WorldWideScience

Sample records for model research results

  1. Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  2. Innovation ecosystem model for commercialization of research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlăduţ Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovation means Creativity and Added value recognise by the market. The first step in creating a sustainable commercialization of research results, Technological Transfer – TT mechanism, on one hand is to define the “technology” which will be transferred and on other hand to define the context in which the TT mechanism work, the ecosystem. The focus must be set on technology as an entity, not as a science or a study of the practical industrial arts and certainly not any specific applied science. The transfer object, the technology, must rely on a subjectively determined but specifiable set of processes and products. Focusing on the product is not sufficient to the transfer and diffusion of technology. It is not merely the product that is transferred but also knowledge of its use and application. The innovation ecosystem model brings together new companies, experienced business leaders, researchers, government officials, established technology companies, and investors. This environment provides those new companies with a wealth of technical expertise, business experience, and access to capital that supports innovation in the early stages of growth.

  3. Mathematical Modeling in Tobacco Control Research: Initial Results From a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feirman, Shari P; Donaldson, Elisabeth; Glasser, Allison M; Pearson, Jennifer L; Niaura, Ray; Rose, Shyanika W; Abrams, David B; Villanti, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration has expressed interest in using mathematical models to evaluate potential tobacco policies. The goal of this systematic review was to synthesize data from tobacco control studies that employ mathematical models. We searched five electronic databases on July 1, 2013 to identify published studies that used a mathematical model to project a tobacco-related outcome and developed a data extraction form based on the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices. We developed an organizational framework to categorize these studies and identify models employed across multiple papers. We synthesized results qualitatively, providing a descriptive synthesis of included studies. The 263 studies in this review were heterogeneous with regard to their methodologies and aims. We used the organizational framework to categorize each study according to its objective and map the objective to a model outcome. We identified two types of study objectives (trend and policy/intervention) and three types of model outcomes (change in tobacco use behavior, change in tobacco-related morbidity or mortality, and economic impact). Eighteen models were used across 118 studies. This paper extends conventional systematic review methods to characterize a body of literature on mathematical modeling in tobacco control. The findings of this synthesis can inform the development of new models and the improvement of existing models, strengthening the ability of researchers to accurately project future tobacco-related trends and evaluate potential tobacco control policies and interventions. These findings can also help decision-makers to identify and become oriented with models relevant to their work. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Long-distance travel modeling: proof of concept : research results digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This research project was established to provide ADOT with direction on the best sources of data and best practices for updating its long-distance personal travel models to better reflect observed travel behavior. Its original intent was to recommend...

  5. A Hybrid Model Ranking Search Result for Research Paper Searching on Social Bookmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    pijitra jomsri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Social bookmarking and publication sharing systems are essential tools for web resource discovery. The performance and capabilities of search results from research paper bookmarking system are vital. Many researchers use social bookmarking for searching papers related to their topics of interest. This paper proposes a combination of similarity based indexing “tag title and abstract” and static ranking to improve search results. In this particular study, the year of the published paper and type of research paper publication are combined with similarity ranking called (HybridRank. Different weighting scores are employed. The retrieval performance of these weighted combination rankings are evaluated using mean values of NDCG. The results suggest that HybridRank and similarity rank with weight 75:25 has the highest NDCG scores. From the preliminary result of experiment, the combination ranking technique provide more relevant research paper search results. Furthermore the chosen heuristic ranking can improve the efficiency of research paper searching on social bookmarking websites.

  6. Building technology transfer meetings: A collaborative model for transferring DOE research results to potential users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankle, D.L.; Hawkins, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Love, P.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilde, G.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Transferring the technology and results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored building energy research to potential users is a critical part of DOE`s successful research programs. To assist in this transfer of information and technologies, the DOE Office of Building Technologies (OBT) has established Building Technology Transfer Meetings that are held twice each year at one of the 10 DOE Regional Support Offices. Meeting participants include DOE personnel and representatives from each of the national laboratories involved in OBT buildings energy research as well as representatives from the DOE Regional Support Offices and other agencies involved in the buildings sector. Since 1991, OBT has held five meetings: Washington D.C., San Francisco, Denver, Oak Ridge, and Seattle. The purpose of these meetings is twofold: (1) for DOE to share information about such topics as new research results, new technologies, and new ways to collaborate with industry and universities to leverage resources; and (2) for the participants to use this information within their region to accelerate the transfer and deployment of new energy-efficient building technologies. The meetings include presentations, demonstrations, and tours. The meetings have provided an excellent opportunity for staff from the Regional Support Offices to learn about new technologies through their interactions with OBT and national laboratory program managers. Meeting tours and demonstrations have provided beneficial opportunities to get hands-on experience with new technologies and to see them in practice.

  7. Results From a Pressure Sensitive Paint Test Conducted at the National Transonic Facility on Test 197: The Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    This report will serve to present results of a test of the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique on the Common Research Model (CRM). This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center. PSP data was collected on several surfaces with the tunnel operating in both cryogenic mode and standard air mode. This report will also outline lessons learned from the test as well as possible approaches to challenges faced in the test that can be applied to later entries.

  8. Results from a model of course-based undergraduate research in the first- and second-year chemistry curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Gabriela

    2014-03-01

    The Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) is a project funded by the URC program of the NSF Chemistry Division. The purpose of CASPiE was to provide students in first and second year laboratory courses with authentic research experiences as a gateway to more traditional forms of undergraduate research. Each research experience is a 6- to 8-week laboratory project based on and contributing to the research work of the experiment's author through data or preparation of samples. The CASPiE program has resulted in a model for engaging students in undergraduate research early in their college careers. To date, CASPiE has provided that experience to over 6000 students at 17 different institutions. Evaluation data collected has included student surveys, interviews and longitudinal analysis of performance. We have found that students' perceptions of their understanding of the material and the discipline increase over the course of the semester, whereas they are seen to decrease in the control courses. Students demonstrate a greater ability to explain the meaning and purpose of their experimental procedures and results and provide extensions to the experimental design, compared not only to control courses but also compared to inquiry-based courses. Longitudinal analysis of grades indicates a possible benefit to performance in courses related to the discipline two and three years later. A similar implementation in biology courses has demonstrated an increase in critical thinking scores. Work supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Chemistry.

  9. Recent results in hydrogen research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Sherman, M.P.; Wong, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Progress has been made in the NRC-supported hydrogen research program in three areas: (1) a comparison of the HECTR and MAAP codes; (2) the completion of a series of experiments in the FLAME facility on flame acceleration and the transition from deflagration to detonation; and (3) a qualitative assessment of the potential for local detonations in a reactor containment. There are significant differences between the combustion models in HECTR and MAAP. These modelling differences can result in different predictions of containment pressure and temperature. Recent FLAME experiments have shown that spontaneous transition from deflagration to detonation can take place in hydrogen mixtures that are relatively insensitive. The presence of obstacles and the degree of confinement also play important roles in the likelihood of this transition. Information obtained during these experiments has been combined with other data and subjective judgments to develop a qualitative methodology for estimating the probability of local detonations. This methodology has been applied to the Bellefonte containment for some accident scenarios

  10. Teaching-based research: Models of and experiences with students doing research and inquiry – results from a university-wide initiative in a research-intensive environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rump, Camilla Østerberg; Damsholt, Tine; Sandberg, Marie

    meat two to three times a year. The over-arching purpose of the project was to integrate research and teaching in order to qualify the students and their academic skills by organizing lessons in ways which introduces the students to the key research methods and processes of the subject. Several......Overall abstract The purpose of this symposium is to explore and compare a multitude of different approaches to implementing research based teaching in a specific institutional setting. The four case studies are characterized by including teaching based research, see e.g. Wilcoxon et al., 2011......,000 students. Following a 4 year’s strategy with a strong emphasis on research, pressure from scientific staff led to a 2012-2016 strategy with teaching as main focus of enhancement at the University. In a process of application by individual or groups of teachers, 8 thematic projects were initiated...

  11. Atmospheric Deposition Modeling Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on model results for dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen and base cation species. Components include deposition velocities, dry...

  12. Climatology of the Iberia coastal low-level wind jet: weather research forecasting model high-resolution results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M. M. Soares

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal low-level jets (CLLJ are a low-tropospheric wind feature driven by the pressure gradient produced by a sharp contrast between high temperatures over land and lower temperatures over the sea. This contrast between the cold ocean and the warm land in the summer is intensified by the impact of the coastal parallel winds on the ocean generating upwelling currents, sharpening the temperature gradient close to the coast and giving rise to strong baroclinic structures at the coast. During summertime, the Iberian Peninsula is often under the effect of the Azores High and of a thermal low pressure system inland, leading to a seasonal wind, in the west coast, called the Nortada (northerly wind. This study presents a regional climatology of the CLLJ off the west coast of the Iberian Peninsula, based on a 9 km resolution downscaling dataset, produced using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale model, forced by 19 years of ERA-Interim reanalysis (1989–2007. The simulation results show that the jet hourly frequency of occurrence in the summer is above 30% and decreases to about 10% during spring and autumn. The monthly frequencies of occurrence can reach higher values, around 40% in summer months, and reveal large inter-annual variability in all three seasons. In the summer, at a daily base, the CLLJ is present in almost 70% of the days. The CLLJ wind direction is mostly from north-northeasterly and occurs more persistently in three areas where the interaction of the jet flow with local capes and headlands is more pronounced. The coastal jets in this area occur at heights between 300 and 400 m, and its speed has a mean around 15 m/s, reaching maximum speeds of 25 m/s.

  13. Cell Phones: Current Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Potential Biological or Adverse Health Effects of Wireless Communication Devices World Health Organization: Electromagnetic Fields and Public Health: Mobile Phones International Agency for Research on Cancer Press Release ...

  14. Promoting interdisciplinary research in departments of medicine: results from two models at Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, David L; Spira, Avrum; Ravid, Katya

    2013-01-01

    We have sought to broaden our department's research capacity using two different interdisciplinary approaches. First, we created the Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research (ECIBR) - a virtual center that promotes and funds Affinity Research Collaboratives (ARCs) initiated by faculty from within and outside Boston University (BU). Of the 11 funded ARCs, the 4 ARCs in existence for a minimum of 3 years have a total of 37 participants, 93 co-authored publications, and 33 new grants. Second, the Department of Medicine (DOM) created a Section of Computational Biomedicine in 2009 to enhance analytical and computational expertise in the DOM. After 3 years, the section is comprised of 10 faculty members and 21 trainees. The faculty members have collaborated with 20 faculty members in other sections or departments and secured 12 extramural grants (totaling ∼$20 million in direct costs). The ECIBR and the Section of Computational Biomedicine represent new organizational approaches to stimulating innovation in research in a DOM.

  15. Expert Meeting Report. Foundations Research Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojczyk, C. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Huelman, P. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carmody, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an expert meeting on Foundations–Research Results on November 15, 2011, in Minneapolis, MN. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover needs and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals. Key results were: greater understanding of the role of moisture transport through foundation and insulation materials and its potential impact on building durability; greater understanding of the role of foundation type in the process of selecting an insulation system for energy performance and building durability; need for research to quantify the risks associated with insulation processes to better enable users to weigh costs and benefits against the existing conditions of a home; need for improved performance modeling capabilities that address variations in foundation types and soil conditions.

  16. Integrating Science and Management - Evaluation of a Collaborative Model to Accelerate the Transition of Sea Level Rise Research Results into Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, D.; DeLorme, D.; Lewitus, A.

    2015-12-01

    The development and implementation of applied research programs that maximize stakeholder collaboration and utility is a well-documented struggle for funding agencies. In 2007, NOAA initiated multi-year stakeholder engagement process to develop a regional-scale, inter-disciplinary research project that resulted in a novel approach to accelerate the application of research results into management. This process culminated in a 2009 federal funding opportunity and resultant 6-year Ecological Effects of Sea Level Rise-Northern Gulf of Mexico (EESLR-NGOM) project focused on the dynamic integration of biological models (wetlands and oysters) with inundation and storm surge models at three National Estuarine Research Reserves in Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi. The project implemented a co-management approach between a traditional principle investigator (PI) and newly created applications co-PI that led a management advisory committee. Our goal was to provide the dedicated funding and infrastructure necessary to ensure the initial relevancy of the proposed project results, to guide ongoing research efforts, and to aid the efficient incorporation of key scientific results and tools into direct management application. As the project nears completion in 2016 and modeling applications reach maturity, this presentation will discuss the programmatic approach that resulted in EESLR-NGOM as well as an evaluation of nearly 6-years of collaborative science. This evaluation will focus on the funding agency perspective, with an emphasis on assessing the pros and cons of project implementation to establish lessons-learned for related collaborative science efforts. In addition, with increased attention in the Gulf of Mexico on projected sea level rise impacts to coastal ecosystem restoration and management, a core benchmark for this evaluation will be the use of project models and tools by coastal managers and planners at local, state, and/or federal agencies.

  17. Model description of CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code); results of testing with post-Chernobyl data from Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S-R.

    1994-07-01

    CHERPAC (Chalk River Environmental Research Pathways Analysis Code), a time-dependent code for assessing doses from accidental and routine releases of radionuclides, has been under development since 1987. A complete model description is provide here with equations, parameter values, assumptions and information on parameter distributions for uncertainty analysis. Concurrently, CHERPAC has been used to participate in the two internal model validation exercises BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) and VAMP (VAlidation of Assessment Model Predictions, a co-ordinated research program of the International Atomic Energy Agency). CHERPAC has been tested for predictions of concentrations of 137 Cs in foodstuffs, body burden and dose over time using data collected after the Chernobyl accident of 1986 April. CHERPAC's results for the recent VAMP scenario for southern Finland are particularly accurate and should represent what the code can do under Canadian conditions. CHERPAC's predictions are compared with the observations from Finland for four and one-half years after the accident as well as with the results of the other participating models from nine countries. (author). 18 refs., 23 figs., 2 appendices

  18. DO ACCOUNTING PRACTITIONERS USE ACCOUNTING RESEARCH RESULTS?

    OpenAIRE

    ALINA BEATTRICE VLADU

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey designed to explore if accounting practitioners are using as a reference point in their daily activities the opinions of academia. Since accounting research comprises various trends of research the earnings management research field is used as illustrative case. Among our respondents were accounting professional, members of professional bodies as the Chamber of Financial Auditors or Romania and also Body of Expert and Licensed Accountants...

  19. Feasibility of the “Bring Your Own Device” Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device” (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model’s feasibility in research settings. Objective To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. Methods 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD” or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). Results The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices.  Conclusions Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant

  20. Feasibility of the "Bring Your Own Device" Model in Clinical Research: Results from a Randomized Controlled Pilot Study of a Mobile Patient Engagement Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Laura; Woodriff, Molly; Crowley, Olga; Lam, Vivian; Sohn, Jeremy; Bradley, Scott

    2016-03-16

    Rising rates of smartphone ownership highlight opportunities for improved mobile application usage in clinical trials. While current methods call for device provisioning, the "bring your own device" (BYOD) model permits participants to use personal phones allowing for improved patient engagement and lowered operational costs. However, more evidence is needed to demonstrate the BYOD model's feasibility in research settings. To assess if CentrosHealth, a mobile application designed to support trial compliance, produces different outcomes in medication adherence and application engagement when distributed through study-provisioned devices compared to the BYOD model. 87 participants were randomly selected to use the mobile application or no intervention for a 28-day pilot study at a 2:1 randomization ratio (2 intervention: 1 control) and asked to consume a twice-daily probiotic supplement. The application users were further randomized into two groups: receiving the application on a personal "BYOD" or study-provided smartphone. In-depth interviews were performed in a randomly-selected subset of the intervention group (five BYOD and five study-provided smartphone users). The BYOD subgroup showed significantly greater engagement than study-provided phone users, as shown by higher application use frequency and duration over the study period. The BYOD subgroup also demonstrated a significant effect of engagement on medication adherence for number of application sessions (unstandardized regression coefficient beta=0.0006, p=0.02) and time spent therein (beta=0.00001, p=0.03). Study-provided phone users showed higher initial adherence rates, but greater decline (5.7%) than BYOD users (0.9%) over the study period. In-depth interviews revealed that participants preferred the BYOD model over using study-provided devices. Results indicate that the BYOD model is feasible in health research settings and improves participant experience, calling for further BYOD model validity

  1. Selected results of the slovak coal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hredzák Slavomír

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The contribution gives the review of Slovak brown coal research in the last 10 years. The state and development trends of the coal research in Slovakia from the point of view of the clean coal technologies application are described. Some selected results which have been obtained at the Institute of Geotechnics of the Slovak Academy of Sciences are also introduced.

  2. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8518 ... Giving girls and women the power to decide. Addressing Africa's unmet need for family planning by intensifying sexual and reproductive and adolescent health research. Research in Action. Health MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH ADOLESCENT HEALTH FAMILY PLANNING ...

  3. Scaling Research Results: Design and Evaluation | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Value and leadership This project will enhance IDRC's partnership value proposition by demonstrating leadership in this field. It will also showcase our innovative and collaborative approach to knowledge creation. This will position IDRC as a leader in the area of scaling research results and designing research programs ...

  4. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  5. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8496 ... Giving girls and women the power to decide. Addressing Africa's unmet need for family planning by intensifying sexual and reproductive and adolescent health research. Webpage.

  6. Confidence crisis of results in biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2017-11-01

    Many biomechanics studies have small sample sizes and incorrect statistical analyses, so reporting of inaccurate inferences and inflated magnitude of effects are common in the field. This review examines these issues in biomechanics research and summarises potential solutions from research in other fields to increase the confidence in the experimental effects reported in biomechanics. Authors, reviewers and editors of biomechanics research reports are encouraged to improve sample sizes and the resulting statistical power, improve reporting transparency, improve the rigour of statistical analyses used, and increase the acceptance of replication studies to improve the validity of inferences from data in biomechanics research. The application of sports biomechanics research results would also improve if a larger percentage of unbiased effects and their uncertainty were reported in the literature.

  7. Interpretation and display of research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It important to properly collect, code, clean and edit the data before interpreting and displaying the research results. Computers play a major role in different phases of research starting from conceptual, design and planning, data collection, data analysis and research publication phases. The main objective of data display is to summarize the characteristics of a data and to make the data more comprehensible and meaningful. Usually data is presented depending upon the type of data in different tables and graphs. This will enable not only to understand the data behaviour, but also useful in choosing the different statistical tests to be applied.

  8. HARVESTING EMSP RESEARCH RESULTS FOR WASTE CLEANUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Nielson, R. Bruce; Phillips, Ann Marie; Lebow, Scott

    2003-02-27

    The extent of environmental contamination created by the nuclear weapons legacy combined with expensive, ineffective waste cleanup strategies at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites prompted Congress to pass the FY96 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which directed the DOE to: ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research, which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs'', ''develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and'' ''seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective.'' In response, the DOE initiated the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)-a targeted, long-term research program intended to produce solutions to DOE's most pressing environmental problems. EMSP funds basic research to lower cleanup cost and reduce risk to workers, the public, and the environment; direct the nation's scientific infrastructure towards cleanup of contaminated waste sites; and bridge the gap between fundamental research and technology development activities. EMSP research projects are competitively awarded based on the project's scientific, merit coupled with relevance to addressing DOE site needs. This paper describes selected EMSP research projects with long, mid, and short-term deployment potential and discusses the impacts, focus, and results of the research. Results of EMSP research are intended to accelerate cleanup schedules, reduce cost or risk for current baselines, provide alternatives for contingency planning, or provide solutions to problems where no solutions exist.

  9. "Action": Publishing Research Results in Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Thieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers commonly disseminate their research findings in academic papers or books that have a selected and limited target audience. A potential method for disseminating the information other than the traditional academic is through film, but this means tailoring the material to this medium and in many cases collaborating with people who have the necessary skills. The aim of this article is to reflect on the experience of making a film from the researcher's perspective. I will in particular shed light on how the filmmaking team worked together and provide examples of the preceding research, as well as the shooting and editing of the film material. The long period of research leading up to the film was a major factor in its success. In addition, all of the people involved have to be willing to share their experiences, recognize each other's expertise and be able to compromise. The film was much more than just an extension of the ongoing multi-site qualitative research. The shooting not only provided new insights into people's lives but also forced me to think much harder about my research and "the fieldwork." The additional costs and efforts related to the film can be justified by a transdisciplinary understanding of research that requires the results to be disseminated beyond academic circles, attract attention from policymakers and activists, and also allow the subjects of the research (who generally do not read English academic articles to become an active audience. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1201316

  10. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-10

    Results 1 - 10 of 8531 ... IDRC and the Embassy of the Netherlands are hosting a panel discussion about the role of research in advancing the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and two-spirit (LGBTQI2) persons in developing countries. Event date(s). May 10, 2018. Event location. IDRC - 8th Floor ...

  11. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8530 ... Economics of tobacco control research initiative: Operating costs for capacity building. Fiscal policies (primarily taxation) for tobacco control have been widely recognized as the most effective measures to curb tobacco consumption and prevent tobacco-related diseases. Project.

  12. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-10

    Results 1 - 10 of 8529 ... IDRC and the Embassy of the Netherlands are hosting a panel discussion about the role of research in advancing the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and two-spirit (LGBTQI2) persons in developing countries. Event date(s). May 10, 2018. Event location. IDRC - 8th Floor ...

  13. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-20

    Results 1 - 10 of 8491 ... FAPESP is a state-level scientific granting council in Brazil. Its primary goal is to support knowledge creation and enhance the research capacity of institutions based in the state of São Paulo. Published date. March 20, 2018. Events ...

  14. The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories. Results of an IAEA Coordinated Research Project 2005-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    The siting, development and operation of waste disposal facilities, and the related safety issues, have been described in many IAEA publications. The safe management and disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle remains a necessary condition for future development of nuclear energy. In particular, the disposal of high level waste and spent nuclear fuel in geological repositories, despite having been studied worldwide over the past several decades, still requires full scale demonstration through safe implementation, as planned at the national level in Finland and Sweden by 2020 and 2023, respectively, and in France by 2025. Safety assessment techniques are currently applicable to potential facility location and development through a quite large range of approaches and methodologies. By implementing research activities through coordinated research projects (CRPs), the IAEA enables research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. In response to requests by several Member States in different networks and platforms dealing with waste disposal, in 2005 a CRP on The Use of Numerical Models in Support of Site Characterization and Performance Assessment Studies of Geological Repositories was proposed and developed to transfer modelling expertise and numerical simulation technology to countries needing them for their national nuclear waste management programmes. All Member States involved in this CRP have acquired the scientific basis for, and expertise in, the site characterization process, including test design, data analysis, model calibration, model validation, predictive modelling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation analysis. This expertise is documented in this publication, in which numerical modelling is used to address the pertinent issue of site characterization and its impact on safety, using data and information from a potential repository site

  15. Performance test results of mock-up model test facility with a full-scale reaction tube for HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Koji; Kato, Michio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Research on a hydrogen production system by steam reforming of methane, chemical reaction; CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}O {yields} 3H{sub 2}O + CO, has been carried out to couple with the HTTR for establishment of high-temperature nuclear heat utilization technology and contribution to hydrogen energy society in future. The mock-up test facility with a full-scale reaction tube test facility, a model simulating one reaction tube of a steam reformer of the HTTR hydrogen production system in full scale, was fabricated to perform tests on controllability, hydrogen production performance etc. under the same pressure and temperature conditions as those of the HTTR hydrogen production system. The design and fabrication of the test facility started from 1997, and the all components were installed until September in 2001. In a performance test conducted from October in 2001 to February in 2002, performance of each component was examined and hydrogen of 120m{sup 3}{sub N}/h was successfully produced with high-temperature helium gas. This report describes the performance test results on components performance, hydrogen production characteristics etc., and main troubles and countermeasures. (author)

  16. Research results of the Optimiturve research program in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakangas, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optimiturve research program is one of the energy research programs funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry of Finland. The main target of the program is double the annual hectare yield of peat dried by solar radiation to decrease the peat production costs, to speed up the circulation of capital invested to peat production with the aid of a new production method developed in this research, and hence improve the price competitivity of peat. The targets of the research program are expected to be completed by improving the drying of peat, the efficiency of the peat production machinery, and by developing peat production techniques. The program was started in 1988, and the targets are to be fulfilled up to year 1993. The research program is carried out in cooperation with universities, research organizations and peat producers. This publication consists of the results of the ongoing projects in the Optimiturve research program in 1991. The aim, the contents and the main results of the 18 projects are presented. At the end of this publication there is a list of the reports published in Reports series

  17. Results of LWR snubber aging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.; Werry, E.V.; Blahnik, D.E.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the aging research results and recommendations for snubbers used in commercial nuclear power plants. Snubbers are safety-related devices used to restrain undesirable dynamic loads at various piping and equipment locations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Each snubber must accommodate a plant's normal thermal movements and must be capable of restraining the maximum off-normal dynamic loads, such as a seismic event or a transient, postulated for its specific location. The effects of snubber aging and the factors that contribute to the degradation of their safety performance need to be better understood. Thus, Phase II of Nuclear Plant Aging Research was conducted to enhance the understanding of snubber aging and its consequences. Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff and their subcontractors, Lake Engineering and Wyle Laboratories, visited eight sites (encompassing thirteen plants) to conduct interviews with NPP staff and to collect data on snubber aging, testing, and maintenance. The Phase II research methodology, evaluation, results, conclusions, and recommendations are described in the report. Effective methods for service-life monitoring of snubbers are included in the recommendations

  18. Ethnical distance in Vojvodina: Research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Žolt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the ethnical distance measuring in Vojvodina, the north Province of the Republic of Serbia. The measuring was carried out on autumn 2002, during realization of the wider project of multiculturalism research in the mentioned region. According to the results the ethnical distances in Vojvodina are quite equalized and they are grouped around the attitude "all the same". Vojvodinian Serbs are more favorable partners for the majority of social contacts, and the relatively largest distance is shown toward Roma. The ethnical distance results also discovers two very important factors for understanding the interethnic relations in Vojvodina: first, the "rational" kind of social contacts with the members of the other ethnical groups are more preferable for the majority of respondents, and second, they have very equal distances toward their own ethnical groups.

  19. Model of the Research Master Program: Results of Testing the New Modules of Basic Educational Programs in the Moscow City Teacher Training University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesmanov S.V.,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the results of testing new modules of basic educational master programs at the Moscow City Teacher Training University. The authors present quantitative and qualitative test characteristics of the modules of research master program, the formation of competencies as units of meaningful activities. The additions to working curricula of disciplines, practices and research were lit in the form of specified learning outcomes in four groups of competencies developed in the framework in the research master’s. The changes in the Federal State Educational Standard for Higher Education of the training direction # 44.04.01 «Pedagogical education» and «Order of organization and implementation of educational activity on bachelor, specialty, and master educational programs of higher education» are proposed. According to the testing results authors carried out correction of new modules of the research master's and a number of the measures directed on increase of efficiency educational programs implemented in the research master’s

  20. Interpreting Results from the Multinomial Logit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This article provides guidelines and illustrates practical steps necessary for an analysis of results from the multinomial logit model (MLM). The MLM is a popular model in the strategy literature because it allows researchers to examine strategic choices with multiple outcomes. However, there seem...... to be systematic issues with regard to how researchers interpret their results when using the MLM. In this study, I present a set of guidelines critical to analyzing and interpreting results from the MLM. The procedure involves intuitive graphical representations of predicted probabilities and marginal effects...... suitable for both interpretation and communication of results. The pratical steps are illustrated through an application of the MLM to the choice of foreign market entry mode....

  1. [Occupational microclimate. Results and prospects of research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanas'eva, R F; Bessonova, N A; Burmistrova, O V; Burmistrov, V M; Losik, T K

    2013-01-01

    The article covers results of studies conducted over last 15 years and aimed to elaboration of requirements to integral parameters of microclimate at workplace, its evaluation and regulation, prophylactic measures against body overcooling and overheating. The authors present methods to evaluate combined effects of physical factors (noise, vibration, microclimate) and to assess microclimate with consideration of factors determining body thermal load (energy expenditure, duration of stay at workplace, heat insulation of clothes and thermo-physical parameters of its materials). Mathematic models of forecasting cold and heat stress are presented, as well as requirements to heat insulation for individual protective means against cold and methods to calculate it. Regimens of work in heating and cooling conditions are specified. The authors set directions for further studies to define regulation requirements to microclimate on basis of studied patterns of body heat state formation, its evaluation criteria, epidemiologic studies results, specified prophylactic measures against overheating and overcooling with consideration of adaptation, sex, thermo-physical characteristics of individual protective means (special clothes, footwear, gauntlets, headwear).

  2. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  3. Experiment using TRACY and its research results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Ken; Ono, Akio; Okazaki, Shuji

    1997-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute started a critical accident trial experiment since 1995 using TRACY (Transient critical experimental apparatus) installed in NUCEF, aiming to elucidate critical accident phenomenon in solution state nuclear fuel and to establish a rational critical accident evaluation method. The TRACY is an apparatus to conduct the experiment beyond critical (super critical) state using uranyl nitrate low condensed aqueous solution treated at reprocessing facility for its fuel. In the TRACY, aiming to evaluate 1) nuclear fission numbers at the burst output portion, total nuclear fission numbers, and maximum nuclear fission ratio (peak output) and pressure, the following conditions and data are required for analysis and evaluation of them at a supposed critical accident: a) system conditions, b) initial conditions, c) nuclear and thermal constants, d) reactivity addition conditions, e) reactivity feed-back mechanism, and f) mobilities of main isotopes. In this paper, experimental plan, summary of experimental apparatus, the obtained results, and future planning of the TRACY were described. (G.K.)

  4. Adaptive Virtual Tow Bar, research results 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, D.M.C.; Hueting, T.F.; Joosten, B.; Uittenbogaard, J.; Martens, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    This document reports the advances made in 2016 for the Early Research Program (ERP) Human Enhancement: Adaptive Automation, sub-project Adaptive Virtual Tow Bar. The ambition of the large scale TNO Early Research Program (ERP) Human Enhancement is to develop a transparent (human-in-the-loop)

  5. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  6. Ice911 Research: A Reversible Localized Geo-Engineering Technique to Mitigate Climate Change Effects: Field Testing, Instrumentation and Climate Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, L. A.; Sholtz, A.; Chetty, S.; Manzara, A.; Johnson, D.; Christodoulou, E.; Decca, R.; Walter, P.; Katuri, K.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Ivanova, D.; Mlaker, V.; Perovich, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    This work uses ecologically benign surface treatment of silica-based materials in carefully selected, limited areas to reduce polar ice melt by reflecting energy from summertime polar sun to attempt to slow ice loss due to the Ice-Albedo Feedback Effect. Application of Ice911's materials can be accomplished within a season, at a comparatively low cost, and with far less secondary environmental impact than many other proposed geo-engineering solutions. Field testing, instrumentation, safety testing, data-handling and modeling results will be presented. The albedo modification has been tested over a number of melt seasons with an evolving array of instrumentation, at multiple sites and on progressively larger scales, most recently in a small artificial pond in Minnesota and in a lake in Barrow, Alaska's BEO (Barrow Experimental Observatory) area. The test data show that the glass bubbles can provide an effective material for increasing albedo, significantly reducing the melting rate of ice. Using NCAR's CESM package the environmental impact of the approach of surface albedo modification was studied. During two separate runs, region-wide Arctic albedo modification as well as more targeted localized treatments were modeled and compared. The parameters of a surface snow layer are used as a proxy to simulate Ice911's high-albedo materials, and the modification is started in January over selected ice/snow regions in the Arctic. Preliminary results show promising possibilities of enhancements in surface albedo, sea ice area and sea-ice concentration, as well as temperature reductions of .5 to 3 degree Kelvin in the Arctic, and global average temperature reductions of .5 to 1 degrees.

  7. Laboratory research of coal geocomposits - some results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Souček, Kamil; Staš, Lubomír; Šňupárek, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2005), s. 271-275 ISSN 1003-6326 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS3086351 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : chemical grouting * reinforcing * geocomposite material Subject RIV: JI - Composite Material s Impact factor: 0.302, year: 2005

  8. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-26

    Mar 26, 2018 ... The Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program is a seven-year, CA$35 million partnership between IDRC, the Israel Science Foundation, the Azrieli Foundation, and the ... However, the costly ingredients that make up animal feed, such as fish and vegetables, threaten the survival of these farmers.

  9. Researches on nuclear wastes: results and outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of a sustainable development, the CEA is engaged in the design, evaluation and development of new fuels and in the research process on radioactive wastes management. This paper gathers the CEA actions in the domain giving general information on the radioactive wastes nature and management, the wastes sorting to reduce the toxicity, the wastes conditioning and the packages long-dated behavior and the wastes storage and disposal. (A.L.B.)

  10. Serbian theolinguistics today: Research issues and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Končarević Ksenija J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The essay gives a survey of basic research directions in Serbian theolinguistics (in the fields of general linguistics, Serbian studies, Slavic studies and foreign philology, and presents the most important achievements in the fundamental and applicative fields of the study of the sacral language (from the synchronic perspective which are presented in monographs, papers published in thematic anthologies, proceedings of scientific conferences and scientific journals in Serbia, Montenegro and the Republic of Srpska (with bibliographic references for the 2000-2013 period. Serbian theolinguistics, although in the stage of scientific constitution, potentially has a wide range of fundamental areas of study (some of the main issues from 2000 to 2013 were theoretical and methodological basis of theolinguistics, modern functioning of liturgical languages, confessional markedness of language levels, functional stylistics, genology and stylistics of resources, discourse theory and spheres of application (lexicography, traductology, linguodidactics. Its perspective in the forthcoming period lies in strengthening the ties with leading centres of theolinguistics in the Slavic world and the integration of researchers of philological and theological profiles in order to further its development. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 179078: Srpska teologija u XX veku: fundamentalne pretpostavke teoloških disciplina u evropskom kontekstu – istorijska i savremena perspektiva

  11. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8494 ... Precooked beans for food, nutrition, and income in Kenya and Uganda. Beans are an important food product that contribute to nutritional security, income generation, and employment in Kenya and Uganda.

  12. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8524 ... A bequest from the Bene family. John G. Bene had a distinguished career in the Canadian forest industry and later, in the public sector both in Canada and internationally. Webpage.

  13. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-03-26

    Results 1 - 10 of 8494 ... IDRC will participate in and support the 2018 Next Einstein Forum (NEF) Global Gathering, under the patronage this year of Paul Kagame, President of the Republic of Rwanda. Event date(s). March 26, 2018 to March 28, 2018. Event location. Kigali Convention Centre Kigali,. Rwanda. Books ...

  14. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 1 - 10 of 8517 ... Empowering women to overcome factors of structural violence in Latin America. Throughout the developing world, young men and women face high unemployment coupled with strong feelings of dissatisfaction with their quality of life in contexts of weak governance and institutions, increased political ...

  15. Preclinical models for obesity research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Barrett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-dimensional strategy to tackle the global obesity epidemic requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie this complex condition. Much of the current mechanistic knowledge has arisen from preclinical research performed mostly, but not exclusively, in laboratory mouse and rat strains. These experimental models mimic certain aspects of the human condition and its root causes, particularly the over-consumption of calories and unbalanced diets. As with human obesity, obesity in rodents is the result of complex gene–environment interactions. Here, we review the traditional monogenic models of obesity, their contemporary optogenetic and chemogenetic successors, and the use of dietary manipulations and meal-feeding regimes to recapitulate the complexity of human obesity. We critically appraise the strengths and weaknesses of these different models to explore the underlying mechanisms, including the neural circuits that drive behaviours such as appetite control. We also discuss the use of these models for testing and screening anti-obesity drugs, beneficial bio-actives, and nutritional strategies, with the goal of ultimately translating these findings for the treatment of human obesity.

  16. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Research infrastructures (RIs) are platforms integrating facilities, resources and services used by the research communities to conduct research and foster innovation. RIs include scientific equipment, e.g., sensor platforms, satellites or other instruments, but also scientific data, sample repositories or archives. E-infrastructures on the other hand provide the technological substratum and middleware to interlink distributed RI components with computing systems and communication networks. The resulting platforms provide the foundation for the design and implementation of RIs and play an increasing role in the advancement and exploitation of knowledge and technology. RIs are regarded as essential to achieve and maintain excellence in research and innovation crucial for the European Research Area (ERA). The implementation of RIs has to be considered as a long-term, complex development process often over a period of 10 or more years. The ongoing construction of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) provides a good example for the general complexity of infrastructure development processes especially in system-of-systems environments. A set of directives issued by the European Commission provided a framework of guidelines for the implementation processes addressing the relevant content and the encoding of data as well as the standards for service interfaces and the integration of these services into networks. Additionally, a time schedule for the overall construction process has been specified. As a result this process advances with a strong participation of member states and responsible organisations. Today, SDIs provide the operational basis for new digital business processes in both national and local authorities. Currently, the development of integrated RIs in Earth and Environmental Sciences is characterised by the following properties: • A high number of parallel activities on European and national levels with numerous institutes and organisations participating

  17. Research plan on Horonobe Underground Research Program. Result report on survey research in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    The Horonobe Underground Research Center planned to construct at Horonobe-town in Hokkaido by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), is one of research facilities on deep underground shown in item on processing and disposal of the radioactive wastes in the 'long-term program on research, development and application on nuclear energy', and is planned to carry out a study on deep underground at an object of the sedimentary rocks. This report is summary of results on survey research carried out at 2000 fiscal year. Here was described on a summary of results on survey research carried out in 2000 fiscal year according to the 'Survey Research Plan in Fiscal Year 2000 of the Underground Research Laboratory (temporary name) Project'. As the Horonobe deep stratum research plan is established to carry out under three steps of 'survey research from earth surface', 'survey research under excavation of a tunnel', and 'survey research under application of the tunnel'. In fiscal year 2000, the first step of the survey research from earth surface' was begun from March, 2001. And, on study on geological science and R and D on stratum disposal, together with intending of concrete execution of survey research contents, a part of literature survey was begun. On a survey actually performed at site, in the environmental survey, the hearing investigation on inhabiting situation of rare flora and fauna, and situation of utilization of the groundwater of Horonobe town were carried out. (G.K.)

  18. AAC Modeling Intervention Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennott, Samuel C.; Light, Janice C.; McNaughton, David

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of research on the effects of interventions that include communication partner modeling of aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the language acquisition of individuals with complex communication needs was conducted. Included studies incorporated AAC modeling as a primary component of the intervention,…

  19. Evaluation of a Potential for Enhancing the Decision Support System of the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center with NASA Earth Science Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Berglund, Judith; Spruce, Joseph P.; McKellip, Rodney; Jasinski, Michael; Borak, Jordan; Lundquist, Julie

    2007-01-01

    NASA's objective for the Applied Sciences Program of the Science Mission Directorate is to expand and accelerate the realization of economic and societal benefits from Earth science, information, and technology. This objective is accomplished by using a systems approach to facilitate the incorporation of Earth observations and predictions into the decision-support tools used by partner organizations to provide essential services to society. The services include management of forest fires, coastal zones, agriculture, weather prediction, hazard mitigation, aviation safety, and homeland security. In this way, NASA's long-term research programs yield near-term, practical benefits to society. The Applied Sciences Program relies heavily on forging partnerships with other Federal agencies to accomplish its objectives. NASA chooses to partner with agencies that have existing connections with end-users, information infrastructure already in place, and decision support systems that can be enhanced by the Earth science information that NASA is uniquely poised to provide (NASA, 2004).

