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Sample records for model reproduces experimental

  1. Systematic heterogenization for better reproducibility in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, S Helene

    2017-08-31

    The scientific literature is full of articles discussing poor reproducibility of findings from animal experiments as well as failures to translate results from preclinical animal studies to clinical trials in humans. Critics even go so far as to talk about a "reproducibility crisis" in the life sciences, a novel headword that increasingly finds its way into numerous high-impact journals. Viewed from a cynical perspective, Fett's law of the lab "Never replicate a successful experiment" has thus taken on a completely new meaning. So far, poor reproducibility and translational failures in animal experimentation have mostly been attributed to biased animal data, methodological pitfalls, current publication ethics and animal welfare constraints. More recently, the concept of standardization has also been identified as a potential source of these problems. By reducing within-experiment variation, rigorous standardization regimes limit the inference to the specific experimental conditions. In this way, however, individual phenotypic plasticity is largely neglected, resulting in statistically significant but possibly irrelevant findings that are not reproducible under slightly different conditions. By contrast, systematic heterogenization has been proposed as a concept to improve representativeness of study populations, contributing to improved external validity and hence improved reproducibility. While some first heterogenization studies are indeed very promising, it is still not clear how this approach can be transferred into practice in a logistically feasible and effective way. Thus, further research is needed to explore different heterogenization strategies as well as alternative routes toward better reproducibility in animal experimentation.

  2. Reproducibility in Computational Neuroscience Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Robert A.; Bulanova, Anna S.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Like all scientific research, computational neuroscience research must be reproducible. Big data science, including simulation research, cannot depend exclusively on journal articles as the method to provide the sharing and transparency required for reproducibility. Methods Ensuring model reproducibility requires the use of multiple standard software practices and tools, including version control, strong commenting and documentation, and code modularity. Results Building on these standard practices, model sharing sites and tools have been developed that fit into several categories: 1. standardized neural simulators, 2. shared computational resources, 3. declarative model descriptors, ontologies and standardized annotations; 4. model sharing repositories and sharing standards. Conclusion A number of complementary innovations have been proposed to enhance sharing, transparency and reproducibility. The individual user can be encouraged to make use of version control, commenting, documentation and modularity in development of models. The community can help by requiring model sharing as a condition of publication and funding. Significance Model management will become increasingly important as multiscale models become larger, more detailed and correspondingly more difficult to manage by any single investigator or single laboratory. Additional big data management complexity will come as the models become more useful in interpreting experiments, thus increasing the need to ensure clear alignment between modeling data, both parameters and results, and experiment. PMID:27046845

  3. Modeling reproducibility of porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, B.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Bao, J.; Oostrom, M.; Battiato, I.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-phase flow in porous media is widely encountered in geological systems. Understanding immiscible fluid displacement is crucial for processes including, but not limited to, CO2 sequestration, non-aqueous phase liquid contamination and oil recovery. Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  4. Experimentally Reproducing Thermal Breakdown of Rock at Earth's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, M. C.; Griffiths, L.; Heap, M. J.; Keanini, R.; Baud, P.

    2016-12-01

    Thermal stressing induces microcrack growth in rock in part due to thermal expansion mismatch between different minerals, mineral phases, or crystalline axes and/or thermal gradients in the entire rock mass. This knowledge is largely derived from experimental studies of thermal microcracking, typically under conditions of very high temperatures (hundreds of °C). Thermal stressing at lower temperatures has received significantly less attention despite the fact that it may play an important role in rock breakdown at and near Earth's surface (Aldred et al., 2015; Collins and Stock, 2016). In particular, Eppes et al. (2016) attribute recorded Acoustic Emissions (AE) from a highly instrumented granite boulder sitting on the ground in natural conditions to subcritical crack growth driven by thermal stresses arising from a combination of solar- and weather-induced temperature changes; however the maximum temperature the boulder experienced was just 65 °C. In order to better understand these results without complicating factors of a natural environment, we conducted controlled laboratory experiments on cylindrical samples (40 mm length and 20 mm diameter) cored from the same granite as the Eppes et al. (2016) experiment, subjecting them to temperature fluctuations that reproduced the field measurements. We used a novel experimental configuration whereby two high temperature piezo-transducers are each in contact with an opposing face of the sample. The servo-controlled uniaxial press compensates for the thermal expansion and contraction of the pistons and the sample, keeping the coupling between the transducers and the sample, and the axial force acting on the sample, constant throughout. The system records AE, as well as P-wave velocity, both independent proxies for microfracture, as well as strain and temperature. Preliminary tests, heating and cooling granite at a rate of 1 °C/min, show that a large amount of AE occurs at temperatures as low as 100 °C. Ultimately, by

  5. Cyberinfrastructure to Support Collaborative and Reproducible Computational Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, J. L.; Castronova, A. M.; Bandaragoda, C.; Morsy, M. M.; Sadler, J. M.; Essawy, B.; Tarboton, D. G.; Malik, T.; Nijssen, B.; Clark, M. P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Creating cyberinfrastructure to support reproducibility of computational hydrologic models is an important research challenge. Addressing this challenge requires open and reusable code and data with machine and human readable metadata, organized in ways that allow others to replicate results and verify published findings. Specific digital objects that must be tracked for reproducible computational hydrologic modeling include (1) raw initial datasets, (2) data processing scripts used to clean and organize the data, (3) processed model inputs, (4) model results, and (5) the model code with an itemization of all software dependencies and computational requirements. HydroShare is a cyberinfrastructure under active development designed to help users store, share, and publish digital research products in order to improve reproducibility in computational hydrology, with an architecture supporting hydrologic-specific resource metadata. Researchers can upload data required for modeling, add hydrology-specific metadata to these resources, and use the data directly within HydroShare.org for collaborative modeling using tools like CyberGIS, Sciunit-CLI, and JupyterHub that have been integrated with HydroShare to run models using notebooks, Docker containers, and cloud resources. Current research aims to implement the Structure For Unifying Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) hydrologic model within HydroShare to support hypothesis-driven hydrologic modeling while also taking advantage of the HydroShare cyberinfrastructure. The goal of this integration is to create the cyberinfrastructure that supports hypothesis-driven model experimentation, education, and training efforts by lowering barriers to entry, reducing the time spent on informatics technology and software development, and supporting collaborative research within and across research groups.

  6. Guidelines for Reproducibly Building and Simulating Systems Biology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medley, J Kyle; Goldberg, Arthur P; Karr, Jonathan R

    2016-10-01

    Reproducibility is the cornerstone of the scientific method. However, currently, many systems biology models cannot easily be reproduced. This paper presents methods that address this problem. We analyzed the recent Mycoplasma genitalium whole-cell (WC) model to determine the requirements for reproducible modeling. We determined that reproducible modeling requires both repeatable model building and repeatable simulation. New standards and simulation software tools are needed to enhance and verify the reproducibility of modeling. New standards are needed to explicitly document every data source and assumption, and new deterministic parallel simulation tools are needed to quickly simulate large, complex models. We anticipate that these new standards and software will enable researchers to reproducibly build and simulate more complex models, including WC models.

  7. Towards reproducible descriptions of neuronal network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in science depends on the effective exchange of ideas among scientists. New ideas can be assessed and criticized in a meaningful manner only if they are formulated precisely. This applies to simulation studies as well as to experiments and theories. But after more than 50 years of neuronal network simulations, we still lack a clear and common understanding of the role of computational models in neuroscience as well as established practices for describing network models in publications. This hinders the critical evaluation of network models as well as their re-use. We analyze here 14 research papers proposing neuronal network models of different complexity and find widely varying approaches to model descriptions, with regard to both the means of description and the ordering and placement of material. We further observe great variation in the graphical representation of networks and the notation used in equations. Based on our observations, we propose a good model description practice, composed of guidelines for the organization of publications, a checklist for model descriptions, templates for tables presenting model structure, and guidelines for diagrams of networks. The main purpose of this good practice is to trigger a debate about the communication of neuronal network models in a manner comprehensible to humans, as opposed to machine-readable model description languages. We believe that the good model description practice proposed here, together with a number of other recent initiatives on data-, model-, and software-sharing, may lead to a deeper and more fruitful exchange of ideas among computational neuroscientists in years to come. We further hope that work on standardized ways of describing--and thinking about--complex neuronal networks will lead the scientific community to a clearer understanding of high-level concepts in network dynamics, and will thus lead to deeper insights into the function of the brain.

  8. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Daniel N.; Pizette, Patrick; Govender, Nicolin; Abriak, Nor-Edine

    2017-06-01

    The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA) particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  9. Towards reproducible experimental studies for non-convex polyhedral shaped particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The packing density and flat bottomed hopper discharge of non-convex polyhedral particles are investigated in a systematic experimental study. The motivation for this study is two-fold. Firstly, to establish an approach to deliver quality experimental particle packing data for non-convex polyhedral particles that can be used for characterization and validation purposes of discrete element codes. Secondly, to make the reproducibility of experimental setups as convenient and readily available as possible using affordable and accessible technology. The primary technology for this study is fused deposition modeling used to 3D print polylactic acid (PLA particles using readily available 3D printer technology. A total of 8000 biodegradable particles were printed, 1000 white particles and 1000 black particles for each of the four particle types considered in this study. Reproducibility is one benefit of using fused deposition modeling to print particles, but an extremely important additional benefit is that specific particle properties can be explicitly controlled. As an example in this study the volume fraction of each particle can be controlled i.e. the effective particle density can be adjusted. In this study the particle volumes reduces drastically as the non-convexity is increased, however all printed white particles in this study have the same mass within 2% of each other.

  10. PDB-NMA of a protein homodimer reproduces distinct experimental motility asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirion, Monique M.; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    We have extended our analytically derived PDB-NMA formulation, Atomic Torsional Modal Analysis or ATMAN (Tirion and ben-Avraham 2015 Phys. Rev. E 91 032712), to include protein dimers using mixed internal and Cartesian coordinates. A test case on a 1.3 {\\mathringA} resolution model of a small homodimer, ActVA-ORF6, consisting of two 112-residue subunits identically folded in a compact 50 {\\mathringA} sphere, reproduces the distinct experimental Debye-Waller motility asymmetry for the two chains, demonstrating that structure sensitively selects vibrational signatures. The vibrational analysis of this PDB entry, together with biochemical and crystallographic data, demonstrates the cooperative nature of the dimeric interaction of the two subunits and suggests a mechanical model for subunit interconversion during the catalytic cycle.

