will give us fresh insights into climate change. This study focuses on the terrestrial biosphere component Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ-GUESS) that simulates vegetation dynamics and compound exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere in EC-Earth. LPJ-GUESS allows for vegetation to dynamically evolve, depending on climate input, and in return provides the climate system and land surface scheme with vegetation-dependent fields such as vegetation types and leaf area index. We present the results of a study to examine the feedbacks between the dynamic terrestrial vegetation and the climate and their impact on the terrestrial ecosystem carbon and nitrogen cycles. Our results are based on a set of global, atmosphere-only historical simulations (1870 to 2014) with and without feedback between climate and vegetation and including or ignoring the effect of nitrogen limitation on plant productivity. These simulations show to what extent the addition degree of freedom in EC-Earth, introduced with the coupling of interactive dynamic vegetation to the atmosphere, has on terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling, and represent contributions to CMIP6 (C4MIP and LUMIP) and the EU Horizon 2020 project CRESCENDO.

  16. Recent trends of high-latitude vegetation activity assessed and explained by contrasting modelling approaches with earth observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, M.; Carvalhais, N.; Reichstein, M.; Thonicke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) showed increasing trends in the arctic tundra and the boreal forests since the 1980s. This greening is related to an increase in photosynthetic activity and is driven by increasing temperatures and a prolongation of the growing season. However, NDVI experienced a decrease in large regions of the boreal forests since the mid-1990s. This browning is related to fire disturbances, temperature-induced summer drought and potentially to insect infestations and diseases. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) can be used to assess the impacts of these changes in vegetation productivity on the carbon and water cycles and on the climate system. In general, these models provide descriptions of ecosystem processes and states that are forced by and feedback to the climate system such as photosynthesis and transpiration, ecosystem respiration, soil carbon and water stocks and vegetation composition. The evaluation of TBMs against observations is a necessary step to assess their suitability to simulate such processes and dynamics. The increasing availability of long-term observations of vegetation activity enables us to evaluate the model ability to diagnose these vegetation greening and browning trends in arctic and boreal regions. The first aim of this study is to evaluate trends in vegetation activity in high-latitude regions as simulated by TBMs against observed trends in vegetation activity. The second aim is to identify potential drivers of these observed and simulated trends to evaluate the ability of models to reproduce the observed functional relations between climatic and environmental drivers and the vegetation trends. The trends in vegetation activity were estimated for a set of satellite-based remote sensing products: NDVI from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), as well as FAPAR observations (Fraction of Observed Photosynthetically

  17. A three-dimensional solid-liquid two-phase turbulence model with the effect of vegetation in non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cheng; SHEN YongMing

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional k-ε-Ap solid-liquid two-phase two-fluid model with the effect of vegetation Is solved numerically with a finite-volume method on an adaptive grid to study water-sediment movements and bed evolution in vegetated channels. The additional drag force and additional turbulence generation due to vegetation are added to the relevant control equations for simulating the interaction between vegetation and flow. The flow structure and the bed-topography changes in a 60° partly vegetated channel bend are calculated by the model. The numerical results agree well with the measured ones. Calculated and measured results show that the primary flow velocity reduces much in the vegetation zone and increases in the non-vegetation zone, the secondary flow velocity weakens in the vegetation zone and strengthens in the non-vegetation zone, the sediment movement and bed-topography change also weaken in the vegetation zone and strengthen in the non-vegetation zone, a well-planed vegetation arrangement can improve bank stabilization program, and the k-ε-Ap model can deal with bed-load transport with a more reasonable method than the one-fluid model.

  18. A three-dimensional solid-liquid two-phase turbulence model with the effect of vegetation in non-orthogonal curvilinear coordinates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional k-ε-Ap solid-liquid two-phase two-fluid model with the effect of vegetation is solved numerically with a finite-volume method on an adaptive grid to study water-sediment movements and bed evolution in vegetated channels. The additional drag force and additional turbulence generation due to vegetation are added to the relevant control equations for simulating the interaction between vegetation and flow. The flow structure and the bed-topography changes in a 60° partly vegetated channel bend are calculated by the model. The numerical results agree well with the measured ones. Calculated and measured results show that the primary flow velocity reduces much in the vegetation zone and increases in the non-vegetation zone, the secondary flow velocity weakens in the vegetation zone and strengthens in the non-vegetation zone, the sediment movement and bed-topography change also weaken in the vegetation zone and strengthen in the non-vegetation zone, a well-planed vegetation arrangement can improve bank stabilization program, and the k-ε-Ap model can deal with bed-load transport with a more reasonable method than the one-fluid model.