  20. Early Childhood Teacher Research: From Questions to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    What is early childhood teacher research and why is it important? How does a teacher researcher formulate a research question and a plan for doing research? How do teachers apply research results to effect change? "Early Childhood Teacher Research" is an exciting new resource that will address the sorts of questions and concerns that pre- and…

  1. Diseño de un modelo conceptual sobre la transferencia de resultados de investigación en salud pública en Honduras Design of a conceptual model on the transference of public health research results in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A Macías-Chapula

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Diseñar un modelo conceptual sobre la comunicación de los resultados de la investigación científica en el área de la salud pública, en un contexto local. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: A través del enfoque de pensamiento de sistemas se utilizó la Metodología de Sistemas Blandos (MSB y la bibliometría para analizar y resolver una situación problemática relacionada con la transferencia de los resultados de la investigación a los diversos actores del sistema de salud de Honduras. RESULTADOS: Se definieron y modelaron seis definiciones de raíz relevantes a la situación problemática expresada, las cuales llevaron al diseño del modelo conceptual. Éste identificó cuatro niveles de resolución: el de los investigadores, los profesionales de la información/documentación, los profesionales de la salud y la población abierta/la sociedad. CONCLUSIONES: La MSB ayudó a diseñar el modelo conceptual. El estudio bibliométrico fue relevante en la construcción de una imagen rica de la situación problemática.OBJECTIVE: To design a conceptual model on the transference of public health research results at the local, context level. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using systems thinking concepts, a soft systems approach (SSM was used to analyse and solve what was perceived as a problem situation related to the transference of research results within Honduras public health system. A bibliometric analysis was also conducted to enrich the problem situation. RESULTS: Six root definitions were defined and modeled as relevant to the expressed problem situation. This led to the development of the conceptual model. The model obtained identified four levels of resolution as derived from the human activities involved in the transference of research results: 1 those of the researchers; 2 the information/documentation professionals; 3 health staff; and 4 the population/society. These actors/ clients and their activities were essential to the functioning of the

  2. Parents’ Preferences for Return of Results in Pediatric Genomic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziniel, Sonja; Savage, Sarah K.; Huntington, Noelle; Amatruda, Jonathan; Green, Robert C.; Weitzman, Elissa R.; Taylor, Patrick; Holm, Ingrid A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To ascertain parental preferences for the return of genetic research results on themselves and their children and their choices for genetic research results to receive. Methods A mail survey was sent to 6,874 families seen at Boston Children’s Hospital. The survey included questions assessing the respondents’ preferences regarding the types of result they wanted to receive on themselves and their children. Results Most of the 1,060 respondents “probably” or “definitely” wanted to receive genetic research results about themselves (84.6%) and their children (88.0%). Among those who wanted to receive results, 83.4% wanted to receive all research results for themselves and 87.8% for their children. When questions about specific types of research results were combined into a composite measure, fewer respondents chose to receive all results for themselves (53.5%) and for their children (56.9%). Conclusion Although most parents report a desire to receive all research results on a general question, almost half only chose to receive a subset of research results when presented with specific types of research results. Our findings suggest that participants might not understand the implications of their choice of individual research results to receive unless faced with specific types of results. PMID:24642506

  3. The results of research on the effectiveness of line management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Lapushkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proves the relevance of research concerning the management system effectiveness in the project company. It shows that the emergence of independent commercial enterprises in the electrical power sector led both to deterioration of continuous processes controllability and to serious failures in functioning of infrastructure processes (repairs, invoice, and receipt of monetary funds. But, at the same time, a number of processes showed an increase of operation efficiency due to decrease in expenses when functioning.Coordination of activities between holding and company showed that process to come up with the weighty arguments in favor of one or other management decisions was the most complicated.The objective of the article is worded as follows: to reveal the regularities for the management efficiency to depend both on the echelons of regulation to make a decision at various times of delay (time from the decision-making moment before impact on object/subject of management and on the abovementioned factors.The research was carried out using the model of the control loop. When conducting research, the model used only line (proportional link, as the most often encountered in the development of management systems in organizations. Line (proportional link is the link with the output value changing with time according to the same law, as the input value. In management the proportional link means that managerial decisions and the impact on employees is proportional to the rejection of planned and actual performances of company activities.To assess the quality of management at different stages of the regulation, principles of regulation and management structures the article suggests to use the indicators of management costs, the integrated indicator of management error, the coefficient of regulation quality, the ratio of discounted costs, and the efficiency of regulation. It also proposes to use the efficiency factor of regulation to show which

  4. Animal models in myopia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffel, Frank; Feldkaemper, Marita

    2015-11-01

    Our current understanding of the development of refractive errors, in particular myopia, would be substantially limited had Wiesel and Raviola not discovered by accident that monkeys develop axial myopia as a result of deprivation of form vision. Similarly, if Josh Wallman and colleagues had not found that simple plastic goggles attached to the chicken eye generate large amounts of myopia, the chicken model would perhaps not have become such an important animal model. Contrary to previous assumptions about the mechanisms of myopia, these animal models suggested that eye growth is visually controlled locally by the retina, that an afferent connection to the brain is not essential and that emmetropisation uses more sophisticated cues than just the magnitude of retinal blur. While animal models have shown that the retina can determine the sign of defocus, the underlying mechanism is still not entirely clear. Animal models have also provided knowledge about the biochemical nature of the signal cascade converting the output of retinal image processing to changes in choroidal thickness and scleral growth; however, a critical question was, and still is, can the results from animal models be applied to myopia in children? While the basic findings from chickens appear applicable to monkeys, some fundamental questions remain. If eye growth is guided by visual feedback, why is myopic development not self-limiting? Why does undercorrection not arrest myopic progression even though positive lenses induce myopic defocus, which leads to the development of hyperopia in emmetropic animals? Why do some spectacle or contact lens designs reduce myopic progression and others not? It appears that some major differences exist between animals reared with imposed defocus and children treated with various optical corrections, although without the basic knowledge obtained from animal models, we would be lost in an abundance of untestable hypotheses concerning human myopia. © 2015 Optometry

  5. Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis: Models and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E.

    1999-01-01

    Research directions, linked to safety assessment of the Ignalina NPP, of the scientific safety analysis group are presented: Thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents and operational transients; Thermal-hydraulic assessment of Ignalina NPP Accident Localization System and other compartments; Structural analysis of plant components, piping and other parts of Main Circulation Circuit; Assessment of RBMK-1500 reactor core and other. Models and main works carried out last year are described. (author)

  6. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  7. Results of Chilean water markets: Empirical research since 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Carl J.

    2004-09-01

    Chile's free-market Water Code turned 20 years old in October 2001. This anniversary was an important milestone for both Chilean and international debates about water policy because Chile has become the world's leading example of the free-market approach to water law and water resources management, the textbook case of treating water rights not merely as private property but also as a fully marketable commodity. The predominant view outside of Chile is that Chilean water markets and the Chilean model of water management have been a success, and this perception has encouraged other countries to follow Chile's lead in water law reform. Much of the debate about Chilean water markets, however, has been based more on theoretical or political beliefs than on empirical study. This paper reverses that emphasis by reviewing the evolution of empirical research about these markets since 1990, when Chile returned to democratic government after 16 years of military rule. During the period since 1990, understanding of how Chilean water markets have worked in practice has gradually improved. There have been two major trends in this research: first, a gradual shift from exaggerated claims of the markets' success toward more balanced assessments of mixed results and, second, a heavy emphasis on the economics of water rights trading with very little attention given to the Water Code's impacts on social equity, river basin management, environmental protection, or resolution of water conflicts. The analysis in this study is qualitative and interdisciplinary, combining law, economics, and institutions.

  8. Translational Environmental Research: Improving the Usefulness and Usability of Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, G.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, requests for proposals more frequently emphasize outreach to stakeholder communities, decision support, and science that serves societal needs. Reports from the National Academy of Sciences and Western States Water Council emphasize the need for science translation and outreach, in order to address societal concerns with climate extremes, such as drought, the use of climate predictions, and the growing challenges of climate change. In the 1990s, the NOAA Climate Program Office developed its Regional Integrated Sciences and Asssessments program to help bridge the gap between climate science (notably, seasonal predictions) and society, to improve the flow of information to stakeholders, and to increase the relevance of climate science to inform decisions. During the same time period, the National Science Foundation initiated multi-year Science and Technology Centers and Decision Making Under Uncertainty Centers, with similar goals, but different metrics of success. Moreover, the combination of population growth, climate change, and environmental degradation has prompted numerous research initiatives on linking knowledge and action for sustainable development. This presentation reviews various models and methodologies for translating science results from field, lab, or modeling work to use by society. Lessons and approaches from cooperative extension, boundary organizations, co-production of science and policy, and medical translational research are examined. In particular, multi-step translation as practiced within the health care community is examined. For example, so- called "T1" (translation 1) research moves insights from basic science to clinical research; T2 research evaluates the effectiveness of clinical practice, who benefits from promising care regimens, and develops tools for clinicians, patients, and policy makers. T3 activities test the implementation, delivery, and spread of research results and clinical practices in order to foster

  9. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  10. Human Endothelial Cell Models in Biomaterial Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Sandra; Jung, Friedrich; Pietzsch, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) models have evolved as important tools in biomaterial research due to ubiquitously occurring interactions between implanted materials and the endothelium. However, screening the available literature has revealed a gap between material scientists and physiologists in terms of their understanding of these biomaterial-endothelium interactions and their relative importance. Consequently, EC models are often applied in nonphysiological experimental setups, or too extensive conclusions are drawn from their results. The question arises whether this might be one reason why, among the many potential biomaterials, only a few have found their way into the clinic. In this review, we provide an overview of established EC models and possible selection criteria to enable researchers to determine the most reliable and relevant EC model to use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PRES 2013: Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Turner, Gosia

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines the results of the "2013 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey" ("PRES"), where 48,401 replies were received from 122 participating institutions. Redeveloped for 2013, our biennial survey is the only national survey to gather insight from postgraduate research students about their learning and…

  12. The ultrasound research's results of the peri menopausal women's genitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodkhoeva, M.F.; Djonova, B.Yu.; Barieva, L.S.; Djonbekova, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    The results of ultrasound research of the peri menopausal women's genitals revealed that the sizes of the ovaries of women with the climacteric syndrome are smaller that the size of ovaries of the women with the physiologic menopause

  13. Pollutants from air traffic. Results of atmospheric research 1992 - 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, U.; Kaercher, B.; Schlager, H.; Wendling, P. [eds.] [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Chlond, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Ebel, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie; Pak, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany). Bereich Managementdienste; Schmitt, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany). Hauptabteilung Verkehrsforschung

    1997-12-01

    `Pollutants from Air Traffic: Effects and Prevention` is a German research program sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Technology (BMBF) over the years 1992-1997. The program is composed of an atmospheric science part and an engine technology part. It aims at assessing the long-term effects of pollutants from air traffic on the atmosphere, developing measures for reducing jet engine emissions, and providing regulatory measures. The report contains results from the atmospheric science part. Atmospheric science work is directed at diagnosing emissions and assessing their possible effects through the gaseous (nitrogen oxides, water vapour, hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide etc.) and particulate components (soot, sulfuric acid aerosols). Remote and in-situ measurements as well as model studies were carried out to analyse the physical and chemical processes which control regional and global changes of atmospheric ozone, cirrus cloud distribution - including contrails - and thus climate possibly induced by air traffic emissions. The research work was performed by partners from universities and research establishments in Germany under coordination by DLR. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs. [Deutsch] Das Verbundprogramm `Schadstoffe in der Luftfahrt: Wirkung und Praevention` wurde im Zeitraum von 1992-1997 vom Bundesministerium fuer Bildung, Wissenschaft, Forschung und Technologie (BMBF) gefoerdert. Das Programm besteht aus den Bereichen Atmosphaerenforschung und Triebwerkstechnologie. Ziel des Programms ist es, die langfristigen Auswirkungen von Emmissionen des Luftverkehrs zu untersuchen, Massnahmen zur Reduktion des Schadstoffausstosses aus Flugzeugtriebwerken zu erarbeiten und Daten und Verfahren fuer regulatorische Massnahmen bereitzustellen. Der Bericht stellt die Ergebnisse aus dem Bereich der Atmosphaerenforschung zusammen. Schwerpunkte der Forschungsarbeiten sind die Analyse der Schadstoffemissionen in Form von Gasen

  14. The use of research results for effective aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.E.; Taylor, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The study of the degradation of structures, components, and systems due to aging is an important ongoing area of research in the nuclear industry. Efforts by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the utility industry, through organizations such as the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have produced substantial research results that can be used by inspectors and operators to effectively understand and manage the aging of nuclear power plants. One of the primary objectives of the NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is to determine how aging affects the safety of nuclear power plants. This program uses operating experience, testing, and engineering analysis to identify failures caused by age-related degradation. Useful information on aging has also resulted from research being performed by the industry to support plant-life extension (PLEX). The EPRI program, for instance, is directed toward the resolution of issues related to materials and components. Degradation of equipment and systems due to aging can occur which, if unmitigated, could result in reduction of the nuclear power plant safety margin as the plant ages. This paper describes how aging research results may be used by plant operating management to effectively address the aging issue and by inspectors responsible for monitoring plant activities and programs

  15. Valorizing Research Results and Innovations in Burkina Faso ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Burkina Faso, scientific research, invention and innovation have generated many results that could contribute to endogenous development. However, these results are little known, underutilized and undervalued. This situation unfavorable to national development can be explained by numerous obstacles, notably: ...

  16. Animal Models and Bone Histomorphometry: Translational Research for the Human Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibonga, Jean D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of animal models to research and inform bone morphology, in particular relating to human research in bone loss as a result of low gravity environments. Reasons for use of animal models as tools for human research programs include: time-efficient, cost-effective, invasive measures, and predictability as some model are predictive for drug effects.

  17. Getting started with research "Writing-up the results of your research".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Jacinta E

    2014-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the considerations and practical aspects of writing up the results of your research, which may be of interest to those beginning their research career or simply carrying out a research project for the first time as part of an academic qualification. It outlines practical steps for both writing up the results of your research as an academic report and thereafter disseminating your results more widely as a peer-reviewed scientific publication.

  18. Returning individual research results for genome sequences of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Disclosure of individual results to participants in genomic research is a complex and contentious issue. There are many existing commentaries and opinion pieces on the topic, but little empirical data concerning actual cases describing how individual results have been returned. Thus, the real life risks and benefits of disclosing individual research results to participants are rarely if ever presented as part of this debate. Methods The Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) is an Australian contribution to the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), that involves prospective sequencing of tumor and normal genomes of study participants with pancreatic cancer in Australia. We present three examples that illustrate different facets of how research results may arise, and how they may be returned to individuals within an ethically defensible and clinically practical framework. This framework includes the necessary elements identified by others including consent, determination of the significance of results and which to return, delineation of the responsibility for communication and the clinical pathway for managing the consequences of returning results. Results Of 285 recruited patients, we returned results to a total of 25 with no adverse events to date. These included four that were classified as medically actionable, nine as clinically significant and eight that were returned at the request of the treating clinician. Case studies presented depict instances where research results impacted on cancer susceptibility, current treatment and diagnosis, and illustrate key practical challenges of developing an effective framework. Conclusions We suggest that return of individual results is both feasible and ethically defensible but only within the context of a robust framework that involves a close relationship between researchers and clinicians. PMID:24963353

  19. ATES Smart Grids research project overview and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Martin; Jaxa-Rozen, Marc; Rostampour, Vahab

    2016-04-01

    Background: ATES is application is growing Application of seasonal Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) contributes to energy saving and Greenhouse Gas (GHG)-reduction goals (CBS, 2015; EU, 2010, 2014). Recently it was shown that ATES is applicable in several parts of the world (Bloemendal et al., 2015). While in most parts of the world adoption is just beginning, in the Netherlands progressive building energy efficiency regulation already caused the adoption of ATES to take off (Heekeren and Bakema, 2015; Sommer et al., 2015). As a result of the large number of ATES systems in the Netherlands, the subsurface plays a crucial role in the energy saving objectives of The Netherlands (Kamp, 2015; SER, 2013). Problem: suboptimal use of the subsurface for energy storage ATES systems accumulate in urban areas, as can be expected with a large growth of ATES systems; at many locations in Dutch cities demand for ATES transcends the available space in the subsurface (Li, 2014; Sommer et al., 2015). Within in the Dutch legal framework and state of technology optimal use of the subsurface is not secured; i.e. minimizing the total GHG emissions in a certain area. (Bloemendal et al., 2014; Li, 2014). The most important aspects in this problem are A) the permanent and often unused claim resulting from static permits and B) excessive safety zones around wells to prevent interaction. Both aspects result in an artificial reduction of subsurface space for potential new ATES systems. Recent research has shown that ground energy storage systems could be placed much closer to each other (Bakr et al., 2013; Sommer et al., 2015), and a controlled/limited degree of interaction between them can actually benefit the overall energy savings of an entire area. Solution: the approach and first results of our research project on ATES Smart Grids The heating and cooling demand of buildings is a dynamic and hard to predict process, due to effects such as weather, climate change, changing function

  20. Mapping the networks of cancer research in Portugal: first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bras, O.R.; Cointet, J.P.; Nunes, J.A.; David, L.; Cambrosio, A.

    2016-07-01

    Social studies of cancer research at the international level have contributed to a better understanding of the developmental dynamics – both organizational and epistemic – of this field (Keating & Cambrosio, 2012). In contrast, despite its robust development, oncology research in Portugal has been the subject of only few studies. Most of them have a strong focus on the first half of the 20th century (Raposo, 2004; Costa, 2010, 2012a; 2012b), while a few focus on more contemporary events (Nunes, 2001). Consequently, we do not have a clear picture of recent trends in oncology research in Portugal, and how it integrates into the international landscape. This hinders public accountability of oncology research while also limiting the analysis of how this research relates to health care delivery, health outcomes, and health policy formulations. This paper presents the first results of an ongoing research project on the organizational and epistemic development of oncology research in Portugal, covering the period from the end of the 20th century to 2015. Among other issues, we intend to explore the extent to which oncology research in Portugal mirrors the international dynamics at a smaller scale, and the extent to which it presents features of its own. The study draws upon computer-based analysis of publications using the platform CorText (http://www.cortext.net/) of IFRIS (Institut Francilien Recherche, Innovation, Société), along with interviews with Portuguese oncologists and related practitioners. (Author)

  1. The effects of professional irradiation, fields of research, results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V. [Institute of Biophysics, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    1993-12-31

    Main results of research of after effects of professional irradiation of the personnel of the first atomic power industry enterprise in the country ({open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes}) are presented. The earliest determinated effects (chronic and acute radiation sickness, local radiation traumae, plutonium pneumosclerosis) and the late effects of external gamma-irradiation and combined (pu-239, tritium) radiation effect in a wide range of doses have been studied. The basis of the paper are the results of a complex medical research of the personnel: the state of haemopoietic, nerve, cardiovascular systems, alimentary canal, other organs and systems, immunity, somatic cells genome and the frequency of tumor and non-tumor diseases. The observation and research period covered is 40 years from the first contact with the ionized radiation source.

  2. The Danish national passenger modelModel specification and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Hansen, Christian Overgaard

    2016-01-01

    , the paper provides a description of a large-scale forecast model with a discussion of the linkage between population synthesis, demand and assignment. Secondly, the paper gives specific attention to model specification and in particular choice of functional form and cost-damping. Specifically we suggest...... a family of logarithmic spline functions and illustrate how it is applied in the model. Thirdly and finally, we evaluate model sensitivity and performance by evaluating the distance distribution and elasticities. In the paper we present results where the spline-function is compared with more traditional...... function types and it is indicated that the spline-function provides a better description of the data. Results are also provided in the form of a back-casting exercise where the model is tested in a back-casting scenario to 2002....

  3. Results of SEI Independent Research and Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    user • path #2: minimizing implementation cost The model problem, Management Station Lite, is a centralized unit for managing a set of auto- mated ... mated consistency-checking techniques across formalisms (models), and semantics of coupl- ing expressions. • Somewhat related to assumption...packets. Since real-time video is time-sensitive, retransmitting data and maintaining order introduces delays that result in poor vid - eo quality to the

  4. Results of a Research Evaluating Quality of Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhorec, Ján; Hašková, Alena; Munk, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an international research on a comparative assessment of the current status of computer science education at the secondary level (ISCED 3A) in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, and Belgium. Evaluation was carried out based on 14 specific factors gauging the students' point of view. The authors present qualitative…

  5. A Developmental Model of Research Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelo, Renata A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We studied mentoring relationships between undergraduate and graduate students in a summer undergraduate research program, over three years. Using a grounded theory approach, we created a model of research mentoring that describes how the roles of the mentor and the student can change. Whereas previous models of research mentoring ignored student…

  6. Interdisciplinary Research Produces Results in the Understanding of Planetary Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Hayward, Rosalyn Kay; Bourke, Mary C.

    2010-08-01

    Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Planetary Analogs—Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data; Alamosa, Colorado, 18-21 May 2010; Dunes and other eolian bed forms are prominent on several planetary bodies in our solar system. Despite 4 decades of study, many questions remain regarding the composition, age, and origins of these features, as well as the climatic conditions under which they formed. Recently acquired data from orbiters and rovers, together with terrestrial analogs and numerical models, are providing new insights into Martian sand dunes, as well as eolian bed forms on other terrestrial planetary bodies (e.g., Titan). As a means of bringing together terrestrial and planetary researchers from diverse backgrounds with the goal of fostering collaborative interdisciplinary research, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, the Desert Research Institute, and the U.S. National Park Service held a workshop in Colorado. The small group setting facilitated intensive discussion of problems and issues associated with eolian processes on Earth, Mars, and Titan.

  7. SCIENTOMETRY AND EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS OF ECONOMIC SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Lucia RISTEA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the necessity of a continuous and demanding evaluation, capable of linking the results obtained with the human, material and financial resources, allocated and periodically setting the position of the national research relative to the world level, the evaluation of the relevance of the publications must be carried out from the positions and requirements of new disciplines: Scientometry. Scientometry is intended to help substantiate the evaluation of research activity and decision-making on its development, the science policy as a whole.

  8. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  9. CMS standard model Higgs boson results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Abia Pablo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In July 2012 CMS announced the discovery of a new boson with properties resembling those of the long-sought Higgs boson. The analysis of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 19.6 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, confirm the Higgs-like nature of the new boson, with a signal strength associated with vector bosons and fermions consistent with the expectations for a standard model (SM Higgs boson, and spin-parity clearly favouring the scalar nature of the new boson. In this note I review the updated results of the CMS experiment.

  10. A Systematic Literature Review of Agile Maturity Model Research

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan Henriques; Maureen Tanner

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim/Purpose: A commonly implemented software process improvement framework is the capability maturity model integrated (CMMI). Existing literature indicates higher levels of CMMI maturity could result in a loss of agility due to its organizational focus. To maintain agility, research has focussed attention on agile maturity models. The objective of this paper is to find the common research themes and conclusions in agile maturity model research. Methodology: This research adop...

  11. Modeling Research Project Risks with Fuzzy Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodea, Constanta Nicoleta; Dascalu, Mariana Iuliana

    2009-01-01

    The authors propose a risks evaluation model for research projects. The model is based on fuzzy inference. The knowledge base for fuzzy process is built with a causal and cognitive map of risks. The map was especially developed for research projects, taken into account their typical lifecycle. The model was applied to an e-testing research…

  12. The latest results from source term research. Overview and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herranz, Luis E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medio Ambientales y Tecnologica (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Haste, Tim [Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, Paul-Lez-Durance (France). Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN); Kaerkelae, Teemu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    Source term research has continued internationally for more than 30 years, increasing confidence in calculations of the potential radioactive release to the environment after a severe reactor accident. Important experimental data have been obtained, mainly under international frameworks such as OECD/NEA and EURATOM. Specifically, Phebus FP provides major insights into fission product release and transport. Results are included in severe accident analysis codes. Data from international projects are being interpreted with a view to further improvements in these codes. This paper synthesizes the recent main outcomes from source term research on these topics, and on source term mitigation. It highlights knowledge gaps remaining and discusses ways to proceed. Aside from this further knowledge-driven research, there is consensus on the need to assess the source term predictive ability of current system codes, taking account of scale-up from experiment to reactor conditions.

  13. Quantitative models in marketing research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); R. Paap (Richard)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRecent advances in data collection and data storage techniques enable marketing researchers to study the individual characteristics of a large range of transactions and purchases, in particular the effects of household-specific characteristics. This book presents the most important and

  14. Meta-analysis in plant pathology: synthesizing research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M S; Garrett, K A; Su, Z; Bowden, R L

    2004-09-01

    ABSTRACT Meta-analysis is a set of statistical procedures for synthesizing research results from a number of different studies. An estimate of a statistical effect, such as the difference in disease severity for plants with or without a management treatment, is collected from each study along with a measure of the variance of the estimate of the effect. Combining results from different studies will generally result in increased statistical power so that it is easier to detect small effects. Combining results from different studies may also make it possible to compare the size of the effect as a function of other predictor variables such as geographic region or pathogen species. We present a review of the basic methodology for meta-analysis. We also present an example of meta-analysis of the relationship between disease severity and yield loss for foliar wheat diseases, based on data collected from a decade of fungicide and nematicide test results.

  15. Researchers' opinions towards the communication of results of biobank research: a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenkamp, Tineke M.; Gevers, Sjef J. K.; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty Dutch investigators (response 41%) involved in biobank research responded to a web-based survey addressing communication of results of biobank research to individual participants. Questions addressed their opinion towards an obligation to communicate results and related issues such as

  16. Sudetic larch in Germany - Results of provenance and progeny research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisgerber, H. [Forest Centre for Management Planning, Research and Ecology, Hann Muenden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    There are only a few older sources of Sudetic larch in Germany. They distinguish themselves by outstanding growth and low susceptibility to canker. This impression was confirmed by results of provenance research. The Sudetic larch tested in comparison with numerous other provenances proved to be fast-growing, site-tolerant, to a large extent insusceptible to canker, with straight but also slightly to moderately curved stems. The Sudetic provenances behave remarkably uniformly as regards these characteristics. In addition to provenance research investigations have been going on for a long time in Germany into individual differences within the Sudetic larch populations. A report is given on the results of progeny tests from free and controlled pollination, using the example of a seed orchard consisting of 54 clones. We point also to possibilities for improving stem quality by selection steps. The results of provenance and progeny research on Sudetic larch are in the meantime being put to use to a large extent in practical forestry. The forest administrations of various federal lands recommend the use of reproductive material of Sudetic origin and from seed orchards. 20 refs, 3 figs

  17. Revisiting Runoff Model Calibration: Airborne Snow Observatory Results Allow Improved Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deterministic snow accumulation and ablation simulation models are widely used by runoff managers throughout the world to predict runoff quantities and timing. Model fitting is typically based on matching modeled runoff volumes and timing with observed flow time series at a few points in the basin. In recent decades, sparse networks of point measurements of the mountain snowpacks have been available to compare with modeled snowpack, but the comparability of results from a snow sensor or course to model polygons of 5 to 50 sq. km is suspect. However, snowpack extent, depth, and derived snow water equivalent have been produced by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) mission for spring of 20013 and 2014 in the Tuolumne River basin above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. These high-resolution snowpack data have exposed the weakness in a model calibration based on runoff alone. The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) calibration that was based on 30-years of inflow to Hetch Hetchy produces reasonable inflow results, but modeled spatial snowpack location and water quantity diverged significantly from the weekly measurements made by ASO during the two ablation seasons. The reason is that the PRMS model has many flow paths, storages, and water transfer equations, and a calibrated outflow time series can be right for many wrong reasons. The addition of a detailed knowledge of snow extent and water content constrains the model so that it is a better representation of the actual watershed hydrology. The mechanics of recalibrating PRMS to the ASO measurements will be described, and comparisons in observed versus modeled flow for both a small subbasin and the entire Hetch Hetchy basin will be shown. The recalibrated model provided a bitter fit to the snowmelt recession, a key factor for water managers as they balance declining inflows with demand for power generation and ecosystem releases during the final months of snow melt runoff.

  18. Immersive visualization of dynamic CFD model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparato, J.R.; Ringel, K.L.; Heath, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    With immersive visualization the engineer has the means for vividly understanding problem causes and discovering opportunities to improve design. Software can generate an interactive world in which collaborators experience the results of complex mathematical simulations such as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Such software, while providing unique benefits over traditional visualization techniques, presents special development challenges. The visualization of large quantities of data interactively requires both significant computational power and shrewd data management. On the computational front, commodity hardware is outperforming large workstations in graphical quality and frame rates. Also, 64-bit commodity computing shows promise in enabling interactive visualization of large datasets. Initial interactive transient visualization methods and examples are presented, as well as development trends in commodity hardware and clustering. Interactive, immersive visualization relies on relevant data being stored in active memory for fast response to user requests. For large or transient datasets, data management becomes a key issue. Techniques for dynamic data loading and data reduction are presented as means to increase visualization performance. (author)

  19. Results from oil spill response research - an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent large oil spills from tankers have reaffirmed the need for continuing technology assessment and research to improve oil spill response capabilities. This paper discusses Minerals Management Service concerns, as reinforced by the acceleration of its research program in 1990. It briefly assesses current state-of-the-art technology for major aspects of spill response, including remote sensing, open-ocean containment and recovery, in-situ burning, use of chemical treating agents, beachline cleanup, and oil behavior. Specific research projects have begun to yield information that will improve detection and at-sea equipment performance; current projects include the development of an airborne laser-fluorosensor to determine whether apparent slicks contain oil. Additional projects involve the development of improved strategies for responding to oil in broken-ice conditions, for gaining an improved understanding of the fate and behavior of spilled oil as it affects response strategies, and for defining the capabilities of available dispersants and development of improved formulations. Recently, progress has been made on the development of safe and environmentally acceptable strategies to burn spilled oil in situ. The Ohmsett facility has been reopened and will be used to test prospective improvements in chemical treating agents and to develop standard procedures for testing and evaluating response equipment. Results of research published since the last Oil Spill Conference are discussed

  20. Engaging Scientists and Users in Climate Change Research and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, E. T.; Reeves, K.; Shimamoto, M. M.; Zerbonne, S.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Global Change Research Program has a mandate to "consult with actual and potential users of the results of the program" in developing products that will support learning about and responding to climate change. USGCRP has sought to engage stakeholders throughout the development and dissemination of key products, such as the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3, 2014) and the Climate and Health Assessment (CHA, 2016), in the strategic planning processes leading to the National Global Change Research Plan (2012) and Update to the Strategic Plan (2016), and through regular postings to social media that highlight research results and opportunities for engagement. Overall, USGCRP seeks to promote dialogue between scientific experts, stakeholders, and decision makers about information needs in regions or sectors, the potential impacts of climate change, and possible responses. This presentation will describe how USGCRP has implemented various stakeholder engagement measures during the planning, development, and release of products such as NCA3 and CHA. Through repeated opportunities for stakeholder input, USGCRP has promoted process transparency and inclusiveness in the framing of assessments and other products. In addition, USGCRP has supported scientists' engagement with a range of audiences and potential collaborators through a variety of mechanisms, including community-based meetings, deliberative forums, and identification of non-Federal speaking and knowledge co-production opportunities. We will discuss key lessons learned and successful approaches for engaging users as well as opportunities and challenges for future engagement.

  1. Report on results in research and development 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This presentation of results of R and D work represents for the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre its scientific annual report for the year 1989, as required by its constitution. The report is divided according to the main areas of work of the KfK in a similar manner to the R and D planning. The individual reports were prepared by the participating institutes and main departments and were then grouped thematically with a note of their origins. The main areas of work are the Fast Breeder Project, the separation nozzle method, the Nuclear Fusion Project, the Reprocessing and Waste Treatment Project, terminal storage, environment and safety solids and matter research, nuclear and particle physics, microtechnology, handling and other research plans (for example, the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor). This report shows the progress of studies on each project named in the KfK R and D programme. The correlation to the R and D programme is meant to facilitate the comparison of aims with achievements and explain the complete context of what are often individual tasks carried out by several institutes. Detailed results can be found in the quoted scientific-technical publications on internal preliminary reports. (orig./HK) [de

  2. Applications of research results from NPAR service water system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarrell, D.B.; Stratton, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has invested considerable resources in understanding the mechanisms, mitigating the damage, and managing the results of nuclear power plant aging degradation. Many direct benefits have resulted from this program in terms of improved plant safety through upgraded regulatory guidance. The 'Service Water System (SWS) Aging Degradation Assessment' (NUREG/CR-5379), produced by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), contributed to this program. Two other benefits have resulted from the NPAR SWS task: (1) a contribution to the content of Generic Letter 89-13 (nuclear plant SWS performance requirements) and (2) the development of a systematic and complete root-cause analysis (RCA) methodology for use in the solution of SWS as well as other system component failures. Less recognized, but also of significance, are the spin-off initiatives from the NRC's NPAR program investigations. One such spin-off resulting specifically from the NRC-sponsored SWS research is the continuing development of the RCA methodology to facilitate the computerized integration of the following: (1) component condition monitoring; (2) fault diagnostics; and (3) failure root cause analysis. The Decision Support system for Operations and Maintenance project being developed at PNL is implementing the NPAR-developed RCA methodology utilizing an artificial intelligence approach

  3. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  4. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  5. Fundamental Research in Turbulent Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Ri equation) implies (23). We introduce wave number space by 4D (k) = R eik. d (24) 813 and the three-dimensional spectrum, E , by the Karman-Howarth...Mech. Series No. 4, 1965, pp. 13-23. 10 simple model for T , which has derivatives only (no integrals*) both in t space and for R ,is 1 ’S 15F The...coefficients have been chosen so that for Kolmogoroff equili- brium, i.e., T = 0 , the only solution is E = const k -5 / 3 and, in addition, Eq. (28) is

  6. Beyond citation analysis: a model for assessment of research impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarli, Cathy C; Dubinsky, Ellen K; Holmes, Kristi L

    2010-01-01

    Is there a means of assessing research impact beyond citation analysis? The case study took place at the Washington University School of Medicine Becker Medical Library. This case study analyzed the research study process to identify indicators beyond citation count that demonstrate research impact. The authors discovered a number of indicators that can be documented for assessment of research impact, as well as resources to locate evidence of impact. As a result of the project, the authors developed a model for assessment of research impact, the Becker Medical Library Model for Assessment of Research. Assessment of research impact using traditional citation analysis alone is not a sufficient tool for assessing the impact of research findings, and it is not predictive of subsequent clinical applications resulting in meaningful health outcomes. The Becker Model can be used by both researchers and librarians to document research impact to supplement citation analysis.

  7. Natural scientific research at the Bolgar settlement (the first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golyeva Alexandra A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the first results of the comprehensive scientific research conducted on the Bulgar fortified settlement site in 2011. Samples for analysis were selected in the form of series of vertical columns from excavation walls. The species of trees used in the construction, the composition of the mud bricks and the bonding mortar, as well as the genesis of individual cultural layers have been identified. It has been found out that the settlement development and functioning had been reciprocating in nature: periods of intense habitation of its individual sections were followed by short stages of desolation. In all investigated soil columns with the cultural layers there are streaks consisting solely of phytoliths and cuticle casts. A possible explanation of the phenomenon may be that the plot was covered with layers of manure of significant length and capacity. This conclusion is debatable and requires further research.

  8. Attitudes toward Genetic Research Review: Results from a Survey of Human Genetics Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, K.L.; Lemke, A.A.; Trinidad, S.B.; Lewis, S.M.; Starks, H.; Quinn Griffin, M.T.; Wiesner, G.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Researchers often relate personal experiences of difficulties and challenges with Institutional Review Board (IRB) review of their human genetic research protocols. However, there have been no studies that document the range and frequency of these concerns among researchers conducting human genetic/genomic studies. Methods An online anonymous survey was used to collect information from human genetic researchers regarding views about IRB review of genetic protocols. Logistic regression was used to test specific hypotheses. Results from the national online survey of 351 human genomic researchers are summarized in this report. Results Issues involving considerable discussion with IRBs included reconsent of subjects (51%), protection of participants’ personal information (39%) and return of results to participants (34%). Over half of the participants had experienced one or more negative consequences of the IRB review process and approximately 25% had experienced one or more positive consequences. Respondents who had served on an IRB were about 80% more likely to report positive consequences of IRB review than their colleagues who had never served on an IRB (p = 0.03). Survey responses were mixed on the need for reconsent before data sharing and risks related to participant reidentification from genomic data. Conclusion The results from this study provide important perspectives of researchers regarding genetic research review and show lack of consensus on key research ethics issues in genomic research. PMID:21487211

  9. Modeling and Field Results from Seismic Stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.; Pride, S.; Lo, W.; Daley, T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Sposito, Garrison; Roberts, P.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the effect of seismic stimulation employing Maxwell-Boltzmann theory shows that the important component of stimulation is mechanical rather than fluid pressure effects. Modeling using Biot theory (two phases) shows that the pressure effects diffuse too quickly to be of practical significance. Field data from actual stimulation will be shown to compare to theory

  10. Geological research on rare earth elements, results and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, H

    1999-01-01

    This is a report of the geological investigation of rare earth elements carried out by CCHEN and ENAMI (Empresa Nacional de Mineria) over 70,000 square kilometers in Chile's northern coastal mountain range. Twenty areas were identified with sphena, davidite, ilmenite, pyroxene, anatase and magnetite minerals containing 0.3 kg/t to 6.0 kg/t of rare earth elements. Additional research on Cerro Carmen Prospect, located near Diego de Almagro, define it as a metasomatic deposit, hosted in metamorphic contact rocks, between andesites (Pliensbachian to early Jurassic) and intrusive monzonitic rocks. This information increases knowledge about the metallogenesis of Chile's copper - iron - rare earth - uranium deposits and the application of this geological model of ore deposits as defined in Australia's Olympic Dam

  11. Some results of medical researches at Ulba Metallurgical Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artemieva, G.I.; Novikov, V.G.; Savchuk, V.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The results of 45-years medical researches at beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant are summarized in this report. Statistic data on different kinds of occupational diseases, related to beryllium production and the dynamics of changing occupational diseases with the development of beryllium production, are given there. Data on average duration of life of occupational disease patients are presented in the report. It includes the description of problems, related to berylliosis diagnosis. Issues, connected to beryllium production effect on health of man, located nearby beryllium production are also discussed there as well. (author)

  12. Progress and Results from the 4DH Research Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Sven; Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2014-01-01

    of district heating and cooling, which also sum up the work of the 4DH Centre: Grids and components; Production and system integration, and Planning and implementation. This paper presents an overview of the progress and results achieved after more than two years of work. This includes the basic definition......With lower and more flexible distribution temperatures, fourth generation district heating systems can utilize renewable energy sources, while meeting the requirements of low-energy buildings and energy conservation measures in the existing building stock. 4DH is an international strategic research...

  13. The SAGE Model of Social Psychological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Séamus A; Velez, Gabriel; Qadafi, Ahmad; Tennant, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    We propose a SAGE model for social psychological research. Encapsulated in our acronym is a proposal to have a synthetic approach to social psychological research, in which qualitative methods are augmentative to quantitative ones, qualitative methods can be generative of new experimental hypotheses, and qualitative methods can capture experiences that evade experimental reductionism. We remind social psychological researchers that psychology was founded in multiple methods of investigation at multiple levels of analysis. We discuss historical examples and our own research as contemporary examples of how a SAGE model can operate in part or as an integrated whole. The implications of our model are discussed.

  14. Horonobe Underground Research Program. A result report on surveys and researches in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    Horonobe Underground Research Program is intended to carry out at three steps such as 'Survey research carried out from the earth surface', 'Survey research carried out under excavating levels', and 'Survey research under using boreholes'. In fiscal year 2001, for technical development on geological investigation, on-land physical investigations, geological survey, and trial boring survey to collect geological environment data were carried out, to carry out modelization of geological environment on a base of data obtained by these surveys. And, these data were also used for selection of establishing area on a research institute. Furthermore, development on monitoring technology on geological environment, study on long-term stability on the geological environment, and investigation for design of underground facility were also carried out. For R and D on geological disposal, some investigations to materialize plans carried out at the underground facility after the second step, were carried out. (G.K.)

  15. A holistic interdisciplinary health care research model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, K M

    1999-01-01

    Collaboration, when viewed as a nonhierarchic endeavor based on a sharing of power and authority, may not be an ideal model for interdisciplinary research. A cooperative venture in which participants willingly join in planning, making decisions about, and implementing a project supervised by a principal investigator is historically the successful structure for interdisciplinary research. A holistic model of mutually respectful cooperation in a hierarchic team is a more realistic goal for interdisciplinary research efforts.

  16. What Will Classroom Teachers Do With Shared Research Results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, M. J.; Weissel, J. K.; Cormier, M.; Newman, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists are passionate about the research problems they investigate, and wish to share their discoveries as widely as possible. Similarly, classroom teachers who are passionate about their subject can better foster student learning. One way to enhance such passions involves bringing teachers and scientists together to discuss cutting-edge discoveries and develop curricular materials based on the respective strengths of educators and investigators. Our presentation describes one example of this approach based on research about gas blowout structures offshore Virginia and North Carolina. Methane venting processes along continental margins may have important climatic, geotechnical, hazard, and resource implications. In 2000, shipboard surveys documented that large structures offshore VA-NC resulted from massive gas expulsion. Gas appears to be trapped in shelf edge deltas and stresses resulting from downslope creep is favoring its release. Scientists undertook a new expedition in 2004 to determine if there is present-day discharge of methane-rich fluids through the floors or walls of the blowouts or whether these seepage sites are relict features, and to gain insight into the origin of the vented methane. In July 2005, 12 teachers from New York and New Jersey met with the co-PIs (Weissel and Cormier), graduate student (Newman), and educational specialist (Passow) over a 2-day workshop to learn about how scientific problems are identified, how a research cruise is organized, what was learned through the measurements and analysis, and what might be possible significant impacts from such understandings. Based on what they learned, participants began development of classroom activities, Internet-based investigations, and constructed-response assessment items utilizing data and concepts from the project and other sources. The resulting curriculum units are designed for use in middle and high school chemistry, physics, earth science, and technology courses. Curricular

  17. Report on results in research and development 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This presentation of results of R and D work represents for the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre its scientific annual report for the year 1990, as required by its constitution. This report is divided according to the main areas of work of the KfK in a similar manner to the R and D planning. The indivudual reports were prepared by the participating institutes and main departments and were then grouped thematically with a note of their origin. This report shows the progress of studies on each project named in the KfK R and D program. The correlation to the R and D programme is meant to facilitate the comparison of aims with achievements and explain the complete context of what are often individual tasks carried out by several institutes. Detailed results can be found in the quoted scientific-technical publications on internal preliminary reports. (orig./HP) [de

  18. Implications of NSTX Lithium Results for Magnetic Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Canik, J.M.; Diem, S.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Taylor, G.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on NSTX for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ∼ 100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium reloadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, ELM control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  19. Implications of NSTX lithium results for magnetic fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Canik, J.M.; Diem, S.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Hosea, J.; Kaye, S.; Mansfield, D.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Taylor, G.

    2010-01-01

    Lithium wall coating techniques have been experimentally explored on National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for the last five years. The lithium experimentation on NSTX started with a few milligrams of lithium injected into the plasma as pellets and it has evolved to a lithium evaporation system which can evaporate up to ∼100 g of lithium onto the lower divertor plates between lithium re-loadings. The unique feature of the lithium research program on NSTX is that it can investigate the effects of lithium in H-mode divertor plasmas. This lithium evaporation system thus far has produced many intriguing and potentially important results; the latest of these are summarized in a companion paper by H. Kugel. In this paper, we suggest possible implications and applications of the NSTX lithium results on the magnetic fusion research which include electron and global energy confinement improvements, MHD stability enhancement at high beta, edge localized mode (ELM) control, H-mode power threshold reduction, improvements in radio frequency heating and non-inductive plasma start-up performance, innovative divertor solutions and improved operational efficiency.