  11. Modeling and evaluating repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mast, J.; van Wieringen, W.N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that currently available methods for the assessment of the repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications are not satisfactory. The paper aims to study whether we can modify a class of models from Item Response Theory, well established for the study of the reliability

  12. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    In experimental musculoskeletal oncology, there remains a need for animal models that can be used to assess the efficacy of new and innovative treatment methodologies for bone tumors. Rat plays a very important role in the bone field especially in the evaluation of metabolic bone diseases. The objective of this study was to develop a rat osteosarcoma model for evaluation of new surgical and molecular methods of treatment for extremity sarcoma. One hundred male SD rats weighing 125.45+/-8.19 g were divided into 5 groups and anesthetized intraperitoneally with 10% chloral hydrate. Orthotopic implantation models of rat osteosarcoma were performed by injecting directly into the SD rat femur with a needle for inoculation with SD tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, 2x10(5) to 1x10(6) UMR106 cells in 50 microl were injected intraosseously into median or distal part of the femoral shaft and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from ultrasound with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. In the third stage, the orthotopically implanted tumors and lung nodules were resected entirely, sectioned, and then counter stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histopathologic evaluation. The tumor take rate was 100% for implants with 8x10(5) tumor cells or more, which was much less than the amount required for subcutaneous implantation, with a high lung metastasis rate of 93.0%. Ultrasound and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.942; p<0.01), which demonstrated that Doppler ultrasonography is a convenient and reliable technique for measuring cancer at any stage. Tumor growth curve showed that orthotopically implanted tumors expanded vigorously with time-lapse, especially in the first 3 weeks. The median time of survival was 38 days and surgical mortality was 0%. The UMR106 cell line has strong carcinogenic capability and high lung metastasis frequency. The present rat

  13. Reproducibility and Transparency in Ocean-Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, N.; Adcroft, A.; Hallberg, R.; Griffies, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Within geophysical modeling and simulation achieving reproducibility can be difficult, especially given the complexity of numerical codes, enormous and disparate data sets, and variety of supercomputing technology. We have made progress on this problem in the context of a large project - the development of new ocean and sea ice models, MOM6 and SIS2. Here we present useful techniques and experience.We use version control not only for code but the entire experiment working directory, including configuration (run-time parameters, component versions), input data and checksums on experiment output. This allows us to document when the solutions to experiments change, whether due to code updates or changes in input data. To avoid distributing large input datasets we provide the tools for generating these from the sources, rather than provide raw input data.Bugs can be a source of non-determinism and hence irreproducibility, e.g. reading from or branching on uninitialized memory. To expose these we routinely run system tests, using a memory debugger, multiple compilers and different machines. Additional confidence in the code comes from specialised tests, for example automated dimensional analysis and domain transformations. This has entailed adopting a code style where we deliberately restrict what a compiler can do when re-arranging mathematical expressions.In the spirit of open science, all development is in the public domain. This leads to a positive feedback, where increased transparency and reproducibility makes using the model easier for external collaborators, who in turn provide valuable contributions. To facilitate users installing and running the model we provide (version controlled) digital notebooks that illustrate and record analysis of output. This has the dual role of providing a gross, platform-independent, testing capability and a means to documents model output and analysis.

  14. Paleomagnetic analysis of curved thrust belts reproduced by physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elisabetta; Speranza, Fabio

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for studying the evolution of curved mountain belts by means of paleomagnetic analyses performed on analogue models. Eleven models were designed aimed at reproducing various tectonic settings in thin-skinned tectonics. Our models analyze in particular those features reported in the literature as possible causes for peculiar rotational patterns in the outermost as well as in the more internal fronts. In all the models the sedimentary cover was reproduced by frictional low-cohesion materials (sand and glass micro-beads), which detached either on frictional or on viscous layers. These latter were reproduced in the models by silicone. The sand forming the models has been previously mixed with magnetite-dominated powder. Before deformation, the models were magnetized by means of two permanent magnets generating within each model a quasi-linear magnetic field of intensity variable between 20 and 100 mT. After deformation, the models were cut into closely spaced vertical sections and sampled by means of 1×1-cm Plexiglas cylinders at several locations along curved fronts. Care was taken to collect paleomagnetic samples only within virtually undeformed thrust sheets, avoiding zones affected by pervasive shear. Afterwards, the natural remanent magnetization of these samples was measured, and alternating field demagnetization was used to isolate the principal components. The characteristic components of magnetization isolated were used to estimate the vertical-axis rotations occurring during model deformation. We find that indenters pushing into deforming belts from behind form non-rotational curved outer fronts. The more internal fronts show oroclinal-type rotations of a smaller magnitude than that expected for a perfect orocline. Lateral symmetrical obstacles in the foreland colliding with forward propagating belts produce non-rotational outer curved fronts as well, whereas in between and inside the obstacles a perfect orocline forms

  15. From alginate impressions to digital virtual models: accuracy and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstra, Michel; Melsen, Birte

    2009-03-01

    To compare the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements performed on digital virtual models with those taken on plaster casts from models poured immediately after the impression was taken, the 'gold standard', and from plaster models poured following a 3-5 day shipping procedure of the alginate impression. Direct comparison of two measuring techniques. The study was conducted at the Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Aarhus, Denmark in 2006/2007. Twelve randomly selected orthodontic graduate students with informed consent. Three sets of alginate impressions were taken from the participants within 1 hour. Plaster models were poured immediately from two of the sets, while the third set was kept in transit in the mail for 3-5 days. Upon return a plaster model was poured as well. Finally digital models were made from the plaster models. A number of measurements were performed on the plaster casts with a digital calliper and on the corresponding digital models using the virtual measuring tool of the accompanying software. Afterwards these measurements were compared statistically. No statistical differences were found between the three sets of plaster models. The intra- and inter-observer variability are smaller for the measurements performed on the digital models. Sending alginate impressions by mail does not affect the quality and accuracy of plaster casts poured from them afterwards. Virtual measurements performed on digital models display less variability than the corresponding measurements performed with a calliper on the actual models.

  16. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  17. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jian; Chekenya, Martha; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Enger, Per Ø; Miletic, Hrvoje; Sakariassen, Per Ø; Huszthy, Peter C; Jacobsen, Hege; Brekkå, Narve; Li, Xingang; Zhao, Peng; Mørk, Sverre

    2009-01-01

    Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression

  18. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA a

  19. Modelling soil erosion at European scale: towards harmonization and reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, C.; de Rigo, D.; Dewitte, O.; Poesen, J.; Panagos, P.

    2015-02-01

    Soil erosion by water is one of the most widespread forms of soil degradation. The loss of soil as a result of erosion can lead to decline in organic matter and nutrient contents, breakdown of soil structure and reduction of the water-holding capacity. Measuring soil loss across the whole landscape is impractical and thus research is needed to improve methods of estimating soil erosion with computational modelling, upon which integrated assessment and mitigation strategies may be based. Despite the efforts, the prediction value of existing models is still limited, especially at regional and continental scale, because a systematic knowledge of local climatological and soil parameters is often unavailable. A new approach for modelling soil erosion at regional scale is here proposed. It is based on the joint use of low-data-demanding models and innovative techniques for better estimating model inputs. The proposed modelling architecture has at its basis the semantic array programming paradigm and a strong effort towards computational reproducibility. An extended version of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) has been implemented merging different empirical rainfall-erosivity equations within a climatic ensemble model and adding a new factor for a better consideration of soil stoniness within the model. Pan-European soil erosion rates by water have been estimated through the use of publicly available data sets and locally reliable empirical relationships. The accuracy of the results is corroborated by a visual plausibility check (63% of a random sample of grid cells are accurate, 83% at least moderately accurate, bootstrap p ≤ 0.05). A comparison with country-level statistics of pre-existing European soil erosion maps is also provided.

  20. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  1. Development of a Consistent and Reproducible Porcine Scald Burn Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy; Cuttle, Leila

    2016-01-01

    There are very few porcine burn models that replicate scald injuries similar to those encountered by children. We have developed a robust porcine burn model capable of creating reproducible scald burns for a wide range of burn conditions. The study was conducted with juvenile Large White pigs, creating replicates of burn combinations; 50°C for 1, 2, 5 and 10 minutes and 60°C, 70°C, 80°C and 90°C for 5 seconds. Visual wound examination, biopsies and Laser Doppler Imaging were performed at 1, 24 hours and at 3 and 7 days post-burn. A consistent water temperature was maintained within the scald device for long durations (49.8 ± 0.1°C when set at 50°C). The macroscopic and histologic appearance was consistent between replicates of burn conditions. For 50°C water, 10 minute duration burns showed significantly deeper tissue injury than all shorter durations at 24 hours post-burn (p ≤ 0.0001), with damage seen to increase until day 3 post-burn. For 5 second duration burns, by day 7 post-burn the 80°C and 90°C scalds had damage detected significantly deeper in the tissue than the 70°C scalds (p ≤ 0.001). A reliable and safe model of porcine scald burn injury has been successfully developed. The novel apparatus with continually refreshed water improves consistency of scald creation for long exposure times. This model allows the pathophysiology of scald burn wound creation and progression to be examined. PMID:27612153

  2. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  3. Using a 1-D model to reproduce diurnal SST signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    The diurnal variability of SST has been extensively studied as it poses challenges for validating and calibrating satellite sensors, merging SST time series, oceanic and atmospheric modelling. As heat is significantly trapped close to the surface, the diurnal signal’s maximum amplitude is best...... captured by radiometers. The availability of infra-red retrievals from a geostationary orbit allows the hourly monitoring of the diurnal SST evolution. When infra-red SSTs are validated with in situ measurements a general mismatch is found, associated with the different reference depth of each type...... of measurement. A generally preferred approach to bridge the gap between in situ and remotely obtained measurements is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. This ESA supported study focuses on the implementation of the 1 dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), in order to resolve...

  4. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  5. Reproducible methods for experimental infection with Flavobacterium psychrophilum in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    1999-01-01

    , and this method was tested using isolates with different elastin- degrading profiles and representing different serotypes. Injecting trout, average weight 1 g, with 10(4) CFU (colony- forming units) per fish caused cumulative mortalities around 60 to 70%. The virulent strains belonged to certain serotypes...... and degraded elastin. The intraperitoneal injection challenge method could be used on larger fish, but the infection dose was 10(7) CFU per fish before mortalities occurred. Bath infection and bath infection in combination with formalin treatment (stress) seemed to be reproducible methods that could be used...

