WorldWideScience

Sample records for model results presented

  1. Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Title: Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface Author: Tomáš Kohan Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor of the master thesis: RNDr. Ondřej Šerý, Ph.D., Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems Abstract: This thesis is devoted to design and implementation of the new debugging interface of the Java PathFinder application. As a suitable inte- face container was selected the Eclipse development environment. The created interface should vis...

  2. [DESCRIPTION AND PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS OF ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM PROCESSING USING AN INFORMATION MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myznikov, I L; Nabokov, N L; Rogovanov, D Yu; Khankevich, Yu R

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes to apply the informational modeling of correlation matrix developed by I.L. Myznikov in early 1990s in neurophysiological investigations, such as electroencephalogram recording and analysis, coherence description of signals from electrodes on the head surface. The authors demonstrate information models built using the data from studies of inert gas inhalation by healthy human subjects. In the opinion of the authors, information models provide an opportunity to describe physiological processes with a high level of generalization. The procedure of presenting the EEG results holds great promise for the broad application.

  3. Presentation of the results 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Gaz de France (GDF) presents in a press kit the main results achieved in 1997. The European community has formulated a project of definition of rules concerning the natural gas market. Minima values for annual consumptions have been defined and the consumption and use of natural gas in EC countries is described. The financial results of GDF in 1997 are compared with previous years. Net sales grew by nearly 1 billion french francs to reach 55 billion. Overall sales were down by 4% but the share of natural gas in french energy consumption increased and sales to industrial users went up in particular due to new cogeneration plants installed in 1996. A comparison of gas prices in Europe is given for the years 1985 to 1998. The efforts of GDF to offer increased quality of services concerning in particular safety aspects as checking programs and installation of new safeguard appliances are described. The efforts of GDF to increase the energy market share of natural gas resulted in the development of new products like cogeneration, air conditioning and fuels for automotive needs. (C.B.)

  4. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    For RTE, the financial year 2003 was marked by a number of achievements: our financial performances registered a clear improvement, above objectives, with turnover growing strongly; net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002; the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%; and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years

  5. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, RTE recorded a clear improvement in its financial results, and continued its debt reduction programme. The financial year 2003 was marked by a clear improvement in RTE's financial performance: results exceeded objectives, with turnover growing strongly, net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002, the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%, and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years. Net income has almost tripled due to RTE's improved productivity completed by a significant rise in its turnover and stabilizing operating costs RTE's finances therefore remain healthy, enabling the company to continue its debt reduction programme. Satisfactory economic and financial rates of return. Deadlines facing RTE in 2004: in application of the second European Directive, adopted on 26 June 2003, RTE faces two major deadlines in 2004: - the implementation of the 2. phase in the process of opening up the French electricity market, - its legal independence. On 1 July 2004, the market will be opened up to competition for all professional customers. At that date RTE, like all other electricity transmission system operators (TSOs) in the European Union, should be a legally independent body. The new central role of TSOs in Europe: how are electricity transmission system operators in other EU countries organised?

  6. Multi-Decadal Variability in the Bering Sea: A Synthesis of Model Results and Observations from 1948 to the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    bottom mixed layer, sea ice thickness distribution, concentration, deformation, drift and export, fast ice , snow cover, melt ponds and surface albedo ...14. SUBJECT TERMS Oceanography, modeling, regime shifts,Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), climate change, Bering Sea , ice , Gulf of...3 Figure 2. ICESat measurements of the distribution of winter sea ice thickness over the Arctic Ocean between 2004 and 2008

  7. ISO Results Presented at International Astronomical Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Some of the work being presented is collected in the attached ESA Information Note N 25-97, ISO illuminates our cosmic ancestry. A set of six colour images illustrating various aspects have also been released and are available at http://www.estec.esa.nl/spdwww/iso1808.htm or in hard copy from ESA Public Relations Paris (fax:+33.1.5369.7690). These pictures cover: 1. Distant but powerful infrared galaxies 2. A scan across the milky way 3. Helix nebula: the shroud of a dead star 4. Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A 5. Trifid nebula: a dusty birthplace of stars 6. Precursors of stars and planets The International Astronomical Union provides a forum where astronomers from all over the world can develop astronomy in all its aspects through international co-operation. General Assemblies are held every three years. It is expected that over 1600 astronomers will attend this year's meeting, which is being held in Kyoto, Japan from 18-30 August. Further information on the meeting can be found at: www.tenmon.or.jp/iau97/ . ISO illuminates our cosmic ancestry The European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, is unmatched in its ability to explore and analyse many of the universal processes that made our existence possible. We are children of the stars. Every atom in our bodies was created in cosmic space and delivered to the Sun's vicinity in time for the Earth's formation, during a ceaseless cycle of birth, death and rebirth among the stars. The most creative places in the sky are cool and dusty, and opaque even to the Hubble Space Telescope. Infrared rays penetrating the dust reveal to ISO hidden objects, and the atoms and molecules of cosmic chemistry. "ISO is reading Nature's recipe book," says Roger Bonnet, ESA's director of science. "As the world's only telescope capable of observing the Universe over a wide range of infrared wavelengths, ISO plays an indispensable part in astronomical discoveries that help to explain how we came to exist." This Information Note

  8. Fuel model studies. Comparison of our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 with results from the EPRI code comparison study. Partial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.; Jansson, L.

    1978-08-01

    Runs with our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 have been compared to results from the EPRI code comparison study. Usually also our version of GAPCON predicts high temperatures, 100-300 K or 10-15% higher than average code predictions and experimental results. The well-known temperaturegas release instablility is found also with GAPCON. In this case one identifies the gas release limits 1400 deg C and 1700 deg C as instablility points. (author)

  9. Atmospheric Deposition Modeling Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on model results for dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen and base cation species. Components include deposition velocities, dry...

  10. Downscaling of the global HadGEM2-ES results to model the future and present-day ocean conditions of the southeastern Brazilian continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Raquel; Assad, Luiz Paulo de Freitas; Landau, Luiz

    2017-09-01

    Changes in the regional hydrodynamics of the region of the South Atlantic near the east coast of Brazil were evaluated from the beginning to the end of the century. The analysis was based on the anomalies from two downscaling experiments using the HadGEM2-ES outputs for the historical and RCP4.5 runs from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project phase 5. The anomalies between the experiments were collected in a system of two nested grids, with 1/3° and 1/12° horizontal resolutions. A northward displacement of the Brazil Current (BC), a southward BC transport intensification, and a 1.44 ° C increase of the mean values of sea surface temperatures were observed. The sea level rise (SLR) was projected up until 2100 across the study area, and the spatial variations were shown to have an average on SLR rate of 7.30 mm year^{-1} for those regions close to the coast. These results highlight the importance of studying climate change and applying methods to enable the evaluation of its effects on coastal zones, especially for regions with few existing studies, such as the Brazilian continental shelf area.

  11. Mass-measurements at GANIL recent results and present developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittig, W.

    1992-01-01

    A time of flight together with a magnetic rigidity measurement of fragmentation products was used to get masses of neutron rich nuclei of A = 20 to A = 50 region. Beams of 48 Ca and 64 Ni provided good yields of these nuclei. Results are presented and compared to model predictions. Recently the authors used the second cyclotron of GANIL to measure with high resolution the mass of fusion and deep inelastic reaction products. The method is described and results are shown. Finally extension of this field by the superconducting doublet of solenoids SISSI is described. The possibility of mass-measurements with an Isol+cyclotron device following the GANIL accelerator is discussed

  12. Presentation of results using the BOST method in food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Borkowski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a brief description of the surveyed enterprises and the manufacturing process of its flagship product - butter. Subsequently an analysis of BOST survey results was conducted. The staff spoke out about the importance of factors describing one of Toyota's management principle. Their opinion was the basis for the systematization of research results and to formulate a performance evaluation of the selected company. Results were presented by using spatial charts.

  13. On the complementary presentation of results of risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation of the loss of years of life provides the opportunity to illustrate in complementary way the mortality risks evaluated as part of risk studies. As phase A of the DRS (German risk study nuclear power plants) bears upon the results of the American ''Reactor Safety Study'' (WASH 1400) it does not contain that factor of failure which has only been determined in subsequent studies. Phase B intends to present the results of risk assessments increasingly in form of abridged lifetime. (orig.) [de

  14. Presentation of search results the CL$_{s}$ technique

    CERN Document Server

    Read, A L

    2002-01-01

    I describe a framework for the presentation of search results which is motivated by frequentist statistics. The most well-known use of this framework is for the combined search for the Higgs boson at LEP. A toy neutrino oscillations experiment is used to illustrate the rich information available in the framework for exclusion and discovery. I argue that the so-called CL/sub s/ technique for setting limits is appropriate for determining exclusion intervals while the determination of confidence intervals advocated by Feldman and Cousins' method is more appropriate for treating established signals, i.e. going beyond discovery to measurement. (17 refs).

  15. LHC experiments present new results at Quark Matter 2011 Conference

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office

    2011-01-01

    The three LHC experiments that study lead ion collisions all presented their latest results today at the annual Quark Matter conference, held this year in Annecy, France. The results are based on analysis of data collected during the last two weeks of the 2010 LHC run, when the LHC switched from protons to lead-ions. All experiments report highly subtle measurements, bringing heavy-ion physics into a new era of high precision studies.   Events recorded by the ALICE experiment from the first lead ion collisions (Nov-Dec 2010). “These results from the LHC lead ion programme are already starting bring new understanding of the primordial universe,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “The subtleties they are already seeing are very impressive.” In its infancy, just microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe consisted of a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP), the fundamental building blocks of matter. By colliding heavy ions, physicists can turn back time an...

  16. Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    AD-A265 274 October 1992 TBESIS Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models Captain Scott C. Van Blarcum AFIT Student... ATMOSPHERIC MODELS BY SCOTT C. VAN BLARCUM A thesis submitted to the Graduate School-New Brunswick Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey in...03 020 I1UIlU1ll ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models by SCOTT C. VAN BLARCUM Thesis

  17. The DIVA programme: General presentation and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Duc, B.

    2000-01-01

    The French 'Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique' (CEA/DRN, Nuclear Reactor Division) is carrying out a new programme devoted to the thermal-hydraulics of steam injectors. This programme was called DIVA. Both experimental and theoretical works are planned. Motivations, objectives, test facility and test section dimensioning of this new programme are presented. A first test series was just performed. The validation of the test section dimensioning and experimental procedures was obtained. These first experimental data are presented and preliminary analyses are given. (author)

  18. Building models for marketing decisions : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, PSH; Wittink, DR

    We review five eras of model building in marketing, with special emphasis on the fourth and the fifth eras, the present and the future. At many firms managers now routinely use model-based results for marketing decisions. Given an increasing number of successful applications, the demand for models

  19. Building models for marketing decisions : past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, Dick R.

    2000-01-01

    We review five eras of model building in marketing, with special emphasis on the fourth and the fifth eras, the present and the future. At many firms managers now routinely use model-based results for marketing decisions. Given an increasing number of successful applications, the demand for models

  20. Presentation of the 1998 financial results of the Framatome group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This document makes a statement of the activity of the Framatome group during the year 1998. The activities of the group are shared into two main sectors of comparable size: the energy sector (nuclear fuels, nuclear realizations, nuclear services and industrial equipments) and the connectors engineering sector (electronics, electricity, automotive industry, interconnections and microelectronics). The financial results show an important growth of the connectors engineering sector while the energy sector remained satisfactory. Results are detailed by sector and activity: energy (realizations and nuclear equipments, nuclear services, nuclear fuels and industrial equipments), connectors engineering, and research and development activity of the group. (J.S.)

  1. Presentation of RTE results 2003; Bilan electrique francais 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 2003, RTE recorded a clear improvement in its financial results, and continued its debt reduction programme. The financial year 2003 was marked by a clear improvement in RTE's financial performance: results exceeded objectives, with turnover growing strongly, net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002, the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%, and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years. Net income has almost tripled due to RTE's improved productivity completed by a significant rise in its turnover and stabilizing operating costs RTE's finances therefore remain healthy, enabling the company to continue its debt reduction programme. Satisfactory economic and financial rates of return. Deadlines facing RTE in 2004: in application of the second European Directive, adopted on 26 June 2003, RTE faces two major deadlines in 2004: - the implementation of the 2. phase in the process of opening up the French electricity market, - its legal independence. On 1 July 2004, the market will be opened up to competition for all professional customers. At that date RTE, like all other electricity transmission system operators (TSOs) in the European Union, should be a legally independent body. The new central role of TSOs in Europe: how are electricity transmission system operators in other EU countries organised?.

  2. Past Results, Present Trends, and Future Challenges in Intrabody Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Naranjo-Hernández

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrabody communication (IBC is a wireless communication technology using the human body to develop body area networks (BANs for remote and ubiquitous monitoring. IBC uses living tissues as a transmission medium, achieving power-saving and miniaturized transceivers, making communications more robust against external interference and attacks on the privacy of transmitted data. Due to these advantages, IBC has been included as a third physical layer in the IEEE 802.15.6 standard for wireless body area networks (WBANs designated as Human Body Communication (HBC. Further research is needed to compare both methods depending on the characteristics of IBC application. Challenges remain for an optimal deployment of IBC technology, such as the effect of long-term use in the human body, communication optimization through more realistic models, the influence of both anthropometric characteristics and the subject’s movement on the transmission performance, standardization of communications, and development of small-size and energy-efficient prototypes with increased data rate. The purpose of this work is to provide an in-depth overview of recent advances and future challenges in human body/intrabody communication for wireless communications and mobile computing.

  3. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  4. Hydrological catchment modelling: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses basic issues in hydrological modelling and flood forecasting, ranging from the roles of physically-based and data-driven rainfall runoff models, to the concepts of predictive uncertainty and equifinality and their implications. The evolution of a wide range of hydrological catchment models employing the physically meaningful and data-driven approaches introduces the need for objective test beds or benchmarks to assess the merits of the different models in reconciling the alternative approaches. In addition, the paper analyses uncertainty in models and predictions by clarifying the meaning of uncertainty, by distinguishing between parameter and predictive uncertainty and by demonstrating how the concept of equifinality must be addressed by appropriate and robust inference approaches. Finally, the importance of predictive uncertainty in the decision making process is highlighted together with possible approaches aimed at overcoming the diffidence of end-users.

  5. Presentation of RTE results 2003; Presentation des resultats 2003 de RTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    For RTE, the financial year 2003 was marked by a number of achievements: our financial performances registered a clear improvement, above objectives, with turnover growing strongly; net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002; the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%; and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years.

  6. Model for Presenting Resources in Scholar's Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Mary; Newby, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Presenting electronic resources to users through a federated search engine introduces unique opportunities and challenges to libraries. This article reports on the decision-making tools and processes used for selecting collections of electronic resources by a project team at the University of Arizona (UA) Libraries for the Association of Research…

  7. Searches for New Physics: Les Houches Recommendations for the Presentation of LHC Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraml, S.; Allanach, B.C.; Mangano, M.; Prosper, H.B.; Sekmen, S.; Balazs, C.; Barr, A.; Bechtle, P.; Belanger, G.; Belyaev, A.; Kenslama, K.; Campanelli, M.; Cranmer, K.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M.J.; Ellis, J.R.; Felcini, M.; Fuks, B.; Guadagnoli, D.; Gunion, J.F.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hewett, J.; Ismail, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kraemer, M.; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Martin, S.P.; Rizzo, T.; Robens, T.; Tytgat, M.; Weiler, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC. (authors)

  8. Searches for new physics: Les Houches recommendations for the presentation of LHC results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraml, S.; Allanach, B.C.; Mangano, M.; Roeck, A. de; Prosper, H.B.; Sekmen, S.; Balazs, C.; Barr, A.; Bechtle, P.; Belanger, G.; Belyaev, A.; Benslama, K.; Campanelli, M.; Cranmer, K.; Dolan, M.J.; Eifert, T.; Hewett, J.; Ismail, A.; Rizzo, T.; Ellis, J.R.; Felcini, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Fuks, B.; Guadagnoli, D.; Gunion, J.F.; Kadastik, M.; Kraemer, M.; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Martin, S.P.; Robens, T.; Tytgat, M.; Weiler, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC. (orig.)

  9. Searches for new physics: Les Houches recommendations for the presentation of LHC results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraml, S.; /LPSC, Grenoble; Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Mangano, M.; /CERN; Prosper, H.B.; /Florida State U.; Sekmen, S.; /CERN /Florida State U.; Balazs, C.; /Monash U.; Barr, A.; /Oxford U.; Bechtle, P.; /Bonn U.; Belanger, G.; /Annecy, LAPTH; Belyaev, A.; /Rutherford /Southampton U.; Benslama, K.; /Regina U.; Campanelli, M.; /University Coll. London; Cranmer, K.; /New York U., CCPP; De Roeck, A.; /CERN; Dolan, M.J.; /Durham U., IPPP; Eifert, T.; /SLAC; Ellis, J.R.; /King' s Coll. London /CERN; Felcini, M.; /Cantabria U., Santander; Fuks, B.; /Strasbourg, IPHC /Strasbourg, IReS; Guadagnoli, D.; /Orsay, LPT /Annecy, LAPTH; Gunion, J.F.; /UC, Davis /Cantabria U., Santander /SLAC /NICPB, Tallinn /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /Fermilab /Clermont-Ferrand U. /CERN /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Northern Illinois U. /Santa Barbara, KITP /SLAC /Dresden, Tech. U. /Gent U. /DESY

    2012-04-17

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC.

  10. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  11. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    effectivities more than a number of fixed essential characteristics. Luiz Artur Ferrareto (UFRGS, undertaking a theoretical proposal for categorizing radio content in four different levels of planning (segment, form, programming and content itself tries to “compare and contrast the practices of Brazilian commercial broadcasting companies to those used on the radio in the United States, a reference market for our national entrepreneurs”. Madalena Oliveira (University of Minho focuses on the current stage of communication researches in Portugal reflecting on the challenges for studying a culture based on listening in times of looking. Marko Ala-Fossi, (University of Tampere beginning with the statement that “radio evolution greatly depends not only on the cultural context of a country but also on the whole social, political, economic development of societies” gives us a projection on radio development around the world for the next decades. Closing the dossier, Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio (UFU assuming radio as language by definition and not as a device understands it as a section and an operating model in such language as it intersects the world. Another six articles, not enrolled in the dossier, round the edition off. Fernando de Tacca debates the category of “photocine” recurring to three recent Spanish productions. Gustavo Souza investigates the possibility of identifying a point of view in documentary movies while establishing a debate that joins the materialities of image and sound with the subjectivity resulting from interpretation. Vinicius Bandeira develops on the special duplicity present in the movies between what is and what is not subsumed by the camera. Neide Jallageas proposes the study of visual communication design from the first modelings, attempting especially to the radical propositions from the early XXth century avant-garde movement. Gilson Schwartz debates on the impact from the distribution of videogames as hegemonic cultural practice in

  12. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  13. Numerical modelling of present and future hydrology at Laxemar- Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassner, Mona; Sabel, Ulrika (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden)); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has performed site investigations at two potential sites for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report presents results of water flow modelling of the Laxemar area. The modelling reported in this document is focused on the near-surface groundwater, i.e. groundwater in Quaternary deposits and shallow rock, and surface water systems, and was performed using the MIKE SHE tool. The main objective of the modelling was to provide input to the radionuclide transport and dose calculations that were carried out as a part of the comparison between the Laxemar and Forsmark sites

  14. Presenting a Model for Setting in Narrative Fiction Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Salimi Namin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims at presenting a model for evaluating and enhancing training the setting in illustration for narrative fictions for undergraduate students of graphic design who are weak in setting. The research utilized expert’s opinions through a survey. The designed model was submitted to eight experts, and their opinions were used to have the model adjusted and improved. Used as research instruments were notes, materials in text books, papers, and related websites, as well as questionnaires. Results indicated that, for evaluating and enhancing the level of training the setting in illustration for narrative fiction to students, one needs to extract sub-indexes of setting. Moreover, definition and recognition of the model of setting helps undergraduate students of graphic design enhance the level of setting in their works skill by recognizing details of setting. Accordingly, it is recommended to design training packages to enhance these sub-indexes and hence improve the setting for narrative fiction illustration.

  15. Presenting an Evaluation Model for the Cancer Registry Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Asadi, Farkhondeh; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Farough; Shahbodaghi, Reihaneh

    2017-12-01

    As cancer is increasingly growing, cancer registry is of great importance as the main core of cancer control programs, and many different software has been designed for this purpose. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive evaluation model is essential to evaluate and compare a wide range of such software. In this study, the criteria of the cancer registry software have been determined by studying the documents and two functional software of this field. The evaluation tool was a checklist and in order to validate the model, this checklist was presented to experts in the form of a questionnaire. To analyze the results of validation, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved, the final version of the evaluation model for the cancer registry software was presented. The evaluation model of this study contains tool and method of evaluation. The evaluation tool is a checklist including the general and specific criteria of the cancer registry software along with their sub-criteria. The evaluation method of this study was chosen as a criteria-based evaluation method based on the findings. The model of this study encompasses various dimensions of cancer registry software and a proper method for evaluating it. The strong point of this evaluation model is the separation between general criteria and the specific ones, while trying to fulfill the comprehensiveness of the criteria. Since this model has been validated, it can be used as a standard to evaluate the cancer registry software.

  16. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  17. Some GCM simulation results on present and possible future climate in northern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meteorology

    1995-12-31

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change initiated in 1993 a project entitled `Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations`. The two basic aims of this project were to assess the skill of current general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating present climate at a regional level and to intercompare the regional response of various GCMs to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. The public data base established for the comparison included simulation results from several modelling centres, but most of the data were available in the form of time-averaged seasonal means only, and important quantities like precipitation were totally lacking in many cases. This presentation summarizes the intercomparison results for surface air temperature and sea level pressure in northern Europe. The quality of the control simulations and the response of the models to increased CO{sub 2} are addressed in both winter (December-February) and summer (June-August)

  18. Present status of composite models in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1986-03-01

    The present status of composite models in particle physics is reviewed with emphasis on the minimal composite model. The subjects to discuss include 1) minimal composite model, 2) generations, 3) mass spectrum and 4) Miyazawa's SUSY and Nambu's SUSY. (author)

  19. Interpreting Results from the Multinomial Logit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This article provides guidelines and illustrates practical steps necessary for an analysis of results from the multinomial logit model (MLM). The MLM is a popular model in the strategy literature because it allows researchers to examine strategic choices with multiple outcomes. However, there seem...... to be systematic issues with regard to how researchers interpret their results when using the MLM. In this study, I present a set of guidelines critical to analyzing and interpreting results from the MLM. The procedure involves intuitive graphical representations of predicted probabilities and marginal effects...... suitable for both interpretation and communication of results. The pratical steps are illustrated through an application of the MLM to the choice of foreign market entry mode....

  20. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  1. Presentations from the Aeroelastic Workshop - latest results from AeroOpt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartvig Hansen, M. (ed.)

    2011-10-15

    This report contains the slides of the presentations at the Aeroelastic Workshop held at Risoe-DTU for the wind energy industry in Denmark on October 27, 2011. The scientific part of the agenda at this workshop was 1) Detailed and reduced models of dynamic mooring system (Anders M. Hansen). 2) Bend-twist coupling investigation in HAWC2 (Taeseong Kim). 3) Q3UIC - A new aerodynamic airfoil tool including rotational effects (Nestor R. Garcia). 4) Influence of up-scaling on loads, control and aerodynamic modeling (Helge Aa. Madsen). 5) Aerodynamic damping of lateral tower vibrations (Bjarne S. Kallesoee). 6) Open- and closed-loop aeroservoelastic analysis with HAWCStab2 (Morten H. Hansen). 7) Design and test of a thick, flatback, high-lift multielement airfoil (Frederik Zahle). The presented results are mainly obtained in the EUDP project ''Aeroelastic Optimization of MW Wind Turbines (AeroOpt)''. (Author)

  2. The Danish national passenger modelModel specification and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Hansen, Christian Overgaard

    2016-01-01

    , the paper provides a description of a large-scale forecast model with a discussion of the linkage between population synthesis, demand and assignment. Secondly, the paper gives specific attention to model specification and in particular choice of functional form and cost-damping. Specifically we suggest...... a family of logarithmic spline functions and illustrate how it is applied in the model. Thirdly and finally, we evaluate model sensitivity and performance by evaluating the distance distribution and elasticities. In the paper we present results where the spline-function is compared with more traditional...... function types and it is indicated that the spline-function provides a better description of the data. Results are also provided in the form of a back-casting exercise where the model is tested in a back-casting scenario to 2002....

  3. Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Christensen, C.

    2012-03-01

    This presentation summarizes NREL's development of a HPWH model for use in hourly building energy simulation programs, such as BEopt; this presentation was given at the Building America Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  4. Recovering alternative presentation models of a web page with VAQUITA

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillon, Laurent; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Souchon, Nathalie

    2002-01-01

    VAQUITA allows developers to reverse engineer a presentation model of a web page according to multiple reverse engineering options. The alternative models offered by these options not only widen the spectrum of possible presentation models but also encourage developers in exploring multiple reverse engineering strategies. The options provide filtering capabilities in a static analysis of HTML code that are targeted either at multiple widgets simultaneously or at single widgets ...

  5. Modeling of present and Eemian stable water isotopes in precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjolte, Jesper

    interglacial. Present day boundary conditions were used except for the insolation and the SST patterns. The modeled summer temperatures for the Northern Hemisphere were found to match proxy data well, with the large summer insolation anomalies causing warmer summers than for present day. The peak summer......The subject of this thesis is the modeling of the isotopic temperature proxies d18O, dD and deuterium excess in precipitation. Two modeling studies were carried out, one using the regional climate model, and one using a global climate model. In the regional study the model was run for the period...... 1959 to 2001 using meteorological data and a domain including Greenland and the surrounding North Atlantic. The model was found to reproduce the observed seasonal variability of temperature and precipitation well. In comparison with ice core data from Greenland and observations from coastal stations...

  6. Teacher-Scientist Partnerships: Past, Present, and Future Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Past and present models of teacher-scientist partnerships will be illustrated with examples cultivated from direct experience. Future models will be proposed, informed by this experience, as well as current STEM reform and policy iniitiatives and evidence-based education research.

  7. Immersive visualization of dynamic CFD model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparato, J.R.; Ringel, K.L.; Heath, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    With immersive visualization the engineer has the means for vividly understanding problem causes and discovering opportunities to improve design. Software can generate an interactive world in which collaborators experience the results of complex mathematical simulations such as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Such software, while providing unique benefits over traditional visualization techniques, presents special development challenges. The visualization of large quantities of data interactively requires both significant computational power and shrewd data management. On the computational front, commodity hardware is outperforming large workstations in graphical quality and frame rates. Also, 64-bit commodity computing shows promise in enabling interactive visualization of large datasets. Initial interactive transient visualization methods and examples are presented, as well as development trends in commodity hardware and clustering. Interactive, immersive visualization relies on relevant data being stored in active memory for fast response to user requests. For large or transient datasets, data management becomes a key issue. Techniques for dynamic data loading and data reduction are presented as means to increase visualization performance. (author)

  8. Present-day heat flow model of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Parro, Laura M.; Jim?nez-D?az, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thicknes...

  9. Macro-System Model Project #AN011 (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M.

    2010-06-08

    A review of the Macro-System Model for hydrogen production pathways analysis, including objectives, accomplishments, collaborations, and future work. Presented at the 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010, in Washington, DC.

  10. Analysis and presentation of experimental results with examples, problems and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulides, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a guide to the analysis and presentation of experimental results. It develops various techniques for the numerical processing of experimental data, using basic statistical methods and the theory of errors. After presenting basic theoretical concepts, the book describes the methods by which the results can be presented, both numerically and graphically. The book is divided into three parts, of roughly equal length, addressing the theory, the analysis of data, and the presentation of results. Examples are given and problems are solved using the Excel, Origin, Python and R software packages. In addition, programs in all four languages are made available to readers, allowing them to use them in analyzing and presenting the results of their own experiments. Subjects are treated at a level appropriate for undergraduate students in the natural sciences, but this book should also appeal to anyone whose work involves dealing with experimental results.

  11. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  12. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  13. Statistical Model of the 2001 Czech Census for Interactive Presentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grim, Jiří; Hora, Jan; Boček, Pavel; Somol, Petr; Pudil, Pavel

    Vol. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1-23 ISSN 0282-423X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/1594; GA MŠk 1M0572 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Interactive statistical model * census data presentation * distribution mixtures * data modeling * EM algorithm * incomplete data * data reproduction accuracy * data mining Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.492, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/RO/grim-0350513.pdf

  14. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrayrou, J. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides et des Solides, UMR ULP-CNRS 7507, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Lagneau, V. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 77 - Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  15. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrayrou, J.; Lagneau, V.

    2007-01-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  16. Experimental summary talk. A summary of the experimental results presented at Moriond QCD 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzyk, B

    2001-06-01

    A summary of the experimental results presented at Moriond QCD 2001 are given. The author reviews results concerning the expected mass of the Higgs boson, the discovery of new particles, heavy-ion collision physics, structure functions, diffractive J/{psi} production, WW physics, heavy flavours and the first results given by BaBar and Belle installations.

  17. Experimental summary talk. A summary of the experimental results presented at Moriond QCD 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, B.

    2001-06-01

    A summary of the experimental results presented at Moriond QCD 2001 are given. The author reviews results concerning the expected mass of the Higgs boson, the discovery of new particles, heavy-ion collision physics, structure functions, diffractive J/Ψ production, WW physics, heavy flavours and the first results given by BaBar and Belle installations

  18. The FODA-TDMA satellite access scheme - Presentation, study of the system, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Nedo; Ferro, Erina

    1991-12-01

    A description is given of FODA-TDMA, a satellite access scheme designed for mixed traffic. The study of the system is presented and the choice of some parameters is justified. A simplified analytic solution is found, describing the steady-state behavior of the system. Some results of the simulation tests for an already existing hardware environment are also presented for the channel speeds of 2 and 8 Mb/s, considering both the stationary and the transient cases. The results of the experimentation at 2 Mb/s on the satellite Eutelsat-F2 are also presented and compared with the results of the simulation.

  19. Modeling of Soybean under Present and Future Climates in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel António Dina Talacuece

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to calibrate and validate the generic crop model (CROPGRO-Soybean and estimate the soybean yield, considering simulations with different sowing times for the current period (1990–2013 and future climate scenario (2014–2030. The database used came from observed data, nine climate models of CORDEX (Coordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment-Africa framework and MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis. The calibration and validation data for the model were acquired in field experiments, carried out in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 growing seasons in the experimental area of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA in Angónia, Mozambique. The yield of two soybean cultivars: Tgx 1740-2F and Tgx 1908-8F was evaluated in the experiments and modeled for two distinct CO2 concentrations. Our model simulation results indicate that the fertilization effect leads to yield gains for both cultivars, ranging from 11.4% (Tgx 1908-8F to 15% (Tgx 1740-2Fm when compared to the performance of those cultivars under current CO2 atmospheric concentration. Moreover, our results show that MERRA, the RegCM4 (Regional Climatic Model version 4 and CNRM-CM5 (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques – Climatic Model version 5 models provided more accurate estimates of yield, while others models underestimate yield as compared to observations, a fact that was demonstrated to be related to the model’s capability of reproducing the precipitation and the surface radiation amount.

  20. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  1. Nuclear model developments in FLUKA for present and future applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerutti Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The FLUKAS code [1–3] is used in research laboratories all around the world for challenging applications spanning a very wide range of energies, projectiles and targets. FLUKAS is also extensively used for in hadrontherapy research studies and clinical planning systems. In this paper some of the recent developments in the FLUKAS nuclear physics models of relevance for very different application fields including medical physics are presented. A few examples are shown demonstrating the effectiveness of the upgraded code.

  2. Nuclear model developments in FLUKA for present and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Francesco; Empl, Anton; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ruben, GarciaAlia; Sala, Paola R.; Smirnov, George; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2017-09-01

    The FLUKAS code [1-3] is used in research laboratories all around the world for challenging applications spanning a very wide range of energies, projectiles and targets. FLUKAS is also extensively used for in hadrontherapy research studies and clinical planning systems. In this paper some of the recent developments in the FLUKAS nuclear physics models of relevance for very different application fields including medical physics are presented. A few examples are shown demonstrating the effectiveness of the upgraded code.

  3. Coupled Michigan MHD - Rice Convection Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, D.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    2002-12-01

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run for idealized storm inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV^gamma.

  4. Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis: Models and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E.

    1999-01-01

    Research directions, linked to safety assessment of the Ignalina NPP, of the scientific safety analysis group are presented: Thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents and operational transients; Thermal-hydraulic assessment of Ignalina NPP Accident Localization System and other compartments; Structural analysis of plant components, piping and other parts of Main Circulation Circuit; Assessment of RBMK-1500 reactor core and other. Models and main works carried out last year are described. (author)

  5. Tables or bar graphs? Presenting test results in electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Noel T; Gilkey, Melissa B; Lillie, Sarah E; Hesse, Bradford W; Sheridan, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    Electronic personal health records offer a promising way to communicate medical test results to patients. We compared the usability of tables and horizontal bar graphs for presenting medical test results electronically. We conducted experiments with a convenience sample of 106 community-dwelling adults. In the first experiment, participants viewed either table or bar graph formats (between subjects) that presented medical test results with normal and abnormal findings. In a second experiment, participants viewed table and bar graph formats (within subjects) that presented test results with normal, borderline, and abnormal findings. Participants required less viewing time when using bar graphs rather than tables. This overall difference was due to superior performance of bar graphs in vignettes with many test results. Bar graphs and tables performed equally well with regard to recall accuracy and understanding. In terms of ease of use, participants did not prefer bar graphs to tables when they viewed only one format. When participants viewed both formats, those with experience with bar graphs preferred bar graphs, and those with experience with tables found bar graphs equally easy to use. Preference for bar graphs was strongest when viewing tests with borderline results. Compared to horizontal bar graphs, tables required more time and experience to achieve the same results, suggesting that tables can be a more burdensome format to use. The current practice of presenting medical test results in a tabular format merits reconsideration.

  6. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  7. Modeling population exposures to silver nanoparticles present in consumer products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Steven G.; Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Cai, Ting; Xu, Shu S.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Mi, Zhongyuan; Calderon, Leonardo; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lee, KiBum; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-11-01

    Exposures of the general population to manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) are expected to keep rising due to increasing use of MNPs in common consumer products (PEN 2014). The present study focuses on characterizing ambient and indoor population exposures to silver MNPs (nAg). For situations where detailed, case-specific exposure-related data are not available, as in the present study, a novel tiered modeling system, Prioritization/Ranking of Toxic Exposures with GIS (geographic information system) Extension (PRoTEGE), has been developed: it employs a product life cycle analysis (LCA) approach coupled with basic human life stage analysis (LSA) to characterize potential exposures to chemicals of current and emerging concern. The PRoTEGE system has been implemented for ambient and indoor environments, utilizing available MNP production, usage, and properties databases, along with laboratory measurements of potential personal exposures from consumer spray products containing nAg. Modeling of environmental and microenvironmental levels of MNPs employs probabilistic material flow analysis combined with product LCA to account for releases during manufacturing, transport, usage, disposal, etc. Human exposure and dose characterization further employ screening microenvironmental modeling and intake fraction methods combined with LSA for potentially exposed populations, to assess differences associated with gender, age, and demographics. Population distributions of intakes, estimated using the PRoTEGE framework, are consistent with published individual-based intake estimates, demonstrating that PRoTEGE is capable of capturing realistic exposure scenarios for the US population. Distributions of intakes are also used to calculate biologically relevant population distributions of uptakes and target tissue doses through human airway dosimetry modeling that takes into account product MNP size distributions and age-relevant physiological parameters.

  8. Past and present of sediment and carbon biogeochemical cycling models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Mackenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is part of the much more extensive sedimentary cycle that involves large masses of carbon in the Earth's inner and outer spheres. Studies of the carbon cycle generally followed a progression in knowledge of the natural biological, then chemical, and finally geological processes involved, culminating in a more or less integrated picture of the biogeochemical carbon cycle by the 1920s. However, knowledge of the ocean's carbon cycle behavior has only within the last few decades progressed to a stage where meaningful discussion of carbon processes on an annual to millennial time scale can take place. In geologically older and pre-industrial time, the ocean was generally a net source of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere owing to the mineralization of land-derived organic matter in addition to that produced in situ and to the process of CaCO3 precipitation. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations because of fossil fuel combustion and land use changes, the direction of the air-sea CO2 flux has reversed, leading to the ocean as a whole being a net sink of anthropogenic CO2. The present thickness of the surface ocean layer, where part of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored, is estimated as of the order of a few hundred meters. The oceanic coastal zone net air-sea CO2 exchange flux has also probably changed during industrial time. Model projections indicate that in pre-industrial times, the coastal zone may have been net heterotrophic, releasing CO2 to the atmosphere from the imbalance between gross photosynthesis and total respiration. This, coupled with extensive CaCO3 precipitation in coastal zone environments, led to a net flux of CO2 out of the system. During industrial time the coastal zone ocean has tended to reverse its trophic status toward a non-steady state situation of net autotrophy, resulting in net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and storage of carbon in the coastal ocean, despite the significant calcification

  9. Maps of sharpness: a methodology to present results of quality control for mammographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Henrique Jesus Quintino de; Marques, Marcio Alexandre; Frere, Annie France; Schiable, Homero; Marques, Paulo M. Azevedo; Irita, Ricardo Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    A new method for evaluating radiologic imaging systems quality is presented. This method intends to relate the numeric results from quality control procedures to the magnitude of shadow and penumbra in the image from given objects. This evaluation is based on a computer simulation and it can be performed for any system and any object placed in any location of the radiation field

  10. Evaluation of INPRES--Intraoperative Presentation of surgical planning and simulation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salb, Tobias; Brief, Jakob; Burgert, Oliver; Gockel, Tilo; Hassfeld, Stefan; Muehling, Joachim; Dillmann, Ruediger

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present fundamental results of the first evaluation of INPRES in a laboratory environment. While the system itself--an HMD-based approach for intraoperative augmented reality in head and neck surgery--has been described elsewhere several times, this paper will focus on methods and outcome of recently accomplished test procedures.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology [fr

  12. Surviving the present: Modeling tools for organizational change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangaro, P. (Pangaro Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like the rest of modern American business, is beset by a confluence of economic, technological, competitive, regulatory, and political pressures. For better or worse, business schools and management consultants have leapt to the rescue, offering the most modern conveniences that they can purvey. Recent advances in the study of organizations have led to new tools for their analysis, revision, and repair. There are two complementary tools that do not impose values or injunctions in themselves. One, called the organization modeler, captures the hierarchy of purposes that organizations and their subparts carry out. Any deficiency or pathology is quickly illuminated, and requirements for repair are made clear. The second, called THOUGHTSTICKER, is used to capture the semantic content of the conversations that occur across the interactions of parts of an organization. The distinctions and vocabulary in the language of an organization, and the relations within that domain, are elicited from the participants so that all three are available for debate and refinement. The product of the applications of these modeling tools is not the resulting models but rather the enhancement of the organization as a consequence of the process of constructing them.

  13. Surviving the present: Modeling tools for organizational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pangaro, P.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like the rest of modern American business, is beset by a confluence of economic, technological, competitive, regulatory, and political pressures. For better or worse, business schools and management consultants have leapt to the rescue, offering the most modern conveniences that they can purvey. Recent advances in the study of organizations have led to new tools for their analysis, revision, and repair. There are two complementary tools that do not impose values or injunctions in themselves. One, called the organization modeler, captures the hierarchy of purposes that organizations and their subparts carry out. Any deficiency or pathology is quickly illuminated, and requirements for repair are made clear. The second, called THOUGHTSTICKER, is used to capture the semantic content of the conversations that occur across the interactions of parts of an organization. The distinctions and vocabulary in the language of an organization, and the relations within that domain, are elicited from the participants so that all three are available for debate and refinement. The product of the applications of these modeling tools is not the resulting models but rather the enhancement of the organization as a consequence of the process of constructing them

  14. Methodology for geometric modelling. Presentation and administration of site descriptive models; Metodik foer geometrisk modellering. Presentation och administration av platsbeskrivande modeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This report presents a methodology to construct, visualise and present geoscientific descriptive models based on data from the site investigations, which the SKB currently performs, to build an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. It is designed for interaction with SICADA (SKB:s site characterisation database) and RVS (SKB:s Rock Visualisation System). However, the concepts of the methodology are general and can be used with other tools capable of handling 3D geometries and parameters. The descriptive model is intended to be an instrument where site investigation data from all disciplines are put together to form a comprehensive visual interpretation of the studied rock mass. The methodology has four main components: 1. Construction of a geometrical model of the interpreted main structures at the site. 2. Description of the geoscientific characteristics of the structures. 3. Description and geometrical implementation of the geometric uncertainties in the interpreted model structures. 4. Quality system for the handling of the geometrical model, its associated database and some aspects of the technical auditing. The geometrical model forms a basis for understanding the main elements and structures of the investigated site. Once the interpreted geometries are in place in the model, the system allows for adding descriptive and quantitative data to each modelled object through a system of intuitive menus. The associated database allows each geometrical object a complete quantitative description of all geoscientific disciplines, variabilities, uncertainties in interpretation and full version history. The complete geometrical model and its associated database of object descriptions are to be recorded in a central quality system. Official, new and old versions of the model are administered centrally in order to have complete quality assurance of each step in the interpretation process. The descriptive model is a cornerstone in the understanding of the

  15. The Synoptic View as a Model for Poster Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. D.; Arrowsmith, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Originally referencing the first three chapters of the New Testament, the term "synoptic" has come to mean "a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing." Large format posters provide an opportunity to present research in synoptic form, rather than as an arrangement of PowerPoint slides and text. In synoptic views, data, analyses, and linkages are presented en masse with the graphical design used as a guide to the linkages. Conclusions about the meanings of the information are largely left to the viewers as they study the information and seek relationships-a natural activity for scientists. Numerous formats produce synoptic views of geoscientific information. Each imposes order on the information through spatial, temporal, or causal connections and provide context for multiple variables. Maps are the most common synoptic presentations. Additional map-sheet information, such as stratigraphic columns and cross sections, gain meaning from and contribute meaning to the areal view. Two and three-dimensional models, including flow charts and organizational diagrams offer a means of portraying complex interactions. Time lines and spatial line (e.g., latitude, depth, distance) diagrams, especially those with additional axes to plot related variables, show temporal or spatial trends, progress, or fluctuation. Some organizational schemes are specific to the sciences. The periodic table is a synoptic portrayal of the elements that designates their chemical behavior by their positions. As an illustration of phenomena, the well designed synoptic poster provides a multi-scale perspective that slices across time, space, or other parameters to expose the significant behaviors of the given system. Bruce Railsback's (2003) reorganization of the periodic table to emphasize the charged species most common in geologic processes is an outstanding example of synoptic design. Edward Tufte's works on graphical style and visual explanations are also excellent guides to

  16. A Parabolic Model Presentation of Solar Radiation Data at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ife, Nigeria has been analysed and simple parabolic models established for predicting them. The models appear in the form of parabolic equations with three parameters. The necessary physical interpretations of the model parameters, their ...

  17. PRESENT STATUS OF RESEARCH IN DEBRIS FLOW MODELING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1985-01-01

    A viable rheological model should consist of both a time-independent part and a time-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criteria) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical, for general use in debris flow modeling. Other rheological models, such as the Bingham plastic fluid model and the so-called Coulomb-viscous model, are compared in terms of the generalized viscoplastic fluid model.

  18. Modeling of present and Eemian stable water isotopes in precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjolte, Jesper

    The subject of this thesis is the modeling of the isotopic temperature proxies d18O, dD and deuterium excess in precipitation. Two modeling studies were carried out, one using the regional climate model, and one using a global climate model. In the regional study the model was run for the period...... the modeled isotopes do not agree with ice core data. The discrepancy between the model output and the ice core data is attributed to the boundary conditions, where changes in ice sheets and vegetation have not been accounted for....

  19. OpenDolphin: presentation models for compelling user interfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Shared applications run on the server. They still need a display, though, be it on the web or on the desktop. OpenDolphin introduces a shared presentation model to clearly differentiate between "what" to display and "how" to display. The "what" is managed on the server and is independent of the UI technology whereas the "how" can fully exploit the UI capabilities like the ubiquity of the web or the power of the desktop in terms of interactivity, animations, effects, 3D worlds, and local devices. If you run a server-centric architecture and still seek to provide the best possible user experience, then this talk is for you. About the speaker Dierk König (JavaOne Rock Star) works as a fellow for Canoo Engineering AG, Basel, Switzerland. He is a committer to many open-source projects including OpenDolphin, Groovy, Grails, GPars and GroovyFX. He is lead author of the "Groovy in Action" book, which is among ...

  20. The presentation of plastic surgery visual data from 1816 to 1916: The evolution of reproducible results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater, M Felix

    2016-09-01

    All scientific data should be presented with sufficient accuracy and precision so that they can be both analyzed properly and reproduced. Visual data are the foundation upon which plastic surgeons advance knowledge. We use visual data to achieve reproducible results by discerning details of procedures and differences between pre- and post-surgery images. This review highlights how the presentation of visual data evolved from 1816, when Joseph Carpue published his book on nasal reconstruction to 1916, when Captain Harold Gillies began to treat over 2000 casualties from the Battle of the Somme. It shows the frailties of human nature that led some authors such as Carl von Graefe, Joseph Pancoast and Thomas Mutter to record inaccurate methods or results that could not be reproduced, and what measures other authors such as Eduard Zeis, Johann Dieffenbach, and Gurdon Buck took to affirm the accuracy of their results. It shows how photography gradually supplanted illustration as a reference standard. Finally, it shows the efforts that some authors and originators took to authenticate and preserve their visual data in what can be considered the forerunners of clinical registries. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  2. CMS standard model Higgs boson results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Abia Pablo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In July 2012 CMS announced the discovery of a new boson with properties resembling those of the long-sought Higgs boson. The analysis of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 19.6 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, confirm the Higgs-like nature of the new boson, with a signal strength associated with vector bosons and fermions consistent with the expectations for a standard model (SM Higgs boson, and spin-parity clearly favouring the scalar nature of the new boson. In this note I review the updated results of the CMS experiment.

  3. PRESENTING SEARCH RESULT WITH REDUCED UNWANTED WEB ADDRESSES USING FUZZY BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Jasmine Goldena

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Big Data is now the most talked about research subject. Over the year with the internet and storage space expansions vast swaths of data are available for would be searcher. About a decade ago when a content was searched, due to minimum amount of content often you end up with accurate set of results. But nowadays most of the data, if not all are sometimes vague and not even sometime pertain to area of search it was indented to. Hence here a novel approach is presented to perform data cleaning using a simple but effective fuzzy rule to weed out data that won’t produce accurate data.

  4. Making sense to modelers: Presenting UML class model differences in prose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the difference between two models, such as different versions of a design, can be difficult. It is a commonly held belief in the model differencing community that the best way of presenting a model difference is by using graph or tree-based visualizations. We disagree and present an...... by a controlled experiment that tests three alternatives to presenting model differences. Our findings support our claim that the approach presented here is superior to EMF Compare.......Understanding the difference between two models, such as different versions of a design, can be difficult. It is a commonly held belief in the model differencing community that the best way of presenting a model difference is by using graph or tree-based visualizations. We disagree and present...... an alternative approach where sets of low-level model differences are abstracted into high-level model differences that lend themselves to being presented textually. This format is informed by an explorative survey to elicit the change descriptions modelers use themselves. Our approach is validated...