  19. Correlation of basic oil quality indices and electrical properties of model vegetable oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevc, Tjaša; Cigić, Blaž; Vidrih, Rajko; Poklar Ulrih, Nataša; Šegatin, Nataša

    2013-11-27

    Model vegetable oil mixtures with significantly different basic oil quality indices (free fatty acid, iodine, and Totox values) were prepared by adding oleic acids, synthetic saturated triglycerides, or oxidized safflower oil ( Carthamus tinctorius ) to the oleic type of sunflower oil. Dielectric constants, dielectric loss factors, quality factors, and electrical conductivities of model lipids were determined at frequencies from 50 Hz to 2 MHz and at temperatures from 293.15 to 323.15 K. The dependence of these dielectric parameters on basic oil quality indices was investigated. Adding oleic acids to sunflower oil resulted in lower dielectric constants and conductivities and higher quality factors. Reduced iodine values resulted in increased dielectric constants and quality factors and decreased conductivities. Higher Totox values resulted in higher dielectric constants and conductivities at high frequencies and lower quality factors. Dielectric constants decreased linearly with temperature, whereas conductivities followed the Arrhenius law.

  20. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  1. A dynamic growth model of vegetative soya bean plants: model structure and behaviour under varying root temperature and nitrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. T.; Wilkerson, G. G.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Gold, H. J.

    1990-01-01

    A differential equation model of vegetative growth of the soya bean plant (Glycine max (L.) Merrill cv. Ransom') was developed to account for plant growth in a phytotron system under variation of root temperature and nitrogen concentration in nutrient solution. The model was tested by comparing model outputs with data from four different experiments. Model predictions agreed fairly well with measured plant performance over a wide range of root temperatures and over a range of nitrogen concentrations in nutrient solution between 0.5 and 10.0 mmol NO3- in the phytotron environment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to changes in parameters relating to carbohydrate concentration in the plant and nitrogen uptake rate.

  2. Drought Forecasting with Vegetation Temperature Condition Index Using ARIMA Models in the Guanzhong Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Tian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper works on the agricultural drought forecasting in the Guanzhong Plain of China using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA models based on the time series of drought monitoring results of Vegetation Temperature Condition Index (VTCI. About 90 VTCI images derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR data were selected to develop the ARIMA models from the erecting stage to the maturity stage of winter wheat (early March to late May in each year at a ten-day interval of the years from 2000 to 2009. We take the study area overlying on the administration map around the study area, and divide the study area into 17 parts where at least one weather station is located in each part. The pixels where the 17 weather stations are located are firstly chosen and studied for their fitting models, and then the best models for all pixels of the whole area are determined. According to the procedures for the models’ development, the selected best models for the 17 pixels are identified and the forecast is done with three steps. The forecasting results of the ARIMA models were compared with the monitoring ones. The results show that with reference to the categorized VTCI drought monitoring results, the categorized forecasting results of the ARIMA models are in good agreement with the monitoring ones. The categorized drought forecasting results of the ARIMA models are more severity in the northeast of the Plain in April 2009, which are in good agreements with the monitoring ones. The absolute errors of the AR(1 models are lower than the SARIMA models, both in the frequency distributions and in the statistic results. However, the ability of SARIMA models to detect the changes of the drought situation is better than the AR(1 models. These results indicate that the ARIMA models can better forecast the category and extent of droughts and can be applied to forecast droughts in the Plain.

  3. How to upscale the coupling between hydrology and vegetation at the hillslope scale with an equivalent soil-vegetation column model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquin, Mathilde; Mugler, Claude; Mouche, Emmanuel; Ducharne, Agnès