  20. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Report on the results of research and development 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The report contains a description of the research projects, a list of the institutes and departments of the scientific-technical range with short articles concerning the results of the institutional work, and a bibliography of all publications of 1985. The main aspects of the projects and research programs are fast breeder, separation nozzle process, nuclear fusion, waste recycling and reprocessing, final storage, nuclear safety, the range of technique-man-environment, solid state and materials research, nuclear and elementary particle physics, and research programs of different institutes. (HK)

  1. Latent Structure of Reflective Learning at the Higher Educational Institution: Mixed Methods Research Results

    OpenAIRE

    Bubnys, Remigijus

    2015-01-01

    The article presents results of the research, conducted using mixed methods research strategy: the reflective learning model as a prerequisite for curriculum development and improvement in university studies. The qualitative study was implemented using unstructured reflections, written by 65 prospective special educators studying at the university. The phenomenological hermeneutical method of data analysis enabled to disclose students’ experiences as preconditions for reflective learning, con...

  2. Animal Models Utilized in HTLV-1 Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the isolation and discovery of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 over 30 years ago, researchers have utilized animal models to study HTLV-1 transmission, viral persistence, virus-elicited immune responses, and HTLV-1-associated disease development (ATL, HAM/TSP. Non-human primates, rabbits, rats, and mice have all been used to help understand HTLV-1 biology and disease progression. Non-human primates offer a model system that is phylogenetically similar to humans for examining viral persistence. Viral transmission, persistence, and immune responses have been widely studied using New Zealand White rabbits. The advent of molecular clones of HTLV-1 has offered the opportunity to assess the importance of various viral genes in rabbits, non-human primates, and mice. Additionally, over-expression of viral genes using transgenic mice has helped uncover the importance of Tax and Hbz in the induction of lymphoma and other lymphocyte-mediated diseases. HTLV-1 inoculation of certain strains of rats results in histopathological features and clinical symptoms similar to that of humans with HAM/TSP. Transplantation of certain types of ATL cell lines in immunocompromised mice results in lymphoma. Recently, “humanized” mice have been used to model ATL development for the first time. Not all HTLV-1 animal models develop disease and those that do vary in consistency depending on the type of monkey, strain of rat, or even type of ATL cell line used. However, the progress made using animal models cannot be understated as it has led to insights into the mechanisms regulating viral replication, viral persistence, disease development, and, most importantly, model systems to test disease treatments.

  3. Coupled Michigan MHD - Rice Convection Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, D.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    2002-12-01

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run for idealized storm inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV^gamma.

  4. Research Output, Socialization, and the Biglan Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Bean, John P.

    1981-01-01

    A test of the Biglan model of faculty subcultures using measures of research output and tests of the model controlling for the effects of faculty socialization are described. The Biglan model is found to be valid, and the distinctiveness of the Biglan groups appears to increase with the socialization of faculty into subject areas. (Author/MLW)

  5. Statistical Learning Theory: Models, Concepts, and Results

    OpenAIRE

    von Luxburg, Ulrike; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Statistical learning theory provides the theoretical basis for many of today's machine learning algorithms. In this article we attempt to give a gentle, non-technical overview over the key ideas and insights of statistical learning theory. We target at a broad audience, not necessarily machine learning researchers. This paper can serve as a starting point for people who want to get an overview on the field before diving into technical details.

  6. Graphical interpretation of numerical model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewes, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer software has been developed to produce high quality graphical displays of data from a numerical grid model. The code uses an existing graphical display package (DISSPLA) and overcomes some of the problems of both line-printer output and traditional graphics. The software has been designed to be flexible enough to handle arbitrarily placed computation grids and a variety of display requirements

  7. Maturity Models Development in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2015-01-01

    of maturity models. Specifically, it explores maturity models literature in IS and standard guidelines, if any to develop maturity models, challenges identified and solutions proposed. Our systematic literature review of IS publications revealed over hundred and fifty articles on maturity models. Extant...... literature reveals that researchers have primarily focused on developing new maturity models pertaining to domain-specific problems and/or new enterprise technologies. We find rampant re-use of the design structure of widely adopted models such as Nolan’s Stage of Growth Model, Crosby’s Grid, and Capability...

  8. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de la Maamora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S(α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file 'up259'. The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  9. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  10. Changes in science classrooms resulting from collaborative action research initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Phil Seok

    Collaborative action research was undertaken over two years between a Korean science teacher and science education researchers at the University of Iowa. For the purpose of realizing science learning as envisioned by constructivist principles, Group-Investigations were implemented three or five times per project year. In addition, the second year project enacted Peer Assessments among students. Student perceptions of their science classrooms, as measured by the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES), provided evidence that the collaborative action research was successful in creating constructivist learning environments. Student attitudes toward science lessons, as examined by the Enjoyment of Science Lessons Scale (ESLS), indicated that the action research also contributed to developing more positive attitudes of students about science learning. Discourse analysis was conducted on video-recordings of in-class presentations and discussions. The results indicated that students in science classrooms which were moving toward constructivist learning environments engaged in such discursive practices as: (1) Communicating their inquiries to others, (2) Seeking and providing information through dialogues, and (3) Negotiating conflicts in their knowledge and beliefs. Based on these practices, science learning was viewed as the process of constructing knowledge and understanding of science as well as the process of engaging in scientific inquiry and discourse. The teacher's discursive practices included: (1) Wrapping up student presentations, (2) Addressing misconceptions, (3) Answering student queries, (4) Coaching, (5) Assessing and advising, (6) Guiding students discursively into new knowledge, and (7) Scaffolding. Science teaching was defined as situated acts of the teacher to facilitate the learning process. In particular, when the classrooms became more constructivist, the teacher intervened more frequently and carefully in student activities to fulfill a

  11. Modeling clicks beyond the first result page

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern web search engines yield a list of documents of a fixed length (usually 10) in response to a user query. The next ten search results are usually available in one click. These documents either replace the current result page or are appended to the end. Hence, in order to examine more

  12. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  13. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  14. GPM Microwave Imager Engineering Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, David; Krimchansky, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) Instrument is being developed by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation (BATC) for the GPM program at NASA Goddard. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international effort managed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological predictions through more accurate and more frequent precipitation measurements. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) will be used to make calibrated, radiometric measurements from space at multiple microwave frequencies and polarizations. GMI will be placed on the GPM Core Spacecraft together with the Dualfrequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The DPR is two-frequency precipitation measurement radar, which will operate in the Ku-band and Ka-band of the microwave spectrum. The Core Spacecraft will make radiometric and radar measurements of clouds and precipitation and will be the central element ofGPM's space segment. The data products from GPM will provide information concerning global precipitation on a frequent, near-global basis to meteorologists and scientists making weather forecasts and performing research on the global energy and water cycle, precipitation, hydrology, and related disciplines. In addition, radiometric measurements from GMI and radar measurements from the DPR will be used together to develop a retrieval transfer standard for the purpose of calibrating precipitation retrieval algorithms. This calibration standard will establish a reference against which other retrieval algorithms using only microwave radiometers (and without the benefit of the DPR) on other satellites in the GPM constellation will be compared.

  15. Modeling and Analyzing Academic Researcher Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Huu Nguyen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper suggests a theoretical framework for analyzing the mechanism of the behavior of academic researchers whose interests are tangled and vary widely in academic factors (the intrinsic satisfaction in conducting research, the improvement in individual research ability, etc. or non-academic factors (career rewards, financial rewards, etc.. Furthermore, each researcher also has his/her different academic stances in their preferences about academic freedom and academic entrepreneurship. Understanding the behavior of academic researchers will contribute to nurture young researchers, to improve the standard of research and education as well as to boost collaboration in academia-industry. In particular, as open innovation is increasingly in need of the involvement of university researchers, to establish a successful approach to entice researchers into enterprises’ research, companies must comprehend the behavior of university researchers who have multiple complex motivations. The paper explores academic researchers' behaviors through optimizing their utility functions, i.e. the satisfaction obtained by their research outputs. This paper characterizes these outputs as the results of researchers' 3C: Competence (the ability to implement the research, Commitment (the effort to do the research, and Contribution (finding meaning in the research. Most of the previous research utilized the empirical methods to study researcher's motivation. Without adopting economic theory into the analysis, the past literature could not offer a deeper understanding of researcher's behavior. Our contribution is important both conceptually and practically because it provides the first theoretical framework to study the mechanism of researcher's behavior. Keywords: Academia-Industry, researcher behavior, ulrich model’s 3C.

  16. Marketing research model of competitive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasilya Dmitriy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To support its competitive advantages in current market conditions, each company needs to choose better ways of guaranteeing its favorable competitive position. In this regard, considerable interest lies in the structuring and algorithmization of marketing research processes that provide the information background of such choice. The article is devoted to modeling the process of marketing research of competitive environment.

  17. Modeling a Longitudinal Relational Research Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michelle D. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to propose a research-based model for a longitudinal data research system that addressed recommendations from a synthesis of literature related to: (1) needs reported by the U.S. Department of Education, (2) the twelve mandatory elements that define federally approved state longitudinal data systems (SLDS), (3) the…

  18. Improving open access to the results of USGS research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since its establishment under the Organic Act of March 3, 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been committed to classifying and characterizing 'the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.' Over time, the pursuit of this mission and understanding the products of the national domain has involved a broad scientific pursuit to understand complex Earth system processes and includes topographic, geologic, biogeographic, and other types of mapping; chemical, physical, hydrological, and biological research; and the application of computer and data science. As science and technology have evolved, classification and characterization of the Nation's natural resources has come to be embodied in digital data of various structure and form. Fundamentally, scientific publications and data produced through research and monitoring form the core of the USGS mission. They are an organizational and national treasure held and provided in trust for the American people and for the global scientific community. The recent memo from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on 'Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research' is part of an overall initiative toward open digital government that dovetails well with the USGS mission. The objectives outlined in the memo correspond directly to goals and objectives of the 2007 USGS Science Strategy ('Facing Tomorrow's Challenges--U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017') and the recently released Science Strategy Plans across all USGS Mission Areas. The USGS response to the OSTP memo involves reinforcing aspects of the USGS commitment to open and free access to scholarly publications and data along with improvements to some of the underlying technological systems that facilitate search and discovery. These actions also align with the USGS response to the Executive Order on May 9, 2013, entitled 'Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for

  19. Managing Incidental Findings and Research Results in Genomic Research Involving Biobanks & Archived Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Crock, Brittney N.; Van Ness, Brian; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Beskow, Laura M.; Cho, Mildred K.; Christman, Michael F.; Green, Robert C.; Hall, Ralph; Illes, Judy; Keane, Moira; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Kohane, Isaac S.; LeRoy, Bonnie; Maschke, Karen J.; McGeveran, William; Ossorio, Pilar; Parker, Lisa S.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Richardson, Henry S.; Scott, Joan A.; Terry, Sharon F.; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wolf, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Biobanks and archived datasets collecting samples and data have become crucial engines of genetic and genomic research. Unresolved, however, is what responsibilities biobanks should shoulder to manage incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of potential health, reproductive, or personal importance to individual contributors (using “biobank” here to refer to both collections of samples and collections of data). This paper reports recommendations from a 2-year, NIH-funded project. The authors analyze responsibilities to manage return of IFs and IRRs in a biobank research system (primary research or collection sites, the biobank itself, and secondary research sites). They suggest that biobanks shoulder significant responsibility for seeing that the biobank research system addresses the return question explicitly. When re-identification of individual contributors is possible, the biobank should work to enable the biobank research system to discharge four core responsibilities: to (1) clarify the criteria for evaluating findings and roster of returnable findings, (2) analyze a particular finding in relation to this, (3) re-identify the individual contributor, and (4) recontact the contributor to offer the finding. The authors suggest that findings that are analytically valid, reveal an established and substantial risk of a serious health condition, and that are clinically actionable should generally be offered to consenting contributors. The paper specifies 10 concrete recommendations, addressing new biobanks and biobanks already in existence. PMID:22436882

  20. Relationship Marketing results: proposition of a cognitive mapping model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iná Futino Barreto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This research sought to develop a cognitive model that expresses how marketing professionals understand the relationship between the constructs that define relationship marketing (RM. It also tried to understand, using the obtained model, how objectives in this field are achieved. Design/methodology/approach – Through cognitive mapping, we traced 35 individual mental maps, highlighting how each respondent understands the interactions between RM elements. Based on the views of these individuals, we established an aggregate mental map. Theoretical foundation – The topic is based on a literature review that explores the RM concept and its main elements. Based on this review, we listed eleven main constructs. Findings – We established an aggregate mental map that represents the RM structural model. Model analysis identified that CLV is understood as the final result of RM. We also observed that the impact of most of the RM elements on CLV is brokered by loyalty. Personalization and quality, on the other hand, proved to be process input elements, and are the ones that most strongly impact others. Finally, we highlight that elements that punish customers are much less effective than elements that benefit them. Contributions - The model was able to insert core elements of RM, but absent from most formal models: CLV and customization. The analysis allowed us to understand the interactions between the RM elements and how the end result of RM (CLV is formed. This understanding improves knowledge on the subject and helps guide, assess and correct actions.

  1. Animal models for HIV cure research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bruno Policicchio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for HIV infection will require multiple tools and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure. Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new nonhuman primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, have the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal.

  2. Leading Undergraduate Research Projects in Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we provide some useful perspectives and experiences in mentoring students in undergraduate research (UR) in mathematical modeling using differential equations. To engage students in this topic, we present a systematic approach to the creation of rich problems from real-world phenomena; present mathematical models that are derived…

  3. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policicchio, Benjamin B; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal.

  4. Identification of High Confidence Nuclear Forensics Signatures. Results of a Coordinated Research Project and Related Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The results of a Coordinated Research Project and related research on the identification of high confidence nuclear forensic isotopic, chemical and physical data characteristics, or signatures, provides information on signatures that can help identify the origin and history of nuclear and other radioactive material encountered out of regulatory control. This research report compiles findings from investigations of materials obtained from throughout the nuclear fuel cycle to include radioactive sources. The report further provides recent results used to identify, analyse in the laboratory, predict and interpret these signatures relative to the requirements of a nuclear forensics examination. The report describes some of the controls on the incorporation and persistence of these signatures in these materials as well as their potential use in a national system of identification to include a national nuclear forensics library.

  5. Deterministic operations research models and methods in linear optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rader, David J

    2013-01-01

    Uniquely blends mathematical theory and algorithm design for understanding and modeling real-world problems Optimization modeling and algorithms are key components to problem-solving across various fields of research, from operations research and mathematics to computer science and engineering. Addressing the importance of the algorithm design process. Deterministic Operations Research focuses on the design of solution methods for both continuous and discrete linear optimization problems. The result is a clear-cut resource for understanding three cornerstones of deterministic operations resear

  6. 15 CFR 734.8 - Information resulting from fundamental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... publication would compromise no proprietary information provided by the company to the researchers is not... shared broadly within the scientific community. Such research can be distinguished from proprietary... ordinarily are restricted for proprietary reasons or specific national security reasons as defined in § 734...

  7. Documentation and dissemination of agricultural Research results in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to find out the volume of documented vis a vis generated agricultural research information over a 10-year period and to identify existing avenues for disseminating generated research information to the target population. A questionnaire survey was conducted between December 1996 and February ...

  8. Cancer research in India: national priorities, global results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard; Badwe, Rajendra A; Rath, Goura K; Pramesh, C S; Shanta, V; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; D'Cruz, Anil; Sharma, Suresh C; Viswanath, Lokesh; Shet, Arun; Vijayakumar, Manavalan; Lewison, Grant; Chandy, Mammen; Kulkarni, Priyadarshini; Bardia, M R; Kumar, Shaleen; Sarin, Rajiv; Sebastian, Paul; Dhillon, Preet K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Trimble, Edward L; Aggarwal, Ajay; Vijaykumar, D K; Purushotham, Arnie D

    2014-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, cancer research in India has grown in size and impact. Clinicians, scientists, and government and state policy makers in India have championed cancer research, from studies to achieve low-tech, large-scale health outcomes to some of the most advanced areas of fundamental cancer science. In this paper, we frame public policy discussions about cancer with use of an in-depth analysis of research publications from India. Cancer research in India is a complex environment that needs to balance public policy across many competing agendas. We identify major needs across these environments such as those for increased research capacity and training and protected time for clinical researchers; for more support from states and enhanced collaborative funding programmes from government; for development of national infrastructures across a range of domains (ie, clinical trials, tissue banking, registries, etc); and for a streamlined and rational regulatory environment. We also discuss improvements that should be made to translate research into improvements in cancer outcomes and public health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing research results : highlighting state and national practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Caltrans Division of Research and Innovation is holding a peer exchange, Characteristics of : Organizations and Skill Sets of Individuals Successful at Accelerating Adoption of Innovation, March 16- : 18, 2011. To prepare for the discussions that ...

  10. Applied research in uncertainty modeling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ayyub, Bilal

    2005-01-01

    Uncertainty has been a concern to engineers, managers, and scientists for many years. For a long time uncertainty has been considered synonymous with random, stochastic, statistic, or probabilistic. Since the early sixties views on uncertainty have become more heterogeneous. In the past forty years numerous tools that model uncertainty, above and beyond statistics, have been proposed by several engineers and scientists. The tool/method to model uncertainty in a specific context should really be chosen by considering the features of the phenomenon under consideration, not independent of what is known about the system and what causes uncertainty. In this fascinating overview of the field, the authors provide broad coverage of uncertainty analysis/modeling and its application. Applied Research in Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis presents the perspectives of various researchers and practitioners on uncertainty analysis and modeling outside their own fields and domain expertise. Rather than focusing explicitly on...

  11. Nutrition communication styles of family doctors: results of quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Hiddink, G J; Koelen, M A; van Woerkum, C M J

    2005-08-01

    To assess the nutrition communication styles of Dutch family doctors and in particular to assess its psychosocial and sociodemographic correlates. A cross-sectional study in which a representative sample of 600 Dutch family doctors completed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted in October and November 2004 in the Netherlands. A total of 267 family doctors completed the questionnaire (response rate 45%). Principal component factor analyses with varimax rotation were performed to construct factors. Cronbach's alpha was used as an index of reliability. Our hypothetical model for nutrition communication style was tested using multiple regression analysis, combining the forward and backward procedures under the condition of the same results. Many family doctors felt at ease with a motivational nutrition communication style. The main predictor for motivational nutrition communication style was task perception of prevention (26%). Some individual and environmental correlates had an additional influence (explained variance 49%). Other styles showed explained variances up to 57%. The motivational style was the best predictor for actual nutrition communication behaviour (35%), while the confrontational style was the best predictor for actual nutrition communication behaviour towards overweight (34%). In contemporary busy practice, family doctors seem to rely on their predominant nutrition communication style to deal with standard situations efficiently: for the majority, this proved to be the motivational nutrition communication style. Moreover, family doctors used a combination of styles. This study suggests that family doctors behave like chameleons, by adapting their style to the specific circumstances, like context, time and patient. If family doctors communicate about nutrition in general, they select any of the five nutrition communication styles. If they communicate about overweight, they pick either the confrontational or motivational style.

  12. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesieutre, Bernard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bravo, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yinger, Robert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chassin, Dave [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Huang, Henry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Ning [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hiskens, Ian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Venkataramanan, Giri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  13. Animal models in motion sickness research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, Nancy G.

    1990-01-01

    Practical information on candidate animal models for motion sickness research and on methods used to elicit and detect motion sickness in these models is provided. Four good potential models for use in motion sickness experiments include the dog, cat, squirrel monkey, and rat. It is concluded that the appropriate use of the animal models, combined with exploitation of state-of-the-art biomedical techniques, should generate a great step forward in the understanding of motion sickness mechanisms and in the development of efficient and effective approaches to its prevention and treatment in humans.

  14. INTERINSTITUTIONAL COOPERATION: RESULTS INDICATORS OF INTERACTIONS OF VISITING RESEARCHERS IN HIGHER EDUCATION AND RESEARCH INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Baron Mussi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to define a proposition for a characterization of indicators applicable to evaluate joint research results. In order to do that, literature on interinstitutional cooperation, exchange programs and indicators was assessed, and its guidelines, adopted. Ten cases were selected for evaluation, and the following procedures undertaken: visits to receptor institutions in several cities; visits to workplace where the subjected projects were being developed; interviews with project managers and visiting researchers; interviews with other personnel; review of the approved projects' official documentation collected during the previous steps; and a new contact with the respondents to clarify eventual doubts. Theoretically, this research contributes to the development of a proposal of a set of indicators to characterize and evaluate interdisciplinary cooperation between researchers from universities and distinct research institutes. Practical contributions to be mentioned are the information gathered that can help promotion agencies to improve their supporting edicts offered to scientific and technological development, as well as upgrading their evaluation systems regarding such actions.

  15. Bibliography of clinical research in malaysia: methods and brief results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, C L; Zuhanariah, M N; Ng, C S; Goh, C C

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the methodology of this bibliography. A search was conducted on the following: (1) bibliographic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and other databases) using search terms that maximize the retrieval of Malaysian publications; (2) Individual journal search of Malaysian healthrelated journals; (3) A targeted search of Google and Google Scholar; (4) Searching of Malaysian institutional repositories; (5) Searching of Ministry of Health and Clinical Research Centre website. The publication years were limited to 2000- 2013. The citations were imported or manually entered into bibliographic software Refworks. After removing duplicates, and correcting data entry errors, PubMed's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms) were added. Clinical research is coded using the definition "patient-oriented-research or research conducted with human subjects (or on material of human origin) for which the investigator directly interacts with the human subjects at some point during the study." A bibliography of citations [n=2056] that fit the criteria of clinical research in Malaysia in selected topics within five domains was generated: Cancers [589], Cardiovascular diseases [432], Infections [795], Injuries [142], and Mental Health [582]. This is done by retrieving citations with the appropriate MESH terms, as follow: For cancers (Breast Neoplasms; Colorectal Neoplasms; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms), for cardiovascular diseases (Coronary Disease; Hypertension; Stroke), for infections (Dengue; Enterovirus Infections, HIV Infections; Malaria; Nipah Virus; Tuberculosis), for injuries (Accidents, Occupational; Accidents, Traffic; Child Abuse; Occupational Injuries), for mental health (Depression; Depressive Disorder; Depressive Disorder, Major; Drug Users; Psychotic Disorders; Suicide; Suicide, Attempted; Suicidal Ideation; Substance- Related Disorders).

  16. Research results on DH-no.13 of trial drilling excavation and its survey research. A rapid report. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    In the Tono Geoscience Center, as a part of the stratum science research, study on wide area groundwater flow was carried out since 1992 fiscal year. This study aims at development on survey and analytical technology required for elucidation of groundwater flow till underground depth and water quality and development on technique to evaluate validity on its survey and analytical results, for objective of an area with 10 km x 10 km containing the Tono mine. This report is a summary on outline of results on trial drilling excavation and various survey researches carried out at DH-no.13 hole excavated on the 13th trial drilling for the study. This hole is excavated at Hiyoshi-cho in Mizunami-city, Gifu prefecture, and has 1015.05 m in depth of its excavation. Here were reported on geological outlines, and results on trial drilling excavation and its survey research. (G.K.)

  17. Research into Learning Resulting from Quality School Library Media Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Maurice P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This annotated bibliography of 20 research reports identifies what has been determined about the effects of library media services on learning and suggests methodologies available for similar studies. Organization is according to area of learning affected--academic achievement; language, reading, and library skills; mathematics; science; social…

  18. Preliminary Results of Professional Development Program for School Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttiprom, Sura; Wuttisela, Karntarat; Phonchaiya, Sonthi; Athiwaspong, Wanwalai; Chitaree, Ratchapak; Sharma, Manjula Devi

    2016-01-01

    Teachers need to design their courses to be as similar to real-life situations as possible as genuine learning emerges in real life as opposed to studying in class. Research-based learning is an innovative approach exploring many critical strategies for success in the twenty-first century. In it, students drive their own learning through inquiry,…

  19. Guidelines for Reporting Quantitative Methods and Results in Primary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John M.; Plonsky, Luke; Ross, Steven J.; Schoonen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Adequate reporting of quantitative research about language learning involves careful consideration of the logic, rationale, and actions underlying both study designs and the ways in which data are analyzed. These guidelines, commissioned and vetted by the board of directors of "Language Learning," outline the basic expectations for…

  20. High school student physics research experience yields positive results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a small scale research project while in high school gives them the hands on experience and ultimately prepares them more for the college experience. SUNY Plattsburgh’s Physics department started a five-week summer program for high school students in 2012. This program has proved not only beneficial for students while in the program, but also as they continue on in their development as scientists/engineers. Independent research, such as that offered by SUNY Plattsburgh’s five-week summer program, offers students a feel and taste of the culture of doing research, and life as a scientist. It is a short-term, risk free way to investigate whether a career in research or a particular scientific field is a good fit.

  1. REPEAT BURGLARY VICTIMIZATION : RESULTS OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemans, E R

    2001-01-01

    This paper explores some theoretical notions about repeat burglary inctimization, and reports findings from research into repeat victimization of residential burglary in the city of Bnschede, the Nether- lands, using police records over a period of six years. The study shows that there is a highly

  2. Results of palaeomagnetic research of karst sediments in Slovenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zupan Hajna, N.; Mihevc, A.; Pruner, Petr; Bosák, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 4/6 (2008), s. 1324797-1324797 ISSN 0161-6951. [International Geological Congress /33./. 06.08.2008-14.08.2008, Oslo ] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : palaeomagnetism * magnetostratigraphy * cave sediments Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  3. Pender's health promotion model in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-09-01

    This review shows how researchers use pander's health promotion model. We included all articles in which Pender's health promotion has been used for theoretical framework. Eligible articles were selected according to review of abstracts. Search was conducted using the electronic database from 1990 to 2012. Based on our search, 74 articles with various methodologies were relevant for review. Their aims of these studies were to predict effective factors/barriers in health promotion behaviours, to detect effects of intervention programme for improving health promotion behaviours, test the model, identify quality of life and health promotion behaviour, predict stage of change in related factors that affect health promotion behaviour, prevent the events that interfere with health promotion behaviour, develop another model similar to this model, compare this model with another model, determine the relationship of variables associated to health promotion behaviours.

  4. Workshop to transfer VELMA watershed model results to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An EPA Western Ecology Division (WED) watershed modeling team has been working with the Snoqualmie Tribe Environmental and Natural Resources Department to develop VELMA watershed model simulations of the effects of historical and future restoration and land use practices on streamflow, stream temperature, and other habitat characteristics affecting threatened salmon populations in the 100 square mile Tolt River watershed in Washington state. To date, the WED group has fully calibrated the watershed model to simulate Tolt River flows with a high degree of accuracy under current and historical conditions and practices, and is in the process of simulating long-term responses to specific watershed restoration practices conducted by the Snoqualmie Tribe and partners. On July 20-21 WED Researchers Bob McKane, Allen Brookes and ORISE Fellow Jonathan Halama will be attending a workshop at the Tolt River site in Carnation, WA, to present and discuss modeling results with the Snoqualmie Tribe and other Tolt River watershed stakeholders and land managers, including the Washington Departments of Ecology and Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, City of Seattle, King County, and representatives of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. The workshop is being co-organized by the Snoqualmie Tribe, EPA Region 10 and WED. The purpose of this 2-day workshop is two-fold. First, on Day 1, the modeling team will perform its second site visit to the watershed, this time focus

  5. Combining Results of Independent Research in Tank Crewman Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-25

    perceptual testing, paper-and- - pencil tests are also the most commonly encountered (Greenstein & Hughes, 1977; Eaton, 1978; Eaton, Bessemer ...of unit personnel performance. And because perceptual paper-and- pencil tests were combined within data sets and adjusted for that process of combining...78-6). Fort Knox, Kentucky: US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 1978. Eaton, N. K., Bessemer , D. W., & Kristiansen, D

  6. Recent research work resulting in IMS building technology improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran PETROVIĆ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available IMS Building Technology is based on pre-fabricated concrete elements of the structure, assembled on-site and joined using prestressing. This construction method, developed in 1950s and implemented worldwide, is still in use. This paper describes recent improvements and the research work that initiated and enabled them, as well as on-site experiences from the process of implementation.

  7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Essential Oils - Results of Joint Research

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, Helena; Aleksovski, S.; Bocevska, M.; Stateva, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2006), s. 168-174 ISSN 1451-9372. [South East European Congress of Chemical Engineering /1./. Belgrade, 25.09.2005-28.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : solute-matrix interaction * collection efficiency * fractionation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  8. Prototype next generation frog foundation - preliminary evaluation : research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that a solid or rigid one-piece frog is preferred because it is easy to maintain. However, testing and subsequent modeling demonstrated that a flexible frog (i.e., a two-piece frog split in the flangeway) produced signifi...

  9. Milieu Models and Milieu Instruments in Market Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Diaz-Bone

    2004-05-01

    field. On the other hand, market research companies try to monopolize the milieu-instrument (i.e. to monopolize the technical knowledge for measuring and interpreting the milieus for the exclusive control of the commercialization of the milieu-model. This strategy is problematic for social science research because the loss of insight in the stages of milieu-research questions validity as a criterion for research quality. This can impede the scientific reception of advanced commercial milieu models and the results of advanced commercial milieu research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402289

  10. Review of Current Standard Model Results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk highlights results selected from the Standard Model research programme of the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider. Results using data from $p-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7,8$~TeV in LHC Run-1 as well as results using data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in LHC Run-2 are covered. The status of cross section measurements from soft QCD processes and jet production as well as photon production are presented. The presentation extends to vector boson production with associated jets. Precision measurements of the production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons, including a first measurement of the mass of the $W$ bosons, $m_W$, are discussed. The programme to measure electroweak processes with di-boson and tri-boson final states is outlined. All presented measurements are compatible with Standard Model descriptions and allow to further constrain it. In addition they allow to probe new physics which would manifest through extra gauge couplings, or Standard Model gauge couplings deviating from their predicted value.

  11. RESEARCH OF EARLY STAGES OF MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Borisovich Nikolaev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In represented article the questions of estimate of accuracy of an average integral characteristics of random process in the course of imitation modeling is considered. For the purposes of analytical treatment of initial stage of modeling a conditionally nonstationary Gaussian process is analyzed as stationary Gaussian process with boundary prehistory. A model of approximant autocorrelation function is recommended. Analytical expression for variance and mathematical expectation of average integral estimation are obtained. Statistical estimation efficiency criterion, the probability of belonging to correct parameter interval is introduced. Dependences of closeness in estimation statistics clearing interval at transient behavior are researched for various types of processes.

  12. Thermohydrogeological modelling of the Whiteshell research area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Nakka, B.W.; O'Connor, P.A.; Uphori, D.U.; Reid, J.A.K.; Scheier, N.W.; Stanchell, F.W.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents details of the modelling that was done to support the development of the simplified geosphere model (GEONET), which was used in the assessment that was presented in the Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed concept for the disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. Detailed modelling of groundwater flow, heat transport and contaminant transport through the geosphere was performed using the MOTIF finite-element computer code and the particle-tracking code TRACK3D. The GEONET model was developed using data from the Whiteshell Research Area, with a hypothetical disposal vault located at a depth of 500 m. This report first briefly describes the conceptual model and summarises the two-dimensional (2-D) simulations that were used initially to define an adequate 3-D representation of the system. The analysis showed that the configuration of major fracture zones could have a large influence on the groundwater flow patterns. These major fracture zones can have high velocities and large flows. The proximity of the radionuclide source to a major fracture zone may strongly influence the time for a radionuclide to be transported from the disposal vault to the surface. Groundwater flow was then simulated and advective/convective particle tracking was conducted in the selected 3-D representation of the system, to aid in selecting a suitable form for the simplified model to be used in the overall systems assessment with the SYVAC3-CC3 computer code. Sensitivity analyses were performed on the effects of (a) different natural geometries of part of the model domain, (b) different hydraulic properties, (c) construction, operation and closure of the vault, (d) the presence of a water supply well and (e) the presence of an open borehole. These analyses indicated that the shape of the topography and the presence of a major low-dipping fracture zone focuses groundwater passing through the vault into a discharge area that is much smaller than the area of the

  13. Models of Man in Industrial Relations Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Bruce E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Kaufman attempts to identify essential characteristics that distinguish behavioral from nonbehavioral research in industrial relations. He argues that they are distinguished by the psychological model of man that is contained in the theoretical framework used to deduce or test hypotheses. Comments from Lewin, Mincer, and Cummings with Kaufman's…

  14. Kazan archaeological school: research results and development prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuzin Fayaz Sh.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Basic stages of Kazan archaeological school development are traced from its origin, which was connected to the Society of Archaeology, History and Ethnology with Kazan University (1878 – early 1930s. The establishment of Kazan Institute of Language, Literature and History in 1939 (from 1945 as part of Kazan Branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences started the formation of Kazan archaeological school. At the beginning, its representatives worked in the sector of History, Institute of Language, Literature and History, Kazan branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences (until 1962, and then joined the sector of Archaeology and Ethnography (1962–1986. Later on, the Department of Archaeology (1986–1995 was created, subsequently (in 1995 transformed into the National Center of Archaeological Research with the Institute of History named after Sh. Marjani of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences. In July, 2013, the Institute of Archaeology named after A.Kh. Khalikov of Tatarstan Academy of Sciences was established on the basis of the Center. The archaeology of Tatarstan was developing in the framework of three basic directions: 1 entire investigation prospecting of the region aimed at creating the most exhaustive list of archaeological monuments of the Middle Volga River region; 2 stationary investigations the prehistoric and medieval sites, first of all historically known Volga Bulgaria towns, rural settlements and necropolises; 3 studies in the sphere of ethnogenesis and ethnic history, interaction between the cultures of the Turkic and Finno-Ugric peoples of the region. For the next 5 years (2014–2018 the researchers of the Institute plan to develop the following trends: I. the medieval Turkic-Tatar civilization of Eurasia; II. prehistorical archaeology of the Volga-Kama region: genesis and interaction of cultures; III. GIS technologies in archaeology; IV. natural science research methods in archaeology; V. conservation and systematization of archaeological

  15. A Systematic Literature Review of Agile Maturity Model Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Henriques

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim/Purpose: A commonly implemented software process improvement framework is the capability maturity model integrated (CMMI. Existing literature indicates higher levels of CMMI maturity could result in a loss of agility due to its organizational focus. To maintain agility, research has focussed attention on agile maturity models. The objective of this paper is to find the common research themes and conclusions in agile maturity model research. Methodology: This research adopts a systematic approach to agile maturity model research, using Google Scholar, Science Direct, and IEEE Xplore as sources. In total 531 articles were initially found matching the search criteria, which was filtered to 39 articles by applying specific exclusion criteria. Contribution:: The article highlights the trends in agile maturity model research, specifically bringing to light the lack of research providing validation of such models. Findings: Two major themes emerge, being the coexistence of agile and CMMI and the development of agile principle based maturity models. The research trend indicates an increase in agile maturity model articles, particularly in the latter half of the last decade, with concentrations of research coinciding with version updates of CMMI. While there is general consensus around higher CMMI maturity levels being incompatible with true agility, there is evidence of the two coexisting when agile is introduced into already highly matured environments. Future Research:\tFuture research direction for this topic should include how to attain higher levels of CMMI maturity using only agile methods, how governance is addressed in agile environments, and whether existing agile maturity models relate to improved project success.

  16. Sodium fires. Progress achieved in research and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.; Duverger de Cuy, G.; Casselman, C.; Charpenel, J.; Natta, M.; Devillers, C.

    1979-08-01

    This paper describes the sodium fire programs undertaken by the CEA's Nuclear Safety Department. Experimental results concerning sodium ignition and combustion, sodium fire suppression, sodium aerosol filtration and sodium-concrete contact reactions are given and the applications of these results in the Super-Phenix reactor is discussed

  17. Nanosafety practices: results from a national survey at research facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Soler, Beatriz María; López-Alonso, Mónica; Martínez-Aires, María Dolores

    2017-05-01

    The exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is a new emerging risk at work due to an increase in the number of workers potentially exposed to them and the current lack of data on their health and safety risks. This paper reports the findings of a survey designed to study the safety practices employed by workers in Spanish research facilities performing tasks involving the use of ENMs at research level. A questionnaire pretested and validated by an expert panel was sent by e-mail to the target audience. The 425 surveys completed show that most of the respondents handled up to 5 different ENMs, in suspension, in small amounts during short periods of exposure. The implementation of common hygienic practices, such as the use of protection for hands and the implementation of fume hoods, is widely indicated. The selection of the preventive and protective measures does not depend on the characteristics of ENMs handled. Also, the risks posed by ENMs are widely ignored. Besides the performance of risk assessment, hygienic monitoring and the conducting of a specific health surveillance are practically non-existent although some accidents relating to ENMs were identified. In conclusion, workers' exposure to ENMs seems to be low. Even though the best practices and preventive and protective measures reported were employed, most of the respondents could not be correctly protected. Moreover, workers do not associate the measures implemented with the nanorisks. Finally, there is a lack of proactive action underway to protect the workers, and concerns about safety are weakly evidenced.

  18. Organic Eprints – Helping research results go to work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ilse Ankjær; Jensen, Allan Leck; Willer, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Ninety certified organic pineapple producers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire in Luwero and Kayung districts in Uganda. Data was analysed using statistical package for Social Scientists (SPSS). Results indicated that most organic farmers (81.1%) kept mostly cattle in combina......Ninety certified organic pineapple producers were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire in Luwero and Kayung districts in Uganda. Data was analysed using statistical package for Social Scientists (SPSS). Results indicated that most organic farmers (81.1%) kept mostly cattle...

  19. Business model in research-development activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszałka Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The partners and allies of business practice in the processes of modernization of the economy are scientific-research institutions, such as scientific institutes, research-development units and universities. A market on which companies can look for the solutions they need and scientific-research institutions can look for inspiration, partners and capital is being formed. The market provides conditions for operation, development and implementation of developed solutions. Taking into consideration the complexity of market, technical, legal, financial, or intellectual property protection issues, research-development units are more and more frequently unable to function efficiently without a clear and unequivocal definition of goals, methods and conditions of activity. Their market offer has to take into consideration not just scientific-research, or methodological aspects. Taking into consideration continuously growing demands of the clients and pressure of the competition, scientific-research institutions have to pay attention also to market, information, personnel, or financial aspects typical of strictly commercial ventures. What may support a comprehensive preparation and implementation of scientific-research activities under market conditions are tools successfully used in trade and economy, such as business models. These issues are the basis of deliberations contained in this work.

  20. Valorizing Research Results and Innovations in Burkina Faso ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    However, these results are little known, underutilized and undervalued. This situation unfavorable to national development can be explained by numerous obstacles, notably: institutional weakness, gaps in the legal framework, lack of communication between actors, unfavorable attitudes, financial insufficiency, and lack of ...

  1. Technical Teachers and Technical Teacher Education - Research Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dobrovská

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Chartered engineers who are new teachers of technical subjects at various educational institutions receive technical teacher education in the accredited bachelor programme at the Czech Technical University in Prague. This paper presents the results of a recent survey in which engineers expressed their opinions on technical teacher education.

  2. Alternative test models for skin aging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Motoki; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean; Morita, Akimichi

    2018-02-25

    Increasing ethical concerns regarding animal experimentation have led to the development of various alternative methods based on the 3Rs (Refinement, Reduction, and Replacement), first described by Russell and Burch in 1959. Cosmetic and skin aging research are particularly susceptible to concerns related to animal testing. In addition to animal welfare reasons, there are scientific and economic reasons to reduce and avoid animal experiments. Importantly, animal experiments may not reflect findings in humans mainly because of the differences of architectures and immune responses between animal skin and human skin. Here we review the shift from animal testing to the development and application of alternative non-animal based methods and the necessity and benefits of this shift. Some specific alternatives to animal models are discussed, including biochemical approaches, two-dimensional and three-dimensional cell cultures, and volunteer studies, as well as future directions, including genome-based research and the development of in silico computer simulations of skin models. Among the in vitro methods, three-dimensional reconstructed skin models are highly popular and useful alternatives to animal models however still have many limitations. With careful selection and skillful handling, these alternative methods will become indispensable for modern dermatology and skin aging research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Rodent Models for Metabolic Syndrome Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Panchal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodents are widely used to mimic human diseases to improve understanding of the causes and progression of disease symptoms and to test potential therapeutic interventions. Chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes and hypertension, together known as the metabolic syndrome, are causing increasing morbidity and mortality. To control these diseases, research in rodent models that closely mimic the changes in humans is essential. This review will examine the adequacy of the many rodent models of metabolic syndrome to mimic the causes and progression of the disease in humans. The primary criterion will be whether a rodent model initiates all of the signs, especially obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dysfunction of the heart, blood vessels, liver and kidney, primarily by diet since these are the diet-induced signs in humans with metabolic syndrome. We conclude that the model that comes closest to fulfilling this criterion is the high carbohydrate, high fat-fed male rodent.

  4. Synthesis on research results of FGD gypsum briquetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosturkiewicz Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available FGD gypsum products can be characterized by significant solubility in water and dusting in dry state. These characteristics can cause a considerable pollution of air, water and soil. Among many approaches of preparing utilization of this waste, the process of compaction using briquetting has proved to be very effective. Using FGD gypsum products a new material of fertilizers characteristics has been acquired and this material is resistant to the conditions of transportation. This paper presents results of experimental briquetting of flue gas desulphurisation products in a roll press. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory roll presses LPW 450 and LPW 1100 equipped with two interchangeable forming rings that form material into saddle-shaped briquettes with volume 6,5 cm3 and 85 cm3. The experiments were conducted with various percentage amounts of FGD gypsum moisture. The results provided information regarding influence of moisture and roll press configuration on quality of briquettes. On the basis of obtained results, technological process and a general outline of technological line for FGD gypsum were developed. Two roll presses of own construction with different outputs were identified as appropriate for this purpose. A range of necessary works related to their adaptation for the FGD gypsum briquetting were pointed out.

  5. Structural dialectical approach in psychology: problems and research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veraksa, Nikolay E.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article dialectical thinking is regarded as one of the central cognitive processes. Because of this cognitive function we can analyze the development of processes and objects. It also determines the possibilities for the creative transformation of some content and for solving problems. The article presents a description and the results of experimental studies. This evidence proves that dialectical thinking is a specific line of cognitive development in children and adults. This line can degrade during school time if the educational program follows formal logical principles, or it can become significantly stronger if the pedagogy is based on dialectical methodology.