  6. Reproducing tailing in breakthrough curves: Are statistical models equally representative and predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Bianchi, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Breakthrough curves (BTCs) observed during tracer tests in highly heterogeneous aquifers display strong tailing. Power laws are popular models for both the empirical fitting of these curves, and the prediction of transport using upscaling models based on best-fitted estimated parameters (e.g. the power law slope or exponent). The predictive capacity of power law based upscaling models can be however questioned due to the difficulties to link model parameters with the aquifers' physical properties. This work analyzes two aspects that can limit the use of power laws as effective predictive tools: (a) the implication of statistical subsampling, which often renders power laws undistinguishable from other heavily tailed distributions, such as the logarithmic (LOG); (b) the difficulties to reconcile fitting parameters obtained from models with different formulations, such as the presence of a late-time cutoff in the power law model. Two rigorous and systematic stochastic analyses, one based on benchmark distributions and the other on BTCs obtained from transport simulations, are considered. It is found that a power law model without cutoff (PL) results in best-fitted exponents (αPL) falling in the range of typical experimental values reported in the literature (1.5 tailing becomes heavier. Strong fluctuations occur when the number of samples is limited, due to the effects of subsampling. On the other hand, when the power law model embeds a cutoff (PLCO), the best-fitted exponent (αCO) is insensitive to the degree of tailing and to the effects of subsampling and tends to a constant αCO ≈ 1. In the PLCO model, the cutoff rate (λ) is the parameter that fully reproduces the persistence of the tailing and is shown to be inversely correlated to the LOG scale parameter (i.e. with the skewness of the distribution). The theoretical results are consistent with the fitting analysis of a tracer test performed during the MADE-5 experiment. It is shown that a simple

  7. COMBINE archive and OMEX format : One file to share all information to reproduce a modeling project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, Frank T.; Olivier, Brett G.; Soiland-Reyes, Stian

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the ever increasing use of computational models in the biosciences, the need to share models and reproduce the results of published studies efficiently and easily is becoming more important. To this end, various standards have been proposed that can be used to describe models,

  8. Inter-laboratory evaluation of instrument platforms and experimental workflows for quantitative accuracy and reproducibility assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Percy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproducibility of plasma protein quantitation between laboratories and between instrument types was examined in a large-scale international study involving 16 laboratories and 19 LC–MS/MS platforms, using two kits designed to evaluate instrument performance and one kit designed to evaluate the entire bottom-up workflow. There was little effect of instrument type on the quality of the results, demonstrating the robustness of LC/MRM-MS with isotopically labeled standards. Technician skill was a factor, as errors in sample preparation and sub-optimal LC–MS performance were evident. This highlights the importance of proper training and routine quality control before quantitation is done on patient samples.

  9. Microbial domestication signatures of Lactococcus lactis can be reproduced by experimental evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Starrenburg, M.J.C.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful approach to unravel how selective forces shape microbial genotypes and phenotypes. To this date, the available examples focus on the adaptation to conditions specific to the laboratory. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis naturally occurs on plants and

  10. Microbial domestication signatures of Lactococcus lactis can be reproduced by experimental evolution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Starrenburg, M.J.; Molenaar, D.; Kleerebezem, M.; van Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evolution is a powerful approach to unravel how selective forces shape microbial genotypes and phenotypes. To this date, the available examples focus on the adaptation to conditions specific to the laboratory. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis naturally occurs on plants and

  11. Prospective validation of pathologic complete response models in rectal cancer: Transferability and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, Johan; Meldolesi, Elisa; van Stiphout, Ruud; Gatta, Roberto; Damiani, Andrea; Valentini, Vincenzo; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-09-01

    Multiple models have been developed to predict pathologic complete response (pCR) in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Unfortunately, validation of these models normally omit the implications of cohort differences on prediction model performance. In this work, we will perform a prospective validation of three pCR models, including information whether this validation will target transferability or reproducibility (cohort differences) of the given models. We applied a novel methodology, the cohort differences model, to predict whether a patient belongs to the training or to the validation cohort. If the cohort differences model performs well, it would suggest a large difference in cohort characteristics meaning we would validate the transferability of the model rather than reproducibility. We tested our method in a prospective validation of three existing models for pCR prediction in 154 patients. Our results showed a large difference between training and validation cohort for one of the three tested models [Area under the Receiver Operating Curve (AUC) cohort differences model: 0.85], signaling the validation leans towards transferability. Two out of three models had a lower AUC for validation (0.66 and 0.58), one model showed a higher AUC in the validation cohort (0.70). We have successfully applied a new methodology in the validation of three prediction models, which allows us to indicate if a validation targeted transferability (large differences between training/validation cohort) or reproducibility (small cohort differences). © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Huntington disease: Experimental models and therapeutic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Sanchez, Teresa; Blanco Lezcano, Lisette; Garcia Minet, Rocio; Alberti Amador, Esteban; Diaz Armesto, Ivan and others

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a degenerative dysfunction of hereditary origin. Up to date there is not, an effective treatment to the disease which having lapsed 15 or 20 years advances inexorably, in a slow form, toward the total inability or death. This paper reviews the clinical and morphological characteristics of Huntington's disease as well as the experimental models more commonly used to study this disease, having as source the articles indexed in Medline data base, published in the last 20 years. Advantages and disadvantages of all experimental models to reproduce the disease as well as the perspectives to therapeutic assay have been also considered. the consent of outline reported about the toxic models, those induced by neurotoxins such as quinolinic acid, appears to be the most appropriate to reproduce the neuropathologic characteristic of the disease, an genetic models contributing with more evidence to the knowledge of the disease etiology. Numerous treatments ameliorate clinical manifestations, but none of them has been able to stop or diminish the affectations derived from neuronal loss. At present time it is possible to reproduce, at least partially, the characteristics of the disease in experimentation animals that allow therapy evaluation in HD. from the treatment view point, the more promissory seems to be transplantation of no neuronal cells, taking into account ethical issues and factibility. On the other hand the new technology of interference RNA emerges as a potential therapeutic tool for treatment in HD, and to respond basic questions on the development of the disease.

  13. A SELDI mass spectrometry study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: sample preparation, reproducibility, and differential protein expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Sausan; Broadwater, Laurie; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest J; McDonough, Jennifer; Gregory, Roger B

    2013-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is widely used as a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mitochondrial dysfunction appears to play a role in the development of neuropathology in MS and may also play a role in disease pathology in EAE. Here, surface enhanced laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (SELDI-MS) has been employed to obtain protein expression profiles from mitochondrially enriched fractions derived from EAE and control mouse brain. To gain insight into experimental variation, the reproducibility of sub-cellular fractionation, anion exchange fractionation as well as spot-to-spot and chip-to-chip variation using pooled samples from brain tissue was examined. Variability of SELDI mass spectral peak intensities indicates a coefficient of variation (CV) of 15.6% and 17.6% between spots on a given chip and between different chips, respectively. Thinly slicing tissue prior to homogenization with a rotor homogenizer showed better reproducibility (CV = 17.0%) than homogenization of blocks of brain tissue with a Teflon® pestle (CV = 27.0%). Fractionation of proteins with anion exchange beads prior to SELDI-MS analysis gave overall CV values from 16.1% to 18.6%. SELDI mass spectra of mitochondrial fractions obtained from brain tissue from EAE mice and controls displayed 39 differentially expressed proteins (p≤ 0.05) out of a total of 241 protein peaks observed in anion exchange fractions. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that protein fractions from EAE animals with severe disability clearly segregated from controls. Several components of electron transport chain complexes (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6b1, subunit 6C, and subunit 4; NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 3, alpha subcomplex subunit 2, Fe-S protein 4, and Fe-S protein 6; and ATP synthase subunit e) were identified as possible differentially expressed proteins. Myelin Basic Protein isoform 8 (MBP8) (14.2 k

  14. Investigation of dimensional variation in parts manufactured by fused deposition modeling using Gauge Repeatability and Reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Hasan Masood, Syed; Lal Bhowmik, Jahar

    2018-02-01

    In the additive manufacturing (AM) market, the question is raised by industry and AM users on how reproducible and repeatable the fused deposition modeling (FDM) process is in providing good dimensional accuracy. This paper aims to investigate and evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of the FDM process through a systematic approach to answer this frequently asked question. A case study based on the statistical gage repeatability and reproducibility (gage R&R) technique is proposed to investigate the dimensional variations in the printed parts of the FDM process. After running the simulation and analysis of the data, the FDM process capability is evaluated, which would help the industry for better understanding the performance of FDM technology.

  15. Duration of growth depression and pathogen shedding in experimentally reproduced poult enteritis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Naresh; Patnayak, Devi P; Ziegler, Andre F; Lago, Alfonso; Goyal, Sagar M

    2009-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine the duration of growth depression and virus shedding in turkey poults after oral inoculation with intestinal contents from birds affected with poult enteritis syndrome (PES). Poults at day 14 of age were divided into four groups (groups A, B, C, and D) of 40 poults each and inoculated orally with unfiltered supernatant, filtered supernatant, sediment suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or PBS alone (control), respectively. The poults were observed daily for clinical signs, and their growth response, pathology, and pathogen shedding were examined at 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 days postinoculation (DPI). Body weights of eight poults in each group were recorded at each of these intervals followed by euthanasia. Dullness, depression, and diarrhea were observed in birds inoculated with supernatant or sediment suspension. All three treatments significantly reduced body weight gain of poults compared with the control group; average weight loss was 14%. Gross pathologic changes consisted of pale distended intestines with watery contents and distended ceca with frothy and watery contents. Astrovirus and rotavirus were detected in the inoculum by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, whereas Salmonella was identified on bacterial isolation. Both viruses were detected in treated poults by RT-PCR for up to 10 and 40 DPI, respectively. Of the three treatments, sediment suspension caused maximal decrease in weight gain as well as greatest pathologic lesions followed by unfiltered supernatant and filtered supernatant. These findings suggest a role for bacteria in increasing the severity of PES. Lower weight gain in treated poults (compared with controls) at 9 wk of age also indicates that PES-affected poults may not reach normal weight at marketing, leading to economic losses for the producer.

  16. Anatomical Reproducibility of a Head Model Molded by a Three-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kosuke; Nemoto, Masaaki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Okonogi, Shinichi; Nomoto, Jun; Harada, Naoyuki; Sugo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Chikao

    2015-01-01

    We prepared rapid prototyping models of heads with unruptured cerebral aneurysm based on image data of computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a three-dimensional (3D) printer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility and accuracy of these models by comparison with the CTA images on a monitor. The subjects were 22 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm who underwent preoperative CTA. Reproducibility of the microsurgical anatomy of skull bone and arteries, the length and thickness of the main arteries, and the size of cerebral aneurysm were compared between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model. The microsurgical anatomy and arteries were favorably reproduced, apart from a few minute regions, in the rapid prototyping models. No significant difference was noted in the measured lengths of the main arteries between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model, but errors were noted in their thickness (p printer. It was concluded that these models are useful tools for neurosurgical simulation. The thickness of the main arteries and size of cerebral aneurysm should be comprehensively judged including other neuroimaging in consideration of errors.