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional watershed models coupled with land surface models have demonstrated the control of soil moisture over land energy fluxes, as evaporation and transpiration (Maxwell and Kollet, Nature Geoscience, 2008; Condon et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2013). However, due to computational costs, these fully integrated watershed models cannot be used at larger scales. Upscaling hydrological models can be an alternative to take into account the impact of groundwater hydrology on land energy fluxes at various scales. In this purpose, we propose a two-step upscaling methodology aiming to replace a hillslope model by an equivalent vertical soil column model suitable for land surface modelling. The hillslope reference model is based on a two-dimensional aquifer model (resolution of Richards' equation) combined with a representation of vegetation and climate forcing as boundary condition. In this system, two main hydrological processes corresponding to different time scales have to be distinguished: the vertical water transfer from roots to the atmosphere through the vegetation, and the longitudinal flow of the aquifer to the stream. In an upscaling approach, two options can be considered: one may accurately model the aquifer longitudinal flow but with a degraded model of vertical transfer, or inversely give a preferential treatment to the vertical flow. As the exchanges between soil, vegetation and atmosphere are strongly dependent on the vertical profile of water (through the distribution of roots), the second option appears to be more adapted to our objective which is the assessment of hillslope hydrology on land surface fluxes. In the first step of our upscaling methodology, the two-dimensional reference hillslope is modelled as a set of one-dimensional independent vertical soil vegetation columns. In each of them, Richards' equation is solved in the vertical direction, the representation of roots and climate forcing remaining unchanged. Moreover, a sink

  4. Obtaining a Pragmatic Representation of Fire Disturbance in Dynamic Vegetation Models by Assimilating Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantzas, Euripides; Quegan, Shaun

    2015-04-01

    Fire constitutes a violent and unpredictable pathway of carbon from the terrestrial biosphere into the atmosphere. Despite fire emissions being in many biomes of similar magnitude to that of Net Ecosystem Exchange, even the most complex Dynamic Vegetation Models (DVMs) embedded in IPCC General Circulation Models poorly represent fire behavior and dynamics, a fact which still remains understated. As DVMs operate on a deterministic, grid cell-by-grid cell basis they are unable to describe a host of important fire characteristics such as its propagation, magnitude of area burned and stochastic nature. Here we address these issues by describing a model-independent methodology which assimilates Earth Observation (EO) data by employing image analysis techniques and algorithms to offer a realistic fire disturbance regime in a DVM. This novel approach, with minimum model restructuring, manages to retain the Fire Return Interval produced by the model whilst assigning pragmatic characteristics to its fire outputs thus allowing realistic simulations of fire-related processes such as carbon injection into the atmosphere and permafrost degradation. We focus our simulations in the Arctic and specifically Canada and Russia and we offer a snippet of how this approach permits models to engage in post-fire dynamics hitherto absent from any other model regardless of complexity.

  5. Tree cover bistability in the MPI Earth system model due to fire-vegetation feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasslop, Gitta; Brovkin, Victor; Kloster, Silvia; Reick, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The global distribution of tree cover is mainly limited by precipitation and temperature. Within tropical ecosystems different tree cover values have been observed in regions with similar climate. Satellite data even revealed a lack of ecosystems with tree coverage around 60% and dominant tree covers of 20% and 80%. Conceptual models have been used to explain this tree cover distribution and base it on a bistability in tree cover caused by fire-vegetation interactions or competition between trees and grasses. Some ecological models also show this property of multiple stable tree covers, but it remains unclear which mechanism is the cause for this behaviour. Vegetation models used in climate simulations usually use simple approaches and were criticised to neglect such ecological theories and misrepresent tropical tree cover distribution and dynamics. Here we show that including the process based fire model SPITFIRE generated a bistability in tree cover in the land surface model JSBACH. Previous model versions showed only one stable tree cover state. Using a conceptual model we can show that a bistability can occur due to a feedback between grasses and fire. Grasses and trees are represented in the model based on plant functional types. With respect to fire the main difference between grasses and trees is the fuel characteristics. Grass fuels are smaller in size, and have a higher surface area to volume ratio. These grass fuels dry faster increasing their flammability which leads to a higher fire rate of spread. Trees are characterized by coarse fuels, which are less likely to ignite and rather suppress fire. Therefore a higher fraction of grasses promotes fire, fire kills trees and following a fire, grasses establish faster. This feedback can stabilize ecosystems with low tree cover in a low tree cover state and systems with high tree cover in a high tree cover state. In previous model versions this feedback was absent. Based on the new JSBACH model driven with