  5. Present status of the VMI and related models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G.

    1980-05-01

    This article traces the evolution of the Variable Moment of Inertia model in its relation to the shell model, the Bohr-Mottelson model and the Interacting Boson Model. The discovery of a new type of spectrum, that of pseudomagic nuclei (isobars of doubly magic nuclei) is reported, and an explanation for their dynamics is suggested. The type of rotational motion underlying the ground state band of an e-e nucleus is shown to depend on whether the minimum number of valence nucleon pairs of one kind (neutrons or protons) is less than or equal to 2 or > 2. In the former case the alpha-dumbbell model holds; in the latter the two-fluid model

  6. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia: The Evaluation of Surgical Treatment Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diaphragmatic hernia could be caused by congenital disorders, blunt trauma or penetrating injuries. The diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is normally neglected during the first presentation leading to late complications and considerably increased mortality and morbidity among the patients. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, descriptive study, we reviewed the medical records of patients presented with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who had undergone surgical operations between 1982-2015 in Ghaem Hospital and Omid Hospital affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied variables included age, gender, clinical symptoms, location of hernia, involved organs, type of imaging modalities, surgical techniques, length of hospital stay, mortality rate and surgical complications. Results: In this study, 38 patients were diagnosed with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia consisting of 28 men and 10 women. In total, 79% and 21% of the patients suffered from penetrating trauma and blunt trauma, respectively. In addition, left-sided, right-sided and bilateral hernias were present in 33%, 4% and 1% of the patients, respectively. The most frequently herniated organ was the stomach, and the most common clinical symptoms were abdominal pain (84% and dyspnea (53%. Initially, chest radiographs were performed on all the patients, and thoracotomy was performed to repair diaphragmatic tears in all the cases (100%. In this study, 3 patients had previously undergone Hartmann’s operation for gangrenous herniated colon, and devolvulation of gastric volvulus had also been performed on 3 patients. The main post-operative complications were reported to be pneumonia and respiratory insufficiency (2 cases, and the mean length of hospital stay was 6 days (5-8 days which was longer (1-2 months in patients with gangrenous bowel (3 patients. Furthermore, no mortality was reported during the course of hospitalization in these

  7. INPRES (intraoperative presentation of surgical planning and simulation results): augmented reality for craniofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salb, Tobias; Brief, Jakob; Welzel, Thomas; Giesler, Bjoern; Hassfeld, Steffan; Muehling, Joachim; Dillmann, Ruediger

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we present recent developments and pre-clinical validation results of our approach for augmented reality (AR, for short) in craniofacial surgery. A commercial Sony Glasstron display is used for optical see-through overlay of surgical planning and simulation results with a patient inside the operation room (OR). For the tracking of the glasses, of the patient and of various medical instruments an NDI Polaris system is used as standard solution. A complementary inside-out navigation approach has been realized with a panoramic camera. This device is mounted on the head of the surgeon for tracking of fiducials placed on the walls of the OR. Further tasks described include the calibration of the head-mounted display (HMD), the registration of virtual objects with the real world and the detection of occlusions in the object overlay with help of two miniature CCD cameras. The evaluation of our work took place in the laboratory environment and showed promising results. Future work will concentrate on the optimization of the technical features of the prototype and on the development of a system for everyday clinical use.

  8. Revisiting Runoff Model Calibration: Airborne Snow Observatory Results Allow Improved Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deterministic snow accumulation and ablation simulation models are widely used by runoff managers throughout the world to predict runoff quantities and timing. Model fitting is typically based on matching modeled runoff volumes and timing with observed flow time series at a few points in the basin. In recent decades, sparse networks of point measurements of the mountain snowpacks have been available to compare with modeled snowpack, but the comparability of results from a snow sensor or course to model polygons of 5 to 50 sq. km is suspect. However, snowpack extent, depth, and derived snow water equivalent have been produced by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) mission for spring of 20013 and 2014 in the Tuolumne River basin above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. These high-resolution snowpack data have exposed the weakness in a model calibration based on runoff alone. The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) calibration that was based on 30-years of inflow to Hetch Hetchy produces reasonable inflow results, but modeled spatial snowpack location and water quantity diverged significantly from the weekly measurements made by ASO during the two ablation seasons. The reason is that the PRMS model has many flow paths, storages, and water transfer equations, and a calibrated outflow time series can be right for many wrong reasons. The addition of a detailed knowledge of snow extent and water content constrains the model so that it is a better representation of the actual watershed hydrology. The mechanics of recalibrating PRMS to the ASO measurements will be described, and comparisons in observed versus modeled flow for both a small subbasin and the entire Hetch Hetchy basin will be shown. The recalibrated model provided a bitter fit to the snowmelt recession, a key factor for water managers as they balance declining inflows with demand for power generation and ecosystem releases during the final months of snow melt runoff.

  9. An uncommon dental presentation during pregnancy resulting from multiple eating disorders: pica and bulimia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cleverick D; Koh, Sheila H; Shynett, Betty; Koh, Jason; Johnson, Claudette

    2006-01-01

    Pica is a compulsive eating disorder involving non-nutritive substances. The etiology of this eating disorder is unknown but it often is associated with subclinical mineral deficiencies. This article focuses on the simultaneous occurrence of two types of eating disorders, the co-existence of depression during four pregnancies, and the resulting dental clinical implications. The literature is substantial enough to support a possible etiological association between these eating disorders and depression during pregnancy. Associations between eating psychopathology, depression, and anxiety have been described consistently. The diagnosis of pica and the dental treatment related to it are not a common part of most dental practices; knowing the clinical features and detecting the condition depend on careful questioning and diligence. At present, no one has described the physiologic or psychological basis for pica. This article reviews the published literature pertaining to pica, specifically pagophagia.

  10. Presentation of main results of Phase I of the SMPR project initiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, F.

    1986-01-01

    As a result of a first Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in August 1983 the IAEA launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in developing countries and thereby also arriving at an estimate of the potential market. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD offered its assistance in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from potential suppliers and buyers. Suppliers responded with an overwhelming 23 design concepts which could be offered for export but with varying levels of readiness and provenness. From potential buyers 17 responses were received, 16 of which were from the developing countries. The analysis of the responses which was done by the Agency with the help of experts from Member States gave the basis for a draft report including the OECD/NEA part. This draft was discussed during a second Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in March 1985. The meeting was characterized by a strong supplier interest but also by hesitation of potential buyers to make any kind of commitments relating to the market introduction of SMPRs. All new information has been incorporated into the report together with a number of expressed comments, especially related to the presentation of the economics of SMPRs, the necessity of a reference plant, provenness of major components and systems etc. The results of the study are presented here with direct reference to the SMPR supply situation and the potential market for SMPRs in terms of the decision-making factors: the financial factors, the economical factors, and the technological factors were identified as the most important ones. The economic competitiveness is not the only decision-making factor and consequently it was decided to end the general study called Phase I by the publication of a report. Specific case studies

  11. Recent results from Fermilab E-687, charm particle decays, lifetimes and photoproduction dynamics: A compilation results presented at DPF 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Recent results on the semi-leptonic decay Decay D 0 → K - μ + ν μ ; charmed mesons; observation of the Decay Ω c 0 Σ + K - K - φ + ; the physics of charm lifetimes; and photoproduction of charmed hadrons. These papers have been cataloged separately

  12. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  13. Bonissone CIDU Presentation: Design of Local Fuzzy Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — After reviewing key background concepts in fuzzy systems and evolutionary computing, we will focus on the use of local fuzzy models, which are related to both kernel...

  14. Modeling and Field Results from Seismic Stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.; Pride, S.; Lo, W.; Daley, T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Sposito, Garrison; Roberts, P.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the effect of seismic stimulation employing Maxwell-Boltzmann theory shows that the important component of stimulation is mechanical rather than fluid pressure effects. Modeling using Biot theory (two phases) shows that the pressure effects diffuse too quickly to be of practical significance. Field data from actual stimulation will be shown to compare to theory

  15. Presentation of automated procedural guidance in surgical simulation: results of two randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewickrema, S; Zhou, Y; Ioannou, I; Copson, B; Piromchai, P; Yu, C; Briggs, R; Bailey, J; Kennedy, G; O'Leary, S

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness and usability of automated procedural guidance during virtual temporal bone surgery. Two randomised controlled trials were performed to evaluate the effectiveness, for medical students, of two presentation modalities of automated real-time procedural guidance in virtual reality simulation: full and step-by-step visual presentation of drillable areas. Presentation modality effectiveness was determined through a comparison of participants' dissection quality, evaluated by a blinded otologist, using a validated assessment scale. While the provision of automated guidance on procedure improved performance (full presentation, p = 0.03; step-by-step presentation, p presentation modalities was vastly different (full presentation, 3.73 per cent; step-by-step presentation, 60.40 per cent). Automated procedural guidance in virtual temporal bone surgery is effective in improving trainee performance. Step-by-step presentation of procedural guidance was engaging, and therefore more likely to be used by the participants.

  16. Results of the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, MISMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of marine ice-sheet behaviour require models that are able to robustly simulate grounding line migration. We present results of an intercomparison exercise for marine ice-sheet models. Verification is effected by comparison with approximate analytical solutions for flux across the grounding line using simplified geometrical configurations (no lateral variations, no effects of lateral buttressing. Unique steady state grounding line positions exist for ice sheets on a downward sloping bed, while hysteresis occurs across an overdeepened bed, and stable steady state grounding line positions only occur on the downward-sloping sections. Models based on the shallow ice approximation, which does not resolve extensional stresses, do not reproduce the approximate analytical results unless appropriate parameterizations for ice flux are imposed at the grounding line. For extensional-stress resolving "shelfy stream" models, differences between model results were mainly due to the choice of spatial discretization. Moving grid methods were found to be the most accurate at capturing grounding line evolution, since they track the grounding line explicitly. Adaptive mesh refinement can further improve accuracy, including fixed grid models that generally perform poorly at coarse resolution. Fixed grid models, with nested grid representations of the grounding line, are able to generate accurate steady state positions, but can be inaccurate over transients. Only one full-Stokes model was included in the intercomparison, and consequently the accuracy of shelfy stream models as approximations of full-Stokes models remains to be determined in detail, especially during transients.

  17. Aerosol retrieval algorithm for MERIS: Description of concept and presenting results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmale, Miriam; Kolmonen, Pekka; Popp, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) has been launched in 2002 onboard the ESA Envisat satellite and was providing data until Envisat's end in 2012. The MERIS spectrometer was designed primarily for surface and land scientific applications and measured reflected solar radiation in 15 channels from 400-900nm. Based on the work of Sayer and Hsu for SeaWiFS, an aerosol retrieval for MERIS was developed as part of the ESA Aerosol_cci project. The high spectral resolution of the instrument provides capability for retrieving aerosols. The algorithm can be transferred also to the OLCI measurements operating onboard the Sentinel-3 satellites since 2015. The retrieval code uses a Look-Up-Table (LUT) approach to speed up the calculations. The LUTs are calculated with the radiative transfer code LibRadtran (Meyer und Kylling, 2005). In minimizing the differences of satellite measurements with forward simulations, with Levenberg-Marquardt as the mathematical approach, the aerosol loading of the satellite measurement is inferred. As basis for the algorithm, a MERIS new cloud detection system (exploiting blue to near infrared channels) was defined, as well as a 16-day moving average surface albedo database. The presentation will describe the general concept of the retrieval algorithm and show results of aerosol properties retrieved from the MERIS measurements. An information content analysis is used to assess the general capability of retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MERIS channels. Challenges concerning the retrieval algorithm and its input data will be discussed. Comparisons with external datasets will be given, either for the cloud mask, the surface database as well as the final AOD product. Results of the aerosol product will be presented together with a discussion on its quality triggered by validation with AERONET measurements. Mayer, B. & Kylling, A. Technical note: The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations

  18. Modelling and simulation-based acquisition decision support: present & future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available of experimental results by DDTG Updated Draft Doctrine and/or System Specification Run experiments in VGD Participate in field exercises and further experiments Analysis of results by DDTG Doctrine Optimization Delivery of equipment... Analysis of experimental results by DDTG Operational Test and Evaluation Analysis of results by DDTG Doctrine Optimization Develop Concepts Develop Concepts Develop Concepts Develop Concepts Doctrine + Equipment In Service Current...

  19. EDF - 2005 Consolidated Annual Results - Analysts' Presentation. Consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2005 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2005: Consolidated income statements, consolidated balance sheets, consolidated cash flow statements, variation in consolidated equity, notes (group accounting policies, impact of first-time application of IFRs, transition to standards IAS 32 and 39 concerning financial instruments, summary of accounting and valuation methods, public distribution concessions in France, significant events and transactions of 2005, impact of the law of august 9, 2004 on comparability, changes in the scope of consolidation, segment reporting, sales, fuel and energy purchases, other external expenses, contractual obligations and commitments entered into in the course of business, personnel expenses, other operating income and expenses, other income and expenses, financial result, income taxes, basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share, goodwill, other intangible assets, property, plant and equipment, investments in companies accounted for under the equity method, financial assets, inventories, including work-in-process, trade receivables, other receivables, cash and cash equivalents, available-for-sale assets and liabilities, equity, provisions, special concession liabilities, current and non-current financial liabilities, derivatives, other liabilities, related parties, greenhouse gas emission quotas, environment, subsequent events, scope of consolidation

  20. Presentations from the Aeroelastic Workshop – latest results from AeroOpt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    ) • Nonlinear beam element in HAWC2 for modelling of mooring systems (Bjarne Kallesøe) • Enhanced BEM including wake expansion and swirl (Christian Bak) • Unsteady viscous-inviscid interactive airfoil code for wind turbines (Néstor Ramos García) • PIV measurements on model scale wind turbine in water channel...

  1. Estimating net present value variability for deterministic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groenendaal, W.J.H.

    1995-01-01

    For decision makers the variability in the net present value (NPV) of an investment project is an indication of the project's risk. So-called risk analysis is one way to estimate this variability. However, risk analysis requires knowledge about the stochastic character of the inputs. For large,

  2. Minimal Z' models present bounds and early LHC reach

    CERN Document Server

    Salvioni, Ennio; Zwirner, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We consider `minimal' Z' models, whose phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the Standard Model ones: the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants. They encompass many popular models motivated by grand unification, as well as many arising in other theoretical contexts. This parameterization takes also into account both mass and kinetic mixing effects, which we show to be sizable in some cases. After discussing the interplay between the bounds from electroweak precision tests and recent direct searches at the Tevatron, we extend our analysis to estimate the early LHC discovery potential. We consider a center-of-mass energy from 7 towards 10 TeV and an integrated luminosity from 50 to several hundred pb^-1, taking all existing bounds into account. We find that the LHC will start exploring virgin land in parameter space for M_Z' around 700 GeV, with lower masses still excluded by the Tevatron and higher masses still excluded by electroweak precision tests. Increasing the energy up to 10...

  3. Graphical interpretation of numerical model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewes, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer software has been developed to produce high quality graphical displays of data from a numerical grid model. The code uses an existing graphical display package (DISSPLA) and overcomes some of the problems of both line-printer output and traditional graphics. The software has been designed to be flexible enough to handle arbitrarily placed computation grids and a variety of display requirements

  4. The San Fernando Automatic Meridian Circle in Argentina: Present state, FIRS T results and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamaci, C. C.; Muiqos, J. L.; Pirez, J. A.; Belizsn, F.; Vallejo, M.; Gallego, M.; Marmolejo, L. F.; Navarro, J. L.; Sedeqo, J. A.

    1998-11-01

    Thanks to a Co-operation and Support Agreement, signed between the National University of San Juan (Argentina) and the Royal Institute and Observatory of the Army in San Fernando (Cadiz, Spain), an Automatic Meridian Circle was settled up in the province of San Juan, in July of 1996. This instrument is "twin" of another already installed in El Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Astrophysical Institute of Canaries) in La Palma Island. In the current state of the instrument, with a photomultiplier as main detector, it is possible to observe about 400-600 stars per night (depending on the time of the year, summer or winter) up to magnitude 15.5, approximately. At present we are carrying out an observation program of stars and Solar System bodies (planets, satellites and asteroids), whose results will yield our first catalogue of positions of celestial objects. As by-product of the observations, the catalogue will also include the magnitudes of the observed objects, obtained by means of the photomultiplier counts. The stability of the instrument and the quality of the observations are good, though we keep working in fine adjustments of the telescope. The future plans for the telescope include the complete renewal of the computer system and the replacement of the photomultiplier and the slit micrometer for a CCD camera. The first of these changes implies the substitution of the current 2113 and A700 HP computers by a modern Pentium PC, and will be made by the end of 1998. The replacement of the sensor will be carried out, probably, during the first semester of 1999. The latter improvement will introduce a substantial change in the philosophy of observation and reduction, and will bring about the whole renewal of the software. All these changes will considerably increase the accuracy in the operation of the instrument, specially because of the significant reduction in mechanical component, since the mechanical movements decrease to a minimum. The handling of the

  5. Modeling clicks beyond the first result page

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern web search engines yield a list of documents of a fixed length (usually 10) in response to a user query. The next ten search results are usually available in one click. These documents either replace the current result page or are appended to the end. Hence, in order to examine more

  6. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    . However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario...... of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological obser-vations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observa-tional data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced...

  7. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    ’ dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble...

  8. MODELS OF STATE REFORMS IN AGRICULTURE: PAST AND PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А Г Киселев

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines social and economic consequences of collectivization to compare this state policy with the changes in agriculture in the 1990s, and to estimate chances of the Russian agriculture to overcome the current crisis. The article is based on archive data on collectivization and on the program developed by the Academy of High Ecotechnologies. The authors believe that at the time of collectivization, it was a way to optimize agriculture: largely due to collectivization, though with all its losses and ‘extremes’, the soviet agriculture was partially industrialized and provided the country with food in the hardest years of the Great Patriotic War and in the post-war period, thus ensuring the food security of the Soviet state. The ‘emergency’ model of the so-called ‘return to civilization’ that was adopted under the reforms of the 1990s aimed at turning the collective farmer into an individual farmer or a rural wageworker, but such a social ‘migration’ strategy imposed ‘from above’ deformed the rural social stratum and determined serious economic problems. Today the authors consider the neo-collective farms as a promising perspec-tive. They also support the program developed by the Academy of High Ecotechnologies for intensification of agricultural production on the basis of progressive domestic and foreign technologies, which will allow to increase the agricultural production in the next three to five years by several times. In particular, for more effective use of agricultural technologies and processing industries, the program suggests develop-ing the enlarged organizational-economic structures - ‘agropromkhozes’.

  9. Hydroclimatology of the Nile: results from a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the result of the regional coupled climatic and hydrologic model of the Nile Basin. For the first time the interaction between the climatic processes and the hydrological processes on the land surface have been fully coupled. The hydrological model is driven by the rainfall and the energy available for evaporation generated in the climate model, and the runoff generated in the catchment is again routed over the wetlands of the Nile to supply moisture for atmospheric feedback. The results obtained are quite satisfactory given the extremely low runoff coefficients in the catchment. The paper presents the validation results over the sub-basins: Blue Nile, White Nile, Atbara river, the Sudd swamps, and the Main Nile for the period 1995 to 2000. Observational datasets were used to evaluate the model results including radiation, precipitation, runoff and evaporation data. The evaporation data were derived from satellite images over a major part of the Upper Nile. Limitations in both the observational data and the model are discussed. It is concluded that the model provides a sound representation of the regional water cycle over the Nile. The sources of atmospheric moisture to the basin, and location of convergence/divergence fields could be accurately illustrated. The model is used to describe the regional water cycle in the Nile basin in terms of atmospheric fluxes, land surface fluxes and land surface-climate feedbacks. The monthly moisture recycling ratio (i.e. locally generated/total precipitation over the Nile varies between 8 and 14%, with an annual mean of 11%, which implies that 89% of the Nile water resources originates from outside the basin physical boundaries. The monthly precipitation efficiency varies between 12 and 53%, and the annual mean is 28%. The mean annual result of the Nile regional water cycle is compared to that of the Amazon and the Mississippi basins.

  10. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  11. Patient-oriented presentation of results of radiological procedures using DICOM-compliant DVD media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Aberle, Denise R.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Lu, David S.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; McGill, D. Ric; McCoy, J. Michael

    2003-05-01

    Some institutions have adopted digital media such as CD ROMs to provide patients and referring physicians with results of radiological procedures. These systems require a computer to review the images and lack the supporting explanations and guidance for patients to properly understand the results. We developed a hybrid DVD encoding format that combines DICOM-compliant image storage format with video streams viewable on any consumer DVD players. The addition of the video material allows radiologists to provide explanations, disclaimers and guidance to the patients regarding the results of the study. The diagnostic report is also included on the DVD as a PDF file and as a set of video frames that can be viewed on a DVD player. The native high-resolution images are also included in DICOM format on the DVD and can be accessed by any workstation equipped with a DICOM viewer. The DVD that can be reviewed on any consumer DVD player overcomes the limitation of CD ROMS that require the use of a personal computer. The results of the radiological procedures become more accessible patients that could be reluctant or unable to use a computer. Also, live video clips add a more personalized note and allow radiologists to convey important messages to the patients. This is particularly useful for self-referred screening procedures where results should always be accompanied with education material and explanations of the findings.

  12. Clinical presentation and time-course of postoperative venous thromboembolism: Results from the RIETE Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcelus, Juan Ignacio; Monreal, Manuel; Caprini, Joseph A; Guisado, Javier Gutiérrez; Soto, Maria José; Núñez, Manuel Jesús; Alvárez, Juan Carlos

    2008-03-01

    There is little literature about the clinical presentation and time-course of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) in different surgical procedures. RIETE is an ongoing, prospective registry of consecutive patients with objectively confirmed, symptomatic acute VTE. In this analysis, we analysed the baseline characteristics, thromboprophylaxis and therapeutic patterns, time-course, and three-month outcome of all patients with postoperative VTE. As of January 2006, there were 1,602 patients with postoperative VTE in RIETE: 393 (25%) after major orthopaedic surgery (145 elective hip arthroplasty, 126 knee arthroplasty, 122 hip fracture); 207 (13%) after cancer surgery; 1,002 (63%) after other procedures. The percentage of patients presenting with clinically overt pulmonary embolism (PE) (48%, 48%, and 50% respectively), the average time elapsed from surgery to VTE (22 +/- 16, 24 +/- 16, and 21 +/- 15 days, respectively), and the three-month incidence of fatal PE (1.3%, 1.4%, and 0.8%, respectively), fatal bleeding (0.8%, 1.0%, and 0.2%, respectively), or major bleeding (2.3%, 2.9%, and 2.8%, respectively) were similar in the three groups. However, the percentage of patients who had received thromboprophylaxis (96%, 76% and 52%, respectively), the duration of prophylaxis (17 +/- 9.6, 13 +/- 8.9, and 12 +/- 11 days, respectively) and the mean daily doses of low-molecular-weight heparin (4,252 +/- 1,016, 3,260 +/- 1,141, and 3,769 +/- 1,650 IU, respectively), were significantly lower in those undergoing cancer surgery or other procedures. In conclusion, the clinical presentation, time-course, and three-month outcome of VTE was similar among the different subgroups of patients, but the use of prophylaxis in patients undergoing cancer surgery or other procedures was suboptimal.

  13. Results and tasks of radiation neurology at the present-day stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.

    1991-01-01

    The main stage are presented of development of radiation clinical neurology, paying attention to the contribution of Soviet clinicals in connection with assessment of possible responses at the Chernobyl accident. Neurological disorders in ARS of various degrees of severity at different periods of diseases as well as during irradiation at doses, not causing ARS development were described. The importance of clinicophysiological investigations for assessment of CNS function during the development of disease and its aftereffects was shown. The role of psychological investigations on mental abilities of persons, exposed to acute ionizing radiation was emphasized

  14. Absolute gravity change in Taiwan: Present result of geodynamic process investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky Kao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity values at 24 sites over 2004 - 2016 measured with absolute gravimeters are used to study geodynamic processes in Taiwan. We model rain-induced grav­ity effects and other temporal effects of non-geodynamic origins to obtain residual gravity, which cannot be fully explained by GPS-derived vertical displacements. We explain the gravity changes associated with deposited debris, earthquake, volcanism and Moho deepening. Gravity changes of 53.37 and 23.38 μGal near Sinwulyu and Laonong Rivers are caused by typhoon Morakot, leading to estimated volumes of 6.0 × 105 and 3.6 × 105 m3 in deposited debris. The observed co-seismic gravity change near the epicenter of the M 6.9 Pingtung earthquake (26 December 2006 is 3.12 ± 0.99 μGal, consistent with a dislocation-based gravity change at the μGal level, thereby supplying a gravity constraint on the modeled fault parameters. The AG re­cord at the Tatun Volcano Group is the longest, but large temporal gravity effects here has led to a current gravity signal-to-noise ratio of less than one, which cannot convince a sinking magma chamber, but supply an error bound for gravity detections of long-term or transient magma movements. The gravity values at Ludao and Lanyu decline steadily at the rates of -2.20 and -0.50 μGal yr-1, consistent with the expected magma states of the two extinct volcanoes. The gravity rates at an uplifting site in central Taiwan and three subsiding sites in eastern Taiwan are negative, and are po­tentially caused by Moho deepening at a rate of -3.34 cm yr-1 and a combined Moho deepening and plate subduction at the rates of -0.18, -2.03, and -1.34 cm yr-1.

  15. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  16. SMOS CATDS Level 3 products, Soil Moisture and Brightness Temperature: Presentation and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Lucie; Mialon, Arnaud; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Cabot, François; Bircher, Simone; Jacquette, Elsa; Quesney, Arnaud; Kerr, Yann H.

    2013-04-01

    The ESA's (European Space Agency) SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, operating since November 2009, is the first satellite dedicated to measuring surface soil moisture and ocean salinity. The CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) has developed the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) ground segment. It provides spatial and temporal synthesis products (referred to as Level 3) of soil moisture, which are now covering the whole SMOS operation period since January 2010. These products have different time resolutions: daily products, 3-day global products (insuring a complete coverage of the Earth's surface), 10-day composite products, and monthly averaged products. Moreover, a new product provides brightness temperatures at H and V polarizations which are computed at fixed incidence angles every 5 degrees. All the CATDS products are presented in the NetCDF format on the EASE grid (Equal Area Scalable Earth grid) with a spatial resolution of ~ 25*25 km². The soil moisture Level 3 algorithm is based on ESA's Level 2 retrieval scheme with the improvement of using several overpasses (3 at most) over a 7-day window. Using many revisits is expected to improve the quality of the retrieved soil moisture. This communication aims at presenting the CATDS soil moisture and brightness temperature products as well as other geophysical parameters retrieved on the side, such as the vegetation optical depth or the dielectric constant of the surface. Furthermore, we illustrate the validation of this database, including the comparison of the Level 3 soil moisture to in-situ measurements available from various sites (Australia, US, southwest of France, Spain, Denmark, West Africa, French Alps), spanning different surface conditions.

  17. Application and evaluation of interactive 3D PDF for presenting and sharing planning results for liver surgery in clinical routine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Newe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: The Portable Document Format (PDF is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. METHODS: We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. RESULTS: Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file ("PDF App". The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty very positively. CONCLUSION: The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open

  18. Present and future costs of COPD in Iceland and Norway: results from the BOLD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R.; Johannessen, A.; Benediktsdottir, B.; Gislason, T.; Buist, A.S.; Gulsvik, A.; Sullivan, S.D.; Lee, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) initiative provides standardised estimates of the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) worldwide. We estimate the current and future economic burden of COPD in Reykjavik, Iceland and Bergen, Norway using data from the BOLD initiative. Data on utilisation of healthcare resources were gathered from the BOLD survey, existing literature and unit costs from national sources. Economic data were applied to a Markov model using transition probabilities derived from Framingham data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted varying unit costs, utilisation and prevalence of disease. The cost of COPD was €478 per patient per yr in Iceland and €284 per patient per yr in Norway. The estimated cumulative costs of COPD for the population aged ≥40 yrs, were €130 million and €1,539 million for the following 10 yrs in Iceland and Norway, respectively. Costs of COPD accounted for 1.2 and 0.7% of healthcare budgets in Iceland and Norway, respectively. Sensitivity analyses showed estimates were most sensitive to changes in exacerbation frequency. COPD has a significant economic burden in both Iceland and Norway and will grow in the future. Interventions aimed at avoiding exacerbations will have the most impact on costs of COPD over the next 20 yrs. PMID:19357148

  19. Some results on the dynamics generated by the Bazykin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgescu, R M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey model formerly proposed by A. Bazykin et al. [Bifurcation diagrams of planar dynamical systems (1985] is analyzed in the case when two of the four parameters are kept fixed. Dynamics and bifurcation results are deduced by using the methods developed by D. K. Arrowsmith and C. M. Place [Ordinary differential equations (1982], S.-N. Chow et al. [Normal forms and bifurcation of planar fields (1994], Y. A. Kuznetsov [Elements of applied bifurcation theory (1998], and A. Georgescu [Dynamic bifurcation diagrams for some models in economics and biology (2004]. The global dynamic bifurcation diagram is constructed and graphically represented. The biological interpretation is presented, too.

  20. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke

    2010-01-01

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  1. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  2. Permanent implants for lip augmentation: Results from a retrospective study and presentation of tips and tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, S; Mandel, V D; Farnetani, F; Manola, C M; Rubino, G; Ruzzu, S; Pellacani, G; Longo, C; Urtis, G G

    2017-05-01

    Requests for lip augmentation are increasing because of expanding media exposure and consumer needs. Temporary effects can be obtained by several techniques, but a recent procedure consisting of lip prosthesis implantation, offering a permanent result, is emerging. Accordingly, the implantation of solid lip prosthesis represents an innovation in the field of esthetic medicine and surgery. A total of 100 women with atrophic or hypoplastic lips were treated with lip implants. The treatment was performed in a single session, and controls were scheduled at fixed time intervals. A standard digital photo was used for measurement and analysis. Data concerning patient satisfaction and complications of the technique were collected and analyzed. Variations to the original technique were also discussed. Patient evaluation revealed that a permanent and natural result without discomfort for the patient and/or the partner was reached with the implantation of silicone prosthesis in the upper and/or lower lip. Swelling, bruising, and malpositions were the most frequent adverse events. A case of severe edema was reported. Practical tricks acquired through experience were discussed to prevent complications. One of the most widespreading methods for lip remodeling is hyaluronic acid injections. Nevertheless, hyaluronic acid has a variable duration, and it is not always the first choice. This context allowed for the development of other techniques such as the implantation of silicone prosthesis. The advantages of this prosthesis are as follows: safety, definitive result, and reversibility considering the possibility to remove the implanted prosthesis in the case of a request. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Paracelsus research past and present: basic results, frustrated attempts, new approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilg, P

    1993-01-01

    As is well known, the Leipzig historian of medicine Karl Sudhoff inaugurated modern research on Paracelsus, providing it with a basis that has remained indispensable right down to the present. Pertinent scholarly contributions by Sudhoff date from 1887; they culminated first in the Paracelsus bibliography of 1894 and reached their fitting conclusion with the edition of Hohenheim's collected works, Abteilung 1: Medizinische, naturwissenschaftliche und philosophische Schriften; its fourteen volumes appeared between 1922 and 1933. Following the second world war the Marburg historian of religion Kurt Goldammer undertook the edition of Abteilung 2: Theologische und religionsphilosophische Schriften; this edition, building on Sudhoff's work, is likewise conceived as comprising fourteen volumes, of which six (together with a supplement), that is, half the projected total, have appeared so far (through 1986). Alongside these fundamental achievements, however, Paracelsus research in the more recent past has also been marked by a series of failed attempts. One of these is the index volume to the Sudhoff edition; it was put together under difficult circumstances, and even at the time of its appearance (1960) it failed to fully satisfy scholarly criteria. A further unsatisfactory aspect, it may be recalled, is the Paracelsus lexicon which was begun forty years ago, but which, despite the pressing need for a research tool of this kind, has still not appeared. Finally, it has not been possible, despite repeated efforts, to establish a Paracelsus institute in the sense of a centre for historical research. Under these circumstances, the continued care for what Paracelsus has bequeathed to us and the coordination of related activities have down to the present been provided for solely by the two pertinent professional societies, the Schweizerische Paracelsus-Gesellschaft (founded in 1942) and the Internationale Paracelsus-Gesellschaft (created in 1951), along with their respective

  4. Results and present status of the Japan-US collaboration on detector research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kasuke

    1985-02-01

    This is a summary report on the results of the Detector R and D work, which we have been carrying out these three years, under the Japan-U.S. collaboration on High Energy Physics. It is clear that there have been already many considerable progress and outputs in the activities, some of which are already applied to the actual detectors in various ways. It is foreseeable that more extensive development will be realized. It should also be better to emphasize that these detector R and D efforts will be very important for the further development of high energy physics in the near future. (author)

  5. Present status of TMI-2 plant and results of its research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Sadaaki; Yokomi, Michiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the accident occurred in the TMI-2 plant on March 28, 1979, the damage was caused in the reactor core, but there scarcely was the effect on the health and safety of general public around the power station. But in USA, it was decided to collect the data on the fuel, decontamination, waste management and so on of this plant and to advance the survey and research on the safety by the analysis and evaluation of the course of the accident mainly by GPUN, EPRI, NRC and DOE. Also in Japan, it was judged that the participation in this research would be useful for improving the reliability of Japanese nuclear power plants hereafter, and the Japan-USA agreement on TMI-2 research and development project was concluded on April 16, 1984. The activity plan in TMI-2 is divided into three stages. Phase 1 is the stage of stabilization, Phase 2 is the stage of taking fuel out, and Phase 3 is the stage of cleaning. At present, Phase 2 - 3 are in progress, and the taking-out and transport of fuel and decontamination are carried out. After finishing Phase 3, the TMI-2 plant is placed in the state of monitoring and preservation, which is scheduled in September, 1988. The final disposal of the plant will be determined thereafter. Decontamination, treatment of contaminated water and wastes, taking-out and transport of fuel, state of the reactor core and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  6. The present status and future growth of maintenance in US manufacturing: results from a pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A research study was conducted (1 to examine the practices employed by US manufacturers to achieve productivity goals and (2 to understand what level of intelligent maintenance technologies and strategies are being incorporated into these practices. This study found that the effectiveness and choice of maintenance strategy were strongly correlated to the size of the manufacturing enterprise; there were large differences in adoption of advanced maintenance practices and diagnostics and prognostics technologies between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. Despite their greater adoption of maintenance practices and technologies, large manufacturing organizations have had only modest success with respect to diagnostics and prognostics and preventive maintenance projects. The varying degrees of success with respect to preventative maintenance programs highlight the opportunity for larger manufacturers to improve their maintenance practices and use of advanced prognostics and health management (PHM technology. The future outlook for manufacturing PHM technology among the manufacturing organizations considered in this study was overwhelmingly positive; many manufacturing organizations have current and planned projects in this area. Given the current modest state of implementation and positive outlook for this technology, gaps, future trends, and roadmaps for manufacturing PHM and maintenance strategy are presented.

  7. The present status and future growth of maintenance in US manufacturing: results from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoning; Siegel, David; Weiss, Brian A; Gamel, Ellen; Wang, Wei; Lee, Jay; Ni, Jun

    A research study was conducted (1) to examine the practices employed by US manufacturers to achieve productivity goals and (2) to understand what level of intelligent maintenance technologies and strategies are being incorporated into these practices. This study found that the effectiveness and choice of maintenance strategy were strongly correlated to the size of the manufacturing enterprise; there were large differences in adoption of advanced maintenance practices and diagnostics and prognostics technologies between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Despite their greater adoption of maintenance practices and technologies, large manufacturing organizations have had only modest success with respect to diagnostics and prognostics and preventive maintenance projects. The varying degrees of success with respect to preventative maintenance programs highlight the opportunity for larger manufacturers to improve their maintenance practices and use of advanced prognostics and health management (PHM) technology. The future outlook for manufacturing PHM technology among the manufacturing organizations considered in this study was overwhelmingly positive; many manufacturing organizations have current and planned projects in this area. Given the current modest state of implementation and positive outlook for this technology, gaps, future trends, and roadmaps for manufacturing PHM and maintenance strategy are presented.

  8. Review of Current Standard Model Results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk highlights results selected from the Standard Model research programme of the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider. Results using data from $p-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7,8$~TeV in LHC Run-1 as well as results using data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in LHC Run-2 are covered. The status of cross section measurements from soft QCD processes and jet production as well as photon production are presented. The presentation extends to vector boson production with associated jets. Precision measurements of the production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons, including a first measurement of the mass of the $W$ bosons, $m_W$, are discussed. The programme to measure electroweak processes with di-boson and tri-boson final states is outlined. All presented measurements are compatible with Standard Model descriptions and allow to further constrain it. In addition they allow to probe new physics which would manifest through extra gauge couplings, or Standard Model gauge couplings deviating from their predicted value.

  9. Probing of Hermean Exosphere by ultraviolet spectroscopy: Instrument presentation, calibration philosophy and first lights results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, J. F.; Rouanet, N.; Maria, J. L.; Quémerais, E.; Mine, P. O.; Zuppella, P.; Suman, M.; Nicolosi, P.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.

    2017-11-01

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double spectrometer for the Extreme Ultraviolet range (55-155 nm) and the Far Ultraviolet range (145-315 nm) dedicated to the characterization of Mercury's exosphere composition and dynamics, and surface-exosphere connections. PHEBUS is part of the ESA BepiColombo cornerstone mission payload devoted to the study of Mercury. The BepiColombo mission consists of two spacecrafts: the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) on which PHEBUS will be mounted. PHEBUS is a French-led instrument implemented in a cooperative scheme involving Japan (detectors), Russia (scanner) and Italy (ground calibration). Before launch, PHEBUS team want to perform a full absolute calibration on ground, in addition to calibrations which will be made in-flight, in order to know the instrument's response as precisely as possible. Instrument overview and calibration philosophy are introduced along with the first lights results observed by a first prototype.

  10. Application and evaluation of interactive 3D PDF for presenting and sharing planning results for liver surgery in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newe, Axel; Becker, Linda; Schenk, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de-facto standard for the exchange of electronic documents. It is platform-independent, suitable for the exchange of medical data, and allows for the embedding of three-dimensional (3D) surface mesh models. In this article, we present the first clinical routine application of interactive 3D surface mesh models which have been integrated into PDF files for the presentation and the exchange of Computer Assisted Surgery Planning (CASP) results in liver surgery. We aimed to prove the feasibility of applying 3D PDF in medical reporting and investigated the user experience with this new technology. We developed an interactive 3D PDF report document format and implemented a software tool to create these reports automatically. After more than 1000 liver CASP cases that have been reported in clinical routine using our 3D PDF report, an international user survey was carried out online to evaluate the user experience. Our solution enables the user to interactively explore the anatomical configuration and to have different analyses and various resection proposals displayed within a 3D PDF document covering only a single page that acts more like a software application than like a typical PDF file ("PDF App"). The new 3D PDF report offers many advantages over the previous solutions. According to the results of the online survey, the users have assessed the pragmatic quality (functionality, usability, perspicuity, efficiency) as well as the hedonic quality (attractiveness, novelty) very positively. The usage of 3D PDF for reporting and sharing CASP results is feasible and well accepted by the target audience. Using interactive PDF with embedded 3D models is an enabler for presenting and exchanging complex medical information in an easy and platform-independent way. Medical staff as well as patients can benefit from the possibilities provided by 3D PDF. Our results open the door for a wider use of this new technology, since the basic idea

  11. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  12. The presentation of the results of Alexander von Humboldt's voyage to Carlos IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Puig-Samper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen  Desde nuestras primeras investigaciones sobre la estancia de Alexander von Humboldt en España siempre nos sorprendió la ausencia de una mínima relación posterior del sabio prusiano con la corona española y sus autoridades. Iniciada una nueva investigación, encontramos que efectivamente se produjo el envío de un primer trabajo a Carlos IV desde Roma acompañado de una carta de gratitud por la protección recibida durante su viaje americano y de sumisión a la corona española, que ahora presentamos.   Summary Ever since our first research into Alexander von Humboldt's stay in Spain, the absence of an ensuing relationship between the wise Prussian and the Spanish Crown and Authorities had always surprised us. On starting new research, we found that indeed he sent his first work to Carlos IV from Rome accompanied by a letter of gratitude for the protection he had received during his American trip and submission to the Spanish Crown, which we now present. This first literary fruit of his voyage, which Alexander von Humboldt alluded to in the letter is the first instalment of his work Plantes Équinoxiales, Recueillies au Mexique, dans l’ile de Cuba, dans les provinces de Caracas, de Cumana etc., published in Paris in 1805.   Zusammenfassung Seit unseren ersten Forschungen über den Aufenthalt Alexander von Humboldts in Spanien hat uns das Fehlen einer hieran anschließenden Beziehung des preußischen Wissenschaftlers mit der spanischen Krone und ihren Behörden erstaunt. Im Laufe einer erneuten Aufnahme der Forschung, haben wir nun entdeckt, dass Humboldt in der Tat von Rom aus eine erste Arbeit an Karl IV gesandt hatte, zusammen mit einem Schreiben des Dankes (für den während der amerikanischen Reise erhaltenen Schutz sowie seiner Unterordnung unter die spanische Krone, das wir nun präsentieren. Das erste literarische Ergebnis seiner Reise, auf das Humboldt in diesem Brief verweist, ist der erste Faszikel seines Werkes

  13. [Cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: preliminary results and presentation of a new program, PROCOG-SEP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissart, H; Leroy, M; Debouverie, M

    2010-04-01

    Although cognitive disorders are well-known in multiple sclerosis (MS), even in earlier stages of the disease, their management may be overlooked. Our objective was to elaborate and evaluate the efficiency of a remedial program (PROCOG-SEP) designed for MS patients. The evidence-based program proposes exercises to both stimulate preserved functions and develop new abilities compensating for cognitive disabilities. Twenty-four patients with MS participated in 10/2-hour PROCOG-SEP sessions over a 6-month period. A neuropsychologist recorded BCcog-SEP performances before and after the PROCOG-SEP program. In addition, the same neuropsychologist conducted psychoclinical interviews to complete the before and after cognitive evaluations. The statistical analysis used the t-test performed with Excel. Compared with the initial levels, subtests of BCcog-SEP showing improvement after PROCOG-SEP were: verbal memory (SRT), visuospatial memory (10/36), verbal fluency (animal categories) and response to conflicting orders. Also, individual psychological interviews tended to be in favor of a general improvement in quality of life (more social interactions for instance). To our knowledge, the management program we have elaborated is the first designed to improve cognitive deficits in MS. These encouraging results suggest possibilities for improving cognition and thus quality-of-life in MS patients. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. {Carbon and oxygen isotope signals from marine ostracod calcite - results from present and past oceans}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, A.; Speijer, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    Systematic stable isotope studies on ostracod calcite are generally rare, in particular for marine taxa only the work of DIDIÉ & BAUCH (2002) provides first clues towards an improved understanding of ostracod stable isotope data in paleoceanography. Here we present analyses from recent near surface sediments from the Gulf of Taranto, the Levantine Basin (15 ka, both Mediterranean Sea) and the Paleocene of Tunisia (southern Tethyan margin). Data are compared to those from selected benthic foraminiferal taxa from which the living habitat and the isotopic disequilibria from ambient sea-water are well known. In addition, size fractions of monospecific samples have been studied in order to test whether a size/mass dependent change exists with respect to the isotopic composition of the carapace calcite. Calcification of ostracod carapaces is a very rapid process, which often takes place within a few hours and the obtained signal provides only a snap-shot of the prevailing paleoceanographic conditions. Multiple mono-specific measurements show therefore a much higher variability than benthic foraminifera, but may give a more complete picture of the seasonal changes. Our study confirms the findings of DIDIÉ & BAUCH (2002) and others (for non-marine taxa) that ostracod calcite displays a positive species-specific deviation from the sea-water ^18O composition between 0.5 and 1.5 per mil with an intra-specific variability of less than 0.5 per mil. In contrast ^13C values cover a huge range with an off-set from sea-water of up to -5 per mil and show a high intra-specific variability of up to 2 per mil. Size-fraction data show no systematic change, although a statistically significant positive covariance between ^18O and ^13C has been observed. This covariance consists of a slope similar to a kinetic controlled fractionation as has been described from asymbiotic planktic foraminifera (Globigerina bulloides) and corals (MCCONNAUGHEY, 1989; SPERO & LEA, 1996). This suggests that

  15. Verification Techniques for Parameter Selection and Bayesian Model Calibration Presented for an HIV Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Mami Tonoe

    Uncertainty quantification plays an important role when making predictive estimates of model responses. In this context, uncertainty quantification is defined as quantifying and reducing uncertainties, and the objective is to quantify uncertainties in parameter, model and measurements, and propagate the uncertainties through the model, so that one can make a predictive estimate with quantified uncertainties. Two of the aspects of uncertainty quantification that must be performed prior to propagating uncertainties are model calibration and parameter selection. There are several efficient techniques for these processes; however, the accuracy of these methods are often not verified. This is the motivation for our work, and in this dissertation, we present and illustrate verification frameworks for model calibration and parameter selection in the context of biological and physical models. First, HIV models, developed and improved by [2, 3, 8], describe the viral infection dynamics of an HIV disease. These are also used to make predictive estimates of viral loads and T-cell counts and to construct an optimal control for drug therapy. Estimating input parameters is an essential step prior to uncertainty quantification. However, not all the parameters are identifiable, implying that they cannot be uniquely determined by the observations. These unidentifiable parameters can be partially removed by performing parameter selection, a process in which parameters that have minimal impacts on the model response are determined. We provide verification techniques for Bayesian model calibration and parameter selection for an HIV model. As an example of a physical model, we employ a heat model with experimental measurements presented in [10]. A steady-state heat model represents a prototypical behavior for heat conduction and diffusion process involved in a thermal-hydraulic model, which is a part of nuclear reactor models. We employ this simple heat model to illustrate verification

  16. Blade element momentum modeling of inflow with shear in comparison with advanced model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Riziotis, V.; Zahle, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    shear is present in the inflow. This gives guidance to how the BEM modeling of shear should be implemented. Another result from the advanced vortex model computations is a clear indication of influence of the ground, and the general tendency is a speed up effect of the flow through the rotor giving...

  17. Initial CGE Model Results Summary Exogenous and Endogenous Variables Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    The following discussion presents initial results of tests of the most recent version of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of this is to test and assess the model’s behavioral properties. The test evaluated whether the predicted impacts are reasonable from a qualitative perspective. This issue is whether the predicted change, be it an increase or decrease in other model variables, is consistent with prior economic intuition and expectations about the predicted change. One of the purposes of this effort is to determine whether model changes are needed in order to improve its behavior qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. SR-Site groundwater flow modelling methodology, setup and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken three groundwater flow modelling studies. These are performed within the SR-Site project and represent time periods with different climate conditions. The simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. Three time periods are addressed; the Excavation and operational phases, the Initial period of temperate climate after closure, and the Remaining part of the reference glacial cycle. The present report is a synthesis of the background reports describing the modelling methodology, setup, and results. It is the primary reference for the conclusions drawn in a SR-Site specific context concerning groundwater flow during the three climate periods. These conclusions are not necessarily provided explicitly in the background reports, but are based on the results provided in these reports. The main results and comparisons presented in the present report are summarised in the SR-Site Main report.

  19. The Effects of Presentation Format for Behavior Modeling of Interpersonal Skills in Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Min Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the most effective model presentation format in behavior modeling to teach interpersonal skills in online learning environments. Four model presentation formats were compared; video, pictures plus audio, audio only, and text-script only. The effects of the model presentation were investigated in terms of…

  20. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyuk, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. We consider the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the ''Mesonic Fluid'' model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutation, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's ''Vortex Atoms'' theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain. (author). 93 refs, 4 figs

  1. CLIMBER-2: a climate system model of intermediate complexity. Pt. 1. Model description and performance for present climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhov, V.; Ganopolski, A.; Brovkin, V.; Claussen, M.; Eliseev, A.; Kubatzki, C.; Rahmstorf, S.