  17. The Accuracy and Reproducibility of Linear Measurements Made on CBCT-derived Digital Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroua, Ahmad L; Ajaj, Mowaffak; Hajeer, Mohammad Y

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of linear measurements made on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-derived digital models. A total of 25 patients (44% female, 18.7 ± 4 years) who had CBCT images for diagnostic purposes were included. Plaster models were obtained and digital models were extracted from CBCT scans. Seven linear measurements from predetermined landmarks were measured and analyzed on plaster models and the corresponding digital models. The measurements included arch length and width at different sites. Paired t test and Bland-Altman analysis were used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements on digital models compared to the plaster models. Also, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to evaluate the reproducibility of the measurements in order to assess the intraobserver reliability. The statistical analysis showed significant differences on 5 out of 14 variables, and the mean differences ranged from -0.48 to 0.51 mm. The Bland-Altman analysis revealed that the mean difference between variables was (0.14 ± 0.56) and (0.05 ± 0.96) mm and limits of agreement between the two methods ranged from -1.2 to 0.96 and from -1.8 to 1.9 mm in the maxilla and the mandible, respectively. The intraobserver reliability values were determined for all 14 variables of two types of models separately. The mean ICC value for the plaster models was 0.984 (0.924-0.999), while it was 0.946 for the CBCT models (range from 0.850 to 0.985). Linear measurements obtained from the CBCT-derived models appeared to have a high level of accuracy and reproducibility.

  18. Can Computational Sediment Transport Models Reproduce the Observed Variability of Channel Networks in Modern Deltas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, E.; Mukerji, T.

    2017-12-01

    River deltas display complex channel networks that can be characterized through the framework of graph theory, as shown by Tejedor et al. (2015). Deltaic patterns may also be useful in a Bayesian approach to uncertainty quantification of the subsurface, but this requires a prior distribution of the networks of ancient deltas. By considering subaerial deltas, one can at least obtain a snapshot in time of the channel network spectrum across deltas. In this study, the directed graph structure is semi-automatically extracted from satellite imagery using techniques from statistical processing and machine learning. Once the network is labeled with vertices and edges, spatial trends and width and sinuosity distributions can also be found easily. Since imagery is inherently 2D, computational sediment transport models can serve as a link between 2D network structure and 3D depositional elements; the numerous empirical rules and parameters built into such models makes it necessary to validate the output with field data. For this purpose we have used a set of 110 modern deltas, with average water discharge ranging from 10 - 200,000 m3/s, as a benchmark for natural variability. Both graph theoretic and more general distributions are established. A key question is whether it is possible to reproduce this deltaic network spectrum with computational models. Delft3D was used to solve the shallow water equations coupled with sediment transport. The experimental setup was relatively simple; incoming channelized flow onto a tilted plane, with varying wave and tidal energy, sediment types and grain size distributions, river discharge and a few other input parameters. Each realization was run until a delta had fully developed: between 50 and 500 years (with a morphology acceleration factor). It is shown that input parameters should not be sampled independently from the natural ranges, since this may result in deltaic output that falls well outside the natural spectrum. Since we are

  19. Implementation of an experimental pilot reproducing the fouling of the exhaust gas recirculation system in diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crepeau Gérald

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The European emission standards EURO 5 and EURO 6 define more stringent acceptable limits for exhaust emissions of new vehicles. The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR system is a partial but essential solution for lowering the emission of nitrogen oxides and soot particulates. Yet, due to a more intensive use than in the past, the fouling of the EGR system is increased. Ensuring the reliability of the EGR system becomes a main challenge. In partnership with PSA Peugeot Citroën, we designed an experimental setup that mimics an operating EGR system. Its distinctive features are (1 its ability to reproduce precisely the operating conditions and (2 its ability to measure the temperature field on the heat exchanger surface with an Infra Red camera for detecting in real time the evolution of the fooling deposit based on its thermal resistance. Numerical codes are used in conjunction with this experimental setup to determine the evolution of the fouling thickness from its thermal resistance.

  20. Cellular automaton model in the fundamental diagram approach reproducing the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Jun-fang; Yuan, Zhen-zhou; Jia, Bin; Fan, Hong-qiang; Wang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Velocity effect and critical velocity are incorporated into the average space gap cellular automaton model [J.F. Tian, et al., Phys. A 391 (2012) 3129], which was able to reproduce many spatiotemporal dynamics reported by the three-phase theory except the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams. The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. It is shown that the occurrence of synchronized outflow, free outflow of wide moving jams is closely related with drivers time delay in acceleration at the downstream jam front and the critical velocity, respectively. -- Highlights: ► Velocity effect is added into average space gap cellular automaton model. ► The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. ► The probabilistic nature of traffic breakdown is simulated. ► Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. ► The occurrence of synchronized outflow of jams depends on drivers time delay.

  1. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  2. NRFixer: Sentiment Based Model for Predicting the Fixability of Non-Reproducible Bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Goyal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Software maintenance is an essential step in software development life cycle. Nowadays, software companies spend approximately 45\\% of total cost in maintenance activities. Large software projects maintain bug repositories to collect, organize and resolve bug reports. Sometimes it is difficult to reproduce the reported bug with the information present in a bug report and thus this bug is marked with resolution non-reproducible (NR. When NR bugs are reconsidered, a few of them might get fixed (NR-to-fix leaving the others with the same resolution (NR. To analyse the behaviour of developers towards NR-to-fix and NR bugs, the sentiment analysis of NR bug report textual contents has been conducted. The sentiment analysis of bug reports shows that NR bugs' sentiments incline towards more negativity than reproducible bugs. Also, there is a noticeable opinion drift found in the sentiments of NR-to-fix bug reports. Observations driven from this analysis were an inspiration to develop a model that can judge the fixability of NR bugs. Thus a framework, {NRFixer,} which predicts the probability of NR bug fixation, is proposed. {NRFixer} was evaluated with two dimensions. The first dimension considers meta-fields of bug reports (model-1 and the other dimension additionally incorporates the sentiments (model-2 of developers for prediction. Both models were compared using various machine learning classifiers (Zero-R, naive Bayes, J48, random tree and random forest. The bug reports of Firefox and Eclipse projects were used to test {NRFixer}. In Firefox and Eclipse projects, J48 and Naive Bayes classifiers achieve the best prediction accuracy, respectively. It was observed that the inclusion of sentiments in the prediction model shows a rise in the prediction accuracy ranging from 2 to 5\\% for various classifiers.

  3. COMBINE archive and OMEX format: one file to share all information to reproduce a modeling project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Frank T; Adams, Richard; Moodie, Stuart; Cooper, Jonathan; Glont, Mihai; Golebiewski, Martin; Hucka, Michael; Laibe, Camille; Miller, Andrew K; Nickerson, David P; Olivier, Brett G; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Sauro, Herbert M; Scharm, Martin; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Waltemath, Dagmar; Yvon, Florent; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2014-12-14

    With the ever increasing use of computational models in the biosciences, the need to share models and reproduce the results of published studies efficiently and easily is becoming more important. To this end, various standards have been proposed that can be used to describe models, simulations, data or other essential information in a consistent fashion. These constitute various separate components required to reproduce a given published scientific result. We describe the Open Modeling EXchange format (OMEX). Together with the use of other standard formats from the Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE), OMEX is the basis of the COMBINE Archive, a single file that supports the exchange of all the information necessary for a modeling and simulation experiment in biology. An OMEX file is a ZIP container that includes a manifest file, listing the content of the archive, an optional metadata file adding information about the archive and its content, and the files describing the model. The content of a COMBINE Archive consists of files encoded in COMBINE standards whenever possible, but may include additional files defined by an Internet Media Type. Several tools that support the COMBINE Archive are available, either as independent libraries or embedded in modeling software. The COMBINE Archive facilitates the reproduction of modeling and simulation experiments in biology by embedding all the relevant information in one file. Having all the information stored and exchanged at once also helps in building activity logs and audit trails. We anticipate that the COMBINE Archive will become a significant help for modellers, as the domain moves to larger, more complex experiments such as multi-scale models of organs, digital organisms, and bioengineering.

  4. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...... development: Grounding We develop an empirically based conceptualization of modelling and use of models in system development projects characterized by a high degree of uncertainty in requirements and point to implications for tools and techniques for modelling in such a setting. Techniques We introduce......This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...

  5. A novel, comprehensive, and reproducible porcine model for determining the timing of bruises in forensic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Kristiane; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Calculating the timing of bruises is crucial in forensic pathology but is a challenging discipline in both human and veterinary medicine. A mechanical device for inflicting bruises in pigs was developed and validated, and the pathological reactions in the bruises were studied over time......-dependent response. Combining these parameters, bruises could be grouped as being either less than 4 h old or between 4 and 10 h of age. Gross lesions and changes in the epidermis and dermis were inconclusive with respect to time determination. Conclusions The model was reproducible and resembled forensic cases...

  6. A novel highly reproducible and lethal nonhuman primate model for orthopox virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Kramski

    Full Text Available The intentional re-introduction of Variola virus (VARV, the agent of smallpox, into the human population is of great concern due its bio-terroristic potential. Moreover, zoonotic infections with Cowpox (CPXV and Monkeypox virus (MPXV cause severe diseases in humans. Smallpox vaccines presently available can have severe adverse effects that are no longer acceptable. The efficacy and safety of new vaccines and antiviral drugs for use in humans can only be demonstrated in animal models. The existing nonhuman primate models, using VARV and MPXV, need very high viral doses that have to be applied intravenously or intratracheally to induce a lethal infection in macaques. To overcome these drawbacks, the infectivity and pathogenicity of a particular CPXV was evaluated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus.A CPXV named calpox virus was isolated from a lethal orthopox virus (OPV outbreak in New World monkeys. We demonstrated that marmosets infected with calpox virus, not only via the intravenous but also the intranasal route, reproducibly develop symptoms resembling smallpox in humans. Infected animals died within 1-3 days after onset of symptoms, even when very low infectious viral doses of 5x10(2 pfu were applied intranasally. Infectious virus was demonstrated in blood, saliva and all organs analyzed.We present the first characterization of a new OPV infection model inducing a disease in common marmosets comparable to smallpox in humans. Intranasal virus inoculation mimicking the natural route of smallpox infection led to reproducible infection. In vivo titration resulted in an MID(50 (minimal monkey infectious dose 50% of 8.3x10(2 pfu of calpox virus which is approximately 10,000-fold lower than MPXV and VARV doses applied in the macaque models. Therefore, the calpox virus/marmoset model is a suitable nonhuman primate model for the validation of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Furthermore, this model can help study mechanisms of OPV pathogenesis.

  7. Improving the Pattern Reproducibility of Multiple-Point-Based Prior Models Using Frequency Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordua, Knud Skou; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Some multiple-point-based sampling algorithms, such as the snesim algorithm, rely on sequential simulation. The conditional probability distributions that are used for the simulation are based on statistics of multiple-point data events obtained from a training image. During the simulation, data...... events with zero probability in the training image statistics may occur. This is handled by pruning the set of conditioning data until an event with non-zero probability is found. The resulting probability distribution sampled by such algorithms is a pruned mixture model. The pruning strategy leads...... to a probability distribution that lacks some of the information provided by the multiple-point statistics from the training image, which reduces the reproducibility of the training image patterns in the outcome realizations. When pruned mixture models are used as prior models for inverse problems, local re...