  6. How important are the descriptions of vegetation in distributed hydrologic models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Thober, Stephan; Zink, Matthias; Rakovec, Oldrich; Samaniego, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The land surface transforms incoming, absorbed radiation into other energy forms and radiation with longer wavelengths. The land surface emits long-wave radiation, stores energy in the soil, the biomass and the air in the boundary layer, and exchanges sensible and latent heat with the atmosphere. The latter, latent heat consists of evaporation from the soil and canopy and transpiration by plants. Plants enhance in this picture the absorption of incoming radiation and decrease the resistance for evaporation of deeper soil water. Transpiration by plants is therefore either energy-limited by low incoming radiation or water-limited by small soil moisture. In the extreme cases, all available energy will be used for evapotranspiration in cold regions and all available water will be used for evapotranspiration in arid regions. Very simple formulations of latent heat, which include plant processes only very indirectly, work well in hydrologic models for these limiting cases. These simple formulations seem to work also surprisingly well in temperate regions. Hydrologic models have, however, considerable problems in semi-arid regions where the vegetation influence on latent heat should be largest. But the models have to deal with much more problems in these regions. For example data scarcity in the Mediterranean leads to very large model uncertainty due to the forcing data. Water supply is also often very regulated in semi-arid regions. Variability in river discharge can hence be largely driven by the anthropogenic influence rather than natural meteorological variations in these regions. Here we will show for Europe the areas and times when the descriptions of plant processes are important for hydrologic models. We will compare differences in model uncertainties that come from 1. different formulations of evapotranspiration, 2. different descriptions of soil-plant interactions, and 3. uncertainty in the model's input data. It can be seen that model uncertainty stemming from

  7. Vegetation water stress monitoring with remote sensing-based energy balance modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Andreu, Ana; Carpintero, Elisabet; Gómez-Giráldez, Pedro; José Polo, María

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the major hazards faced by agroforestry systems in southern Europe, and an increase in frequency is predicted under the conditions of climate change for the region. Timely and accurate monitoring of vegetation water stress using remote sensing time series may assist early-warning services, helping to assess drought impacts and the design of management actions leading to reduce the economic and environmental vulnerability of these systems. A holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is an agro-silvo-pastoral system occupying more than 3 million hectares the Iberian Peninsula and Greece. It consists of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus ilex L.), combined with crops, pasture and Mediterranean shrubs, and it is considered an example of sustainable land use, with great importance in the rural economy. Soil water dynamics is known to have a central role in current tree decline and the reduction of the forested area that is threatening its conservation. A two-source thermal-based evapotranspiration model (TSEB) has been applied to monitor the effect on vegetation water use of soil moisture stress in a dehesa located in southern Spain. The TSEB model separates the soil and canopy contributions to the radiative temperature and to the exchange of surface energy fluxes, so it is especially suited for partially vegetated landscapes. The integration of remotely sensed data in this model may support an evaluation of the whole ecosystem state at a large scale. During two consecutive summers, in 2012 and 2013, time series of optical and thermal MODIS images, with 250m and 1 km of spatial resolution respectively, have been combined with meteorological data provided by a ground station to monitor the evapotranspiration (ET) of the system. An eddy covariance tower (38°12' N; 4°17' W, 736 m a.s.l), equipped with instruments to measure all the components of the energy balance and 1 km of homogeneous fetch in the predominant wind

  8. Assessment of Anthropogenic and Climatic Impacts on the Global Carbon Cycle Using a 3-D Model Constrained by Isotopic Carbon Measurements and Remote Sensing of Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Charles D.; Piper, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    Our original proposal called for improved modeling of the terrestrial biospheric carbon cycle, specifically using biome-specific process models to account for both the energy and water budgets of plant growth, to facilitate investigations into recent changes in global atmospheric CO2 abundance and regional distribution. The carbon fluxes predicted by these models were to be incorporated into a global model of CO2 transport to establish large-scale regional fluxes of CO2 to and from the terrestrial biosphere subject to constraints imposed by direct measurements of atmospheric CO2 and its 13C/12C isotopic ratio. Our work was coordinated with a NASA project (NASA NAGW-3151) at the University of Montana under the direction of Steven Running, and was partially funded by the Electric Power Research Institute. The primary objective of this project was to develop and test the Biome-BGC model, a global biological process model with a daily time step which simulates the water, energy and carbon budgets of plant growth. The primary product, the unique global gridded daily land temperature, and the precipitation data set which was used to drive the process model is described. The Biome-BGC model was tested by comparison with a simpler biological model driven by satellite-derived (NDVI) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and (PAR) Photosynthetically Active Radiation data and by comparison with atmospheric CO2 observations. The simple NDVI model is also described. To facilitate the comparison with atmospheric CO2 observations, a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model was used to produce predictions of atmospheric CO2 variations given CO2 fluxes owing to (NPP) Net Primary Productivity and heterotrophic respiration that were produced by the Biome-BGC model and by the NDVI model. The transport model that we used in this project, and errors associated with transport simulations, were characterized by a comparison of 12 transport models.