    1998-02-01

    A 2.5-dimensional climate system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 and its performance for present climate conditions are presented. The model consists of modules describing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land surface processes, terrestrial vegetation cover, and global carbon cycle. The modules interact (on-line) through the fluxes of momentum, energy, water and carbon. The model has a coarse spatial resolution, allowing nevertheless to capture the major features of the Earth`s geography. The model describes temporal variability of the system on seasonal and longer time scales. Due to the fact that the model does not employ any type of flux adjustment and has fast turnaround time, it can be used for study of climates significantly different from the present one and allows to perform long-term (multimillennia) simulations. The constraints for coupling the atmosphere and ocean without flux adjustment are discussed. The results of a model validation against present climate data show that the model successfully describes the seasonal variability of a large set of characteristics of the climate system, including radiative balance, temperature, precipitation, ocean circulation and cryosphere. (orig.) 62 refs.

  2. Evaluation of a novel periodontal risk assessment model in patients presenting for dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R Viswa

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to develop a new periodontal risk assessment model based on the periodontal risk assessment (PRA) model by Lang and Tonetti, and to evaluate the risk assessment capability of the proposed model. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis were selected randomly and a thorough examination and charting of the periodontal status was performed. An intra-oral periapical radiograph of the area with the deepest probing depth was also taken. The following parameters were recorded: percentage of sites with BOP, number of sites with pocket depths > or = 5mm, number of teeth lost, bone loss/age ratio, attachment loss/age ratio, diabetic and smoking status, dental status, other systemic factors and risk determinants. Using Microsoft Excel, the parameters were plotted on the radar chart as per the original and the proposed model. Of the cases identified by the original model, 42.3% were high-risk cases and 30.8% of the cases were low-risk cases. In the proposed model, 46.2% of high-risk cases and 46.2% of low-risk cases were identified. Only 7.7% of the cases identified with the new model were moderate-risk cases. Statistical analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the risk scores of the two models. The results suggest that risk assessment by this model does not vary significantly as compared to the original model, and both are equally adept at detecting potential risk groups.

  3. Modelling of present and future hydrology and solute transport at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosson, Emma (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stocholm (Sweden)); Sassner, Mona; Sabel, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    Radioactive waste from nuclear power plants in Sweden is managed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB. SKB has performed site investigations at two different locations in Sweden, referred to as the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for high-level radioactive waste. In 2009 a decision was made to focus on the Forsmark site. This decision was based on a large amount of empirical evidence suggesting Forsmark to be more suitable for a geological repository /SKB 2010b/. This report presents model results of numerical flow and transport modelling of surface water and near-surface groundwater at the Forsmark site for present and future conditions. Both temperate and periglacial climates have been simulated. Also different locations of the shoreline have been applied to the model, as well as different models of vegetation and Quaternary deposits. The modelling was performed using the modelling tool MIKE SHE and was based on the SDM-Site Forsmark MIKE SHE model (presented by Bosson et al. in SKB report R-08-09). The present work is a part of the biosphere modelling performed for the SR-Site safety assessment. The Forsmark area has a flat, small-scale topography. The study area is almost entirely below 20 m.a.s.l. (metres above sea level). There is a strong correlation between the topography of the ground surface and the ground water level in the Quaternary deposits (QD); thus, the surface water divides and the groundwater divides for the QD can be assumed to coincide. No major water courses flow through the catchment. Small brooks, which often dry out in the summer, connect the different sub-catchments with each other. The main lakes in the area, Lake Bolundsfjaerden, Lake Fiskarfjaerden, Lake Gaellsbotraesket and Lake Eckarfjaerden, all have sizes of less than one km2. The lakes are in general shallow. Approximately 70% of the catchment areas are covered by forest. Agricultural land is only present in

  4. Challenges in validating model results for first year ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Arne; Eastwood, Steinar; Xie, Jiping; Aaboe, Signe; Bertino, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of model results for the distribution of first year ice, a comparison with a product based on observations from satellite-borne instruments has been performed. Such a comparison is not straightforward due to the contrasting algorithms that are used in the model product and the remote sensing product. The implementation of the validation is discussed in light of the differences between this set of products, and validation results are presented. The model product is the daily updated 10-day forecast from the Arctic Monitoring and Forecasting Centre in CMEMS. The forecasts are produced with the assimilative ocean prediction system TOPAZ. Presently, observations of sea ice concentration and sea ice drift are introduced in the assimilation step, but data for sea ice thickness and ice age (or roughness) are not included. The model computes the age of the ice by recording and updating the time passed after ice formation as sea ice grows and deteriorates as it is advected inside the model domain. Ice that is younger than 365 days is classified as first year ice. The fraction of first-year ice is recorded as a tracer in each grid cell. The Ocean and Sea Ice Thematic Assembly Centre in CMEMS redistributes a daily product from the EUMETSAT OSI SAF of gridded sea ice conditions which include "ice type", a representation of the separation of regions between those infested by first year ice, and those infested by multi-year ice. The ice type is parameterized based on data for the gradient ratio GR(19,37) from SSMIS observations, and from the ASCAT backscatter parameter. This product also includes information on ambiguity in the processing of the remote sensing data, and the product's confidence level, which have a strong seasonal dependency.

  5. Cytogenetical effects of low doses: results obtained by N.N.Luchik and present-day problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of present status of the problem of quantitative assessment of cytogenetic effects low is presented. The importance of works of N.V. Luchik is demonstrated for the development of this field of radiobiology. The results of the author's own experimental and theoretical research on the regularities of induction of cytogenetical damage by low doses of ionising radiation are presented

  6. Results of the benchmark for blade structural models, part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekou, D.J.; Chortis, D.; Belen Fariñas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Task 2.2 of the InnWind.Eu project. The benchmark is based on the reference wind turbine and the reference blade provided by DTU [1]. "Structural Concept developers/modelers" of WP2 were provided with the necessary input for a comparison numerical simulation run, upon definition of the reference blade......A benchmark on structural design methods for blades was performed within the InnWind.Eu project under WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design”. The present document is describes the results of the comparison simulation runs that were performed by the partners involved within...

  7. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  8. Workshop to transfer VELMA watershed model results to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An EPA Western Ecology Division (WED) watershed modeling team has been working with the Snoqualmie Tribe Environmental and Natural Resources Department to develop VELMA watershed model simulations of the effects of historical and future restoration and land use practices on streamflow, stream temperature, and other habitat characteristics affecting threatened salmon populations in the 100 square mile Tolt River watershed in Washington state. To date, the WED group has fully calibrated the watershed model to simulate Tolt River flows with a high degree of accuracy under current and historical conditions and practices, and is in the process of simulating long-term responses to specific watershed restoration practices conducted by the Snoqualmie Tribe and partners. On July 20-21 WED Researchers Bob McKane, Allen Brookes and ORISE Fellow Jonathan Halama will be attending a workshop at the Tolt River site in Carnation, WA, to present and discuss modeling results with the Snoqualmie Tribe and other Tolt River watershed stakeholders and land managers, including the Washington Departments of Ecology and Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, City of Seattle, King County, and representatives of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. The workshop is being co-organized by the Snoqualmie Tribe, EPA Region 10 and WED. The purpose of this 2-day workshop is two-fold. First, on Day 1, the modeling team will perform its second site visit to the watershed, this time focus

  9. Meteorological uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion model results (MUD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Amstrup, B.; Feddersen, H.

    2013-08-01

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can be derived. (Author)

  10. KioskAR: An Augmented Reality Game as a New Business Model to Present Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones A. Sekhavat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of KioskAR, which is a pervasive game implemented using augmented reality (AR. This game introduces a new business model that makes it possible for players to present their artworks in virtual kiosks using augmented reality, while they are having fun playing the game. In addition to competition between the players in the game, this game requires social interaction between players to earn more points. A user study is conducted to evaluate the sense of presence and the usability of the application. The results of experiments show that KioskAR can achieve a high level of usability as well as sense of presence.

  11. Measurement model choice influenced randomized controlled trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Rosalie; Fox, Jean-Paul; Apeldoorn, Adri; Twisk, Jos

    2016-11-01

    In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), outcome variables are often patient-reported outcomes measured with questionnaires. Ideally, all available item information is used for score construction, which requires an item response theory (IRT) measurement model. However, in practice, the classical test theory measurement model (sum scores) is mostly used, and differences between response patterns leading to the same sum score are ignored. The enhanced differentiation between scores with IRT enables more precise estimation of individual trajectories over time and group effects. The objective of this study was to show the advantages of using IRT scores instead of sum scores when analyzing RCTs. Two studies are presented, a real-life RCT, and a simulation study. Both IRT and sum scores are used to measure the construct and are subsequently used as outcomes for effect calculation. The bias in RCT results is conditional on the measurement model that was used to construct the scores. A bias in estimated trend of around one standard deviation was found when sum scores were used, where IRT showed negligible bias. Accurate statistical inferences are made from an RCT study when using IRT to estimate construct measurements. The use of sum scores leads to incorrect RCT results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Presenting the Students' Academic Achievement Causal Model based on Goal Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Pour-Safar, Ali; Taheri, Mahdokht; Sedighi Pashaky, Abdullah; Asadi Louyeh, Ataollah

    2017-10-01

    Several factors play a role in academic achievement, individual's excellence and capability to do actions and tasks that the learner is in charge of in learning areas. The main goal of this study was to present academic achievement causal model based on the dimensions of goal orientation and learning approaches among the students of Medical Science and Dentistry courses in Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This study is based on a cross-sectional model. The participants included 175 first and second students of the Medical and Dentistry schools in Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected by random cluster sampling [121 persons (69%) Medical Basic Science students and 54 (30.9%) Dentistry students]. The measurement tool included the Goal Orientation Scale of Bouffard and Study Process Questionnaire of Biggs) and the students' Grade Point Average. The study data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and structural equations modeling. SPSS 14 and Amos were used to analyze the data. The results indicated a significant relationship between goal orientation and learning strategies (P<0.05). In addition, the results revealed that a significant relationship exists between learning strategies[Deep Learning (r=0.37, P<0.05), Surface Learning (r=-0.21,P<0.05)], and academic achievement.The suggested model of research is fitted to the data of the research. Results showed that the students' academic achievement model fits with experimental data, so it can be used in learning principles which lead to students' achievement in learning.

  13. International Workshop on Exotic Hadronic Atoms, Deeply Bound Kaonic Nuclear States and Antihydrogen : Present Results, Future Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  14. Modeling nonstationary extreme wave heights in present and future climates of Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Galiatsatou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV distribution function was used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum wave heights for selected locations in the Greek Seas, both in the present and future climates. The available significant wave height data were divided into groups corresponding to the present period (1951–2000, a first future period (2001–2050, and a second future period (2051–2100. For each time period, the parameters of the GEV distribution were specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN. For each location and selected time period, a total number of 29 linear and nonlinear models were fitted to the wave data, for a given combination of covariates. The covariates used in the GEV-CDN models consisted of wind fields resulting from the Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3 developed by the International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP with a spatial resolution of 10 km × 10 km, after being processed using principal component analysis (PCA. The results obtained from the best fitted models in the present and future periods for each location were compared, revealing different patterns of relationships between wind components and extreme wave height quantiles in different parts of the Greek Seas and different periods. The analysis demonstrates an increase of extreme wave heights in the first future period as compared with the present period, causing a significant threat to Greek coastal areas in the North Aegean Sea and the Ionian Sea.

  15. Position-sensitive transition edge sensor modeling and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammock, Christina E-mail: chammock@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Apodaca, Emmanuel; Bandler, Simon; Boyce, Kevin; Chervenak, Jay; Finkbeiner, Fred; Kelley, Richard; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Scott; Saab, Tarek; Stahle, Caroline

    2004-03-11

    We report the latest design and experimental results for a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST). The PoST is motivated by the desire to achieve a larger field-of-view without increasing the number of readout channels. A PoST consists of a one-dimensional array of X-ray absorbers connected on each end to a Transition Edge Sensor (TES). Position differentiation is achieved through a comparison of pulses between the two TESs and X-ray energy is inferred from a sum of the two signals. Optimizing such a device involves studying the available parameter space which includes device properties such as heat capacity and thermal conductivity as well as TES read-out circuitry parameters. We present results for different regimes of operation and the effects on energy resolution, throughput, and position differentiation. Results and implications from a non-linear model developed to study the saturation effects unique to PoSTs are also presented.

  16. Present-day heat flow and seismicity of Mars as predicted from convective thermal evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Knapmeyer, M.; Grott, M.; Breuer, D.; Golombek, M.; Wieczorek, M.; Spohn, T.

    2017-09-01

    The InSight (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Discovery class mission, to be launched in 2018, will perform a comprehensive geophysical investigation of Mars using a seismometer and a heat flow probe as well as precision tracking. The seismic and heat flow data are ultimately important to constrain the present-day interior structure and heat budget of the planet, and, in turn, offer constraints on its thermal and chemical evolution. As the InSight lander will perform its measurements at a single location, in the Elysium Planitia region, numerical simulations of the dynamics of the interior can greatly help to interpret the data in a global context. In this study we present 3D numerical thermal evolution models of Mars and focus on the present-day state. Furthermore, we compare our results with available estimates of elastic lithosphere thickness and seismicity.

  17. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  18. Neuro-ophthalmic presentation and surgical results of unruptured intracranial aneurysms—prospective Helsinki experience of 142 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Elina; Setälä, Kirsi; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Laakso, Aki

    2015-04-01

    To assess prospectively neuro-ophthalmic findings associated with unruptured intracranial aneurysms and treatment morbidity and to identify factors predicting these findings. Patients admitted to Helsinki University Central Hospital and treated surgically or endovascularly during 2011 underwent a neuro-ophthalmic examination, including formal visual field testing, before operation, at discharge, and 2-4 months and ≥6 months postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify factors predicting eye movement disorders. Study participants included 142 patients with 184 treated aneurysms: 7 (5%) had a third, fourth, or sixth nerve palsy or skew deviation preoperatively, and 16 (11%) had a third, fourth, or sixth nerve palsy or skew deviation postoperatively; the frequency was 8 (6%) at the last follow-up evaluation. Other findings included compressive optic neuropathy (n = 4), ischemic optic neuropathy (n = 1), Weber syndrome (n = 3), Benedikt syndrome (n = 1), and Wallenberg syndrome (n = 1). Of the 140 survivors at 6 months, 7 (5%) presented with visual field defects resulting from the aneurysm or its treatment. In the best bivariate model, factors independently predicting postoperative eye movement disorders were aneurysm location in the posterior circulation with an odds ratio of 142.02 (95% confidence interval = 20.13-1002.22) and aneurysm size (odds ratio = 1.28 for each 1-mm increase in diameter, 95% confidence interval = 1.12-1.47). Management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms is fairly safe from a neuro-ophthalmic perspective, with some treatment-related morbidity being transient and minor. Although rare, an irreversible deficit is possible and should be taken into account when considering preventive treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Presenting the students’ academic achievement causal model based on goal orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EBRAHIM NASIRI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several factors play a role in academic achievement, individual’s excellence and capability to do actions and tasks that the learner is in charge of in learning areas. The main goal of this study was to present academic achievement causal model based on the dimensions of goal orientation and learning approaches among the students of Medical Science and Dentistry courses in Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This study is based on a cross-sectional model. The participants included 175 first and second year students of the Medical and Dentistry schools in Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected by random cluster sampling [121 persons (69% Medical Basic Science students and 54 (30.9% Dentistry students]. The measurement tool included the Goal Orientation Scale of Bouffard and Study Process Questionnaire of Biggs and the students’ Grade Point Average. The study data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and structural equations modeling. SPSS 14 and Amos were used to analyze the data. Results: The results indicated a significant relationship between goal orientation and learning strategies (P<0.05. In addition, the results revealed that a significant relationship exists between learning strategies [Deep Learning (r=0.37, P<0.05, Surface Learning (r=-0.21, P<0.05], and academic achievement. The suggested model of research is fitted to the data of the research. Conclusion: Results showed that the students’ academic achievement model fits with experimental data, so it can be used in learning principles which lead to students’ achievement in learning.

  20. Verification of aseismic design model by using experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Sugiyama, N.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, Y.; Miura, K.; Miyagawa, N.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice model is applied as an analysis model for an aseismic design of the Hamaoka nuclear reactor building. With object to verify an availability of this design model, two reinforced concrete blocks are constructed on the ground and the forced vibration tests are carried out. The test results are well followed by simulation analysis using the lattice model. Damping value of the ground obtained from the test is more conservative than the design value. (orig.)

  1. Quark cluster model of nuclei and lepton scattering results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.; Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames

    1984-01-01

    A review of the quark cluster model (QCM) of nuclei is presented along with applications to deep inelastic lepton scattering and elastic lepton scattering experiments. In addition a sample comparison is made with high momentum transfer (p, π) data. The QCM prediction for the ratio of nuclear structure functions in the x > 1 domain is discussed as a critical test of the model

  2. 3D instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, Anne; Spakman, Wim; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Pranger, Casper

    2017-04-01

    we also intend to experiment with a dynamic free surface. In short, the forcing in our models comprises lateral pressure gradients, mantle buoyancy and forcing related to the prescribed plate motions. Based on the above initial and boundary conditions, we obtain model predictions of the regional flow field. Focusing on the crust, these represent predictions of the GPS velocity field that we can compare to the actual GPS field (e.g. compilation of Kreemer et al., 2014). Our preliminary models provide a good overall fit to the direction and magnitude of the GPS velocities. Subsequent models will include constructed variations in subduction morphology, slab segmentation, fault zone geometry and boundary conditions, for which a wide range of hypotheses can be found in the literature (e.g. Biryol et al., 2011). Changes in the resulting model predictions either improve or lessen our fit to the GPS velocity field and help determine the controls of mantle dynamics on present-day tectonic deformation in the Aegean region. This enables us to characterize the general sensitivity of surface observables to plate motions, mantle flow and slab dynamics and to further quantify the coupling of crust and mantle dynamics.

  3. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO 2 and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request

  4. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified s-channel models of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boveia, Antonio [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp Univ., Wilrijk (Belgium); Buchmueller, Oliver [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Busoni, Giorgio [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); D' Eramo, Francesco [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); De Roeck, Albert [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp Univ., Wilrijk (Belgium); De Simone, Andrea [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Doglioni, Caterina [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Dolan, Matthew J. [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); Genest, Marie-Helene [Univ. of Grenoble, Saint-Martin-d' Hares (France); Hahn, Kristian [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Haisch, Ulrich [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Harris, Philip C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Heisig, Jan [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Ippolito, Valerio [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Kahlhoefer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Khoze, Velentin V. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Sichota [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Wien (Austria); Landsberg, Greg [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Lowette, Steven [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malik, Sarah [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Mangano, Michelangelo [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); McCabe, Christopher [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mrenna, Stephen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pani, Priscilla [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); du Pree, Tristan [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Riotto, Antonio [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salek, David [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Shepherd, William [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Tait, Tim M.P. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Wang, Lian-Tao [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Worm, Steven [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Zurek, Kathryn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-14

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on s-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.

  5. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified $s$-channel models of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Boveia, Antonio; Busoni, Giorgio; D'Eramo, Francesco; De Roeck, Albert; De Simone, Andrea; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolan, Matthew J.; Genest, Marie-Helene; Hahn, Kristian; Haisch, Ulrich; Harris, Philip C.; Heisig, Jan; Ippolito, Valerio; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Khoze, Valentin V.; Kulkarni, Suchita; Landsberg, Greg; Lowette, Steven; Malik, Sarah; Mangano, Michelangelo; McCabe, Christopher; Mrenna, Stephen; Pani, Priscilla; Pree, Tristan du; Riotto, Antonio; Salek, David; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Shepherd, William; Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Worm, Steven; Zurek, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.

  6. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    horizontal. High-speed radiometer measurements were made of the time-dependent impact flash at wavelengths of 350-1100 nm. We will present comparisons between these measurements and the output of APL's model. The results of this validation allow us to determine basic relationships between observed optical signatures and impact conditions.

  7. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  8. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified s-channel models of dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boveia, Antonio; Buchmueller, Oliver; Busoni, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.......This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments....

  9. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  10. Quercus suber range dynamics by ecological niche modelling: from the Last Interglacial to present time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessella, Federico; Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2015-07-01

    Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) is widely used to depict species potential occurrence according to environmental variables under different climatic scenarios. We tested the ENM approach to infer past range dynamics of cork oak, a keystone species of the Mediterranean Biome, from 130 ka to the present time. Hindcasting implications would deal with a better species risk assessment and conservation management for the future. We modelled present and past occurrence of cork oak using seven ENM algorithms, starting from 63,733 spatially unique presence points at 30 arc-second resolution. Fourteen environmental variables were used and four time slices were considered (Last Interglacial, Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and present time). A threshold-independent evaluation of the goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated by means of ROC curve and fossil or historical evidences were used to validate the results. Four weighted average maps depicted the dynamics of area suitability for cork oak in the last 130 ka. The derived species autoecology allowed its long-term occurrence in the Mediterranean without striking range reduction or shifting. Fossil and historical post-processing validation support the modelled past spatial extension and a neglected species presence at Levantine until the recent time. Despite the severe climatic oscillation since the Last Glacial Maximum, cork oak potential distribution area experienced limited range changes, confirming its strong link with the Mediterranean Basin. The ecological amplitude of Quercus suber could be therefore adopted as a reference to trace the Mediterranean bioclimate area. A better knowledge of the past events of Mediterranean vegetation, a wider range of study species and environmental determinants are essential to inform us about its current state, its sensitivity to human impact and the potential responses to future changes.

  11. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F.

    1999-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling is presented that allows an estimation of potential effects of climate change on the North Sea. Therefore, the ocean general circulation model OPYC is adapted for application on a shelf by adding a lateral boundary formulation and a tide model. In this set-up the model is forced, first, with data from the ECMWF reanalysis for model validation and the study of the natural variability, and, second, with data from climate change experiments to estimate the effects of climate change on the North Sea. (orig.)

  12. A binomial random sum of present value models in investment analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Βουδούρη, Αγγελική; Ντζιαχρήστος, Ευάγγελος

    1997-01-01

    Stochastic present value models have been widely adopted in financial theory and practice and play a very important role in capital budgeting and profit planning. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a binomial random sum of stochastic present value models and offer an application in investment analysis.

  13. [Effect of the presentation of results from clinical trials on the intention to prescribing: relativity of the relative risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneu Ricardo, R; Peiró, S; Márquez Calderón, S

    1998-04-30

    To determine if the methods of reporting results of clinical trials affects the physician views on prescribing. Analysis of responses, from a convenience sample of primary care physicians, of one teaching exercise on prescribing intention which showed 5 different methods of reporting results: relative risk reduction (RRR), absolute risk reduction, the percent of event free patients, the number needed to treat (NNT) and RRR and mortality. Curses of clinical management in Valencia and Barcelona. The willingness to prescribe was significantly influenced by the way in which data were presented, being major when they were showed as RRR and minor when mortality was added. The method of reporting trial results has an important influence on the prescribing intention. The reporting of clinical trial results, and their abstracts or citations, should be include the NNT and negative results, for avoiding a subjective bias of treatment effect magnification.

  14. Results on the symmetries of integrable fermionic models on chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolcini, F.; Montorsi, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate integrable fermionic models within the scheme of the graded quantum inverse scattering method, and prove that any symmetry imposed on the solution of the Yang-Baxter equation reflects on the constants of motion of the model; generalizations with respect to known results are discussed. This theorem is shown to be very effective when combined with the polynomial R-matrix technique (PRT): we apply both of them to the study of the extended Hubbard models, for which we find all the subcases enjoying several kinds of (super)symmetries. In particular, we derive a geometrical construction expressing any gl(2,1)-invariant model as a linear combination of EKS and U-supersymmetric models. Further, we use the PRT to obtain 32 integrable so(4)-invariant models. By joint use of the Sutherland's species technique and η-pairs construction we propose a general method to derive their physical features, and we provide some explicit results

  15. Presenting a conceptual model of data collection to manage the groundwater quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourbakhsh Zahra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model was proposed in the present study, which highlighted important independent and dependent variables in order to managing the groundwater quality. Furthermore, the methods of selection of variable and collection of related data were explained. The study was carried out in the Tajan Plain, north of Iran; 50 drinking wells were considered as sampling points. In this model the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was proposed to select the indicator water quality parameters. According to expert opinions and characteristics of the study area ten factors were chosen as variables influencing the quality of groundwater (land use types, lithology units, geology units, distance of wells to the outlet, distance to the residential areas, direction toward the residential areas, depth of the groundwater table, the type of aquifer, transmissivity and population. Geographic Information System (AecGIS 9.3 was used to manage the spatial-based variables and the data of non-spatial-based variables were obtained from relevant references. A database, which contains all collected data related to groundwater quality management in the studied area, was created as the output of the model. The output of this conceptual model can be used as an input for quantitative and mathematical models. Results show that 6 parameters (sulphate, iron, nitrate, electrical conductivity, calcium, and total dissolved solids (TDS were the best indicators for groundwater quality analysis in the area. More than 50% of the wells were drilled in the depth of groundwater table about 5 meters, in this low depth pollutants can load into the wells and also 78% of the wells are located within 5 km from the urban area; it can be concluded from this result that the intensive urban activities could affect groundwater quality.

  16. Three-dimensional instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Pranger, Casper; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Fraters, Menno; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean region (Eastern Mediterranean) is exemplary of the interaction between crustal tectonics, plate motion, subduction and mantle flow: African subduction underneath the region has been continuous for at least the last 100 My, leading to about 2100-2500 km of subducted lithosphere residing in the mantle (van Hinsbergen et al., 2005). During this subduction, decoupled upper continental and oceanic crust accreted into a wedge of stacked nappes. In turn, these nappes have been significantly extended, predominantly during the last 25 My, due to the retreat of the African slab relative to Eurasia (van Hinsbergen and Schmid, 2012). As a first step to better understanding the coupling of the tectonic evolution of the crust and the underlying mantle dynamics, we are developing 3-D numerical models of the instantaneous dynamics of the present-day Aegean subduction system using the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012). The instantaneous models are set up with initial slab geometries derived from tomography and realistic plate boundary configurations and incorporate the major crustal weak zones of the overriding plate. Our modeling results in predictions of flow fields and stress, strain rate and rotation rate fields for the present-day tectonic setting of the Aegean region. By comparing our various model predictions to the widely available observations, such as focal mechanisms, GPS velocities and seismic anisotropy, we aim at an improved understanding of how mantle flow, subduction morphology and possibly slab segmentation, as well as the rheological behavior of the overriding plate, control present-day tectonic deformation. We expect to show preliminary results of this comparison. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T. and Bangerth, W. (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29. Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J., Hafkenscheid, E., Spakman, W., Meulenkamp, J. E. and Wortel, R. (2005

  17. Some Econometric Results for the Blanchard-Watson Bubble Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Soren; Lange, Theis

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse a simple bubble model suggested by Blanchard and Watson. The model is defined by y(t) =s(t)¿y(t-1)+e(t), t=1,…,n, where s(t) is an i.i.d. binary variable with p=P(s(t)=1), independent of e(t) i.i.d. with mean zero and finite variance. We take ¿>1 so ...

  18. Evapotranspiration and irrigation algorithms in hydrologic modeling:Present Status and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrologic models are used extensively for predicting water availability and water quality responses to alternative irrigation, tillage, crop, and fertilizer management practices and global climate change. Modeling results have been frequently used by regulatory agencies for developing remedial meas...

  19. "Still Rather Hazy at Present": Citizens' and Physicians' Views on Returning Results from Biobank Research Using Broad Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Gaia; Cavalli, Samuele; Benaroyo, Lazare; Kaufmann, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Informed consent and return of research results are among the most debated topics in the biobank literature. We discuss ethical, social, and policy issues associated with returning results in the context of biobanks using a broad consent approach, in the light of data from a qualitative survey of citizens' and physicians' views. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups to investigate stakeholders' perspectives about a large-scale hospital-based biobank designed to foster biomedical research, including prospective genomics research, and "personalized" medicine. Both physicians and citizens considered psychosocial impacts as crucial in the assessment of benefits expected from a return of results to biobank participants. In particular, physicians highlighted the possible consequences on the patient-doctor relationship and discussed implications for the concept of "personalized" medicine. Citizens held ambivalent attitudes toward returning individual research results: they defended the "right not to know," while they also considered a sort of "responsibility to know" because of potential implications of results for family members. Moreover, physicians and citizens raised questions about the broad consent model used for inhospital biobank recruitment and expressed their needs for more training in genomics and more information on the biobank initiative. Stakeholders such as citizens and physicians, who may be concerned as potential biobank participants or as healthcare professionals involved in the management of clinically relevant research results, provide useful insights into several aspects of broad consent and return of results, related in particular to the interface between research and the clinic.

  20. Results from the coupled Michigan MHD model and the Rice Convection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, R.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run with steady inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV^gamma. The coupled-code simulation will be compared with results from RCM runs and algorithms.

  1. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.; /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba; Alabau Pons, M.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Amann, J.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; /Daresbury; Apsimon, R.; /Oxford U., JAI; Araki, S.; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bai, S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bellomo, P.; /SLAC; Bett, D.; /Oxford U., JAI; Blair, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Bolzon, B.; /Savoie U.; Boogert, S.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Burrows, P.N.; Christian, G.; Coe, P.; Constance, B.; /Oxford U., JAI; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; /CERN; Deacon, L.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Elsen, E.; /DESY /Valencia U., IFIC /KEK, Tsukuba /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Savoie U. /Fermilab /Ecole Polytechnique /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyungpook Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Savoie U. /Daresbury /Tokyo U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /University Coll. London /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tohoku U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Tokyo U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Brookhaven /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /SLAC /Orsay /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Orsay /Fermilab /Tohoku U. /Manchester U. /CERN /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Hiroshima U. /KEK, Tsukuba /CERN /KEK, Tsukuba /Oxford U., JAI /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC /Oxford U., JAI /Fermilab /SLAC /Liverpool U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Tokyo U. /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /CERN

    2011-11-11

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  2. Geographical Information System Model for Potential Mines Data Management Presentation in Kabupaten Gorontalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviana, D.; Tajuddin, A.; Edi, S.

    2017-03-01

    Mining potential in Indonesian is very abundant, ranging from Sabang to Marauke. Kabupaten Gorontalo is one of many places in Indonesia that have different types of minerals and natural resources that can be found in every district. The abundant of mining potential must be balanced with good management and ease of getting information by investors. The current issue is, (1) ways of presenting data/information about potential mines area is still manually (the maps that already capture from satellite image, then printed and attached to information board in the office) it caused the difficulties of getting information; (2) the high cost of maps printing; (3) the difficulties of regency leader (bupati) to obtain information for strategic decision making about mining potential. The goal of this research is to build a model of Geographical Information System that could provide data management of potential mines, so that the investors could easily get information according to their needs. To achieve that goal Research and Development method is used. The result of this research, is a model of Geographical Information System that implemented in an application to presenting data management of mines.

  3. BRCAPRO 6.0 Model Validation in Male Patients Presenting for BRCA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Zahi I; Jackson, Michelle; Garby, Carolyn; Song, Juhee; Giordano, Sharon H; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N; Singletary, Claire N; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Arun, Banu K; Litton, Jennifer K

    2015-06-01

    BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model to estimate the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. BRCA mutation carriers are at higher risk of developing breast, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO was developed for women and found to be superior to other risk assessment models. The present study evaluated the validity of BRCAPRO at predicting the risk of male patients carrying a BRCA mutation. A total of 146 men who presented for genetic counseling and testing from February1997 to September 2011, and their test results were included in the present study. BRCAPRO risk assessment for all patients was calculated using the BRCAPRO clinical CancerGene assessment software. The mean age at presentation was 57 years. Of the 146 patients, 48 had breast cancer, 18 had pancreatic cancer, 39 had prostate cancer, 27 had other primary cancers, and 37 had no cancer. Fifty patients (34%) tested positive for a BRCA mutation (22 BRCA1, 27 BRCA2, and 1 BRCA1 and BRCA2). The mean BRCAPRO score for all patients was 24.96%. The BRCAPRO score was significantly higher for patients who tested positive for a BRCA mutation (46.19% vs. 13.9%, p BRCA mutation. At a cutoff point of 30.02%, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.74, 0.81, 0.67, and 0.86, respectively. BRCAPRO appears to be a valid risk assessment tool for determining the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation in men. Men carrying genetic mutations in the BRCA gene have a greater risk than the general population of developing certain types of cancer, including breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model that predicts the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. The present study aimed at validating BRCAPRO for use with men seen for genetic counseling, whether affected by cancer or not. The data available for 146 patients revealed that BRCAPRO was effective at identifying patients at risk of BRCA mutation. These findings could help in identifying a subset

  4. A model presented for classification ECG signals base on Case-Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Sayari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of heart diseases/abnormalities can prolong life and enhance the quality of living through appropriate treatment; thus classifying cardiac signals will be helped to immediate diagnosing of heart beat type in cardiac patients. The present paper utilizes the case base reasoning (CBR for classification of ECG signals. Four types of ECG beats (normal beat, congestive heart failure beat, ventricular tachyarrhythmia beat and atrial fibrillation beat obtained from the PhysioBank database was classified by the proposed CBR model. The main purpose of this article is classifying heart signals and diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients that in proposed CBR (Case Base Reasoning system, Training and testing data for diagnosing and classifying types of heart beat have been used. The evaluation results from the model are shown that the proposed model has high accuracy in classifying heart signals and helps to clinical decisions for diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients which indeed has high impact on diagnosing the type of heart beat aided computer.

  5. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  6. Mappings from models presenting topological mass mechanisms to purely topological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Costa, J.V.; Bouffon, L.O.; Lemes, V.E.R.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a class of mappings between the fields of the Cremmer-Sherk and pure BF model in 4D. These mappings are established both with an interactive procedure as well as with an exact mapping procedure. Related equivalencies in 5D and 3D are discussed. (author)

  7. Mappings From Models Presenting Topological Mass Mechanisms to Purely Topological Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Costa, J.V.; Ventura, O.S.; Bouffon, L.O.; Lemes, V.E.R.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a class of mappings between the fields of the Cremmer-Sherk and pure BF model in 4D. These mappings are established both with an iterative procedure as well as with an exact mapping procedure. Related equivalences in 5D and 3D are discussed

  8. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  9. Lithium-Ion Battery Safety Study Using Multi-Physics Internal Short-Circuit Model (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G-.H.; Smith, K.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-06-01

    This presentation outlines NREL's multi-physics simulation study to characterize an internal short by linking and integrating electrochemical cell, electro-thermal, and abuse reaction kinetics models.

  10. ExEP yield modeling tool and validation test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhonda; Turmon, Michael; Delacroix, Christian; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Lowrance, Patrick; Liu, Xiang Cate; Nunez, Paul

    2017-09-01

    EXOSIMS is an open-source simulation tool for parametric modeling of the detection yield and characterization of exoplanets. EXOSIMS has been adopted by the Exoplanet Exploration Programs Standards Definition and Evaluation Team (ExSDET) as a common mechanism for comparison of exoplanet mission concept studies. To ensure trustworthiness of the tool, we developed a validation test plan that leverages the Python-language unit-test framework, utilizes integration tests for selected module interactions, and performs end-to-end crossvalidation with other yield tools. This paper presents the test methods and results, with the physics-based tests such as photometry and integration time calculation treated in detail and the functional tests treated summarily. The test case utilized a 4m unobscured telescope with an idealized coronagraph and an exoplanet population from the IPAC radial velocity (RV) exoplanet catalog. The known RV planets were set at quadrature to allow deterministic validation of the calculation of physical parameters, such as working angle, photon counts and integration time. The observing keepout region was tested by generating plots and movies of the targets and the keepout zone over a year. Although the keepout integration test required the interpretation of a user, the test revealed problems in the L2 halo orbit and the parameterization of keepout applied to some solar system bodies, which the development team was able to address. The validation testing of EXOSIMS was performed iteratively with the developers of EXOSIMS and resulted in a more robust, stable, and trustworthy tool that the exoplanet community can use to simulate exoplanet direct-detection missions from probe class, to WFIRST, up to large mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR.

  11. Convergence models for cylindrical caverns and the resulting ground subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haupt, W.; Sroka, A.; Schober, F.

    1983-02-01

    The authors studied the effects of different convergence characteristics on surface soil response for the case of narrow, cylindrical caverns. Maximum ground subsidence - a parameter of major importance in this type of cavern - was calculated for different convergence models. The models were established without considering the laws of rock mechanics and rheology. As a result, two limiting convergence models were obtained that describe an interval of expectation into which all other models fit. This means that ground movements over cylindrical caverns can be calculated ''on the safe side'', correlating the trough resulting on the surface with the convergence characterisitcs of the cavern. Among other applications, the method thus permits monitoring of caverns.

  12. Modelling the eutrophication of the Seine Bight (France) under historical, present and future riverine nutrient loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugier, P.; Billen, G.; Guillaud, J. F.; Garnier, J.; Ménesguen, A.

    2005-03-01

    Because of the occurrence of episodic blooms of toxic dinoflagellates, eutrophication of the Seine Bight is a subject of growing concern. In order to better understand the relationships between these processes and human activity in the Seine watershed, two models have been used in connection: A model describing nutrient (N, P, Si) transfer processes at the scale of the whole Seine Basin (RIVERSTRAHLER [Billen, G., Garnier, J., Ficht, A., Cun, C., 2001. Modelling the response of water quality in the Seine River Estuary in response to human activity in the watershed over the last 50 years. Estuaries 24, 977-993]), allowing human activity (agricultural practices, waterscape management, urban wastewater management, etc.) to be related to fluxes delivered to the sea. A model of 3D hydrodynamic and ecological model of the Seine Bight (SiAM-3D/ELISE [Cugier, P., 1999. Modélisation du devenir à moyen terme dans l'eau et le sédiment des éléments majeurs (N, P, Si, O) rejetés par la Seine en baie de Seine. Thèse de doctorat, Univ. de Caen, p. 241; Cugier, P., Le Hir, P., 2000. Modélisation 3D des matières en suspension en baie de Seine Orientale (Manche, France). C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Sciences de la Terre et des planétes 331, 287-294]), capable of reproducing the spatio-temporal variations of sediment transport, thermo-haline stratification and phytoplanktonic development in the plume of the Seine river. The models are validated by their ability to reproduce observed trends of interannual variations of nutrients delivered by the Seine during the last 50 years, as well as the response of the marine system in terms of diatoms and dinoflagellate development, for which data are available from 1976 to 1984 for the former and from 1987 to 1997 for the latter. The results show clearly that dry years, where silica inputs show a deficit with respect to nitrogen and phosphorus, are those where summer blooms of dinoflagellates are particularly pronounced. Various scenarios

  13. The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model: key components and results

    OpenAIRE

    Jochen Woessner; Danciu Laurentiu; Domenico Giardini; Helen Crowley; Fabrice Cotton; G. Grünthal; Gianluca Valensise; Ronald Arvidsson; Roberto Basili; Mine Betül Demircioglu; Stefan Hiemer; Carlo Meletti; Roger W. Musson; Andrea N. Rovida; Karin Sesetyan

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model (ESHM13) results from a community-based probabilistic seismic hazard assessment supported by the EU-FP7 project “Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe” (SHARE, 2009–2013). The ESHM13 is a consistent seismic hazard model for Europe and Turkey which overcomes the limitation of national borders and includes a through quantification of the uncertainties. It is the first completed regional effort contributing to the “Global Earthquake Model” initiative. It m...

  14. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  15. The changing radiative forcing of fires: global model estimates for past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ward

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fires are a global phenomenon that impact climate and biogeochemical cycles, and interact with the biosphere, atmosphere and cryosphere. These impacts occur on a range of temporal and spatial scales and are difficult to quantify globally based solely on observations. Here we assess the role of fires in the climate system using model estimates of radiative forcing (RF from global fires in pre-industrial, present day, and future time periods. Fire emissions of trace gases and aerosols are derived from Community Land Model simulations and then used in a series of Community Atmosphere Model simulations with representative emissions from the years 1850, 2000, and 2100. Additional simulations are carried out with fire emissions from the Global Fire Emission Database for a present-day comparison. These results are compared against the results of simulations with no fire emissions to compute the contribution from fires. We consider the impacts of fire on greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol effects (including aerosol effects on biogeochemical cycles, and land and snow surface albedo. Overall, we estimate that pre-industrial fires were responsible for a RF of −1 W m−2 with respect to a pre-industrial climate without fires. The largest magnitude pre-industrial forcing from fires was the indirect aerosol effect on clouds (−1.6 W m−2. This was balanced in part by an increase in carbon dioxide concentrations due to fires (+0.83 W m−2. The RF of fires increases by 0.5 W m−2 from 1850 to 2000 and 0.2 W m−2 from 1850 to 2100 in the model representation from a combination of changes in fire activity and changes in the background environment in which fires occur, especially increases and decreases in the anthropogenic aerosol burden. Thus, fires play an important role in both the natural equilibrium climate and the climate perturbed by anthropogenic activity and need to be considered in future

  16. Presenting Numerical Modelling of Explosive Volcanic Eruption to a General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, C.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Blasi, G.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical modeling of explosive volcanic eruptions has been widely applied, during the last decades, to study pyroclastic flows dispersion along volcano's flanks and to evaluate their impact on urban areas. Results from these transient multi-phase and multi-component simulations are often reproduced in form of computer animations, representing the spatial and temporal evolution of relevant flow variables (such as temperature, or particle concentration). Despite being a sophisticated, technical tool to analyze and share modeling results within the scientific community, these animations truly look like colorful cartoons showing an erupting volcano and are especially suited to be shown to a general public. Thanks to their particular appeal, and to the large interest usually risen by exploding volcanoes, these animations have been presented several times on television and magazines and are currently displayed in a permanent exposition, at the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples. This work represents an effort to produce an accompanying tool for these animations, capable of explaining to a large audience the scientific meaning of what can otherwise look as a graphical exercise. Dealing with research aimed at the study of dangerous, explosive volcanoes, improving the general understanding of these scientific results plays an important role as far as risk perception is concerned. An educated population has better chances to follow an appropriate behavior, i.e.: one that could lead, on the long period, to a reduction of the potential risk. In this sense, a correct divulgation of scientific results, while improving the confidence of the population in the scientific community, should belong to the strategies adopted to mitigate volcanic risk. Due to the relevance of the long term final goal of such divulgation experiment, this work represents an interdisciplinary effort, combining scientific expertise and specific competence from the modern communication science and risk

  17. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  18. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  19. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  20. [The long-term results of the application of the combined rehabilitative treatment in the patients presenting with knee osteoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Purigа, A O; Yurova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The rehabilitative treatment of the patients suffering from knee osteoarthrosis (OA) up-to-date remains one of the most important medical and social problems of modern medicine due to the high prevalence of this disease, heavy morbidity, and the significant deterioration of the quality of the patients' life. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long-term results of the combined application of radon and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with knee OA. The study involved 75 patients at the age from 35 to 62 years with the confirmed diagnosis of stage II and III knee osteoarthrosis. They were divided into 3 groups. Those comprising the main group received extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in combination with the treatment based on the use of radon baths. The patients included in the group of comparison were given a course of radon therapy alone while the patients of the control group received the standard treatment including physiotherapy, magnetic therapy, and the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The study has demonstrated the high effectiveness of the combined application of the radon baths and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy that was manifested as the substantial decrease of pain intensity, the increased range of motion in the knee joints, and the improvement of the general quality of life. These beneficial effects persisted during a period of up to 12 months. The stable remission was documented in 82% of the patients comprising the main group. The data obtained give reason to recommend the method employed in the present study for the extensive practical application at different stages of medical rehabilitation of the patients presenting with knee osteoarthrosis.

  1. Relationship Marketing results: proposition of a cognitive mapping model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iná Futino Barreto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This research sought to develop a cognitive model that expresses how marketing professionals understand the relationship between the constructs that define relationship marketing (RM. It also tried to understand, using the obtained model, how objectives in this field are achieved. Design/methodology/approach – Through cognitive mapping, we traced 35 individual mental maps, highlighting how each respondent understands the interactions between RM elements. Based on the views of these individuals, we established an aggregate mental map. Theoretical foundation – The topic is based on a literature review that explores the RM concept and its main elements. Based on this review, we listed eleven main constructs. Findings – We established an aggregate mental map that represents the RM structural model. Model analysis identified that CLV is understood as the final result of RM. We also observed that the impact of most of the RM elements on CLV is brokered by loyalty. Personalization and quality, on the other hand, proved to be process input elements, and are the ones that most strongly impact others. Finally, we highlight that elements that punish customers are much less effective than elements that benefit them. Contributions - The model was able to insert core elements of RM, but absent from most formal models: CLV and customization. The analysis allowed us to understand the interactions between the RM elements and how the end result of RM (CLV is formed. This understanding improves knowledge on the subject and helps guide, assess and correct actions.

  2. Present status of theories and data analyses of mathematical models for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawaguchi, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are the basic mathematical models (hazard functions), present trend of the model studies and that for radiation carcinogenesis. Hazard functions of carcinogenesis are described for multi-stage model and 2-event model related with cell dynamics. At present, the age distribution of cancer mortality is analyzed, relationship between mutation and carcinogenesis is discussed, and models for colorectal carcinogenesis are presented. As for radiation carcinogenesis, models of Armitage-Doll and of generalized MVK (Moolgavkar, Venson, Knudson, 1971-1990) by 2-stage clonal expansion have been applied to analysis of carcinogenesis in A-bomb survivors, workers in uranium mine (Rn exposure) and smoking doctors in UK and other cases, of which characteristics are discussed. In analyses of A-bomb survivors, models above are applied to solid tumors and leukemia to see the effect, if any, of stage, age of exposure, time progression etc. In miners and smokers, stages of the initiation, promotion and progression in carcinogenesis are discussed on the analyses. Others contain the analyses of workers in Canadian atomic power plant, and of patients who underwent the radiation therapy. Model analysis can help to understand the carcinogenic process in a quantitative aspect rather than to describe the process. (R.T.)

  3. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  4. Childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark 1979-1994: incidence, clinical features and laboratory results at presentation in 48 children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Milman, N; Byg, K E

    2004-01-01

    .7-15). In 1979-1994 the incidence was 0.29 per 100000 person-years y of age. The incidence was 0.06 in children y of age and increased gradually with age to 1.02 in children aged 14-15 y. General malaise, fever, weight loss, abdominal discomfort, respiratory symptoms, lymphadenopathy......AIM: To describe the incidence, clinical presentation and paraclinical findings in childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark, 1979-1994. METHODS: Patients (n = 5536) with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis were drawn from the nationwide Patient Registry; 81 patients were y of age. The diagnosis...... of sarcoidosis was reconfirmed in 48/81 (59%) patients. In 35/48 (73%) patients, diagnosis was verified by histology, and in 13 it was substantiated by paraclinical/clinical findings. RESULTS: The series comprised 26 boys and 22 girls (male/female ratio 1.18). Median age at diagnosis was 13 y (range 0...