  6. Radiation budget measurement/model interface research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NIMBUS 6 data were analyzed to form an up to date climatology of the Earth radiation budget as a basis for numerical model definition studies. Global maps depicting infrared emitted flux, net flux and albedo from processed NIMBUS 6 data for July, 1977, are presented. Zonal averages of net radiation flux for April, May, and June and zonal mean emitted flux and net flux for the December to January period are also presented. The development of two models is reported. The first is a statistical dynamical model with vertical and horizontal resolution. The second model is a two level global linear balance model. The results of time integration of the model up to 120 days, to simulate the January circulation, are discussed. Average zonal wind, meridonal wind component, vertical velocity, and moisture budget are among the parameters addressed.

  7. Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Alberg Østergaard, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This editorial introduces the seventh volume of the International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management. The volume presents part of the outcome of the project Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis (ENSYMORA) funded by the Danish Innovation Fund. The project carried out...... by 11 university and industry partners has improved the basis for decision-making within energy planning and energy scenario making by providing new and improved tools and methods for energy systems analyses....

  8. FORMATIVE AND REFLECTIVE MODELS IN MARKETING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ioana CIOBANU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Compliance with the construct validity criteria is necessary for the correct assessment of the research in terms of quality and for further development of the marketing models. The identification of formative and reflective constructs as well as the correct testing of their validity and reliability are important methodological steps for marketing research as described in this article. The first part defines the reflective and the formative constructs and highlighst their particularities by analysing the theoretical criteria that differentiate them. In the second part of the study aspects of validity and trust for the formative and reflective constructs are presented as well as some empirical considerations from research literature regarding their measurement.

  9. Medieval horse stable; the results of multi proxy interdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejmal, Miroslav; Lisá, Lenka; Fišáková Nývltová, Miriam; Bajer, Aleš; Petr, Libor; Kočár, Petr; Kočárová, Romana; Nejman, Ladislav; Rybníček, Michal; Sůvová, Zdenka; Culp, Randy; Vavrčík, Hanuš

    2014-01-01

    A multi proxy approach was applied in the reconstruction of the architecture of Medieval horse stable architecture, the maintenance practices associated with that structure as well as horse alimentation at the beginning of 13th century in Central Europe. Finally, an interpretation of the local vegetation structure along Morava River, Czech Republic is presented. The investigated stable experienced two construction phases. The infill was well preserved and its composition reflects maintenance practices. The uppermost part of the infill was composed of fresh stabling, which accumulated within a few months at the end of summer. Horses from different backgrounds were kept in the stable and this is reflected in the results of isotope analyses. Horses were fed meadow grasses as well as woody vegetation, millet, oat, and less commonly hemp, wheat and rye. Three possible explanations of stable usage are suggested. The stable was probably used on a temporary basis for horses of workers employed at the castle, courier horses and horses used in battle.

  10. Medieval Horse Stable; The Results of Multi Proxy Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejmal, Miroslav; Lisá, Lenka; Fišáková Nývltová, Miriam; Bajer, Aleš; Petr, Libor; Kočár, Petr; Kočárová, Romana; Nejman, Ladislav; Rybníček, Michal; Sůvová, Zdenka; Culp, Randy; Vavrčík, Hanuš

    2014-01-01

    A multi proxy approach was applied in the reconstruction of the architecture of Medieval horse stable architecture, the maintenance practices associated with that structure as well as horse alimentation at the beginning of 13th century in Central Europe. Finally, an interpretation of the local vegetation structure along Morava River, Czech Republic is presented. The investigated stable experienced two construction phases. The infill was well preserved and its composition reflects maintenance practices. The uppermost part of the infill was composed of fresh stabling, which accumulated within a few months at the end of summer. Horses from different backgrounds were kept in the stable and this is reflected in the results of isotope analyses. Horses were fed meadow grasses as well as woody vegetation, millet, oat, and less commonly hemp, wheat and rye. Three possible explanations of stable usage are suggested. The stable was probably used on a temporary basis for horses of workers employed at the castle, courier horses and horses used in battle. PMID:24670874

  11. Medieval horse stable; the results of multi proxy interdisciplinary research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Dejmal

    Full Text Available A multi proxy approach was applied in the reconstruction of the architecture of Medieval horse stable architecture, the maintenance practices associated with that structure as well as horse alimentation at the beginning of 13th century in Central Europe. Finally, an interpretation of the local vegetation structure along Morava River, Czech Republic is presented. The investigated stable experienced two construction phases. The infill was well preserved and its composition reflects maintenance practices. The uppermost part of the infill was composed of fresh stabling, which accumulated within a few months at the end of summer. Horses from different backgrounds were kept in the stable and this is reflected in the results of isotope analyses. Horses were fed meadow grasses as well as woody vegetation, millet, oat, and less commonly hemp, wheat and rye. Three possible explanations of stable usage are suggested. The stable was probably used on a temporary basis for horses of workers employed at the castle, courier horses and horses used in battle.

  12. Plan to increase public access to the results of Federally-funded scientific research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-16

    This plan is issued in response to the February 22, 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies entitled Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Researc...

  13. STC synthesis of research results for water quality management at construction sites : research project capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The RAC Region II has initiated a collaborative research program consortium through the : Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) Program. The research program is called the Southeast : Transportation Consortium (STC) and is intended to encourage coordinati...

  14. STC Synthesis of Best Practices for Determining Value of Research Results : Research Project Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The RAC Region II has initiated a collaborative research program consortium : through the Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) Program. The research program : is called the Southeast Transportation Consortium (STC) and is intended to : encourage coordina...

  15. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: Comparison of model to human participant results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, G. C.; Weschler, Charles J.; Beko, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. The model predictions are consistent...

  16. Online citizen panels as an advance in research and consultation – A Review of pilot results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Sharp

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper details a new model for local government consultation and research. The model involves a local government partnering with a university to establish an online panel of citizens that is then used for consultations and research on a range of local government issues over time. The model was evaluated across an 18-month pilot involving three metropolitan councils in South Australia, each running its own panel. This paper details the rationale behind the panels, steps involved in their establishment, and what the most effective recruitment methods were to build panel membership. The model’s ability to recruit a wide audience of citizens as members, including those who would not normally participate in local government matters, is examined, as well as citizen expectations of the panel and satisfaction with being a member. Finally, key learnings from the pilot are identified. The pilot results demonstrate that such an online panel model can be used effectively in the local government context. The panels achieved citizen membership wider than that historically seen in local government consultation and research, and were sustainable in terms of continued participation and high levels of citizen satisfaction. Since the pilot, the project has grown to include seven councils and almost 2500 citizens. This is further evidence that this model offers a way forward for enhanced citizen participation in local government decision-making and policy development.

  17. A Conceptual Culture Model for Design Science Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Richter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of design science research (DSR in information systems is the user-centred creation of IT-artifacts with regard to specific social environments. For culture research in the field, which is necessary for a proper localization of IT-artifacts, models and research approaches from social sciences usually are adopted. Descriptive dimension-based culture models most commonly are applied for this purpose, which assume culture being a national phenomenon and tend to reduce it to basic values. Such models are useful for investigations in behavioural culture research because it aims to isolate, describe and explain culture-specific attitudes and characteristics within a selected society. In contrast, with the necessity to deduce concrete decisions for artifact-design, research results from DSR need to go beyond this aim. As hypothesis, this contribution generally questions the applicability of such generic culture dimensions’ models for DSR and focuses on their theoretical foundation, which goes back to Hofstede’s conceptual Onion Model of Culture. The herein applied literature-based analysis confirms the hypothesis. Consequently, an alternative conceptual culture model is being introduced and discussed as theoretical foundation for culture research in DSR.

  18. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Samuel J; Thomas, Gareth J

    2017-08-01

    Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of 'non-animal human tissue' models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Human tissue models in cancer research: looking beyond the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Jackson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse models, including patient-derived xenograft mice, are widely used to address questions in cancer research. However, there are documented flaws in these models that can result in the misrepresentation of human tumour biology and limit the suitability of the model for translational research. A coordinated effort to promote the more widespread development and use of ‘non-animal human tissue’ models could provide a clinically relevant platform for many cancer studies, maximising the opportunities presented by human tissue resources such as biobanks. A number of key factors limit the wide adoption of non-animal human tissue models in cancer research, including deficiencies in the infrastructure and the technical tools required to collect, transport, store and maintain human tissue for lab use. Another obstacle is the long-standing cultural reliance on animal models, which can make researchers resistant to change, often because of concerns about historical data compatibility and losing ground in a competitive environment while new approaches are embedded in lab practice. There are a wide range of initiatives that aim to address these issues by facilitating data sharing and promoting collaborations between organisations and researchers who work with human tissue. The importance of coordinating biobanks and introducing quality standards is gaining momentum. There is an exciting opportunity to transform cancer drug discovery by optimising the use of human tissue and reducing the reliance on potentially less predictive animal models.

  20. Results of investigations of an 0.010-scale 140A/B configuration (model 72-OTS) of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter in the NASA/Langley Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozzi, M. T.; Milam, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Langley unitary plan wind tunnel on a sting mounted 0.010-scale outer mold line model of the 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International Space Shuttle Vehicle. The primary test objectives were to obtain: (1) six component force and moment data for the mated vehicle at subsonic and transonic conditions, (2) effects of configuration build-up, (3) effects of protuberances, ET/orbiter fairings and attach structures, and (4) elevon deflection effects on wing bending moment. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data and base and balance cavity pressures were recorded over Mach numbers of 1.6, 2.0, 2.5, 2.86, 3.9, and 4.63 at a nominal Reynolds number of 20 to the 6th power per foot. Selected configurations were tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -10 deg to +10 deg. For all configurations involving the orbiter, wing bending, and torsion coefficients were measured on the right wing.

  1. Bridging Research, Practice, and Policy: The "Evidence Academy" Conference Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohweder, Catherine L; Laping, Jane L; Diehl, Sandra J; Moore, Alexis A; Isler, Malika Roman; Scott, Jennifer Elissa; Enga, Zoe Kaori; Black, Molly C; Dave, Gaurav; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Melvin, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Innovative models to facilitate more rapid uptake of research findings into practice are urgently needed. Community members who engage in research can accelerate this process by acting as adoption agents. We implemented an Evidence Academy conference model bringing together researchers, health care professionals, advocates, and policy makers across North Carolina to discuss high-impact, life-saving study results. The overall goal is to develop dissemination and implementation strategies for translating evidence into practice and policy. Each 1-day, single-theme, regional meeting focuses on a leading community-identified health priority. The model capitalizes on the power of diverse local networks to encourage broad, common awareness of new research findings. Furthermore, it emphasizes critical reflection and active group discussion on how to incorporate new evidence within and across organizations, health care systems, and communities. During the concluding session, participants are asked to articulate action plans relevant to their individual interests, work setting, or area of expertise.

  2. The Global Research Race: New Models of Research Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, William H.

    1989-01-01

    National technology development initiatives in Japan and Europe are playing an increasingly important role in many fields of research. Such heightened international activity suggests a need for a more global perspective on research administration, and raises many questions for the United States' research community and science and technology…

  3. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  4. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  5. NASA Enterprise Architecture and Its Use in Transition of Research Results to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbie, T. E.; Hall, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    Enterprise architecture describes the design of the components of an enterprise, their relationships and how they support the objectives of that enterprise. NASA Stennis Space Center leads several projects involving enterprise architecture tools used to gather information on research assets within NASA's Earth Science Division. In the near future, enterprise architecture tools will link and display the relevant requirements, parameters, observatories, models, decision systems, and benefit/impact information relationships and map to the Federal Enterprise Architecture Reference Models. Components configured within the enterprise architecture serving the NASA Applied Sciences Program include the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool. The Earth Science Components Knowledge Base systematically catalogues NASA missions, sensors, models, data products, model products, and network partners appropriate for consideration in NASA Earth Science applications projects. The Systems Components database is a centralized information warehouse of NASA's Earth Science research assets and a critical first link in the implementation of enterprise architecture. The Earth Science Architecture Tool is used to analyze potential NASA candidate systems that may be beneficial to decision-making capabilities of other Federal agencies. Use of the current configuration of NASA enterprise architecture (the Earth Science Components Knowledge Base, the Systems Components database, and the Earth Science Architecture Tool) has far exceeded its original intent and has tremendous potential for the transition of research results to operational entities.

  6. 28 CFR 512.20 - Publication of results of research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... project. 512.20 Section 512.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.20 Publication of results of research project. (a) A researcher may publish in book form and professional journals the results of any research project conducted...

  7. Verification of aseismic design model by using experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Sugiyama, N.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, Y.; Miura, K.; Miyagawa, N.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice model is applied as an analysis model for an aseismic design of the Hamaoka nuclear reactor building. With object to verify an availability of this design model, two reinforced concrete blocks are constructed on the ground and the forced vibration tests are carried out. The test results are well followed by simulation analysis using the lattice model. Damping value of the ground obtained from the test is more conservative than the design value. (orig.)

  8. Research on the model of home networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  9. Using Remote Sensing Data and Research Results for Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Maury; Luvall, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides information on the characteristics of the urban heat island, research designed to provide the data needed to develop effective urban heat island reduction strategies, and the development of local working groups to develop implementation plans. As background, an overview of research results on the urban heat island phenomenon and the resultant effect on energy usage and air quality will be explored. The use of more reflective roofing materials, paving materials, tree planting, and other initiatives will be explored as a basis for strategies to mitigate urban heat islands and improve the urban environment. Current efforts to use aircraft remote sensing data in Atlanta, Baton Rouge, Sacramento, and Salt Lake City and our work with non-profit organizations designated to lead public education and strategic development efforts will be presented. Efforts to organize working groups comprised of key stakeholders, the process followed in communicating research results, and methodology for soliciting feedback and incorporating ideas into local plans, policies and decision-making will be discussed. Challenges in developing and transferring data products and research results to stakeholders will be presented. It is our ultimate goal that such efforts be integrated into plans and/or decision models that encourage sustainable development.

  10. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the Nuclear Medicine Research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In May 1987, OHER management requested the Office of Program Analysis (OPA) to conduct a peer review of the projects of the DOE Nuclear Medicine Research program. This was done using procedures and a quantitative methodology OPA developed for assessing DOE research programs. Sixty-three individual nuclear medicine projects were reviewed by seven panels; one panel on isotopes and radioisotopes, three on radiopharmacology, two on clinical feasibility, and one on instrumentation. Each panel consisted of five to ten knowledgeable reviewers. 5 figs

  11. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  12. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  13. Research on Model of Student Engagement in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, online learning refers students under the guidance of teachers through the online learning platform for organized learning. Based on the analysis of related research results, considering the existing problems, the main contents of this paper include the following aspects: (1) Analyze and study the current student engagement model.…

  14. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  15. Analytical results for the Sznajd model of opinion formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slanina, František; Lavička, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, - (2003), s. 279-288 ISSN 1434-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/1091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : agent models * sociophysics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.457, year: 2003

  16. Development of Rail Temperature Prediction Model : Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Preventing track buckling is important to the railroad industry's goal of operational safety. It is a common practice for railroads to impose slow orders during hot weather when the risk of track buckling is high. Numerous factors affect track buckli...

  17. Research on an innovative design model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Y.; Fang, H.

    2018-03-01

    The design methods of furniture are different from east to west; it has been the hotspot of the scholars. However, in terms of the theory of modern design innovation, neither the early creation theory, the modern design theory, nor the widely applied TRIZ theory can fully fit the modern furniture design innovation, so it is urgent to study the modern furniture design theory. This paper is based on the idea of TRIZ theory, using lots of literatures as data, and uses the method of statistical stratification to analyze and sort out the research of modern sitting equipment, and finally put forward the modern furniture design model, which provides new ideas and perspectives for the modern design of Chinese furniture.

  18. Results of the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, MISMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of marine ice-sheet behaviour require models that are able to robustly simulate grounding line migration. We present results of an intercomparison exercise for marine ice-sheet models. Verification is effected by comparison with approximate analytical solutions for flux across the grounding line using simplified geometrical configurations (no lateral variations, no effects of lateral buttressing. Unique steady state grounding line positions exist for ice sheets on a downward sloping bed, while hysteresis occurs across an overdeepened bed, and stable steady state grounding line positions only occur on the downward-sloping sections. Models based on the shallow ice approximation, which does not resolve extensional stresses, do not reproduce the approximate analytical results unless appropriate parameterizations for ice flux are imposed at the grounding line. For extensional-stress resolving "shelfy stream" models, differences between model results were mainly due to the choice of spatial discretization. Moving grid methods were found to be the most accurate at capturing grounding line evolution, since they track the grounding line explicitly. Adaptive mesh refinement can further improve accuracy, including fixed grid models that generally perform poorly at coarse resolution. Fixed grid models, with nested grid representations of the grounding line, are able to generate accurate steady state positions, but can be inaccurate over transients. Only one full-Stokes model was included in the intercomparison, and consequently the accuracy of shelfy stream models as approximations of full-Stokes models remains to be determined in detail, especially during transients.

  19. Towards a common provenance model for research publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L.; Ma, X.; West, P.; Beaulieu, S. E.; Di Stefano, M.; Fox, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Provenance is information about entities, activities, and people involved in producing a piece of data or thing, which can be used to form assessments about its quality, reliability or trustworthiness. In a research publication, provenance includes entities, activities and people involved in the process leading to the parts of the publication such as figures, tables, paragraphs etc. Such information is often desirable for the readers to correctly interpret publication content and enables them to evaluate the credibility of the reported results by digging into the software in use, source data and responsible agents or even reproducing the results themselves. In this presentation, we will describe our ontology designed to model the preparing process of research publications based on our experience from two projects, both focusing on provenance capturing for research publications. The first project is about capturing provenance information for a National Climate Assessment (NCA) report of the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), and the second about capturing provenance information for an Ecosystem Status Report (ESR) of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC). Both projects base their provenance modeling on the W3C Provenance ontology (PROV-O), which proves to be an effective way to create models for provenance capturing. We will illustrate the commonalities and differences between use cases of these two projects and how we derive a common model from models specifically designed to capture provenance information for each of the projects.

  20. Results on the symmetries of integrable fermionic models on chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolcini, F.; Montorsi, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate integrable fermionic models within the scheme of the graded quantum inverse scattering method, and prove that any symmetry imposed on the solution of the Yang-Baxter equation reflects on the constants of motion of the model; generalizations with respect to known results are discussed. This theorem is shown to be very effective when combined with the polynomial R-matrix technique (PRT): we apply both of them to the study of the extended Hubbard models, for which we find all the subcases enjoying several kinds of (super)symmetries. In particular, we derive a geometrical construction expressing any gl(2,1)-invariant model as a linear combination of EKS and U-supersymmetric models. Further, we use the PRT to obtain 32 integrable so(4)-invariant models. By joint use of the Sutherland's species technique and η-pairs construction we propose a general method to derive their physical features, and we provide some explicit results

  1. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  2. Research plan and preliminary results - A field research site for emerging contaminants in Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoebelen, Douglas J.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Barber, Larry B.; Furlong, Edward T.; Meyer, Michael; Skopec, M.

    2006-01-01

    Research has recently documented the prevalence of a wide variety of pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants (ECs) in streams across the United States. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been found to be an important source and collection point of ECs to streams as many ECs are incompletely removed during treatment. To investigate the complex in-stream processes (e.g., dilution, sorption, degradation, dispersion, etc.) that can affect ECs following their input from a WWTP and determining if such input is having an effect on the aquatic ecosystem requires the integration of multi-disciplinary efforts at a carefully selected field site. Preliminary work has identified an 8-km reach of Fourmile Creek in central Iowa as an ideal research site to investigate such important research questions pertaining to ECs. Unique aspects of Fourmile Creek included: (1) it single source effluent-dominated stream, (2) background data document the input of a wide variety of ECs from WWTP discharge, (3) small basin size, (4) relatively simple flow system, (5) background data suggest that undefined processes are taking place decreasing the level of select ECs during stream transport, (6) the WWTP uses a treatment technology (activated sludge) typical of many towns in Iowa and the United States (7) a hydrogeologic setting of a low-gradient, small stream (average discharge less than 1.41 m³/s) in glacial drift is typical of many areas in Iowa and across the Midwest, and (8) the existence of a low-head clam approximately 2 km upstream of the WWTP outfall allowing more accurate "above WWTP" and "below WWTP" comparisons in aquatic ecosystems. Furthermore, the WWTP is scheduled to close by 2011 providing a unique opportunity to determine how stream hydrology, water chemistry and aquatic biota react to the removal of the primary source of flow and ECs in this system. This will allow a novel "before" and "after" assessment not previously available in EC research. Research to date

  3. Are invertebrates relevant models in ageing research?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    is an evolutionary conserved key protein kinase in the TOR pathway that regulates growth, proliferation and cell metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and stress. Comparing the ageing process in invertebrate model organisms with relatively short lifespan with mammals provides valuable information about...... the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process faster than mammal systems. Inhibition of the TOR pathway activity via either genetic manipulation or rapamycin increases lifespan profoundly in most invertebrate model organisms. This contribution will review the recent findings in invertebrates concerning...... the TOR pathway and effects of TOR inhibition by rapamycin on lifespan. Besides some contradictory results, the majority points out that rapamycin induces longevity. This suggests that administration of rapamycin in invertebrates is a promising tool for pursuing the scientific puzzle of lifespan...

  4. Critical infrastructure protection research results of the first critical infrastructure protection research project in Hungary

    CERN Document Server

    Padányi, József

    2016-01-01

    This book presents recent research in the recognition of vulnerabilities of national systems and assets which gained special attention for the Critical Infrastructures in the last two decades. The book concentrates on R&D activities in the relation of Critical Infrastructures focusing on enhancing the performance of services as well as the level of security. The objectives of the book are based on a project entitled "Critical Infrastructure Protection Researches" (TÁMOP-4.2.1.B-11/2/KMR-2011-0001) which concentrated on innovative UAV solutions, robotics, cybersecurity, surface engineering, and mechatrinics and technologies providing safe operations of essential assets. This report is summarizing the methodologies and efforts taken to fulfill the goals defined. The project has been performed by the consortium of the Óbuda University and the National University of Public Service.

  5. Modeling good research practices--overview: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force--1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, J Jaime; Briggs, Andrew H; Siebert, Uwe; Kuntz, Karen M

    2012-01-01

    Models--mathematical frameworks that facilitate estimation of the consequences of health care decisions--have become essential tools for health technology assessment. Evolution of the methods since the first ISPOR Modeling Task Force reported in 2003 has led to a new Task Force, jointly convened with the Society for Medical Decision Making, and this series of seven articles presents the updated recommendations for best practices in conceptualizing models; implementing state-transition approaches, discrete event simulations, or dynamic transmission models; and dealing with uncertainty and validating and reporting models transparently. This overview article introduces the work of the Task Force, provides all the recommendations, and discusses some quandaries that require further elucidation. The audience for these articles includes those who build models, stakeholders who utilize their results, and, indeed, anyone concerned with the use of models to support decision making. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Legacy model integration for enhancing hydrologic interdisciplinary research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, A.; Arabi, M.; David, O.

    2013-12-01

    implementation of the message passing interface (MPI), which includes FORTRAN, C, Java, the .NET languages, Python, R, Matlab, and many others. The system is tested on a longstanding legacy hydrologic model, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), to observe and enhance speed-up capabilities for various optimization, parameter estimation, and model uncertainty characterization techniques, which is particularly important for computationally intensive hydrologic simulations. Initial results indicate that the legacy extension system significantly decreases developer time, computation time, and the cost of purchasing commercial parallel processing licenses, while enhancing interdisciplinary research by providing detailed two-way feedback mechanisms between various process models with minimal changes to legacy code.

  7. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy by national organizations, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956. Since then, many valuable results of research have been produced in the diverse fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation, medicine and others, in this way, the test and research have played large roles in the promotion of the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. This is the 23rd report, in which the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out in fiscal year 1982 by national organizations are summarized. 5 researches on nuclear fusion, 12 researches on engineering safety, 5 researches on environmental radioactivity safety, 3 researches on food irradiation, 5 researches on the countermeasures to cancer, 8 researches on soil fertilization, 4 researches on quality improvement, 7 researches on crop protection, 5 researches on the improvement of breeding, 8 researches on diagnosis and treatment, 8 researches on pharmaceuticals, 10 researches on the application to pathology, 6 researches on mining and industry, 6 researches on power reactors and nuclear ships, 1 research on underground water, 6 researches on activation analysis and 3 researches on injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Recent advances in animal model experimentation in autism research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tania, Mousumi; Khan, Md Asaduzzaman; Xia, Kun

    2014-10-01

    Autism, a lifelong neuro-developmental disorder is a uniquely human condition. Animal models are not the perfect tools for the full understanding of human development and behavior, but they can be an important place to start. This review focused on the recent updates of animal model research in autism. We have reviewed the publications over the last three decades, which are related to animal model study in autism. Animal models are important because they allow researchers to study the underlying neurobiology in a way that is not possible in humans. Improving the availability of better animal models will help the field to increase the development of medicines that can relieve disabling symptoms. Results from the therapeutic approaches are encouraging remarkably, since some behavioral alterations could be reversed even when treatment was performed on adult mice. Finding an animal model system with similar behavioral tendencies as humans is thus vital for understanding the brain mechanisms, supporting social motivation and attention, and the manner in which these mechanisms break down in autism. The ongoing studies should therefore increase the understanding of the biological alterations associated with autism as well as the development of knowledge-based treatments therapy for those struggling with autism. In this review, we have presented recent advances in research based on animal models of autism, raising hope for understanding the disease biology for potential therapeutic intervention to improve the quality of life of autism individuals.

  9. Solar activity variations of ionosonde measurements and modeling results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altadill, D.; Arrazola, D.; Blanch, E.; Burešová, Dalia

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2008), s. 610-616 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506 Grant - others:MCYT(ES) REN2003-08376-C02-02; CSIC(XE) 2004CZ0002; AGAUR(XE) 2006BE00112; AF Research Laboratory(XE) FA8718-L-0072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mid-latitude ionosphere * bottomside modeling * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2008 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02731177

  10. Sensitivity-based research prioritization through stochastic characterization modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wender, Ben A.; Prado-Lopez, Valentina; Fantke, Peter

    2018-01-01

    to guide research efforts in data refinement and design of experiments for existing and emerging chemicals alike. This study presents a sensitivity-based approach for estimating toxicity characterization factors given high input data uncertainty and using the results to prioritize data collection according......Product developers using life cycle toxicity characterization models to understand the potential impacts of chemical emissions face serious challenges related to large data demands and high input data uncertainty. This motivates greater focus on model sensitivity toward input parameter variability...... to parameter influence on characterization factors (CFs). Proof of concept is illustrated with the UNEP-SETAC scientific consensus model USEtox....

  11. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the report of the results of research carried out by the common utilization of the reactor 'Yayoi' and an electron accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory in fiscal year 1989. In fiscal year 1989, the research themes using the reactor Yayoi or related to it were 15, and those using the linear accelerator reached 12, thus the common utilization attracted the strong interest of users. The Yayoi has been operated satisfactorily without trouble. The results of the research carried out by the common utilization of the Yayoi and a linac and the reports of 12 Yayoi research meetings in fiscal year 1989 are collected. (J.P.N.)

  12. Research Project Control System (RPCS); research results utilization data as of 06/30/81. Status summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The report on 'Research Results Utilization' provides status and control information concerning the utilization of research results in the regulatory policies and practices of the NRC. Research Information Letters (RILs) are prepared by RES to transmit research results to NRC user offices upon completion of a substantial, coherent and reasonably complete body of experimental and/or analytical research work. Section 3.0 of this report lists the RILs issued to date, together with an identification of the research program manager and the research program element which generated the RIL. The potential applicability of each RIL to the regulatory process is also identified, and comments from the cognizant RES and user office staff are summarized which relate to the expected impact of the reported RILs on the regulatory process

  13. Voluntary research results for five years along the master plan on nuclear safety research. FY 2001 - 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshinori

    2006-05-01

    Safety Research has been conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency which took over former Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. This report shows the voluntary research results for five years conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005). (author)

  14. Complexity and agent-based modelling in urban research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian

    Urbanisation processes are results of a broad variety of actors or actor groups and their behaviour and decisions based on different experiences, knowledge, resources, values etc. The decisions done are often on a micro/individual level but resulting in macro/collective behaviour. In urban research...... influence on the bigger system. Traditional scientific methods or theories often tried to simplify, not accounting complex relations of actors and decision-making. The introduction of computers in simulation made new approaches in modelling, as for example agent-based modelling (ABM), possible, dealing...... is (still) seen very critical regarding its usefulness and explanatory power....

  15. Research on the Intensity Analysis and Result Visualization of Construction Land in Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Dong, B.; Li, J.; Li, L.

    2017-09-01

    As a fundamental work of urban planning, the intensity analysis of construction land involves many repetitive data processing works that are prone to cause errors or data precision loss, and the lack of efficient methods and tools to visualizing the analysis results in current urban planning. In the research a portable tool is developed by using the Model Builder technique embedded in ArcGIS to provide automatic data processing and rapid result visualization for the works. A series of basic modules provided by ArcGIS are linked together to shape a whole data processing chain in the tool. Once the required data is imported, the analysis results and related maps and graphs including the intensity values and zoning map, the skyline analysis map etc. are produced automatically. Finally the tool is installation-free and can be dispatched quickly between planning teams.

  16. Animal models of pancreatic cancer for drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapischke, Matthias; Pries, Alexandra

    2008-10-01

    The operative and conservative results of therapy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remain appallingly poor. This underlines the demand for further research for effective anticancer drugs. The various animal models remain the essential method for the determination of efficacy of substances during preclinical phase. Unfortunately, most of these tested substances showed a good efficacy in pancreatic carcinoma in the animal model but were not confirmed during the clinical phase. The available literature in PubMed, Medline, Ovid and secondary literature was searched regarding the available animal models for drug testing against pancreatic cancer. The models were analyzed regarding their pros and cons in anticancer drug testing. The different modifications of the orthotopic model (especially in mice) seem at present to be the best model for anticancer testing in pancreatic carcinoma. The value of genetically engineered animal model (GEM) and syngeneic models is on debate. A good selection of the model concerning the questions supposed to be clarified may improve the comparability of the results of animal experiments compared to clinical trials.

  17. A biobank management model applicable to biomedical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patenaude Johane

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work of Research Ethics Boards (REBs, especially when involving genetics research and biobanks, has become more challenging with the growth of biotechnology and biomedical research. Some REBs have even rejected research projects where the use of a biobank with coded samples was an integral part of the study, the greatest fear being the lack of participant protection and uncontrolled use of biological samples or related genetic data. The risks of discrimination and stigmatization are a recurrent issue. In light of the increasing interest in biomedical research and the resulting benefits to the health of participants, it is imperative that practical solutions be found to the problems associated with the management of biobanks: namely, protecting the integrity of the research participants, as well as guaranteeing the security and confidentiality of the participant's information. Methods We aimed to devise a practical and efficient model for the management of biobanks in biomedical research where a medical archivist plays the pivotal role as a data-protection officer. The model had to reduce the burden placed on REBs responsible for the evaluation of genetics projects and, at the same time, maximize the protection of research participants. Results The proposed model includes the following: 1 a means of protecting the information in biobanks, 2 offers ways to provide follow-up information requested about the participants, 3 protects the participant's confidentiality and 4 adequately deals with the ethical issues at stake in biobanking. Conclusion Until a governmental governance body is established in Quebec to guarantee the protection of research participants and establish harmonized guidelines for the management of biobanks in medical research, it is definitely up to REBs to find solutions that the present lack of guidelines poses. The model presented in this article offers a practical solution on a day-to-day basis for REBs

  18. Using the QUAIT Model to Effectively Teach Research Methods Curriculum to Master's-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy J.; Gitchel, Dent

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To apply Slavin's model of effective instruction to teaching research methods to master's-level students. Methods: Barriers to the scientist-practitioner model (student research experience, confidence, and utility value pertaining to research methods as well as faculty research and pedagogical incompetencies) are discussed. Results: The…

  19. Convergence models for cylindrical caverns and the resulting ground subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haupt, W.; Sroka, A.; Schober, F.

    1983-02-01

    The authors studied the effects of different convergence characteristics on surface soil response for the case of narrow, cylindrical caverns. Maximum ground subsidence - a parameter of major importance in this type of cavern - was calculated for different convergence models. The models were established without considering the laws of rock mechanics and rheology. As a result, two limiting convergence models were obtained that describe an interval of expectation into which all other models fit. This means that ground movements over cylindrical caverns can be calculated ''on the safe side'', correlating the trough resulting on the surface with the convergence characterisitcs of the cavern. Among other applications, the method thus permits monitoring of caverns.

  20. Results of research in the area of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARPOV Alexey Ivanovich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To popularize scientific achievements in construction the main results of Russian and foreign scientists’ research are published in the form of abstract. Within the investigation «Obtaining and research of physical and chemical properties of nanosized system nickel–copper» experimentally proved model of synthesis of nanosized powders of system nickel–copper based on the method of reduction of metal salts from water solution has been offered; optimal conditions for obtaining radiographic pure powders have been determined. The paper also deals with conditions for obtaining and phase composition of mixed nickel and copper hydroxides including those which are stable when stored in wet conditions. The copper hydroxide stabilization method has been proposed. The practical value of performed investigation «Research of electron structure functionalized carbon nanotubes by spectographic methods with synchronous radiation» is that it developed one of the areas of physical chemistry: complex research of electron structure of carbon nanotubes including functionalized ones was carried out by the method of experimental (spectographic with synchrotron radiation of different energies and theoretical methods; the general methods of the modern applied plasmonics aimed at identification of characteristics of defects formation in carbon nanosystems of low dimension have been developed.

  1. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  2. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    . However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario...... of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological obser-vations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observa-tional data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced...

  3. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    ’ dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble...

  4. The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model: key components and results

    OpenAIRE

    Jochen Woessner; Danciu Laurentiu; Domenico Giardini; Helen Crowley; Fabrice Cotton; G. Grünthal; Gianluca Valensise; Ronald Arvidsson; Roberto Basili; Mine Betül Demircioglu; Stefan Hiemer; Carlo Meletti; Roger W. Musson; Andrea N. Rovida; Karin Sesetyan

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model (ESHM13) results from a community-based probabilistic seismic hazard assessment supported by the EU-FP7 project “Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe” (SHARE, 2009–2013). The ESHM13 is a consistent seismic hazard model for Europe and Turkey which overcomes the limitation of national borders and includes a through quantification of the uncertainties. It is the first completed regional effort contributing to the “Global Earthquake Model” initiative. It m...

  5. Hydroclimatology of the Nile: results from a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the result of the regional coupled climatic and hydrologic model of the Nile Basin. For the first time the interaction between the climatic processes and the hydrological processes on the land surface have been fully coupled. The hydrological model is driven by the rainfall and the energy available for evaporation generated in the climate model, and the runoff generated in the catchment is again routed over the wetlands of the Nile to supply moisture for atmospheric feedback. The results obtained are quite satisfactory given the extremely low runoff coefficients in the catchment. The paper presents the validation results over the sub-basins: Blue Nile, White Nile, Atbara river, the Sudd swamps, and the Main Nile for the period 1995 to 2000. Observational datasets were used to evaluate the model results including radiation, precipitation, runoff and evaporation data. The evaporation data were derived from satellite images over a major part of the Upper Nile. Limitations in both the observational data and the model are discussed. It is concluded that the model provides a sound representation of the regional water cycle over the Nile. The sources of atmospheric moisture to the basin, and location of convergence/divergence fields could be accurately illustrated. The model is used to describe the regional water cycle in the Nile basin in terms of atmospheric fluxes, land surface fluxes and land surface-climate feedbacks. The monthly moisture recycling ratio (i.e. locally generated/total precipitation over the Nile varies between 8 and 14%, with an annual mean of 11%, which implies that 89% of the Nile water resources originates from outside the basin physical boundaries. The monthly precipitation efficiency varies between 12 and 53%, and the annual mean is 28%. The mean annual result of the Nile regional water cycle is compared to that of the Amazon and the Mississippi basins.

  6. Report on the results of studies on revised ECCS evaluation models for LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    For evaluating the function and performance of emergency core cooling systems of LWR power plants, the use of the ECCS evaluation models of GE and westinghouse are permitted. For the models, however, the formulae of correlation with higher accuracy were developed along with the accumulation of results of experimental and theoretical studies in the field. Revision to the models has thus been proposed on the basis of the results of researches both in Japan and abroad. Such alterations and the results of the studies thereon are described. The following matters are described: on the evaluation models for BWR ECCS, CCFL model, low flow rate film boiling heat transfer coefficient, radiation heat transfer model, and critical flow model; on the evaluation models, for PWR ECCS, heat radiation, between fuel rods, accumulator injection pressure loss in reflooding, rupture of cladding tubes, hot wall delay, model of steam cooling in reflooding 17 x 17 core ELECHT correlation, and temperature at reactor vessel top. (Mori, K.)

  7. Visual Literacy and Science Education: Results of a Qualitative Research Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regula Fankhauser

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the didactics of science the role of pictures—mainly photographs and diagrams—as learning media and their function in the acquisition of knowledge have been discussed. However, the specific problems understanding pictures have seldom been reflected systematically. The aim of the project described in this paper was to address this deficiency. In a first step I refer to theoretical concepts of understanding pictures that were generated within the context of qualitative social research. Next I generate a theoretical model of visual literacy. The focus is on the understanding of pictures used in science education. The model includes aesthetic, epistemological, technical, and pragmatic dimensions. This model was then empirically tested. Thirty-five students were interviewed regarding their reception of scientific pictures. The results reveal that students have difficulties in describing the aesthetic features of pictures. The interviews clarified the epistemological frame theory on which picture understanding is based: most of the students consider the picture as a realistic copy of the object represented. Only a few students showed a more constructivist frame theory. Furthermore, the results revealed no connection between the epistemological theory and the technical knowledge of the students. The discussion of the design and the method of interpretation reflects the results of the study; the students' patterns of picture understanding are surprisingly homogeneous. On the one hand this could be reduced to the method of content analysis; on the other hand it could be an effect of the single sided view of the design. I explored only the subjective reception of pictures. Further research must consider other perspectives and focus on the way teachers work with visual material in classroom teaching. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090129

  8. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  9. Critical appraisal of quantitative PCR results in colorectal cancer research: Can we rely on published qPCR results?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.R.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Bustin, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in cancer research has become ubiquitous. The relative simplicity of qPCR experiments, which deliver fast and cost-effective results, means that each year an increasing number of papers utilizing this technique are being published.

  10. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  11. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    ROMS, Ocean Modelling, 26 (1-2), 91-103, 2009. Le Bars, Y., F. Lyard, C. Jeandel, and L. Dardengo, The AMANDES tidal model for the Amazon estuary and shelf, Ocean Modelling, 31 (3-4), 132-149, 2010. Longuet-Higgins, M., and R. Stewart, Radiation stresses in water waves; a physical discussion, with applications, Deep Sea Research and Oceanographic Abstracts, 11 (4), 529-562, 1964. Mastenbroek, C., G. Burgers, and P. A. E. M. Janssen, The Dynamical Coupling of a Wave Model and a Storm Surge Model through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer, pp. -, 1993. Tolman, H. L., A mosaic approach to wind wave modeling, Ocean Modelling, 25 (1-2), 35-47, 2008. Wolf, J., Coastal flooding: impacts of coupled wave-surge-tide models, Nat Hazards, 49 (2), 241-260, 2008.