  9. Assessment of Anthropogenic and Climatic Impacts on the Global Carbon Cycle Using a 3-D Model Constrained by Isotopic Carbon Measurements and Remote Sensing of Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Charles D.; Piper, S. C.

    1998-01-01

    Our original proposal called for improved modeling of the terrestrial biospheric carbon cycle, specifically using biome-specific process models to account for both the energy and water budgets of plant growth, to facilitate investigations into recent changes in global atmospheric CO2 abundance and regional distribution. The carbon fluxes predicted by these models were to be incorporated into a global model of CO2 transport to establish large-scale regional fluxes of CO2 to and from the terrestrial biosphere subject to constraints imposed by direct measurements of atmospheric CO2 and its 13C/12C isotopic ratio. Our work was coordinated with a NASA project (NASA NAGW-3151) at the University of Montana under the direction of Steven Running, and was partially funded by the Electric Power Research Institute. The primary objective of this project was to develop and test the Biome-BGC model, a global biological process model with a daily time step which simulates the water, energy and carbon budgets of plant growth. The primary product, the unique global gridded daily land temperature, and the precipitation data set which was used to drive the process model is described. The Biome-BGC model was tested by comparison with a simpler biological model driven by satellite-derived (NDVI) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and (PAR) Photosynthetically Active Radiation data and by comparison with atmospheric CO2 observations. The simple NDVI model is also described. To facilitate the comparison with atmospheric CO2 observations, a three-dimensional atmospheric transport model was used to produce predictions of atmospheric CO2 variations given CO2 fluxes owing to (NPP) Net Primary Productivity and heterotrophic respiration that were produced by the Biome-BGC model and by the NDVI model. The transport model that we used in this project, and errors associated with transport simulations, were characterized by a comparison of 12 transport models.

  10. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  11. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully

  12. Transfer of knowledge about flowering and vegetative propagation from model species to bulbous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeggangers, Hendrika A C F; Moreno-Pachon, Natalia; Gude, Henk; Immink, Richard G H

    2013-01-01

    The extensive characterization of plant genes and genome sequences summed to the continuous development of biotechnology tools, has played a major role in understanding biological processes in plant model species. The challenge for the near future is to generate methods and pipelines for an efficient transfer of this knowledge to economically important crops and other plant species. In the case of flower bulbs, which are economically very important for the ornamental industry, flowering time control and vegetative propagation constitute the most relevant processes for agronomical improvements. Those processes have been reasonably studied in reference species, making them excellent candidates for translational investigations in bulbous plant species. The approaches that can be taken for the transfer of biological knowledge from model to non-model species can be roughly categorized as "bottom-up" or "top-down". The former approach usually goes from individual genes to systems, also known as a "gene-by-gene" approach. It assumes conservation of molecular pathways and therefore makes use of sequence homology searches to identify candidate genes. "Top-down" methodologies go from systems to genes, and are e.g. based on large scale transcriptome profiling via heterologous microarrays or RNA sequencing, followed by the identification of associations between phenotypes, genes, and gene expression patterns and levels. In this review, examples of the various knowledge-transfer approaches are provided and pros and cons are discussed. Due to the latest developments in transgenic research and next generation sequencing and the emerging of systems biology as a matured research field, transfer of knowledge concerning flowering time and vegetative propagation capacity in bulbous species are now within sight.

  13. When cholesterol is not cholesterol: a note on the enzymatic determination of its concentration in model systems containing vegetable extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamplona Reinald

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental evidences demonstrate that vegetable derived extracts inhibit cholesterol absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. To further explore the mechanisms behind, we modeled duodenal contents with several vegetable extracts. Results By employing a widely used cholesterol quantification method based on a cholesterol oxidase-peroxidase coupled reaction we analyzed the effects on cholesterol partition. Evidenced interferences were analyzed by study