  5. Distribution of hemoglobinopathies in patients presenting for electrophoresis and comparison of result with High performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nearly 226 million carriers of thalassemias and abnormal hemoglobin are present worldwide according to the World Health Organization (WHO. The laboratory plays an important role in the investigation of the thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis at alkaline pH and diagnosis based mainly on visual impression of thickness of band may miss the thalassemic trait patients. The aim of this study was to find out different hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia presenting in our hospital and to compare electrophoresis results with HPLC.Materials and Methods: This study was performed in the hematopathology section of Department of Pathology of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital on cases sent for electrophoresis during 18 months period from October 2013 to March 2015 and included hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias identified by either electrophoresis or HPLC. 97 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria and thus were included in the study. Electrophoresis at alkaline pH was done in all whereas HPLC was performed in 27 cases.Results: A sharp peak of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias was seen in Tharu community though other communities are also affected. Thalassemia trait was the most common diagnosis (26.8% followed by sickle cell anemia (21.6%.  Electrophoresis was efficient in detecting some alpha thalassemia variants but missed many cases of beta thalassemia trait.Conclusion: Beta Thalassemia trait and sickle cell anemia both are common in Nepal , along with some other hemoglobinopathies  A sharp peak of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias are seen in Tharu community. These abnormal hemoglobins and thalassemias are mainly seen in Terai region. Electrophoresis fails to quantify hemoglobin percentage and thus is not appropriate test in beta thalassemia screening. 

  6. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Dongsheng [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  7. Fuel assembly bow: analytical modeling and resulting design improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabel, J.; Huebsch, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The bowing of fuel assemblies may result in a contact between neighbouring fuel assemblies and in connection with a vibration to a resulting wear or even perforation at the corners of the spacer grids of neighbouring assemblies. Such events allowed reinsertion of a few fuel assemblies in Germany only after spacer repair. In order to identify the most sensitive parameters causing the observed bowing of fuel assemblies a new computer model was develop which takes into a account the highly nonlinear behaviour of the interaction between fuel rods and spacers. As a result of the studies performed with this model, design improvements such as a more rigid connection between guide thimbles and spacer grids, could be defined. First experiences with this improved design show significantly better fuel behaviour. (author). 5 figs., 1 tabs

  8. Error statistics of hidden Markov model and hidden Boltzmann model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hidden Markov models and hidden Boltzmann models are employed in computational biology and a variety of other scientific fields for a variety of analyses of sequential data. Whether the associated algorithms are used to compute an actual probability or, more generally, an odds ratio or some other score, a frequent requirement is that the error statistics of a given score be known. What is the chance that random data would achieve that score or better? What is the chance that a real signal would achieve a given score threshold? Results Here we present a novel general approach to estimating these false positive and true positive rates that is significantly more efficient than are existing general approaches. We validate the technique via an implementation within the HMMER 3.0 package, which scans DNA or protein sequence databases for patterns of interest, using a profile-HMM. Conclusion The new approach is faster than general naïve sampling approaches, and more general than other current approaches. It provides an efficient mechanism by which to estimate error statistics for hidden Markov model and hidden Boltzmann model results.

  9. Methodology and Results of Mathematical Modelling of Complex Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrova, Nataliya V.

    2018-03-01

    The methodology of system analysis allows us to draw a mathematical model of the complex technological process. The mathematical description of the plasma-chemical process was proposed. The importance the quenching rate and initial temperature decrease time was confirmed for producing the maximum amount of the target product. The results of numerical integration of the system of differential equations can be used to describe reagent concentrations, plasma jet rate and temperature in order to achieve optimal mode of hardening. Such models are applicable both for solving control problems and predicting future states of sophisticated technological systems.

  10. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-06-15

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena.

  11. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the 1 / 5 -scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena

  12. Novel threadlike structures may be present on the large animal organ surface: evidence in Swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Nam, Min-Ho; Yoon, Ji Woong; Kwon, Hee-Min; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS) development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure) that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  13. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  14. A water balance model for Saxonian catchments - present state and projections up to 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Peter; Hauffe, Corina; Baldy, Agnes; Schwarze, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The impact of climate change on the regional water balance regime may have severe consequences for agriculture, forestry and water resources management. In this respect the following questions arise: Will extensive irrigation be necessary on Saxonian crop land in future? Which are the necessary adaptions in water resources management? Are new agricultural and forestry concepts necessary? Therefore, the project KliWES aims at modelling the present water balance regime for whole Saxonia (with the exception of the mining regions and the Elbe-corridor which is largely governed by flood events). Moreover, the effects of climate projections from the WetReg model (CEC) on the water balance regime have been investigated. The calibration strategy relies on splitting up the measured discharges into the major water balance components (evaporation, surface flow, subsurface flow and percolation) by a geometrical analysis of the hydrograph (DIFGA, Schwarze et al.). Thereafter, the water balance software ArcEGMO (Pfützner et al.) has been calibrated on these water balance components. Calibration parameters include correction factors for soil macroporosity, evapo-transpiration and the distribution factor between fast and slow groundwater components. Geological and Soil data have been drawn from official databases (LfULG). Subareas where no continuous gauge data are available have been parametrised by a regionalisation procedure relying on correlations between parameters and physical properties of the subareas considered. Possibilities and limitations of such a regionalisation procedure have been pointed out. Focal point of the present study is an investigation of water balance components in different spatial and temporal resolutions. The Results of the model for the climate projections show drastic increase of evaporation and decrease of groundwater recharge especially in the north-eastern parts of Saxonia (Lausitz). Here, this problem is worsened by the predominantly sandy soils

  15. Results of the eruptive column model inter-comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Suzuki, Yujiro; Cerminara, M.; Devenish, Ben J.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Herzog, Michael; Van Eaton, Alexa; Denby, L.C.; Bursik, Marcus; de' Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Engwell, S.; Neri, Augusto; Barsotti, Sara; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Girault, F.; Carazzo, G.; Tait, S.; Kaminski, E.; Mastin, Larry G.; Woodhouse, Mark J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Degruyter, Wim; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models of volcanic eruption columns in a set of different inter-comparison exercises. The exercises were designed as a blind test in which a set of common input parameters was given for two reference eruptions, representing a strong and a weak eruption column under different meteorological conditions. Comparing the results of the different models allows us to evaluate their capabilities and target areas for future improvement. Despite their different formulations, the 1D and 3D models provide reasonably consistent predictions of some of the key global descriptors of the volcanic plumes. Variability in plume height, estimated from the standard deviation of model predictions, is within ~ 20% for the weak plume and ~ 10% for the strong plume. Predictions of neutral buoyancy level are also in reasonably good agreement among the different models, with a standard deviation ranging from 9 to 19% (the latter for the weak plume in a windy atmosphere). Overall, these discrepancies are in the range of observational uncertainty of column height. However, there are important differences amongst models in terms of local properties along the plume axis, particularly for the strong plume. Our analysis suggests that the simplified treatment of entrainment in 1D models is adequate to resolve the general behaviour of the weak plume. However, it is inadequate to capture complex features of the strong plume, such as large vortices, partial column collapse, or gravitational fountaining that strongly enhance entrainment in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that there is a need to more accurately quantify entrainment rates, improve the representation of plume radius, and incorporate the effects of column instability in future versions of 1D volcanic plume models.

  16. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei Yuit

    2015-01-01

    The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners' and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre.

  17. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yuit Chan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre.

  18. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei Yuit

    2015-01-01

    The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre. PMID:26194482

  19. KMWin--a convenient tool for graphical presentation of results from Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnd Gross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of clinical studies often necessitates multiple graphical representations of the results. Many professional software packages are available for this purpose. Most packages are either only commercially available or hard to use especially if one aims to generate or customize a huge number of similar graphical outputs. We developed a new, freely available software tool called KMWin (Kaplan-Meier for Windows facilitating Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis. KMWin is based on the statistical software environment R and provides an easy to use graphical interface. Survival time data can be supplied as SPSS (sav, SAS export (xpt or text file (dat, which is also a common export format of other applications such as Excel. Figures can directly be exported in any graphical file format supported by R. RESULTS: On the basis of a working example, we demonstrate how to use KMWin and present its main functions. We show how to control the interface, customize the graphical output, and analyse survival time data. A number of comparisons are performed between KMWin and SPSS regarding graphical output, statistical output, data management and development. Although the general functionality of SPSS is larger, KMWin comprises a number of features useful for survival time analysis in clinical trials and other applications. These are for example number of cases and number of cases under risk within the figure or provision of a queue system for repetitive analyses of updated data sets. Moreover, major adjustments of graphical settings can be performed easily on a single window. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that our tool is well suited and convenient for repetitive analyses of survival time data. It can be used by non-statisticians and provides often used functions as well as functions which are not supplied by standard software packages. The software is routinely applied in several clinical study groups.

  20. Mean field theory of nuclei and shell model. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Many of the recent topics of the nuclear structure are concerned on the problems of unstable nuclei. It has been revealed experimentally that the nuclear halos and the neutron skins as well as the cluster structures or the molecule-like structures can be present in the unstable nuclei, and the magic numbers well established in the stable nuclei disappear occasionally while new ones appear. The shell model based on the mean field approximation has been successfully applied to stable nuclei to explain the nuclear structure as the finite many body system quantitatively and it is considered as the standard model at present. If the unstable nuclei will be understood on the same model basis or not is a matter related to fundamental principle of nuclear structure theories. In this lecture, the fundamental concept and the framework of the theory of nuclear structure based on the mean field theory and the shell model are presented to make clear the problems and to suggest directions for future researches. At first fundamental properties of nuclei are described under the subtitles: saturation and magic numbers, nuclear force and effective interactions, nuclear matter, and LS splitting. Then the mean field theory is presented under subtitles: the potential model, the mean field theory, Hartree-Fock approximation for nuclear matter, density dependent force, semiclassical mean field theory, mean field theory and symmetry, Skyrme interaction and density functional, density matrix expansion, finite range interactions, effective masses, and motion of center of mass. The subsequent section is devoted to the shell model with the subtitles: beyond the mean field approximation, core polarization, effective interaction of shell model, one-particle wave function, nuclear deformation and shell model, and shell model of cross shell. Finally structure of unstable nuclei is discussed with the subtitles: general remark on the study of unstable nuclear structure, asymptotic behavior of wave

  1. Interaction between subducting plates: results from numerical and analogue modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic setting of the Alpine-Mediterranean area is achieved during the late Cenozoic subduction, collision and suturing of several oceanic fragments and continental blocks. In this stage, processes such as interactions among subducting slabs, slab migrations and related mantle flow played a relevant role on the resulting tectonics. Here, we use numerical models to first address the mantle flow characteristic in 3D. During the subduction of a single plate the strength of the return flow strongly depends on the slab pull force, that is on the plate's buoyancy, however the physical properties of the slab, such as density, viscosity or width, do not affect largely the morphology of the toroidal cell. Instead, dramatic effects on the geometry and the dynamics of the toroidal cell result in models where the thickness of the mantle is varied. The vertical component of the vorticity vector is used to define the characteristic size of the toroidal cell, which is ~1.2-1.3 times the mantle depth. This latter defines the range of viscous stress propagation through the mantle and consequent interactions with other slabs. We thus further investigate on this setup where two separate lithospheric plates subduct in opposite sense, developing opposite polarities and convergent slab retreat, and model different initial sideways distance between the plates. The stress profiles in time illustrate that the plates interacts when slabs are at the characteristic distance and the two slabs toroidal cells merge. Increased stress and delayed slab migrations are the results. Analogue models of double-sided subduction show similar maximum distance and allow testing the additional role of stress propagated through the plates. We use a silicon plate subducting on its two opposite margins, which is either homogeneous or comprises oceanic and continental lithospheres, differing in buoyancy. The modeling results show that the double-sided subduction is strongly affected by changes in plate

  2. First experiments results about the engineering model of Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalot, A.; Ginier, R.; Sauvage, M.

    1964-01-01

    This report deals with the first series of experiments carried out on the engineering model of Rapsodie and on an associated sodium facility set in a laboratory hall of Cadarache. It conveys more precisely: 1/ - The difficulties encountered during the erection and assembly of the engineering model and a compilation of the results of the first series of experiments and tests carried out on this installation (loading of the subassemblies preheating, thermal chocks...). 2/ - The experiments and tests carried out on the two prototypes control rod drive mechanisms which brought to the choice for the design of the definitive drive mechanism. As a whole, the results proved the validity of the general design principles adopted for Rapsodie. (authors) [fr

  3. INDICATOR AND PATHOGENIC MICROORGANISMS CONTAMINATION OF HIDE OF CATTLE PRESENTED TO FOR SLAUGHTER AND CONTAMINATION OF THE RESULTANT CARCASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Liuzzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne pathogens including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp., can enter the meat chain at multiple points. Animals with excessively dirty hides will represent a risk of cross-contaminations during transport, in the slaughtered house environment and during dressing procedures. The aim of this work was to investigate the relationship among hygiene indicator microorganisms (Enterobacteriaceae and Escherichia coli count, in hide and carcass of cattle presented for slaughter, and different hide cleanliness level in two abattoir (R and F and estimate the prevalence of pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp and Campylobacter spp. in hide and carcass of dirty animals. The results showed that hide Escherichia coli and Enterobacteriaceae count were significantly higher in dirty animals than in clean animals (P<0,05, but carcass contamination were significantly higher in dirty animals than in clean animals only in R abattoir. Escherichia coli O 157:H7 was detected in 19 samples of hide (40,4%, and 2 samples of carcass. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated in 13 samples of hide (25,5% and one sample of carcass. Salmonella spp. were not found in all the samples of hide and carcass.

  4. Utilizing past and present mouse systems to engineer more relevant pancreatic cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCant, Brian T; Principe, Daniel R; Guerra, Carmen; Pasca di Magliano, Marina; Grippo, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  5. Utilizing Past and Present Mouse Systems to Engineer More Relevant Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T DeCant

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  6. Some results on hyperscaling in the 3D Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Kawashima, Naoki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-09-01

    The authors review exact studies on finite-sized 2 dimensional Ising models and show that the point for an infinite-sized model at the critical temperature is a point of nonuniform approach in the temperature-size plane. They also illuminate some strong effects of finite-size on quantities which do not diverge at the critical point. They then review Monte Carlo studies for 3 dimensional Ising models of various sizes (L = 2--100) at various temperatures. From these results they find that the data for the renormalized coupling constant collapses nicely when plotted against the correlation length, determined in a system of edge length L, divided by L. They also find that {zeta}{sub L}/L {ge} 0.26 is definitely too large for reliable studies of the critical value, g*, of the renormalized coupling constant. They have reasonable evidence that {zeta}{sub L}/L {approx} 0.1 is adequate for results that are within one percent of those for the infinite system size. On this basis, they have conducted a series of Monte Carlo calculations with this condition imposed. These calculations were made practical by the development of improved estimators for use in the Swendsen-Wang cluster method. The authors found from these results, coupled with a reversed limit computation (size increases with the temperature fixed at the critical temperature), that g* > 0, although there may well be a sharp downward drop in g as the critical temperature is approached in accord with the predictions of series analysis. The results support the validity of hyperscaling in the 3 dimensional Ising model.

  7. South polar permanent CO2 ice cap presentation in the Global Mars Multiscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel-Rastgar, Farahnaz

    2018-02-01

    The atmospheric influence caused by the Martian permanent south CO2 ice cap is examined to improve the Global Mars Multiscale Model (GM3) to see if it can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology. However, the seasonal carbon dioxide ice in the polar regions is presented in the surface ice simulation by the Global Mars Multiscale Model but the model does not produce a permanent south CO2 ice cap, and the physics code must modify to capture the realistic physical such as ice process detail; probably makes a bias in terms of total CO2 ice and meteorological processes in the model aside from ice formation. The permanent south CO2 ice cap in the model can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology for example in predicted surface temperatures, surface pressures, horizontal and zonal winds over the south cap and possible initiation of dust storms at south polar region during the southern summer period.

  8. Thermal-Chemical Model Of Subduction: Results And Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Gerya, T. V.; Connolly, J. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Rudolph, M.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structures with strong positive and negative velocity anomalies in the mantle wedge above subduction zones have been interpreted as thermally and/or chemically induced phenomena. We have developed a thermal-chemical model of subduction, which constrains the dynamics of seismic velocity structure beneath volcanic arcs. Our simulations have been calculated over a finite-difference grid with (201×101) to (201×401) regularly spaced Eulerian points, using 0.5 million to 10 billion markers. The model couples numerical thermo-mechanical solution with Gibbs energy minimization to investigate the dynamic behavior of partially molten upwellings from slabs (cold plumes) and structures associated with their development. The model demonstrates two chemically distinct types of plumes (mixed and unmixed), and various rigid body rotation phenomena in the wedge (subduction wheel, fore-arc spin, wedge pin-ball). These thermal-chemical features strongly perturb seismic structure. Their occurrence is dependent on the age of subducting slab and the rate of subduction.The model has been validated through a series of test cases and its results are consistent with a variety of geological and geophysical data. In contrast to models that attribute a purely thermal origin for mantle wedge seismic anomalies, the thermal-chemical model is able to simulate the strong variations of seismic velocity existing beneath volcanic arcs which are associated with development of cold plumes. In particular, molten regions that form beneath volcanic arcs as a consequence of vigorous cold wet plumes are manifest by > 20% variations in the local Poisson ratio, as compared to variations of ~ 2% expected as a consequence of temperature variation within the mantle wedge.

  9. A model for time-dependent cosmological constant and its consistency with the present Friedmann universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novello, M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barcelos-Neto, J [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salim, J M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-06-07

    We use a model where the cosmological term can be related to the chiral gauge anomaly of a possible quantum scenario of the initial evolution of the universe. We show that this term is compatible with the Friedmann behaviour of the present universe.

  10. Implementing Adaptability in the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rutledge (Lloyd); L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses the implementation of adaptability in environments that are based on the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems. This adaptability is explored in the context of style sheets, which are represented in such formats as DSSSL. The use of

  11. Mobile Applications in Cell Biology Present New Approaches for Cell Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mayara Lustosa; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology apps were surveyed in order to identify whether there are new approaches for modelling cells allowed by the new technologies implemented in tablets and smartphones. A total of 97 apps were identified in 3 stores surveyed (Apple, Google Play and Amazon), they are presented as: education 48.4%, games 26.8% and medicine 15.4%. The apps…

  12. Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Provenzale, A. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The course Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models is explicitly devoted to these issues. A solar cycle ago, in summer 1985, G. Cini organized a similar school, in a time when this field was in a very early stage of development and definitely fewer high-quality measurements were available. After eleven years, the field has grown toward becoming a robust scientific discipline, new data have been obtained, and new ideas have been proposed by both solar physicists and climate dynamicists. For this reason, the authors felt that it was the right time to organize a new summer school, with the aim of formalizing the developments that have taken place during these years, and also for speculating and maybe dreaming of new results that will be achieved in the upcoming years. The papers of the lectures have now been collected in this volume. First, in order to know what the authors talking about, they need to obtain reliable data from terrestrial archives,and to properly date the records that have been measured. To these crucial aspects is devoted the first part of the book, dealing with various types of proxy data and with the difficult issue of the dating of the records.

  13. 3D radiation belt diffusion model results using new empirical models of whistler chorus and hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, G.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Tu, W.

    2012-12-01

    3D diffusion codes model the energization, radial transport, and pitch angle scattering due to wave-particle interactions. Diffusion codes are powerful but are limited by the lack of knowledge of the spatial & temporal distribution of waves that drive the interactions for a specific event. We present results from the 3D DREAM model using diffusion coefficients driven by new, activity-dependent, statistical models of chorus and hiss waves. Most 3D codes parameterize the diffusion coefficients or wave amplitudes as functions of magnetic activity indices like Kp, AE, or Dst. These functional representations produce the average value of the wave intensities for a given level of magnetic activity; however, the variability of the wave population at a given activity level is lost with such a representation. Our 3D code makes use of the full sample distributions contained in a set of empirical wave databases (one database for each wave type, including plasmaspheric hiss, lower and upper hand chorus) that were recently produced by our team using CRRES and THEMIS observations. The wave databases store the full probability distribution of observed wave intensity binned by AE, MLT, MLAT and L*. In this presentation, we show results that make use of the wave intensity sample probability distributions for lower-band and upper-band chorus by sampling the distributions stochastically during a representative CRRES-era storm. The sampling of the wave intensity probability distributions produces a collection of possible evolutions of the phase space density, which quantifies the uncertainty in the model predictions caused by the uncertainty of the chorus wave amplitudes for a specific event. A significant issue is the determination of an appropriate model for the spatio-temporal correlations of the wave intensities, since the diffusion coefficients are computed as spatio-temporal averages of the waves over MLT, MLAT and L*. The spatiotemporal correlations cannot be inferred from the

  14. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Storch, H. von [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2000-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling for the North Sea is presented. The numerical model used for the study is the coupled ice-ocean model OPYC. In a hindcast of the years 1979 to 1993 it was forced with atmospheric forcing of the ECMWF reanalysis. The models capability in simulating the observed mean state and variability in the North Sea is demonstrated by the hindcast. Two time scale ranges, from weekly to seasonal and the longer-than-seasonal time scales are investigated. Shorter time scales, for storm surges, are not captured by the model formulation. The main modes of variability of sea level, sea-surface circulation, sea-surface temperature, and sea-surface salinity are described and connections to atmospheric phenomena, like the NAO, are discussed. T106 ''time-slice'' simulations with a ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' horizon are used to estimate the effects of a changing climate on the shelf sea ''North Sea''. The ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' changes in the surface forcing are accompanied by changes in the lateral oceanic boundary conditions taken from a global coupled climate model. For ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' the time mean sea level increases up to 25 cm in the German Bight in the winter, where 15 cm are due to the surface forcing and 10 cm due to thermal expansion. This change is compared to the ''natural'' variability as simulated in the ECMWF integration and found to be not outside the range spanned by it. The variability of sea level on the weekly-to-seasonal time-scales is significantly reduced in the scenario integration. The variability on the longer-than-seasonal time-scales in the control and scenario runs is much smaller then in the ECMWF integration. This is traced back to the use of ''time-slice'' experiments. Discriminating between locally forced changes and changes induced at the lateral oceanic boundaries of the model in the circulation and

  15. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  16. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 x 10 -5 and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 x 10 -3 . Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible

  17. A regional climate model for northern Europe: model description and results from the downscaling of two GCM control simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummukainen, M.; Räisänen, J.; Bringfelt, B.; Ullerstig, A.; Omstedt, A.; Willén, U.; Hansson, U.; Jones, C.

    This work presents a regional climate model, the Rossby Centre regional Atmospheric model (RCA1), recently developed from the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM). The changes in the HIRLAM parametrizations, necessary for climate-length integrations, are described. A regional Baltic Sea ocean model and a modeling system for the Nordic inland lake systems have been coupled with RCA1. The coupled system has been used to downscale 10-year time slices from two different general circulation model (GCM) simulations to provide high-resolution regional interpretation of large-scale modeling. A selection of the results from the control runs, i.e. the present-day climate simulations, are presented: large-scale free atmospheric fields, the surface temperature and precipitation results and results for the on-line simulated regional ocean and lake surface climates. The regional model modifies the surface climate description compared to the GCM simulations, but it is also substantially affected by the biases in the GCM simulations. The regional model also improves the representation of the regional ocean and the inland lakes, compared to the GCM results.

  18. A regional climate model for northern Europe: model description and results from the downscaling of two GCM control simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummukainen, M.; Raeisaenen, J.; Bringfelt, B.; Ullerstig, A.; Omstedt, A.; Willen, U.; Hansson, U.; Jones, C. [Rossby Centre, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This work presents a regional climate model, the Rossby Centre regional Atmospheric model (RCA1), recently developed from the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM). The changes in the HIRLAM parametrizations, necessary for climate-length integrations, are described. A regional Baltic Sea ocean model and a modeling system for the Nordic inland lake systems have been coupled with RCA1. The coupled system has been used to downscale 10-year time slices from two different general circulation model (GCM) simulations to provide high-resolution regional interpretation of large-scale modeling. A selection of the results from the control runs, i.e. the present-day climate simulations, are presented: large-scale free atmospheric fields, the surface temperature and precipitation results and results for the on-line simulated regional ocean and lake surface climates. The regional model modifies the surface climate description compared to the GCM simulations, but it is also substantially affected by the biases in the GCM simulations. The regional model also improves the representation of the regional ocean and the inland lakes, compared to the GCM results. (orig.)

  19. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  20. The European Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) effort: achievements and first physics results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. Falchetto,; Coster, D.; Coelho, R.; Scott, B. D.; Figini, L.; Kalupin, D.; Nardon, E.; Nowak, S.; L.L. Alves,; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; João P.S. Bizarro,; C. Boulbe,; Dinklage, A.; Farina, D.; B. Faugeras,; Ferreira, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Huynh, P.; Imbeaux, F.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jonsson, T.; H.-J. Klingshirn,; Konz, C.; Kus, A.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Pereverzev, G.; M. Owsiak,; Poli, E.; Peysson, Y.; R. Reimer,; Signoret, J.; Sauter, O.; Stankiewicz, R.; Strand, P.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Westerhof, E.; T. Zok,; Zwingmann, W.; ITM-TF contributors,; ASDEX Upgrade team,; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2014-01-01

    A selection of achievements and first physics results are presented of the European Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (EFDA ITM-TF) simulation framework, which aims to provide a standardized platform and an integrated modelling suite of validated numerical codes for the simulation and

  1. Modelling of water potential and water uptake rate of tomato plants in the greenhouse: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, G.T.; Schouwink, H.E.; Gieling, Th.H.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic model is presented which predicts water potential and water uptake rate of greenhouse tomato plants using transpiration rate as input. The model assumes that water uptake is the resultant of water potential and hydraulic resistance, and that water potential is linearly related to water

  2. Mobile satellite propagation measurements and modeling: A review of results for systems engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, W. L. (Editor); Barts, R. M.; Bostian, C. W.; Butterworth, J. S.; Campbell, R.; Goldhirsh, J.; Vogel, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of Mobile Satellite System (MSS) propagation measurements and modeling is given, including a summary of results. The simple models presented should be of some use to systems engineers. A complete summary of propagation experiments with literature references is included.

  3. Comparison of models of automatic classification of textural patterns of mineral presents in Colombian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Carvajal, Jaime; Branch Bedoya, John Willian

    2005-01-01

    The automatic classification of objects is a very interesting approach under several problem domains. This paper outlines some results obtained under different classification models to categorize textural patterns of minerals using real digital images. The data set used was characterized by a small size and noise presence. The implemented models were the Bayesian classifier, Neural Network (2-5-1), support vector machine, decision tree and 3-nearest neighbors. The results after applying crossed validation show that the Bayesian model (84%) proved better predictive capacity than the others, mainly due to its noise robustness behavior. The neuronal network (68%) and the SVM (67%) gave promising results, because they could be improved increasing the data amount used, while the decision tree (55%) and K-NN (54%) did not seem to be adequate for this problem, because of their sensibility to noise

  4. Influence of vegetation size on the clinical presentation and outcome of lead-associated endocarditis: results from the MEDIC registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspon, Arnold J; Le, Katherine Y; Prutkin, Jordan M; Sohail, M Rizwan; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Baddour, Larry M; Danik, Stephan B; Peacock, James; Falces, Carlos; Miro, Jose M; Naber, Christoph; Carrillo, Roger G; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Uslan, Daniel Z

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the clinical presentation of lead-associated endocarditis (LAE) is related to the size of lead vegetations and how size is related to bacteriology and clinical outcomes. Cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) infection may present as either local pocket infection or bloodstream infection with or without LAE. LAE is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The clinical presentation and course of LAE were evaluated by the MEDIC (Multicenter Electrophysiologic Device Cohort) registry, an international registry enrolling patients with CIED infection. Consecutive LAE patients enrolled in the MEDIC registry between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012 were analyzed. The clinical features and outcomes of 2 groups of patients were compared based on the size of the lead vegetation detected by echocardiography (> or vegetation vegetation ≥1 cm in diameter (Group II). Patients in Group I more often presented with signs of local pocket infection, whereas Group II patients presented with clinical evidence of systemic infection. Staphylococcus aureus was the organism most often responsible for LAE, whereas infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci was associated with larger vegetations. Outcomes were improved among those who underwent complete device removal. However, major complications were associated with an open surgical approach for device removal. The clinical presentation of LAE is influenced by the size of the lead vegetation. Prompt recognition and management of LAE depends on obtaining blood cultures and echocardiography, including transesophageal echocardiography, in CIED patients who present with either signs of local pocket or systemic infection. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  6. Latest results from the EU project AVATAR : Aerodynamic modelling of 10 MW wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceyhan, J. G Schepers O; Ceyhan, O; Boorsma, K; Gonzalez, A; Munduate, X; Pires, O; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Simao Ferreira, C.; Sieros, G; Madsen, J.; Voutsinas, S.; Lutz, T.; Barakos, G.; Colonia, S.; Heißelmann, H.; Meng, F.; Croce, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent results from the EU project AVATAR in which aerodynamic models are improved and validated for wind turbines on a scale of 10 MW and more. Measurements on a DU 00-W-212 airfoil are presented which have been taken in the pressurized DNW-HDG wind tunnel up to a

  7. Temperature trends during the Present and Last Interglacial periods - a multi-model-data comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Martrat, B.; Charbit, S.; Renssen, H.; Gröger, M.; Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Lohmann, G.; Lunt, D. J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Phipps, S. J.; Prange, M.; Ritz, S. P.; Schulz, M.; Stenni, B.; Stone, E. J.; Varma, V.

    2014-09-01

    Though primarily driven by insolation changes associated with well-known variations in Earth's astronomical parameters, the response of the climate system during interglacials includes a diversity of feedbacks involving the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, vegetation and land ice. A thorough multi-model-data comparison is essential to assess the ability of climate models to resolve interglacial temperature trends and to help in understanding the recorded climatic signal and the underlying climate dynamics. We present the first multi-model-data comparison of transient millennial-scale temperature changes through two intervals of the Present Interglacial (PIG; 8-1.2 ka) and the Last Interglacial (LIG; 123-116.2 ka) periods. We include temperature trends simulated by 9 different climate models, alkenone-based temperature reconstructions from 117 globally distributed locations (about 45% of them within the LIG) and 12 ice-core-based temperature trends from Greenland and Antarctica (50% of them within the LIG). The definitions of these specific interglacial intervals enable a consistent inter-comparison of the two intervals because both are characterised by minor changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and more importantly by insolation trends that show clear similarities. Our analysis shows that in general the reconstructed PIG and LIG Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude cooling compares well with multi-model, mean-temperature trends for the warmest months and that these cooling trends reflect a linear response to the warmest-month insolation decrease over the interglacial intervals. The most notable exception is the strong LIG cooling trend reconstructed from Greenland ice cores that is not simulated by any of the models. A striking model-data mismatch is found for both the PIG and the LIG over large parts of the mid-to-high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere where the data depicts negative temperature trends that are not in agreement with near zero

  8. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  9. Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: methodology of a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wania

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP was created to evaluate our present ability to simulate large-scale wetland characteristics and corresponding methane (CH4 emissions. A multi-model comparison is essential to evaluate the key uncertainties in the mechanisms and parameters leading to methane emissions. Ten modelling groups joined WETCHIMP to run eight global and two regional models with a common experimental protocol using the same climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing datasets. We reported the main conclusions from the intercomparison effort in a companion paper (Melton et al., 2013. Here we provide technical details for the six experiments, which included an equilibrium, a transient, and an optimized run plus three sensitivity experiments (temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The diversity of approaches used by the models is summarized through a series of conceptual figures, and is used to evaluate the wide range of wetland extent and CH4 fluxes predicted by the models in the equilibrium run. We discuss relationships among the various approaches and patterns in consistencies of these model predictions. Within this group of models, there are three broad classes of methods used to estimate wetland extent: prescribed based on wetland distribution maps, prognostic relationships between hydrological states based on satellite observations, and explicit hydrological mass balances. A larger variety of approaches was used to estimate the net CH4 fluxes from wetland systems. Even though modelling of wetland extent and CH4 emissions has progressed significantly over recent decades, large uncertainties still exist when estimating CH4 emissions: there is little consensus on model structure or complexity due to knowledge gaps, different aims of the models, and the range of temporal and spatial resolutions of the models.

  10. Presenting Knowledge Management Implementation Model with Fuzzy Approach in Information Technology Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razmi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of modern sciences and more competitive becoming environment in the technology era, knowledge management is being counted as one of the most important stable competitive advantages of technology oriented organizations. This matter is of higher importance in high technology organizations, especially those active in information technology field due to their unique identity. This way, knowledge management has been already shifted to one of the most important priorities of such organizations that in case of not identifying, applying, recording and creating that knowledge, the organization is inevitable to pay fortunesto revive the knowledge gone. The purpose of this research is presenting a comprehensive knowledge management implementation model in information technology industry. Therefore, the measures of the suggested research’s model were identified by studying identical researches and projects done in knowledge management and information technology sector and also through consultation with the experts. This way, a questionnaire was designed in two parts and distributed among experts in the understudied organizations. The research’s data were analyzed through T Test and Binomial Test through fuzzy approach due to the constraints presented by the Lickert scale. The research findings demonstrate that the stages of knowledge management implementation model in information technology sector include knowledge evaluation, knowledge leverage, knowledge planning, knowledge culture, knowledge strategies, knowledge management processes, suitable knowledge infrastructures, knowledge organization and knowledge presentation. There also exist actions in each stage that effect successful implementation of the mentioned stages.

  11. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  12. MCNP Modeling Results for Location of Buried TRU Waste Drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinman, D K; Schweitzer, J S

    2006-01-01

    In the 1960's, fifty-five gallon drums of TRU waste were buried in shallow pits on remote U.S. Government facilities such as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (now split into the Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Completion Project [ICP]). Subsequently, it was decided to remove the drums and the material that was in them from the burial pits and send the material to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Several technologies have been tried to locate the drums non-intrusively with enough precision to minimize the chance for material to be spread into the environment. One of these technologies is the placement of steel probe holes in the pits into which wireline logging probes can be lowered to measure properties and concentrations of material surrounding the probe holes for evidence of TRU material. There is also a concern that large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) are also present that would contaminate the environment during removal. In 2001, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) built two pulsed neutron wireline logging tools to measure TRU and VOC around the probe holes. The tools are the Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) and the Pulsed Neutron Gamma (PNG), respectively. They were tested experimentally in surrogate test holes in 2003. The work reported here estimates the performance of the tools using Monte-Carlo modelling prior to field deployment. A MCNP model was constructed by INEEL personnel. It was modified by the authors to assess the ability of the tools to predict quantitatively the position and concentration of TRU and VOC materials disposed around the probe holes. The model was used to simulate the tools scanning the probe holes vertically in five centimetre increments. A drum was included in the model that could be placed near the probe hole and at other locations out to forty-five centimetres from the probe-hole in five centimetre increments. Scans were performed with no chlorine in the

  13. A review of the evidence linking adult attachment theory and chronic pain: presenting a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Ownsworth, Tamara; Strong, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    It is now well established that pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, affected by a gamut of psychosocial and biological variables. According to diathesis-stress models of chronic pain, some individuals are more vulnerable to developing disability following acute pain because they possess particular psychosocial vulnerabilities which interact with physical pathology to impact negatively upon outcome. Attachment theory, a theory of social and personality development, has been proposed as a comprehensive developmental model of pain, implicating individual adult attachment pattern in the ontogenesis and maintenance of chronic pain. The present paper reviews and critically appraises studies which link adult attachment theory with chronic pain. Together, these papers offer support for the role of insecure attachment as a diathesis (or vulnerability) for problematic adjustment to pain. The Attachment-Diathesis Model of Chronic Pain developed from this body of literature, combines adult attachment theory with the diathesis-stress approach to chronic pain. The evidence presented in this review, and the associated model, advances our understanding of the developmental origins of chronic pain conditions, with potential application in guiding early pain intervention and prevention efforts, as well as tailoring interventions to suit specific patient needs.

  14. Mycobacterial disease in cats in Great Britain: I. Culture results, geographical distribution and clinical presentation of 339 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn-Moore, Danièlle A; McFarland, Sarah E; Brewer, Jacqueline I; Crawshaw, Timothy R; Clifton-Hadley, Richard S; Kovalik, Marcel; Shaw, Darren J

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated 339 cases of feline mycobacterial disease from cats with cutaneous lesions or masses found at exploratory laparotomy. Tissue samples were submitted to the Veterinary Laboratories Agency for mycobacterial culture over a 4-year period to December 2008. The study assessed which species of culturable mycobacteria were involved, where the cats lived, and their clinical presentation (physical findings, serum biochemistry, radiography, feline leukaemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus status). Mycobacterium microti was cultured from 19%, Mycobacterium bovis 15%, Mycobacterium avium 7%, non-M avium non-tuberculous mycobacteria 6%, with no growth in 53% of samples. M microti, M bovis and M avium were found in almost mutually exclusive clusters within Great Britain (GB) (ie, M bovis in South-West England/Wales/Welsh Border, M avium in eastern England and M microti south of London and in South-West Scotland). While differences were seen in the clinical presentation and distribution of lesions caused by the different infections, these were not sufficiently different to be diagnostic. Cats commonly presented with single or multiple cutaneous lesions (74%), which were sometimes ulcerated or discharging, located most frequently on the head (54%). Lymph nodes were usually involved (47%); typically the submandibular nodes. Systemic or pulmonary signs were rarely seen (10-16%). When a cat is suspected of having mycobacteriosis, accurate identification of the species involved helps to determine appropriate action. Our findings show that knowing the cat's geographic location can be helpful, while the nature of the clinical presentation is less useful. Most cases of feline mycobacterial disease in GB are cutaneous. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  16. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Healey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report: A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion: Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required.

  17. Comparison of blade-strike modeling results with empirical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskey, Gene R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-03-01

    This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner. The first phase of this study included a sensitivity analysis to consider the effects of difference in geometry and operations between families of turbines on the strike probability response surface. The analysis revealed that the orientation of fish relative to the leading edge of a runner blade and the location that fish pass along the blade between the hub and blade tip are critical uncertainties in blade-strike models. Over a range of discharges, the average prediction of injury from blade strike was two to five times higher than average empirical estimates of visible injury from shear and mechanical devices. Empirical estimates of mortality may be better metrics for comparison to predicted injury rates than other injury measures for fish passing at mid-blade and blade-tip locations.

  18. Modeling drifting snow in Antarctica with a regional climate model: 2. Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model study of the impact of drifting snow on the lower atmosphere, surface snow characteristics, and surface mass balance of Antarctica. We use the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.1/ANT with a high horizontal resolution (27 km), equipped with a drifting snow routine

  19. Stochastic Hourly Weather Generator HOWGH: Validation and its Use in Pest Modelling under Present and Future Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, M.; Hirschi, M.; Spirig, C.

    2014-12-01

    To quantify impact of the climate change on a specific pest (or any weather-dependent process) in a specific site, we may use a site-calibrated pest (or other) model and compare its outputs obtained with site-specific weather data representing present vs. perturbed climates. The input weather data may be produced by the stochastic weather generator. Apart from the quality of the pest model, the reliability of the results obtained in such experiment depend on an ability of the generator to represent the statistical structure of the real world weather series, and on the sensitivity of the pest model to possible imperfections of the generator. This contribution deals with the multivariate HOWGH weather generator, which is based on a combination of parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Here, HOWGH is used to generate synthetic hourly series of three weather variables (solar radiation, temperature and precipitation) required by a dynamic pest model SOPRA to simulate the development of codling moth. The contribution presents results of the direct and indirect validation of HOWGH. In the direct validation, the synthetic series generated by HOWGH (various settings of its underlying model are assumed) are validated in terms of multiple climatic characteristics, focusing on the subdaily wet/dry and hot/cold spells. In the indirect validation, we assess the generator in terms of characteristics derived from the outputs of SOPRA model fed by the observed vs. synthetic series. The weather generator may be used to produce weather series representing present and future climates. In the latter case, the parameters of the generator may be modified by the climate change scenarios based on Global or Regional Climate Models. To demonstrate this feature, the results of codling moth simulations for future climate will be shown. Acknowledgements: The weather generator is developed and validated within the frame of projects WG4VALUE (project LD12029 sponsored by the Ministry

  20. The albatross plot: A novel graphical tool for presenting results of diversely reported studies in a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sean; Jones, Hayley E; Martin, Richard M; Lewis, Sarah J; Higgins, Julian P T

    2017-09-01

    Meta-analyses combine the results of multiple studies of a common question. Approaches based on effect size estimates from each study are generally regarded as the most informative. However, these methods can only be used if comparable effect sizes can be computed from each study, and this may not be the case due to variation in how the studies were done or limitations in how their results were reported. Other methods, such as vote counting, are then used to summarize the results of these studies, but most of these methods are limited in that they do not provide any indication of the magnitude of effect. We propose a novel plot, the albatross plot, which requires only a 1-sided P value and a total sample size from each study (or equivalently a 2-sided P value, direction of effect and total sample size). The plot allows an approximate examination of underlying effect sizes and the potential to identify sources of heterogeneity across studies. This is achieved by drawing contours showing the range of effect sizes that might lead to each P value for given sample sizes, under simple study designs. We provide examples of albatross plots using data from previous meta-analyses, allowing for comparison of results, and an example from when a meta-analysis was not possible. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Modeling soluble salt assemblages on Mars: past aqueous history and present-day habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soluble salt assemblages formed through aqueous processes are widespread on Mars. These minerals are important for understanding the past aqueous history of Mars and indicate critical habitability parameters such as pH, temperature, water activity, and salinity. Equilibrium models have been used to determine solution chemistry and salt precipitation sequences from aqueous chemical data; however, current models are limited by a lack of experimental data for low-temperature perchlorates, and some model predictions are clearly anomalous. To address the need for accurate equilibrium models, we have developed a comprehensive model for low-temperature perchlorate-rich brines using (1) previously neglected literature data, (2) experimental solubilities determined in low-temperature perchlorate solutions, and (3) solubility and heat capacity results determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Our resulting model is a significant improvement over existing models, such as FREZCHEM, particularly for perchlorate mixtures. We have applied our model to evaporation and freezing of a nominal Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) solution measured at the Phoenix site. For a freezing WCL solution, our model indicates that ice, KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·3H2O), calcite (CaCO3), meridianiite (MgSO4·11H2O), MgCl2·12H2O, NaClO4·2H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form at the eutectic (209 K); whereas, KClO4, hydromagnesite, kieserite (MgSO4·H2O), anhydrite (CaSO4), halite (NaCl), NaClO4·H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form upon complete evaporation at 298 K. In general, evaporation yields more dehydrated mineral assemblages than salts produced by freezing. Hydrated phases that form during evaporation contain 0.3 wt. % water, which compares with 1.2 wt. % during freezing. Given independent evidence for the presence of calcite and minimum water contents in Martian soils of ~1.5 wt. %, salts at the Phoenix site, and possibly elsewhere, appear more likely to have formed during

  2. The Effect of Google Earth and Wiki Models on Oral Presentation Skills of University EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Ghada; Diab, Hassan B.

    2018-01-01

    This article reports the results of an experimental study that investigated the effectiveness of Google Earth and Wiki tools in improving the oral presentation skills of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners and boosting their motivation for learning. The participants (n =81) are enrolled in writing classes at two English-medium…

  3. The Multipole Plasma Trap-PIC Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Nathaniel; Bowman, Amanda; Godden, Katarina

    2017-10-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) multipole structure is studied via particle-in-cell computer modeling, to assess the response of quasi-neutral plasma to the imposed RF fields. Several regimes, such as pair plasma, antimatter plasma, and conventional (ion-electron) plasma are considered. In the case of equal charge-to-mass ratio of plasma species, the effects of the multipole field are symmetric between positive and negative particles. In the case of a charge-to-mass disparity, the multipole RF parameters (frequency, voltage, structure size) may be chosen such that the light species (e.g. electrons) is strongly confined, while the heavy species (e.g. positive ions) does not respond to the RF field. In this case, the trapped negative space charge creates a potential well that then traps the positive species. 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of this concept are presented, to assess plasma response and trapping dependences on multipole order, consequences of the formation of an RF plasma sheath, and the effects of an axial magnetic field. The scalings of trapped plasma parameters are explored in each of the mentioned regimes, to guide the design of prospective experiments investigating each. Supported by U.S. NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering Grant PHY-1619615.

  4. Modeling Framework and Results to Inform Charging Infrastructure Investments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wood, Eric W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market is experiencing rapid growth with dozens of battery electric (BEV) and plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) models already available and billions of dollars being invested by automotive manufacturers in the PEV space. Electric range is increasing thanks to larger and more advanced batteries and significant infrastructure investments are being made to enable higher power fast charging. Costs are falling and PEVs are becoming more competitive with conventional vehicles. Moreover, new technologies such as connectivity and automation hold the promise of enhancing the value proposition of PEVs. This presentation outlines a suite of projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Office to conduct assessments of the economic value and charging infrastructure requirements of the evolving PEV market. Individual assessments include national evaluations of PEV economic value (assuming 73M PEVs on the road in 2035), national analysis of charging infrastructure requirements (with community and corridor level resolution), and case studies of PEV ownership in Columbus, OH and Massachusetts.

  5. Stirling cryocooler test results and design model verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on progress in developing a long-life Stirling cycle cryocooler for space borne applications. It presents the results from tests on a preliminary breadboard version of the cryocooler used to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and to validate the regenerator design code used in its development. This machine achieved a cold-end temperature of 65 K while carrying a 1/2 Watt cooling load. The basic machine is a double-acting, flexure-bearing, split Stirling design with linear electromagnetic drives for the expander and compressors. Flat metal diaphragms replace pistons for both sweeping and sealing the machine working volumes. In addition, the double-acting expander couples to a laminar-channel counterflow recuperative heat exchanger for regeneration. A PC compatible design code was developed for this design approach that calculates regenerator loss including heat transfer irreversibilities, pressure drop, and axial conduction in the regenerator walls

  6. Stress Resultant Based Elasto-Viscoplastic Thick Shell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Woelke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents enhancement introduced to the elasto-viscoplastic shell formulation, which serves as a theoretical base for the finite element code EPSA (Elasto-Plastic Shell Analysis [1–3]. The shell equations used in EPSA are modified to account for transverse shear deformation, which is important in the analysis of thick plates and shells, as well as composite laminates. Transverse shear forces calculated from transverse shear strains are introduced into a rate-dependent yield function, which is similar to Iliushin's yield surface expressed in terms of stress resultants and stress couples [12]. The hardening rule defined by Bieniek and Funaro [4], which allows for representation of the Bauschinger effect on a moment-curvature plane, was previously adopted in EPSA and is used here in the same form. Viscoplastic strain rates are calculated, taking into account the transverse shears. Only non-layered shells are considered in this work.

  7. Modelling the influence of changing climate in present and future marine eutrophication impacts from spring barley production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Niero, Monia

    2017-01-01

    carrying capacity, or on the presently proposed method, point to the value of adding spatial differentiation to LCIA models. The inclusion of time variation and spatial differentiation in characterisation modelling of marine eutrophication and the identification of a paucity of adequate inventory data...... in Denmark, the paper has two objectives: (i) to estimate the present and future marine eutrophication impacts by combining a novel Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) modelling approach with a quantification of the effects of climate change on its parameterisation, and (ii) to discuss the implications...... was added to the resulting ‘present’ and ‘future’ characterisation factors (CFs) and calculated for the Baltic and North Sea. The temporal variability of both midpoint normalised impact scores and damage scores reflect a 34% and 28% increase of the CFs in the North Sea and Baltic Sea, respectively...