  12. Research on Business Models in their Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jabłoński

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of theoretical discussions and research findings in the field of designing sustainable business models that support the creation of value at various stages of the business life cycle. The paper presents selected findings of extensive research into the business models of Polish companies listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange. Companies which are at various stages of development should build and adapt their business models in order to maintain the ability to create value for stakeholders. Characteristics of business models at the early stages of development are different than at mature stages. The paper highlights the differences in business models in the context of the life cycle of companies and sustainability criteria. The paper presents research findings which show that the company’s development can be seen from the point of view of the business model. Research on business models concentrated on identifying the key attributes and the configuration of the business models appropriate for the early stage of development as well as the maturity stage. It was found that the business models of companies at an early stage of the development of companies listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange are oriented primarily to how the company shapes, delivers, and captures value from the market in order to generate profits for shareholders and increase the value of the company, while the business models of mature companies include the intentions of management used to balance objectives with respect to different groups of stakeholders, and to carefully formulate and implement business objectives with particular attention paid to preserving the sustainability of the business. The assessment of business models from the point of view of the life cycle proves that managers change their approach to configuring business models over time; at some point, they include management intentions aimed at a broader range of goals than merely

  13. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke

    2010-01-01

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  14. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  15. Research on nonlinear stochastic dynamical price model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiaorui; Xu Wei; Xie Wenxian; Ren Zhengzheng

    2008-01-01

    In consideration of many uncertain factors existing in economic system, nonlinear stochastic dynamical price model which is subjected to Gaussian white noise excitation is proposed based on deterministic model. One-dimensional averaged Ito stochastic differential equation for the model is derived by using the stochastic averaging method, and applied to investigate the stability of the trivial solution and the first-passage failure of the stochastic price model. The stochastic price model and the methods presented in this paper are verified by numerical studies

  16. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, C.S. do; Andrade, D.A.; Mesquita, R.N. de

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  17. Psychometric model for safety culture assessment in nuclear research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, C.S. do, E-mail: claudio.souza@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2468, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade, D.A., E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mesquita, R.N. de, E-mail: rnavarro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN – SP), Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • A psychometric model to evaluate ‘safety climate’ at nuclear research facilities. • The model presented evidences of good psychometric qualities. • The model was applied to nuclear research facilities in Brazil. • Some ‘safety culture’ weaknesses were detected in the assessed organization. • A potential tool to develop safety management programs in nuclear facilities. - Abstract: A safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants depends not only on technical performance, but also on the people and on the organization. Organizational factors have been recognized as the main causal mechanisms of accidents by research organizations through USA, Europe and Japan. Deficiencies related with these factors reveal weaknesses in the organization’s safety culture. A significant number of instruments to assess the safety culture based on psychometric models that evaluate safety climate through questionnaires, and which are based on reliability and validity evidences, have been published in health and ‘safety at work’ areas. However, there are few safety culture assessment instruments with these characteristics (reliability and validity) available on nuclear literature. Therefore, this work proposes an instrument to evaluate, with valid and reliable measures, the safety climate of nuclear research facilities. The instrument was developed based on methodological principles applied to research modeling and its psychometric properties were evaluated by a reliability analysis and validation of content, face and construct. The instrument was applied to an important nuclear research organization in Brazil. This organization comprises 4 research reactors and many nuclear laboratories. The survey results made possible a demographic characterization and the identification of some possible safety culture weaknesses and pointing out potential areas to be improved in the assessed organization. Good evidence of reliability with Cronbach's alpha

  18. TEACHERS AND EDUCATION OF CHARACTER INSTILLATION (Research Result at Private Elementary School of Muhammadiyah in Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Teachers are the most important element in the development of character education in elementary school, because it becomes the main foundation for a child. Therefore character education made a continuous process to produce a future human figure rooted in the cultural values of the Indonesian nation. Character education in the current context is very relevant to students to tackle the ongoing moral crisis in our country, including free association, crime against friends, teenage theft, cheating, drug abuse and drugs, pornography, brawls, and others. This is based on the results of research on SDS Muhammadiyah about teacher and character education education. The research methodology was conducted with qualitative descriptive analysis. Data obtained based on interviews, observation, and study documentation with the object of research. The result of the research shows that character education education in SDS Muhammadiyah 29 Medan City is contained in all subjects and outside subjects that are instilled early on by all teachers. Cultivation of character education conducted in all subjects through 3 content, ie general content (PAI, PKn, IPS, IPA, Bahasa Indonesia, Mathematics, Arts and Culture, special content (Kemuhammadiyahan, and Local Content (Malay Arabic / Arabic, English, Computer. Character education model performed outside the subjects through 4 things, namely: religious habituation (religious, discipline exercises, fun activities, and sports activities. Commonalities include (the implementation of Zuhr prayers bertamaaah, dhuha congregation, tadarus Al-Qur'an and memorizing the verses of Al-Qur'an, and culture shake. Discipline includes (the existence of rules and school rules and liaison books every day. Kewiraaan include (Flag ceremony and Hizbul wathan. Exercise includes (physical fitness exercise.

  19. Modelling the Image Research of a Tourism Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Teodorescu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The problematic area of the tourism destination image has a high expansion in marketing, the efforts of its conceptualization and phenomenalism being remarkable among specialists. In this context, the authors propose a systemic approach, the result of which refers to a model regarding the image research of a tourism destination, whose validation has been attained using Transalpina destination. The model created by the authors envisages morphological features and specific functional relationships, which are consistent with the marketing theory, and, in context, with the consumer behaviour theory. The conceptualmethodological solutions are magnified by applicative-experimental validations, which enhance the theoretical and practical valences of the created model. The main direction of developing the elaborated model consists in efforts of formalization and abstracting, in the perspective offered by several scientific disciplines.

  20. Research on artistic gymnastics training guidance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Sun, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics training guidance model, taking into consideration the features of artistic gymnastics training, is put forward to help gymnasts identify their deficiencies and unskilled technical movements and improve their training effects. The model is built on the foundation of both physical quality indicator model and artistic gymnastics training indicator model. Physical quality indicator model composed of bodily factor, flexibility-strength factor and speed-dexterity factor delivers an objective evaluation with reference to basic sport testing data. Training indicator model, based on physical fitness indicator, helps analyze the technical movements, through which the impact from each bodily factor on technical movements is revealed. AG training guidance model, in further combination with actual training data and in comparison with the data shown in the training indicator model, helps identify the problems in trainings, and thus improve the training effect. These three models when in combined use and in comparison with historical model data can check and verify the improvement in training effect over a certain period of time.

  1. Research results in the field of information support for innovation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Žižlavský

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with an actual issue focused on one of the world wide problem – effective development of an innovation process in the company. Just innovation is deemed as an essential part of company’s efficiency and its development with an impact on overall performance and competitiveness. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss knowledge and findings of original primary research into South-Moravian companies within two projects of Internal Grant Agency Faculty of Business and Management Brno University of Technology, which were conducted in 2009 and 2010. For this analysis a questionnaire survey was used – the results of the primary research reflect innovative activities from the top managers’ point of view. The scientific aim of the paper is to gain knowledge and analyse the present status of innovative activities as it pertains to Czech and foreign professional literature and in the Czech business environment. Authors proved with help of questionnaire survey that many companies still neglect information support of their innovation activities although given the importance of innovation as an engine of growth. Moreover, as shown by the primary research, the majority of companies lack a sophisticated marketing information system, modelling and analysis of the future market, analyses of customers, their behaviour and unsaid needs, definition of price strategies, and analysis of new expansion areas. These findings are not affirmative for our business environment.

  2. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Dongsheng [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  3. Reports of the research results for the peaceful uses of atomic energy, no. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Many valuable results have been obtained by the tests and researches concerning the peaceful utilization of atomic energy, and they accomplished major role in the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy in Japan. In this report, the results of the tests and researches on the peaceful utilization of atomic energy carried out by national research institutes and others in 1978 fiscal year are outlined. It is desirable to deepen understandings further on the recent trend and results of the tests and researches with this book. The report is divided into the following chapters: nuclear fusion, safety research (technological safety research, environmental radioactivity safety research), food irradiation, countermeasures to cancers, agriculture, forestry and fishery (fertilized soil, quality improvement, farm product protection, breeding improvement), medicine (diagnosis and therapy, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene, application to living body pathology), mining and industry (radiation chemistry, radiation measurement, process analysis), power utilization (nuclear reactor materials, nuclear ships), civil engineering, radioactivation analysis, and injury prevention research. (Kako, I.)

  4. Fuel assembly bow: analytical modeling and resulting design improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabel, J.; Huebsch, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The bowing of fuel assemblies may result in a contact between neighbouring fuel assemblies and in connection with a vibration to a resulting wear or even perforation at the corners of the spacer grids of neighbouring assemblies. Such events allowed reinsertion of a few fuel assemblies in Germany only after spacer repair. In order to identify the most sensitive parameters causing the observed bowing of fuel assemblies a new computer model was develop which takes into a account the highly nonlinear behaviour of the interaction between fuel rods and spacers. As a result of the studies performed with this model, design improvements such as a more rigid connection between guide thimbles and spacer grids, could be defined. First experiences with this improved design show significantly better fuel behaviour. (author). 5 figs., 1 tabs

  5. Supply chain management models, applications, and research directions

    CERN Document Server

    Pardalos, Panos; Romeijn, H

    2005-01-01

    This work brings together some of the most up to date research in the application of operations research and mathematical modeling te- niques to problems arising in supply chain management and e-Commerce. While research in the broad area of supply chain management enc- passes a wide range of topics and methodologies, we believe this book provides a good snapshot of current quantitative modeling approaches, issues, and trends within the field. Each chapter is a self-contained study of a timely and relevant research problem in supply chain mana- ment. The individual works place a heavy emphasis on the application of modeling techniques to real world management problems. In many instances, the actual results from applying these techniques in practice are highlighted. In addition, each chapter provides important mana- rial insights that apply to general supply chain management practice. The book is divided into three parts. The first part contains ch- ters that address the new and rapidly growing role of the inte...

  6. Methodology and Results of Mathematical Modelling of Complex Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrova, Nataliya V.

    2018-03-01

    The methodology of system analysis allows us to draw a mathematical model of the complex technological process. The mathematical description of the plasma-chemical process was proposed. The importance the quenching rate and initial temperature decrease time was confirmed for producing the maximum amount of the target product. The results of numerical integration of the system of differential equations can be used to describe reagent concentrations, plasma jet rate and temperature in order to achieve optimal mode of hardening. Such models are applicable both for solving control problems and predicting future states of sophisticated technological systems.

  7. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-06-15

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena.

  8. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the 1 / 5 -scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena

  9. Some results on the dynamics generated by the Bazykin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgescu, R M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey model formerly proposed by A. Bazykin et al. [Bifurcation diagrams of planar dynamical systems (1985] is analyzed in the case when two of the four parameters are kept fixed. Dynamics and bifurcation results are deduced by using the methods developed by D. K. Arrowsmith and C. M. Place [Ordinary differential equations (1982], S.-N. Chow et al. [Normal forms and bifurcation of planar fields (1994], Y. A. Kuznetsov [Elements of applied bifurcation theory (1998], and A. Georgescu [Dynamic bifurcation diagrams for some models in economics and biology (2004]. The global dynamic bifurcation diagram is constructed and graphically represented. The biological interpretation is presented, too.

  10. Research Anxiety and Students' Perceptions of Research: An Experiment. Part I. Effect of Teaching Kuhlthau's ISP Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracker, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the effect of a 30-minute presentation of Carol Kuhlthau's Information Search Process (ISP) model on undergraduate students' perceptions of research and research paper anxiety, focusing on results of the quantitative analysis. Highlights include pretests and posttest results; and data analysis and hypothesis testing. (Author/LRW)

  11. Results of the eruptive column model inter-comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Suzuki, Yujiro; Cerminara, M.; Devenish, Ben J.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Herzog, Michael; Van Eaton, Alexa; Denby, L.C.; Bursik, Marcus; de' Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Engwell, S.; Neri, Augusto; Barsotti, Sara; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Girault, F.; Carazzo, G.; Tait, S.; Kaminski, E.; Mastin, Larry G.; Woodhouse, Mark J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Degruyter, Wim; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models of volcanic eruption columns in a set of different inter-comparison exercises. The exercises were designed as a blind test in which a set of common input parameters was given for two reference eruptions, representing a strong and a weak eruption column under different meteorological conditions. Comparing the results of the different models allows us to evaluate their capabilities and target areas for future improvement. Despite their different formulations, the 1D and 3D models provide reasonably consistent predictions of some of the key global descriptors of the volcanic plumes. Variability in plume height, estimated from the standard deviation of model predictions, is within ~ 20% for the weak plume and ~ 10% for the strong plume. Predictions of neutral buoyancy level are also in reasonably good agreement among the different models, with a standard deviation ranging from 9 to 19% (the latter for the weak plume in a windy atmosphere). Overall, these discrepancies are in the range of observational uncertainty of column height. However, there are important differences amongst models in terms of local properties along the plume axis, particularly for the strong plume. Our analysis suggests that the simplified treatment of entrainment in 1D models is adequate to resolve the general behaviour of the weak plume. However, it is inadequate to capture complex features of the strong plume, such as large vortices, partial column collapse, or gravitational fountaining that strongly enhance entrainment in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that there is a need to more accurately quantify entrainment rates, improve the representation of plume radius, and incorporate the effects of column instability in future versions of 1D volcanic plume models.

  12. Clinical verification of genetic results returned to research participants: findings from a Colon Cancer Family Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Truitt, Anjali R; Tenney, Lederle; Fisher, Douglass; Lindor, Noralane M; Veenstra, David; Jarvik, Gail P; Newcomb, Polly A; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2017-11-01

    The extent to which participants act to clinically verify research results is largely unknown. This study examined whether participants who received Lynch syndrome (LS)-related findings pursued researchers' recommendation to clinically verify results with testing performed by a CLIA-certified laboratory. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center site of the multinational Colon Cancer Family Registry offered non-CLIA individual genetic research results to select registry participants (cases and their enrolled relatives) from 2011 to 2013. Participants who elected to receive results were counseled on the importance of verifying results at a CLIA-certified laboratory. Twenty-six (76.5%) of the 34 participants who received genetic results completed 2- and 12-month postdisclosure surveys; 42.3% of these (11/26) participated in a semistructured follow-up interview. Within 12 months of result disclosure, only 4 (15.4%) of 26 participants reported having verified their results in a CLIA-certified laboratory; of these four cases, all research and clinical results were concordant. Reasons for pursuing clinical verification included acting on the recommendation of the research team and informing future clinical care. Those who did not verify results cited lack of insurance coverage and limited perceived personal benefit of clinical verification as reasons for inaction. These findings suggest researchers will need to address barriers to seeking clinical verification in order to ensure that the intended benefits of returning genetic research results are realized. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A simple model for research interest evolution patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tao; Wang, Dashun; Szymanski, Boleslaw

    Sir Isaac Newton supposedly remarked that in his scientific career he was like ``...a boy playing on the sea-shore ...finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary''. His remarkable modesty and famous understatement motivate us to seek regularities in how scientists shift their research focus as the career develops. Indeed, despite intensive investigations on how microscopic factors, such as incentives and risks, would influence a scientist's choice of research agenda, little is known on the macroscopic patterns in the research interest change undertaken by individual scientists throughout their careers. Here we make use of over 14,000 authors' publication records in physics. By quantifying statistical characteristics in the interest evolution, we model scientific research as a random walk, which reproduces patterns in individuals' careers observed empirically. Despite myriad of factors that shape and influence individual choices of research subjects, we identified regularities in this dynamical process that are well captured by a simple statistical model. The results advance our understanding of scientists' behaviors during their careers and open up avenues for future studies in the science of science.

  14. Multilevel models in international business research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, M.F.; Arregle, J-L.; Martin, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Multiple-level (or mixed linear) modeling (MLM) can simultaneously test hypotheses at several levels of analysis (usually two or three), or control for confounding effects at one level while testing hypotheses at others. Advances in multi-level modeling allow increased precision in quantitative

  15. Undergraduate Research: Mathematical Modeling of Mortgages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngna; Spero, Steven

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we study financing in the real estate market and show how various types of mortgages can be modeled and analyzed. With only an introductory level of interest theory, finance, and calculus, we model and analyze three types of popular mortgages with real life examples that explain the background and inevitable outcome of the current…

  16. Applications of computer modeling to fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Progress achieved during this report period is presented on the following topics: Development and application of gyrokinetic particle codes to tokamak transport, development of techniques to take advantage of parallel computers; model dynamo and bootstrap current drive; and in general maintain our broad-based program in basic plasma physics and computer modeling.

  17. Applications of computer modeling to fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Progress achieved during this report period is presented on the following topics: Development and application of gyrokinetic particle codes to tokamak transport, development of techniques to take advantage of parallel computers; model dynamo and bootstrap current drive; and in general maintain our broad-based program in basic plasma physics and computer modeling

  18. Initial CGE Model Results Summary Exogenous and Endogenous Variables Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    The following discussion presents initial results of tests of the most recent version of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of this is to test and assess the model’s behavioral properties. The test evaluated whether the predicted impacts are reasonable from a qualitative perspective. This issue is whether the predicted change, be it an increase or decrease in other model variables, is consistent with prior economic intuition and expectations about the predicted change. One of the purposes of this effort is to determine whether model changes are needed in order to improve its behavior qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. Regulatory ozone modeling: status, directions, and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, P G

    1995-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have established selected comprehensive, three-dimensional, Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs) as the required regulatory tools for analyzing the urban and regional problem of high ambient ozone levels across the United States. These models are currently applied to study and establish strategies for meeting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone in nonattainment areas; State Implementation Plans (SIPs) resulting from these efforts must be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in November 1994. The following presentation provides an overview and discussion of the regulatory ozone modeling process and its implications. First, the PAQSM-based ozone attainment demonstration process is summarized in the framework of the 1994 SIPs. Then, following a brief overview of the representation of physical and chemical processes in PAQSMs, the essential attributes of standard modeling systems currently in regulatory use are presented in a nonmathematical, self-contained format, intended to provide a basic understanding of both model capabilities and limitations. The types of air quality, emission, and meteorological data needed for applying and evaluating PAQSMs are discussed, as well as the sources, availability, and limitations of existing databases. The issue of evaluating a model's performance in order to accept it as a tool for policy making is discussed, and various methodologies for implementing this objective are summarized. Selected interim results from diagnostic analyses, which are performed as a component of the regulatory ozone modeling process for the Philadelphia-New Jersey region, are also presented to provide some specific examples related to the general issues discussed in this work. Finally, research needs related to a) the evaluation and refinement of regulatory ozone modeling, b) the characterization of uncertainty in photochemical modeling, and c

  20. Interaction between subducting plates: results from numerical and analogue modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic setting of the Alpine-Mediterranean area is achieved during the late Cenozoic subduction, collision and suturing of several oceanic fragments and continental blocks. In this stage, processes such as interactions among subducting slabs, slab migrations and related mantle flow played a relevant role on the resulting tectonics. Here, we use numerical models to first address the mantle flow characteristic in 3D. During the subduction of a single plate the strength of the return flow strongly depends on the slab pull force, that is on the plate's buoyancy, however the physical properties of the slab, such as density, viscosity or width, do not affect largely the morphology of the toroidal cell. Instead, dramatic effects on the geometry and the dynamics of the toroidal cell result in models where the thickness of the mantle is varied. The vertical component of the vorticity vector is used to define the characteristic size of the toroidal cell, which is ~1.2-1.3 times the mantle depth. This latter defines the range of viscous stress propagation through the mantle and consequent interactions with other slabs. We thus further investigate on this setup where two separate lithospheric plates subduct in opposite sense, developing opposite polarities and convergent slab retreat, and model different initial sideways distance between the plates. The stress profiles in time illustrate that the plates interacts when slabs are at the characteristic distance and the two slabs toroidal cells merge. Increased stress and delayed slab migrations are the results. Analogue models of double-sided subduction show similar maximum distance and allow testing the additional role of stress propagated through the plates. We use a silicon plate subducting on its two opposite margins, which is either homogeneous or comprises oceanic and continental lithospheres, differing in buoyancy. The modeling results show that the double-sided subduction is strongly affected by changes in plate

  1. First experiments results about the engineering model of Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalot, A.; Ginier, R.; Sauvage, M.

    1964-01-01

    This report deals with the first series of experiments carried out on the engineering model of Rapsodie and on an associated sodium facility set in a laboratory hall of Cadarache. It conveys more precisely: 1/ - The difficulties encountered during the erection and assembly of the engineering model and a compilation of the results of the first series of experiments and tests carried out on this installation (loading of the subassemblies preheating, thermal chocks...). 2/ - The experiments and tests carried out on the two prototypes control rod drive mechanisms which brought to the choice for the design of the definitive drive mechanism. As a whole, the results proved the validity of the general design principles adopted for Rapsodie. (authors) [fr

  2. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  3. Meteorological uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion model results (MUD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Amstrup, B.; Feddersen, H.

    2013-08-01

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can be derived. (Author)

  4. Model-Based Learning: A Synthesis of Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Norbert M.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of theoretical approaches to model-based learning and related research. In accordance with the definition of model-based learning as an acquisition and utilization of mental models by learners, the first section centers on mental model theory. In accordance with epistemology of modeling the issues of semantics,…

  5. Some results on hyperscaling in the 3D Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Kawashima, Naoki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-09-01

    The authors review exact studies on finite-sized 2 dimensional Ising models and show that the point for an infinite-sized model at the critical temperature is a point of nonuniform approach in the temperature-size plane. They also illuminate some strong effects of finite-size on quantities which do not diverge at the critical point. They then review Monte Carlo studies for 3 dimensional Ising models of various sizes (L = 2--100) at various temperatures. From these results they find that the data for the renormalized coupling constant collapses nicely when plotted against the correlation length, determined in a system of edge length L, divided by L. They also find that {zeta}{sub L}/L {ge} 0.26 is definitely too large for reliable studies of the critical value, g*, of the renormalized coupling constant. They have reasonable evidence that {zeta}{sub L}/L {approx} 0.1 is adequate for results that are within one percent of those for the infinite system size. On this basis, they have conducted a series of Monte Carlo calculations with this condition imposed. These calculations were made practical by the development of improved estimators for use in the Swendsen-Wang cluster method. The authors found from these results, coupled with a reversed limit computation (size increases with the temperature fixed at the critical temperature), that g* > 0, although there may well be a sharp downward drop in g as the critical temperature is approached in accord with the predictions of series analysis. The results support the validity of hyperscaling in the 3 dimensional Ising model.

  6. Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Title: Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface Author: Tomáš Kohan Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor of the master thesis: RNDr. Ondřej Šerý, Ph.D., Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems Abstract: This thesis is devoted to design and implementation of the new debugging interface of the Java PathFinder application. As a suitable inte- face container was selected the Eclipse development environment. The created interface should vis...

  7. Characterizing Researchers by Strategies Used for Retaining Minority Participants: Results of a National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C.; Fryer, Craig S.; Garza, Mary A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research...

  8. Report of the research results with JAERI's facilities in fiscal 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    Results of the research works by educational institutions using facilities of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in fiscal 1975 are reported in individual summaries. Facilities utilized are research reactors, Co-60 irradiation facilities, hot laboratory, Linac and electron accelerators. Fields of research are the following: nuclear physics, radiation damage/solid-state physics, positron annihilation, activation analysis/nuclear chemistry, hot atom chemistry, irradiation effects, biology, and neutron diffraction; and, cooperative works to JAERI. (Mori, K.)

  9. Process models as tools in forestry research and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Johnsen; Lisa Samuelson; Robert Teskey; Steve McNulty; Tom Fox

    2001-01-01

    Forest process models are mathematical representations of biological systems that incorporate our understanding of physiological and ecological mechanisms into predictive algorithms. These models were originally designed and used for research purposes, but are being developed for use in practical forest management. Process models designed for research...

  10. Preferences for the return of individual results from research on pediatric biobank samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Savage, Sarah K.; Huntington, Noelle L.; Weitzman, Elissa R.; Ziniel, Sonja I.; Bacon, Phoebe L.; Cacioppo, Cara N.; Green, Robert C.; Holm, Ingrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Discussions about disclosing individual genetic research results include calls to consider participants’ preferences. In this study, parents of Boston Children’s Hospital patients set preferences for disclosure based on disease preventability and severity, and could exclude mental health, developmental, childhood degenerative, and adult-onset disorders. Participants reviewed hypothetical reports and reset preferences, if desired. Among 661 participants who initially wanted all results (64%), 1% reset preferences. Among 336 participants who initially excluded at least one category (36%), 38% reset preferences. Participants who reset preferences added 0.9 categories, on average; and their mean satisfaction on 0–10 scales increased from 4.7 to 7.2 (p<0.001). Only 2% reduced the number of categories they wanted disclosed. Findings demonstrate the benefits of providing examples of preference options and the tendency of participants to want results disclosed. Findings also suggest that preference-setting models that do not provide specific examples of results could underestimate participants’ desires for information. PMID:28421887

  11. Challenges in validating model results for first year ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Arne; Eastwood, Steinar; Xie, Jiping; Aaboe, Signe; Bertino, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of model results for the distribution of first year ice, a comparison with a product based on observations from satellite-borne instruments has been performed. Such a comparison is not straightforward due to the contrasting algorithms that are used in the model product and the remote sensing product. The implementation of the validation is discussed in light of the differences between this set of products, and validation results are presented. The model product is the daily updated 10-day forecast from the Arctic Monitoring and Forecasting Centre in CMEMS. The forecasts are produced with the assimilative ocean prediction system TOPAZ. Presently, observations of sea ice concentration and sea ice drift are introduced in the assimilation step, but data for sea ice thickness and ice age (or roughness) are not included. The model computes the age of the ice by recording and updating the time passed after ice formation as sea ice grows and deteriorates as it is advected inside the model domain. Ice that is younger than 365 days is classified as first year ice. The fraction of first-year ice is recorded as a tracer in each grid cell. The Ocean and Sea Ice Thematic Assembly Centre in CMEMS redistributes a daily product from the EUMETSAT OSI SAF of gridded sea ice conditions which include "ice type", a representation of the separation of regions between those infested by first year ice, and those infested by multi-year ice. The ice type is parameterized based on data for the gradient ratio GR(19,37) from SSMIS observations, and from the ASCAT backscatter parameter. This product also includes information on ambiguity in the processing of the remote sensing data, and the product's confidence level, which have a strong seasonal dependency.

  12. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects. PMID:21635721

  13. Attitudes of nearly 7000 health professionals, genomic researchers and publics toward the return of incidental results from sequencing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Anna; Morley, Katherine I; Bragin, Eugene; Firth, Helen V; Hurles, Matthew E; Wright, Caroline F; Parker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide sequencing in a research setting has the potential to reveal health-related information of personal or clinical utility for the study participant. There is increasing pressure to return research findings to participants that may not be related to the project aims, particularly when these could be used to prevent disease. Such secondary, unsolicited or 'incidental findings' (IFs) may be discovered unintentionally when interpreting sequence data, or as the result of a deliberate opportunistic screen. This cross-sectional, web-based survey investigated attitudes of 6944 individuals from 75 countries towards returning IFs from genome research. Participants included four relevant stakeholder groups: 4961 members of the public, 533 genetic health professionals, 843 non-genetic health professionals and 607 genomic researchers who were invited via traditional media, social media and professional e-mail list-serve. Treatability and perceived utility of incidental results were deemed important with 98% of stakeholders personally interested in learning about preventable life-threatening conditions. Although there was a generic interest in receiving genomic information, stakeholders did not expect researchers to opportunistically screen for IFs in a research setting. On many items, genetic health professionals had significantly more conservative views compared with other stakeholders. This finding demonstrates a disconnect between the views of those handling the findings of research and those participating in research. Exploring, evaluating and ultimately addressing this disconnect should form a priority for researchers and clinicians alike. This social sciences study offers the largest dataset, published to date, of attitudes towards issues surrounding the return of IFs from sequencing research.

  14. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  15. Multilevel Modeling for Research in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, James P.; Trott, Arianna; Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers in group counseling often encounter complex data from individual clients who are members of a group. Clients in the same group may be more similar than clients from different groups and this can lead to violations of statistical assumptions. The complexity of the data also means that predictors and outcomes can be measured at both the…

  16. Commenting on Research Results in Applied Linguistics and Education: A Comparative Genre-Based Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jason Miin-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    As university students are frequently given the tasks of writing research reports to fulfil their respective programme requirements, teaching novice writers to present the results of their reports understandably constitutes an essential component of English lessons at tertiary level. While past research has shown that results are consistently…

  17. Proceeding of the Seminar of Research Result of Multipurpose Reactor Center Year of 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jujuratisbela, U.

    1998-08-01

    The proceeding contained papers presented in seminar on research results of Multipurpose Reactor Center year 1997/1998 held on June 9-10, 1998 in Serpong, Indonesia. These papers are the significant result of research activities conducted in the Multipurpose Reactor Center, National Atomic Energy Agency during fiscal year of 1997/1998. There are 37 article which have separated index. (ID)

  18. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1997/1998 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 26 papers indexed individually (ID)

  19. The Research Results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center Year 1996/1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiman, P.; Martono, H.; Las, T.; Lubis, E.; Mulyanto; Wisnubroto, D. S.; Sucipta

    1997-12-01

    The research results of Radioactive Waste Management Technology Center, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia year 1996/1997 contain paper as form of research results on radioactive waste management related fields. There were included many aspects such as radioactive waste processing, storage, decontamination, decommissioning, safety and environmental aspects. There are 24 papers and 12 short communications indexed individually(ID)

  20. Researchers’ opinions towards the communication of results of biobank research: a survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenkamp, T.M.; Gevers, S.J.K.; Bovenberg, J.A.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Eighty Dutch investigators (response 41%) involved in biobank research responded to a web-based survey addressing communication of results of biobank research to individual participants. Questions addressed their opinion towards an obligation to communicate results and related issues such as

  1. Thermal-Chemical Model Of Subduction: Results And Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Gerya, T. V.; Connolly, J. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Rudolph, M.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structures with strong positive and negative velocity anomalies in the mantle wedge above subduction zones have been interpreted as thermally and/or chemically induced phenomena. We have developed a thermal-chemical model of subduction, which constrains the dynamics of seismic velocity structure beneath volcanic arcs. Our simulations have been calculated over a finite-difference grid with (201×101) to (201×401) regularly spaced Eulerian points, using 0.5 million to 10 billion markers. The model couples numerical thermo-mechanical solution with Gibbs energy minimization to investigate the dynamic behavior of partially molten upwellings from slabs (cold plumes) and structures associated with their development. The model demonstrates two chemically distinct types of plumes (mixed and unmixed), and various rigid body rotation phenomena in the wedge (subduction wheel, fore-arc spin, wedge pin-ball). These thermal-chemical features strongly perturb seismic structure. Their occurrence is dependent on the age of subducting slab and the rate of subduction.The model has been validated through a series of test cases and its results are consistent with a variety of geological and geophysical data. In contrast to models that attribute a purely thermal origin for mantle wedge seismic anomalies, the thermal-chemical model is able to simulate the strong variations of seismic velocity existing beneath volcanic arcs which are associated with development of cold plumes. In particular, molten regions that form beneath volcanic arcs as a consequence of vigorous cold wet plumes are manifest by > 20% variations in the local Poisson ratio, as compared to variations of ~ 2% expected as a consequence of temperature variation within the mantle wedge.

  2. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Student Scientist Guidebook. Model Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama

    2009-01-01

    The Expedition Earth and Beyond Student Scientist Guidebook is designed to help student researchers model the process of science and conduct a research investigation. The Table of Contents listed outlines the steps included in this guidebook

  3. STS-40 orbital acceleration research experiment flight results during a typical sleep period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Nicholson, J. Y.; Ritter, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), an electrostatic accelerometer package with complete on-orbit calibration capabilities, was flown for the first time aboard the Space Shuttle on STS-40. This is also the first time an accelerometer package with nano-g sensitivity and a calibration facility has flown aboard the Space Shuttle. The instrument is designed to measure and record the Space Shuttle aerodynamic acceleration environment from the free molecule flow regime through the rarified flow transition into the hypersonic continuum regime. Because of its sensitivity, the OARE instrument defects aerodynamic behavior of the Space Shuttle while in low-earth orbit. A 2-hour orbital time period on day seven of the mission, when the crew was asleep and other spacecraft activities were at a minimum, was examined. During the flight, a 'trimmed-mean' filter was used to produce high quality, low frequency data which was successfully stored aboard the Space Shuttle in the OARE data storage system. Initial review of the data indicated that, although the expected precision was achieved, some equipment problems occurred resulting in uncertain accuracy. An acceleration model which includes aerodynamic, gravity-gradient, and rotational effects was constructed and compared with flight data. Examination of the model with the flight data shows the instrument to be sensitive to all major expected low frequency acceleration phenomena; however, some erratic instrument bias behavior persists in two axes. In these axes, the OARE data can be made to match a comprehensive atmospheric-aerodynamic model by making bias adjustments and slight linear corrections for drift. The other axis does not exhibit these difficulties and gives good agreement with the acceleration model.

  4. Animal models for Gaucher disease research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Farfel-Becker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD, is caused by the defective activity of the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase, which is encoded by the GBA gene. Generation of animal models that faithfully recapitulate the three clinical subtypes of GD has proved to be more of a challenge than first anticipated. The first mouse to be produced died within hours after birth owing to skin permeability problems, and mice with point mutations in Gba did not display symptoms correlating with human disease and also died soon after birth. Recently, conditional knockout mice that mimic some features of the human disease have become available. Here, we review the contribution of all currently available animal models to examining pathological pathways underlying GD and to testing the efficacy of new treatment modalities, and propose a number of criteria for the generation of more appropriate animal models of GD.

  5. The Research of Optical Turbulence Model in Underwater Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of turbulence on underwater imaging system and image restoration, the underwater turbulence model is simulated by computer fluid dynamics. This model is obtained in different underwater turbulence intensity, which contains the pressure data that influences refractive index distribution. When the pressure value is conversed to refractive index, the refractive index distribution can be received with the refraction formula. In the condition of same turbulent intensity, the distribution of refractive index presents gradient in the whole region, with disorder and mutations in the local region. With the turbulence intensity increase, the holistic variation of the refractive index in the image is larger, and the refractive index change more tempestuously in the local region. All the above are illustrated by the simulation results with he ray tracing method and turbulent refractive index model. According to different turbulence intensity analysis, it is proved that turbulence causes image distortion and increases noise.

  6. Fuzzy expert systems models for operations research and management science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, I. B.

    1993-12-01

    Fuzzy expert systems can be developed for the effective use of management within the domains of concern associated with Operations Research and Management Science. These models are designed with: (1) expressive powers of representation embedded in linguistic variables and their linguistic values in natural language expressions, and (2) improved methods of interference based on fuzzy logic which is a generalization of multi-valued logic with fuzzy quantifiers. The results of these fuzzy expert system models are either (1) approximately good in comparison with their classical counterparts, or (2) much better than their counterparts. Moreover, for fuzzy expert systems models, it is only necessary to obtain ordinal scale data. Whereas for their classical counterparts, it is generally required that data be at least on ratio and absolute scale in order to guarantee the additivity and multiplicativity assumptions.

  7. Characterizing Researchers by Strategies Used for Retaining Minority Participants: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C.; Fryer, Craig S.; Garza, Mary A.; Kim, Kevin H.; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) and examined their use of seven commonly used retention strategies. The number and type of retention strategies used, how these strategies differ by researcher type, and other characteristics (e.g., funding) were explored. We identified three clusters of researchers: comprehensive retention strategy researchers - utilized the greatest number of retention strategies; moderate retention strategy researchers - utilized an average number of retention strategies; and limited retention strategy researchers - utilized the least number of retention strategies. The comprehensive and moderate retention strategy researchers were more likely than the limited retention strategy researchers to conduct health outcomes research, work with a community advisory board, hire minority staff, use steps at a higher rate to overcome retention barriers, develop new partnerships with the minority community, modify study materials for the minority population, and allow staff to work flexible schedules. This study is a novel effort to characterize researchers, without implying a value judgment, according to their use of specific retention strategies. It provides critical information for conducting future research to determine the effectiveness of using a combination of retention strategies. PMID:23764697

  8. Measurement model choice influenced randomized controlled trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Rosalie; Fox, Jean-Paul; Apeldoorn, Adri; Twisk, Jos

    2016-11-01

    In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), outcome variables are often patient-reported outcomes measured with questionnaires. Ideally, all available item information is used for score construction, which requires an item response theory (IRT) measurement model. However, in practice, the classical test theory measurement model (sum scores) is mostly used, and differences between response patterns leading to the same sum score are ignored. The enhanced differentiation between scores with IRT enables more precise estimation of individual trajectories over time and group effects. The objective of this study was to show the advantages of using IRT scores instead of sum scores when analyzing RCTs. Two studies are presented, a real-life RCT, and a simulation study. Both IRT and sum scores are used to measure the construct and are subsequently used as outcomes for effect calculation. The bias in RCT results is conditional on the measurement model that was used to construct the scores. A bias in estimated trend of around one standard deviation was found when sum scores were used, where IRT showed negligible bias. Accurate statistical inferences are made from an RCT study when using IRT to estimate construct measurements. The use of sum scores leads to incorrect RCT results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The report of the results of common utilization of the reactor 'Yayoi' and the electron beam linear accelerator is completed. The Yayoi has been operated almost smoothly, and the research themes by its common utilization and the related research reached 19 cases, 4 cases more than the last year. The utilization of making the best use of the features of the Yayoi was carried out, and good results were obtained. On the other hand, the linear accelerator was reconstructed as a twin linear accelerator, and its common utilization was resumed in October, 1989, consequently, the research themes including those utilizing the twin linear accelerator became 14 cases, and the utilization of good condition has continued. In this report, in addition to the above results of the common utilization of the Yayoi and the linear accelerator, 15 reports of Yayoi Study Group carried out in fiscal 1989 are included. (K.I.)

  10. Analysis of information quality attribute for SME towards adoption of research result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriani, E.; Dewobroto, W. S.; Anggraini, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) holds significant role in fostering Indonesian economy. However, the research that is supposed to support the development of SMEs business has not yet fully adopted or utilized. Information attributes may be used as the benchmark to find the intention of SMEs from a research result and develop the strategy of quality information for all organizations both SMEs and the researcher. Therefore, because of the importance of information quality attribute required by SMEs, the research aims to analyses the information quality required by SMEs to clarify the information quality into the dimension of information quality. The research was started by distributing online questionnaire to SMEs. The questionnaire result showed that the content dimension is the most aspect required by SMEs, followed by time and form dimension, respectively. Quality information attribute required by SMEs from a research is that the result may be applied to the business.

  11. Animal models for HIV/AIDS research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatziioannou, Theodora; Evans, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic continues to present us with unique scientific and public health challenges. Although the development of effective antiretroviral therapy has been a major triumph, the emergence of drug resistance requires active management of treatment regimens and the continued development of new antiretroviral drugs. Moreover, despite nearly 30 years of intensive investigation, we still lack the basic scientific knowledge necessary to produce a safe and effective vaccine against HIV-1. Animal models offer obvious advantages in the study of HIV/AIDS, allowing for a more invasive investigation of the disease and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines. Advances in humanized mouse models, non-human primate immunogenetics and recombinant challenge viruses have greatly increased the number and sophistication of available mouse and simian models. Understanding the advantages and limitations of each of these models is essential for the design of animal studies to guide the development of vaccines and antiretroviral therapies for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:23154262

  12. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISO 9001 CERTIFICATION MATURITY AND EFQM BUSINESS EXCELLENCE MODEL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Fonseca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This exploratory research evaluates if there a relationship between the number of years since an organization has achieved ISO 9001 certification and the highest level of recognition received by the same organization with the EFQM Business Excellence Model.Methodology/Approach: After state of the art review a detailed comparison between both models was made. Fifty two Portuguese organizations were considered and Correlation coefficient Spearman Rho was used to investigate the possible relationships.Findings: Conclusion is that there is indeed a moderate positive correlation between these two variables, the higher the number of years of ISO 9001 certification, the higher the results of the organization EFQM model evaluation and recognition. This supports the assumption that ISO 9001 International Standard by incorporating many of the principles present in the EFQM Business Excellence Model is consistent with this model and can be considered as a step towards that direction.Research Limitation/implication: Due to the dynamic nature of these models that might change over time and the possible time delays between implementation and results, more in-depth studies like experimental design or a longitudinal quasi-experimental design could be used to confirm the results of this investigation.Originality/Value of paper: This research gives additional insights on conjunct studies of both models. The use of external evaluation results carried out by the independent EFQM assessors minimizes the possible bias of previous studies accessing the value of ISO 9001 certification.

  14. Results for Phase I of the IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, Friederike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties in design and safety analysis of reactors is today not only broadly accepted, but in many cases became the preferred way to replace traditional conservative analysis for safety and licensing analysis. The use of a more fundamental methodology is also consistent with the reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes available today. To facilitate uncertainty analysis applications a comprehensive approach and methodology must be developed and applied. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR) has its own peculiarities, coated particle design, large graphite quantities, different materials and high temperatures that also require other simulation requirements. The IAEA has therefore launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling (UAM) in 2013 to study uncertainty propagation specifically in the HTGR analysis chain. Two benchmark problems are defined, with the prismatic design represented by the General Atomics (GA) MHTGR-350 and a 250 MW modular pebble bed design similar to the HTR-PM (INET, China). This report summarizes the contributions of the HTGR Methods Simulation group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) up to this point of the CRP. The activities at INL have been focused so far on creating the problem specifications for the prismatic design, as well as providing reference solutions for the exercises defined for Phase I. An overview is provided of the HTGR UAM objectives and scope, and the detailed specifications for Exercises I-1, I-2, I-3 and I-4 are also included here for completeness. The main focus of the report is the compilation and discussion of reference results for Phase I (i.e. for input parameters at their nominal or best-estimate values), which is defined as the first step of the uncertainty quantification process. These reference results can be used by other CRP participants for comparison with other codes or their own reference

  15. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: results from a post-project review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; France, Kathryn E; Henley, Nadine; D'Antoine, Heather A; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-06-02

    Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects.

  16. Feedback of Individual Genetic Results to Research Participants: Is It Feasible in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascalzoni, Deborah; Soini, Sirpa; Machado, Helena; Kaye, Jane; Bentzen, Heidi Beate; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; D'Abramo, Flavio; Witt, Michał; Schamps, Geneviève; Katić, Višnja; Krajnovic, Dusanca; Harris, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing consensus that individual genetic research results that are scientifically robust, analytically valid, and clinically actionable should be offered to research participants. However, the general practice in European research projects is that results are usually not provided to research participants for many reasons. This article reports on the views of European experts and scholars who are members of the European COST Action CHIP ME IS1303 (Citizen's Health through public-private Initiatives: Public health, Market and Ethical perspectives) regarding challenges to the feedback of individual genetic results to research participants in Europe and potential strategies to address these challenges. Materials and Methods: A consultation of the COST Action members was conducted through an email survey and a workshop. The results from the consultation were analyzed following a conventional content analysis approach. Results: Legal frameworks, professional guidelines, and financial, organizational, and human resources to support the feedback of results are largely missing in Europe. Necessary steps to facilitate the feedback process include clarifying legal requirements to the feedback of results, developing harmonized European best practices, promoting interdisciplinary and cross-institutional collaboration, designing educational programs and cost-efficient IT-based platforms, involving research ethics committees, and documenting the health benefits and risks of the feedback process. Conclusions: Coordinated efforts at pan-European level are needed to enable equitable, scientifically sound, and socially robust feedback of results to research participants. PMID:27082461

  17. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  18. SR-Site groundwater flow modelling methodology, setup and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken three groundwater flow modelling studies. These are performed within the SR-Site project and represent time periods with different climate conditions. The simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. Three time periods are addressed; the Excavation and operational phases, the Initial period of temperate climate after closure, and the Remaining part of the reference glacial cycle. The present report is a synthesis of the background reports describing the modelling methodology, setup, and results. It is the primary reference for the conclusions drawn in a SR-Site specific context concerning groundwater flow during the three climate periods. These conclusions are not necessarily provided explicitly in the background reports, but are based on the results provided in these reports. The main results and comparisons presented in the present report are summarised in the SR-Site Main report.