  8. Reproducing the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a structured beam with a generalized continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, J.; Fernández-Sáez, J.; Zaera, R.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we study the coupled axial-transverse nonlinear vibrations of a kind of one dimensional structured solids by application of the so called Inertia Gradient Nonlinear continuum model. To show the accuracy of this axiomatic model, previously proposed by the authors, its predictions are compared with numeric results from a previously defined finite discrete chain of lumped masses and springs, for several number of particles. A continualization of the discrete model equations based on Taylor series allowed us to set equivalent values of the mechanical properties in both discrete and axiomatic continuum models. Contrary to the classical continuum model, the inertia gradient nonlinear continuum model used herein is able to capture scale effects, which arise for modes in which the wavelength is comparable to the characteristic distance of the structured solid. The main conclusion of the work is that the proposed generalized continuum model captures the scale effects in both linear and nonlinear regimes, reproducing the behavior of the 1D nonlinear discrete model adequately.

  9. Mouse Models of Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Reproduce the Heterogeneity of the Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Michelotti, Gregory Alexander; Xie, Guanhua; de Almeida, Thiago Pereira; Boursier, Jerome; Bohnic, Brittany; Guy, Cynthia D.; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the potentially progressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is the pandemic liver disease of our time. Although there are several animal models of NASH, consensus regarding the optimal model is lacking. We aimed to compare features of NASH in the two most widely-used mouse models: methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet and Western diet. Methods Mice were fed standard chow, MCD diet for 8 weeks, or Western diet (45% energy from fat, predominantly saturated fat, with 0.2% cholesterol, plus drinking water supplemented with fructose and glucose) for 16 weeks. Liver pathology and metabolic profile were compared. Results The metabolic profile associated with human NASH was better mimicked by Western diet. Although hepatic steatosis (i.e., triglyceride accumulation) was also more severe, liver non-esterified fatty acid content was lower than in the MCD diet group. NASH was also less severe and less reproducible in the Western diet model, as evidenced by less liver cell death/apoptosis, inflammation, ductular reaction, and fibrosis. Various mechanisms implicated in human NASH pathogenesis/progression were also less robust in the Western diet model, including oxidative stress, ER stress, autophagy deregulation, and hedgehog pathway activation. Conclusion Feeding mice a Western diet models metabolic perturbations that are common in humans with mild NASH, whereas administration of a MCD diet better models the pathobiological mechanisms that cause human NAFLD to progress to advanced NASH. PMID:26017539

  10. Mouse models of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis reproduce the heterogeneity of the human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Verdelho Machado

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, the potentially progressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, is the pandemic liver disease of our time. Although there are several animal models of NASH, consensus regarding the optimal model is lacking. We aimed to compare features of NASH in the two most widely-used mouse models: methionine-choline deficient (MCD diet and Western diet.Mice were fed standard chow, MCD diet for 8 weeks, or Western diet (45% energy from fat, predominantly saturated fat, with 0.2% cholesterol, plus drinking water supplemented with fructose and glucose for 16 weeks. Liver pathology and metabolic profile were compared.The metabolic profile associated with human NASH was better mimicked by Western diet. Although hepatic steatosis (i.e., triglyceride accumulation was also more severe, liver non-esterified fatty acid content was lower than in the MCD diet group. NASH was also less severe and less reproducible in the Western diet model, as evidenced by less liver cell death/apoptosis, inflammation, ductular reaction, and fibrosis. Various mechanisms implicated in human NASH pathogenesis/progression were also less robust in the Western diet model, including oxidative stress, ER stress, autophagy deregulation, and hedgehog pathway activation.Feeding mice a Western diet models metabolic perturbations that are common in humans with mild NASH, whereas administration of a MCD diet better models the pathobiological mechanisms that cause human NAFLD to progress to advanced NASH.

  11. Reproducibility analysis of measurements with a mechanical semiautomatic eye model for evaluation of intraocular lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rank, Elisabet; Traxler, Lukas; Bayer, Natascha; Reutterer, Bernd; Lux, Kirsten; Drauschke, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical eye models are used to validate ex vivo the optical quality of intraocular lenses (IOLs). The quality measurement and test instructions for IOLs are defined in the ISO 11979-2. However, it was mentioned in literature that these test instructions could lead to inaccurate measurements in case of some modern IOL designs. Reproducibility of alignment and measurement processes are presented, performed with a semiautomatic mechanical ex vivo eye model based on optical properties published by Liou and Brennan in the scale 1:1. The cornea, the iris aperture and the IOL itself are separately changeable within the eye model. The adjustment of the IOL can be manipulated by automatic decentration and tilt of the IOL in reference to the optical axis of the whole system, which is defined by the connection line of the central point of the artificial cornea and the iris aperture. With the presented measurement setup two quality criteria are measurable: the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the Strehl ratio. First the reproducibility of the alignment process for definition of initial conditions of the lateral position and tilt in reference to the optical axis of the system is investigated. Furthermore, different IOL holders are tested related to the stable holding of the IOL. The measurement is performed by a before-after comparison of the lens position using a typical decentration and tilt tolerance analysis path. Modulation transfer function MTF and Strehl ratio S before and after this tolerance analysis are compared and requirements for lens holder construction are deduced from the presented results.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations with electronic stopping can reproduce experimental sputtering yields of metals impacted by large cluster ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiting; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian

    2018-03-01

    An unsolved problem in research of sputtering from metals induced by energetic large cluster ions is that molecular dynamics (MD) simulations often produce sputtering yields much higher than experimental results. Different from the previous simulations considering only elastic atomic interactions (nuclear stopping), here we incorporate inelastic electrons-atoms interactions (electronic stopping, ES) into MD simulations using a friction model. In this way we have simulated continuous 45° impacts of 10-20 keV C60 on a Ag(111) surface, and found that the calculated sputtering yields can be very close to the experimental results when the model parameter is appropriately assigned. Conversely, when we ignore the effect of ES, the yields are much higher, just like the previous studies. We further expand our research to the sputtering of Au induced by continuous keV C60 or Ar100 bombardments, and obtain quite similar results. Our study indicates that the gap between the experimental and the simulated sputtering yields is probably induced by the ignorance of ES in the simulations, and that a careful treatment of this issue is important for simulations of cluster-ion-induced sputtering, especially for those aiming to compare with experiments.

  13. The construction of a two-dimensional reproducing kernel function and its application in a biomedical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Shen, Shu-Ting

    2016-04-29

    There are two major classes of cardiac tissue models: the ionic model and the FitzHugh-Nagumo model. During computer simulation, each model entails solving a system of complex ordinary differential equations and a partial differential equation with non-flux boundary conditions. The reproducing kernel method possesses significant applications in solving partial differential equations. The derivative of the reproducing kernel function is a wavelet function, which has local properties and sensitivities to singularity. Therefore, study on the application of reproducing kernel would be advantageous. Applying new mathematical theory to the numerical solution of the ventricular muscle model so as to improve its precision in comparison with other methods at present. A two-dimensional reproducing kernel function inspace is constructed and applied in computing the solution of two-dimensional cardiac tissue model by means of the difference method through time and the reproducing kernel method through space. Compared with other methods, this method holds several advantages such as high accuracy in computing solutions, insensitivity to different time steps and a slow propagation speed of error. It is suitable for disorderly scattered node systems without meshing, and can arbitrarily change the location and density of the solution on different time layers. The reproducing kernel method has higher solution accuracy and stability in the solutions of the two-dimensional cardiac tissue model.

  14. Why are models unable to reproduce multi-decadal trends in lower tropospheric baseline ozone levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Liu, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S.

    2017-12-01

    Assessments of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing rely on accurate model simulations. Parrish et al (2014) found that three chemistry-climate models (CCMs) overestimate present-day O3 mixing ratios and capture only 50% of the observed O3 increase over the last five decades at 12 baseline sites in the northern mid-latitudes, indicating large uncertainties in our understanding of the ozone trends and their implications for radiative forcing. Here we present comparisons of outputs from two chemical transport models (CTMs) - GEOS-Chem and the Global Modeling Initiative model - with O3 observations from the same sites and from the global ozonesonde network. Both CTMs are driven by reanalysis meteorological data (MERRA or MERRA2) and thus are expected to be different in atmospheric transport processes relative to those freely running CCMs. We test whether recent model developments leading to more active ozone chemistry affect the computed ozone sensitivity to perturbations in emissions. Preliminary results suggest these CTMs can reproduce present-day ozone levels but fail to capture the multi-decadal trend since 1980. Both models yield widespread overpredictions of free tropospheric ozone in the 1980s. Sensitivity studies in GEOS-Chem suggest that the model estimate of natural background ozone is too high. We discuss factors that contribute to the variability and trends of tropospheric ozone over the last 30 years, with a focus on intermodel differences in spatial resolution and in the representation of stratospheric chemistry, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, halogen chemistry, and biogenic VOC emissions and chemistry. We also discuss uncertainty in the historical emission inventories used in models, and how these affect the simulated ozone trends.

  15. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  16. Stochastic model of financial markets reproducing scaling and memory in volatility return intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontis, V.; Havlin, S.; Kononovicius, A.; Podobnik, B.; Stanley, H. E.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the volatility return intervals in the NYSE and FOREX markets. We explain previous empirical findings using a model based on the interacting agent hypothesis instead of the widely-used efficient market hypothesis. We derive macroscopic equations based on the microscopic herding interactions of agents and find that they are able to reproduce various stylized facts of different markets and different assets with the same set of model parameters. We show that the power-law properties and the scaling of return intervals and other financial variables have a similar origin and could be a result of a general class of non-linear stochastic differential equations derived from a master equation of an agent system that is coupled by herding interactions. Specifically, we find that this approach enables us to recover the volatility return interval statistics as well as volatility probability and spectral densities for the NYSE and FOREX markets, for different assets, and for different time-scales. We find also that the historical S&P500 monthly series exhibits the same volatility return interval properties recovered by our proposed model. Our statistical results suggest that human herding is so strong that it persists even when other evolving fluctuations perturbate the financial system.