  8. Present and Future of Dengue Fever in Nepal: Mapping Climatic Suitability by Ecological Niche Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bipin Kumar; Cao, Chunxiang; Xu, Min; Khanal, Laxman; Naeem, Shahid; Pandit, Shreejana

    2018-01-23

    Both the number of cases of dengue fever and the areas of outbreaks within Nepal have increased significantly in recent years. Further expansion and range shift is expected in the future due to global climate change and other associated factors. However, due to limited spatially-explicit research in Nepal, there is poor understanding about the present spatial distribution patterns of dengue risk areas and the potential range shift due to future climate change. In this context, it is crucial to assess and map dengue fever risk areas in Nepal. Here, we used reported dengue cases and a set of bioclimatic variables on the MaxEnt ecological niche modeling approach to model the climatic niche and map present and future (2050s and 2070s) climatically suitable areas under different representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5). Simulation-based estimates suggest that climatically suitable areas for dengue fever are presently distributed throughout the lowland Tarai from east to west and in river valleys at lower elevations. Under the different climate change scenarios, these areas will be slightly shifted towards higher elevation with varied magnitude and spatial patterns. Population exposed to climatically suitable areas of dengue fever in Nepal is anticipated to further increase in both 2050s and 2070s on all the assumed emission scenarios. These findings could be instrumental to plan and execute the strategic interventions for controlling dengue fever in Nepal.

  9. Past, Present, and Future Anthropogenic Emissions over Asia: a Regional Air Quality Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jung-Hun; Jung, Bujeon; Choi, Ki-Chul; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Rokjin J.; Youn, Daeok; Jeong, Jaein; Moon, Byung-Kwon; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2010-05-01

    Climate change will also affect future regional air quality which has potential human health, ecosystem, and economic implications. To analyze the impacts of climate change on Asian air quality, the NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea) integrated modeling framework was developed based on global-to-regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models. In this study, we developed emission inventories for the modeling framework for 1980~2100 with an emphasis on Asia emissions. Two emission processing systems which have functions of emission projection, spatial/temporal allocation, and chemical speciation have been also developed in support of atmospheric chemistry models including GEOS-Chem and Models-3/CMAQ. Asia-based emission estimates, projection factors, temporal allocation parameters were combined to improve regional modeling capability of past, present and future air quality over Asia. The global CO emissions show a 23% decrease from the years 1980 to 2000. For the future CO (from year 2000 to 2100), the A2 scenario shows a 95% increase due to the B40 (Residential-Biofuel) sector of Western Africa, Eastern Africa and East Asia and the F51 (Transport Road-Fossil fuel) sector of Middle East, USA and South Asia. The B1 scenario, however, shows a 79% decrease of emissions due to B40 and F51 sectors of East Asia, South Asia and USA for the same period. In many cases, Asian emissions play important roles for global emission increase or decrease depending on the IPCC scenarios considered. The regional ozone forming potential will be changed due to different VOC/NOx emission ratio changes in the future. More similarities and differences of Asian emission characteristics, in comparison with its global counterpart, are investigated.

  10. Results of EPRI/ANL DCH investigations and model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sehgal, B.R.; Merilo, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a series of five experiments are described addressing the severity and mitigation of direct containment heating. The tests were performed in a 1:30 linear scale mockup of the Zion PWR containment system using a reactor-material corium melt consisting of 60% UO 2 , 16% ZrO 2 , 24% SSt at nominally 2800C initial temperature. A ''worst-case'' type test involving unimpeded corium dispersal through an air atmosphere in a closed vessel produced an atmosphere heatup of 323K, equivalent to a DCH efficiency of 62%. With the addition of structural features which impeded the corium dispersal, representative of dispersal pathway features at Zion, the DCH efficiency was reduced to 1--5%. (This important result is scale dependent and requires larger scale tests such as the SURTSEY program at SNL plus mechanistic modeling for application to the reactor system.) With the addition of water in the cavity region, there was no measurable heatup of the atmosphere. This was attributable to the vigorous codispersal of water with corium which prevented the temperature of the atmosphere from significantly exceeding T/sub sat/. In this case the DCH load was replaced by the more benign ''steam spike'' from corium quench. Significant oxidation of the corium constituents occurred in the tests, adding chemical energy to the system and producing hydrogen. Overall, the results suggest that with consideration of realistic, plant specific, mitigating features, DCH may be no worse and possibly far less severe than the previously examined steam spike. Implications for accident management are addressed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Sergio; Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis-a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others' world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios.

  12. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A.; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis–a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others’ world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios. PMID:29298349

  13. English as a second language and outcomes of patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes: results from the CONCORDANCE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Craig P; Dabin, Bilyana; French, John K; Kritharides, Leonard; Hyun, Karice; Kilian, Jens; Chew, Derek Pb; Brieger, David

    2016-04-04

    To investigate whether patients with English as their second language have similar acute coronary syndrome (ACS) outcomes to people whose first language is English. Retrospective, observational study, using admissions, treatment and follow-up data. A total of 6304 subjects from 41 sites enrolled in the investigator-initiated CONCORDANCE ACS registry. Baseline characteristics, treatments, and in-hospital and 6-month mortality. English as a second language (ESL) was reported by 1005 subjects (15.9%). Patients with English as their first language (EFL) were older, and were less likely to have diabetes mellitus or to smoke than the ESL patients. Prior myocardial infarction, heart failure and chronic renal failure were more common in the ESL group. In-hospital mortality was also higher in these patients (7.1% v 3.8% for EFL patients; P language, age, in-hospital renal failure, and recurrent ischaemia as predictors of 6-month mortality. Patients presenting with an ACS who report English as their second language have poorer outcomes than patients who use English as their first language. This difference may not be entirely explained by baseline demographic disparities or management differences.

  14. The Relationship between Spiritual Health and other Dimensions of Health: Presentation of a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Heidari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes to humankind will have different effects on health service delivery. Health might used to be intended to provide physical health in the past; today, however, many researchers and clinicians consider the concept health to be beyond physical health. In support of this claim, it is enough to indicate that the bio-psycho-social model has for years been held by scientific communities to be a fully admitted model. However, the missing ring in this model, as suggested by many, is the spiritual health. In recent years, the relationship between spirituality and clinical interventions with a comprehensive focus on health has been under increasing scrutiny. Although different models have been presented for investigation of the relationship between spiritual health and other dimensions, the fundamental challenge in this regard is the actual place of spiritual health compared with other dimensions. In this article, attempts are made to address the position and weight of spiritual health from the Islam’s point of view.

  15. Hydrological Modeling in Northern Tunisia with Regional Climate Model Outputs: Performance Evaluation and Bias-Correction in Present Climate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Foughali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate the performance of a hydrological balance model in a watershed located in northern Tunisia (wadi Sejnane, 378 km2 in present climate conditions using input variables provided by four regional climate models. A modified version (MBBH of the lumped and single layer surface model BBH (Bucket with Bottom Hole model, in which pedo-transfer parameters estimated using watershed physiographic characteristics are introduced is adopted to simulate the water balance components. Only two parameters representing respectively the water retention capacity of the soil and the vegetation resistance to evapotranspiration are calibrated using rainfall-runoff data. The evaluation criterions for the MBBH model calibration are: relative bias, mean square error and the ratio of mean actual evapotranspiration to mean potential evapotranspiration. Daily air temperature, rainfall and runoff observations are available from 1960 to 1984. The period 1960–1971 is selected for calibration while the period 1972–1984 is chosen for validation. Air temperature and precipitation series are provided by four regional climate models (DMI, ARP, SMH and ICT from the European program ENSEMBLES, forced by two global climate models (GCM: ECHAM and ARPEGE. The regional climate model outputs (precipitation and air temperature are compared to the observations in terms of statistical distribution. The analysis was performed at the seasonal scale for precipitation. We found out that RCM precipitation must be corrected before being introduced as MBBH inputs. Thus, a non-parametric quantile-quantile bias correction method together with a dry day correction is employed. Finally, simulated runoff generated using corrected precipitation from the regional climate model SMH is found the most acceptable by comparison with runoff simulated using observed precipitation data, to reproduce the temporal variability of mean monthly runoff. The SMH model is the most accurate to

  16. Present situation and prospect of medical knowledge based systems in German-speaking countries: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, Cord; Spitzer, K; Honekamp, W

    2012-01-01

    After a decrease of interest in classical medical expert systems, the publication activity concerning the medical application of Artificial Intelligence and the interest in medical decision support have markedly increased. Nonetheless, no systematic exploratory study has yet been carried out, which directly considers the actual fields of applications, exemplary approaches, obstacles, challenges, and future prospect as seen by pioneering users and developers in a given region. This paper reports the results of an online survey designed to fill this gap with the "Knowledge Based Systems" working group of the German Society for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (GMDS) in 2010. The survey was based on an online questionnaire (5 single and multiple choice questions, 8 Likert-scaled items, 7 free text questions) consented to by the working group. The answers were analyzed by descriptive statistics and a qualitative analysis (bottom-up coding). All academic institutions of Medical Informatics in the German-speaking countries and contributors reporting KBS-related projects at the relevant scientific conferences and in a journal specialized in the field were invited to participate. The survey reached a response rate of 33.4%. The results show a gap between the reported obstacles of medical KBS (mainly low acceptance and rare use in clinical practice) and their future prospect as stated by the participants. Problems previously discussed in the literature like low acceptance, integration, and sustainability of KBS projects were confirmed. The current situation was characterized by naming exemplary existing systems and specifying promising fields of application. The field of KBS in medicine is more diversified and has evolved beyond expectations in the German-speaking countries.

  17. A Tower Model for Lightning Overvoltage Studies Based on the Result of an FDTD Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Taku

    This paper describes a method for deriving a transmission tower model for EMTP lightning overvoltage studies from a numerical electromagnetic simulation result obtained by the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method. The FDTD simulation carried out in this paper takes into account the following items which have been ignored or over-simplified in previously-presented simulations: (i) resistivity of the ground soil; (ii) arms, major slant elements, and foundations of the tower; (iii) development speed of the lightning return stroke. For validation purpose a pulse test of a 500-kV transmission tower is simulated, and a comparison with the measured result shows that the present FDTD simulation gives a sufficiently accurate result. Using this validated FDTD-based simulation method the insulator-string voltages of a tower for a lightning stroke are calculated, and based on the simulation result the parameter values of the proposed tower model for EMTP studies are determined in a systematic way. Since previously-presented models include trial-and-error process in the parameter determination, it can be said that the proposed model is more general in this regard. As an illustrative example, the 500-kV transmission tower mentioned above is modeled, and it is shown that the derived model closely reproduces the FDTD simulation result.

  18. A Duality Result for the Generalized Erlang Risk Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanpeng Ji

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the generalized Erlang risk model and its dual model. By using a conditional measure-preserving correspondence between the two models, we derive an identity for two interesting conditional probabilities. Applications to the discounted joint density of the surplus prior to ruin and the deficit at ruin are also discussed.

  19. Design and creating model and interactive presentation of GEM for Microcosm Exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Lakdee, Natthaphop

    2017-01-01

    GEM or Gas Electron Multiplier is the newer and easier way to amplify electron signal than conventional CSS. It was first created by Fabio Sauli at CERN in 1997 and was developed to get better efficiency over time. Right now, it was brought to use in many detector stations at CERN. To make GEM more publicly known, one of the ways is show in Microcosm Exhibition which is always visited by people from around the world everyday, so my main project as summer student is to design and create the model and interactive presentation which make GEM interesting and easy to understand by ordinary people.

  20. Beyond the standard Higgs at the LHC. Present constraints on little Higgs models and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonini, Marco

    2014-11-01

    This thesis discusses the consistency of different Little Higgs models with the collected collider data as of the summer of 2013. Moreover, future prospects for possible discoveries and mass measurement methods of new physics signals at the foreseen LHC run II with increased center-of-mass energy are presented. Little Higgs models belong to a class of extensions of the Standard Higgs model, predicting a strong interaction regime at a compositeness scale Λ=4πf approximate global symmetry spontaneously broken at the scale f. A natural hierarchy between the compositeness and the electroweak scale is introduced by the Collective Symmetry Breaking mechanism: one-loop diagrams generating the Higgs mass term are forced to be at most logarithmically sensitive to Λ. A naturally light Higgs boson can thus be accommodated, consistently with a perturbative theory until a scale of order 10 TeV. We have probed the parameter space of three prominent examples of Little Higgs models, namely the Simplest Little Higgs model, the Littlest Higgs model, and the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity, against electroweak precision observables and the collected LHC data concerning both Higgs properties and direct searches for new particles, with √(s)=7,8 TeV and up to 25 fb -1 of integrated luminosity. Lower bounds on the scale f are set, within a certain degree of confidence level, which allow to draw conclusions on the ''naturalness'' of the different models. Optimisations of the existing direct searches setups, assuming a Little Higgs signal, as well as dedicated mass measurement methods designed for the foreseen LHC runs with √(s)=13,14 TeV are thoroughly discussed and proposed in this thesis. Special attention will be dedicated to final states including either a large or negligible fraction of missing transverse momentum. In particular, we will propose a dedicated collider search tailored for the discovery and mass measurement of a top partner, exploiting jet

  1. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  2. Results of the first tests of the SIDRA satellite-borne instrument breadboard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, O.V.; Kurbatov, E.V.; Avilov, A.M.; Titov, K.G.; Prieto, M; Sanchez, S.; Spassky, A.V.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the results of the calibration of the solid-state detectors and electronic channels of the SIDRA satellite borne energetic charged particle spectrometer-telescope breadboard model are presented. The block schemes and experimental equipment used to conduct the thermal vacuum and electromagnetic compatibility tests of the assemblies and modules of the compact satellite equipment are described. The results of the measured thermal conditions of operation of the signal analog and digital processing critical modules of the SIDRA instrument prototype are discussed. Finally, the levels of conducted interference generated by the instrument model in the primary vehicle-borne power circuits are presented.

  3. Lattice Hamiltonian approach to the Schwinger model. Further results from the strong coupling expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyniszewski, Marcin; Manchester Univ.; Cichy, Krzysztof; Poznan Univ.; Kujawa-Cichy, Agnieszka

    2014-10-01

    We employ exact diagonalization with strong coupling expansion to the massless and massive Schwinger model. New results are presented for the ground state energy and scalar mass gap in the massless model, which improve the precision to nearly 10 -9 %. We also investigate the chiral condensate and compare our calculations to previous results available in the literature. Oscillations of the chiral condensate which are present while increasing the expansion order are also studied and are shown to be directly linked to the presence of flux loops in the system.

  4. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  5. Presentation and surgical results of incidentally discovered nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas: evidence for a better outcome independently of other patients' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Donofrio, Carmine A; Barzaghi, Raffaella; Mortini, Pietro

    2013-12-01

    Few data are available on the surgical results in patients with incidentally discovered nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFPA). We investigated the efficacy and safety of surgery in patients with incidentally discovered NFPA. Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded outcomes. From 1990 to 2011, of 804 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for NFPA, 212 cases had an incidentally discovered tumor (26.4%). Among them, 117 patients were asymptomatic, while 95 had some visual and/or hormonal deficit. The main outcome of the study was to evaluate the frequency of radical resection as judged on the first postoperative neuroimaging study and detection of recurring disease during long-term follow-up. Postoperative residual tumor was detected in 8.9% of patients with asymptomatic incidentalomas as compared with 31.2% of patients with symptomatic incidentalomas (P<0.001) and 41.2% of patients in the control group (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that having an asymptomatic incidentaloma was independently associated with a better outcome. The 5-year recurrence-free survival in patients with incidentaloma was 86.8% (95% CI 80.2-92.4%) as compared with 77.9% (95% CI 73.6-82.2%; P<0.01) in the control group. This difference was almost completely due to a lower frequency of relapse in asymptomatic patients. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent lower risk of tumor recurrence in asymptomatic NFPA. Our study shows for the first time that surgically treated patients with asymptomatic NFPA have a better early and long-term outcome that is independent from all the other demographic, clinical, and morphologic characteristics of the patients.

  6. Presentation of the results of 1993-1994 of the peat production research area; Turvetuotanto - tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A.

    1996-12-31

    The development target of the peat production research area of the Biomass research programme is to improve the competitivity of peat by reducing the production costs by 20 % (5-6 FIM/MWh) from the level of 1992 and to reduce the environmental load. The main targets of peat production, by which the target can be met, are ditching and preparation technologies, drying technology, machine technology, methodology, integration of wood harvesting and peat production, and application of the results of the Optimiturve research programme in practice. The objectives of the peat production research are possible to meet if the partial targets are met. Increment of the open-ditch distance from 20 m to 60 m reduces the production costs by 5.0 %, increment of the rate of utilization of solar radiation from 30 % to 40 % reduces the production costs by 8 %, reduction of the amount of residual peat from 3000 MWh to 1500 MWh reduces the costs by 6.5 %, development of light and firesafe machines by 3 %, and integrated harvesting of wood by 3 %. Meeting of the partial targets reduces the production costs by 24 %. The main research areas of peat production will be carried out further. The total funding of the peat production researches in 1993-1994 was 19.4 million FIM (9.7 million FIM/a). The share of the total funding of the research organization projects has been 6.7 million FIM and that of the company projects 12.7 million FIM. The share of the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry of the funding has been 9.0 million FIM (46 %)

  7. Innovation ecosystem model for commercialization of research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlăduţ Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovation means Creativity and Added value recognise by the market. The first step in creating a sustainable commercialization of research results, Technological Transfer – TT mechanism, on one hand is to define the “technology” which will be transferred and on other hand to define the context in which the TT mechanism work, the ecosystem. The focus must be set on technology as an entity, not as a science or a study of the practical industrial arts and certainly not any specific applied science. The transfer object, the technology, must rely on a subjectively determined but specifiable set of processes and products. Focusing on the product is not sufficient to the transfer and diffusion of technology. It is not merely the product that is transferred but also knowledge of its use and application. The innovation ecosystem model brings together new companies, experienced business leaders, researchers, government officials, established technology companies, and investors. This environment provides those new companies with a wealth of technical expertise, business experience, and access to capital that supports innovation in the early stages of growth.

  8. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  9. Planck intermediate results XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    . The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density Sigma(Md), the dust optical extinction A(V), and the starlight intensity heating the bulk...... grains per unit A(V), and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL A(V) estimate, dependent of U-min, which compensates...

  10. Parametric Modeling of Urban Landscape: Decoding the Brasilia of Lucio Costa from Modernism to Present Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara Moura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the case study of the Pilot-Plan of Brasilia, important example of modernist urban design protected as human heritage. Discusses a methodological process to promote visualization of maximum envelops of urban volumes, organized in a set of rules and scripts which structures urban parameters in a logic of volume constructions. Applies City Engine - ESRI facilities to construct and visualize the urban rules. It has the goal to promote characterization, analysis, proposals and simulation of urban parameters in order to support decision making in land use transformation. The research deals with the difficulties of management urban pressure of transformation and the maintenance of urban cultural heritage. The methodology defends the change from authorial urban design to the decoding of collective values and goals. The 3D modeling and dynamic visualization promotes the composition of the whole, which means to work in a relative mode, and not in an absolute sense. Although it had been developed for a particular case study, the protected historical area of Brasilia, it presents methodological processes of how to structure rules of three-dimensional modeling to simulate the maximum constructive authorized by planning legislation (maximum envelopes, so that it can be reapplied in any other situation of definition of parameters in urban master plans and in laws for land use and occupation.

  11. Multi-nutrient, multi-group model of present and future oceanic phytoplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Litchman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton community composition profoundly affects patterns of nutrient cycling and the dynamics of marine food webs; therefore predicting present and future phytoplankton community structure is crucial to understand how ocean ecosystems respond to physical forcing and nutrient limitations. We develop a mechanistic model of phytoplankton communities that includes multiple taxonomic groups (diatoms, coccolithophores and prasinophytes, nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and iron, light, and a generalist zooplankton grazer. Each taxonomic group was parameterized based on an extensive literature survey. We test the model at two contrasting sites in the modern ocean, the North Atlantic (North Atlantic Bloom Experiment, NABE and subarctic North Pacific (ocean station Papa, OSP. The model successfully predicts general patterns of community composition and succession at both sites: In the North Atlantic, the model predicts a spring diatom bloom, followed by coccolithophore and prasinophyte blooms later in the season. In the North Pacific, the model reproduces the low chlorophyll community dominated by prasinophytes and coccolithophores, with low total biomass variability and high nutrient concentrations throughout the year. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the identity of the most sensitive parameters and the range of acceptable parameters differed between the two sites. We then use the model to predict community reorganization under different global change scenarios: a later onset and extended duration of stratification, with shallower mixed layer depths due to increased greenhouse gas concentrations; increase in deep water nitrogen; decrease in deep water phosphorus and increase or decrease in iron concentration. To estimate uncertainty in our predictions, we used a Monte Carlo sampling of the parameter space where future scenarios were run using parameter combinations that produced acceptable modern day outcomes and the

  12. Body wave travel times and amplitudes for present-day seismic model of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskiy, Sergey; Gudkova, Tamara

    At the moment Martian interior structure models are constrained by the satellite observational data (the mass, the moment of inertia factor, the Love number k _{2}) (Konopliv et al., 2011) and high pressure experimental data (Bertka and Fei, 1997). Seismological observations could provide unparalleled capability for studying Martian interiors. Future missions include seismic experiments on Mars (Lognonné et al., 2012). The main instrument for these seismic experiments is a broadband seismometer (Robert et al., 2012). When seismic measurements are not yet available, physically consistent interior models, characterized by properties of relevant minerals, make possible to study of the seismic response of the planet. \\To estimate travel times for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP body waves as a function of epicentral distance and hypocentral depth, as well as their amplitudes at the surface for a given marsquake, software product was developed in MatLab, as it encompasses many plotting routines that plot resulting travel times and ray paths. The computational results have been compared with the program TTBox (Knapmeyer, 2004). The code computes seismic ray paths and travel times for a one-dimentional spherical interior model (density and seismic velocities are functions of a radius only). Calculations of travel times tables for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP waves and their amplitudes are carried out for a trial seismic model of Mars M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009): the core radius is 1800 km, the thickness of the crust is 50 km. Direct and core reflected P and S waves are recorded to a maximum epicentral distance equal to about 100(°) , and PKP arrivals can be detected for epicental distances larger than 150(°) . The shadow zone is getting wider in comparison with previous results (Knapmeyer, 2010), as the liquid core radius of the seismic model under consideration is larger. Based on the estimates of

  13. Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation uses a vehicle simulator and economics model called the Battery Ownership Model to examine the levelized cost per mile of conventional (CV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in comparison with the cost to operate an electric vehicle (EV) under a service provider business model. The service provider is assumed to provide EV infrastructure such as charge points and swap stations to allow an EV with a 100-mile range to operate with driving profiles equivalent to CVs and HEVs. Battery cost, fuel price forecast, battery life, and other variables are examined to determine under what scenarios the levelized cost of an EV with a service provider can approach that of a CV. Scenarios in both the United States as an average and Hawaii are examined. The levelized cost of operating an EV with a service provider under average U.S. conditions is approximately twice the cost of operating a small CV. If battery cost and life can be improved, in this study the cost of an EV drops to under 1.5 times the cost of a CV for U.S. average conditions. In Hawaii, the same EV is only slightly more expensive to operate than a CV.

  14. Present capabilities and new developments in antenna modeling with the numerical electromagnetics code NEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, G.J.

    1988-04-08

    Computer modeling of antennas, since its start in the late 1960's, has become a powerful and widely used tool for antenna design. Computer codes have been developed based on the Method-of-Moments, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, or integration of Maxwell's equations. Of such tools, the Numerical Electromagnetics Code-Method of Moments (NEC) has become one of the most widely used codes for modeling resonant sized antennas. There are several reasons for this including the systematic updating and extension of its capabilities, extensive user-oriented documentation and accessibility of its developers for user assistance. The result is that there are estimated to be several hundred users of various versions of NEC world wide. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  15. A model study of present-day Hall-effect circulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placke, B. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Bosco, S. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Fundamentals of Future Information Technologiesh, Juelich (Germany); DiVincenzo, D.P. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Fundamentals of Future Information Technologiesh, Juelich (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute, Theoretical Nanoelectronics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Stimulated by the recent implementation of a three-port Hall-effect microwave circulator of Mahoney et al. (MEA), we present model studies of the performance of this device. Our calculations are based on the capacitive-coupling model of Viola and DiVincenzo (VD). Based on conductance data from a typical Hall-bar device obtained from a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field, we numerically solve the coupled field-circuit equations to calculate the expected performance of the circulator, as determined by the S parameters of the device when coupled to 50Ω ports, as a function of frequency and magnetic field. Above magnetic fields of 1.5 T, for which a typical 2DEG enters the quantum Hall regime (corresponding to a Landau-level filling fraction ν of 20), the Hall angle θ{sub H} = tan{sup -1} σ{sub xy}/σ{sub xx} always remains close to 90 , and the S parameters are close to the analytic predictions of VD for θ{sub H} = π/2. As anticipated by VD, MEA find the device to have rather high (kΩ) impedance, and thus to be extremely mismatched to 50Ω, requiring the use of impedance matching. We incorporate the lumped matching circuits of MEA in our modeling and confirm that they can produce excellent circulation, although confined to a very small bandwidth. We predict that this bandwidth is significantly improved by working at lower magnetic field when the Landau index is high, e.g. ν = 20, and the impedance mismatch is correspondingly less extreme. Our modeling also confirms the observation of MEA that parasitic port-to-port capacitance can produce very interesting countercirculation effects. (orig.)

  16. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  17. Spinal cord stimulation: modeling results and clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Struijk, J.J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    The potential distribution in volume couductor models of the spinal cord at cervical, midthoracic and lowthoracic levels, due to epidural stimulation, was calculated. Treshold stimuli of modeled myelhated dorsal column and dorsal root fibers were calculated and were compared with perception

  18. How to: understanding SWAT model uncertainty relative to measured results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed models are being relied upon to contribute to most policy-making decisions of watershed management, and the demand for an accurate accounting of complete model uncertainty is rising. Generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) is a widely used method for quantifying uncertainty i...

  19. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    simulate the wind field and related economic impact of both historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since end of the 19th century. Our technique involves the dynamical downscaling of the 20CR to 3 km horizontal resolution using the numerical Weather Research and Forecasting model and the subsequent loss simulation using an open-source impact model. This impact model estimates, for modern economic and social conditions, storm-related economic losses at municipality level, and thus allows a numerical simulation of the impact from both historic and present-day severe winter storms in Switzerland on a relatively fine spatial scale. In this study, we apply the modelling chain to a storm sample of almost 90 high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since 1871, and we are thus able to make a statement of the typical wind and loss patterns of hazardous windstorms in Switzerland. To evaluate our modelling chain, we compare simulated storm losses with insurance loss data for the present-day windstorms "Lothar" and "Joachim" in December 1999 and December 2011, respectively. Our study further includes a range of sensitivity experiments and a discussion of the main sources of uncertainty.

  20. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  1. Geometric modelling of channel present in reservoir petroleum using Bezier splines; Modelagem da geometria de paleocanais presentes em reservatorios petroliferos usando splines de Bezier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Carlos Eduardo S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos 25 da ANP]. E-mail: carlos@dme.ufcg.edu.br; Silva, Rosana M. da [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica e Estatistica]. E-mail: rosana@dme.ufcg.edu.br

    2004-07-01

    This work presents an implementation of a synthetic model of a channel found in oil reservoir. The generation these models is one of the steps to the characterization and simulation of the equal probable three-dimensional geological scenery. O implemented model was obtained from fitting techniques of geometric modeling of curves and surfaces to the geological parameters (width, thickness, sinuosity and preferential direction) that defines the form to be modeled. The parameter sinuosity is related with the parameter wave length and the local amplitude of the channel, the parameter preferential direction indicates the way of the flow and the declivity of the channel. The modeling technique used to represent the surface of the channel is the sweeping technique, the consist in effectuate a translation operation from a curve along a guide curve. The guide curve, in our implementation, was generated by the interpolation of points obtained form sampled values or simulated of the parameter sinuosity, using the cubic splines of Bezier technique. A semi-ellipse, determinate by the parameter width and thickness, representing a transversal section of the channel, is the transferred curve through the guide curve, generating the channel surface. (author)

  2. Latest results from the EU project AVATAR: Aerodynamic modelling of 10 MW wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepers O. Ceyhan, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Gonzalez, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent results from the EU project AVATAR in which aerodynamic models are improved and validated for wind turbines on a scale of 10 MW and more. Measurements on a DU 00-W-212 airfoil are presented which have been taken in the pressurized DNW-HDG wind tunnel up...... to a Reynolds number of 15 Million. These measurements are compared with measurements in the LM wind tunnel for Reynolds numbers of 3 and 6 Million and with calculational results. In the analysis of results special attention is paid to high Reynolds numbers effects. CFD calculations on airfoil performance...... results from 3D rotor models where a comparison is made between results from vortex wake methods and BEM methods at yawed conditions....

  3. Investigating the Effective Factors on Entering into International Markets by Presenting the Local Islamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Mohammad Ali Alamolhodaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The internationalization of small and medium size businesses is regarded as one of the most leading general policies in many of the world’s countries. The reason is that it is often the small and medium size companies which have a vital role in industrial innovation and gain profit for their societies through economic development. This research has investigated and identified the effective factors (organizational factors and business etiquette in Islam on entering into international markets by presenting local Islamic model in the companies of incubator of Science and Technology Park. The statistical population of the research includes the existing companies of Incubator of Mashhad Science and Technology Park. The statistical sample was investigated through simple random sampling from managers of active companies in export in Science and Technology Park. AMOS and SPSS software were applied for data analysis to identify the effects among variables survey research methodology and questionnaire tools were used.

  4. New analytic results for speciation times in neutral models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhard, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the standard Yule model, and a recently studied model of speciation and extinction, the "critical branching process." We develop an analytic way-as opposed to the common simulation approach-for calculating the speciation times in a reconstructed phylogenetic tree. Simple expressions for the density and the moments of the speciation times are obtained. Methods for dating a speciation event become valuable, if for the reconstructed phylogenetic trees, no time scale is available. A missing time scale could be due to supertree methods, morphological data, or molecular data which violates the molecular clock. Our analytic approach is, in particular, useful for the model with extinction, since simulations of birth-death processes which are conditioned on obtaining n extant species today are quite delicate. Further, simulations are very time consuming for big n under both models.

  5. Box photosynthesis modeling results for WRF/CMAQ LSM

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Box Photosynthesis model simulations for latent heat and ozone at 6 different FLUXNET sites. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Ran, L., J....

  6. New Results in Optical Modelling of Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvian Fara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project brought further advancements to the quantum well solar cell concept proposed by Keith Barnham. In this paper, the optical modelling of MQW solar cells was analyzed and we focussed on the following topics: (i simulation of the refraction index and the reflectance, (ii simulation of the absorption coefficient, (iii simulation of the quantum efficiency for the absorption process, (iv discussion and modelling of the quantum confinement effect, and (v evaluation of datasheet parameters of the MQW cell.

  7. Verification of simulation model with COBRA-IIIP code by confrontment of experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Galetti, M.R. da; Pontedeiro, A.C.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de

    1985-01-01

    It is presented an evaluation of the COBRA IIIP/MIT code (of thermal hydraulic analysis by subchannels), comparing their results with experimental data obtained in stationary and transient regimes. It was done a study to calculate the spatial and temporal critical heat flux. It is presented a sensitivity study of simulation model related to the turbulent mixture and the number of axial intervals. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Buddleja thyrsoides Lam. crude extract presents antinociceptive effect on an arthritic pain model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Maria Fernanda Pessano; Brusco, Indiara; da Silva Brum, Evelyne; Piana, Mariana; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Trevisan, Gabriela; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan

    2017-08-17

    Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease which reduces the life quality of affected individuals. Therapeutic tools used for treating inflammatory pain are associated with several undesirable effects. Buddleja thyrsoides Lam., known as 'Barbasco' or 'Cambara', is mostly used in several disorders and possesses antirheumatic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the B. thyrsoides crude extract applied orally and topically in acute pain models and an arthritic pain model induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) paw injection in male mice (25-30 g). The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the B. thyrsoides extract crude revealed the presence of the lupeol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol. The stability study of the B. thyrsoides gel did not show relevant changes at low temperatures. The oral treatment with the B. thrysoides extract prevented the capsaicin-induced spontaneous nociception and the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, but did not alter the thermal threshold in the tail immersion test. The B. thyrsoides antinociceptive effect was not reversed by naloxone in the capsaicin test. The B. thyrsoides oral or topical treatment reversed the CFA-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with maximum inhibition ( I max ) of 69 ± 6 and 68 ± 5% as well as 78 ± 15 and 87 ± 12%, respectively. Moreover, the topical but not oral treatment inhibited the CFA-induced cell infiltration, but did not reduce the paw edema significantly. The oral treatment with B. thyrsoides did not cause adverse effects. These findings suggest that the oral or topical treatment with B. thyrsoides presents antinociceptive actions in an arthritic pain model without causing adverse effects. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. The animal model determines the results of Aeromonas virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of A. hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria. The implication of T3SS in the virulence of A. hydrophila was analysed using the AH-1::aopB mutant. This mutant was less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated into zebrafish larvae, as described in other vertebrates. However, the zebrafish model exhibited slight differences in mortality kinetics only observed using invertebrate models. Infections using the mutant AH-1∆vapA lacking the gene coding for the surface S-layer suggested that this protein was not totally necessary to the bacteria once it was inside the host, but it contributed to the inflammatory response. Only when healthy zebrafish larvae were infected did the mutant produce less mortality than the wild type. Variations between models were evidenced using the AH-1∆rmlB, which lacks the O-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the AH-1∆wahD, which lacks the O-antigen LPS and part of the LPS outer-core. Both mutants showed decreased mortality in all of the animal models, but the differences between them were only observed in injured zebrafish larvae, suggesting that residues from the LPS outer core must be important for virulence. The greatest differences were observed using the AH-1ΔFlaB-J (lacking polar flagella and unable to swim and the AH-1::motX (non-motile but producing flagella. They were as pathogenic as the wild-type strain when injected into mice and trout, but no mortalities were registered in zebrafish larvae. This study

  10. The Transition From the Present-Day Climate to a Snowball Earth Simulated With a Comprehensive Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.; Marotzke, J.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, Marotzke and Botzet (2007) have shown that in a comprehensive climate model both the current climate and a completely ice-covered Earth are stable states under today's total solar irradiance (TSI) and greenhouse gas concentrations. By setting TSI to near-zero they were able to cause a transition from the present-day climate to the ice-covered state within 15 years [1]. In order to study the bifurcation point, we have repeated this experiment with the same model, i.e. the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM, at lower resolution (horizontally T31 in the atmosphere and 3.0 degrees in the ocean). We give estimates for the critical values of TSI and greenhouse gas concentrations needed to trigger the transition from the present-day to the ice- covered state. Starting from today's climate and setting TSI to 44% of today's value leads to a glaciation within 30 years. Furthermore, we investigate the degree of oceanic ice-cover needed for an unstoppable glaciation. We find that only an almost completely ice-covered ocean guarantees that the model does not return to the present-day climate when TSI is reset to its today's value. Our results indicate that a snowball Earth could, in principle, be triggered by a brief decrease of TSI. [1] Marotzke, J. and M. Botzet (2007), Present-day and ice-covered equilibrium states in a comprehensive climate model, Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 34, No. 16, L16704, doi:10.1029/2006GL028880

  11. The Plumbing of Land Surface Models: Is Poor Performance a Result of Methodology or Data Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Ned; Abramowitz, Gab; Pitman, Andy J.; Or, Dani; Best, Martin J.; Johnson, Helen R.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boone, Aaron; Cuntz, Matthais; Decharme, Bertrand; hide

    2016-01-01

    The PALS Land sUrface Model Benchmarking Evaluation pRoject (PLUMBER) illustrated the value of prescribing a priori performance targets in model intercomparisons. It showed that the performance of turbulent energy flux predictions from different land surface models, at a broad range of flux tower sites using common evaluation metrics, was on average worse than relatively simple empirical models. For sensible heat fluxes, all land surface models were outperformed by a linear regression against downward shortwave radiation. For latent heat flux, all land surface models were outperformed by a regression against downward shortwave, surface air temperature and relative humidity. These results are explored here in greater detail and possible causes are investigated. We examine whether particular metrics or sites unduly influence the collated results, whether results change according to time-scale aggregation and whether a lack of energy conservation in fluxtower data gives the empirical models an unfair advantage in the intercomparison. We demonstrate that energy conservation in the observational data is not responsible for these results. We also show that the partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes in LSMs, rather than the calculation of available energy, is the cause of the original findings. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the nature of this partitioning problem is likely shared among all contributing LSMs. While we do not find a single candidate explanation forwhy land surface models perform poorly relative to empirical benchmarks in PLUMBER, we do exclude multiple possible explanations and provide guidance on where future research should focus.

  12. [Analysis of the model OPM3®application and results for health area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto Dos Santos, Luis; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2011-01-01

    This research sought to analyze if a questionnaire model created by an international community of project management is applicable to health organizations. The model OPM3 ® (Organizational Project Management Maturity Model) was created in order that organizations of any area or size can identify the presence or absence of good management practices. The aim of applying this model is to always evaluate the organization and not the interviewee. In this paper, one presents the results of employing this model in an organization that has information technology products and services applied to health area. This study verified that the model is rapidly applicable and that the analyzed organization has an expressive number of good practices.

  13. Modeling the radiation transfer of discontinuous canopies: results for gap probability and single-scattering contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Zou, Kai; Shang, Hong; Ji, Zheng; Zhao, Huijie; Huang, Wenjiang; Li, Cunjun

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we present an analytical model for the computation of radiation transfer of discontinuous vegetation canopies. Some initial results of gap probability and bidirectional gap probability of discontinuous vegetation canopies, which are important parameters determining the radiative environment of the canopies, are given and compared with a 3- D computer simulation model. In the model, negative exponential attenuation of light within individual plant canopies is assumed. Then the computation of gap probability is resolved by determining the entry points and exiting points of the ray with the individual plants via their equations in space. For the bidirectional gap probability, which determines the single-scattering contribution of the canopy, a gap statistical analysis based model was adopted to correct the dependence of gap probabilities for both solar and viewing directions. The model incorporates the structural characteristics, such as plant sizes, leaf size, row spacing, foliage density, planting density, leaf inclination distribution. Available experimental data are inadequate for a complete validation of the model. So it was evaluated with a three dimensional computer simulation model for 3D vegetative scenes, which shows good agreement between these two models' results. This model should be useful to the quantification of light interception and the modeling of bidirectional reflectance distributions of discontinuous canopies.

  14. Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K.

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  15. Results From Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, Kevin [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  16. Present mantle flow in North China Craton constrained by seismic anisotropy and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, H.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    North China Carton (NCC) has undergone complicated geodynamic processes during the Cenozoic, including the westward subduction of the Pacific plate to its east and the collision of the India-Eurasia plates to its southwest. Shear wave splitting measurements in NCC reveal distinct seismic anisotropy patterns at different tectonic blocks, that is, the predominantly NW-SE trending alignment of fast directions in the western NCC and eastern NCC, weak anisotropy within the Ordos block, and N-S fast polarization beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). To better understand the origin of seismic anisotropy from SKS splitting in NCC, we obtain a high-resolution dynamic model that absorbs multi-geophysical observations and state-of-the-art numerical methods. We calculate the mantle flow using a most updated version of software ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) with high-resolution temperature and density structures from a recent 3-D thermal-chemical model by Guo et al. (2016). The thermal-chemical model is obtained by multi-observable probabilistic inversion using high-quality surface wave measurements, potential fields, topography, and surface heat flow (Guo et al., 2016). The viscosity is then estimated by combining the dislocation creep, diffusion creep, and plasticity, which is depended on temperature, pressure, and chemical composition. Then we calculate the seismic anisotropy from the shear deformation of mantle flow by DREX, and predict the fast direction and delay time of SKS splitting. We find that when complex boundary conditions are applied, including the far field effects of the deep subduction of Pacific plate and eastward escaping of Tibetan Plateau, our model can successfully predict the observed shear wave splitting patterns. Our model indicates that seismic anisotropy revealed by SKS is primarily resulting from the LPO of olivine due to the shear deformation from asthenospheric flow. We suggest that two branches of mantle flow may contribute to the

  17. The effect of presenting information about invasive follow-up testing on individuals' noninvasive colorectal cancer screening participation decision: results from a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benning, Tim M; Dellaert, Benedict G C; Severens, Johan L; Dirksen, Carmen D

    2014-07-01

    Many national colorectal cancer screening campaigns have a similar structure. First, individuals are invited to take a noninvasive screening test, and, second, in the case of a positive screening test result, they are advised to undergo a more invasive follow-up test. The objective of this study was to investigate how much individuals' participation decision in noninvasive screening is affected by the presence or absence of detailed information about invasive follow-up testing and how this effect varies over screening tests. We used a labeled discrete choice experiment of three noninvasive colorectal cancer screening types with two versions that did or did not present respondents with detailed information about the possible invasive follow-up test (i.e., colonoscopy) and its procedure. We used data from 631 Dutch respondents aged 55 to 75 years. Each respondent received only one of the two versions (N = 310 for the invasive follow-up test information specification version, and N = 321 for the no-information specification version). Mixed logit model results show that detailed information about the invasive follow-up test negatively affects screening participation decisions. This effect can be explained mainly by a decrease in choice shares for the most preferred screening test (a combined stool and blood sample test). Choice share simulations based on the discrete choice experiment indicated that presenting invasive follow-up test information decreases screening participation by 4.79%. Detailed information about the invasive follow-up test has a negative effect on individuals' screening participation decisions in noninvasive colorectal cancer screening campaigns. This result poses new challenges for policymakers who aim not only to increase uptake but also to provide full disclosure to potential screening participants. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering results on model compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Tomkinson heterobicyclic molecules could form a reasonable base of model compounds to un- derstand the eigenvectors of one interesting molecular system; the nitrogenous het- erocyclic bases of the nucleotides. Low energy molecular vibrational eigenvectors involve atomic displacements over the molecule as a whole ...

  19. Delta-tilde interpretation of standard linear mixed model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per Bruun; Amorim, Isabel de Sousa; Kuznetsova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    data set and compared to actual d-prime calculations based on Thurstonian regression modeling through the ordinal package. For more challenging cases we offer a generic "plug-in" implementation of a version of the method as part of the R-package SensMixed. We discuss and clarify the bias mechanisms...

  20. Some Results On The Modelling Of TSS Manufacturing Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel MÎNZU

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the modelling of a particular class of manufacturing lines, governed by a decentralised control strategy so that they balance themselves. Such lines are known as “bucket brigades” and also as “TSS lines”, after their first implementation, at Toyota, in the 70’s. A first study of their behaviour was based upon modelling as stochastic dynamic systems, which emphasised, in the frame of the so-called “Normative Model”, a sufficient condition for self-balancing, that means for autonomous functioning at a steady production rate (stationary behaviour. Under some particular conditions, a simulation analysis of TSS lines could be made on non-linear block diagrams, showing that the state trajectories are piecewise continuous in between occurrences of certain discrete events, which determine their discontinuity. TSS lines may therefore be modelled as hybrid dynamic systems, more specific, with autonomous switching and autonomous impulses (jumps. A stability analysis of such manufacturing lines is allowed by modelling them as hybrid dynamic systems with discontinuous motions.

  1. Some results for the dynamic (s, S) inventory model *

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Tijms

    1971-01-01

    textabstractSummary The periodic review, single item, stationary (s, S) inventory model is considered. There is a fixed lead time, a linear purchase cost, a fixed set‐up cost, a holding and shortage cost function, a discount factor 0 < α≤ 1 and backlogging of unfilled demand. The solution for the

  2. Recent numerical results on the two dimensional Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, A.; Sorella, S.; Baroni, S.; Car, R.; Parrinello, M.; Tosatti, E. (SISSA, Trieste (Italy))

    1989-12-01

    A new method for simulating strongly correlated fermionic systems, has been applied to the study of the ground state properties of the 2D Hubbard model at various fillings. Comparison has been made with exact diagonalizations in the 4 x 4 lattices where very good agreement has been verified in all the correlation functions which have been studied: charge, magnetization and momentum distribution. (orig.).

  3. Analytical results for the Sznajd model of opinion formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slanina, František; Lavička, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, - (2003), s. 279-288 ISSN 1434-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/1091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : agent models * sociophysics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.457, year: 2003

  4. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (p<0.0001) and in vivo tumors (p<0.0001) versus controls. Subpopulation analyses revealed a homogeneous response to combined therapy in both cultured organoids and in vivo tumors, while single agent treatment with XL147 alone or paclitaxel alone elicited heterogeneous responses in organoids. Tumor volume decreased with combination treatment through treatment day 30. These results indicate that OMI of organoids generated from PyVmT tumors can accurately reflect drug response in heterogeneous allografts with both innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  5. Presenting a comprehensive market oriented model and evaluating its impact on organization performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taqi Amini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Like other innovative strategies, companies have paid more attention to market oriented strategies in recent years. This has been focused by organizations for improved effectiveness and the organization performance accelerated a lot in business competition. In responding to this fact, organizations are trying to formulate many of the issues familiar to large organizations, which have involved with market oriented strategy planning. This paper reviews key elements in market-oriented strategy planning with regard to competitiveness and performance in large organizations and outlines a comprehensive model for strategy planning in profit organizations. These elements include environment, top management, organization structure and market oriented strategy. Professional question of this study has a particularly important role in formulating relations of this model. These elements are well positioned to evaluate the impact of market-oriented strategy planning on organizations and their expected impacts on organization performance. A well-organized questionnaire to help organizations with their planning is proposed in this survey. Based on the proposed questionnaire, data obtained from Tehran food industry experts and analyzed by using SEM method. Results accepted eight hypotheses and rejected one.

  6. Nonlinear modeling of ferroelectric-ferromagnetic composites based on condensed and finite element approaches (Presentation Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricoeur, Andreas; Lange, Stephan; Avakian, Artjom

    2015-04-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling is an inherent property of only a few crystals exhibiting very low coupling coefficients at low temperatures. On the other hand, these materials are desirable due to many promising applications, e.g. as efficient data storage devices or medical or geophysical sensors. Efficient coupling of magnetic and electric fields in materials can only be achieved in composite structures. Here, ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) phases are combined e.g. including FM particles in a FE matrix or embedding fibers of the one phase into a matrix of the other. The ME coupling is then accomplished indirectly via strain fields exploiting magnetostrictive and piezoelectric effects. This requires a poling of the composite, where the structure is exposed to both large magnetic and electric fields. The efficiency of ME coupling will strongly depend on the poling process. Besides the alignment of local polarization and magnetization, it is going along with cracking, also being decisive for the coupling properties. Nonlinear ferroelectric and ferromagnetic constitutive equations have been developed and implemented within the framework of a multifield, two-scale FE approach. The models are microphysically motivated, accounting for domain and Bloch wall motions. A second, so called condensed approach is presented which doesn't require the implementation of a spatial discretisation scheme, however still considering grain interactions and residual stresses. A micromechanically motivated continuum damage model is established to simulate degradation processes. The goal of the simulation tools is to predict the different constitutive behaviors, ME coupling properties and lifetime of smart magnetoelectric devices.

  7. Interpretation of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Models: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel

    2017-11-27

    This paper is an overview of the most significant and impactful interpretation approaches of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, their development, and application. The evolution of the interpretation paradigm from "model → descriptors → (structure)" to "model → structure" is indicated. The latter makes all models interpretable regardless of machine learning methods or descriptors used for modeling. This opens wide prospects for application of corresponding interpretation approaches to retrieve structure-property relationships captured by any models. Issues of separate approaches are discussed as well as general issues and prospects of QSAR model interpretation.