  19. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 x 10 -5 and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 x 10 -3 . Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible

  20. What makes age diverse teams effective? Results from a six-year research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegge, J; Jungmann, F; Liebermann, S; Shemla, M; Ries, B C; Diestel, S; Schmidt, K-H

    2012-01-01

    Based on a new model of productivity in age diverse tams, findings from a six-year research program are reported in which data from more than 745 natural teams with 8,848 employees in three different fields (car production, administrative work, financial services) were collected. Moreover, central assumptions of this model were tested with a representative survey of the German workforce (N = 2,000). Results support both significant advantages and disadvantages for age-mixed teams. Based on the findings, the following preconditions for the effectiveness of age diverse teams are identified: high task complexity, low salience and high appreciation of age diversity, a positive team climate, low age-discrimination, ergonomic design of work places, and the use of age differentiated leadership. Based on these insights, we developed a new training for supervisors, which addresses the aforementioned aspects and seeks to improve team performance and health of team members. It was found that the training reduces age stereotypes, team conflicts and enhances innovation. Thus, we can conclude that effective interventions for a successful integration of elderly employees in work groups are available and that combinations of measures that address ergonomic design issues, team composition and leadership are to be strongly recommended for practice.

  1. Fate, weathering, and modelling research: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.

    1992-01-01

    Fate and behavior studies are fundamental to oil spill research and their results are important for operational response. Knowledge of the ultimate fate and behavior of oil should drive countermeasures decisions. Research has been conducted around the world on oil fate and behavior. The effort has not been, in this author's opinion, focussed and long-term as it should have been. Unfortunately, research funding for oil spills is very oscillatory. Fate and behavior studies require a long, concerted effort to yield valuable results. Because of this, fate and behavior studies have suffered much more than others from funding spurts. Little research has been maintained at universities because of the lack of sustained funding. Few other research organizations have facilities, equipment and expertise to carry out fundamental studies. A second difficulty in the field has been the tendency to fund one-year studies. In many cases little can be answered in a year. Specialized apparatus take 6-12 months to build or to acquire. Little time is left to operate these. The learning curve is also a factor. It is generally accepted in a specialized field that it takes a new scientist 6 months to produce any useful work, 2 years to become productive, and 5 years to be fully productive. Hopefully, future efforts will allow for longer-term studies on fate and behavior. The state-of-the-art in the field of fate, behavior, weathering and modelling could be summarized as variable. There are many deficiencies in our knowledge about the fate, weathering and modelling of oil spills. The fate, behavior and transformation of oil is dominated by the reality that oil is a varying mixture of hundreds of compounds

  2. Results of the benchmark for blade structural models, part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekou, D.J.; Chortis, D.; Belen Fariñas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Task 2.2 of the InnWind.Eu project. The benchmark is based on the reference wind turbine and the reference blade provided by DTU [1]. "Structural Concept developers/modelers" of WP2 were provided with the necessary input for a comparison numerical simulation run, upon definition of the reference blade......A benchmark on structural design methods for blades was performed within the InnWind.Eu project under WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design”. The present document is describes the results of the comparison simulation runs that were performed by the partners involved within...

  3. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  4. The Wider Implications of Business-model Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Lettl, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Business-model research has struggled to develop a clear footprint in the strategic management field. This introduction to the special issue on the wider implications of business-model research argues that part of this struggle relates to the application of five different perspectives on the term...... “business model,” which creates ambiguity about the conceptual boundaries of business models, the applied terminology, and the potential contributions of business-model research to strategic management literature. By explicitly distinguishing among these five perspectives and by aligning them into one...

  5. Results of research and development in large-scale research centers as an innovation source for firms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theenhaus, R.

    1978-01-01

    The twelve large-scale research centres of the Federal Republic of Germany with their 16,000 employees represent a considerable scientific and technical potential. Cooperation with industry with regard to large-scale projects has already become very close and the know-how flow as well as the contributions to innovation connected therewith are largely established. The first successful steps to utilizing the results of basic research, of spin off and those within the frame of research and development as well as the fulfilling of services are encouraging. However, there is a number of detail problems which can only be solved between all parties concerned, in particular between industry and all large-scale research centres. (orig./RW) [de

  6. A Garbage Can Model of the Psychological Research Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joanne

    1981-01-01

    Reviews models commonly used in psychological research, and, particularly, in organizational decision making. An alternative model of organizational decision making is suggested. The model, referred to as the garbage can model, describes a process in which members of an organization collect the problems and solutions they generate by dumping them…

  7. Deriving user-informed climate information from climate model ensemble results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Huebener

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Communication between providers and users of climate model simulation results still needs to be improved. In the German regional climate modeling project ReKliEs-De a midterm user workshop was conducted to allow the intended users of the project results to assess the preliminary results and to streamline the final project results to their needs. The user feedback highlighted, in particular, the still considerable gap between climate research output and user-tailored input for climate impact research. Two major requests from the user community addressed the selection of sub-ensembles and some condensed, easy to understand information on the strengths and weaknesses of the climate models involved in the project.

  8. Sourcebook of models for biomedical research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conn, P. Michael

    2008-01-01

    ... have the advantage that the reproductive, mitotic, development or aging cycles are rapid compared with those in humans; others are utilized because individual proteins may be studied in an advantageous way and that have human homologs. Other organisms are facile to grow in laboratory settings or lend themselves to convenient analyses, have defined genomes or present especially good human models of human or animal disease. We have made an effort not to be seduced into making the entire book homage to the rem...

  9. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    horizontal. High-speed radiometer measurements were made of the time-dependent impact flash at wavelengths of 350-1100 nm. We will present comparisons between these measurements and the output of APL's model. The results of this validation allow us to determine basic relationships between observed optical signatures and impact conditions.

  10. POSITIVE LEADERSHIP MODELS: THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Blanch, Francisco Gil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is twofold; firstly, we establish the theoretical boundaries of positive leadership and the reasons for its emergence. It is related to the new paradigm of positive psychology that has recently been shaping the scope of organizational knowledge. This conceptual framework has triggered the development of the various forms of positive leadership (i.e. transformational, servant, spiritual, authentic, and positive. Although the construct does not seem univocally defined, these different types of leadership overlap and share a significant affinity. Secondly, we review the empirical evidence that shows the impact of positive leadership in organizations and we highlight the positive relationship between these forms of leadership and key positive organizational variables. Lastly, we analyse future research areas in order to further develop this concept.

  11. The marketing system as a management form of the research and development results (transfer of technology)

    OpenAIRE

    Mączyński, Jacek; Żuber, Ryszard

    2001-01-01

    II International Conference on Advances in Production Engineering - APE'2001 The usage of the results of research and development works realised by schools as well as scientific and technical backup of industry is unsatisfactory. This problem gains special importance in the period of economy transformation. Marketing cam be used as a tool for managing the research and development works. The proposed solution presents the following aims: the functions of the system of marketing the research...

  12. "Still Rather Hazy at Present": Citizens' and Physicians' Views on Returning Results from Biobank Research Using Broad Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Gaia; Cavalli, Samuele; Benaroyo, Lazare; Kaufmann, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Informed consent and return of research results are among the most debated topics in the biobank literature. We discuss ethical, social, and policy issues associated with returning results in the context of biobanks using a broad consent approach, in the light of data from a qualitative survey of citizens' and physicians' views. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups to investigate stakeholders' perspectives about a large-scale hospital-based biobank designed to foster biomedical research, including prospective genomics research, and "personalized" medicine. Both physicians and citizens considered psychosocial impacts as crucial in the assessment of benefits expected from a return of results to biobank participants. In particular, physicians highlighted the possible consequences on the patient-doctor relationship and discussed implications for the concept of "personalized" medicine. Citizens held ambivalent attitudes toward returning individual research results: they defended the "right not to know," while they also considered a sort of "responsibility to know" because of potential implications of results for family members. Moreover, physicians and citizens raised questions about the broad consent model used for inhospital biobank recruitment and expressed their needs for more training in genomics and more information on the biobank initiative. Stakeholders such as citizens and physicians, who may be concerned as potential biobank participants or as healthcare professionals involved in the management of clinically relevant research results, provide useful insights into several aspects of broad consent and return of results, related in particular to the interface between research and the clinic.

  13. Report on research and development results in 1990 by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    Report on research and development results in 1990 by the Institute for Nuclear Waste Management (INE). Priorities in 1990 were: Experiments on the behaviour of platinum metals during vitrification of high-level fission product solutions. Experiments at a technical plant and at a laboratory melter on the vitrification of simulated fission product solutions with a high content of platinum metals. Development of a closed treatment system for high and medium-level and alpha bearing wastes from reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel element fabrication. Solidification of the waste concentrate resulting from the above treatment, in an aluminium silicate matrix. Investigation into the actinide oxide/solidification matrix materials systems in contact with hydrochloric acid; determination of activity distribution between solid and liquid phases. Development of tests and models to register geochemical reactions between waste forms and saline solutions in the near vicinity of final repositories. Leaching experiments on spent LWR fuels in saline solutions. Investigations into the corrosion behaviour of material combinations for POLLUX containers designed for direct ultimate storage. Improvement of programmes to calculate the thermomechanical processes in the ultimate repository, and analyse the stress in drifts in the vicinity of the storage site. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Much achievement was obtained also in fiscal 1983 by the common utilization of the nuclear reactor ''Yayoi'' and the linear accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. These results were summarized, and this report is published. In the utilization of the reactor ''Yayoi'', the period of operation and the maximum output were limited very much, because long cooling period is necessary to prepare for the repair of fuel cladding in the next year. Also foreign research students commonly utilized the reactor ''Yayoi''. The common utilization of the linear accelerator was begun six years ago, and now it is carried out widely and smoothly. The total number of those who commonly utilized the facilities reached 3,179. The summaries of the results of 5 on-pile researches, 17 off-pile researches, and 16 researches using the linear accelerator are collected. The committee meetings and study meetings held in fiscal 1983 are listed. The names of the members of various committees and the names of those in charge of various experiments are given. (Kako, I.)

  15. Modelling as an indispensible research tool in the information society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Science and society would be well advised to develop a different relationship as the information revolution penetrates all aspects of modern life. Rather than produce clear answers to clear questions in a top-down manner, land-use issues related to the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) present "wicked"problems involving different, strongly opiniated, stakeholders with conflicting ideas and interests and risk-averse politicians. The Dutch government has invited its citizens to develop a "science agenda", defining future research needs, implicitly suggesting that the research community is unable to do so. Time, therefore, for a pro-active approach to more convincingly define our:"societal license to research". For soil science this could imply a focus on the SDGs , considering soils as living, characteristically different, dynamic bodies in a landscape, to be mapped in ways that allow generation of suitable modelling data. Models allow a dynamic characterization of water- and nutrient regimes and plant growth in soils both for actual and future conditions, reflecting e.g. effects of climate or land-use change or alternative management practices. Engaging modern stakeholders in a bottom-up manner implies continuous involvement and "joint learning" from project initiation to completion, where modelling results act as building blocks to explore alternative scenarios. Modern techniques allow very rapid calculations and innovative visualization. Everything is possible but only modelling can articulate the economic, social and environmental consequences of each scenario, demonstrating in a pro-active manner the crucial and indispensible role of research. But choices are to be made by stakeholders and reluctant policy makers and certainly not by scientists who should carefully guard their independance. Only clear results in the end are convincing proof for the impact of science, requiring therefore continued involvement of scientists up to the very end of projects. To

  16. Brief review of topmost scientific results obtained in 2015 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabaeva, E.V.; Krupko, E.I.

    2016-01-01

    This brief review presents the topmost scientific results obtained in 2015 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in such fields as theoretical and experimental physics, radiation and radiobiological research, accelerators, information technology and computer physics. It also provides information about the publications by JINR staff members, awards given to JINR scientists, and activities carried out at the JINR University Centre in 2015. [ru

  17. Brief review of topmost scientific results obtained in 2016 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, E.I.; Sabaeva, E.V.

    2017-01-01

    This brief review presents the topmost scientific results obtained in 2016 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in such fields as theoretical and experimental physics, radiation and radiobiological research, accelerators, information technology and computer physics. It also provides information about the publications by JINR staff members and activities carried out at the JINR University Centre in 2016. [ru

  18. Results of Low-Cost Electric Propulsion System Research for Small Satellite Application

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, T.J.; Sellers, J.J.; Ward, J.W.; Paul, M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper summarises on-going research into lowcost electric propulsion system options for small satellite stationkeeping missions. An overview of system cost drivers, electric propulsion system trade-offs, and initial water resistojet experimental results is given. The propulsion system for the forthcoming UoSAT-12 minisatellite system is described. Future water resistojet research work is summarised.

  19. Transfer Paths of Research Results to the Practice: Observations From the Receiving End

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findikakis, A. N.

    2005-12-01

    A non-scientific poll of fellow practicing professionals suggests that there is a range of opinions regarding the effectiveness of different ways of becoming acquainted with and using the results of academic research in their practice. Journal articles remain the dominant path for transferring research results to the profession, even though accessing them is becoming more difficult with time. Driven primarily by cost considerations personal and corporate subscriptions seem to be on the decline. Libraries are one of the first victims of cost cutting measures in the industry. Even though the availability of journal articles in electronic form facilitates their availability, their prices are prohibitive. This is especially true during when a professional is searching for a solution to a problem and may have to review several papers on the subject. One colleague suggested that the professional organizations and other publishers of research articles could learn from the experience of the music industry, by lowering the cost of downloading individual papers to something like a dollar per article, recovering thus their production costs through the increase in the volume of purchased articles. The posting on the internet of special reports and dissertations by research institutions is viewed as very useful by those working in practice. The distribution through the internet of reports by federal organizations conducting or sponsoring research, such as the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is greatly appreciated by the practicing professionals. The use of leading researchers as consultants provides a direct path for bringing research results to the practice, but it is limited to a small number of cases where bringing in a consultant can be justified. Short courses are viewed as an effective way of familiarizing professionals with the latest research findings on specific subjects. The notes distributed in such courses are considered

  20. Genomic research with human samples. Points of view from scientists and research subjects about disclosure of results and risks of genomic research. Ethical and empirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Mansilla, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often now ask subjects to donate samples to be deposited in biobanks. This is not only of interest to researchers, patients and society as a whole can benefit from the improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention that the advent of genomic medicine portends. However, there is a growing debate regarding the social and ethical implications of creating biobanks and using stored human tissue samples for genomic research. Our aim was to identify factors related to both scientists and patients' preferences regarding the sort of information to convey to subjects about the results of the study and the risks related to genomic research. The method used was a survey addressed to 204 scientists and 279 donors from the U.S. and Spain. In this sample, researchers had already published genomic epidemiology studies; and research subjects had actually volunteered to donate a human sample for genomic research. Concerning the results, patients supported more frequently than scientists their right to know individual results from future genomic research. These differences were statistically significant after adjusting by the opportunity to receive genetic research results from the research they had previously participated and their perception of risks regarding genetic information compared to other clinical data. A slight majority of researchers supported informing participants about individual genomic results only if the reliability and clinical validity of the information had been established. Men were more likely than women to believe that patients should be informed of research results even if these conditions were not met. Also among patients, almost half of them would always prefer to be informed about individual results from future genomic research. The three main factors associated to a higher support of a non-limited access to individual results were: being from the US, having previously been offered individual information and considering

  1. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  2. Research on the maximum utilization of PSR (Periodic Safety Review) results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Tae Myung; Lee, Jae Kyung; Ahn, Jin Chul; Kim, G. U.; Ryu, Y. S.; Lee, G. B.; Park, D. H. [Chungju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    This is the final report of 'research on the maximum utilization of PSR results' focused on linkage strategy of PSR with continued operation over design life of operating NPP. Study was mace mainly on the analysis of current status of continued operation over plant design life in foreign countries, analysis of domestic PSR implementation status and establishment of basic strategy for linking PSR with continued operation. The results of the study performed so far can be summarized as below, the recent worldwide trend of promoting efficiency of NPP operation is focused on life extension of the plants rather than building of new. Considering the fact that some developed countries have already implemented the plant life extension and not a few countries at least have invested a good amount of fund for R and D of plant life management, we can not disregard the owner's request for review of life extension application without any reasonable description. As a result of investigation and analysis for the current status of continued operation over plant design life in foreign countries, it is concluded that most countries tend to link PSR with continued operation over plant design life and the extended operation has already been implemented in some developed countries. From the point, it turned out to be more desirable to couple those two systems for continued operation over plant design life of Korean NPP. A less than 7 years left until the end of design life for the oldest NPP Kori unit 1, it is strongly recommended to establish institutional frame including a legal basis and regulatory guidelines for continued operation over plant design life before long. For the prioritization methods of corrective actions in consideration of safety significance of shortcomings picked up from PSR, some related systems are reviewed including IAEA guidelines, PSR implementation experience of UK and US prioritization system for GSI (Generic Safety Issue). Basic principles are

  3. Commenting on Results in Published Research Articles and Masters Dissertations in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturkmen, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the ways writers comment on the results of their research. Making claims in the form of Commenting on Results is a key move in discussion of results sections. Using data drawn from published journal articles and master dissertations in Language Teaching, the study investigates how published academics and students writing…

  4. On-line high-speed rail defect detection : research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The rail defect detection prototype, which is being developed by the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) under a Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) Office of Research and Development (R&D) grant, has produced encouraging results in recent fi...

  5. Return of Research Results in the Saudi Biobank: An Exploratory Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Ghiath; Dierickx, Kris

    2017-03-01

    There are many research biobanks in the world, including a small number in the Middle East. The Saudi biobank, one of the newly established biobanks, has just started to collect data and samples in 2016. A survey was conducted to assess the opinions of stakeholders regarding the return of individual research results. A total of 180 adults from three different groups (researchers, physicians, and laypeople) participated in this cross-sectional study. There was strong agreement among all respondents that the biobank has the duty and donors have the right to be provided with important results that may have direct or indirect benefits. Moreover, there was strong support for the view that donors have the right to refuse to receive any research results. These results are compatible with many other studies and are in line with the governance of the Saudi biobank.

  6. RESULTS OF RESEARCH OF AIR POLLUTION BY AUTOMOBILE TRANSPORT IN THE STREETS OF KHARKIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezhneva, E.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Results of the research of the atmospheric air of residential area roadside territory at functioning of motor transport are presented. Architectural and planning activities to improve the environmental performance of the local area of Kharkiv are offered.

  7. The prisoner as model organism: malaria research at Stateville Penitentiary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Nathaniel

    2009-09-01

    In a military-sponsored research project begun during the Second World War, inmates of the Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois were infected with malaria and treated with experimental drugs that sometimes had vicious side effects. They were made into reservoirs for the disease and they provided a food supply for the mosquito cultures. They acted as secretaries and technicians, recording data on one another, administering malarious mosquito bites and experimental drugs to one another, and helping decide who was admitted to the project and who became eligible for early parole as a result of his participation. Thus, the prisoners were not simply research subjects; they were deeply constitutive of the research project. Because a prisoner's time on the project was counted as part of his sentence, and because serving on the project could shorten one's sentence, the project must be seen as simultaneously serving the functions of research and punishment. Michel Foucault wrote about such 'mixed mechanisms' in his Discipline and punish. His shining example of such a 'transparent' and subtle style of punishment was the panopticon, Jeremy Bentham's architectural invention of prison cellblocks arrayed around a central guard tower. Stateville prison was designed on Bentham's model; Foucault featured it in his own discussion. This paper, then, explores the power relations in this highly idiosyncratic experimental system, in which the various roles of model organism, reagent, and technician are all occupied by sentient beings who move among them fluidly. This, I argue, created an environment in the Stateville hospital wing more panoptic than that in the cellblocks. Research and punishment were completely interpenetrating, and mutually reinforcing.

  8. Results of a research study on the impact of active daylighting on operating results of a retail business. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    In preliminary evaluations of So-Luminaire`s (SI) product in 1985 and 1986, DOE concluded that it warranted further research and evaluation and was worthy of receiving governmental financial and structural support therefor. SI, along with Safeway, had known intuitively that the So-Luminaire systems which had been previously installed in several of their Phoenix-area stores had resulted in a marked reduction in electrical energy consumption. However, a definitive determination of energy savings had been utilized in previous installations. Further, SI and Safeway both hypothesized that the high quality of natural light provided by these systems displayed goods to greater advantage and contributed to an overall increase in store sales, all other factors being held constant. A study to attempt to objectively determine these two presumed benefits of active daylighting in a commercial application was begun.

  9. Results of a research study on the impact of active daylighting on operating results of a retail business

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    In preliminary evaluations of So-Luminaire's (SI) product in 1985 and 1986, DOE concluded that it warranted further research and evaluation and was worthy of receiving governmental financial and structural support therefor. SI, along with Safeway, had known intuitively that the So-Luminaire systems which had been previously installed in several of their Phoenix-area stores had resulted in a marked reduction in electrical energy consumption. However, a definitive determination of energy savings had been utilized in previous installations. Further, SI and Safeway both hypothesized that the high quality of natural light provided by these systems displayed goods to greater advantage and contributed to an overall increase in store sales, all other factors being held constant. A study to attempt to objectively determine these two presumed benefits of active daylighting in a commercial application was begun.

  10. PROFESSIONAL-PEDAGOGICAL REFLECTION OF STUDENTS: RESULTS OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Dudina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today, questions of valuable preferences and priorities of young people choosing a career in teaching are attracting widespread interest due to the introduction of new educational standards and subsequently fullygrown social and state requirements for teaching professionals. Individual characteristics (own intensions, potentialities, achievements of future teachers have to correspond ideally to a humanistic educational paradigm and personally focused model of training and education.The aim of this research is to clarify the specifics of students’ reflection on the acquired profession and seeing themselves as future teachers.Methodology and research methods. The methodological framework of the study is based on competencyand system-based approaches. The author’s technique built upon a questionnaire was the main research tool. The technique of psychometric diagnostics offered by S. A. Minyurova and A. I. Kalashnikov became initial material for drawing up tasks of the questionnaire; that diagnostics is designed for measurement of professional commitment of school teachers and adapted to study reflexive sphere of students’ personality who chose pedagogical field of study. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-criterion test was applied when processing the data obtained during the questionnaire to compare average values of independent samples of respondents.Results and scientific novelty. The carried out analysis of dynamically changing external and internal (objective and subjective allowed the author to emphasize the factors that influence students’ motivation to pedagogical activity, desire to realize themselves in it, and aspirations to study “through all life”. The proposed by the author new technique of a self-assessment for students with different levels of higher pedagogical education including postgraduate is approved. Significantly, the technique enables to reveal: socially and personally significant purposes of future

  11. Research on Evacuation Based on Social Force Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Deng, Z.; Li, W.; Lin, J.

    2017-09-01

    Crowded centers always cause personnel casualties in evacuation operations. Stampede events often occur by hit, squeeze and crush due to panic. It is of vital important to alleviate such situation. With the deepening of personnel evacuation research, more and more researchers are committed to study individual behaviors and self-organization phenomenon in evacuation process. The study mainly includes: 1, enrich the social force model from different facets such as visual, psychological, external force to descript more realistic evacuation; 2, research on causes and effects of self - organization phenomenon. In this paper, we focus on disorder motion that occurs in the crowded indoor publics, especially the narrow channel and safety exits and other special arteries. We put forward the improved social force model to depict pedestrians' behaviors, an orderly speed-stratification evacuation method to solve disorder problem, and shape-changed export to alleviate congestion. The result of this work shows an improvement of evacuation efficiency by 19.5 %. Guiding pedestrians' direction to slow down the influence of social forces has a guidance function in improving the efficiency of indoor emergency evacuation.

  12. THE RESEARCH RESULTS OF TENDER PROCUREMENTS OF THE DRUGS FOR CANCER PATIENTS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Panfilova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since 2002, the pharmaceutical care of the cancer patients in Ukraine is carried out centrally by public funds in the framework of the target program "Oncology." In a chronic shortage of funds in the national health care system, as well as taking into account the perspectives of the introduction of the social model of obligatory medical insurance (OMI, enhanced the importance of research on the development of rational mechanisms for the use of public funds, which are sent to drug purchases. Given the high mortality rate among cancer patients, especially in children in Ukraine, these works are of particular socio-economic importance. The aim of work. To study drug purchases that are made for cancer patients in Ukraine in order to identify the main problems and directions of rational scientific basis for the use of public funds in terms of lack of resources in health care, as well as from the perspectives of the introduction of the social model of OMI in Ukraine. Materials and methods. Objects of research: data from the National Cancer Registry, annual plans and registers of public drug procurement Ministry of Ukraine. The paper used data from national legislative and regulatory framework governing the organization of pharmaceutical support cancer patients, standard methods of statistical processing of the dynamics of the clinic-economic analysis. Results and discussion. During 2010-2013 marked increase in the amounts of permanent drug purchases for cancer patients, which is on the growth rate did not meet the dynamics of changes in the relevant during epidemiological indicators. The results integrated ABC/VEN-analysis found no drug purchasing products from the group N and with the status A/V, and the dominance of the number of agents with the status items C/V. The main volume of financial resources was directed to the purchase of drugs from the group E (84.8% - 92.4% and the status of A/E (78,9% -79,8%, as well as drug belonging to

  13. THE RESEARCH ACTIVITY OF THE UNIVERSITY TEACHERS: DIRECTIONS, RESULTS, AND PROSPECTS. SOCIOLOGICAL CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vasilyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of an integrated monitoring research is the analysis of the main directions of research activity of faculty, staff and young scientists of the university.Methods. Scientific and theoretical analysis of publications on the researched topic are used as basic methods; sociological and diagnostic data collection methods; the method of statistical processing and classification of documentary and empirical data; the methods of content analysis and quantification of documentary and sociological information.Scientific novelty. The research is characterized by an integrated approach to the study of the problem: the basic provisions are analyzed; conclusions and recommendations of reports on research projects made by members of temporary research teams (or, university scientists and teaching staff. The classification (depending on the translation vectors results of dissertation works of graduate students, doctoral candidates is carried out in the course of the present study. Documentary information about the publication and presentation of scientific and pedagogical staff of the university is systematized; the report and information cards on the activities of innovative platforms are analyzed. The research team, with the direct participation of the author, after studying a few scientific publications on the subject, has developed an original method of complex research of the main directions of research activity of university scientists.Results. The presented research has allowed to note publication and innovative activity of the research and educational personnel, along with other its types, can act as the indicators characterizing the main directions of research activity both of higher education institution in general, and its concrete educational and scientific divisions. At the same, time the author emphasizes that efficiency of research process is caused not so much by quantitative as qualitative characteristics of concrete research

  14. International Research Results and Accomplishments From the International Space Station - A New Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttley, Tara; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Perkins, Nekisha; Cohen, Luchino; Marcil, Isabelle; Heppener, Marc; Hatton, Jason; Tasaki, Kazuyuki; Umemura, Sayaka; hide

    2016-01-01

    In 2016, the International Space Station (ISS) partnership published the first-ever compilation of international ISS research publications resulting from research performed on the ISS through 2011 (Expeditions 0 through 30). International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results. From 2000-2011 is a collection of over 1,200 journal publications that describe ISS research in the areas of biology and biotechnology; Earth and space science; educational activities and outreach; human research; physical sciences; technology development and demonstration; and, results from ISS operations. This paper will summarize the ISS results publications obtained through 2011 on behalf of the ISS Program Science Forum that is made up of senior science representatives across the international partnership. NASA's ISS Program Science office maintains an online experiment database (www.nasa.gov/iss- science) that tracks and communicates ISS research activities across the entire ISS partnership, and it is continuously updated by cooperation and linking with the results tracking activities of each partner. It captures ISS experiment summaries and results and includes citations to the journals, conference proceedings, and patents as they become available. This content is obtained through extensive and regular journal and patent database searches, and input provided by the ISS international partners ISS scientists themselves. The International Space Station Research Accomplishments: An Analysis of Results From 2000-2011 is a testament to the research that was underway even as the ISS laboratory was being built. It rejects the scientific knowledge gained from ISS research, and how it impact the fields of science in both space and traditional science disciplines on Earth. Now, during a time when utilization is at its busiest, and with extension of the ISS through at least 2024, the ISS partners work together to track the accomplishments and the new knowledge gained in a

  15. Position-sensitive transition edge sensor modeling and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammock, Christina E-mail: chammock@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Apodaca, Emmanuel; Bandler, Simon; Boyce, Kevin; Chervenak, Jay; Finkbeiner, Fred; Kelley, Richard; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Scott; Saab, Tarek; Stahle, Caroline

    2004-03-11

    We report the latest design and experimental results for a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST). The PoST is motivated by the desire to achieve a larger field-of-view without increasing the number of readout channels. A PoST consists of a one-dimensional array of X-ray absorbers connected on each end to a Transition Edge Sensor (TES). Position differentiation is achieved through a comparison of pulses between the two TESs and X-ray energy is inferred from a sum of the two signals. Optimizing such a device involves studying the available parameter space which includes device properties such as heat capacity and thermal conductivity as well as TES read-out circuitry parameters. We present results for different regimes of operation and the effects on energy resolution, throughput, and position differentiation. Results and implications from a non-linear model developed to study the saturation effects unique to PoSTs are also presented.

  16. Mentoring Model for Lecturers' Research Skills Development: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The informal group mentoring model for research skills development begins with desk research for qualities of a publishable paper. Five dummy papers were reviewed by participants for quality. Participants conducted new studies and wrote research articles. These articles were peer reviewed by participants and submitted ...

  17. The Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) Maturity Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahl, Bernd; Obach, Michael; Yaghmaei, Emad

    2017-01-01

    Responsible research and innovation (RRI) is an approach to research and innovation governance aiming to ensure that research purpose, process and outcomes are acceptable, sustainable and even desirable. In order to achieve this ambitious aim, RRI must be relevant to research and innovation in in...... studies show the model to be viable and useful in corporate innovation processes. With this approach, we aim to inspire further research and evaluation of the proposed maturity model as a tool for facilitating the integration of RRI in corporate management....

  18. Comparison of blade-strike modeling results with empirical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskey, Gene R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-03-01

    This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner. The first phase of this study included a sensitivity analysis to consider the effects of difference in geometry and operations between families of turbines on the strike probability response surface. The analysis revealed that the orientation of fish relative to the leading edge of a runner blade and the location that fish pass along the blade between the hub and blade tip are critical uncertainties in blade-strike models. Over a range of discharges, the average prediction of injury from blade strike was two to five times higher than average empirical estimates of visible injury from shear and mechanical devices. Empirical estimates of mortality may be better metrics for comparison to predicted injury rates than other injury measures for fish passing at mid-blade and blade-tip locations.

  19. Aeroelastic tailoring via ribs orientation of NASA Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y. N.; Harmin, M. Y.; Rafie, A. S. M.

    2017-12-01

    A baseline model in reference to the NASA Common Research Model is selected to illustrate the concept of aeroelastic tailoring of wing ribs structure by varying the orientation of the ribs. This enables the torsional-bending modes characteristic to be altered, which results in a possibility of improvement in the aeroelastic performance without having to compromise its overall weight. Two strategies are implanted in this work: the first strategy considers the whole ribs to be oriented in parallel while the second one is by dividing the wing into six parts where the ribs are allowed to be oriented in parallel within their part only. In many cases, there are a significant improvement with up to 5.5% of flutter increment via orientating the ribs section, hence leading to a possibility in significant structural weight reduction.

  20. Results and future plans for the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is under the rise-to-power stage at the Oarai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This reactor is aimed not only at establishment of the infrastructural technology on high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its upgrading, but also at promotion of the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering. The research is a series of innovative high-temperature irradiation studies, making the best use of the characteristic of the HTTR that it provides a very wide irradiation space at high temperatures. The JAERI has been conducting preliminary tests of the innovative research since 1994, in collaboration with universities and other research institutes, in the fields of 1) new materials development, 2) high temperature radiation chemistry and fusion-related research, and 3) high temperature irradiation techniques and other nuclear research. The HTTR Utilization Research Committee has been examining the results and methodology of the preliminary tests and the future plans, as well as examining the preparatory arrangements of facilities for the HTTR irradiation and post-irradiation examinations. This report presents a summary of results of the preliminary tests and preparatory arrangements for about seven years, together with an outline of the future plans. (author)

  1. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in fiscal year 1991. The Yayoi was operated smoothly throughout the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized, and the related themes reached 21 cases. After the linear accelerator was reconstructed as the twin linac, the joint utilization was resumed in October, 1989, and the number of research themes, was 15 cases. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the reports of 15 cases of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1991 are collected. (K.I.)

  2. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  3. A narrative review of research impact assessment models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milat, Andrew J; Bauman, Adrian E; Redman, Sally

    2015-03-18

    Research funding agencies continue to grapple with assessing research impact. Theoretical frameworks are useful tools for describing and understanding research impact. The purpose of this narrative literature review was to synthesize evidence that describes processes and conceptual models for assessing policy and practice impacts of public health research. The review involved keyword searches of electronic databases, including MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EBM Reviews, and Google Scholar in July/August 2013. Review search terms included 'research impact', 'policy and practice', 'intervention research', 'translational research', 'health promotion', and 'public health'. The review included theoretical and opinion pieces, case studies, descriptive studies, frameworks and systematic reviews describing processes, and conceptual models for assessing research impact. The review was conducted in two phases: initially, abstracts were retrieved and assessed against the review criteria followed by the retrieval and assessment of full papers against review criteria. Thirty one primary studies and one systematic review met the review criteria, with 88% of studies published since 2006. Studies comprised assessments of the impacts of a wide range of health-related research, including basic and biomedical research, clinical trials, health service research, as well as public health research. Six studies had an explicit focus on assessing impacts of health promotion or public health research and one had a specific focus on intervention research impact assessment. A total of 16 different impact assessment models were identified, with the 'payback model' the most frequently used conceptual framework. Typically, impacts were assessed across multiple dimensions using mixed methodologies, including publication and citation analysis, interviews with principal investigators, peer assessment, case studies, and document analysis. The vast majority of studies relied on principal investigator

  4. Patenting of university and non-university public research organisations in Germany: evidence from patent applications for medical research results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tinnemann

    . Internationally mounting evidence questions the viability of policies to increase commercial exploitation of publicly funded research results. To evaluate the outcome of research policies a transparent evidence base for public debate is needed in Germany.

  5. Delivering the Goods: Scaling out Results of Natural Resource Management Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Harrington

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To help integrated natural resource management (INRM research "deliver the goods" for many of the world's poor over a large area and in a timely manner, the authors suggest a problem-solving approach that facilitates the scaling out of relevant agricultural practices. They propose seven ways to foster scaling out: (1 develop more attractive practices and technologies through participatory research (2 balance supply-driven approaches with resource user demands, (3 use feedback to redefine the research agenda, (4 encourage support groups and networks for information sharing, (5 facilitate negotiation among stakeholders, (6 inform policy change and institutional development, and (7 make sensible use of information management tools, including models and geographic information systems (GIS. They also draw on experiences in Mesoamerica, South Asia, and southern Africa to describe useful information management tools, including site similarity analyses, the linking of simulation models with GIS, and the use of farmer and land type categories.

  6. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute’s Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  7. The "Research Audit" Model: A Prototype for Data-Driven Discovery of Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, Margaret H.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interdisciplinarity of scientific research creates both challenges and opportunities for librarians. The liaison model may be inadequate for supporting campus research that represents multiple disciplines and geographically dispersed departments. The identification of units, researchers, and projects is a first step in planning and…

  8. Conceptual Models in Health Informatics Research: A Literature Review and Suggestions for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Contributing to health informatics research means using conceptual models that are integrative and explain the research in terms of the two broad domains of health science and information science. However, it can be hard for novice health informatics researchers to find exemplars and guidelines in working with integrative conceptual models. Objectives The aim of this paper is to support the use of integrative conceptual models in research on information and communication technologies in the health sector, and to encourage discussion of these conceptual models in scholarly forums. Methods A two-part method was used to summarize and structure ideas about how to work effectively with conceptual models in health informatics research that included (1) a selective review and summary of the literature of conceptual models; and (2) the construction of a step-by-step approach to developing a conceptual model. Results The seven-step methodology for developing conceptual models in health informatics research explained in this paper involves (1) acknowledging the limitations of health science and information science conceptual models; (2) giving a rationale for one’s choice of integrative conceptual model; (3) explicating a conceptual model verbally and graphically; (4) seeking feedback about the conceptual model from stakeholders in both the health science and information science domains; (5) aligning a conceptual model with an appropriate research plan; (6) adapting a conceptual model in response to new knowledge over time; and (7) disseminating conceptual models in scholarly and scientific forums. Conclusions Making explicit the conceptual model that underpins a health informatics research project can contribute to increasing the number of well-formed and strongly grounded health informatics research projects. This explication has distinct benefits for researchers in training, research teams, and researchers and practitioners in information, health, and other

  9. Animal models for implant biomaterial research in bone: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A I Pearce

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of an optimal interface between bone and orthopaedic and dental implants has taken place for many years. In order to determine whether a newly developed implant material conforms to the requirements of biocompatibility, mechanical stability and safety, it must undergo rigorous testing both in vitro and in vivo. Results from in vitro studies can be difficult to extrapolate to the in vivo situation. For this reason the use of animal models is often an essential step in the testing of orthopaedic and dental implants prior to clinical use in humans. This review discusses some of the more commonly available and frequently used animal models such as the dog, sheep, goat, pig and rabbit models for the evaluation of bone-implant interactions. Factors for consideration when choosing an animal model and implant design are discussed. Various bone specific features are discussed including the usage of the species, bone macrostructure and microstructure and bone composition and remodelling, with emphasis being placed on the similarity between the animal model and the human clinical situation. While the rabbit was the most commonly used of the species discussed in this review, it is clear that this species showed the least similarities to human bone. There were only minor differences in bone composition between the various species and humans. The pig demonstrated a good likeness with human bone however difficulties may be encountered in relation to their size and ease of handling. In this respect the dog and sheep/goat show more promise as animal models for the testing of bone implant materials. While no species fulfils all of the requirements of an ideal model, an understanding of the differences in bone architecture and remodelling between the species is likely to assist in the selection of a suitable species for a defined research question.

  10. A Critical Synthesis of Scientific Research on Business Models and Business Model Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana CLODNIȚCHI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current volatile economic environment, globalization and evermore shorter technology cycles impact the way business is done today. Business modelling proves itself as an instrument, which may impact decisively the success or failure of a business. This is why both the business and academic community critically address this issue. The aim of this article is to contribute to the development of a unifying research agenda by synthesising the most relevant scientific research and studies. The author reviewed and analysed the scientific theoretical framework on this subject from the past 15 years. The research result consists in a systematisation on past approaches on business modelling stressing the components as they are defined by contemporary scholars. By doing this, the author aims at reconciling the fragmented and only partially overlapping definition of the concept of “business model”.

  11. Development and Validation of the Controller Acceptance Rating Scale (CARS): Results of Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katharine K.; Kerns, Karol; Bone, Randall

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of operational acceptability is important for the development, implementation, and evolution of air traffic management decision support tools. The Controller Acceptance Rating Scale was developed at NASA Ames Research Center for the development and evaluation of the Passive Final Approach Spacing Tool. CARS was modeled after a well-known pilot evaluation rating instrument, the Cooper-Harper Scale, and has since been used in the evaluation of the User Request Evaluation Tool, developed by MITRE's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development. In this paper, we provide a discussion of the development of CARS and an analysis of the empirical data collected with CARS to examine construct validity. Results of intraclass correlations indicated statistically significant reliability for the CARS. From the subjective workload data that were collected in conjunction with the CARS, it appears that the expected set of workload attributes was correlated with the CARS. As expected, the analysis also showed that CARS was a sensitive indicator of the impact of decision support tools on controller operations. Suggestions for future CARS development and its improvement are also provided.

  12. An applied research model for the sport sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David

    2008-01-01

    Sport science can be thought of as a scientific process used to guide the practice of sport with the ultimate aim of improving sporting performance. However, despite this goal, the general consensus is that the translation of sport-science research to practice is poor. Furthermore, researchers have been criticised for failing to study problems relevant to practitioners and for disseminating findings that are difficult to implement within a practical setting. This paper proposes that the situation may be improved by the adoption of a model that guides the direction of research required to build our evidence base about how to improve performance. Central to the Applied Research Model for the Sport Sciences (ARMSS) described in this report is the idea that only research leading to practices that can and will be adopted can improve sporting performance. The eight stages of the proposed model are (i) defining the problem; (ii) descriptive research; (iii) predictors of performance; (iv) experimental testing of predictors; (v) determinants of key performance predictors; (vi) efficacy studies; (vii) examination of barriers to uptake; and (viii) implementation studies in a real sporting setting. It is suggested that, from the very inception, researchers need to consider how their research findings might ultimately be adapted to the intended population, in the actual sporting setting, delivered by persons with diverse training and skills, and using the available resources. It is further argued in the model that a greater understanding of the literature and more mechanistic studies are essential to inform subsequent research conducted in real sporting settings. The proposed ARMSS model therefore calls for a fundamental change in the way in which many sport scientists think about the research process. While there is no guarantee that application of this proposed research model will improve actual sports performance, anecdotal evidence suggests that sport-science research is

  13. Longitudinal Omics Modelling and Integration in Clinical Metabonomics Research: challenges in childhood metabolic health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eSperisen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology is an important approach for deciphering the complex processes in health maintenance and the etiology of metabolic diseases. Such integrative methodologies will help better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in growth and development throughout childhood, and consequently will result in new insights about metabolic and nutritional requirements of infants, children and adults. To achieve this, a better understanding of the physiological processes at anthropometric, cellular and molecular level for any given individual is needed. In this respect, novel omics technologies in combination with sophisticated data modelling techniques are key. Due to the highly complex network of influential factors determining individual trajectories, it becomes imperative to develop proper tools and solutions that will comprehensively model biological information related to growth and maturation of our body functions. The aim of this review and perspective is to evaluate, succinctly, promising data analysis approaches to enable data integration for clinical research, with an emphasis on the longitudinal component. Approaches based on empirical and mechanistic modelling of omics data are essential to leverage findings from high dimensional omics datasets and enable biological interpretation and clinical translation. On the one hand, empirical methods, which provide quantitative descriptions of patterns in the data, are mostly used for exploring and mining datasets. On the other hand, mechanistic models are based on an understanding of the behavior of a system’s components and condense information about the known functions, allowing robust and reliable analyses to be performed by bioinformatics pipelines and similar tools. Herein, we will illustrate current examples, challenges and perspectives in the applications of empirical and mechanistic modelling in the context of childhood metabolic health research.