  17. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  18. How well do CMIP5 Climate Models Reproduce the Hydrologic Cycle of the Colorado River Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, J.; Mascaro, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Colorado River, which is the primary source of water for nearly 40 million people in the arid Southwestern states of the United States, has been experiencing an extended drought since 2000, which has led to a significant reduction in water supply. As the water demands increase, one of the major challenges for water management in the region has been the quantification of uncertainties associated with streamflow predictions in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) under potential changes of future climate. Hence, testing the reliability of model predictions in the CRB is critical in addressing this challenge. In this study, we evaluated the performances of 17 General Circulation Models (GCMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Five (CMIP5) and 4 Regional Climate Models (RCMs) in reproducing the statistical properties of the hydrologic cycle in the CRB. We evaluated the water balance components at four nested sub-basins along with the inter-annual and intra-annual changes of precipitation (P), evaporation (E), runoff (R) and temperature (T) from 1979 to 2005. Most of the models captured the net water balance fairly well in the most-upstream basin but simulated a weak hydrological cycle in the evaporation channel at the downstream locations. The simulated monthly variability of P had different patterns, with correlation coefficients ranging from -0.6 to 0.8 depending on the sub-basin and the models from same parent institution clustering together. Apart from the most-upstream sub-basin where the models were mainly characterized by a negative seasonal bias in SON (of up to -50%), most of them had a positive bias in all seasons (of up to +260%) in the other three sub-basins. The models, however, captured the monthly variability of T well at all sites with small inter-model variabilities and a relatively similar range of bias (-7 °C to +5 °C) across all seasons. Mann-Kendall test was applied to the annual P and T time-series where majority of the models

  19. Reproducibility of summertime diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility of diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs were evaluated, in comparison with station data (NCDC-9813) and satellite data (GSMaP-V5). We first calculated diurnal cycles by averaging precipitation at each local solar time (LST) in June-July-August during 1981-2000 over the continent of northern Eurasia (0-180E, 45-90N). Then we examined occurrence time of maximum precipitation and a contribution of diurnally varying precipitation to the total precipitation.The contribution of diurnal precipitation was about 21% in both NCDC-9813 and GSMaP-V5. The maximum precipitation occurred at 18LST in NCDC-9813 but 16LST in GSMaP-V5, indicating some uncertainties even in the observational datasets. The diurnal contribution of the CMIP5 models varied largely from 11% to 62%, and their timing of the precipitation maximum ranged from 11LST to 20LST. Interestingly, the contribution and the timing had strong negative correlation of -0.65. The models with larger diurnal precipitation showed precipitation maximum earlier around noon. Next, we compared sensitivity of precipitation to surface temperature and tropospheric humidity between 5 models with large diurnal precipitation (LDMs) and 5 models with small diurnal precipitation (SDMs). Precipitation in LDMs showed high sensitivity to surface temperature, indicating its close relationship with local instability. On the other hand, synoptic disturbances were more active in SDMs with a dominant role of the large scale condensation, and precipitation in SDMs was more related with tropospheric moisture. Therefore, the relative importance of the local instability and the synoptic disturbances was suggested to be an important factor in determining the contribution and timing of the diurnal precipitation. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

  20. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  1. Reproducibility and consistency of proteomic experiments on natural populations of a non-model aquatic insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Galiana, Amparo; Monge, Marta; Biron, David G; Canals, Francesc; Ribera, Ignacio; Cieslak, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Population proteomics has a great potential to address evolutionary and ecological questions, but its use in wild populations of non-model organisms is hampered by uncontrolled sources of variation. Here we compare the response to temperature extremes of two geographically distant populations of a diving beetle species (Agabus ramblae) using 2-D DIGE. After one week of acclimation in the laboratory under standard conditions, a third of the specimens of each population were placed at either 4 or 27°C for 12 h, with another third left as a control. We then compared the protein expression level of three replicated samples of 2-3 specimens for each treatment. Within each population, variation between replicated samples of the same treatment was always lower than variation between treatments, except for some control samples that retained a wider range of expression levels. The two populations had a similar response, without significant differences in the number of protein spots over- or under-expressed in the pairwise comparisons between treatments. We identified exemplary proteins among those differently expressed between treatments, which proved to be proteins known to be related to thermal response or stress. Overall, our results indicate that specimens collected in the wild are suitable for proteomic analyses, as the additional sources of variation were not enough to mask the consistency and reproducibility of the response to the temperature treatments.

  2. An improved cost-effective, reproducible method for evaluation of bone loss in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Daniel H; Schreiner, Helen; Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Greenberg, Barbara; Jiang, Shuying; Markowitz, Kenneth; Furgang, David

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the utility of two "new" definitions for assessment of bone loss in a rodent model of periodontitis. Eighteen rats were divided into three groups. Group 1 was infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), group 2 was infected with an Aa leukotoxin knock-out, and group 3 received no Aa (controls). Microbial sampling and antibody titres were determined. Initially, two examiners measured the distance from the cemento-enamel-junction to alveolar bone crest using the three following methods; (1) total area of bone loss by radiograph, (2) linear bone loss by radiograph, (3) a direct visual measurement (DVM) of horizontal bone loss. Two "new" definitions were adopted; (1) any site in infected animals showing bone loss >2 standard deviations above the mean seen at that site in control animals was recorded as bone loss, (2) any animal with two or more sites in any quadrant affected by bone loss was considered as diseased. Using the "new" definitions both evaluators independently found that infected animals had significantly more disease than controls (DVM system; p<0.05). The DVM method provides a simple, cost effective, and reproducible method for studying periodontal disease in rodents.

  3. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  4. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Injury: Reproducible, Quantitative, Physiological Models to Impair Skeletal Muscle's Capacity to Generate Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Jarrod A; Lowe, Dawn A

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of muscle regeneration an experimental injury model is required. Advantages of eccentric contraction-induced injury are that it is a controllable, reproducible, and physiologically relevant model to cause muscle injury, with injury being defined as a loss of force generating capacity. While eccentric contractions can be incorporated into conscious animal study designs such as downhill treadmill running, electrophysiological approaches to elicit eccentric contractions and examine muscle contractility, for example before and after the injurious eccentric contractions, allows researchers to circumvent common issues in determining muscle function in a conscious animal (e.g., unwillingness to participate). Herein, we describe in vitro and in vivo methods that are reliable, repeatable, and truly maximal because the muscle contractions are evoked in a controlled, quantifiable manner independent of subject motivation. Both methods can be used to initiate eccentric contraction-induced injury and are suitable for monitoring functional muscle regeneration hours to days to weeks post-injury.

  5. Experimental Verification of the Transient Model in an Enrichment Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandino, Maria; Brasnarof, Daniel; Delmastro, Dario

    2003-01-01

    In the present work an experimental closed loop representing a single stage of an uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment cascade is described, loop that is used to experimentally validate an analytical model that describes the dynamics inside such a loop.The conditions established inside the experimental loop after a few working hours were reproduced by the analytical model, leaving the slower thermal phenomena taking place for future studies.Two kinds of perturbations were experimentally introduced: a change in the range of operation of one of the compressors and the addition of mass into the loop.Numerical and experimental results are compared and presented in this work. The analytical model proposed was verified against these two changes, with very good agreement in the time response and measured values.This analytical model allows us to determine the characteristic time response of the system

  6. Validation of the 3D Skin Comet assay using full thickness skin models: Transferability and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Kerstin; Blatz, Veronika; Brinkmann, Joep; Downs, Thomas R; Fischer, Anja; Henkler, Frank; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Krul, Cyrille; Liebsch, Manfred; Luch, Andreas; Pirow, Ralph; Reus, Astrid A; Schulz, Markus; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Recently revised OECD Testing Guidelines highlight the importance of considering the first site-of-contact when investigating the genotoxic hazard. Thus far, only in vivo approaches are available to address the dermal route of exposure. The 3D Skin Comet and Reconstructed Skin Micronucleus (RSMN) assays intend to close this gap in the in vitro genotoxicity toolbox by investigating DNA damage after topical application. This represents the most relevant route of exposure for a variety of compounds found in household products, cosmetics, and industrial chemicals. The comet assay methodology is able to detect both chromosomal damage and DNA lesions that may give rise to gene mutations, thereby complementing the RSMN which detects only chromosomal damage. Here, the comet assay was adapted to two reconstructed full thickness human skin models: the EpiDerm™- and Phenion ® Full-Thickness Skin Models. First, tissue-specific protocols for the isolation of single cells and the general comet assay were transferred to European and US-American laboratories. After establishment of the assay, the protocol was then further optimized with appropriate cytotoxicity measurements and the use of aphidicolin, a DNA repair inhibitor, to improve the assay's sensitivity. In the first phase of an ongoing validation study eight chemicals were tested in three laboratories each using the Phenion ® Full-Thickness Skin Model, informing several validation modules. Ultimately, the 3D Skin Comet assay demonstrated a high predictive capacity and good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility with four laboratories reaching a 100% predictivity and the fifth yielding 70%. The data are intended to demonstrate the use of the 3D Skin Comet assay as a new in vitro tool for following up on positive findings from the standard in vitro genotoxicity test battery for dermally applied chemicals, ultimately helping to drive the regulatory acceptance of the assay. To expand the database, the validation will

  7. Reproducibility of the heat/capsaicin skin sensitization model in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallone LF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura F Cavallone,1 Karen Frey,1 Michael C Montana,1 Jeremy Joyal,1 Karen J Regina,1 Karin L Petersen,2 Robert W Gereau IV11Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St Louis, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USAIntroduction: Heat/capsaicin skin sensitization is a well-characterized human experimental model to induce hyperalgesia and allodynia. Using this model, gabapentin, among other drugs, was shown to significantly reduce cutaneous hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Since the larger thermal probes used in the original studies to produce heat sensitization are now commercially unavailable, we decided to assess whether previous findings could be replicated with a currently available smaller probe (heated area 9 cm2 versus 12.5–15.7 cm2.Study design and methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, 15 adult healthy volunteers participated in two study sessions, scheduled 1 week apart (Part A. In both sessions, subjects were exposed to the heat/capsaicin cutaneous sensitization model. Areas of hypersensitivity to brush stroke and von Frey (VF filament stimulation were measured at baseline and after rekindling of skin sensitization. Another group of 15 volunteers was exposed to an identical schedule and set of sensitization procedures, but, in each session, received either gabapentin or placebo (Part B.Results: Unlike previous reports, a similar reduction of areas of hyperalgesia was observed in all groups/sessions. Fading of areas of hyperalgesia over time was observed in Part A. In Part B, there was no difference in area reduction after gabapentin compared to placebo.Conclusion: When using smaller thermal probes than originally proposed, modifications of other parameters of sensitization and/or rekindling process may be needed to allow the heat/capsaicin sensitization protocol to be used as initially intended. Standardization and validation of

  8. Developing a reproducible non-line-of-sight experimental setup for testing wireless medical device coexistence utilizing ZigBee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSorte, Nickolas J; Rajab, Samer A; Refai, Hazem H

    2012-11-01

    The integration of heterogeneous wireless technologies is believed to aid revolutionary healthcare delivery in hospitals and residential care. Wireless medical device coexistence is a growing concern given the ubiquity of wireless technology. In spite of this, a consensus standard that addresses risks associated with wireless heterogeneous networks has not been adopted. This paper serves as a starting point by recommending a practice for assessing the coexistence of a wireless medical device in a non-line-of-sight environment utilizing 802.15.4 in a practical, versatile, and reproducible test setup. This paper provides an extensive survey of other coexistence studies concerning 802.15.4 and 802.11 and reports on the authors' coexistence testing inside and outside an anechoic chamber. Results are compared against a non-line-of-sight test setup. Findings relative to co-channel and adjacent channel interference were consistent with results reported in the literature.