  8. Use of the LQ model with large fraction sizes results in underestimation of isoeffect doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Tommy; Molkentine, Jessica; Transtrum, Mark K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Withers, Hubert Rodney; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the appropriateness of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe survival of jejunal crypt clonogens after split doses with variable (small 1–6 Gy, large 8–13 Gy) first dose, as a model of its appropriateness for both small and large fraction sizes. Methods: C3Hf/KamLaw mice were exposed to whole body irradiation using 300 kVp X-rays at a dose rate of 1.84 Gy/min, and the number of viable jejunal crypts was determined using the microcolony assay. 14 Gy total dose was split into unequal first and second fractions separated by 4 h. Data were analyzed using the LQ model, the lethal potentially lethal (LPL) model, and a repair-saturation (RS) model. Results: Cell kill was greater in the group receiving the larger fraction first, creating an asymmetry in the plot of survival vs size of first dose, as opposed to the prediction of the LQ model of a symmetric response. There was a significant difference in the estimated βs (higher β after larger first doses), but no significant difference in the αs, when large doses were given first vs small doses first. This difference results in underestimation (based on present data by approximately 8%) of isoeffect doses using LQ model parameters based on small fraction sizes. While the LPL model also predicted a symmetric response inconsistent with the data, the RS model results were consistent with the observed asymmetry. Conclusion: The LQ model underestimates doses for isoeffective crypt-cell survival with large fraction sizes (in the present setting, >9 Gy)

  9. Dynamic model of the electrorheological fluid based on measurement results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivenkov, K; Ulrich, S; Bruns, R

    2013-01-01

    To develop modern applications for vibration decoupling based on electrorheological fluids with suitable control strategies, an appropriate mathematical model of the ERF is necessary. The devices mostly used have annular-shape electrorheological valves. This requires the use of flow channels to measure the static and dynamic properties of the electrorheological fluids in similar flow conditions. Particularly for the identification of the dynamic behavior of the fluids, the influences of the non-electrorheological properties on the overall system must be taken into account. In this contribution three types of parameters with several nonlinear dependencies for the mapping of the static and dynamic properties of the ERF are considered: electro-rheological, hydraulic and electrical. The mathematical model introduced can precisely demonstrate the static and dynamic behavior of the electrorheological fluid and can be used for the future design of real systems for vibration decoupling or other systems with high dynamic requirements.

  10. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  11. 1-g model loading tests: methods and results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feda, Jaroslav

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (1999), s. 371-381 ISSN 1436-6517. [Int.Conf. on Soil - Structure Interaction in Urban Civ. Engineering. Darmstadt, 08.10.1999-09.10.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC C7.10 Keywords : shallow foundation * model tests * sandy subsoil * bearing capacity * subsoil failure * volume deformation Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  12. Model films of cellulose. I. Method development and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunnars, S.; Wågberg, L.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new method for the preparation of thin cellulose films. NMMO (N- methylmorpholine- N-oxide) was used to dissolve cellulose and addition of DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) was used to control viscosity of the cellulose solution. A thin layer of the cellulose solution is spin- coated

  13. Sharing brain mapping statistical results with the neuroimaging data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maumet, Camille; Auer, Tibor; Bowring, Alexander; Chen, Gang; Das, Samir; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit; Glatard, Tristan; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Helmer, Karl G.; Jenkinson, Mark; Keator, David B.; Nichols, B. Nolan; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Reynolds, Richard; Sochat, Vanessa; Turner, Jessica; Nichols, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Only a tiny fraction of the data and metadata produced by an fMRI study is finally conveyed to the community. This lack of transparency not only hinders the reproducibility of neuroimaging results but also impairs future meta-analyses. In this work we introduce NIDM-Results, a format specification providing a machine-readable description of neuroimaging statistical results along with key image data summarising the experiment. NIDM-Results provides a unified representation of mass univariate analyses including a level of detail consistent with available best practices. This standardized representation allows authors to relay methods and results in a platform-independent regularized format that is not tied to a particular neuroimaging software package. Tools are available to export NIDM-Result graphs and associated files from the widely used SPM and FSL software packages, and the NeuroVault repository can import NIDM-Results archives. The specification is publically available at: http://nidm.nidash.org/specs/nidm-results.html. PMID:27922621

  14. Building a Global Groundwater Model fromScratch - Concepts and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, R.; Song, Q.; Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.; Doll, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    To represent groundwater-surface water interactions as well as the impact of capillary rise on evapotranspiration in global-scale hydrological models, it is necessary to simulate the location and temporal variation of the groundwater table. This requires to replace simulation of groundwater dynamics by calculating groundwater storage variations in individual grid cells (independent from the storage variation in neighboring cells) by hydraulic head gradient-based groundwater modeling. Based on the experience of two research groups who have published different approaches for global-scale groundwater modeling, we present first results of our effort to develop a transient global groundwater model that is to replace the simple storage-based ground-water module of the global hydrological model WaterGAP. The following three technical and conceptual aspects of this endeavour arediscussed: (1) A software engineering approach to build a new hydraulic head based global groundwater model from scratch with the goal of maximizing performance and extensibility. (2) Comparison to other model approaches and their inherent problems. (3) Global-data deficits and how to deal with them. Furthermore, this poster presents and discusses first results and provides an outlook on future developments.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISO 9001 CERTIFICATION MATURITY AND EFQM BUSINESS EXCELLENCE MODEL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Fonseca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This exploratory research evaluates if there a relationship between the number of years since an organization has achieved ISO 9001 certification and the highest level of recognition received by the same organization with the EFQM Business Excellence Model.Methodology/Approach: After state of the art review a detailed comparison between both models was made. Fifty two Portuguese organizations were considered and Correlation coefficient Spearman Rho was used to investigate the possible relationships.Findings: Conclusion is that there is indeed a moderate positive correlation between these two variables, the higher the number of years of ISO 9001 certification, the higher the results of the organization EFQM model evaluation and recognition. This supports the assumption that ISO 9001 International Standard by incorporating many of the principles present in the EFQM Business Excellence Model is consistent with this model and can be considered as a step towards that direction.Research Limitation/implication: Due to the dynamic nature of these models that might change over time and the possible time delays between implementation and results, more in-depth studies like experimental design or a longitudinal quasi-experimental design could be used to confirm the results of this investigation.Originality/Value of paper: This research gives additional insights on conjunct studies of both models. The use of external evaluation results carried out by the independent EFQM assessors minimizes the possible bias of previous studies accessing the value of ISO 9001 certification.

  16. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  17. DISCRETE DEFORMATION WAVE DYNAMICS IN SHEAR ZONES: PHYSICAL MODELLING RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bornyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of earthquake migration along active fault zones [Richter, 1958; Mogi, 1968] and related theoretical concepts [Elsasser, 1969] have laid the foundation for studying the problem of slow deformation waves in the lithosphere. Despite the fact that this problem has been under study for several decades and discussed in numerous publications, convincing evidence for the existence of deformation waves is still lacking. One of the causes is that comprehensive field studies to register such waves by special tools and equipment, which require sufficient organizational and technical resources, have not been conducted yet.The authors attempted at finding a solution to this problem by physical simulation of a major shear zone in an elastic-viscous-plastic model of the lithosphere. The experiment setup is shown in Figure 1 (A. The model material and boundary conditions were specified in accordance with the similarity criteria (described in detail in [Sherman, 1984; Sherman et al., 1991; Bornyakov et al., 2014]. The montmorillonite clay-and-water paste was placed evenly on two stamps of the installation and subject to deformation as the active stamp (1 moved relative to the passive stamp (2 at a constant speed. The upper model surface was covered with fine sand in order to get high-contrast photos. Photos of an emerging shear zone were taken every second by a Basler acA2000-50gm digital camera. Figure 1 (B shows an optical image of a fragment of the shear zone. The photos were processed by the digital image correlation method described in [Sutton et al., 2009]. This method estimates the distribution of components of displacement vectors and strain tensors on the model surface and their evolution over time [Panteleev et al., 2014, 2015].Strain fields and displacements recorded in the optical images of the model surface were estimated in a rectangular box (220.00×72.17 mm shown by a dot-and-dash line in Fig. 1, A. To ensure a sufficient level of

  18. Updating the CHAOS series of field models using Swarm data and resulting candidate models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    Ten months of data from ESA's Swarm mission, together with recent ground observatory monthly means, are used to update the CHAOS series of geomagnetic field models with a focus on time-changes of the core field. As for previous CHAOS field models quiet-time, night-side, data selection criteria......th order spline representation with knot points spaced at 0.5 year intervals. The resulting field model is able to consistently fit data from six independent low Earth orbit satellites: Oersted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the three Swarm satellites. As an example, we present comparisons of the excellent model...... fit obtained to both the Swarm data and the CHAMP data. The new model also provides a good description of observatory secular variation, capturing rapid field evolution events during the past decade. Maps of the core surface field and its secular variation can already be extracted in the Swarm-era. We...

  19. Modeling High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Fermi Bubbles - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 50 degrees in galactic latitude and 20-30 degrees in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration is responsible for the high-energy emission of the bubbles. Second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields—both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. I use the assumption of second order Fermi acceleration in the transport equation, which describes the diffusion of particles. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to Fermi second order acceleration and compare this analytical solution to a numerical solution provided by Dr. P. Mertsch. Analytical solutions to the transport equation are taken from Becker, Le, & Dermer and are used to further test the numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution converges to the analytical solution in all cases. Thus, we know the numerical solution accurately calculates the proton spectrum. The gamma-ray spectrum follows the proton spectrum, and will be computed in the future.

  20. Being present in action: a theoretical model about the interlocking between intentions and environmental affordances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eTriberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuropsychological evidence suggest that a key role in linking perceptions and intentions is played by sense of presence. Despite this phenomenon having been studied primarily in the field of virtual reality (conceived as the illusion of being in the virtual space, recent research highlighted that it is a fundamental feature of everyday experience. Specifically, the function of presence as a cognitive process is to locate the Self in a physical space or situation, based on the perceived possibility to act in it; so, the variations in sense of presence allow one to continuously adapt his own action to the external environment. Indeed intentions, as the cognitive antecedents of action, are not static representations of the desired outcomes, but dynamic processes able to adjust their own representational content according to the opportunities/restrictions emerging in the environment. Focusing on the peculiar context of action mediated by interactive technologies, we here propose a theoretical model showing how each level of an intentional hierarchy (future-directed; present directed; and motor intentions can interlock with environmental affordances in order to promote a continuous stream of action and activity.

  1. Being Present in Action: A Theoretical Model About the "Interlocking" Between Intentions and Environmental Affordances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberti, Stefano; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuropsychological evidence suggest that a key role in linking perceptions and intentions is played by sense of presence. Despite this phenomenon having been studied primarily in the field of virtual reality (conceived as the illusion of being in the virtual space), recent research highlighted that it is a fundamental feature of everyday experience. Specifically, the function of presence as a cognitive process is to locate the Self in a physical space or situation, based on the perceived possibility to act in it; so, the variations in sense of presence allow one to continuously adapt his own action to the external environment. Indeed intentions, as the cognitive antecedents of action, are not static representations of the desired outcomes, but dynamic processes able to adjust their own representational content according to the opportunities/restrictions emerging in the environment. Focusing on the peculiar context of action mediated by interactive technologies, we here propose a theoretical model showing how each level of an intentional hierarchy (future-directed; present directed; and motor intentions) can "interlock" with environmental affordances in order to promote a continuous stream of action and activity.

  2. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  3. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  4. Solar activity variations of ionosonde measurements and modeling results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altadill, D.; Arrazola, D.; Blanch, E.; Burešová, Dalia

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2008), s. 610-616 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506 Grant - others:MCYT(ES) REN2003-08376-C02-02; CSIC(XE) 2004CZ0002; AGAUR(XE) 2006BE00112; AF Research Laboratory(XE) FA8718-L-0072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mid-latitude ionosphere * bottomside modeling * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2008 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02731177

  5. Characteristics of Tropical Cyclones in High-resolution Models in the Present Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Daehyun; Kumar, Arun; LaRow, Timothy E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Reed, Kevin; hide

    2014-01-01

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) fields in two types of experiments, using climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TC frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.

  6. Characteristics of Tropical Cyclones in High-Resolution Models of the Present Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffery A.; Kim, Daeyhun; Kumar, Arun; LaRow, Timothy E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Roberts, Malcolm J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) in two types of experiments, using a climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TC frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.

  7. Combining forming results via weld models to powerful numerical assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kose, K.; Rietman, Bert

    2004-01-01

    Forming simulations generally give satisfying results with respect to thinning, stresses, changed material properties and, with a proper springback calculation, the geometric form. The joining of parts by means of welding yields an extra change of the material properties and the residual stresses.

  8. Presentation of a stochastic model estimating the wind energy contribution in remote island electrical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Kapsali, M.; Tiligadas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study estimates the maximum wind energy contribution to an isolated micro-grid. ► An integrated computational tool is developed on the basis of stochastic analysis. ► The probability distribution of the wind energy surplus and deficit is estimated. ► The results indicate that a strict penetration limit is imposed to wind energy. -- Abstract: The electrification in remote islands whose electricity distribution network is not connected to the mainland’s grid is mostly based on Autonomous Power Stations (APSs) that are usually characterized by a considerably high electricity production cost, while at the same time the contribution of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) in these regions accounts for less than 10% of the total electricity generation. This actually results from the fact that despite the excellent wind potential of most of these islands, the wind energy contribution is significantly restricted from limits imposed to protect the remote electrical grids from possible instability problems, due to the stochastic wind speed behavior and the variable electricity consumption. On the basis of probability distribution of the load demand of a representative Greek island and the corresponding data related to the available wind potential, the present study estimates the maximum – acceptable by the local grid – wind energy contribution. For that reason, an integrated computational algorithm has been developed from first principles, based on a stochastic analysis. According to the results obtained, it becomes evident that with the current wind turbine technology, wind energy cannot play a key role in coping with the electrification problems encountered in many Greek island regions, excluding however the case of introducing bulk energy storage systems that may provide considerable recovery of the remarkable wind energy rejections expected.

  9. The Past, Present and Future of Cyber-Physical Systems: A Focus on Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about better engineering of cyber-physical systems (CPSs through better models. Deterministic models have historically proven extremely useful and arguably form the kingpin of the industrial revolution and the digital and information technology revolutions. Key deterministic models that have proven successful include differential equations, synchronous digital logic and single-threaded imperative programs. Cyber-physical systems, however, combine these models in such a way that determinism is not preserved. Two projects show that deterministic CPS models with faithful physical realizations are possible and practical. The first project is PRET, which shows that the timing precision of synchronous digital logic can be practically made available at the software level of abstraction. The second project is Ptides (programming temporally-integrated distributed embedded systems, which shows that deterministic models for distributed cyber-physical systems have practical faithful realizations. These projects are existence proofs that deterministic CPS models are possible and practical.

  10. The past, present and future of cyber-physical systems: a focus on models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward A

    2015-02-26

    This paper is about better engineering of cyber-physical systems (CPSs) through better models. Deterministic models have historically proven extremely useful and arguably form the kingpin of the industrial revolution and the digital and information technology revolutions. Key deterministic models that have proven successful include differential equations, synchronous digital logic and single-threaded imperative programs. Cyber-physical systems, however, combine these models in such a way that determinism is not preserved. Two projects show that deterministic CPS models with faithful physical realizations are possible and practical. The first project is PRET, which shows that the timing precision of synchronous digital logic can be practically made available at the software level of abstraction. The second project is Ptides (programming temporally-integrated distributed embedded systems), which shows that deterministic models for distributed cyber-physical systems have practical faithful realizations. These projects are existence proofs that deterministic CPS models are possible and practical.

  11. Presenting a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Azarhoosh, Mohammad; Halladj, Rouein; Askari, Sima

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins (MTO) reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) mechanism was presented and the kinetic parameters was obtained using a genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP). Several kinetic models for the MTO reactions have been presented. However, due to the complexity of the reactions, most reactions are considered lumped and elementary, which cannot be deemed a completely accurate kinetic model of the process. Therefore, in this study, the LHHW mechanism is presented as kinetic models of MTO reactions. Because of the non-linearity of the kinetic models and existence of many local optimal points, evolutionary algorithms (GA and GP) are used in this study to estimate the kinetic parameters in the rate equations. Via the simultaneous connection of the code related to modelling the reactor and the GA and GP codes in the MATLAB R2013a software, optimization of the kinetic models parameters was performed such that the least difference between the results from the kinetic models and experiential results was obtained and the best kinetic parameters of MTO process reactions were achieved. A comparison of the results from the model with experiential results showed that the present model possesses good accuracy.

  12. Modelling and simulation of heat pipes with TAIThermIR (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Max E.

    2016-10-01

    Regarding thermal camouflage usually one has to reduce the surface temperature of an object. All vehicles and installations having a combustion engine usually produce a lot of heat with results on hot spots on the surface which are highly conspicuous. Using heat pipes to transfer this heat to another place on the surface more efficiently might be a way to reduce those hotspots and the overall conspicuity. In a first approach, a model for the Software TAIThermIR was developed to test which parameters of the heat pipes are relevant and what effects can be achieved. It will be shown, that the thermal resistivity of contact zones are quite relevant and the thermal coupling of the engine (source of heat) defines if the alteration of the thermal signature is large or not. Furthermore the impact of the use of heat pipes in relation to surface material is discussed. The influence of different weather scenarios on the change of signatures due to the use of heat pipes is of minor relevance and depends on the choice of the surface material. Finally application issues for real systems are discussed.

  13. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  14. Vaginal hemodynamic changes during sexual arousal in a rat model by diffuse optical spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeryun; Seong, Myeongsu; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Park, Kwangsung; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2017-02-01

    Not only men suffer from sexual dysfunction, but the number of women who have sexual dysfunction rises. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an objective diagnostic technique to examine the sexual dysfunction of female patients, who are afflicted with the disorders. For this purpose, we developed a diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) probe to measure the change of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentration along with blood flow from vaginal wall of female rats. A cylindrical stainless steel DOS probe with a diameter of 3 mm was designed for the vaginal wall of rats which consisted of two lasers (785 and 850nm) and two spectrometers with a separation of 2 mm. A thermistor was placed on the top of the probe to measure the temperature change from vaginal wall during experiments. A modified Beer-Lambert's law is utilized to acquire the changes of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin, and blood flow information is obtained by diffuse speckle contrast analysis technique. For the experiments, Sprague Dawley ( 400 g) female rats were divided into two groups (control and vaginal dryness model). Vaginal oxygenation, blood flow and temperature were continuously monitored before and after sexual around induced by apomorphine. After the measurement, histologic examination was performed to support the results from DOS probe in the vaginal wall. The hemodynamic information acquired by the DOS probe can be utilized to establish an objective and accurate standard of the female sexual disorders.

  15. Kinetic modelling and characterization of microbial community present in a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enitan, Abimbola M; Kumari, Sheena; Swalaha, Feroz M; Adeyemo, J; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2014-02-01

    The performance of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastewater was investigated by microbial analysis and kinetic modelling. The microbial community present in the granular sludge was detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and further confirmed using polymerase chain reaction. A group of 16S rRNA based fluorescent probes and primers targeting Archaea and Eubacteria were selected for microbial analysis. FISH results indicated the presence and dominance of a significant amount of Eubacteria and diverse group of methanogenic Archaea belonging to the order Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales within in the UASB reactor. The influent brewery wastewater had a relatively high amount of volatile fatty acids chemical oxygen demand (COD), 2005 mg/l and the final COD concentration of the reactor was 457 mg/l. The biogas analysis showed 60-69% of methane, confirming the presence and activities of methanogens within the reactor. Biokinetics of the degradable organic substrate present in the brewery wastewater was further explored using Stover and Kincannon kinetic model, with the aim of predicting the final effluent quality. The maximum utilization rate constant U max and the saturation constant (K(B)) in the model were estimated as 18.51 and 13.64 g/l/day, respectively. The model showed an excellent fit between the predicted and the observed effluent COD concentrations. Applicability of this model to predict the effluent quality of the UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater was evident from the regression analysis (R(2) = 0.957) which could be used for optimizing the reactor performance.

  16. SModelS: A Tool for Making Systematic Use of Simplified Models Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; SModelS Group

    2016-10-01

    We present an automated software tool ”SModelS” to systematically confront theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) with experimental data. The tool consists of a general procedure to decompose such BSM theories into their Simplified Models Spectra (SMS). In addition, SModelS features a database containing the majority of the published SMS results of CMS and ATLAS. These results consist of the 95% confidence level upper limits on signal production cross sections. The two components together allow us to quickly confront any BSM model with LHC results. As a show-case example we will briefly discuss an application of our procedure to a specific supersymmetric model. It is one of our ongoing efforts to extend the framework to include also efficiency maps produced either by the experimental collaborations, by efforts performed within the phenomenological groups, or possibly also by ourselves. While the current implementation can handle null results only, it is our ultimate goal to build the Next Standard Model in a bottom-up fashion from both negative and positive results of several experiments. The implementation is open source, written in python, and available from http://smodels.hephy.at.

  17. Updating Finite Element Model of a Wind Turbine Blade Section Using Experimental Modal Analysis Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Luczak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents selected results and aspects of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research oriented for the experimental and numerical study of the structural dynamics of a bend-twist coupled full scale section of a wind turbine blade structure. The main goal of the conducted research is to validate finite element model of the modified wind turbine blade section mounted in the flexible support structure accordingly to the experimental results. Bend-twist coupling was implemented by adding angled unidirectional layers on the suction and pressure side of the blade. Dynamic test and simulations were performed on a section of a full scale wind turbine blade provided by Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and the discrepancies are assessed by natural frequency difference and modal assurance criterion. Based on sensitivity analysis, set of model parameters was selected for the model updating process. Design of experiment and response surface method was implemented to find values of model parameters yielding results closest to the experimental. The updated finite element model is producing results more consistent with the measurement outcomes.

  18. A mathematical model of past, present and future shore level displacement in Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasse, T. [Sveriges Geologiska Undersoekning, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    Shore level displacement in Fennoscandia is mainly due to two interactive vertical movements, glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic sea level rise. A recent investigation of the lake-tilting phenomenon has made it possible to discern the course of glacio-isostatic. As a consequence an iteration process to estimate glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic rise using empirical data of the shore level displacement has been started. The model indicates that there are two mechanisms involved in glacio-isostatic uplift, one slow and the other fast. The main uplift, still in progress, acts slowly. Arctan functions have proved to be suitable tools for describing slow glacio-isostatic uplift. The time of maximal uplift rate is isochronous, meaning that slow uplift occurred simultaneously in all Fennoscandia in an interactive movement. For slow uplift there is a relationship between the rate of decline and the crustal thickness. In areas with greater crustal thickness the rate of decline of the glacio-isostatic recovery is lower than in areas with thinner crust. The fast mechanism gave rise to a crustal subsidence which started about 12 500 BP. After about 10 300 BP, in the early Holocene, the subsidence was restored by a fast uplift. Normal distribution functions have been used for calculating the fast mechanism. The mantle material exhibits plastic behaviour. When the mantle encounters short-lived stresses the material behaves like an elastic solid but in response to long-term stresses it will flow. The slow mechanism can be linked to viscous flow and as a response to long-term stresses. The fast mechanism is probably the response to a short-lived stress. This stress could have been caused by renewed ice loading, due to a self-triggered redistribution of the ice load during deglaciation. Future development regarding glacio-isostatic uplift, eustasy and shore level displacement is predicted in Fennoscandia using the results from the modelling. Predictions are based on the

  19. Modeling of rock friction 1. Experimental results and constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    Direct shear experiments on ground surfaces of a granodiorite from Raymond, California, at normal stresses of approx.6 MPa demonstrate that competing time, displacement, and velocity, effects control rock friction. It is proposed that the strength of the population of points of contacts between sliding surfaces determines frictional strength and that the population of contacts changes continuously with displacements. Previous experiments demonstrate that the strength of the contacts increases with the age of the contacts. The present experiments establish that a characteristic displacement, proportional to surface roughness, is required to change the population of contacts. Hence during slip the average age of the points of contact and therefore frictional strength decrease as slip velocity increases. Displacement weakening and consequently the potential for unstable slip occur whenever displacement reduces the average age of the contacts. In addition to this velocity dependency, which arises from displacement dependency and time dependency, the experiments also show a competing but transient increase in friction whenever slip velocity increases. Creep of the sliding surface at stresses below that for steady state slip also observed. Constitutive relationships are developed that permit quantitative simulation of the friction versus displacement data as a function of surface roughness and for different time and velocity histories. Unstable slip in experiments is controlled by these constitutive effects and by the stiffness of the experimental system. It is argued that analogous properties control earthquake instability

  20. African-American (AA) men with local-regional prostate cancer (PC) present with higher prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels than whites: results of RTOG 94-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Winter, K.; Sause, W.; Gallagher, M.J.; Perez, C.; Bondy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To use pretreatment serum PSA levels as an 20), gleason score (2-5,6-7,7-10), race (whites and AAs), and two interactions viz (a) PSA by race (p=0.0012) and (b) PSA by total gleason score (p=0.0001). When race was replaced by educational status, or income, or both, the fits (0.8246,0.8197, and 0.7815, respectively) were not as good as the fit with race in the model. Conclusion: The findings of this nation-wide prospective registration study with a high percentage of AA patient participation confirms previous, smaller, geographically-limited studies (1,2,3) results that AA patients with non-metastatic PC present with a higher mean PSA values than whites. The multivariate findings imply that, for each level of total gleason score, there is a higher percentage of whites with PSA levels 20. Education and/or income as surrogates of sociological status could not completely explain the racial differences. Other reasons for health-care barriers among AAs need to be identified

  1. Characteristics of the Inner and Middle Magnetosphere: Results From the Coupled Michigan MHD Model and the Rice Convection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, D.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    2002-05-01

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run with steady inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV**gamma. The coupled-code simulation will be compared with results from RCM runs and algorithms.

  2. A Global Flood Model in the Context of the Global Assessment Report 2015: methodology presentation and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudari, Roberto; Campo, Lorenzo; Silvestro, Francesco; Herold, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The Global Assessment Report (GAR) is a major initiative of the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR). It contributes to the achievement of the Hyogo Framework of Action (HFA) through monitoring risk patterns and trends and progress in disaster risk reduction and by providing guidance, to governments and non-governmental actors alike, on why and how they can, together, reduce disaster risks. Among its goals is an enhanced Global Risk Model, addressing gaps in current knowledge on risk patterns and trends and providing accurate and credible information for the global disaster risk reduction community. Within this goal the present work aimed at improving the Global Flood Model. The contribution will focus on the Hazard maps definition starting form a combination of stream-flow gauges frequency analysis and Hydrologic-hydraulic modelling. The Hazard maps produced by the Global Flood Model are not considering flood defences and are therefore not suitable as such for risk parameters computations; a post-processing procedure to consider flood defences is proposed and applied. The Hazard maps are then used to produce a full set of Possible Flood scenarios in order to compute PML curves. Results are discussed with reference to some example countries highlighting advantages and limitations of the approach undertaken.

  3. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  5. Present-day 3D structural model of the Po Valley basin, Northern Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrini, C.; Lacombe, O.; Roure, F.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D structural model of the Po Valley basin (Northern Italy) was built by integrating the dataset available from the public domain (DEM, wells, isobath-maps, cross-sections, outcrop-trends).The model shows the complex foredeep-foreland architecture across the basin, from the Moho level to the

  6. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit (oral presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents an...

  7. Preserving the Public Good: Presenting an Organizational Model for the Changing Future of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Stephanie Parra

    2011-01-01

    Institutions of higher education face financial pressure to become self-sustaining (Gumport, 2001; 2000). This rapidly growing economic demand is negatively affecting the social mission of higher education (Kezar, 2004). Scholars suggest the implementation of a new model of higher education, one that blends a for-profit model with the traditional…

  8. Product modeling standards for the building and construction industry : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolman, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    For the past ten years most sectors of industry have been developing standards for the electronic sharing and exchange of product model data. While several related industries, such as automotive and shipbuilding manufacturing have been relatively successful in integrating electronic product models

  9. "Medical informatics in a medical research facility. An interactive multimedia presentation". Diabetes as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, E; Sirman, D; Georges, L P; Phillips, J

    1991-01-01

    This interactive demonstration provides a model for integrating information in a medical facility. By the use of networking computers, diagnostic data and scientific data are shared between geographically-separated clinical and research units. Data collected in a patient database in the outpatient clinic is sorted on specified qualifying criteria and the resulting subset further analyzed for research studies. To show the process of patient selection from a general database to a diabetes database, and further selection to a subset of diabetes, i.e., Diabetic Neuropathy, the authors used HyperCard. Firstly, HyperCard provided us with a flexible design allowing for both vertical and horizontal progressions. Because we wanted to include an educational component on diabetes and its complications, this flexibility was important. At any point in the demonstration, the viewer is able to access more information nested in several levels. Secondly, we wanted to be able to import a variety of programs that are used to translate diagnostic data into scientific data that is analyzed and prepared for publication in a medical textbook or journal. According to Douglas Adams, author of "Pathways and Relationships", HyperCard occupies the same niche in the evolution of software as human beings do in the evolution of life. "It's the fact that we are unspecialized but infinitely adaptable that has been our success as a species. In the same way, HyperCard is unspecialized but can turn its hand to any kind of task. And if the task is beyond it, HyperCard can use the phone, go for a ride on Excel, or go out and find a powerful graphics tool or sophisticated wordprocessing program!"

  10. Animal Models of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma-Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Harit; Lohani, Kush Raj; Lee, Tommy H; Agrawal, Devendra K; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is the fastest rising cancer in the United States. It develops from long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease which affects >20% of the general population. It carries a very poor prognosis with 5-year survival Animal models can provide a comprehensive functional and anatomic platform for such a study. Rats and mice have been the most widely studied but disease homology with humans has been questioned. No animal model naturally simulates the inflammation to adenocarcinoma progression as in humans, with all models requiring surgical bypass or destruction of existing antireflux mechanisms. Valuable properties of individual models could be utilized to holistically evaluate disease progression. In this review paper, we critically examined the current animal models of Barrett's esophagus, their differences and homologies with human disease and how they have shaped our current understanding of Barrett's carcinogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Modeling results for a linear simulator of a divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Jackson, M.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Molvik, A.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Nilson, D.G.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-06-23

    A divertor simulator, IDEAL, has been proposed by S. Cohen to study the difficult power-handling requirements of the tokamak program in general and the ITER program in particular. Projections of the power density in the ITER divertor reach {approximately} 1 Gw/m{sup 2} along the magnetic fieldlines and > 10 MW/m{sup 2} on a surface inclined at a shallow angle to the fieldlines. These power densities are substantially greater than can be handled reliably on the surface, so new techniques are required to reduce the power density to a reasonable level. Although the divertor physics must be demonstrated in tokamaks, a linear device could contribute to the development because of its flexibility, the easy access to the plasma and to tested components, and long pulse operation (essentially cw). However, a decision to build a simulator requires not just the recognition of its programmatic value, but also confidence that it can meet the required parameters at an affordable cost. Accordingly, as reported here, it was decided to examine the physics of the proposed device, including kinetic effects resulting from the intense heating required to reach the plasma parameters, and to conduct an independent cost estimate. The detailed role of the simulator in a divertor program is not explored in this report.

  12. Modeling results for a linear simulator of a divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Jackson, M.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Molvik, A.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Nilson, D.G.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    A divertor simulator, IDEAL, has been proposed by S. Cohen to study the difficult power-handling requirements of the tokamak program in general and the ITER program in particular. Projections of the power density in the ITER divertor reach ∼ 1 Gw/m 2 along the magnetic fieldlines and > 10 MW/m 2 on a surface inclined at a shallow angle to the fieldlines. These power densities are substantially greater than can be handled reliably on the surface, so new techniques are required to reduce the power density to a reasonable level. Although the divertor physics must be demonstrated in tokamaks, a linear device could contribute to the development because of its flexibility, the easy access to the plasma and to tested components, and long pulse operation (essentially cw). However, a decision to build a simulator requires not just the recognition of its programmatic value, but also confidence that it can meet the required parameters at an affordable cost. Accordingly, as reported here, it was decided to examine the physics of the proposed device, including kinetic effects resulting from the intense heating required to reach the plasma parameters, and to conduct an independent cost estimate. The detailed role of the simulator in a divertor program is not explored in this report

  13. Model unspecific search in CMS. Results at 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Hebbeker, Thomas; Knutzen, Simon; Lieb, Jonas; Meyer, Arnd; Pook, Tobias; Roemer, Jonas [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the year 2012, CMS collected a total data set of approximately 20 fb{sup -1} in proton-proton collisions at √(s)=8 TeV. Dedicated searches for physics beyond the standard model are commonly designed with the signatures of a given theoretical model in mind. While this approach allows for an optimised sensitivity to the sought-after signal, it may cause unexpected phenomena to be overlooked. In a complementary approach, the Model Unspecific Search in CMS (MUSiC) analyses CMS data in a general way. Depending on the reconstructed final state objects (e.g. electrons), collision events are sorted into classes. In each of the classes, the distributions of selected kinematic variables are compared to standard model simulation. An automated statistical analysis is performed to quantify the agreement between data and prediction. In this talk, the analysis concept is introduced and selected results of the analysis of the 2012 CMS data set are presented.

  14. Fuel models and results from the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS TMI-2 accident calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, E.C.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description of several fuel models used in the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS analysis of the TMI-2 accident is presented, and some of the significant fuel-rod behavior results from this analysis are given. Peak fuel-rod temperatures, oxidation heat production, and embrittlement and failure behavior calculated for the TMI-2 accident are discussed. Other aspects of fuel behavior, such as cladding ballooning and fuel-cladding eutectic formation, were found not to significantly affect the accident progression

  15. Recent results of searches for beyond Standard Model physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Serkin, Leonid; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Recent results of searches for beyond Standard Model physics in ATLAS are presented, with particular focus on searches for new phenomena in high jet multiplicity final states. These include searches for charged Higgs boson in the $H^{+} \\to tb $ decay channel, vector-like quark pair production, four-top-quark production in different signal benchmark scenarios and associated heavy Higgs boson production. No significant excess are observed in data and exclusion limits on cross sections and masses are given for the signal models in a number of benchmark scenarios, in most cases significantly extending the reach of previous searches.

  16. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven; Ferracin, P. [CERN; Sabbi, G. [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-10-06

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  17. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, G; Wanderer, P; Ferracin, P; Sabbi, G

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  18. The Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model: A brief review and some recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhan, Anton

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model is given, which is a top-down holographic model of low-energy QCD with chiral quarks derived from type-IIA superstring theory. The main predictions of the model, in particular concerning meson spectra, the gluon condensate, the QCD string tension, the mass of the η' and of baryons are discussed and compared quantitatively with available experimental and/or lattice results. Then some recent results of potential interest to the physics program at the future FAIR facility are presented: The spectrum of glueballs and their decay rates into pions, and the phase diagram of QCD at finite temperature, density, and magnetic field strength.

  19. The Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model: A brief review and some recent results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebhan Anton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model is given, which is a top-down holographic model of low-energy QCD with chiral quarks derived from type-IIA superstring theory. The main predictions of the model, in particular concerning meson spectra, the gluon condensate, the QCD string tension, the mass of the η′ and of baryons are discussed and compared quantitatively with available experimental and/or lattice results. Then some recent results of potential interest to the physics program at the future FAIR facility are presented: The spectrum of glueballs and their decay rates into pions, and the phase diagram of QCD at finite temperature, density, and magnetic field strength.

  20. Comparative Results on 3D Navigation of Quadrotor using two Nonlinear Model based Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Y.; Siguerdidjane, H.; Bestaoui, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Recently the quadrotors are being increasingly employed in both military and civilian areas where a broad range of nonlinear flight control techniques are successfully implemented. With this advancement, it has become necessary to investigate the efficiency of these flight controllers by studying theirs features and compare their performance. In this paper, the control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) quadrotor, using two different approaches, is presented. The first controller is Nonlinear PID (NLPID) whilst the second one is Nonlinear Internal Model Control (NLIMC) that are used for the stabilization as well as for the 3D trajectory tracking. The numerical simulations have shown satisfactory results using nominal system model or disturbed model for both of them. The obtained results are analyzed with respect to several criteria for the sake of comparison.

  1. Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions for the Pliocene (Plio-QUMP): Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J.O.; Collins, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Hunter, S.J.; Lunt, D.J.; Pickering, S.J.; Pound, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Examination of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP; ~. 3.3 to 3.0. Ma BP) provides an excellent opportunity to test the ability of climate models to reproduce warm climate states, thereby assessing our confidence in model predictions. To do this it is necessary to relate the uncertainty in model simulations of mPWP climate to uncertainties in projections of future climate change. The uncertainties introduced by the model can be estimated through the use of a Perturbed Physics Ensemble (PPE). Developing on the UK Met Office Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions (QUMP) Project, this paper presents the results from an initial investigation using the end members of a PPE in a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean model (HadCM3) running with appropriate mPWP boundary conditions. Prior work has shown that the unperturbed version of HadCM3 may underestimate mPWP sea surface temperatures at higher latitudes. Initial results indicate that neither the low sensitivity nor the high sensitivity simulations produce unequivocally improved mPWP climatology relative to the standard. Whilst the high sensitivity simulation was able to reconcile up to 6 ??C of the data/model mismatch in sea surface temperatures in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (relative to the standard simulation), it did not produce a better prediction of global vegetation than the standard simulation. Overall the low sensitivity simulation was degraded compared to the standard and high sensitivity simulations in all aspects of the data/model comparison. The results have shown that a PPE has the potential to explore weaknesses in mPWP modelling simulations which have been identified by geological proxies, but that a 'best fit' simulation will more likely come from a full ensemble in which simulations that contain the strengths of the two end member simulations shown here are combined. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Modelling present-day basal melt rates for Antarctic ice shelves using a parametrization of buoyant meltwater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, Werner M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian; Hilmar Gudmundsson, G.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2018-01-01

    Basal melting below ice shelves is a major factor in mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which can contribute significantly to possible future sea-level rise. Therefore, it is important to have an adequate description of the basal melt rates for use in ice-dynamical models. Most current ice models use rather simple parametrizations based on the local balance of heat between ice and ocean. In this work, however, we use a recently derived parametrization of the melt rates based on a buoyant meltwater plume travelling upward beneath an ice shelf. This plume parametrization combines a non-linear ocean temperature sensitivity with an inherent geometry dependence, which is mainly described by the grounding-line depth and the local slope of the ice-shelf base. For the first time, this type of parametrization is evaluated on a two-dimensional grid covering the entire Antarctic continent. In order to apply the essentially one-dimensional parametrization to realistic ice-shelf geometries, we present an algorithm that determines effective values for the grounding-line depth and basal slope in any point beneath an ice shelf. Furthermore, since detailed knowledge of temperatures and circulation patterns in the ice-shelf cavities is sparse or absent, we construct an effective ocean temperature field from observational data with the purpose of matching (area-averaged) melt rates from the model with observed present-day melt rates. Our results qualitatively replicate large-scale observed features in basal melt rates around Antarctica, not only in terms of average values, but also in terms of the spatial pattern, with high melt rates typically occurring near the grounding line. The plume parametrization and the effective temperature field presented here are therefore promising tools for future simulations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet requiring a more realistic oceanic forcing.

  3. Insight into runoff characteristics using hydrological modeling in the data-scarce southern Tibetan Plateau: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingyong; Yang, Shengtian; Zhao, Changsen; Zhou, Qiuwen; Hou, Lipeng

    2017-01-01

    Regional hydrological modeling in ungauged regions has attracted growing attention in water resources research. The southern Tibetan Plateau often suffers from data scarcity in watershed hydrological simulation and water resources assessment. This hinders further research characterizing the water cycle and solving international water resource issues in the area. In this study, a multi-spatial data based Distributed Time-Variant Gain Model (MS-DTVGM) is applied to the Yarlung Zangbo River basin, an important international river basin in the southern Tibetan Plateau with limited meteorological data. This model is driven purely by spatial data from multiple sources and is independent of traditional meteorological data. Based on the methods presented in this study, daily snow cover and potential evapotranspiration data in the Yarlung Zangbo River basin in 2050 are obtained. Future (2050) climatic data (precipitation and air temperature) from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-AR5) are used to study the hydrological response to climate change. The result shows that river runoff will increase due to precipitation and air temperature changes by 2050. Few differences are found between daily runoff simulations from different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) for 2050. Historical station observations (1960-2000) at Nuxia and model simulations for two periods (2006-2009 and 2050) are combined to study inter-annual and intra-annual runoff distribution and variability. The inter-annual runoff variation is stable and the coefficient of variation (CV) varies from 0.21 to 0.27. In contrast, the intra-annual runoff varies significantly with runoff in summer and autumn accounting for more than 80% of the total amount. Compared to the historical period (1960-2000), the present period (2006-2009) has a slightly uneven intra-annual runoff temporal distribution, and becomes more balanced in

  4. Insight into runoff characteristics using hydrological modeling in the data-scarce southern Tibetan Plateau: Past, present, and future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Cai

    Full Text Available Regional hydrological modeling in ungauged regions has attracted growing attention in water resources research. The southern Tibetan Plateau often suffers from data scarcity in watershed hydrological simulation and water resources assessment. This hinders further research characterizing the water cycle and solving international water resource issues in the area. In this study, a multi-spatial data based Distributed Time-Variant Gain Model (MS-DTVGM is applied to the Yarlung Zangbo River basin, an important international river basin in the southern Tibetan Plateau with limited meteorological data. This model is driven purely by spatial data from multiple sources and is independent of traditional meteorological data. Based on the methods presented in this study, daily snow cover and potential evapotranspiration data in the Yarlung Zangbo River basin in 2050 are obtained. Future (2050 climatic data (precipitation and air temperature from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-AR5 are used to study the hydrological response to climate change. The result shows that river runoff will increase due to precipitation and air temperature changes by 2050. Few differences are found between daily runoff simulations from different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 for 2050. Historical station observations (1960-2000 at Nuxia and model simulations for two periods (2006-2009 and 2050 are combined to study inter-annual and intra-annual runoff distribution and variability. The inter-annual runoff variation is stable and the coefficient of variation (CV varies from 0.21 to 0.27. In contrast, the intra-annual runoff varies significantly with runoff in summer and autumn accounting for more than 80% of the total amount. Compared to the historical period (1960-2000, the present period (2006-2009 has a slightly uneven intra-annual runoff temporal distribution, and becomes more

  5. Environmental Models as a Service: Enabling Interoperability through RESTful Endpoints and API Documentation (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achieving interoperability in environmental modeling has evolved as software technology has progressed. The recent rise of cloud computing and proliferation of web services initiated a new stage for creating interoperable systems. Scientific programmers increasingly take advantag...

  6. Using Integrated Environmental Modeling to Automate a Process-Based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and...

  7. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  8. User-independent diffusion tensor imaging analysis pipelines in a rat model presenting ventriculomegalia: A comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakpo, Luis; Pierre, Wyston C; Jin, Chen; Londono, Irène; Pouliot, Philippe; Lodygensky, Gregory A

    2017-11-01

    Automated analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data is an appealing way to process large datasets in an unbiased manner. However, automation can sometimes be linked to a lack of interpretability. Two whole-brain, automated and voxelwise methods exist: voxel-based analysis (VBA) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In VBA, the amount of smoothing has been shown to influence the results. TBSS is free of this step, but a projection procedure is introduced to correct for residual misalignments. This projection assigns the local highest fractional anisotropy (FA) value to the mean FA skeleton, which represents white matter tract centers. For both methods, the normalization procedure has a major impact. These issues are well documented in humans but, to our knowledge, not in rodents. In this study, we assessed the quality of three different registration algorithms (ANTs SyN, DTI-TK and FNIRT) using study-specific templates and their impact on automated analysis methods (VBA and TBSS) in a rat pup model of diffuse white matter injury presenting large unilateral deformations. VBA and TBSS results were stable and anatomically coherent across the three pipelines. For VBA, in regions around the large deformations, interpretability was limited because of the increased partial volume effect. With TBSS, two of the three pipelines found a significant decrease in axial diffusivity (AD) at the known injury site. These results demonstrate that automated voxelwise analyses can be used in an animal model with large deformations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Developing Charismatic Delivery through Transformational Presentations: Modeling the Persona of Steve Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivic, Rebecca K.; Green, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    How can public speaking instructors teach students how to be charismatic and confident speakers? The activity presented in this article suggests that instructors foster competent and charismatic presentational skills by having students channel the stylistic capabilities of an exceptional speaker. The activity requires students to take on the…

  10. Comparison of Experimental Surface and Flow Field Measurements to Computational Results of the Juncture Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozeboom, Nettie H.; Lee, Henry C.; Simurda, Laura J.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body juncture flow fields on commercial aircraft configurations are challenging to compute accurately. The NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program's juncture flow committee is designing an experiment to provide data to improve Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling in the juncture flow region. Preliminary design of the model was done using CFD, yet CFD tends to over-predict the separation in the juncture flow region. Risk reduction wind tunnel tests were requisitioned by the committee to obtain a better understanding of the flow characteristics of the designed models. NASA Ames Research Center's Fluid Mechanics Lab performed one of the risk reduction tests. The results of one case, accompanied by CFD simulations, are presented in this paper. Experimental results suggest the wall mounted wind tunnel model produces a thicker boundary layer on the fuselage than the CFD predictions, resulting in a larger wing horseshoe vortex suppressing the side of body separation in the juncture flow region. Compared to experimental results, CFD predicts a thinner boundary layer on the fuselage generates a weaker wing horseshoe vortex resulting in a larger side of body separation.