  14. Longitudinal omics modeling and integration in clinical metabonomics research: challenges in childhood metabolic health research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperisen, Peter; Cominetti, Ornella; Martin, François-Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology is an important approach for deciphering the complex processes in health maintenance and the etiology of metabolic diseases. Such integrative methodologies will help better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in growth and development throughout childhood, and consequently will result in new insights about metabolic and nutritional requirements of infants, children and adults. To achieve this, a better understanding of the physiological processes at anthropometric, cellular and molecular level for any given individual is needed. In this respect, novel omics technologies in combination with sophisticated data modeling techniques are key. Due to the highly complex network of influential factors determining individual trajectories, it becomes imperative to develop proper tools and solutions that will comprehensively model biological information related to growth and maturation of our body functions. The aim of this review and perspective is to evaluate, succinctly, promising data analysis approaches to enable data integration for clinical research, with an emphasis on the longitudinal component. Approaches based on empirical and mechanistic modeling of omics data are essential to leverage findings from high dimensional omics datasets and enable biological interpretation and clinical translation. On the one hand, empirical methods, which provide quantitative descriptions of patterns in the data, are mostly used for exploring and mining datasets. On the other hand, mechanistic models are based on an understanding of the behavior of a system's components and condense information about the known functions, allowing robust and reliable analyses to be performed by bioinformatics pipelines and similar tools. Herein, we will illustrate current examples, challenges and perspectives in the applications of empirical and mechanistic modeling in the context of childhood metabolic health research. PMID:26301225

  15. Outline of results of safety research (in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The safety research in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation in fiscal year 1996 has been carried out based on the basic plan of safety research (from fiscal year 1996 to 2000) which was decided in March, 1996. In this report, on nuclear fuel cycle field, namely all the subjects in the fields of nuclear fuel facilities, environmental radioactivity and waste disposal, and the subjects related to nuclear fuel facilities among the fields of aseismatic and probabilistic safety assessments, the results of research in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5-year project, are summarized together with the outline of the basic plan of safety research. The basic policy, objective and system for promotion of the safety research are described. The objectives of the safety research are the advancement of safety technology, the safety of facilities, stable operation techniques, the safety design and the evaluation techniques of next generation facilities, and the support of transferring nuclear fuel cycle to private businesses. The objects of the research are uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication and reprocessing, and waste treatment and storage. 52 investigation papers of the results of the safety research in nuclear fuel cycle field in fiscal year 1996 are collected in this report. (K.I.)

  16. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy in national institutes, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956, and since then, the many valuable results of research have been obtained so far in the diversified fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, the irradiation of foods, medicine and others, thus the test and research accomplished the large role for promoting the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. In this report, the gists of the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out by national institutes in fiscal year 1985 are collected. No.1 of this report was published in 1960, and this is No.26. It is desired to increase the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization with this book. The researches on nuclear fusion, engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety, the irradiation of foods, the countermeasures against cancer, fertilized soil, the quality improvement of brewing and farm products, the protection of farm products and the improvement of breeding, diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene, the application to physiology and pathology, radiochemistry, radiation measurement, process analysis, nuclear reactor materials, nuclear powered ships, civil engineering, radioactivation analysis and injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Results of EPRI/ANL DCH investigations and model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sehgal, B.R.; Merilo, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a series of five experiments are described addressing the severity and mitigation of direct containment heating. The tests were performed in a 1:30 linear scale mockup of the Zion PWR containment system using a reactor-material corium melt consisting of 60% UO 2 , 16% ZrO 2 , 24% SSt at nominally 2800C initial temperature. A ''worst-case'' type test involving unimpeded corium dispersal through an air atmosphere in a closed vessel produced an atmosphere heatup of 323K, equivalent to a DCH efficiency of 62%. With the addition of structural features which impeded the corium dispersal, representative of dispersal pathway features at Zion, the DCH efficiency was reduced to 1--5%. (This important result is scale dependent and requires larger scale tests such as the SURTSEY program at SNL plus mechanistic modeling for application to the reactor system.) With the addition of water in the cavity region, there was no measurable heatup of the atmosphere. This was attributable to the vigorous codispersal of water with corium which prevented the temperature of the atmosphere from significantly exceeding T/sub sat/. In this case the DCH load was replaced by the more benign ''steam spike'' from corium quench. Significant oxidation of the corium constituents occurred in the tests, adding chemical energy to the system and producing hydrogen. Overall, the results suggest that with consideration of realistic, plant specific, mitigating features, DCH may be no worse and possibly far less severe than the previously examined steam spike. Implications for accident management are addressed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Quality of research results in agro-economy by data mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukelić Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data Mining (DM through data in agroeconomy is a scientific method that enables researchers not to go through set research scenarioes that are predetermined assumptions and hypotheses on the basis of insignificant atributes. On the contrary, by data mining detection of these atributes is made possible, in general, those hiden facts that enable setting a hypothesis. The DM method does this by an iterative way, including key atributes and factors and their influence on the quality of agro-resources. The research was conducted on a random sample, by analyzing the quality of eggs. The research subject is the posibility of classifying and predicting significant variablesatributes that determine the level of egg quality. The research starts from the use of Data Mining, as an area of machine studies, which significantly helps researchers in optimizing research. The applied methodology during research includes analyticalsintetic procedures and methods of Data Mining, with a special focus on using Supervised linear discrimination analysis and the Decision Tree. The results indicate significant posibilities of using DM as an additional analytical procedure in performing agroresearch and it can be concluded that it contributes to an improvement in effectiveness and validity of process in performing these researches.

  19. International Space Station Science Research Accomplishments During the Assembly Years: An Analysis of Results from 2000-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Robinson, Julie A.; Tate-Brown, Judy; Thumm, Tracy; Crespo-Richey, Jessica; Baumann, David; Rhatigan, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes research accomplishments on the International Space Station (ISS) through the first 15 Expeditions. When research programs for early Expeditions were established, five administrative organizations were executing research on ISS: bioastronautics research, fundamental space biology, physical science, space product development, and space flight. The Vision for Space Exploration led to changes in NASA's administrative structures, so we have grouped experiments topically by scientific themes human research for exploration, physical and biological sciences, technology development, observing the Earth, and educating and inspiring the next generation even when these do not correspond to the administrative structure at the time at which they were completed. The research organizations at the time at which the experiments flew are preserved in the appendix of this document. These investigations on the ISS have laid the groundwork for research planning for Expeditions to come. Humans performing scientific investigations on ISS serve as a model for the goals of future Exploration missions. The success of a wide variety of investigations is an important hallmark of early research on ISS. Of the investigations summarized here, some are completed with results released, some are completed with preliminary results, and some remain ongoing.

  20. DESIGN OF THE RESEARCH INSTITUTION TYPE SITE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia T. Zadorozhna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The description of the model of site of research institution of NAPS of Ukraine (TSRI is presented. Goals and objectives оf the TSRI model are defined. Web 2.0 theoretical base for site development is considered, as well as described information environment, TSRI internet and intranet models. There are substantiated the site structure, design and site layout for research institution of NAPS of Ukraine. The example of the website of the Institute of Information Technologies and Learning Tools of the NAPS of Ukraine based on the TSRI model is showen. The technological aspects of the TSRI model are considered. There is given the scheme of internet-intranet environment to support scientific publications on pedagogical and psychological sciences. This paper is intended to web designers, researchers and administrative staff of research institutions.

  1. Long distance atmospheric pollution: assessment, risks, management and decision. Collection of abstracts of research works. Synthesis of results of researches performed within the framework of the PRIMEQUAL programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Severine; Ramalho, Olivier; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Blondeau, Patrice; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Campagna, Dave; Cellier, Pierre; Charles, Lionel; Coddeville, Patrice; Coll, Isabelle; Frejafon, Emeric; Gehin, Evelyne; George, Christian; Glorennec, Philippe; Gros, Valerie; Hecq, Walter; Laj, Paolo; Le Calve, Stephane; Mallet, Cecile; Momas, Isabelle; Mullot, Jean-Ulrich; Plaisance, Herve; Probst, Anne; Seigneur, Christian; Vlassopoulo, Chloe; Weiss, Karine

    2014-11-01

    After a brief presentation of the PRIMEQUAL programme, an inter-agency and institution research programme for a better air quality (275 supported research actions since the programme creation), an introduction presents the context of research works within this programme on long distance pollution. Various research works are then briefly presented. They address three main themes: 1) determining factors and atmospheric processes (role of organic nitrates in nitrogen transport, source and evolution of organic carbonated pollution in the atmosphere, modelling of long distance pollution, a miniature and autonomous station for atmospheric composition monitoring), 2) the regional evidence of pollutants transport (local and long distance pollution in Ile-de-France, pollutant transport and air quality in Mediterranean Sea, measurement and modelling of the deposition of Saharan dusts, relationship between forest fires and air quality), and 3) long term impacts on ecosystems, health and economy (peat lands as markers of atmospheric contamination, 20 years of measurements of atmospheric depositions in France and trends on the long term, vulnerability of ecosystems to atmospheric nitrogen, a cost-benefit approach to the relationship between long distance pollution and climate change). An appendix contains the call for research propositions which resulted in the above-mentioned researches

  2. A Duality Result for the Generalized Erlang Risk Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanpeng Ji

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the generalized Erlang risk model and its dual model. By using a conditional measure-preserving correspondence between the two models, we derive an identity for two interesting conditional probabilities. Applications to the discounted joint density of the surplus prior to ruin and the deficit at ruin are also discussed.

  3. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  4. Commentary: why do research on spirituality and health, and what do the results mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Harold G

    2012-06-01

    I address two related questions in this article. First, why conduct research on religion/spirituality (R/S) and health? Second, what are the dangers of misinterpreting or misapplying the results from such research? If relationships are found, so what? What is the practical value or clinical relevance of such information? Why should investigators spend time and scarce financial resources to explore such connections? What might health care professionals do differently as a result? How would people live their lives differently in light of such information? Questions like these need solid answers for the field to continue to move forward. Related to the "So what?" question is the issue of how results from research in this area are translated into popular understanding and application. After discussing why conducting research on religion and health is important, I identify a recently published research report that focuses on the relationship between R/S and self-control, an article that received considerable media press coverage. I present the results reported by the authors of this study and then examine a column written about the study that appeared in the New York Times. Finally, I explore what the findings mean, how the media portrayed the findings, and problems that might result depending on how people applied those findings.

  5. [Analysis of the model OPM3®application and results for health area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto Dos Santos, Luis; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2011-01-01

    This research sought to analyze if a questionnaire model created by an international community of project management is applicable to health organizations. The model OPM3 ® (Organizational Project Management Maturity Model) was created in order that organizations of any area or size can identify the presence or absence of good management practices. The aim of applying this model is to always evaluate the organization and not the interviewee. In this paper, one presents the results of employing this model in an organization that has information technology products and services applied to health area. This study verified that the model is rapidly applicable and that the analyzed organization has an expressive number of good practices.

  6. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  7. ExEP yield modeling tool and validation test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhonda; Turmon, Michael; Delacroix, Christian; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Lowrance, Patrick; Liu, Xiang Cate; Nunez, Paul

    2017-09-01

    EXOSIMS is an open-source simulation tool for parametric modeling of the detection yield and characterization of exoplanets. EXOSIMS has been adopted by the Exoplanet Exploration Programs Standards Definition and Evaluation Team (ExSDET) as a common mechanism for comparison of exoplanet mission concept studies. To ensure trustworthiness of the tool, we developed a validation test plan that leverages the Python-language unit-test framework, utilizes integration tests for selected module interactions, and performs end-to-end crossvalidation with other yield tools. This paper presents the test methods and results, with the physics-based tests such as photometry and integration time calculation treated in detail and the functional tests treated summarily. The test case utilized a 4m unobscured telescope with an idealized coronagraph and an exoplanet population from the IPAC radial velocity (RV) exoplanet catalog. The known RV planets were set at quadrature to allow deterministic validation of the calculation of physical parameters, such as working angle, photon counts and integration time. The observing keepout region was tested by generating plots and movies of the targets and the keepout zone over a year. Although the keepout integration test required the interpretation of a user, the test revealed problems in the L2 halo orbit and the parameterization of keepout applied to some solar system bodies, which the development team was able to address. The validation testing of EXOSIMS was performed iteratively with the developers of EXOSIMS and resulted in a more robust, stable, and trustworthy tool that the exoplanet community can use to simulate exoplanet direct-detection missions from probe class, to WFIRST, up to large mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR.

  8. Brief review of topmost scientific results obtained in 2014 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulatova, V.V.; Sabaeva, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    This brief review presents the topmost scientific results obtained in 2014 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in such fields as theoretical and experimental physics, radiation and radiobiological research, accelerators, information technology and computer physics. It also provides information about the publications by JINR staff members, patents for inventions, awards given to JINR scientists, and activities carried out at the JINR University Centre in 2014. [ru

  9. Results of Cold Gas and Resistojet Research for Small Satellite Application

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, T.; Sweeting., M.; Paul, M.; Humble., R.; Drum, J.; Sellers, J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper summarises on-going research into low-cost propulsion system options for small satellite missions at the University of Surrey. Recent results of the engine flight qualification tests of a 0.01 N water resistojet for the UoSAT-12 minisatellite are discussed. The research programme (done in collaboration with the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) ) investigating nitrous oxide hybrids for small satellite upper stage application is described. A study (also done in collaboration wi...

  10. NASA Plan for Increasing Access to the Results of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This plan is issued in response to the Executive Office of the President's February 22, 2013, Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, "Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research." Through this memorandum, OSTP directed all agencies with more than $100 million in annual research and development expenditures to prepare a plan for improving the public's access to the results of federally funded research. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) invests on the order of $3 billion annually in fundamental and applied research and technology development1 across a broad range of topics, including space and Earth sciences, life and physical sciences, human health, aeronautics, and technology. Promoting the full and open sharing of data with research communities, private industry, academia, and the general public is one of NASA's longstanding core values. For example, NASA's space and suborbital mission personnel routinely process, archive, and distribute their data to researchers around the globe. This plan expands the breadth of NASA's open-access culture to include data and publications for all of the scientific research that the Agency sponsors.

  11. Identifying Ethical Issues in Mental Health Research with Minors Adolescents: Results of a Delphi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeta Ioana Hiriscau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research with minors, especially for preventive purposes, e.g., suicide prevention, investigating risk or self-destructive behaviors such as deviance, drug abuse, or suicidal behavior, is ethically sensitive. We present a Delphi study exploring the ethical implications of the needs formulated by researchers in an international pre-conference who would benefit from ethics support and guidance in conducting Mental Health Research with minors. The resulting List of Ethical Issues (LEI was submitted to a 2-rounds Delphi process via the Internet, including 34 multidisciplinary experts. In the first round, the experts reviewed the LEI and completed a questionnaire. Results from this round were analyzed and grouped in nine categories comprising 40 items. In the second round, the experts had to agree/disagree with the needs expressed in the LEI leading to a final list of 25 ethical issues considered relevant for Mental Health Research with minors such as: confidentiality of the sensitive data, competence for consenting alone and risk of harm and stigma related to the methodology used in research. It was shown that studies like SEYLE (Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe trigger among researchers wishes to obtain specific recommendations helping to comply with standards for good practice in conducting research with minors.

  12. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  13. Moving improvement research closer to practice: the Researcher-in-Residence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Martin; Pagel, Christina; French, Catherine; Utley, Martin; Allwood, Dominique; Fulop, Naomi; Pope, Catherine; Banks, Victoria; Goldmann, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The traditional separation of the producers of research evidence in academia from the users of that evidence in healthcare organisations has not succeeded in closing the gap between what is known about the organisation and delivery of health services and what is actually done in practice. As a consequence, there is growing interest in alternative models of knowledge creation and mobilisation, ones which emphasise collaboration, active participation of all stakeholders, and a commitment to shared learning. Such models have robust historical, philosophical and methodological foundations but have not yet been embraced by many of the people working in the health sector. This paper presents an emerging model of participation, the Researcher-in-Residence. The model positions the researcher as a core member of a delivery team, actively negotiating a body of expertise which is different from, but complementary to, the expertise of managers and clinicians. Three examples of in-residence models are presented: an anthropologist working as a member of an executive team, operational researchers working in a front-line delivery team, and a Health Services Researcher working across an integrated care organisation. Each of these examples illustrates the contribution that an embedded researcher can make to a service-based team. They also highlight a number of unanswered questions about the model, including the required level of experience of the researcher and their areas of expertise, the institutional facilitators and barriers to embedding the model, and the risk that the independence of an embedded researcher might be compromised. The Researcher-in-Residence model has the potential to engage both academics and practitioners in the promotion of evidence-informed service improvement, but further evaluation is required before the model should be routinely used in practice. PMID:24894592

  14. Updating Finite Element Model of a Wind Turbine Blade Section Using Experimental Modal Analysis Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Luczak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents selected results and aspects of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research oriented for the experimental and numerical study of the structural dynamics of a bend-twist coupled full scale section of a wind turbine blade structure. The main goal of the conducted research is to validate finite element model of the modified wind turbine blade section mounted in the flexible support structure accordingly to the experimental results. Bend-twist coupling was implemented by adding angled unidirectional layers on the suction and pressure side of the blade. Dynamic test and simulations were performed on a section of a full scale wind turbine blade provided by Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and the discrepancies are assessed by natural frequency difference and modal assurance criterion. Based on sensitivity analysis, set of model parameters was selected for the model updating process. Design of experiment and response surface method was implemented to find values of model parameters yielding results closest to the experimental. The updated finite element model is producing results more consistent with the measurement outcomes.

  15. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is Volume 25, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1984 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation chemistry and radiation measurement in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; and the research on the prevention of injuries. (Kako, I.)

  16. Radiative effects of a CO2 increase: Results of a model comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    Many infrared (IR) radiative transfer models have been developed that range in complexity from line-by-line calculations to simplified parameterizations used in climate models and general circulation models. Assessment of the potential climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide requires first an evaluation of the radiative properties of each gas and determination of the perturbation to the radiative fluxes. The most detailed radiative transfer models are well suited for this application. The perturbed radiative fluxes lead to climatic effects that are evaluated using models that couple radiative, dynamic transport, and hydrological processes. Recently, chemical interactions have also been included in the assessments. It is desirable that a better understanding be developed of the differences in model approaches used by various modeling groups and how these differences affect model sensitivity to perturbations such as increased carbon dioxide. Since many factors affect model sensitivity, a practical approach is to start with a comparison of the basic physical processes without feedbacks and couplings, then to build in complexity. Because increases in carbon dioxide leads to radiative forcing, the treatment of radiative processes is a natural starting point for comparison. A comparison of infrared radiative transfer models has begun under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program. The results of the IR model comparison will be included in the state-of-the-art report on climate modeling

  17. Common swine models of cardiovascular disease for research and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisóstomo, Verónica; Sun, Fei; Maynar, Manuel; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Blanco, Virginia; Garcia-Lindo, Monica; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major health concern and therefore an important topic in biomedical research. Large animal models allow researchers to assess the safety and efficacy of new cardiovascular procedures in systems that resemble human anatomy; additionally, they can be used to emulate scenarios for training purposes. Among the many biomedical models that are described in published literature, it is important that researchers understand and select those that are best suited to achieve the aims of their research, that facilitate the humane care and management of their research animals and that best promote the high ethical standards required of animal research. In this resource the authors describe some common swine models that can be easily incorporated into regular practices of research and training at biomedical institutions. These models use both native and altered vascular anatomy of swine to carry out research protocols, such as testing biological reactions to implanted materials, surgically creating aneurysms using autologous tissue and inducing myocardial infarction through closed-chest procedures. Such models can also be used for training, where native and altered vascular anatomy allow medical professionals to learn and practice challenging techniques in anatomy that closely simulates human systems.

  18. Operationalizing the Concept of Value--An Action Research-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, Dag; Olsson, Annika; Karlsson, Sture

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: While the importance of measuring customer satisfaction levels is well established, less research exists on how organizations operationalize such knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to describe an action research (AR) case study resulting in a workshop model to operationalize the concept of value. The model facilitates organizational…

  19. A model for increasing appreciation, accessibility and application of research in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward, Karen-Leigh

    2015-01-01

    The confidence and engagement of nurses (and midwives) in research are an area for continued development. The Research Appreciation, Accessibility, and Application Model (RAAAM), developed in 2011, provides a framework for enhancing research activities by nurses within the clinical setting. Unlike other models, the RAAAM does not assume a preexisting capacity or knowledge of research; however, the model incorporates the multiple research activities that comprise a research culture. Although it is acknowledged that undertaking a research project is not for everyone, using evidence-based knowledge for practice development is essential and relates to all clinical staff. The RAAAM model presents four domains-research appreciation, research accessibility, research application, and research sustainability. Research appreciation is a first step in realizing the potential beneficial impact of research in practice. Relating these activities to identified key result areas that are drawn from key stakeholders completes the loop, ensuring sustainability of research activities and processes. The model presented here offers a practical and user-friendly approach for research enhancement in nursing using the platform of a clinical and academic partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Plumbing of Land Surface Models: Is Poor Performance a Result of Methodology or Data Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Ned; Abramowitz, Gab; Pitman, Andy J.; Or, Dani; Best, Martin J.; Johnson, Helen R.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boone, Aaron; Cuntz, Matthais; Decharme, Bertrand; hide

    2016-01-01

    The PALS Land sUrface Model Benchmarking Evaluation pRoject (PLUMBER) illustrated the value of prescribing a priori performance targets in model intercomparisons. It showed that the performance of turbulent energy flux predictions from different land surface models, at a broad range of flux tower sites using common evaluation metrics, was on average worse than relatively simple empirical models. For sensible heat fluxes, all land surface models were outperformed by a linear regression against downward shortwave radiation. For latent heat flux, all land surface models were outperformed by a regression against downward shortwave, surface air temperature and relative humidity. These results are explored here in greater detail and possible causes are investigated. We examine whether particular metrics or sites unduly influence the collated results, whether results change according to time-scale aggregation and whether a lack of energy conservation in fluxtower data gives the empirical models an unfair advantage in the intercomparison. We demonstrate that energy conservation in the observational data is not responsible for these results. We also show that the partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes in LSMs, rather than the calculation of available energy, is the cause of the original findings. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the nature of this partitioning problem is likely shared among all contributing LSMs. While we do not find a single candidate explanation forwhy land surface models perform poorly relative to empirical benchmarks in PLUMBER, we do exclude multiple possible explanations and provide guidance on where future research should focus.

  1. Survey of French research in biological and medical engineering - aims, means, results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, J.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the aims and means available is followed by an outline of the results of French research in biological and medical engineering. Most of the work undertaken has given very positive results from the scientific view-point, followed up by industrial applications. Scintigraphic image processing research has led to CINE 200. A study of heart output quantification in real time has produced a haemodynamic investigation system, the Sysconoram, now commercialized. The study of heart signal recording methods has led to a marketable and reliable system for the detection of pathological heart conditions. Research in neurosurgery on the use of pressure transducers in integrated technology, using a piezoelectric detector associated with a field effect amplifier, has enabled two types of extradural pressure transducer and one cervical intraventricular pressure transducer to be industrialized. Finally the study of a gamma detector combined with a light-amplifier tube has led to the development of camera giving quite exceptional results [fr

  2. Blade element momentum modeling of inflow with shear in comparison with advanced model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Riziotis, V.; Zahle, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    shear is present in the inflow. This gives guidance to how the BEM modeling of shear should be implemented. Another result from the advanced vortex model computations is a clear indication of influence of the ground, and the general tendency is a speed up effect of the flow through the rotor giving...

  3. Report of results of research on surface sterilization of tangerines by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Radiation has become to be widely utilized in industries, agriculture, medical treatment and others, and contributes to the improvement of the living and welfare of nation. Food irradiation techniques attract more attention in foreign countries, and their research and development have been advanced actively. FAO, IAEA, WHO and other international organs collected and summarized the results of the research and development in various countries, and advances the general evaluation of food irradiation techniques. Particularly it was concluded that as to the soundness of food in the case of irradiating the foods with the substantial mean dose not more than 1 Mrad, there is not problem at all. As of March, 1986, the legal permission of food irradiation reached about 60 items in 33 countries. In Japan, the results of the research on the irradiation of potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, vienna sausages and fish paste products have been already reported, and as for tangerines, the initial objective was attained, therefore, the results were summarized, and are reported in this paper. The research program for the surface sterilization of tangerines by irradiation, the results of research regarding the effect of irradiation and the soundness are described. (Kako, I.).

  4. Report of results of research on surface sterilization of tangerines by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation has become to be widely utilized in industries, agriculture, medical treatment and others, and contributes to the improvement of the living and welfare of nation. Food irradiation techniques attract more attention in foreign countries, and their research and development have been advanced actively. FAO, IAEA, WHO and other international organs collected and summarized the results of the research and development in various countries, and advances the general evaluation of food irradiation techniques. Particularly it was concluded that as to the soundness of food in the case of irradiating the foods with the substantial mean dose not more than 1 Mrad, there is not problem at all. As of March, 1986, the legal permission of food irradiation reached about 60 items in 33 countries. In Japan, the results of the research on the irradiation of potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, vienna sausages and fish paste products have been already reported, and as for tangerines, the initial objective was attained, therefore, the results were summarized, and are reported in this paper. The research program for the surface sterilization of tangerines by irradiation, the results of research regarding the effect of irradiation and the soundness are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Innovation policies of SME's in the South Moravian and Moravian Silesian regions: results of the research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Heralecký

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to identify the present situation in innovation policies of small and medium-sized enterprises in the South Moravian and Moravian Silesian regions. In order to achieve the specified objective, quantitative research was carried out in the small and medium-sized enterprises by way of questionnaires. The achieved results imply that the enterprises under investigation apply competitive strategy focusing on top quality of goods on offer. The research manifested that the companies focused markedly on innovations in supplying products on offer with additional functions or features. The research results show that the companies do not conduct changes in production organization frequently, not even following their earlier innovative activities. The results of the research into the innovative activity “change in product design” imply that this activity is not applied frequently in comparison with the above-mentioned activities. Based on the interviewed companies' weak points in human resources, the elementary drawbacks include lack of management's command of foreign languages as well as production staff's expert skills. The results of the research imply that the interviewed companies perceive the sphere of products (improved product quality, extension of a product range, the sphere of new technologies and the sphere of an increase in market potential as the most significant. The questionnaire inquiry shows that innovative and development activities are most frequently financed from companies' own funds, subsidies/grants, bank credits and leases. Mortgages and venture capital are only made used of occasionally.

  6. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F.

    1999-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling is presented that allows an estimation of potential effects of climate change on the North Sea. Therefore, the ocean general circulation model OPYC is adapted for application on a shelf by adding a lateral boundary formulation and a tide model. In this set-up the model is forced, first, with data from the ECMWF reanalysis for model validation and the study of the natural variability, and, second, with data from climate change experiments to estimate the effects of climate change on the North Sea. (orig.)

  7. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Phase I Status and Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2014-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. One way to address the uncertainties in the HTGR analysis tools is to assess the sensitivity of critical parameters (such as the calculated maximum fuel temperature during loss of coolant accidents) to a few important input uncertainties. The input parameters were identified by engineering judgement in the past but are today typically based on a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) process. The input parameters can also be derived from sensitivity studies and are then varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, there is often no easy way to compensate for these uncertainties. In engineering system design, a common approach for addressing performance uncertainties is to add compensating margins to the system, but with passive properties credited it is not so clear how to apply it in the case of modular HTGR heat removal path. Other more sophisticated uncertainty modelling approaches, including Monte Carlo analysis, have also been proposed and applied. Ideally one wishes to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies, and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Therefore some safety analysis calculations may use a mixture of these approaches for different parameters depending upon the particular requirements of the analysis problem involved. Sensitivity analysis can for example be used to provide information as part of an uncertainty analysis to determine best estimate plus uncertainty results to the

  8. Communicating BRCA research results to patients enrolled in international clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulford, David J; Harter, Philipp; Floquet, Anne

    2016-01-01

    pharmacogenetic informed consent. Differences in local requirements, clinical practice, and opinion regarding the ethical aspects of how to convey genetic results to patients are all potential barriers to returning individual BRCA results to patients. Communicating the aggregate BRCA result from this study......BACKGROUND: The focus on translational research in clinical trials has the potential to generate clinically relevant genetic data that could have importance to patients. This raises challenging questions about communicating relevant genetic research results to individual patients. METHODS......: An exploratory pharmacogenetic analysis was conducted in the international ovarian cancer phase III trial, AGO-OVAR 16, which found that patients with clinically important germ-line BRCA1/2 mutations had improved progression-free survival prognosis. Mechanisms to communicate BRCA results were evaluated, because...

  9. Model and Computing Experiment for Research and Aerosols Usage Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daler K. Sharipov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a math model for research and management of aerosols released into the atmosphere as well as numerical algorithm used as hardware and software systems for conducting computing experiment.

  10. Evaluation and Application of the Weather Research and Forecast Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Passner, Jeffrey E

    2007-01-01

    ... by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to determine how accurate and robust the model is under a variety of meteorological conditions, with an emphasis on fine resolution, short-range forecasts in complex terrain...

  11. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 3.5-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Hawaiian island of Oahu at...

  12. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern...

  13. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Guam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the island of Guam at...

  14. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Regional Atmospheric Model: Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale numerical weather prediction model 7-day hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at...

  15. A REVIEW OF RECENT RESEARCH IN INDOOR MODELLING & MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gunduz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor modeling and mapping has been an active area of research in last 20 years in order to tackle the problems related to positioning and tracking of people and objects indoors, and provides many opportunities for several domains ranging from emergency response to logistics in micro urban spaces. The outputs of recent research in the field have been presented in several scientific publications and events primarily related to spatial information science and technology. This paper summarizes the outputs of last 10 years of research on indoor modeling and mapping within a proper classification which covers 7 areas, i.e. Information Acquisition by Sensors, Model Definition, Model Integration, Indoor Positioning and LBS, Routing & Navigation Methods, Augmented and Virtual Reality Applications, and Ethical Issues. Finally, the paper outlines the current and future research directions and concluding remarks.

  16. a Review of Recent Research in Indoor Modelling & Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, M.; Isikdag, U.; Basaraner, M.

    2016-06-01

    Indoor modeling and mapping has been an active area of research in last 20 years in order to tackle the problems related to positioning and tracking of people and objects indoors, and provides many opportunities for several domains ranging from emergency response to logistics in micro urban spaces. The outputs of recent research in the field have been presented in several scientific publications and events primarily related to spatial information science and technology. This paper summarizes the outputs of last 10 years of research on indoor modeling and mapping within a proper classification which covers 7 areas, i.e. Information Acquisition by Sensors, Model Definition, Model Integration, Indoor Positioning and LBS, Routing & Navigation Methods, Augmented and Virtual Reality Applications, and Ethical Issues. Finally, the paper outlines the current and future research directions and concluding remarks.

  17. Instruments of the Marketing Mix in Non-Governmental Organizations – the Results of Empirical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Wioletta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present the instruments of the marketing mix of NGOs in light of empirical research. Marketing mix is the set of instruments for the implementation of marketing strategies of the organization. The paper presents selected results of research on the role of marketing strategies of non-profit organizations in creating value for stakeholders. In the literature one can find different concepts of “marketing mix”, for example, “4P”, “5P”, “7P”, “4C”. The survey results a...

  18. Consumer opinions about print and on-line pay contents according to primary research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Jäckel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the sub results of a primer research project process. Themain objective of survey was to explore the effectof the digitalization onto themedia consumption habits, with a strange look ontothe print and the on-line paycontents. During the research we applied qualitative and quantitative methods. Weanalysed the most important changes of the media consumption preferences withthe help of expert interviews and consumers surveystaking the influencing role ofthe international trends onto consideration. Basedon the results of the researchcan be characterised the main target groups of on-line pay contents and the printmediums.

  19. Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program of the USNRC and its foreign partners: Program content and principal results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Eltawila, F.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its associated foreign partners have been engaged in an extensive Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program. In addition to the NRC, the partners currently include Belgium, the Czech Republic, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the Community of European Countries. The purpose of this research is to provide a technical basis for decisions involved in potential severe accidents in light water reactor (LWR) power plants. The research includes relatively large-scale integral tests and smaller scale separate-effects experiments on the dominant phenomena regarding severe accident behavior in LWR power plants, the development of phenomenological models of the key phenomena involved, and the development and validation of large computer codes for use in the analysis of core behavior and of a LWR systems behavior under severe accident conditions. The research results are also used in probabilistic risk assessment for LWRS

  20. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  1. Spinal cord stimulation: modeling results and clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Struijk, J.J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    The potential distribution in volume couductor models of the spinal cord at cervical, midthoracic and lowthoracic levels, due to epidural stimulation, was calculated. Treshold stimuli of modeled myelhated dorsal column and dorsal root fibers were calculated and were compared with perception

  2. Quark cluster model of nuclei and lepton scattering results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.; Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames

    1984-01-01

    A review of the quark cluster model (QCM) of nuclei is presented along with applications to deep inelastic lepton scattering and elastic lepton scattering experiments. In addition a sample comparison is made with high momentum transfer (p, π) data. The QCM prediction for the ratio of nuclear structure functions in the x > 1 domain is discussed as a critical test of the model

  3. How to: understanding SWAT model uncertainty relative to measured results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed models are being relied upon to contribute to most policy-making decisions of watershed management, and the demand for an accurate accounting of complete model uncertainty is rising. Generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) is a widely used method for quantifying uncertainty i...

  4. Management strategies to utilize salt affected soils. Isotopic and conventional research methods. Results of a co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the results of a co-ordinated research programme on ''The Use of Nuclear Techniques for Improvement of Crop Production in Salt-affected Soils''. It aims at providing scientists experimental evidence of demonstrating technical feasibility of biological amelioration of salt affected soils as an alternative option of using expensive chemical amendments in soil reclamation complementing engineering structures of farm drainage systems or option of leaving the saline areas as barren lands in spite of the fact that arable agricultural lands have exhausted. 68 refs, 26 figs, 32 tabs

  5. Research for Future Training Modeling and Simulation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Simulation (M&S) — 2010 Research,” for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, Systems Engineering, Director, Modeling and...http://ignoranceisfutile.wordpress.com/2008/10/15/darpa-backked- siri -nearing-launch-of-personal-artificial- intelligence/. 11 virtual assistant ...this TMSSP addresses: • Defense Training Environment (DTE) • Personal Learning Assistant (PLA), and • More agile business models for training. This

  6. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0296 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Gregory Faris SRI INTERNATIONAL MENLO PARK CA Final... Faris , Gregory P. Smith 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SRI International...International Final Technical Report • September 14, 2015 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Prepared by: Gregory W. Faris

  7. Results From the Data & Democracy Initiative to Enhance Community-Based Organization Data and Research Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll-Scott, Amy; Toy, Peggy; Wyn, Roberta; Zane, Jazmin I.; Wallace, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. In an era of community-based participatory research and increased expectations for evidence-based practice, we evaluated an initiative designed to increase community-based organizations’ data and research capacity through a 3-day train-the-trainer course on community health assessments. Methods. We employed a mixed method pre–post course evaluation design. Various data sources collected from 171 participants captured individual and organizational characteristics and pre–post course self-efficacy on 19 core skills, as well as behavior change 1 year later among a subsample of participants. Results. Before the course, participants reported limited previous experience with data and low self-efficacy in basic research skills. Immediately after the course, participants demonstrated statistically significant increases in data and research self-efficacy. The subsample reported application of community assessment skills to their work and increased use of data 1 year later. Conclusions. Results suggest that an intensive, short-term training program can achieve large immediate gains in data and research self-efficacy in community-based organization staff. In addition, they demonstrate initial evidence of longer-term behavior change related to use of data and research skills to support their community work. PMID:22594748

  8. Fulfilling the law of a single independent variable and improving the result of mathematical educational research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardimin, H.; Arcana, N.

    2018-01-01

    Many types of research in the field of mathematics education apply the Quasi-Experimental method and statistical analysis use t-test. Quasi-experiment has a weakness that is difficult to fulfil “the law of a single independent variable”. T-test also has a weakness that is a generalization of the conclusions obtained is less powerful. This research aimed to find ways to reduce the weaknesses of the Quasi-experimental method and improved the generalization of the research results. The method applied in the research was a non-interactive qualitative method, and the type was concept analysis. Concepts analysed are the concept of statistics, research methods of education, and research reports. The result represented a way to overcome the weaknesses of quasi-Experiments and T-test. In addition, the way was to apply a combination of Factorial Design and Balanced Design, which the authors refer to as Factorial-Balanced Design. The advantages of this design are: (1) almost fulfilling “the low of single independent variable” so no need to test the similarity of the academic ability, (2) the sample size of the experimental group and the control group became larger and equal; so it becomes robust to deal with violations of the assumptions of the ANOVA test.

  9. Overview of research activities associated with the World Health Organization: results of a survey covering 2006/07

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Robert F

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the first comprehensive effort to provide an overview of the research associated with the World Health Organization (WHO headquarters in 2006/07. Methods Information was obtained by questionnaire and interviews with senior staff operating at WHO headquarters in Geneva. Research type, purpose and resources (both financial and staff were defined and compared for each of the 37 departments identified and a comparative analysis was made with the global burden of disease as expressed by Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY. Results Research expenditure in 2006/07 was estimated at US$215 million. WHO is involved in more than 60 research networks/partnerships and often WHO itself is the network host. Using the DALY model, 84% of the funding WHO allocates to research goes to DALY Type I diseases (communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional diseases which represents 40% of DALY. 4% is allocated to Daly Type II (non-communicable diseases which contributes to 48% of DALY. 45% of WHO permanent staff are involved with health research and the WHO's approach to research is predominantly focused on policy, advocacy, health systems and population based research. The Organization principally undertakes secondary research using published data and commissions others to conduct this work through contracts or research grants. This approach is broadly in line with the stated strategy of the Organization. Conclusions The difficulty in undertaking this survey highlights the complexity of obtaining an Organization-wide assessment of research activity in the absence of common standards for research classification, methods for priority setting and a mechanism across WHO, or within the governance of global health research more generally, for managing a research portfolio. This paper presents a strategic birds-eye view of the WHO research portfolio using methodologies that, with further development, may provide the strategic

  10. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  11. Assessing and Adapting Scientific Results for Space Weather Research to Operations (R2O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. J.; Friedl, L.; Halford, A. J.; Mays, M. L.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Singer, H. J.; Stehr, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Why doesn't a solid scientific paper necessarily result in a tangible improvement in space weather capability? A well-known challenge in space weather forecasting is investing effort to turn the results of basic scientific research into operational knowledge. This process is commonly known as "Research to Operations," abbreviated R2O. There are several aspects of this process: 1) How relevant is the scientific result to a particular space weather process? 2) If fully utilized, how much will that result improve the reliability of the forecast for the associated process? 3) How much effort will this transition require? Is it already in a relatively usable form, or will it require a great deal of adaptation? 4) How much burden will be placed on forecasters? Is it "plug-and-play" or will it require effort to operate? 5) How can robust space weather forecasting identify challenges for new research? This presentation will cover several approaches that have potential utility in assessing scientific results for use in space weather research. The demonstration of utility is the first step, relating to the establishment of metrics to ensure that there will be a clear benefit to the end user. The presentation will then move to means of determining cost vs. benefit, (where cost involves the full effort required to transition the science to forecasting, and benefit concerns the improvement of forecast reliability), and conclude with a discussion of the role of end users and forecasters in driving further innovation via "O2R."