  9. Reproducing the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition: Factor Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One of the ways to increase the reproducibility of research is for authors to provide a sufficient description of the data analytic procedures so that others can replicate the results. The publishers of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V) do not follow these guidelines when reporting their confirmatory factor…

  10. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  11. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy...... source. Toluene was degraded under aerobic conditions at a constant temperature of 28 degreesC. The experiments were modelled by a Monod model - extended to meet the air/liquid system, and the parameter values were estimated using a statistical nonlinear estimation procedure. Model reduction analysis...... resulted in a simpler model without the biomass decay term. In order to test for model reduction and reproducibility of parameter estimates, a likelihood ratio test was employed. The limited reproducibility for these experiments implied that all 9 batch experiments could not be described by the same set...

  12. A computational model for histone mark propagation reproduces the distribution of heterochromatin in different human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly compact and dynamic nuclear structure that consists of DNA and associated proteins. The main organizational unit is the nucleosome, which consists of a histone octamer with DNA wrapped around it. Histone proteins are implicated in the regulation of eukaryote genes and they carry numerous reversible post-translational modifications that control DNA-protein interactions and the recruitment of chromatin binding proteins. Heterochromatin, the transcriptionally inactive part of the genome, is densely packed and contains histone H3 that is methylated at Lys 9 (H3K9me). The propagation of H3K9me in nucleosomes along the DNA in chromatin is antagonizing by methylation of H3 Lysine 4 (H3K4me) and acetylations of several lysines, which is related to euchromatin and active genes. We show that the related histone modifications form antagonized domains on a coarse scale. These histone marks are assumed to be initiated within distinct nucleation sites in the DNA and to propagate bi-directionally. We propose a simple computer model that simulates the distribution of heterochromatin in human chromosomes. The simulations are in agreement with previously reported experimental observations from two different human cell lines. We reproduced different types of barriers between heterochromatin and euchromatin providing a unified model for their function. The effect of changes in the nucleation site distribution and of propagation rates were studied. The former occurs mainly with the aim of (de-)activation of single genes or gene groups and the latter has the power of controlling the transcriptional programs of entire chromosomes. Generally, the regulatory program of gene transcription is controlled by the distribution of nucleation sites along the DNA string.

  13. Experimental models of chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abbondanza, Josephine A; Loch Macdonald, R

    2014-02-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical problem. Most studies of pathogenesis and treatment involve humans. Advances in understanding of human diseases may be made using animal models. We reviewed all animal models of CSDH and report here their results, conclusions and limitations in order to set a baseline upon which further advanced experimental work related to this disease can be made. PubMed, Medline, Embase and ISI Web of Knowledge were searched with no time limits using the keyword 'chronic subdural hematoma' and MeSH term 'hematoma, subdural, chronic'. The authors reviewed all papers written related to this disease and selected all publications involving animals. There were no other restrictions. The findings and conclusions of the papers are summarized here. No formal analysis was done because of the variation in species used, methods for induction of CSDH, times of assessment and reporting of results. Attempts to create CSDH have been made in mice, rats, cats, dogs and monkeys. Methods include injection or surgical implantation of clotted blood or various other blood products and mixtures into the potential subdural space or the subcutaneous space. No intracranial model produced a progressively expanding CSDH. Transient hematoma expansion with liquification could be produced by subcutaneous injections in some models. Spontaneous subdural blood collections were found after creation of hydrocephalus in mice by systemic injection of the neurotoxin, 6-aminonicotinamide. The histology of the hematoma membranes in several models resembles the appearance in humans. None of the models has been replicated since its first description. We did not find a report of a reproducible, well-described animal model of human CSDH.

  14. Assessment of the potential forecasting skill of a global hydrological model in reproducing the occurrence of monthly flow extremes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Candogan Yossef

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As an initial step in assessing the prospect of using global hydrological models (GHMs for hydrological forecasting, this study investigates the skill of the GHM PCR-GLOBWB in reproducing the occurrence of past extremes in monthly discharge on a global scale. Global terrestrial hydrology from 1958 until 2001 is simulated by forcing PCR-GLOBWB with daily meteorological data obtained by downscaling the CRU dataset to daily fields using the ERA-40 reanalysis. Simulated discharge values are compared with observed monthly streamflow records for a selection of 20 large river basins that represent all continents and a wide range of climatic zones.

    We assess model skill in three ways all of which contribute different information on the potential forecasting skill of a GHM. First, the general skill of the model in reproducing hydrographs is evaluated. Second, model skill in reproducing significantly higher and lower flows than the monthly normals is assessed in terms of skill scores used for forecasts of categorical events. Third, model skill in reproducing flood and drought events is assessed by constructing binary contingency tables for floods and droughts for each basin. The skill is then compared to that of a simple estimation of discharge from the water balance (PE.

    The results show that the model has skill in all three types of assessments. After bias correction the model skill in simulating hydrographs is improved considerably. For most basins it is higher than that of the climatology. The skill is highest in reproducing monthly anomalies. The model also has skill in reproducing floods and droughts, with a markedly higher skill in floods. The model skill far exceeds that of the water balance estimate. We conclude that the prospect for using PCR-GLOBWB for monthly and seasonal forecasting of the occurrence of hydrological extremes is positive. We argue that this conclusion applies equally to other similar GHMs and

  15. Experimental models of developmental hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argumedo, G S; Sanz, C R; Olguín, H J

    2012-02-01

    Hypothyroidism is a systemic disease resulting from either thyroid gland's anatomical and functional absence or lack of hypophyseal stimulation, both of which can lead to deficiency in thyroid hormone (TH) production. TH is essential for human and animal development, growth, and function of multiple organs. Children with deficient TH can develop alterations in central nervous system (CNS), striated muscle, bone tissue, liver, bone marrow, and cardiorespiratory system. Among the clinical outlook are signs like breathing difficulty, cardiac insufficiency, dysphagia, and repeated bronchial aspiration, constipation, muscle weakness, cognitive alterations, cochlear dysfunction, reduced height, defects in temperature regulation, anaemia, jaundice, susceptibility to infection, and others. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that TH is very essential for normal brain development. Other research work based on mice pointed out that a reduced level of TH in pregnant mother leads to congenital hypothyroidism in animal models and it is associated with mental retardation, deep neurologic deficiency that impacts on cognitive, learning, and memory functions. The principal experimental model studies that have focused on hypothyroidism are reviewed in this study. This is important on considering the fact that almost all animal species require thyroid hormones for their metabolism. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Two-Finger Tightness: What Is It? Measuring Torque and Reproducibility in a Simulated Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, William B; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Shih, Albert J; Irwin, Todd A; Holmes, James R

    2016-05-01

    Residents in training are often directed to insert screws using "two-finger tightness" to impart adequate torque but minimize the chance of a screw stripping in bone. This study seeks to quantify and describe two-finger tightness and to assess the variability of its application by residents in training. Cortical bone was simulated using a polyurethane foam block (30-pcf density) that was prepared with predrilled holes for tightening 3.5 × 14-mm long cortical screws and mounted to a custom-built apparatus on a load cell to capture torque data. Thirty-three residents in training, ranging from the first through fifth years of residency, along with 8 staff members, were directed to tighten 6 screws to two-finger tightness in the test block, and peak torque values were recorded. The participants were blinded to their torque values. Stripping torque (2.73 ± 0.56 N·m) was determined from 36 trials and served as a threshold for failed screw placement. The average torques varied substantially with regard to absolute torque values, thus poorly defining two-finger tightness. Junior residents less consistently reproduced torque compared with other groups (0.29 and 0.32, respectively). These data quantify absolute values of two-finger tightness but demonstrate considerable variability in absolute torque values, percentage of stripping torque, and ability to consistently reproduce given torque levels. Increased years in training are weakly correlated with reproducibility, but experience does not seem to affect absolute torque levels. These results question the usefulness of two-finger tightness as a teaching tool and highlight the need for improvement in resident motor skill training and development within a teaching curriculum. Torque measuring devices may be a useful simulation tools for this purpose.

  17. Experimental study and modeling of a novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Li, Weihua; Sun, Shuaishuai; Du, Haiping; Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Deng, H X

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental setup aiming at evaluating the performance of a newly designed magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) seismic isolator. As a further effort to explore the field-dependent stiffness/damping properties of the MRE isolator, a series of experimental testing were conducted. Based upon the analysis of the experimental responses and the characteristics of the MRE isolator, a new model that is capable of reproducing the unique MRE isolator dynamics behaviors is proposed. The validation results verify the model’s effectiveness to portray the MRE isolator. A study on the field-dependent parameters is then provided to make the model valid with fluctuating magnetic fields. To fully explore the mechanism of the proposed model, an investigation relating the dependence of the proposed model on every parameter is carried out. (technical note)

  18. Intestinal microdialysis--applicability, reproducibility and local tissue response in a pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmertsen, K J; Wara, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Microdialysis has been applied to the intestinal wall for the purpose of monitoring local ischemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability, reproducibility and local response to microdialysis in the intestinal wall. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 12 pigs two...... the probes were processed for histological examination. RESULTS: Large intra- and inter-group differences in the relative recovery were found between all locations. Absolute values of metabolites showed no significant changes during the study period. The lactate in blood was 25-30% of the intra-tissue values...