  11. Comparative animal models for the study of lymphohematopoietic tumors: strengths and limitations of present approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Owen A; Toner, Lorraine E; Vrhovac, Radovan; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Smith, Emily A; Bergman, Philip

    2005-07-01

    The lymphomas probably represent the most complex and heterogenous set of malignancies known to cancer medicine. Underneath the single term lymphoma exist some of the fastest growing cancers known to science (i.e Burkitt's and lymphoblastic lymphoma), as well as some of the slowest growing (i.e. small lymphocytic lymphoma [SLL] and follicular lymphoma). It is this very biology that can dictate the selection of drugs and treatment approaches for managing these patients, strategies that can range from very aggressive combination chemotherapy administered in an intensive care unit (for example, patients with Burkitt's lymphoma), to watch and wait approaches that may go on for years in patients with SLL. This impressive spectrum of biology emerges from a relatively restricted number of molecular defects. The importance of these different molecular defects is of course greatly influenced by the intrinsic biology that defines the lymphocyte at its different stages of differentiation and maturation. It is precisely this molecular understanding that is beginning to form the basis for a new approach to thinking about lymphoma, and novel approaches to its management. Unfortunately, while our understanding of human lymphoma has blossomed, our ability to generate appropriate animal models reflective of this biology has not. Most preclinical models of these diseases still rely upon sub-cutaneous xenograft models of only the most aggressive lymphomas like Burkitt's lymphoma. While these models clearly serve an important role in understanding biology, and perhaps more importantly, in identifying promising new drugs for these diseases, they fall short in truly representing the broader, more heterogenous biology found in patients. Clearly, depending upon the questions being posed, or the types of drugs being studied, the best model to employ may vary from situation to situation. In this article, we will review the numerous complexities associated with various animal models of

  12. Inferring the past and present connectivity across the range of a North American leaf beetle: combining ecological niche modeling and a geographically explicit model of coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellicour, Simon; Fearnley, Shannon; Lombal, Anicée; Heidl, Sarah; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Rank, Nathan E; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The leaf beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis occurs across Western North America, either at high elevation or in small, isolated populations along the coast, and thus has a highly fragmented distribution. DNA sequence data (three loci) were collected from five regions across the species range. Population connectivity was examined using traditional ecological niche modeling, which suggested that gene flow could occur among regions now and in the past. We developed geographically explicit coalescence models of sequence evolution that incorporated a two-dimensional representation of the hypothesized ranges suggested by the niche-modeling estimates. We simulated sequence data according to these models and compared them to observed sequences to identify most probable scenarios regarding the migration history of C. aeneicollis. Our results disagreed with initial niche-modeling estimates by clearly rejecting recent connectivity among regions, and were instead most consistent with a long period of range fragmentation, extending well beyond the last glacial maximum. This application of geographically explicit models of coalescence has highlighted some limitations of the use of climatic variables for predicting the present and past range of a species and has explained aspects of the Pleistocene evolutionary history of a cold-adapted organism in Western North America. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Model analyses of atmospheric mercury: present air quality and effects of transpacific transport on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, H.; Liang, X.-Z.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Tao, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric mercury is a toxic air and water pollutant that is of significant concern because of its effects on human health and ecosystems. A mechanistic representation of the atmospheric mercury cycle is developed for the state-of-the-art global climate-chemistry model, CAM-Chem (Community Atmospheric Model with Chemistry). The model simulates the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in three forms: elemental mercury (Hg(0)), reactive mercury (Hg(II)), and particulate mercury (PHg). Emissions of mercury include those from human, land, ocean, biomass burning and volcano related sources. Land emissions are calculated based on surface solar radiation flux and skin temperature. A simplified air-sea mercury exchange scheme is used to calculate emissions from the oceans. The chemistry mechanism includes the oxidation of Hg(0) in gaseous phase by ozone with temperature dependence, OH, H2O2 and chlorine. Aqueous chemistry includes both oxidation and reduction of Hg(0). Transport and deposition of mercury species are calculated through adapting the original formulations in CAM-Chem. The CAM-Chem model with mercury is driven by present meteorology to simulate the present mercury air quality during the 1999-2001 period. The resulting surface concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM) are then compared with the observations from worldwide sites. Simulated wet depositions of mercury over the continental United States are compared to the observations from 26 Mercury Deposition Network stations to test the wet deposition simulations. The evaluations of gaseous concentrations and wet deposition confirm a strong capability for the CAM-Chem mercury mechanism to simulate the atmospheric mercury cycle. The general reproduction of global TGM concentrations and the overestimation on South Africa indicate that model simulations of TGM are seriously affected by emissions. The comparison to wet deposition indicates that wet deposition patterns

  14. PV Performance Modeling Methods and Practices: Results from the 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In 2014, the IEA PVPS Task 13 added the PVPMC as a formal activity to its technical work plan for 2014-2017. The goal of this activity is to expand the reach of the PVPMC to a broader international audience and help to reduce PV performance modeling uncertainties worldwide. One of the main deliverables of this activity is to host one or more PVPMC workshops outside the US to foster more international participation within this collaborative group. This report reviews the results of the first in a series of these joint IEA PVPS Task 13/PVPMC workshops. The 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop was held in Cologne, Germany at the headquarters of TÜV Rheinland on October 22-23, 2015.

  15. Monte Carlo modelling of the Belgian materials testing reactor BR2: present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Raedt, Ch. de; Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    A very detailed 3-D MCNP-4B model of the BR2 reactor was developed to perform all neutron and gamma calculations needed for the design of new experimental irradiation rigs. The Monte Carlo model of BR2 includes the nearly exact geometrical representation of fuel elements (now with their axially varying burn-up), of partially inserted control and regulating rods, of experimental devices and of radioisotope production rigs. The multiple level-geometry possibilities of MCNP-4B are fully exploited to obtain sufficiently flexible tools to cope with the very changing core loading. (orig.)

  16. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  17. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  18. Simple Stellar Population Modeling of Quasar Host Galaxies with Diffusion K-Means Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Gregory; Moravec, E. A.; Tremonti, C. A.; Wolf, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the correlation of the masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxy stellar spheroid velocity dispersions (the M-sigma relation) was greeted as clear evidence for the co-evolution of host galaxies and their SMBHs. However, studies in the last five years have posited that this relation could arise from central-limit properties of hierarchical formation alone. To address the question of whether and how often the SMBHs evolve with their host galaxies, it is necessary to look at galaxies whose SMBHs are actively growing—quasars—and determine the host galaxy properties. The central nuclei of quasar host galaxies complicate this type of study because their high luminosity tends to wash out their host galaxies. But, by using 3-D spectroscopy with the integral field unit (IFU) Sparsepak on the WIYN telescope, we have shown that the quasar light can be mostly isolated to one fiber in order to obtain the spectra of the quasar and the host galaxy concurrently. We can then model simultaneously the scattered quasar light and the stellar populations in the host galaxy fiber using a new simple stellar population (SSP) modeling method called diffusion k-means (DFK). The objectives of the research presented in this poster are to model synthetic quasar host galaxies using a DFK basis and a more traditional basis, compare the accuracy of both modeling methods, and test the affects of various prescriptions for masking the quasar lines in the host galaxy fiber. We present results from our SSP modeling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) results for DFK and traditional modeling schemes using synthetic data. By determining and then using the more robust stellar population modeling method, we can more confidently study quasar host galaxies to answer remaining questions in galaxy evolution. This work was partially supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (NSF Grant DGE-0718123) and through the NSF's REU program (NSF Award

  19. Global Monthly CO2 Flux Inversion Based on Results of Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.; Peters, W.; Krol, M.

    2008-12-01

    Most of our understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 has come from inverse studies of atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements. However, the number of currently available observation stations and our ability to simulate the diurnal planetary boundary layer evolution over continental regions essentially limit the number of regions that can be reliably inverted globally, especially over continental areas. In order to overcome these restrictions, a nested inverse modeling system was developed based on the Bayesian principle for estimating carbon fluxes of 30 regions in North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Inverse modeling was conducted in monthly steps using CO2 concentration measurements of 5 years (2000 - 2005) with the following two models: (a) An atmospheric transport model (TM5) is used to generate the transport matrix where the diurnal variation n of atmospheric CO2 concentration is considered to enhance the use of the afternoon-hour average CO2 concentration measurements over the continental sites. (b) A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model (BEPS) is used to produce hourly step carbon fluxes, which could minimize the limitation due to our inability to solve the inverse problem in a high resolution, as the background of our inversion. We will present our recent results achieved through a combination of the bottom-up modeling with BEPS and the top-down modeling based on TM5 driven by offline meteorological fields generated by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMFW).

  20. First-order fire effects on herbs and Shrubs: present knowledge and process modeling needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten Stephan; Melanie Miller; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    Herbaceous plants and shrubs have received little attention in terms of fire effects modeling despite their critical role in ecosystem integrity and resilience after wildfires and prescribed burns. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge of direct effects of fire on herb and shrub (including cacti) vegetative tissues and seed banks, propose key components for...

  1. Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Model Group: Installed Solar PV System Prices (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodrich, A. C.; Woodhouse, M.; James, T.

    2011-02-01

    EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Program is charged with leading the Secretary's SunShot Initiative to reduce the cost of electricity from solar by 75% to be cost competitive with conventional energy sources without subsidy by the end of the decade. As part of this Initiative, the program has funded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop module manufacturing and solar PV system installation cost models to ensure that the program's cost reduction targets are carefully aligned with current and near term industry costs. The NREL cost analysis team has leveraged the laboratories' extensive experience in the areas of project finance and deployment, as well as industry partnerships, to develop cost models that mirror the project cost analysis tools used by project managers at leading U.S. installers. The cost models are constructed through a "bottoms-up" assessment of each major cost element, beginning with the system's bill of materials, labor requirements (type and hours) by component, site-specific charges, and soft costs. In addition to the relevant engineering, procurement, and construction costs, the models also consider all relevant costs to an installer, including labor burdens and overhead rates, supply chain costs, and overhead and materials inventory costs, and assume market-specific profits.

  2. The effect of PLS regression in PLS path model estimation when multicollinearity is present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke; Kristensen, Kai; Eskildsen, Jacob

    PLS path modelling has previously been found to be robust to multicollinearity both between latent variables and between manifest variables of a common latent variable (see e.g. Cassel et al. (1999), Kristensen, Eskildsen (2005), Westlund et al. (2008)). However, most of the studies investigate...

  3. Having an IM-PACT: A Model for Improving Instructional Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ruth

    2000-01-01

    Explains IM-PACT (Instructional Model-Purpose, Audience, Content, Technique), a framework for systematic lesson design in an information literacy context. Includes an example of IM-PACT's application to a high school-level information skills lesson plan, collaboratively designed by the teacher-librarian and English teacher. (LRW)

  4. Present State of the Single and Twin Aperture Short Dipole Model Program for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, N I; Kurtyka, T; Leroy, D; Oberli, L R; Perini, D; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siegel, N; Siemko, A; Tommasini, D; Vanenkov, I; Walckiers, L; Weterings, W

    1998-01-01

    The LHC model program for main dipoles is based on the design, fabrication and testing at CERN of a number of single and twin aperture 1m long magnets. So far, a number of single aperture models, each with specific characteristics, were tested at 2 K at a rate of about one per month. These magnets are the main tool used to check coil performance as a function of design and assembly options in view of optimizing and finalizing choices of components and procedures. Initial quenching field levels of 8.8 T were obtained and the short sample limit of the cable at 1.9 K was reached corresponding to a central bore field of 10 T. A few twin aperture dipole models were also built and tested, using the same structural components as for the long magnets which are now being built in industry. The paper discusses the main characteristics of the models built so far, the instrumentation developed to date and the experience obtained. Finally it describes the plans aimed at continuing a vigorous program to provide input to th...

  5. Results from a full coupling of the HIRHAM regional climate model and the MIKE SHE hydrological model for a Danish catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, J.C.; Drews, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in the emerging research field of coupling of existing regional climate models (RCMs) and hydrology/land-surface models is the computational interaction between the models. Here we present results from a full two-way coupling of the HIRHAM RCM over a 4000 km × 2800 km domain at 11...

  6. Social Approval of the Community Assessment Model for Odor Dispersal: Results from a Citizen Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, John C.; Grudens-Schuck, Nancy; Harmon, Jay D.; Hoff, Steve J.

    2012-08-01

    Odors emitted from US Midwest hog production facilities present farmers, residents, and state regulatory agencies with a set of complex challenges. To predict odor exposure from multiple swine production sources simultaneously, and to determine siting recommendations for proposed new or enlarged hog facilities, researchers at Iowa State University designed the community assessment model for odor dispersion (CAM). A three-county citizen survey conducted in Iowa examined the level of hypothetical social acceptance of the modeling process, and level of trust in CAM results. While 69 % of respondents approved of modeling as a way to determine the most socially appropriate location for production sites, only 35 % would trust the results if potential odor exposure from a new facility were proposed to be built near their home. We analyzed approval of the CAM model, and level of trust, across a number of demographic, attitudinal, and belief factors regarding environmental quality and the hog industry. Overall, trust in CAM was uneven and varied across respondents. Those residents who would not trust CAM tended to be more concerned with environmental quality and less inclined to believe that the hog industry is critically important economically. Those who would not trust CAM results also had significantly more direct experience with odors. Findings point to predominantly positive, yet equivocal acceptance of CAM results among the citizenry, which is not unexpected given conflict typical of siting decisions in industry and waste disposal arenas. Recommendations are offered regarding the interaction of trust, beliefs and attitudes and the utility of CAM.

  7. Using Model-Based System Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-Cycle and Technical Reviews Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Edith L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    This is the presentation for the AIAA Space conference in September 2017. It highlights key information from Using Model-Based Systems Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-cycle and Technical Reviews paper.

  8. Landscape modelling of past, present and future state of areas affected by mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Brejcha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface mining of brown coal changed Iron mountains basin region fundamentally. Hundreds of millions of hauled masses significantly affected the landscape appearance. Involvement of government authorities and citizens of the affected towns and villages is essential and participation is expected. For proper assessment of the projected mining intent with subsequent remediation of the consequences, processing of 3D models and interactive visualizations options shared with web technology is an important factor. Creation of dump body 3D model, including internal composition, can play important role in various tasks solving, for example in hydrology or geotechnics. High-quality processing of these materials requires use of modern surveying technology, CAD systems and various tools of computer graphics processing.

  9. Past, present and future of the pathophysiological model of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Obeso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current model of basal ganglia was introduced two decades ago and has settled most of our current understanding of basal ganglia function and dysfunction. Extensive research efforts have been carried out in recent years leading to further refinement and understanding of the normal and diseased basal ganglia. Several questions, however, are yet to be resolved. This short review provides a synopsis of the evolution of thought regarding the pathophysiological model of the BG and summarizes the main recent findings and additions to this field of research. We have also tried to identify major challenges that need to be addressed and resolved in the near future. Detailed accounts and state-of-the-art developments concerning research on the basal ganglia are provided in the articles that make up this Special Issue.

  10. The chlorine budget of the present-day atmosphere - A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of source gases to the total amount of inorganic chlorine (ClY) is examined analytically with a time-dependent model employing 11 source gases. The source-gas emission data are described, and the modeling methodology is set forth with attention given to the data interpretation. The abundances and distributions are obtained for all 11 source gases with corresponding ClY production rates and mixing ratios. It is shown that the ClY production rate and the ClY mixing ratio for each source gas are spatially dependent, and the change in the relative contributions from 1950 to 1990 is given. Ozone changes in the past decade are characterized by losses in the polar and midlatitude lower stratosphere. The values for CFC-11, CCl4, and CH3CCl3 suggest that they are more evident in the lower stratosphere than is suggested by steady-state estimates based on surface concentrations.

  11. The present and future of the most favoured inflationary models after Planck 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, Miguel; Ramírez, Héctor; Boubekeur, Lotfi; Mena, Olga [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 (Spain); Giusarma, Elena, E-mail: miguel.escudero@ific.uv.es, E-mail: hector.ramirez@ific.uv.es, E-mail: lboubekeur@usfq.edu.ec, E-mail: elena.giusarma@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: olga.mena@ific.uv.es [Physics Department and INFN, Università di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    The value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in the region allowed by the latest Planck 2015 measurements can be associated to a large variety of inflationary models. We discuss here the potential of future Cosmic Microwave Background cosmological observations in disentangling among the possible theoretical scenarios allowed by our analyses of current Planck temperature and polarization data. Rather than focusing only on r, we focus as well on the running of the primordial power spectrum, α{sub s} and the running thereof, β{sub s}. If future cosmological measurements, as those from the COrE mission, confirm the current best-fit value for β{sub s} ∼> 10{sup −2} as the preferred one, it will be possible to rule-out the most favoured inflationary models.

  12. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S. Malskaer; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2008-01-01

    . The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow cover. Gases considered are carbon dioxide and methane for all three carbon isotopes, nitrous oxide......A new, low-order Earth system model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years...... ocean layer and segment area stems from observed ocean depth distributions. Sediment burial is calculated from sedimentation velocities at the base of the bioturbated layer. Bioturbation rates and oxic and anoxic remineralisation rates depend on organic carbon rain rates and dissolved oxygen...

  13. Euroconference on the appropriate modellings of galaxy evolution from their cosmological formation to their presently observable structures

    CERN Document Server

    Stasińska, Grażyna; Harfst, Stefan; Kroupa, Pavel; Theis, Christian; THE EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES

    2003-01-01

    Galaxies have a history This has become clear from recent sky surveys which have shown that distant galaxies, formed early in the life of the Universe, differ from the nearby ones New observational windows at ultraviolet, infrared and millimetric wavelengths (provided by ROSAT, IRAM, IUE, IRAS, ISO) have revealed that galaxies contain a wealth of components very hot gas, atomic hydrogen, molecules, dust, dark matter A significant advance is expected from the results of new instruments (VLT, FIRST, XMM) which will allow one to explore the most distant Universe Three Euroconferences were planned to punctuate this new epoch in galactic research, bringing together specialists in various fields of Astronomy This book contains the proceedings of the third conference and presents the actual state-of-the-art of modelling galaxy evolution

  14. Review on discretization techniques for complex fluid flow models: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A.; Chinesta, F.; Cueto, E.; Phillips, T.

    2007-04-01

    In the last decades several new and advanced numerical strategies have been proposed for solving the flow models of complex fluids. Most of them were based in the classical discretization techniques (finite elements, finite volumes, finite differences, spectral methods, meshless approachesĚ) applied on the macroscopic descriptions of such flows (differential and integral models) where special advances were introduced for accounting for the mixed character of the associated variational formulations as well as for stabilizing the advection terms in the motion and constitutive equations. Recently micro-macro approaches are being the more and more applied. They allows to avoid closure relations and the microscopic physics are better described. These models are based on kinetic theory and their main difficulty concerns the curse of dimension. The microstructure conformation is defined in a multidimensional space where standard discretization techniques fail. To overcome this difficulty stochastic techniques were introduced (inspired in the Monte Carlo techniques) but the control of the statistical noise and the low convergence order are some of their main drawbacks. Other new strategies have been recently proposed, as for example the ones based on the sparse grid and the separated representation that allows circumventing the aforementioned difficulties. However the models are the more and more focused on the microscopic scale, where they are formulated in terms of Brownian or molecular dynamics. They allow describing very precisely the molecular dynamics, but the computing time remains its main drawback. Thus, in the next years new efforts must be paid to reduce the computing time involved in microscopic simulations and the definitions of bridges between the different descriptions scales.

  15. 3D modelling and Virtual Reality as a Tool for Presenting Architecture to a Customer

    OpenAIRE

    Mosunova, Mariia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, modern technologies are becoming more and more developed and they are used in different fields. Virtual reality is a new technological boom. Subsequently, it is possible to combine virtual reality and the design field. This thesis is a research about virtual reality, 3D modelling and how it can be used in the architectural sphere. Tyris Software, a company in Valencia, Spain, commissioned the project. The main goal was to invent and develop a platform for architects and customer...

  16. Improving the reliability of seasonal climate forecasts through empirical downscaling and multi-model considerations; presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available , discrimination and sharpness. We present seasonal prediction verification for the equatorial Pacific Ocean (where El Niño and La Niña events occur) sea-surface temperatures. The verification is done over a recent multi-decadal period for which hindcasts (re-forecasts...

  17. Modeling the present and future impact of aviation on climate: an AOGCM approach with online coupled chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Huszar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our work is among the first that use an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM with online chemistry to evaluate the impact of future aviation emissions on temperature. Other particularities of our study include non-scaling to the aviation emissions, and the analysis of models' transient response using ensemble simulations. The model we use is the Météo-France CNRM-CM5.1 earth system model extended with the REPROBUS chemistry scheme. The time horizon of our interest is 1940–2100, assuming the A1B SRES scenario. We investigate the present and future impact of aviation emissions of CO2, NOx and H2O on climate, taking into account changes in greenhouse gases, contrails and contrail-induced cirrus (CIC. As in many transport-related impact studies, we distinguish between the climate impacts of CO2 emissions and those of non-CO2 emissions. Aviation-produced aerosol is not considered in the study. Our modeling system simulated a notable sea-ice bias in the Arctic, and therefore results concerning the surface should be viewed with caution. The global averaged near-surface CO2 impact reaches around 0.1 K by the end of the 21st century, while the non-CO2 impact reaches 0.2 K in the second half of the century. The NOx emissions impact is almost negligible in our simulations, as our aviation-induced ozone production is small. As a consequence, the non-CO2 signal is very similar to the CIC signal. The seasonal analysis shows that the strongest warming due to aviation is modeled for the late summer and early autumn. In the stratosphere, a significant cooling is attributed to aviation CO2 emissions (−0.25 K by 2100. A −0.3 K temperature decrease is modeled when considering all the aviation emissions, but no significant signal appears from the CIC or NOx forcings in the stratosphere.

  18. In vitro three-dimensional cancer metastasis modeling: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei-jing, Han; Wei, Yuan; Jiang-rui, Zhu; Qihui, Fan; Junle, Qu; Li-yu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of most cancer deaths, as opposed to dysregulated cell growth of the primary tumor. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis have been studied for decades and the findings have evolved our understanding of the progression of malignancy. However, most of the molecular mechanisms fail to address the causes of cancer and its evolutionary origin, demonstrating an inability to find a solution for complete cure of cancer. After being a neglected area of tumor biology for quite some time, recently several studies have focused on the impact of the tumor microenvironment on cancer growth. The importance of the tumor microenvironment is gradually gaining attention, particularly from the perspective of biophysics. In vitro three-dimensional (3-D) metastatic models are an indispensable platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment, as they mimic the in vivo tumor tissue. In 3-D metastatic in vitro models, static factors such as the mechanical properties, biochemical factors, as well as dynamic factors such as cell-cell, cell-ECM interactions, and fluid shear stress can be studied quantitatively. With increasing focus on basic cancer research and drug development, the in vitro 3-D models offer unique advantages in fundamental and clinical biomedical studies. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345), and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 7154221).

  19. Results from ITMIX - the Ice Thickness Models Intercomparison eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinotti, Daniel; Itmix Consortium, The

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about the ice thickness distribution of a given glacier or ice cap is essential for a number of glaciological and hydrological applications. Yet, the ice thickness of the majority of worlds' ice masses remains poorly constrained. Recently, significant advances have been made in numerical methods that infer glacier ice thickness from surface characteristics, and a number of approaches have been proposed. A comprehensive assessment of their performance, however, is missing to date. Here, we present results from ITMIX - the Ice Thickness Models Intercomparison eXperiment - which was the first coordinated effort to assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of individual approaches. Operating in a working group of the International Association of Cryospheric Sciences, we present results from a total of 17 different models, applied over 21 test cases including glaciers, ice caps, and synthetic geometries. We show that the results from individual approaches can differ largely, but that combining them into an ensemble-estimate can yield significantly improvements. Comparison against direct ice thickness measurements reveals that ensemble solution can achieve accuracies in the order of 10 ± 24 % of the mean ice thickness. We additionally highlight how input-data quality can affect the estimates, and argue that better accounting for input-data uncertainty will be a key for an improved next generation of ice thickness estimation models.

  20. The Microscopic Models of Collective Excitations. Present Status and Possible Ways of Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, S.T.

    1968-01-01

    The paper analyses possible generalizations of the known collective excitation models in the following directions: (a) inclusion of other kinds of interactions, generating new types of oscillations, (b) improvement of the quasiboson approximation. The classification of excitations according to the quantum numbers of correlate pairs provides the basis for the corresponding classification of the elementary interactions generating these excitations. For low excitations the number of important ''generating interactions'' is not large and practically all of them have been tested. A special study is made of the particle-particle channel where ''elementary interactions'' can be introduced without any new parameters, if the hypothesis of gauge invariance of nucleon-nucleon interaction is used. Additional (to usual pairing) interaction in the particle-particle channel generates 0 + -states - ''coherent pairing fluctuation'' — having a uniquely large probability ratio of EO and E2 transitions into the ground band. The experimental identification of such states is of great interest. The necessity to: reject the quasiboson approximation is dictated by the complicated vibrational-rotational structure of experimental nuclear spectra. The main difficulty of their theoretical description is the absence of a consistent microscopic picture of rotational excitations. Only in very special models can the group theory be applied and show how rotation appears in the system of interacting particles. A method worked out by Belyaev and Zelevinsky is considered, which gives the possibility of a microscopic description of rotations. The proposed method includes some aspects of group theory approach that, together with the equations of motion for pair operators,allow the consideration of realistic models in a sufficiently good approximation. The illustration of the method serves to obtain the rotational spectrum for j N configuration with a further generalization on an arbitrary number of

  1. The cultural route of present and lost landscapes in the centre of Bucharest - digital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2015-04-01

    We are developing a digital model of the Magheru boulevard in central Bucharest. This N-S axis in the centre of the city is a unique encounter with interwar architecture. It is a protected area in the city, with buildings listed individually or as group of monuments, and also with protection at urban planning level. But at the same time the landscape does not facilitate the building of urban routes between monuments. A GIS model of the area exists, but does not yet take into account this heritage value of the buildings, being developed in a civil engineering environment. It is also one of the few partial 3D models of Bucharest. It allows datascapes of various buidling characteristics. At the same time a 3D model which equally covers all items in an area is ressources expensive. Hence, we propose, similarly to strategic planning to do a Kevin Lynch type selection. Landmarks will be identified as nodes of the routes, and the remaining area treated as zone. Ways connect the nodes and we paid special attention as we will see to their landscape. We developed a concept on how to further build from the idea of layers in GIS to include the issue of scale. As such, floor plans can build strategic points for the nodes of the route such as in Nolli or Sitte plans. Cooperation between GIS and GoogleEarth is envisaged, since GoogleEarth allows for detailing in SketchUp for the interior space. This way we developed an alternative digital model to the levels of detail of CityGML, the classical for 3D city models. The route itself is to be analysed with the method of Space Syntax. While this part of the research focused on the built heritage, on culture, we included also issues of landscape. First, the landscape of the boulevard has to be shaped as to build the route between these nodes of the route. Our concept includes the creation of pocket parks and of links between the pocket parks through vegetal and mineral elements to connect them. Existing urban spaces and empty plots are

  2. Applying the Many-Facet Rasch Model to Evaluate PowerPoint Presentation Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the usefulness of the many-facet Rasch model (MFRM) in evaluating the quality of performance related to PowerPoint presentations in higher education. The Rasch Model utilizes item response theory stating that the probability of a correct response to a test item/task depends largely on a single parameter, the ability of the…

  3. Use of the FAR Guide to Present a Pedagogical Analogical Model of Gel Electrophoresis in Year 10 Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a qualitative, practice based study describing the use of the Focus-Action-Reflection (FAR) Guide (Harrison & Treagust, 2000) to address the shortcomings of a pedagogical analogical model in Year 10 Science. The aim of this paper is to present my experience of the FAR Guide in relation to an analogical model that gave rise to…

  4. Summarized presentation of the numerical model used for the pressurizer of a light water nuclear reactor. Description and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siarry, P.

    1981-12-01

    The pressurizer model is first described together with its coupling to the nuclear unit. The different stages involved in the validation are then presented: validation of overall qualitative behavior; validation of the open loop pressurizer model; validation of the various units for controlling pressures and levels; simulation of two large transients (Bugey plant) [fr

  5. Financial analysis and forecasting of the results of small businesses performance based on regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana O. Musienko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the economicmathematical model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies. Methods using comparative analysis the article studies the existing approaches to the construction of the company management models. Applying the regression analysis and the least squares method which is widely used for financial management of enterprises in Russia and abroad the author builds a model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies which can be used in the financial analysis and prediction of small enterprisesrsquo performance. Results the article states the need to identify factors affecting the financial management efficiency. The author analyzed scientific research and revealed the lack of comprehensive studies on the methodology for assessing the small enterprisesrsquo management while the methods used for large companies are not always suitable for the task. The systematized approaches of various authors to the formation of regression models describe the influence of certain factors on the company activity. It is revealed that the resulting indicators in the studies were revenue profit or the company relative profitability. The main drawback of most models is the mathematical not economic approach to the definition of the dependent and independent variables. Basing on the analysis it was determined that the most correct is the model of dependence between revenues and total assets of the company using the decimal logarithm. The model was built using data on the activities of the 507 small businesses operating in three spheres of economic activity. Using the presented model it was proved that there is direct dependence between the sales proceeds and the main items of the asset balance as well as differences in the degree of this effect depending on the economic activity of small

  6. Models of presentation of intraarticular masses; Normas de presentacion de las masas intraarticulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, M. [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset. Valencia (Spain); Molla, E. [Clinica Quiron. Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, L.; Galant, J. [Hospital San Juan. Alicante (Spain); Madariaga, B. [Hospital Clinico Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Intraarticular masses are relatively rare, and their magnetic resonance (MR) features are little known. The purpose of this report was to asses the presentation and MR imaging findings associated with the different histological types encountered in a series of 22 patients. We review the MR imaging findings in 22 intraarticular masses (18 in knee, two in ankle and two in shoulder). The variables studied were: calcifications, edema, morphology, methemoglobin, hemosiderin, homogeneity, margins, bone changes, T1-weighted signal intensity, T2-weightes/STIR signal intensity, clinical presentation and patient age. The statistical relationships were determined by {chi}''2 test and ANOVA (Student-Newman-Keuls). Among the intraarticular masses, there were 14 cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis (SVNP) (63.6%), 3 cases of themangioma (13.6%), 3 cases of synovial sarcoma (13.6%) and 2 cases of chondrosarcoma (9.1%). Statistical significant relationships were observed between histological type and; calcifications (p=0.004), which were irregular in chondrosarcomas and appeared as phleboliths in hemangionas: morphology (p=0.007), which was serpiginous in hemangiomas and oval in focal SVNP; areas of hemosiderin (p=0.002)in SVNP and synovial sarcoma: clinica presentation (p=0.003), with skin changes in cases of hemangioma: and age (p=0.04), hemangioma patients being younger (mean: 21 years) and those with synovial sarcoma being older (mean: 56 years). In cases of intraarticular masses, the presence of calcification, tumor morphology, the presence of hemosiderin, patient age and clinical presentation show statistically significant differences depending on the histological type. (Author) 23 refs.

  7. Geochemical modelling and speciation studies of metal pollutants present in selected water systems in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magu, M. M.; Govender, P. P.; Ngila, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal pollutants in water poses great threats to living beings and hence requires to be monitored regularly to avoid loss of lives. Various analytical methods are available to monitor these pollutants in water and can be improved with time. Modelling of metal pollutants in any water system helps chemists, engineers and environmentalists to greatly understand the various chemical processes in such systems. Water samples were collected from waste water treatment plant and river from highlands close to its source all the way to the ocean as it passing through areas with high anthropogenic activities. Pre-concentration of pollutants in the samples was done through acid digestion and metal pollutants were analysed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectra (ICP-OES) to determine the concentration levels. Metal concentrations ranged between 0.1356-0.4658 mg/L for Al; 0.0031-0.0050 mg/L for Co, 0.0019-0.0956 mg/L for Cr; 0.0028-0.3484 mg/L for Cu; 0.0489-0.3474 mg/L for Fe; 0.0033-0.0285 mg/L for Mn; 0.0056-0.0222 mg/L for Ni; 0.0265-0.4753 mg/L for Pb and 0.0052-0.5594 mg/L for Zn. Modelling work was performed using PHREEQC couple with Geochemist's workbench (GWB) to determine speciation dynamics and bioavailability of these pollutants. Modelling thus adds value to analytical methods and hence a better complementary tool to laboratory-based experimental studies.

  8. Building trusted national identity management systems: Presenting the privacy concern-trust (PCT) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Joseph K.; Olesen, Henning

    systems. We adopted a qualitative research approach in our analysis of data that was gathered through a series of interviews and a stakeholder workshop in Ghana. Our findings indicate that, beyond the threshold level of trust, societal information privacy concern is low; hence, trust is high, thereby......This paper discusses the effect of trust and information privacy concerns on citizens’ attitude towards national identity management systems. We introduce the privacyconcerns- trust model, which shows the role of trust in mediating and moderating citizens’ attitude towards identity management...... encouraging further institutional collaboration and acceptance of citizens’ informational self-determination....

  9. Modelling Groundwater Depletion at Regional and Global Scales: Present State and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Except for frozen water in ice and glaciers, groundwater is the world's largest distributed store of freshwater and has strategic importance to global food and water security. In this paper, the most recent advances quantifying groundwater depletion (GWD) are comprehensively reviewed. This paper critically evaluates the recently advanced modeling approaches estimating GWD at regional and global scales, and the evidence of feedbacks to the Earth system including sea-level rise associated with GWD. Finally, critical challenges and opportunities in the use of groundwater are identified for the adaption to growing food demand and uncertain climate.

  10. The ''Adatom Model'' of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering): The present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.; Billmann, J.; Eickmans, J.; Ertuerk, U.; Pettenkofer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The model predicts resonant Raman scattering by adsorbate vibrations through photon excited charge transfer transition from localized electronic states at sites of atomic scale roughness (e.g. 'adatoms') on silver surfaces to the affinity levels of the adsorbates. Experimental tests are discussed: search for the localized states, shifts of the affinity levels, comparison of SERS at sites of ASR and at atomically smooth parts of the surface, changes in SER vibrational bands by shifts of the affinity levels, 'SERS' vibrational selection rules. Infrared enhancement at sites of ASR is conjectured. Different hypotheses on the role of the 'porosity' of coldly deposited silver films are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Prof. Samuel ting presents results from AMS experiment at CERN main auditorium. Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS1) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter. The results, presented by AMS spokesperson Professor Samuel Ting in a seminar at CERN, are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters. They report the observation of an excess of positrons in the cosmic ray flux

  12. Quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising: a comparative study in Australia, Malaysia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Noordin; Vitry, Agnes I; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2010-05-29

    Journal advertising is used by pharmaceutical companies to disseminate medicine information to doctors. The quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in Australia and the US has been questioned in several studies. No recent evidence is available on the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in Australia and the US and no Malaysian data have been published. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in these three countries. A consecutive sample of 85 unique advertisements from each country was selected from journal advertising published between January 2004 to December 2006. Claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising were compared between the three countries. Less than one-third of the claims were unambiguous claims (Australia, 30%, Malaysia 17%, US, 23%). In Malaysia significantly less unambiguous claims were provided than in Australia and the US (P references than other claims (80%). Most evidence was obtained from at least one randomized controlled trial, a systematic review or meta-analysis (Australia, 84%, Malaysia, 81%, US, 76%) with journal articles being the most commonly cited references in all countries. Data on file were significantly more likely to be cited in the US (17%) than in Australia (2%) and Malaysia (4%) (P references in the US. The use of relative rather than absolute benefits may overemphasize the benefit of medicines which may leave doctors susceptible to misinterpreting information.

  13. Non-SUSY Beyond Standard Model Searches: Recent Results from ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Malek, Fairouz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a sensational success, especially since the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. However, there are still numerous unanswered questions. Why is the Higgs so light? Do the interactions couplings unify and how can gravity be included? Why three fermion generations? What is dark matter? Theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as Grand Unified Theories, Extra Dimensions or Technicolour are trying to answer these questions. In this proceedings, we will focus on the most recent results obtained by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC for BSM searches, excluding Higgs and supersymmetry searches. New results on Dark matter, heavy narrow bosons, new heavy quarks and third generation leptoquarks are presented. A summary of the prospects at 14 TeV and at the High Luminosity LHC period is given.

  14. Turbulence modeling with fractional derivatives: Derivation from first principles and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden; Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Fluid turbulence is an outstanding unsolved problem in classical physics, despite 120+ years of sustained effort. Given this history, we assert that a new mathematical framework is needed to make a transformative breakthrough. This talk offers one such framework, based upon kinetic theory tied to the statistics of turbulent transport. Starting from the Boltzmann equation and ``Lévy α-stable distributions'', we derive a turbulence model that expresses the turbulent stresses in the form of a fractional derivative, where the fractional order is tied to the transport behavior of the flow. Initial results are presented herein, for the cases of Couette-Poiseuille flow and 2D boundary layers. Among other results, our model is able to reproduce the logarithmic Law of the Wall in shear turbulence.

  15. A Compact Synchronous Cellular Model of Nonlinear Calcium Dynamics: Simulation and FPGA Synthesis Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Hamid; Drakakis, Emmanuel M

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that calcium is a widespread intracellular ion that controls a wide range of temporal dynamics in the mammalian body. The simulation and validation of such studies using experimental data would benefit from a fast large scale simulation and modelling tool. This paper presents a compact and fully reconfigurable cellular calcium model capable of mimicking Hopf bifurcation phenomenon and various nonlinear responses of the biological calcium dynamics. The proposed cellular model is synthesized on a digital platform for a single unit and a network model. Hardware synthesis, physical implementation on FPGA, and theoretical analysis confirm that the proposed cellular model can mimic the biological calcium behaviors with considerably low hardware overhead. The approach has the potential to speed up large-scale simulations of slow intracellular dynamics by sharing more cellular units in real-time. To this end, various networks constructed by pipelining 10 k to 40 k cellular calcium units are compared with an equivalent simulation run on a standard PC workstation. Results show that the cellular hardware model is, on average, 83 times faster than the CPU version.

  16. Comparison of TS and ANN Models with the Results of Emission Scenarios in Rainfall Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babaei Hessar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Precipitation is one of the most important and sensitive parameters of the tropical climate that influence the catchments hydrological regime. The prediction of rainfall is vital for strategic planning and water resources management. Despite its importance, statistical rainfall forecasting, especially for long-term, has been proven to be a great challenge due to the dynamic nature of climate phenomena and random fluctuations involved in the process. Various methods, such as time series and artificial neural network models, have been proposed to predict the level of rainfall. But there is not enough attention to global warming and climate change issues. The main aim of this study is to investigate the conformity of artificial neural network and time series models with climate scenarios. Materials and Methods: For this study, 50 years of daily rainfall data (1961 to 2010 of the synoptic station of Urmia, Tabriz and Khoy was investigated. Data was obtained from Meteorological Organization of Iran. In the present study, the results of two Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Time Seri (TS methods were compared with the result of the Emission Scenarios (A2 & B1. HadCM3 model in LARS-WG software was used to generate rainfall for the next 18 years (2011-2029. The results of models were compared with climate scenarios over the next 18 years in the three synoptic stations located in the basin of the Lake Urmia. At the first stage, the best model of time series method was selected. The precipitation was estimated for the next 18 years using these models. For the same period, precipitation was forecast using artificial neural networks. Finally, the results of two models were compared with data generated under two scenarios (B1 and A2 in LARS-WG. Results and Discussion: Different order of AR, MA and ARMA was examined to select the best model of TS The results show that AR(1 was suitable for Tabriz and Khoy stations .In the Urmia station MA(1 was

  17. Promoter or enhancer, what's the difference? Deconstruction of established distinctions and presentation of a unifying model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin

    2015-01-01

    of enhancers. Among the different approaches, profiling of enhancer RNAs yields the highest specificity and may be superior in detecting in vivo activity. I discuss their apparent similarities to promoters, which challenge the established view of enhancers and promoters as distinct entities, and present......Gene transcription is strictly controlled by the interplay of regulatory events at gene promoters and gene-distal regulatory elements called enhancers. Despite extensive studies of enhancers, we still have a very limited understanding of their mechanisms of action and their restricted spatio...

  18. Pesticides in groundwater: modelling and data analysis of the past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binning, Philip John; McKnight, Ursula S.; Malaguerra, Flavio

    Pesticides are the most frequently detected groundwater contaminants in Denmark. However, there is still a great deal of debate about the fate of pesticides and their future occurrence in our environment. We do not really understand the link between past usage and current observations, and are no......Pesticides are the most frequently detected groundwater contaminants in Denmark. However, there is still a great deal of debate about the fate of pesticides and their future occurrence in our environment. We do not really understand the link between past usage and current observations...... to jointly manage our groundwater and surface water resources. Here, observed pesticide data is analyzed and combined with models to address these questions and needs. Groundwater and surface water pesticide observations reflect the fact that these two hydrological components have a strong interaction...

  19. Defects in Antigen-Presenting Cells in the BB-DP Rat Model of Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sommandas (Vinod)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractType-1 diabetes is the result of a T cell mediated immune response against the insulin-producing β cells in the islet of Langerhans. In humans, until now, the disease is only clearly detectable at the onset of the disease. Therefore studies to identify initial factors involved in

  20. Philosophical Presentation in Ptolemy’s Harmonics: The Timaeus as a Model for Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Tolsa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ptolemy’s self-representation as philosopher is conventional in the Almagest but not so in Harmonics, which emulates Plato’s Timaeus and makes philosophy the result  of understanding harmonics rather than the premise.

  1. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Shen, Hongxia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Chan, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; McDevitt, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Sturges, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-02-07

    Policies aimed at energy conservation and efficiency have broad environmental and economic impacts. Even if these impacts are relatively small, they may be significant compared to the cost of implementing the policy. Methodologies that quantify the marginal impacts of reduced demand for energy have an important role to play in developing accurate measures of both the benefits and costs of a given policy choice. This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of reduced demand for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. The approach uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), a mid-range energy forecast model developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA)(DOE EIA 2013). The report is organized as follows: In the rest of this section the traditional NEMS-BT approach is reviewed and an outline of the new reduced form NEMS methodology is presented. Section 2 provides an overview of how the NEMS model works, and describes the set of NEMS-BT runs that are used as input to the reduced form approach. Section 3 presents our NEMS-BT simulation results and post-processing methods. In Section 4 we show how the NEMS-BT output can be generalized to apply to a broader set of end-uses. In Section 5 we disuss the application of this approach to policy analysis, and summarize some of the issues that will be further investigated in Part 2 of this study.

  2. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Recent progress and the current status of AgMIP will be presented, highlighting three areas of activity: preliminary results from crop pilot studies, outcomes from regional workshops, and emerging scientific challenges. AgMIP crop modeling efforts are being led by pilot studies, which have been established for wheat, maize, rice, and sugarcane. These crop-specific initiatives have proven instrumental in testing and contributing to AgMIP protocols, as well as creating preliminary results for aggregation and input to agricultural trade models. Regional workshops are being held to encourage collaborations and set research activities in motion for key agricultural areas. The first of these workshops was hosted by Embrapa and UNICAMP and held in Campinas, Brazil. Outcomes from this meeting have informed crop modeling research activities within South America, AgMIP protocols, and future regional workshops. Several scientific challenges have emerged and are currently being addressed by AgMIP researchers. Areas of particular interest include geospatial weather generation, ensemble methods for climate scenarios and crop models, spatial aggregation of field-scale yields to regional and global production, and characterization of future changes in climate variability.

  3. Model of the Arctic evolution since the Cretaceous to present, based on upper mantle convection linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2015-04-01

    The present paper comprises a model of Arctic basin evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. The model is based on the mechanism of upper mantle substance circulation beneath the Arctic lithosphere linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction. Seismic tomography data obtained for the Pacific-Eurasia-Arctic joint area indicate that Pacific lithosphere slab sinking to the mantle in subduction zone transforms into the horizontal layer upon reaching the upper mantle foot, this layer extending for two or more thousands km beneath the Eurasian continent. This pattern of seismic tomography indicates the presence of a horizontal convective cell where a flow of substance moving along the upper mantle foot from a subduction zone into the continent is compensated by a return flow moving along the lithosphere foot towards the subduction zone. The return mantle flow makes continental lithosphere extension, giving rise to processes of rifting, magmatism and spreading. The convective cell being continuously supplied with new substance which is transported through the subduction zone it is sure to expand horizontally. The above cell expansion occurs first, due to ocean ward movement of subduction zone (roll back) and secondly, due to the cell front propagation into the continent. The given model allows to understand main features for the Arctic evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. Numerous seismic profiling data obtained for shelf and deep water sedimentary basins in the Arctic Ocean as well as on land geological investigation reveal that since Aptian up to present the Arctic region has been characterized by sublatitudinal lithosphere extension. This extension is explained by the effect the return mantle flow related to the subduction of the Northern part of the Pacific plate acts on the Arctic lithosphere foot. The model shows the phenomenon of Arctic plume to be caused by the convective cell uprising flow. In fact lower horizontal flow of convective cell moving

  4. Furthering our Understanding of Land Surface Interactions using SVAT modelling: Results from SimSphere's Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matt; Petropoulos, George; Ireland, Gareth; Rendal, Daisy; Carlson, Toby

    2015-04-01

    demonstrated greatest simulation accuracies within ecologically stable sites, where low inter-annual change in vegetation phenology was exhibited, such as open woodland savannah, shrub land and mulga woodland, whereas poorer simulation accuracies were attained in cropland and grazing pasture sites. This study results present its first comprehensive validation. It is also very timely due to the rapidly expanding global use of the model, both as a standalone tool used for research, education and training in several institutions worldwide, but also for its synergistic applications to Earth Observation data. Currently, several space agencies are evaluating the model 's use synergistically with Earth Observation data in providing spatio-temporal estimates of energy fluxes and / or soil moisture at operational level. Key Words: SimSphere, Validation, FLUXNET, SVAT, Shortwave Incoming Solar Radiation, Net Radiation, Latent Heat, Sensible Heat, Air Temperature

  5. Assessment of present and future risk to Italian forests and human health: modelling and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Alessandra

    2009-05-01

    A review of ozone pollution in Italy shows levels largely above the thresholds established by EU regulation for vegetation and human health protection. The Italian air quality monitoring network appears quantitatively inadequate to cover all the territorial surface, because of scarcity and unequal distribution of monitoring sites. By applying the integrated assessment model RAINS-Italy to the year 2000, the whole of Italy exceeds the AOT40 critical level for forest, while Northern and central areas show strong potential of O(3) impact on human health with approximately 11% of territory >10 O(3)-induced premature deaths. Two scenarios for the year 2020, the Current Legislation and the Maximum Technical Feasible Reduction, show a reduction of AOT40Forest by 29% and 44%, SOMO35 by 31% and 47%, and O(3)-induced premature deaths by 32% and 48%, compared to 2000. RAINS-Italy can be used to improve the map quality and cover areas not reached by the national monitoring network.

  6. Development of Concepts and Models of Performance Evaluation from the 19th Century to the Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornungová Jana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to provide a framework of concepts and models from the area of performance measurement. Due to the fact that the business environment is con-stantly changing, changes also occur in the trends relating to performance. Traditional financial performance measures have been highly criticized and the need identified to integrate non-financial perspectives, such as level of innovation, degree of motivation, intellectual capital and other criteria. Intellectual capital is often a crucial factor in the creation of value in a company. This paper provides a literature review supplemented by the author’s research in the field of performance. The article shows that the performance appraisal system is currently focused on several areas that could affect the performance of the company, which is also part of the overall performance of the economy in the form of GDP growth. Based on the research, it can be said that, for the sample tracked, the selection of performance evaluation system does not depend on the legal form of the business.

  7. Atmosphere and permafrost in the Arctic: results from a new regional coupled atmosphere-land model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Heidrun; Rinke, Annette; Zhou, Xu; Dethloff, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Frozen ground is one of the key components of the land part of the Arctic climate system. A reliable representation of the exchanges of energy, water and gases (CO2 and CH4) between frozen ground and the atmosphere is essential for simulating the present day Arctic coupled climate system realistically and its future changes with some confidence. Regional atmosphere-snow-permafrost interactions can be best studied with Regional Climate Models (RCMs) due to their high horizontal resolution compared to Global Climate Models. For this purpose, the sophisticated land model CLM4 was integrated into the Arctic regional climate model HIRHAM5 (HIRHAM5-CLM4). To validate this model, it was run over the ERAInterim period (1979-2014) and the model results were compared to a similar simulation of HIRHAM5, using the inbuilt land model, as well as to station observations. The comparison focuses on the models ability to represent observations on permafrost like permafrost extent, active layer thickness (ALT) and soil temperature profiles, as well as on the representation of the Arctic atmosphere. The representation of ALT and soil temperature profiles is significantly improved in HIRHAM5-CLM4 compared to HIRHAM5. Averaged over the period 2000-2011, the bias to station observations of ALT is reduced from -1.3 m to -0.3 m, the Arctic wide winter soil temperature root mean square is reduced from up to 14.4K to a maximum of 5K. Arctic climatology of 2m air temperature and mean sea level pressure are well represented in both HIRHAM5-CLM4 and HIRHAM5, HIRHAM5-CLM4 reduces the air temperature bias averaged over 1979-2014 over Eastern and Central Siberia in winter by 0.5K. Using CLM4 in HIRHAM5 impacts the simulation of local circulation patterns and influences the occurrence of baroclinic cyclones.