  12. Nurse practitioner faculty research: Results from the 2012 National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Bloch, Joan Rosen; Westrin, David; Fogg, Louis

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the research capacity and productivity of nurse practitioner (NP) faculty, a study was conducted to describe the types of research that have been and are being completed by National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) members. A web-based survey was developed with input from members of the NONPF Research Special Interest Group and the NONPF Board. This 23-question survey included demographic, academic degree, NP population focus, and research-related questions. Three e-mails were sent to NONPF members over a 10-week period of time (late December 2012 to early February 2013). Respondents (N = 344) in the sample were Advanced Practice Registered Nurses with either a Masters, Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNS or PhD as their highest academic degree. Study results demonstrated that current NP faculty research includes a wide breadth of clinical areas studied, types of methodologies used, variety of funding mechanisms, and successful publication records. Because NP faculty conduct a wide array of research on clinically relevant topics, and demonstrate successful funding and publication track records, they are poised to continue to be leaders in healthcare research. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Identification of Translational Dermatology Research Priorities in the UK; Results of an e-Delphi Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, E.; Reynolds, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Translational research is the direct application of basic and applied research to patient care. It is estimated that there are at least 2,000 different skin diseases, thus there are considerable challenges in seeking to undertake research on each of these disorders. Objective This eDelphi exercise was conducted in order to generate a list of translational dermatology research questions which are regarded as a priority for further investigations. Results During the first phase of the eDelphi, 228 research questions were generated by an expert panel which included clinical academic dermatologists, clinical dermatologists, non-clinical scientists, dermatology trainees and representatives from patient support groups. Following completion of the second and third phases, 40 questions on inflammatory skin disease, 20 questions on structural skin disorders / genodermatoses, 37 questions on skin cancer and 8 miscellaneous questions were designated as priority translational dermatology research questions (PRQs). In addition to PRQs on a variety of disease areas (including multiple PRQs on psoriasis, eczema, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and melanoma), there were a number of cross-cutting themes which identified a need to investigate mechanisms / pathogenesis of disease and the necessity to improve treatments for patients with skin disease. Conclusion It is predicted that this list of PRQs will help to provide a strategic direction for translational dermatology research in the UK and that addressing this list of questions will ultimately provide clinical benefit for substantial numbers of subjects with skin disorders. PMID:26149834

  14. White Sturgeon Research Needs: Workshop Results, Seattle, Washington, November 3-4, 1983.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fickeisen, Duane H.; Neitzel, D.A.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the results of a workshop to develop a research program for Columbia River Basin white surgeon. Invited participants developed a list of white sturgeon research needs and rationale for ranking the relative importance of the research needs. The highest ranked research needs were: define physical habitat requirements (substrate, flow, water quality) for early life history stages; identify genetic stocks; assess population status (e.g., distribution, densities, age-structure, year-class strength, age-specific mortality, disease, parasitism); assess reproductive status (e.g., spawning success, recruitment, age/size-dependent fecundity); develop new sampling techniques and gear for collecting early life history stages; assess gametogenesis (timing of maturation, frequency of spawning), including effects of environmental factors on gonadal development; and define physical habitat requirements (substrate, flow, water quality) for spawning. 2 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the National Photovoltaics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Office of Energy Research (OER) undertook an assessment of 115 research projects (listed in Appendix A) sponsored by the National Photovoltaics Program. The Program is located within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). This report summarizes the results of that review. The Office of Solar Energy Conversion is responsible for the management of the National Photovoltaics Program. This program focuses on assisting US industry in development of fundamental technology to bring advanced photovoltaic energy systems to commercial use. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the following: (1) the quality of research of individual projects; (2) the impact of these individual projects on the mission of the program; and (3) the priority of future research opportunities.

  16. NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA): Early Results and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    This talk will review the status and progress of the NASA/Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) atmospheric global reanalysis project called the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). An overview of NASA's emerging capabilities for assimilating a variety of other Earth Science observations of the land, ocean, and atmospheric constituents will also be presented. MERRA supports NASA Earth science by synthesizing the current suite of research satellite observations in a climate data context (covering the period 1979-present), and by providing the science and applications communities with of a broad range of weather and climate data with an emphasis on improved estimates of the hydrological cycle. MERRA is based on a major new version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5), that includes the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF)-based GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model and the new NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) unified grid-point statistical interpolation (GST) analysis scheme developed as a collaborative effort between NCEP and the GMAO. In addition to MERRA, the GMAO is developing new capabilities in aerosol and constituent assimilation, ocean, ocean biology, and land surface assimilation. This includes the development of an assimilation capability for tropospheric air quality monitoring and prediction, the development of a carbon-cycle modeling and assimilation system, and an ocean data assimilation system for use in coupled short-term climate forecasting.

  17. Application of Logic Models in a Large Scientific Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Christine M.; Head, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    It is the purpose of this article to discuss the development and application of a logic model in the context of a large scientific research program within the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). CSIRO is Australia's national science agency and is a publicly funded part of Australia's innovation system. It conducts…

  18. UNDER GRADUATE RESEARCH An alternative model of doing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. UNDER GRADUATE RESEARCH An alternative model of doing science. The main work force is undergraduate students. Using research as a tool in education. Advantages : High risk tolerance. Infinite energy. Uninhibited lateral thinking. Problems: Japanese ...

  19. Swales' Cars Model and the Metaphor of Research Space: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To this end, the introductions of 59 RAs published in the Legon Journal of the Humanities from 2005 to 2010 were analyzed using the CARS model. The findings reveal that the authors of these RAs may perhaps not be exploiting Step 3 (reviewing items of previous research) under Move 1 in order to reinforce the research ...

  20. Ethnographic Decision Tree Modeling: A Research Method for Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kirk A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes ethnographic decision tree modeling (EDTM; C. H. Gladwin, 1989) as a mixed method design appropriate for counseling psychology research. EDTM is introduced and located within a postpositivist research paradigm. Decision theory that informs EDTM is reviewed, and the 2 phases of EDTM are highlighted. The 1st phase, model…

  1. Experiences with the Capability Maturity Model in a research environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der M.J.; Vreke, J.; Wal, van der B.; Symons, A.

    1996-01-01

    The project described here was aimed at evaluating the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) in the context of a research organization. Part of the evaluation was a standard CMM assessment. It was found that CMM could be applied to a research organization, although its five maturity levels were considered

  2. Development of Prototype Driver Models for Highway Design: Research Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    One of the high-priority research areas of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is the development of the Interactive Highway Safety Design Model (IHSDM). The goal of the IHSDM research program is to develop a systematic approach that will allow...

  3. Broadening participation in Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs: an evaluation of the team research model for undergraduate research experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelote, A. R.; Geraghty Ward, E. M.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The REU site on sustainable land and water resources has a goal of broadening participation in the geosciences by underrepresented groups and particularly Native American students. We are evaluating modifications to the traditional REU model in order to better support these students. First, we review a team research model for REU students, where students are placed on teams and work together in peer groups supported by a team of mentors. Second, the REU takes place in locations that have high populations of Native American students to remove barriers to participation for non-traditional students. Finally, the teams do research on issues related to local concerns with cultural focus. Traditional REU models (1 faculty to 1 student/on campus) have been shown to be effective in supporting student movement into graduate programs but often fail to attract a diverse group of candidates. In addition, they rely for success on the relationship between faculty and student, which can often be undermined by unrealistic expectations on the part of the student about the mentor relationship, and can be exacerbated by cultural misunderstanding, conflicting discourse, or students' personal or family issues. At this REU site, peer mentorship and support plays a large role. Students work together to select their research question, follow the project to completion and present the results. Students from both native and non-native backgrounds learn about the culture of the partner reservations and work on a project that is of immediate local concern. The REU also teaches students protocols for working on Native American lands that support good relations between reservation and University. Analysis of participant data gathered from surveys and interview over the course of our 3-year program indicates that the team approach is successful. Students noted that collaborating with other teams was rewarding and mentors reported positively about their roles in providing guidance for the student

  4. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy in children: prospective, multicenter results from the Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Holubkov, Richard; Browd, Samuel R; Cochrane, D Douglas; Drake, James M; Limbrick, David D; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Simon, Tamara D; Tamber, Mandeep S; Wellons, John C; Whitehead, William E; Kestle, John R W

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is now established as a viable treatment option for a subgroup of children with hydrocephalus. Here, the authors report prospective, multicenter results from the Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN) to provide the most accurate determination of morbidity, complication incidence, and efficacy of ETV in children and to determine if intraoperative predictors of ETV success add substantially to preoperative predictors. METHODS All children undergoing a first ETV (without choroid plexus cauterization) at 1 of 7 HCRN centers up to June 2013 were included in the study and followed up for a minimum of 18 months. Data, including detailed intraoperative data, were prospectively collected as part of the HCRN's Core Data Project and included details of patient characteristics, ETV failure (need for repeat hydrocephalus surgery), and, in a subset of patients, postoperative complications up to the time of discharge. RESULTS Three hundred thirty-six eligible children underwent initial ETV, 18.8% of whom had undergone shunt placement prior to the ETV. The median age at ETV was 6.9 years (IQR 1.7-12.6), with 15.2% of the study cohort younger than 12 months of age. The most common etiologies were aqueductal stenosis (24.8%) and midbrain or tectal lesions (21.2%). Visible forniceal injury (16.6%) was more common than previously reported, whereas severe bleeding (1.8%), thalamic contusion (1.8%), venous injury (1.5%), hypothalamic contusion (1.5%), and major arterial injury (0.3%) were rare. The most common postoperative complications were CSF leak (4.4%), hyponatremia (3.9%), and pseudomeningocele (3.9%). New neurological deficit occurred in 1.5% cases, with 0.5% being permanent. One hundred forty-one patients had documented failure of their ETV requiring repeat hydrocephalus surgery during follow-up, 117 of them during the first 6 months postprocedure. Kaplan-Meier rates of 30-day, 90-day, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year failure

  5. The trials methodological research agenda: results from a priority setting exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Research into the methods used in the design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials is essential to ensure that effective methods are available and that clinical decisions made using results from trials are based on the best available evidence, which is reliable and robust. Methods An on-line Delphi survey of 48 UK Clinical Research Collaboration registered Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) was undertaken. During round one, CTU Directors were asked to identify important topics that require methodological research. During round two, their opinion about the level of importance of each topic was recorded, and during round three, they were asked to review the group’s average opinion and revise their previous opinion if appropriate. Direct reminders were sent to maximise the number of responses at each round. Results are summarised using descriptive methods. Results Forty one (85%) CTU Directors responded to at least one round of the Delphi process: 25 (52%) responded in round one, 32 (67%) responded in round two, 24 (50%) responded in round three. There were only 12 (25%) who responded to all three rounds and 18 (38%) who responded to both rounds two and three. Consensus was achieved amongst CTU Directors that the top three priorities for trials methodological research were ‘Research into methods to boost recruitment in trials’ (considered the highest priority), ‘Methods to minimise attrition’ and ‘Choosing appropriate outcomes to measure’. Fifty other topics were included in the list of priorities and consensus was reached that two topics, ‘Radiotherapy study designs’ and ‘Low carbon trials’, were not priorities. Conclusions This priority setting exercise has identified the research topics felt to be most important to the key stakeholder group of Directors of UKCRC registered CTUs. The use of robust methodology to identify these priorities will help ensure that this work informs the trials methodological research agenda, with

  6. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  7. Amnestic MCI Patients' Perspectives toward Disclosure of Amyloid PET Results in a Research Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschaeghe, Gwendolien; Schaeverbeke, Jolien; Vandenberghe, Rik; Dierickx, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Researchers currently are not obligated to share individual research results (IRR) with participants. This non-disclosure policy has been challenged on the basis of participants' rights to be aware and in control of their personal medical information. Here, we determined how patients view disclosure of research PET results of brain amyloid and why they believe it is advantageous or disadvantageous to disclose. As a part of a larger diagnostic trial, we conducted semi-structured interviews with patients with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI). Participants had the option to receive their brain amyloid PET scan result (i.e., their IRR). Interviews were conducted before they received their IRR. A total of 38 aMCI patients (100% of study participants) wanted to know their IRR. The two most frequently mentioned reasons for choosing IRR disclosure were to better understand their brain health status and to be better able to make informed decisions about future personal arrangements (e.g., inheritance tax, moving into a smaller house, end-of-life decisions, etc.). Emotional risk was mentioned as the primary disadvantage of knowing one's IRR. On the other hand, non-disclosure was considered to be emotionally difficult also, as patients would be uncertain about their future health condition. Many patients diagnosed clinically with aMCI want to know their brain amyloid test results, even though this knowledge may be disadvantageous to them. Knowing what is going on with their health and the ability to make informed decisions about their future were the two principal advantages mentioned for obtaining their amyloid PET results. Because of the overwhelming consensus of aMCI patients was to disclose their brain amyloid PET scan results, researchers should strongly consider releasing this information to research subjects.

  8. New analytic results for speciation times in neutral models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhard, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the standard Yule model, and a recently studied model of speciation and extinction, the "critical branching process." We develop an analytic way-as opposed to the common simulation approach-for calculating the speciation times in a reconstructed phylogenetic tree. Simple expressions for the density and the moments of the speciation times are obtained. Methods for dating a speciation event become valuable, if for the reconstructed phylogenetic trees, no time scale is available. A missing time scale could be due to supertree methods, morphological data, or molecular data which violates the molecular clock. Our analytic approach is, in particular, useful for the model with extinction, since simulations of birth-death processes which are conditioned on obtaining n extant species today are quite delicate. Further, simulations are very time consuming for big n under both models.

  9. Box photosynthesis modeling results for WRF/CMAQ LSM

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Box Photosynthesis model simulations for latent heat and ozone at 6 different FLUXNET sites. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Ran, L., J....

  10. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: comparison of model to human participant results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Glenn; Weschler, Charles J.; Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. It also demonstrates that uptake...... is sensitive to both the gap between skin and clothing and the time clothing is allowed to adsorb phthalates. The model predictions are consistent with the observation that exposed clothing increases dermal uptake when compared with uptake observed in bare-skin participants. Extension of this model beyond...... the cotton-phthalate system will be challenging until data on partition coefficients are quantified for other combinations of SVOCs, fabric materials and environmental conditions....

  11. New Results in Optical Modelling of Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvian Fara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project brought further advancements to the quantum well solar cell concept proposed by Keith Barnham. In this paper, the optical modelling of MQW solar cells was analyzed and we focussed on the following topics: (i simulation of the refraction index and the reflectance, (ii simulation of the absorption coefficient, (iii simulation of the quantum efficiency for the absorption process, (iv discussion and modelling of the quantum confinement effect, and (v evaluation of datasheet parameters of the MQW cell.

  12. Some Econometric Results for the Blanchard-Watson Bubble Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Soren; Lange, Theis

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse a simple bubble model suggested by Blanchard and Watson. The model is defined by y(t) =s(t)¿y(t-1)+e(t), t=1,…,n, where s(t) is an i.i.d. binary variable with p=P(s(t)=1), independent of e(t) i.i.d. with mean zero and finite variance. We take ¿>1 so ...

  13. Conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research: an international legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Christian

    2002-07-01

    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.

  14. Students' Difficulties in Reading Images. Comparing Results from Four National Research Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Roser; Ametller, Jaume

    2002-01-01

    Compares the results of four studies made under the auspices of the Science Teacher Training in an Information Society (STTIS) project researching the difficulties students have in reading images. The studies are compared under such categories as pre-eminence of narrative readings, real-world versus symbolic elements, verbal elements, and…

  15. Results of single borehole hydraulic testing in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daimaru, Shuji; Takeuchi, Ryuji; Onoe, Hironori; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2012-09-01

    This report summarize the results of the single borehole hydraulic tests of 79 sections conducted as part of the Construction phase (Phase 2) in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) Project. The details of each test (test interval depth, geology, etc.) as well as the interpreted hydraulic parameters and analytical method used are presented in this report. (author)

  16. [Exploring models for the assessment of the economic, social, political, and scientific impact of health research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Angel, Beatriz; Agudelo-Calderón, Carlos A

    2015-05-01

    Health research produces effects on the health of populations. This document approaches the frameworks and the models used by developed countries to assess the impact of health research through documentary analysis of research with the highest impact. With this, it was possible to identify two guiding axes of analysis: one having to do with focus, and the other having to do with emphasis. With these, the published models, their uses, their reach, and their origins are related. Our study brings awareness to the features they have and the areas in which Colombia could implement them. We found that the framework for evaluating health research known as the "payback model" is a model for monitoring research that tracks the process and research results with multidimensional categorization of the impacts of research.

  17. Conceptual Frameworks in the Doctoral Research Process: A Pedagogical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jeanette; Smyth, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    This paper contributes to consideration of the role of conceptual frameworks in the doctoral research process. Through reflection on the two authors' own conceptual frameworks for their doctoral studies, a pedagogical model has been developed. The model posits the development of a conceptual framework as a core element of the doctoral…

  18. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  19. The Job Demands?Resources model: Challenges for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Demerouti (Eva); A.B. Bakke (Arnold B.)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractMotivation: The motivation of this overview is to present the state of the art of Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model whilst integrating the various contributions to the special issue. Research purpose: To provide an overview of the JD-R model, which incorporates many possible working

  20. Attitude Research in Science Education: Contemporary Models and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawley, Frank E.; Kobala, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a summary of models and methods of attitude research which are embedded in the theoretical tenets of social psychology and in the broader framework of constructivism. Focuses on the construction of social reality rather than the construction of physical reality. Models include theory of reasoned action, theory of planned behavior, and…

  1. Changing Models for Researching Pedagogy with Information and Communications Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines changing models of pedagogy by drawing on recent research with teachers and their students as well as theoretical developments. In relation to a participatory view of learning, the paper reviews existing pedagogical models that take little account of the use of information and communications technologies as well as those that…

  2. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  3. The animal model determines the results of Aeromonas virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of A. hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria. The implication of T3SS in the virulence of A. hydrophila was analysed using the AH-1::aopB mutant. This mutant was less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated into zebrafish larvae, as described in other vertebrates. However, the zebrafish model exhibited slight differences in mortality kinetics only observed using invertebrate models. Infections using the mutant AH-1∆vapA lacking the gene coding for the surface S-layer suggested that this protein was not totally necessary to the bacteria once it was inside the host, but it contributed to the inflammatory response. Only when healthy zebrafish larvae were infected did the mutant produce less mortality than the wild type. Variations between models were evidenced using the AH-1∆rmlB, which lacks the O-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the AH-1∆wahD, which lacks the O-antigen LPS and part of the LPS outer-core. Both mutants showed decreased mortality in all of the animal models, but the differences between them were only observed in injured zebrafish larvae, suggesting that residues from the LPS outer core must be important for virulence. The greatest differences were observed using the AH-1ΔFlaB-J (lacking polar flagella and unable to swim and the AH-1::motX (non-motile but producing flagella. They were as pathogenic as the wild-type strain when injected into mice and trout, but no mortalities were registered in zebrafish larvae. This study

  4. Research & development and growth: A Bayesian model averaging analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 6 (2011), s. 2669-2673 ISSN 0264-9993. [Society for Non-linear Dynamics and Econometrics Annual Conferencen. Washington DC, 16.03.2011-18.03.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/0965 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Research and development * Growth * Bayesian model averaging Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.701, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/E/horvath-research & development and growth a bayesian model averaging analysis.pdf

  5. MODERN MUNICIPAL POLICIES FOR YOUTH IN RUSSIA: RESULTS OF OUR RESEARCH; THE WAY FORWARD; THE MEANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Aleksandrovna Knyazkova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to present the data provided from the research that was devoted to the study about the main conclusions and subsidiary findings of the Municipal Youth Policy, and the development of proposals for action based on its principles.The positive results from the research were as follows:1       There is a theoretical discussion in terms of how to realize the aims of the Municipal Youth Policy.2       It is demonstrated that the State Youth Policy can be made more effective by working with young people in a more target-oriented way, being considerate towards the needs and interests of young people in their local societies.3       The Municipal Youth Policy is studied as a part of the State Youth Policy for the Russian Federation. The MYP has its priorities connected with the place of residence and customs of the local area.4       It is noted that the MYP has not yet been fully implemented, despite the constitutional, legislative and basic legal backing of the local administrations;5       A case is made to increase the political cultural awareness amongst young people who participate in the development of political resources based on the Municipal Youth Policy;6       On the basis of the recognized discrepancies and tendencies of the Municipal Youth Policy, the proposals have been elaborated in regards to the formation of the effective model of the Municipal Youth PolicyThe methodology of the studies conducted uses a wide range of scientific methods. At different stages of the study, a wide range of fact-collecting methods was used, and the processing, analyzing and interpreting of it was flexible.The results of the study may be expressed as follows:1       On the one hand, the Municipal Youth Policy is determined by the State Youth Policy, and its priorities in relation to the young generation; and on the other hand, it is a fundamentally new concept for the Russian Federation.2

  6. Integrating the results of user research into medical device development: insights from a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Jennifer L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that considering users is an important aspect of medical device development. However it is also well established that there are numerous barriers to successfully conducting user research and integrating the results into product development. It is not sufficient to simply conduct user research, it must also be effectively integrated into product development. Methods A case study of the development of a new medical imaging device was conducted to examine in detail how users were involved in a medical device development project. Two user research studies were conducted: a requirements elicitation interview study and an early prototype evaluation using contextual inquiry. A descriptive in situ approach was taken to investigate how these studies contributed to the product development process and how the results of this work influenced the development of the technology. Data was collected qualitatively through interviews with the development team, participant observation at development meetings and document analysis. The focus was on investigating the barriers that exist to prevent user data from being integrated into product development. Results A number of individual, organisational and system barriers were identified that functioned to prevent the results of the user research being fully integrated into development. The user and technological aspects of development were seen as separate work streams during development. The expectations of the developers were that user research would collect requirements for the appearance of the device, rather than challenge its fundamental concept. The manner that the user data was communicated to the development team was not effective in conveying the significance or breadth of the findings. Conclusion There are a range of informal and formal organisational processes that can affect the uptake of user data during medical device development. Adopting formal decision

  7. Regional models - Emerging research tools for synoptic meteorologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Daniel; Uccellini, Louis W.

    1987-01-01

    A number of regional-scale numerical weather prediction models are discussed together with their application to the study of the structure and the dynamics of mesoscale phenomena. Consideration is given to investigations of natural phenomena (such as midlatitude cyclones and related baroclinic disturbances; upper-level jet-front systems; surface frontal zones, squall lines, and rain bands; mesoscale convective systems; and severe-storm environments) in which two operational models and four research models are used for regional-model studies. It is shown that these models provide investigators with four-dimensional dynamically consistent data sets to supplement and extend those available from observations.

  8. Changing requirements and resulting needs for IT-infrastructure for longitudinal research in the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Karoline; Quade, Matthias; Rienhoff, Otto; Nussbeck, Sara Y

    2016-01-01

    The observation of growing "difficulties" in IT-infrastructures in neuroscience research during the last years led to a search for reasons and an analysis on how this phenomenon is reflected in the scientific literature. With a retrospective analysis of nine examples of multicenter research projects in the neurosciences and a literature review the observation was systematically analyzed. Results show that the rise in complexity mainly stems from two reasons: (1) more and more need for information on quality and context of research data (metadata) and (2) long-term requirements to handle the consent and identity/pseudonyms of study participants and biomaterials in relation to legal requirements. The combination of these two aspects together with very long study times and data evaluation periods are components of the subjectively perceived "difficulties". A direct consequence of this result is that big multicenter trials are becoming part of integrated research data environments and are not standing alone for themselves anymore. This drives up the resource needs regarding the IT-infrastructure in neuroscience research. In contrast to these findings, literature on this development is scarce and the problem probably underestimated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Results from the Data & Democracy initiative to enhance community-based organization data and research capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll-Scott, Amy; Toy, Peggy; Wyn, Roberta; Zane, Jazmin I; Wallace, Steven P

    2012-07-01

    In an era of community-based participatory research and increased expectations for evidence-based practice, we evaluated an initiative designed to increase community-based organizations' data and research capacity through a 3-day train-the-trainer course on community health assessments. We employed a mixed method pre-post course evaluation design. Various data sources collected from 171 participants captured individual and organizational characteristics and pre-post course self-efficacy on 19 core skills, as well as behavior change 1 year later among a subsample of participants. Before the course, participants reported limited previous experience with data and low self-efficacy in basic research skills. Immediately after the course, participants demonstrated statistically significant increases in data and research self-efficacy. The subsample reported application of community assessment skills to their work and increased use of data 1 year later. Results suggest that an intensive, short-term training program can achieve large immediate gains in data and research self-efficacy in community-based organization staff. In addition, they demonstrate initial evidence of longer-term behavior change related to use of data and research skills to support their community work.

  10. Research progress on animal models of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen DONG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system, and its pathogenesis is complex. Animal models play an important role in study on pathogenesis and treatment of AD. This paper summarized methods of building models, observation on animal models and evaluation index in recent years, so as to provide related evidence for basic and clinical research in future. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.003

  11. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bagno

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6 developed during a year and a half (about 330 h , several lessons (minimodules dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d the formation of a community of practice; and (e acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  12. [Service quality in health care: the application of the results of marketing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen, F W; Harteloh, P P

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with quality assurance in health care and its relation to quality assurance in trade and industry. We present the service quality model--a model of quality from marketing research--and discuss how it can be applied to health care. Traditional quality assurance appears to have serious flaws. It lacks a general theory of the sources of hazards in the complex process of patient care and tends to stagnate, for no real improvement takes place. Departing from this criticism, modern quality assurance in health care is marked by: defining quality in a preferential sense as "fitness for use"; the use of theories and models of trade and industry (process-control); an emphasis on analyzing the process, instead of merely inspecting it; use of the Deming problem solving technique (plan, do, check, act); improvement of the process of care by altering perceptions of parties involved. We present an experience of application and utilization of this method in the University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands. The successful application of this model requires a favorable corporate culture and motivation of the health care workers. This model provides a useful framework to uplift the traditional approach to quality assurance in health care.

  13. Teacher Emotion Research: Introducing a Conceptual Model to Guide Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Leanne; Mansfield, Caroline; Dobozy, Eva

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a conceptual model of teacher emotion through a review of teacher emotion research published between 2003 and 2013. By examining 82 publications regarding teacher emotion, the main aim of the review was to identify how teacher emotion was conceptualised in the literature and develop a conceptual model to…

  14. International Research Workshop on Integrating GIS and Environmental Modeling: Problems, Prospects, and Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Bradley

    2001-01-01

    The 4th International Conference on Integrating GIS and Environmental Modeling (GIS/EM4) was convened in Banff, Canada, September 2-8, 2000 at The Banff Centre for Conferences. The meeting's purpose, like it's predecessors was to reformulate, each three to four years, the collaborative research agenda for integrating spatio-temporal analysis with environmental simulation modeling.

  15. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  16. Can Participatory Action Research Create Value for Business Model Innovation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Mogens; Rasmussen, Ole Horn; Fast, Alf Michael

    Abstract: Participatory Action Research (PAR) has a longer academic history compared with the idea of business models (BMs). This paper indicates how industries gain by using the combined methodology. The research question "Can participatory action research create value for Business Model...... Innovation (BMI)?” – has been investigated from five different perspectives based upon The Business Model Cube and The Where to Look Model. Using both established and newly developed tools the paper presents how. Theory and data from two cases are presented and it is demonstrated how industry increase...... their monetary and/or non-monetary value creation doing BMI based upon PAR. The process is essential and using the methodology of PAR creates meaning. Behind the process, the RAR methodology and its link to BM and BMI may contribute to theory construction and creation of a common language in academia around...

  17. Research in the Ciemat on severe accidents: strategy and recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L. E.

    2012-01-01

    Severe accident research is a fundamental brick in the nuclear technology wall. Its complexity entails huge challenges that require international cooperation to be overcome. CIEMAT has accumulated more than 40 years of experience in the field. By setting a structured research strategy and a continuous enhancement of theoretical an experimental capabilities, CIEMAT has recently produced the results on which this article builds up. Through them, both its working domains and its firm commitment for a continuous growth of knowledge and know-how are outlined. (Author) 24 refs.

  18. Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K.

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  19. Results From Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, Kevin [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  20. Proposal for a telehealth concept in the translational research model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Angélica Baptista; Morel, Carlos Médicis; Moraes, Ilara Hämmerli Sozzi de

    2014-04-01

    To review the conceptual relationship between telehealth and translational research. Bibliographical search on telehealth was conducted in the Scopus, Cochrane BVS, LILACS and MEDLINE databases to find experiences of telehealth in conjunction with discussion of translational research in health. The search retrieved eight studies based on analysis of models of the five stages of translational research and the multiple strands of public health policy in the context of telehealth in Brazil. The models were applied to telehealth activities concerning the Network of Human Milk Banks, in the Telemedicine University Network. The translational research cycle of human milk collected, stored and distributed presents several integrated telehealth initiatives, such as video conferencing, and software and portals for synthesizing knowledge, composing elements of an information ecosystem, mediated by information and communication technologies in the health system. Telehealth should be composed of a set of activities in a computer mediated network promoting the translation of knowledge between research and health services.

  1. Integrating the results of user research into medical device development: insights from a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L; Barnett, Julie

    2012-07-19

    It is well established that considering users is an important aspect of medical device development. However it is also well established that there are numerous barriers to successfully conducting user research and integrating the results into product development. It is not sufficient to simply conduct user research, it must also be effectively integrated into product development. A case study of the development of a new medical imaging device was conducted to examine in detail how users were involved in a medical device development project. Two user research studies were conducted: a requirements elicitation interview study and an early prototype evaluation using contextual inquiry. A descriptive in situ approach was taken to investigate how these studies contributed to the product development process and how the results of this work influenced the development of the technology. Data was collected qualitatively through interviews with the development team, participant observation at development meetings and document analysis. The focus was on investigating the barriers that exist to prevent user data from being integrated into product development. A number of individual, organisational and system barriers were identified that functioned to prevent the results of the user research being fully integrated into development. The user and technological aspects of development were seen as separate work streams during development. The expectations of the developers were that user research would collect requirements for the appearance of the device, rather than challenge its fundamental concept. The manner that the user data was communicated to the development team was not effective in conveying the significance or breadth of the findings. There are a range of informal and formal organisational processes that can affect the uptake of user data during medical device development. Adopting formal decision making processes may assist manufacturers to take a more integrated and

  2. Nutritional implications of organic conversion in large scale food service preliminary results from Core Organic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; He, Chen

    POPY study and was conducted to investigate if such changes can be found in school food settings. In other words does organic food schemes at school and related curricular activities help to create environments that are supportive for healthier eating among children? The research was carried out among school...... eating than their non organic counterparts. However the results were only significant for Denmark and Italy, In Germany results were significant in some cases where as for Finland there were no differences or results were contradictory. The findings suggest the changes in school food services seems...

  3. Stability results for a soil model with singular hysteretic hydrology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; O'Kane, J.P.; Pokrovskii, A.; Rachinskii, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 268, č. 1 (2011), 012016 ISSN 1742-6588. [5th International workshop on multi-rate processes and hysteresis. Pecs, 31.05.2010-03.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/2315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : hysteresis * evolution equation * stability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/268/1/012016

  4. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering results on model compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Tomkinson heterobicyclic molecules could form a reasonable base of model compounds to un- derstand the eigenvectors of one interesting molecular system; the nitrogenous het- erocyclic bases of the nucleotides. Low energy molecular vibrational eigenvectors involve atomic displacements over the molecule as a whole ...

  5. Delta-tilde interpretation of standard linear mixed model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per Bruun; Amorim, Isabel de Sousa; Kuznetsova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    data set and compared to actual d-prime calculations based on Thurstonian regression modeling through the ordinal package. For more challenging cases we offer a generic "plug-in" implementation of a version of the method as part of the R-package SensMixed. We discuss and clarify the bias mechanisms...

  6. Some Results On The Modelling Of TSS Manufacturing Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel MÎNZU

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the modelling of a particular class of manufacturing lines, governed by a decentralised control strategy so that they balance themselves. Such lines are known as “bucket brigades” and also as “TSS lines”, after their first implementation, at Toyota, in the 70’s. A first study of their behaviour was based upon modelling as stochastic dynamic systems, which emphasised, in the frame of the so-called “Normative Model”, a sufficient condition for self-balancing, that means for autonomous functioning at a steady production rate (stationary behaviour. Under some particular conditions, a simulation analysis of TSS lines could be made on non-linear block diagrams, showing that the state trajectories are piecewise continuous in between occurrences of certain discrete events, which determine their discontinuity. TSS lines may therefore be modelled as hybrid dynamic systems, more specific, with autonomous switching and autonomous impulses (jumps. A stability analysis of such manufacturing lines is allowed by modelling them as hybrid dynamic systems with discontinuous motions.

  7. Some results for the dynamic (s, S) inventory model *

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Tijms

    1971-01-01

    textabstractSummary The periodic review, single item, stationary (s, S) inventory model is considered. There is a fixed lead time, a linear purchase cost, a fixed set‐up cost, a holding and shortage cost function, a discount factor 0 < α≤ 1 and backlogging of unfilled demand. The solution for the

  8. Recent numerical results on the two dimensional Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, A.; Sorella, S.; Baroni, S.; Car, R.; Parrinello, M.; Tosatti, E. (SISSA, Trieste (Italy))

    1989-12-01

    A new method for simulating strongly correlated fermionic systems, has been applied to the study of the ground state properties of the 2D Hubbard model at various fillings. Comparison has been made with exact diagonalizations in the 4 x 4 lattices where very good agreement has been verified in all the correlation functions which have been studied: charge, magnetization and momentum distribution. (orig.).

  9. Assessing flood risk at the global scale: model setup, results, and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Philip J; Jongman, Brenden; Weiland, Frederiek Sperna; Winsemius, Hessel C; Bouwman, Arno; Ligtvoet, Willem; Van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc F P

    2013-01-01

    Globally, economic losses from flooding exceeded $19 billion in 2012, and are rising rapidly. Hence, there is an increasing need for global-scale flood risk assessments, also within the context of integrated global assessments. We have developed and validated a model cascade for producing global flood risk maps, based on numerous flood return-periods. Validation results indicate that the model simulates interannual fluctuations in flood impacts well. The cascade involves: hydrological and hydraulic modelling; extreme value statistics; inundation modelling; flood impact modelling; and estimating annual expected impacts. The initial results estimate global impacts for several indicators, for example annual expected exposed population (169 million); and annual expected exposed GDP ($1383 billion). These results are relatively insensitive to the extreme value distribution employed to estimate low frequency flood volumes. However, they are extremely sensitive to the assumed flood protection standard; developing a database of such standards should be a research priority. Also, results are sensitive to the use of two different climate forcing datasets. The impact model can easily accommodate new, user-defined, impact indicators. We envisage several applications, for example: identifying risk hotspots; calculating macro-scale risk for the insurance industry and large companies; and assessing potential benefits (and costs) of adaptation measures. (letter)

  10. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Recent progress and the current status of AgMIP will be presented, highlighting three areas of activity: preliminary results from crop pilot studies, outcomes from regional workshops, and emerging scientific challenges. AgMIP crop modeling efforts are being led by pilot studies, which have been established for wheat, maize, rice, and sugarcane. These crop-specific initiatives have proven instrumental in testing and contributing to AgMIP protocols, as well as creating preliminary results for aggregation and input to agricultural trade models. Regional workshops are being held to encourage collaborations and set research activities in motion for key agricultural areas. The first of these workshops was hosted by Embrapa and UNICAMP and held in Campinas, Brazil. Outcomes from this meeting have informed crop modeling research activities within South America, AgMIP protocols, and future regional workshops. Several scientific challenges have emerged and are currently being addressed by AgMIP researchers. Areas of particular interest include geospatial weather generation, ensemble methods for climate scenarios and crop models, spatial aggregation of field-scale yields to regional and global production, and characterization of future changes in climate variability.

  11. Methods of Science Investigation Part 2: Results of Implementation of a Curriculum Fostering Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    Originally designed to allow secondary students with special needs to participate in original scientific research, the Methods of Science Curriculum was piloted in 2008. Students participating included those with special needs, English language learners, and the general population. Students were incrementally graduated from traditional inquiry activities towards authentic student-generated research projects. Students were evaluated via class work grades, an in-school symposium and a pre/post test. 100 percent of participants successfully completed and presented their original research. The pre/post evaluation demonstrated improvement for 91 percent of participants. An unanticipated result was the performance and growth of English language learners, possibly because of the emphasis on the creative and active process of science rather than vocabulary. A teacher-training program is being developed for expansion of the curriculum to additional schools in 2009.

  12. Higher education and curriculum innovation: results of an institutional network research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Maria Prata-Linhares

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we share the paths of an investigation carried out by a group of researchers from different Brazilian universities (FORPEC, which, based on the results of the investigation, built a network of information and research involving various education institutions. While describing this group’s pathway, the text presents innovating experiences of curriculums in higher education which provided important and significant pedagogic changes in their projects. During the period of investigation, 6 (six projects of university courses with innovation proposals were brought up and analyzed. This analysis allowed for the elaboration of innovation concepts for Higher Education, identify active innovating methodologies, create and implant innovative projects in Higher Education, as well as give the start off to investigation concerning the development of the docents integrating the innovating curricular projects. The groups’ pathway in itself may be considered an innovative research project.

  13. Defining and implementing a model for pharmacy resident research projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick TB

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a standard approach to provide a support structure for pharmacy resident research that emphasizes self-identification of a residency research project. Methods: A subcommittee of the residency advisory committee was formed at our institution. The committee was initially comprised of 2 clinical pharmacy specialists, 1 drug information pharmacist, and 2 pharmacy administrators. The committee developed research guidelines that are distributed to residents prior to the residency start that detail the research process, important deadlines, and available resources. Instructions for institutional review board (IRB training and deadlines for various assignments and presentations throughout the residency year are clearly defined. Residents conceive their own research project and emphasis is placed on completing assignments early in the residency year. Results: In the 4 years this research process has been in place, 15 of 16 (94% residents successfully identified their own research question. All 15 residents submitted a complete research protocol to the IRB by the August deadline. Four residents have presented the results of their research at multi-disciplinary national professional meetings and 1 has published a manuscript. Feedback from outgoing residents has been positive overall and their perceptions of their research projects and the process are positive. Conclusion: Pharmacy residents selecting their own research projects for their residency year is a feasible alternative to assigning or providing lists of research projects from which to select a project.

  14. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Storch, H. von [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2000-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling for the North Sea is presented. The numerical model used for the study is the coupled ice-ocean model OPYC. In a hindcast of the years 1979 to 1993 it was forced with atmospheric forcing of the ECMWF reanalysis. The models capability in simulating the observed mean state and variability in the North Sea is demonstrated by the hindcast. Two time scale ranges, from weekly to seasonal and the longer-than-seasonal time scales are investigated. Shorter time scales, for storm surges, are not captured by the model formulation. The main modes of variability of sea level, sea-surface circulation, sea-surface temperature, and sea-surface salinity are described and connections to atmospheric phenomena, like the NAO, are discussed. T106 ''time-slice'' simulations with a ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' horizon are used to estimate the effects of a changing climate on the shelf sea ''North Sea''. The ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' changes in the surface forcing are accompanied by changes in the lateral oceanic boundary conditions taken from a global coupled climate model. For ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' the time mean sea level increases up to 25 cm in the German Bight in the winter, where 15 cm are due to the surface forcing and 10 cm due to thermal expansion. This change is compared to the ''natural'' variability as simulated in the ECMWF integration and found to be not outside the range spanned by it. The variability of sea level on the weekly-to-seasonal time-scales is significantly reduced in the scenario integration. The variability on the longer-than-seasonal time-scales in the control and scenario runs is much smaller then in the ECMWF integration. This is traced back to the use of ''time-slice'' experiments. Discriminating between locally forced changes and changes induced at the lateral oceanic boundaries of the model in the circulation and

  15. Outline of the results of test and research at expense of entrusting research on atomic energy peaceful utilization, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The test research on the substances promoting the recovery from radiation injuries, the research on the security of the facilities using radioisotopes in earthquakes, the test research on the distribution and behavior of radioactive nuclides in environment for the evaluation of exposure dose, the test research on the rate of scattering of RIs, the measurement and dose evaluation of gaseous radioactive nuclides, the research on the measuring techniques for medium and high concentration gaseous tritium, the test research on the evaluation of the effect of low dose radiation on living things, the epidemiological research on low dose effect, the research on the genetic safety of irradiated foods, the test research on the development of radiation sensitizers to cancer cells, the research on the automation and acceleration of the production of short life RI-labeled compounds, the test research on the safety of high performance air filters for nuclear fuel facilities, the test research on the evaluation of the impact properties of nuclear fuel-transporting casks loaded on vehicles, the research on the application of improved security measures to large scale reprocessing facilities, and the test research on the protection capability of countercollision structures for nuclear ships are outlined. (Kako, I.)

  16. The Effect of Cooperative Learning Model and Kolb Learning Styles on Learning Result of the Basics of Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiharto

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research were to determine the effect of cooperative learning model and learning styles on learning result. This quasi-experimental study employed a 2x2 treatment by level, involved independent variables, i.e. cooperative learning model and learning styles, and learning result as the dependent variable. Findings signify that: (1)…

  17. The Job Demands–Resources model: Challenges for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Demerouti

    2011-05-01

    Research purpose: To provide an overview of the JD–R model, which incorporates many possible working conditions and focuses on both negative and positive indicators of employee well-being. Moreover, the studies of the special issue were introduced. Research design: Qualitative and quantitative studies on the JD–R model were reviewed to enlighten the health and motivational processes suggested by the model. Main findings: Next to the confirmation of the two suggested processes of the JD–R model, the studies of the special issue showed that the model can be used to predict work-place bullying, incidences of upper respiratory track infection, work-based identity, and early retirement intentions. Moreover, whilst psychological safety climate could be considered as a hypothetical precursor of job demands and resources, compassion satisfaction moderated the health process of the model. Contribution/value-add: The findings of previous studies and the studies of the special issue were integrated in the JD–R model that can be used to predict well-being and performance at work. New avenues for future research were suggested. Practical/managerial implications: The JD–R model is a framework that can be used for organisations to improve employee health and motivation, whilst simultaneously improving various organisational outcomes.

  18. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven; Ferracin, P. [CERN; Sabbi, G. [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-10-06

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  19. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, G; Wanderer, P; Ferracin, P; Sabbi, G

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  20. Report of the research results for the peaceful uses of atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this report, the results of the test and research on the peaceful uses of atomic energy, performed in national test and research institutes in fiscal year 1979, are summarized. This is the 20th report, since the first report was published in 1961, and was compiled by the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency. 7 reports on nuclear fusion, 9 reports on technological safety research, 9 reports on environmental radioactivity and safety research, 13 reports on food irradiation, 5 reports on the countermeasures against cancers, 16 reports on fertilized soils, 11 reports on the improvement of plant species, 12 reports on the protection of farm products, 14 reports on the improvement of cattle breeding, 11 reports on diagnosis and treatment, 5 reports on medicines, 7 reports on environmental hygiene, 28 reports on the application to living body pathology, 9 reports on radiochemistry, 9 reports on radiation measurement, 1 report on process analysis, 3 reports on nuclear reactor materials, 3 reports on nuclear-powered ships, 4 reports on civil engineering, 3 reports on radioactivation analysis and 2 reports on injury prevention research are summarized. (Kako, I.)