  8. Construction of a radiometer for pyroelectric detector and presentation of a model for detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    An expression has been developed for the pyroelectric voltage as a function of electric and thermal parameters of the detector. It has also been developed expressions for determination of unknown parameters from the experimentally obtained pyroelectric voltage curve as function of time and some other known information. It has also been shown figures of merit for characterization of the detectors, a study showing the detector performance dependence on each electric and thermal parameter and some illustrative experimental results. The radiometer designed and built for this work, is described. (author) [pt

  9. Tracer simulation using a global general circulation model: Results from a midlatitude instantaneous source experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlman, J.D.; Moxim, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    An 11-level general circulation model with seasonal variation is used to perform an experiment on the dispersion of passive tracers. Specially constructed time-dependent winds from this model are used as input to a separate tracer model. The methodologies employed to construct the tracer model are described.The experiment presented is the evolution of a hypothetical instantaneous source of tracer on 1 Janaury with maximum initial concentration at 65 mb, 36 0 N, 180 0 E. The tracer is assumed to have no sources or sinks in the stratosphere, but is subject to removal processes in the lower troposphere.The experimental results reveal a number of similarities to observed tracer behavior, including the average poleward-downward slope of mixing ratio isopleths, strong tracer gradients across the tropopause, intrusion of tracer into the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere, and the long-term interhemispheric exchange rate. The model residence times show behavior intermediate to those exhibited for particulate radioactive debris and gaseous C 14 O 2 . This suggests that caution should be employed when either radioactive debris or C 14 O 2 data are used to develop empirical models for prediction of gaseous tracers which are efficiently removed in the troposphere.In this experiment, the tracer mixing ratio and potential vorticity evolve to very high correlations. Mechanisms for this correlation are discussed. The zonal mean tracer balances exhibit complex behavior among the various transport terms. At early stages, the tracer evolution is dominated by eddy effects. Later, a very large degree of self-cancellation between mean cell and eddy effects is observed. During seasonal transitions, however, this self-cancellation diminishes markedly, leading to significant changes in the zonal mean tracer distribution. A possible theoretical explanation is presented

  10. Uncertainty and variability of infiltration at Yucca Mountain: Part 2. Model results and corroboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothoff, Stuart A.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission actively investigated climate and infiltration at Yucca Mountain for two decades to (i) understand important controls and uncertainties influencing percolation through the unsaturated zone on multimillennial time scales and (ii) provide flux boundary conditions for up to 1 million years in performance assessment models of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. This second part of a two-part series describes site-scale model results for present and potential future conditions and confirmatory analyses for present-day conditions. At both the grid-cell and site-average scale, the calculated uncertainty distribution for net infiltration is approximately lognormal, and the coefficient of variation decreases with increasing net infiltration. Smaller relative but larger absolute responses to climate change occur where net infiltration is large. Comparisons of distributed model estimates with temperature and geochemical observations from the unsaturated zone suggest that average estimates are generally consistent but exhibit significant variability. An observed seepage event in the South Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility, combined with related subsurface observations across the site, suggests that subsurface spreading from zones of high infiltration to zones of low infiltration may occur in stratabound fractures, laterally extensive discontinuities, or at transitions between welded and nonwelded tuff units. Two conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow each explain the subsurface observations, collectively providing bounding estimates for net infiltration. Model-predicted uncertainty distribution for decadal-average site-scale net infiltration is generally consistent with estimated percolation fluxes using the bounding hypotheses, suggesting that the model-calculated uncertainty is reasonably consistent with the uncertainty in interpreting site observations.

  11. alpha-pinene oxidation by OH : Box model simulation of experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capouet, M.; Fantechi, G.; Peeters, J.; Noziere, B.; Muller, J.-F.

    2003-04-01

    A detailed gas-phase mechanism for the oxidation of alpha-pinene and pinonaldehyde by OH in the presence of NOx (Peeters et al., 2001; Fantechi et al., 2002) has been implemented in a box model. A module describing the gas/particle partitioning of the semi-volatile products has been developed and coupled to the gas-phase model. The estimation of the gas/particle partitioning coefficients requires the prediction of the saturation vapour pressures for the compounds produced in the mechanism. The method developed in this work is outlined and compared with two published methods : The Marrero and Gani (2001) and the UNIFAC ( Asher et al, 2002) methods. In order to validate the gas-phase mechanism and the partitioning model, we present comparisons of simulations results with time-dependent product concentrations measured in a series of laboratories experiments performed by Noziere et al. (1999). In these experiments, gaseous products as well as total secondary organic aerosol were measured in a variety of conditions (initial alpha-pinene, NOx, type of lamp and radical precursor). The results of these comparisons are discussed. An excellent agreement is generally observed for most gaseous products, in contrast with a very poor match between modelled and observed aerosol concentrations, pointing to the existence of missing heterogeneous processes.

  12. An analytical model for nanoparticles concentration resulting from infusion into poroelastic brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichelli, G; Di Michele, F; Sinibaldi, E

    2016-02-01

    We consider the infusion of a diluted suspension of nanoparticles (NPs) into poroelastic brain tissue, in view of relevant biomedical applications such as intratumoral thermotherapy. Indeed, the high impact of the related pathologies motivates the development of advanced therapeutic approaches, whose design also benefits from theoretical models. This study provides an analytical expression for the time-dependent NPs concentration during the infusion into poroelastic brain tissue, which also accounts for particle binding onto cells (by recalling relevant results from the colloid filtration theory). Our model is computationally inexpensive and, compared to fully numerical approaches, permits to explicitly elucidate the role of the involved physical aspects (tissue poroelasticity, infusion parameters, NPs physico-chemical properties, NP-tissue interactions underlying binding). We also present illustrative results based on parameters taken from the literature, by considering clinically relevant ranges for the infusion parameters. Moreover, we thoroughly assess the model working assumptions besides discussing its limitations. While not laying any claims of generality, our model can be used to support the development of more ambitious numerical approaches, towards the preliminary design of novel therapies based on NPs infusion into brain tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. National Fire Fuels and Risks Assessment Using Remote Sensing and Ecological Modeling: Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Rollins, M.

    2003-12-01

    Hazardous fuel reduction, ecosystem rehabilitation and restoration, and firefighting safety, are land management priorities emphasized by recent national fire policies such as the National Fire Plan. Implementation of these policies requires geospatial data of vegetation conditions, fire fuels, risks, and ecosystem status developed consistently nationwide that can be used at multiple scales (i.e., local, regional, and national). A new research and development project called LANDFIRE has been conducted to develop an integrated methodology to produce geospatial fire data and predictive models for the land management community and a broad range of other applications. Main deliverables include mapped potential and existing vegetation types and structure variables, various biophysical data layers, fire fuels models, fire risk layers, as well as state-of-the-art computer models for assessing fire risk, behavior and effects. In this presentation, we will review research results and findings of the LANDFIRE project using results from a prototype study covering central Utah Uinta and Wasatch ecosystems. Particularly we will describe how a consistent and operational vegetation mapping component may be achieved by integrating machine-learning algorithms, field reference data, satellite imagery, and ecologically significant biophysical variables. We will discuss how remotely sensed vegetation cover types and structure can be successfully converted to fire fuel classes and risk layers which are necessary input into fire behavior and fire effect models. Finally we will discuss challenges and opportunities for national implementation of the methodology.

  14. EcoClimate: a database of climate data from multiple models for past, present, and future for macroecologists and biogeographers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Souza Lima-Ribeiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies in biogeography and macroecology have been increasing massively since climate and biodiversity databases became easily accessible. Climate simulations for past, present, and future have enabled macroecologists and biogeographers to combine data on species’ occurrences with detailed information on climatic conditions through time to predict biological responses across large spatial and temporal scales. Here we present and describe ecoClimate, a free and open data repository developed to serve useful climate data to macroecologists and biogeographers. ecoClimate arose from the need for climate layers with which to build ecological niche models and test macroecological and biogeographic hypotheses in the past, present, and future. ecoClimate offers a suite of processed, multi-temporal climate data sets from the most recent multi-model ensembles developed by the Coupled Modeling Intercomparison Projects (CMIP5 and Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Projects (PMIP3 across past, present, and future time frames, at global extents and 0.5° spatial resolution, in convenient formats for analysis and manipulation. A priority of ecoClimate is consistency across these diverse data, but retaining information on uncertainties among model predictions. The ecoClimate research group intends to maintain the web repository updated continuously as new model outputs become available, as well as software that makes our workflows broadly accessible.

  15. Compilation of publication and results from project C2: Modelling of microclimates in collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holck, O. [ed.

    1999-08-01

    It is important to avoid condensation in solar collectors, most of all because wetness of the absorber can damage the selective surface and cause corrosion on the absorber plate. During night time the cover of collectors will cool below ambient temperature due to thermal radiation to the cold sky. In climates where the air during night time becomes saturated with humidity (the relative humidity is 100%), condensation will form on the outside and inside of the collector glazing. If too much condensation takes place on the inside of the glazing, it will start to fall off on to the absorber surface. The intent of the present work is improvement of a existing computer model for calculation of microclimates data in collectors. Calculations with the model give insight in the humidity and temperature for artificial or realistic climatic data. This design tool makes it possible to calculate the effect of ventilation and insulation materials. Results from investigation of ventilation rates together with a model of the moisture inside the collector are built into the computer program. It has been found that modelling of the moisture transfer in backside insulation is essential to determine the humidity in the air gap of the collector. The objective is to develop guidelines for solar collector design to achieve the most favourable microclimates condition for materials. As a tool the computer model will be useful to fulfil this. Guidelines for collectors will be essential for manufactures to improve the long-term durability of solar collectors. (au)

  16. Behavioural present value

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Piasecki

    2013-01-01

    Impact of chosen behavioural factors on imprecision of present value is discussed here. The formal model of behavioural present value is offered as a result of this discussion. Behavioural present value is described here by fuzzy set. These considerations were illustrated by means of extensive numerical case study. Finally there are shown that in proposed model the return rate is given, as a fuzzy probabilistic set.

  17. Present and future connection of Asian-Pacific Oscillation to large-scale atmospheric circulations and East Asian rainfall: results of CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Botao; Xu, Ying; Shi, Ying

    2018-01-01

    The summer Asian-Pacific oscillation (APO), one of the major modes of climate variability over the Asian-Pacific sector, has a pronounced effect on variations of large-scale atmospheric circulations and climate. This study evaluated the capability of 30 state-of-the-art climate models among the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) in simulating its association with the atmospheric circulations over the Asian-Pacific region and the precipitation over East Asia. Furthermore, their future connections under the RCP8.5 scenario were examined. The evaluation results show that 5 out of 30 climate models can well capture the observed APO-related features in a comprehensive way, including the strengthened South Asian high (SAH), deepened North Pacific trough (NPT) and northward East Asian jet (EAJ) in the upper troposphere; an intensification of the Asian low and the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) as well as a northward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) in the lower troposphere; and a decrease in East Asian summer rainfall (EASR) under the positive APO phase. Based on the five CMIP5 models' simulations, the dynamic linkages of the APO to the SAH, NPT, AL, and NPSH are projected to maintain during the second half of the twenty-first century. However, its connection with the EASR tends to reduce significantly. Such a reduction might result from the weakening of the linkage of the APO to the meridional displacement of the EAJ and WPSH as a response to the warming scenario.

  18. Silent game as Model for Examining Student Online Creativity - Preliminary Results from an Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2016-01-01

    -called “Silent game” (Habraken & Gross, 1988). But where Habraken et al.’s research in design games focussed on how professional architects and designers collaborate, we examine the potential of Silent game as model for researching online creative collaboration among students. This paper presents the results...... of the experiment and a tentative analysis. The aim is to discuss the possibilities in using Silent game as a model for examining and improving online creativity.......The ERASMUS+ project “OnCreate” aims at improving online mediated creative collaboration among students. But what are the differences between collaboration online and in a face-to-face setting in terms of creative processes? Theories on media richness and collaborative creativity can provide...

  19. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  20. Effect of Additional Incentives for Aviation Biofuels: Results from the Biomass Scenario Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, Emily K [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory supported the Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office, with analysis of alternative jet fuels in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. Airlines for America requested additional exploratory scenarios within FAA analytic framework. Airlines for America requested additional analysis using the same analytic framework, the Biomass Scenario Model. The results were presented at a public working meeting of the California Air Resources Board on including alternative jet fuel in the Low Carbon Fuel Standard on March 17, 2017 (https://www.arb.ca.gov/fuels/lcfs/lcfs_meetings/lcfs_meetings.htm). This presentation clarifies and annotates the slides from the public working meeting, and provides a link to the full data set. NREL does not advocate for or against the policies analyzed in this study.

  1. MSFC Stream Model Preliminary Results: Modeling Recent Leonid and Perseid Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, William J.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2004-01-01

    The cometary meteoroid ejection model of Jones and Brown (1996b) was used to simulate ejection from comets 55P/Tempel-Tuttle during the last 12 revolutions, and the last 9 apparitions of 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Using cometary ephemerides generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory s (JPL) HORIZONS Solar System Data and Ephemeris Computation Service, two independent ejection schemes were simulated. In the first case, ejection was simulated in 1 hour time steps along the comet s orbit while it was within 2.5 AU of the Sun. In the second case, ejection was simulated to occur at the hour the comet reached perihelion. A 4th order variable step-size Runge-Kutta integrator was then used to integrate meteoroid position and velocity forward in time, accounting for the effects of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the gravitational forces of the planets, which were computed using JPL s DE406 planetary ephemerides. An impact parameter was computed for each particle approaching the Earth to create a flux profile, and the results compared to observations of the 1998 and 1999 Leonid showers, and the 1993 and 2004 Perseids.

  2. The present and future situation of "model project for investigation and analysis of medical practice associated deaths" in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hisanaga; Sugimoto, Kana; Nakama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuma; Takeuchi, Dan; Ochi, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mayumi; Tamura, Yoshihide; Tsujino, Masaki; Mitsukuni, Yoichi; Matoba, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    To enhance the quality and safety of medical care, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) launched a model project in September 2005 for investigation and analysis of medical practice associated deaths in an attempt to move the existing system in a different direction. The project, initiated in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Kobe, has now been implemented in nine prefectures. In the hope that the model project will lead to the nationwide development of medical safety investigating committees, the MHLW has submitted a provisional third plan. Based on our practical experience of the model project in Osaka, we present and discuss practical problems and legal issues involving surgeons' criminal punishment.

  3. pyLIMA: An Open-source Package for Microlensing Modeling. I. Presentation of the Software and Analysis of Single-lens Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, E.; Norbury, M.; Bozza, V.; Street, R.

    2017-11-01

    Microlensing is a unique tool, capable of detecting the “cold” planets between ˜1 and 10 au from their host stars and even unbound “free-floating” planets. This regime has been poorly sampled to date owing to the limitations of alternative planet-finding methods, but a watershed in discoveries is anticipated in the near future thanks to the planned microlensing surveys of WFIRST-AFTA and Euclid's Extended Mission. Of the many challenges inherent in these missions, the modeling of microlensing events will be of primary importance, yet it is often time-consuming, complex, and perceived as a daunting barrier to participation in the field. The large scale of future survey data products will require thorough but efficient modeling software, but, unlike other areas of exoplanet research, microlensing currently lacks a publicly available, well-documented package to conduct this type of analysis. We present version 1.0 of the python Lightcurve Identification and Microlensing Analysis (pyLIMA). This software is written in Python and uses existing packages as much as possible to make it widely accessible. In this paper, we describe the overall architecture of the software and the core modules for modeling single-lens events. To verify the performance of this software, we use it to model both real data sets from events published in the literature and generated test data produced using pyLIMA's simulation module. The results demonstrate that pyLIMA is an efficient tool for microlensing modeling. We will expand pyLIMA to consider more complex phenomena in the following papers.

  4. Testing a Poisson counter model for visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-06-01

    The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is continued until the stimulus disappears, and the overt response is based on the categorization made the greatest number of times. The model was evaluated by Monte Carlo tests of goodness of fit against observed probability distributions of responses in two extensive experiments and also by quantifications of the information loss of the model compared with the observed data by use of information theoretic measures. The model provided a close fit to individual data on identification of digits and an apparently perfect fit to data on identification of Landolt rings.

  5. Gamma spectroscopy modelization intercomparison of the modelization results using two different codes (MCNP, and Pascalys-mercure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Chiron, M.; Toubon, H.; Dogny, S.; Huver, M.; Berger, L.

    2001-01-01

    The research performed in common these last 3 years by the French Atomic Commission CEA, COGEMA and Eurisys Mesures had for main subject the realization of a complete tool of modelization for the largest range of realistic cases, the Pascalys modelization software. The main purpose of the modelization was to calculate the global measurement efficiency, which delivers the most accurate relationship between the photons emitted by the nuclear source in volume, punctual or deposited form and the germanium hyper pure detector, which detects and analyzes the received photons. It has been stated since long time that experimental global measurement efficiency becomes more and more difficult to address especially for complex scene as we can find in decommissioning and dismantling or in case of high activities for which the use of high activity reference sources become difficult to use for both health physics point of view and regulations. The choice of a calculation code is fundamental if accurate modelization is searched. MCNP represents the reference code but its use is long time calculation consuming and then not practicable in line on the field. Direct line-of-sight point kernel code as the French Atomic Commission 3-D analysis Mercure code can represent the practicable compromise between the most accurate MCNP reference code and the realistic performances needed in modelization. The comparison between the results of Pascalys-Mercure and MCNP code taking in account the last improvements of Mercure in the low energy range where the most important errors can occur, is presented in this paper, Mercure code being supported in line by the recent Pascalys 3-D modelization scene software. The incidence of the intrinsic efficiency of the Germanium detector is also approached for the total efficiency of measurement. (authors)

  6. Disparity of outcomes: the limits of modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in murine models and translating results clinically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Zwiegers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastatingly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying etiological factors contributing to disease pathogenesis. Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic development, disease presentation in ALS remains largely intractable to intervention. To date, the most common rodent model used in pre-clinical drug development accounts for a small proportion of the affected patient population and is predicated upon the significant overexpression of a mutant form of the human antioxidant protein, superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1. After more than 50 clinical trials, there is an alarming paucity of positive outcomes at the clinical level of ALS therapeutics with strong supporting pre-clinical data in mSOD1 models. Potential reasons for the negative clinical results are multifactorial in nature and include an overly reductionist model system that is heavily influenced by individual transgene level variation, as well as attempting to widely apply findings derived from a model of specific genetic causality to a patient population where the majority of cases are of unknown etiology. With such a tremendous disease burden and a lack of therapeutic options, it is critical that the research community re-evaluate the dependence on mSOD1 pre-clinical models as the gold standard prior to translating findings at the clinical level. Here we briefly review both the clinical and pre-clinical findings of select therapeutics, discuss the limitations of pre-clinical mSOD1 models, and suggest future stratagems that could aid in the clinical translation of efficacious therapeutic agents. Supplementary files: The supplementary files of this article are found under 'Article Tools' at the right  side bar.

  7. The Formation of the Model of Diagnosing the Results Implementation of of Consulting Projects for Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Oleh Ye.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the graphic-analytical model of diagnostics of results of implementation of consulting projects is formed, which allows to: take into consideration interests of participants to the project on choice of methods and methodologies of diagnosing; allocate alternative sets of business indicators for each object of impact in terms of consulting project; establish economic and non-economic criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of consulting, as well as monitoring of indicators and automated processing of diagnostic results to control deviations from the optimal values of the diagnosed project results. A structural-logical model of formation of alternative sets of indicators and choice of indicators for diagnostics of results of consulting projects has been developed. The elements of the enterprise management system have been codified to harmonize the corresponding indicators with their subsequent combination within the proposed sets. The control system objects and their elements have been allocated. The groups of indicators according to the technology of Balanced Score Card (BSC have been presented. The prospect of further research is the economic assessment of implementation of the diagnosed consulting projects, which will reveal the links between the parameters of production-economic activity and the assessment of projects, and allows choose the most significant ones.

  8. The Nainital-Cape Survey. II. Report for pulsation in five chemically peculiar A-type stars and presentation of 140 null results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S.; Mary, D. L.; Martinez, P.; Kurtz, D. W.; Girish, V.; Seetha, S.; Sagar, R.; Ashoka, B. N.

    2006-08-01

    Aims.We search for photometric variability in chemically peculiar A type stars in the northern hemisphere. Methods: .High-speed photometric observations of Ap and Am star candidates have been carried out from ARIES (Manora Peak, Nainital) using a three-channel fast photometer attached to the ARIES 104-cm Sampurnanand telescope. Results: .This paper presents three new variables: HD 113878, HD 118660 and HD 207561. During the time span of the survey (1999 December to 2004 January) pulsations of the δ Sct type were also found for the two evolved Am stars HD 102480 and HD 98851, as reported in Joshi et al. (2002, 2003). Additionally, we present 140 null results of the survey for this time span. Conclusions: .The star HD 113878 pulsates with a period of 2.31 h, which is typical of δ Sct stars. HD 118660 exhibits multi-periodic variability with a prominent period of nearly 1 h. These periods need to be investigated and make HD 118660 a particularly interesting target for further observations. For HD 207561, a star classified as Am, a probable pulsation with a period of 6 min was found in the light curves obtained on two consecutive nights. Both HD 102480 and HD 98851 exhibit unusual alternating high and low amplitude maxima, with a period ratio of 2:1. The analysis of the null results confirms the photometric quality of the Nainital site.

  9. Optimising The Available Scarce Water Resources At European Scale In A Modelling Environment: Results And Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roo, Ad; Burek, Peter; Gentile, Alessandro; Udias, Angel; Bouraoui, Faycal

    2013-04-01

    sector, the manufacturing-industry sector, the energy-production sector and the domestic sector. Also, potential flood damage of a 100-year return period flood has been used as an indicator. The study has shown that technically this modelling software environment can deliver optimum scenario combinations of packages of measures that improve various water quantity and water quality indicators, but that additional work is needed before final conclusions can be made using the tool. Further work is necessary, especially in the economic loss estimations, the water prices and price-elasticity, as well as the implementation and maintenance costs of individual scenarios. First results and challenges will be presented and discussed.

  10. SEMI-ANALYTIC GALAXY EVOLUTION (SAGE): MODEL CALIBRATION AND BASIC RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croton, Darren J.; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Tonini, Chiara; Garel, Thibault; Bernyk, Maksym; Bibiano, Antonio; Hodkinson, Luke; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Shattow, Genevieve M. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    This paper describes a new publicly available codebase for modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context, the “Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution” model, or sage for short.{sup 5} sage is a significant update to the 2006 model of Croton et al. and has been rebuilt to be modular and customizable. The model will run on any N-body simulation whose trees are organized in a supported format and contain a minimum set of basic halo properties. In this work, we present the baryonic prescriptions implemented in sage to describe the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their calibration for three N-body simulations: Millennium, Bolshoi, and GiggleZ. Updated physics include the following: gas accretion, ejection due to feedback, and reincorporation via the galactic fountain; a new gas cooling–radio mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating cycle; AGN feedback in the quasar mode; a new treatment of gas in satellite galaxies; and galaxy mergers, disruption, and the build-up of intra-cluster stars. Throughout, we show the results of a common default parameterization on each simulation, with a focus on the local galaxy population.

  11. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: Comparison of model to human participant results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, G. C.; Weschler, Charles J.; Beko, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. The model predictions are consistent...

  12. Recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, J.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Marti, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-01

    We show recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition, from both full-PIC and the recently developed hybrid-PIC capability of OSIRIS 2.0. Our results show full-scale modeling of fast ignition over full density and time scales, where laser absorption, electron beam divergence, and energy deposition in the compressed core will be addressed in a self-consistent manner. Full-PIC and hybrid-PIC simulations of isolated targets will be presented, illustrating the importance of this type of modeling in order to accurately infer the beam divergence and transport properties. We will also demonstrate the possibility of performing full-scale simulations of shock ignition with the new hybrid-PIC capability, using compressed target profiles from hydrodynamic simulations, and studying the self-consistent laser absorption, electron transport, and energy deposition that can lead to the generation of the shock required for ignition. Work supported by DOE under DE-FC02-04-ER54789 and DE-FG52-09NA29552, and NSF under NSF-Phy-0904039, FCT (Portugal), and the HiPER project. Simulations performed on Hoffman at UCLA, Thresher at SDSC, and Intrepid at ANL supported by Incite grant FastIgnitionPIC.

  13. Consistent and Clear Reporting of Results from Diverse Modeling Techniques: The A3 Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The measurement and reporting of model error is of basic importance when constructing models. Here, a general method and an R package, A3, are presented to support the assessment and communication of the quality of a model fit along with metrics of variable importance. The presented method is accurate, robust, and adaptable to a wide range of predictive modeling algorithms. The method is described along with case studies and a usage guide. It is shown how the method can be used to obtain more accurate models for prediction and how this may simultaneously lead to altered inferences and conclusions about the impact of potential drivers within a system.

  14. Symmetry breaking in frustrated XY models: Results from new self-consistent fluctuation approach and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Azad Esmailov

    1999-10-01

    The critical behavior of the fully frustrated XY model has remained controversial in spite of almost two decades of related research. In this study, we have developed a new method inspired by Netz and Berker's hard-spin mean- field theory. Our approach for XY models yields results consistent with Monte Carlo simulations as the ratio of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic interactions is varied. The method captures two phase transitions clearly separated in temperature for ratios of 0.5, 0.6, and 1.5, with these transitions moving closer together in temperature as the interaction ratio approaches 1.0, the fully frustrated case. From the system's chirality as a function of temperature in the critical region, we calculate the critical exponent β in agreement with an Ising transition for all of the interaction ratios studied, including 1.0. This result provides support for the view that there are two transitions, rather than one transition in a new universality class, occurring in the fully frustrated XY model. Finite size effects in this model can be essentially eliminated by rescaling the local magnetization, the quantity retained self- consistently in our computations. This rescaling scheme also shows excellent results when tested on the two- dimensional Ising model, and the method, as generalized, provides a framework for an analytical approach to complex systems. Monte Carlo simulations of the fully frustrated XY model in a magnetic field provide further evidence of two transitions. The magnetic field breaks the rotational symmetry of the model, but the two-fold chiral degeneracy of the ground state persists in the field. This lower degeneracy with the field present makes Monte Carlo simulations converge more rapidly. The critical exponent δ determined from the sublattice magnetizations as a function of field agrees with the value expected for a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Further, the zero-field specific heat obtained by extrapolation from simulations in a

  15. External validation of a model to predict the survival of patients presenting with a spinal epidural metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Feuth, T.; Rades, D.; Hedlund, R.; Villas, C.; Linden, Y. van der; Borm, W.; Kappelle, A.C.; Maazen, R.W. van der; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of spinal metastases is evolving. The major problem is the selection of patients who may benefit from surgical treatment. One of the criteria is an expected survival of at least 3 months. A prediction model has been previously developed. The present study has been performed in

  16. An Overview of Recent Building Downwash Research at EPA/ORD (2017 Regional, State, and Local Modelers' Workshop Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the fate of effluent from an industrial stack is important for assessing its impact on human health. AERMOD is one of several Gaussian plume models containing algorithms to evaluate the effect of buildings on the movement of the effluent from a stack. This presentation ...

  17. An investigation on the relationship between the user model and graphic representations for the automated generation of multimedia presentations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Schwarz

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis investigates a possible solution to adapting an automatically generated presentation to an anonymous user. We will explore the field of User Modeling, specifically Adaptive Hypermedia, to find suitable methods. In our case study, we combine the methods we find to develop a

  18. Perfectionistic Self-Presentation, Socially Prescribed Perfectionism, and Suicide in Youth: A Test of the Perfectionism Social Disconnection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxborough, Heather M.; Hewitt, Paul L.; Kaldas, Janet; Flett, Gordon L.; Caelian, Carmen M.; Sherry, Simon; Sherry, Dayna L.

    2012-01-01

    The role of interpersonal components of perfectionism in suicide outcomes among youth was assessed and the Perfectionism Social Disconnection Model (PSDM) was tested by determining whether the links between socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) and perfectionistic self-presentation (PSP) and suicide outcomes are mediated by experiences of social…

  19. Regression mixture models : Does modeling the covariance between independent variables and latent classes improve the results?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, A.E.; Vermunt, J.K.; Van Horn, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Regression mixture models are increasingly used as an exploratory approach to identify heterogeneity in the effects of a predictor on an outcome. In this simulation study, we tested the effects of violating an implicit assumption often made in these models; that is, independent variables in the

  20. Comparison of model results obtained with several European regional air quality models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hass, H.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.

    1997-01-01

    An intercomparison study has been performed with four photo-oxidant dispersion models (EMEP, EURAD, LOTOS and REM3) which are currently capable of performing photo-oxidant formation calculations over larger path of Europe. The models, in principle, were run in the mode in which they are normally

  1. Simulations of preindustrial, present-day, and 2100 conditions in the NASA GISS composition and climate model G-PUCCINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of atmospheric composition and climate has been developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS that includes composition seamlessly from the surface to the lower mesosphere. The model is able to capture many features of the observed magnitude, distribution, and seasonal cycle of trace species. The simulation is especially realistic in the troposphere. In the stratosphere, high latitude regions show substantial biases during period when transport governs the distribution as meridional mixing is too rapid in this model version. In other regions, including the extrapolar tropopause region that dominates radiative forcing (RF by ozone, stratospheric gases are generally well-simulated. The model's stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE agrees well with values inferred from observations for both the global mean flux and the ratio of Northern (NH to Southern Hemisphere (SH downward fluxes. Simulations of preindustrial (PI to present-day (PD changes show tropospheric ozone burden increases of 11% while the stratospheric burden decreases by 18%. The resulting tropopause RF values are −0.06 W/m2 from stratospheric ozone and 0.40 W/m2 from tropospheric ozone. Global mean mass-weighted OH decreases by 16% from the PI to the PD. STE of ozone also decreased substantially during this time, by 14%. Comparison of the PD with a simulation using 1979 pre-ozone hole conditions for the stratosphere shows a much larger downward flux of ozone into the troposphere in 1979, resulting in a substantially greater tropospheric ozone burden than that seen in the PD run. This implies that reduced STE due to stratospheric ozone depletion may have offset as much as 2/3 of the tropospheric ozone burden increase from PI to PD. However, the model overestimates the downward flux of ozone at high Southern latitudes, so this estimate is likely an upper limit. In the future, the tropospheric ozone burden increases by 101% in 2100 for the A2 scenario

  2. CERN Library | Tord Ekelöf presents the proceedings of the Nobel Symposium on the Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results | 12 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Thursday, 12 June 2014 at 16:00 in the Library (52-1-052).   The “Nobel Symposium on LHC results” took place at Krusenberg mansion, Uppsala, Sweden on 13-17 May 2013. The aim of the Symposium was to give an overview of the latest experimental and theoretical results pertaining to the LHC programme but also to give an occasion to ponder over the implications of these results in the broader context of the past, present and future evolution of the field of Particle Physics. “Nobel Symposium 154: The Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results”, ed. by Tord Ekelöf, Physica Scripta T154, IOP, 2013, ISBN 9789789789781. * Coffee will be served from 15:30 * E-proceedings available here.

  3. The MARINA model (Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs): Model description and results for China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokal, Maryna; Kroeze, Carolien; Wang, Mengru; Bai, Zhaohai; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-15

    Chinese agriculture has been developing fast towards industrial food production systems that discharge nutrient-rich wastewater into rivers. As a result, nutrient export by rivers has been increasing, resulting in coastal water pollution. We developed a Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs (MARINA) for China. The MARINA Nutrient Model quantifies river export of nutrients by source at the sub-basin scale as a function of human activities on land. MARINA is a downscaled version for China of the Global NEWS-2 (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model with an improved approach for nutrient losses from animal production and population. We use the model to quantify dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) export by six large rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf (Yellow, Hai, Liao), Yellow Sea (Yangtze, Huai) and South China Sea (Pearl) in 1970, 2000 and 2050. We addressed uncertainties in the MARINA Nutrient model. Between 1970 and 2000 river export of dissolved N and P increased by a factor of 2-8 depending on sea and nutrient form. Thus, the risk for coastal eutrophication increased. Direct losses of manure to rivers contribute to 60-78% of nutrient inputs to the Bohai Gulf and 20-74% of nutrient inputs to the other seas in 2000. Sewage is an important source of dissolved inorganic P, and synthetic fertilizers of dissolved inorganic N. Over half of the nutrients exported by the Yangtze and Pearl rivers originated from human activities in downstream and middlestream sub-basins. The Yellow River exported up to 70% of dissolved inorganic N and P from downstream sub-basins and of dissolved organic N and P from middlestream sub-basins. Rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf are drier, and thus transport fewer nutrients. For the future we calculate further increases in river export of nutrients. The MARINA Nutrient model quantifies the main sources of coastal water pollution for sub-basins. This information can contribute to formulation of

  4. Report on the results of studies on revised ECCS evaluation models for LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    For evaluating the function and performance of emergency core cooling systems of LWR power plants, the use of the ECCS evaluation models of GE and westinghouse are permitted. For the models, however, the formulae of correlation with higher accuracy were developed along with the accumulation of results of experimental and theoretical studies in the field. Revision to the models has thus been proposed on the basis of the results of researches both in Japan and abroad. Such alterations and the results of the studies thereon are described. The following matters are described: on the evaluation models for BWR ECCS, CCFL model, low flow rate film boiling heat transfer coefficient, radiation heat transfer model, and critical flow model; on the evaluation models, for PWR ECCS, heat radiation, between fuel rods, accumulator injection pressure loss in reflooding, rupture of cladding tubes, hot wall delay, model of steam cooling in reflooding 17 x 17 core ELECHT correlation, and temperature at reactor vessel top. (Mori, K.)

  5. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  6. Modelling the effects of phase change materials on the energy use in buildings. Results of Experiments and System Dynamics Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, J.

    2012-02-15

    The current era is in need for more and more sustainable energy solutions. Phase Change Materials (PCM's) are a solution for a more sustainable build environment because they can help to reduce the energy use of buildings during heating and cooling of the indoor air. This paper presents the results of recent experiments that have been executed with test boxes. In addition a System Dynamics model has been developed to find out how PCM's can be used efficiently without testing in reality. The first experiment, in which PCM's were applied in a concrete floor, shows a reduction of peak temperatures with 4C {+-} 0.7C on maximum temperatures and over 1.5C {+-} 0.7C on minimum temperatures during warm periods. The model confirmed these findings, although the predicted reductions were slightly. During the second experiment more PCM's were applied by mounting them into the walls using gypsum plasterboard to increase the latent heat capacity. Remarkably, both the experimental set-up as the model showed that the increase of PCM's (of almost 98%) causes hardly any difference compared to the first situation. Adapting the exterior in a way to absorb more solar energy, increases the average indoor temperature but decreases the reduction of peak temperatures. Again the model confirmed these findings of the experiment. These results show that the effect of PCM's varies on different climatological contexts and with different construction components physics. This means no straight forward advice on the use of PCM's for a building design can be given. The solution for this problem is provided by the model, showing that the effects of PCM's can be modelled in order to use PCM's in an effective way in different climatological contexts and with different characteristics of construction components. The research shows that a simple model is already capable of predicting PCM performance in test boxes with reasonable accuracy. Therefore it can be

  7. Present-day distribution and trends of global tropospheric ozone from satellite observations: Results from the Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudel, A.; Cooper, O. R.; Barret, B.; Boynard, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Huang, G.; Hurtmans, D.; Kerridge, B. J.; Latter, B.; Le Flochmoen, E.; Liu, X.; Neu, J. L.; Siddans, R.; Wespes, C.; Worden, H. M.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a greenhouse gas and pollutant detrimental to human health and crop and ecosystem productivity. Since 1990 a large portion of the anthropogenic emissions that react in the atmosphere to produce ozone have shifted from North America and Europe to Asia. This rapid shift, coupled with limited ozone monitoring in developing nations, has left scientists unable to answer the most basic questions: Is ozone continuing to decline in nations with strong emission controls? To what extent is ozone increasing in the developing world? IGAC's Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) has been designed to answer these questions and this presentation will show the results from the TOAR-Climate initiative, focusing on the present-day distribution and trends of global tropospheric ozone from satellite observations. Five satellite products based on OMI (2 products using two different retrieval methods) and IASI (also 2 products using two different retrieval methods) and the OMI/MLS combined product were intercompared. An important result is the close agreement among the five products regarding the quantification of the total mass of all tropospheric ozone, the so called tropospheric ozone burden (TOB). The mean estimate for TOB between 60° N and 60° S is 296 Tg, with all products agreeing within ± 4%. However, on a regional basis the five satellite products have notable differences and there is no agreement in terms of ozone trends over the past decade. Continuing work is exploring the causes of these differences.

  8. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model, methods and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; di Porcia, Manfredo; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Longo, Marcos

    2017-04-01

    Lianas are an important component of tropical forests, commonly constituting up to 40% of the woody stems and about 35% of the woody species and contributing substantially to forest leaf biomass. Lianas compete strongly with trees for both above- and below-ground resources. Their indirect impact on the carbon balance, due to their influence on tree community dynamics (by increasing mortality and suppressing tree growth), is far larger than their direct contribution to biomass. Currently tropical forests are experiencing large-scale structural changes, including an increase in liana abundance and biomass. This may eventually reduce the projected carbon sink of tropical forests. Despite their crucial role no single terrestrial ecosystem model has included lianas so far. The goal of this work is to include lianas in a vegetation model and to test it against experimental data. For the purpose we chose ED2 (Ecosystem Demography model version 2), a model that occupies the midpoint on the continuum from gap models that contain individual trees, to area-based global models. ED2 explicitly tracks horizontal and vertical heterogeneity in canopy structure making it very suitable to study liana impacts at a large scale. At the same time, the very inner structure of the model, that is its spatial implicitness, constraints the programming design of this new liana PFT. The first part of the presentation will focus on the current representation of lianas in ED2 and the parameterization that has been used. We will provide reference to the available literature to justify the choices made for parameters and allometries. In the second part first results will be shown where we compare the output of the model with data collected in the Paracou site (French Guiana). The data comes from both inventories and fluxtowers. We will focus mainly on plant density, diameter distributions (demography) and carbon/water fluxes. By comparing runs starting from bare ground, rus starting from observed

  9. Energy and exergy analysis of an indirect solar cabinet dryer based on mathematical modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, Samaneh; Etesami, Nasrin; Rahimi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, using a previously developed dynamic mathematical model for performance analysis of an indirect cabinet solar dryer , a microscopic energy and exergy analysis for an indirect solar cabinet dryer is carried out. To this end, appropriate energy and exergy models are developed and using the predicted values for temperature and enthalpy of gas stream and the temperature, enthalpy and moisture content of the drying solid, the energy and exergy efficiencies are estimated. The validity of the model for predicting variations in gas and solid characteristics along the time and the length of the solar collector and/or dryer length was examined against some existing experimental data. The results show that in spite of high energy efficiency, the indirect solar cabinet dryer has relatively low exergy efficiency. Results show that the maximum exergy losses are in midday. Also the minimums of total exergy efficiency are 32.3% and 47.2% on the first and second days, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of some operating parameters, including length of the collector, its surface, and air flow rate was investigated on the exergy destruction and efficiency. -- Highlights: → In the literature, there are few studies on the energy and exergy analysis of solar cabinet dryers. → In the present study a microscopic energy and exergy analysis for an indirect solar cabinet dryer is carried out. → Effect of operating parameters, including collector length, and air flow rate was investigated on the exergy destruction and efficiency. → For collector section, the maximum values for outlet air temperature, outlet exergy and energy are 69 o C, 2.5 kW and 1.12 kW, respectively. → Increasing the air flow rate decreases the exergy efficiency of solar collector.

  10. Presentation of the Results from the Project of Making Base Documents for Low-Emission Development Strategy for Croatia Until 2030 with an Outlook to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelavic, V.; Delija, V.; Herencic, L.

    2016-01-01

    Paris Climate Agreement is United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change way of encouraging countries to prepare Low-Emission development strategies and shows that climate change require long-term development strategies that support sustainable development, with the purpose of limiting the increase of global temperature to the maximal 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. The starting point of EU's policy towards low-emission economy is a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95 percent by 2050. In accordance with that goal, The European Council adopted a climate-energy framework 2030 in October 2014, which sets a goal of reducing emissions - 40 percent by 2030. It also sets a goal of renewable energy sources share of up to 27 percent and an indicative goal of reducing energy consumption - 27 percent. At this moment, a process of accepting and consultations for regulatory climate-energy framework is taking part, as well as a change of greenhouse gas market directive, distribution of load on countries regulation and calculations of emissions from the sector of Land use, Land-use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) regulation. In 2015, The Ministry of Environment and Energy has started a project of making base documents for Low-Emission Development Strategy until 2030 with an outlook to 2050. This strategy applies to every economy and human activity sector and is especially linked to energy sector, industrial, transport, agriculture, forestry and waste management sectors. In the process of making base documents for the Strategy, a number of scenarios were analysed, models for simulations and optimisation were applied and an integral model for national greenhouse gas projections was developed. The Strategy outlines three scenarios: Reference scenario represents the application of the existing legislation while the other two scenarios present a transition towards low-emission economy: Gradual Transition Scenario (NU1) and Strong Transition

  11. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  12. The barriers to accessing primary care resulting in hospital presentation for exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a large teaching hospital in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Marium; Khachi, Hasanin

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account direct costs of £1 billion each per year in the United Kingdom (UK). A national review of asthma deaths found that a significant proportion of patients die without seeking medical assistance or before emergency medical care could be provided. This study aims to establish the pathway that patients undertake to access care in the lead up to an accident and emergency (A&E) attendance and/or inpatient admission. Patients attending A&E and/or following an inpatient admission due to an exacerbation of asthma or COPD were reviewed by a specialist respiratory pharmacist during weekday working hours. Over a one-year period, 920 (224 asthma and 696 COPD) presentations for exacerbation of asthma and COPD were reviewed. Although the majority of the patients were registered with a general practitioner (GP), less than 50% received medical attention from their GP and/or had an active intervention prior to presenting to hospital. These findings correlate with those found in the national review of asthma deaths. At a time of increasing demands on healthcare resources, these results pose the question of how we can better triage patients to appropriate care settings to minimise unscheduled care and improve patient outcomes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [The results of the combined application of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy and radon baths during the rehabilitative treatment of the patients presenting with gonarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Puriga, A O; Yurova, O V

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading diseases of the musculoskeletal system and the main cause of arthritic joint damage. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combined application of radon baths and shock-wave therapy in the patients suffering from knee OA. The study involved 75 patients at the age of 35 to 62 years with the confirmed diagnosis of stage II and III gonarthrosis; they were divided into 3 groups. The patients of the main group received the combined treatment including extracorporeal shock-wave therapy and radon baths The patients comprising the group of comparison were given the course of radon therapy alone while those in the control group were offered the standard treatment including physiotherapy, magnetic therapy, and NSAIDs. The study has demonstrated the high effectiveness of the combined application of the radon baths and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for the rehabilitation of the patients with deforming arthrosis of the knee that was apparent from the substantial decrease of pain syndrome, the increase of the range of motions in the knee joints, and the overall improvement of the quality of life. These beneficial changes persisted for a period of up to 6 months. The results of the present study give reason to recommend the proposed method of the remedial treatment for the wide practical application as a component in the framework of the medical rehabilitation programs.

  14. Single-trial detection of event-related fields in MEG from the presentation of happy faces: Results of the Biomag 2016 data challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, H; Barachant, A; King, J R; Sanchez Bornot, J; Prasad, G

    2017-07-01

    The recognition of brain evoked responses at the single-trial level is a challenging task. Typical non-invasive brain-computer interfaces based on event-related brain responses use eletroencephalograhy. In this study, we consider brain signals recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG), and we expect to take advantage of the high spatial and temporal resolution for the detection of targets in a series of images. This study was used for the data analysis competition held in the 20th International Conference on Biomagnetism (Biomag) 2016, wherein the goal was to provide a method for single-trial detection of even-related fields corresponding to the presentation of happy faces during the rapid presentation of images of faces with six different facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, neutrality, sadness, and happiness). The datasets correspond to 204 gradiometers signals obtained from four participants. The best method is based on the combination of several approaches, and mainly based on Riemannian geometry, and it provided an area under the ROC curve of 0.956±0.043. The results show that a high recognition rate of facial expressions can be obtained at the signal-trial level using advanced signal processing and machine learning methodologies.

  15. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on \\text{I}{{\\text{n}}_{0.48}}\\text{G}{{\\text{a}}_{0.52}}\\text{P} buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, \\vec{k}\\;\\cdot \\;\\vec{p} bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband \\vec{k}\\;\\cdot \\;\\vec{p} approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further

  16. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-16

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on In₀.₄₈Ga₀.₅₂ buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, [Formula: see text] bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband [Formula: see text] approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further verifications, which have clarified some aspects of the experimental

  17. Modeling and Results for Creating Oblique Fields in a Magnetic Flux Leakage Survey Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, James C.

    2010-02-01

    Integrity management programs designed to maintain safe pipeline systems quite often will use survey results from In line inspection (ILI) tools in addition to data from other sources. Commonly referred to a "smart pigs," one of the most widely used types are those based upon the magnetic flux leakage technique, typically used to detect and quantify metal loss zones. The majority of pipelines surveyed to date have used tools with the magnetic field direction axially aligned with the length of the pipeline. In order to enable detection and quantification of extremely narrow metal loss features or certain types of weld zone anomalies, tools employing magnetic circuits directing the magnetic fields around the pipe circumference have been designed and are use in segments where these feature categories are a primary concern. Modeling and laboratory test data of metal loss features will be used to demonstrate the response of extremely narrow metal loss zones as the features are rotated relative to the induced field direction. Based upon these results, the basis for developing a magnetizer capable of creating fields oblique to either pipeline axis will be presented along with the magnetic field profile models of several configurations.

  18. Snpdat: Easy and rapid annotation of results from de novo snp discovery projects for model and non-model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doran Anthony G

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most abundant genetic variant found in vertebrates and invertebrates. SNP discovery has become a highly automated, robust and relatively inexpensive process allowing the identification of many thousands of mutations for model and non-model organisms. Annotating large numbers of SNPs can be a difficult and complex process. Many tools available are optimised for use with organisms densely sampled for SNPs, such as humans. There are currently few tools available that are species non-specific or support non-model organism data. Results Here we present SNPdat, a high throughput analysis tool that can provide a comprehensive annotation of both novel and known SNPs for any organism with a draft sequence and annotation. Using a dataset of 4,566 SNPs identified in cattle using high-throughput DNA sequencing we demonstrate the annotations performed and the statistics that can be generated by SNPdat. Conclusions SNPdat provides users with a simple tool for annotation of genomes that are either not supported by other tools or have a small number of annotated SNPs available. SNPdat can also be used to analyse datasets from organisms which are densely sampled for SNPs. As a command line tool it can easily be incorporated into existing SNP discovery pipelines and fills a niche for analyses involving non-model organisms that are not supported by many available SNP annotation tools. SNPdat will be of great interest to scientists involved in SNP discovery and analysis projects, particularly those with limited bioinformatics experience.

  19. Channel Verification Results for the SCME models in a Multi-Probe Based MIMO OTA Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Carreño, Xavier; S. Ashta, Jagjit

    2013-01-01

    , where the focus is on comparing results from various proposed methods. Channel model verification is necessary to ensure that the target channel models are correctly implemented inside the test area. This paper shows that the all the key parameters of the SCME models, i.e., power delay profile, temporal...

  20. UOE Pipe Numerical Model: Manufacturing Process And Von Mises Residual Stresses Resulted After Each Technological Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delistoian, Dmitri; Chirchor, Mihael

    2017-12-01

    Fluid transportation from production areas to final customer is effectuated by pipelines. For oil and gas industry, pipeline safety and reliability represents a priority. From this reason, pipe quality guarantee directly influence pipeline designed life, but first of all protects environment. A significant number of longitudinally welded pipes, for onshore/offshore pipelines, are manufactured by UOE method. This method is based on cold forming. In present study, using finite element method is modeled UOE pipe manufacturing process and is obtained von Mises stresses for each step. Numerical simulation is performed for L415 MB (X60) steel plate with 7,9 mm thickness, length 30 mm and width 1250mm, as result it is obtained a DN 400 pipe.