  19. Pharmacokinetic Modelling to Predict FVIII:C Response to Desmopressin and Its Reproducibility in Nonsevere Haemophilia A Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Lisette M; van Hest, Reinier M; Stoof, Sara C M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Cnossen, Marjon H; Kruip, Marieke J H A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2018-04-01

     Nonsevere haemophilia A (HA) patients can be treated with desmopressin. Response of factor VIII activity (FVIII:C) differs between patients and is difficult to predict.  Our aims were to describe FVIII:C response after desmopressin and its reproducibility by population pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling.  Retrospective data of 128 nonsevere HA patients (age 7-75 years) receiving an intravenous or intranasal dose of desmopressin were used. PK modelling of FVIII:C was performed by nonlinear mixed effect modelling. Reproducibility of FVIII:C response was defined as less than 25% difference in peak FVIII:C between administrations.  A total of 623 FVIII:C measurements from 142 desmopressin administrations were available; 14 patients had received two administrations at different occasions. The FVIII:C time profile was best described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Interindividual variability of the estimated baseline FVIII:C, central volume of distribution and clearance were 37, 43 and 50%, respectively. The most recently measured FVIII:C (FVIII-recent) was significantly associated with FVIII:C response to desmopressin ( p  C increase of 0.47 IU/mL (median, interquartile range: 0.32-0.65 IU/mL, n  = 142). C response was reproducible in 6 out of 14 patients receiving two desmopressin administrations.  FVIII:C response to desmopressin in nonsevere HA patients was adequately described by a population PK model. Large variability in FVIII:C response was observed, which could only partially be explained by FVIII-recent. C response was not reproducible in a small subset of patients. Therefore, monitoring FVIII:C around surgeries or bleeding might be considered. Research is needed to study this further. Schattauer Stuttgart.

  20. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research.

  1. The Experimental Projectile Impact Chamber (EPIC) at Centro de Astrobiología, Spain: Reproducibility and verification of scaling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormö, J.; Wünnemann, K.; Collins, G.; Melero Asensio, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Experimental Projectile Impact Chamber (EPIC) consists of a 20.5mm caliber, compressed gas gun and a 7m wide test bed. It is possible to vary the projectile size and density, the velocity up to about 5001n/"s, the impact angle. and the target composition. The EPIC is especially designed for the analysis of impacts into unconsolidated and liquid targets. i.e. allowing the use of gravity scaling. The general objective with the EPIC is to analyze the cratering and modification processes at wet-target (e.g. marinle) impacts. We have carried out 14 shots into dry sand targets with two projectile compositions (light and weak; heavy and strong), at two impact angles. at three impact velocities, and in both quarter-space and half- space geometries. We recorded the impacts with a high-speed camera and compared the results with numerical simulations using iSALE. The evaluation demonstrated that there are noticeable differences between the results from the two projectile types, but that the crater dimensions are consistent with scaling laws based on other impact experiments [1]. This proves the usefulness of the EPIC in the analysis of natural impacts.

  2. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  3. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  4. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    that the free portion of the endometrium was directed towards the lumen of the abdominal cavity. After 21 days the animals were again operated to observe the size of the implants and to remove the ectopic endometrium for microscopic analysis. Results: we macroscopically observed a significant growth of the endometrial implants. Microscopic examination showed presence of glandular epithelium and stroma similar to topic epithelium. Conclusion: this model reproduces endometriosis in the female rat allowing a better study of this pathology, mainly the action of drugs on these implants.

  5. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  6. A Reliable and Reproducible Model for Assessing the Effect of Different Concentrations of α-Solanine on Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ordóñez-Vásquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Αlpha-solanine (α-solanine is a glycoalkaloid present in potato (Solanum tuberosum. It has been of particular interest because of its toxicity and potential teratogenic effects that include abnormalities of the central nervous system, such as exencephaly, encephalocele, and anophthalmia. Various types of cell culture have been used as experimental models to determine the effect of α-solanine on cell physiology. The morphological changes in the mesenchymal stem cell upon exposure to α-solanine have not been established. This study aimed to describe a reliable and reproducible model for assessing the structural changes induced by exposure of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to different concentrations of α-solanine for 24 h. The results demonstrate that nonlethal concentrations of α-solanine (2–6 μM changed the morphology of the cells, including an increase in the number of nucleoli, suggesting elevated protein synthesis, and the formation of spicules. In addition, treatment with α-solanine reduced the number of adherent cells and the formation of colonies in culture. Immunophenotypic characterization and staining of MSCs are proposed as a reproducible method that allows description of cells exposed to the glycoalkaloid, α-solanine.

  7. The Computable Catchment: An executable document for model-data software sharing, reproducibility and interactive visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Y.; Duffy, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes the concept of a "Computable Catchment" which is used to develop a collaborative platform for watershed modeling and data analysis. The object of the research is a sharable, executable document similar to a pdf, but one that includes documentation of the underlying theoretical concepts, interactive computational/numerical resources, linkage to essential data repositories and the ability for interactive model-data visualization and analysis. The executable document for each catchment is stored in the cloud with automatic provisioning and a unique identifier allowing collaborative model and data enhancements for historical hydroclimatic reconstruction and/or future landuse or climate change scenarios to be easily reconstructed or extended. The Computable Catchment adopts metadata standards for naming all variables in the model and the data. The a-priori or initial data is derived from national data sources for soils, hydrogeology, climate, and land cover available from the www.hydroterre.psu.edu data service (Leonard and Duffy, 2015). The executable document is based on Wolfram CDF or Computable Document Format with an interactive open-source reader accessible by any modern computing platform. The CDF file and contents can be uploaded to a website or simply shared as a normal document maintaining all interactive features of the model and data. The Computable Catchment concept represents one application for Geoscience Papers of the Future representing an extensible document that combines theory, models, data and analysis that are digitally shared, documented and reused among research collaborators, students, educators and decision makers.

  8. Validation of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Busuioc, Aristita

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX is the European branch of the international CORDEX initiative that aims to provide improved regional climate change projections for Europe. The main objective of this paper is to document the performance of the individual models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania. Here three EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) ensemble (scenario RCP4.5) are analysed and inter-compared: DMI-HIRHAM5, KNMI-RACMO2.2 and MPI-REMO. Compared to previous studies, when the RCM validation regarding the Romanian climate has mainly been made on mean state and at station scale, a more quantitative approach of precipitation extremes is proposed. In this respect, to have a more reliable comparison with observation, a high resolution daily precipitation gridded data set was used as observational reference (CLIMHYDEX project). The comparison between the RCM outputs and observed grid point values has been made by calculating three extremes precipitation indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Indices (ETCCDI), for the 1976-2005 period: R10MM, annual count of days when precipitation ≥10mm; RX5DAY, annual maximum 5-day precipitation and R95P%, precipitation fraction of annual total precipitation due to daily precipitation > 95th percentile. The RCMs capability to reproduce the mean state for these variables, as well as the main modes of their spatial variability (given by the first three EOF patterns), are analysed. The investigation confirms the ability of RCMs to simulate the main features of the precipitation extreme variability over Romania, but some deficiencies in reproducing of their regional characteristics were found (for example, overestimation of the mea state, especially over the extra Carpathian regions). This work has been realised within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian

  9. Reproducibility of swollen sinuses in broilers by experimental infection with avian metapneumovirus subtypes A and B of turkey origin and their comparative pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Ye Htut; Liman, Martin; Neumann, Ulrich; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2008-02-01

    Swollen head syndrome (SHS) associated with avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) subtype A or subtype B in broilers and broiler breeders has been reported worldwide. Data about pathogenesis of aMPV subtypes A and B in broilers are scarce. It has been difficult to reproduce swollen sinuses in chickens with aMPV under experimental conditions. In the field, SHS in broilers is suspected to be induced by combined infections with different respiratory pathogens. The objectives of the present study were to compare the pathogenesis of subtypes A and B aMPV in commercial broilers and to investigate the reproducibility of clinical disease. In two repeat experiments, commercial broilers free of aMPV maternal antibodies were inoculated with aMPV subtypes A and B of turkey origin. The clinical signs such as depression, coughing, nasal exudates, and frothy eyes appeared at 4 days post inoculation, followed by swelling of periorbital sinuses at 5 days post inoculation. Higher numbers of broilers showed clinical signs in subtype-B-inoculated compared with subtype-A-inoculated groups. Seroconversion to aMPV was detectable from 10 to 11 days post inoculation. The appearance of serum aMPV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibodies and the clearance of the aMPV genome coincided. Subtype B aMPV showed a broader tissue distribution and longer persistence than subtype A. Histopathological changes were observed in the respiratory tract tissues of aMPV-inoculated broilers, and also in paraocular glands, such as the Harderian and lachrymal glands. Overall, our study shows that representative strains of both aMPV turkey isolates induced lesions in the respiratory tract, accompanied by swelling of infraorbital sinuses, indicating the role of aMPV as a primary pathogen for broilers.

  10. Failure of Stadard Optical Models to Reproduce Neutron Total Cross Section Difference in the W Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Finlay, R W; Abfalterer, W P; Bateman, F B; Haight, R C; Morgan, G L; Bauge, E; Delaroche, J P; Romain, P

    2001-11-01

    Recently cross section differences among the isotopes{sup 182,184,186}W have been measured as part of a study of total cross sections in the 5-560 MeV energy range. These measurements show oscillations up to 150 mb between 5 and 100 MeV. Spherical and deformed phenomenological optical potentials with typical radial and isospin dependences show very small oscillations, in disagreement with the data. In a simple Ramsauer model, this discrepancy can be traced to a cancellation between radial and isospin effects. Understanding this problem requires a more detailed model that incorporates a realistic description of the neutron and proton density distributions. This has been done with results of Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force, together with a microscopic folding model employing a modification of the JLM potential as an effective interaction. This treatment yields a satisfactory interpretation of the observed total cross section differences.

  11. A simple branching model that reproduces language family and language population distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2009-07-01

    Human history leaves fingerprints in human languages. Little is known about language evolution and its study is of great importance. Here we construct a simple stochastic model and compare its results to statistical data of real languages. The model is based on the recent finding that language changes occur independently of the population size. We find agreement with the data additionally assuming that languages may be distinguished by having at least one among a finite, small number of different features. This finite set is also used in order to define the distance between two languages, similarly to linguistics tradition since Swadesh.

  12. Contrasting response to nutrient manipulation in Arctic mesocosms are reproduced by a minimum microbial food web model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Aud; Egge, Jorun K; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Di Capua, Iole; Thyrhaug, Runar; Bratbak, Gunnar; Thingstad, T Frede

    2015-03-01

    A minimum mathematical model of the marine pelagic microbial food web has previously shown to be able to reproduce central aspects of observed system response to different bottom-up manipulations in a mesocosm experiment Microbial Ecosystem Dynamics (MEDEA) in Danish waters. In this study, we apply this model to two mesocosm experiments (Polar Aquatic Microbial Ecology (PAME)-I and PAME-II) conducted at the Arctic location Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. The different responses of the microbial community to similar nutrient manipulation in the three mesocosm experiments may be described as diatom-dominated (MEDEA), bacteria-dominated (PAME-I), and flagellated-dominated (PAME-II). When allowing ciliates to be able to feed on small diatoms, the model describing the diatom-dominated MEDEA experiment give a bacteria-dominated response as observed in PAME I in which the diatom community comprised almost exclusively small-sized cells. Introducing a high initial mesozooplankton stock as observed in PAME-II, the model gives a flagellate-dominated response in accordance with the observed response also of this experiment. The ability of the model originally developed for temperate waters to reproduce population dynamics in a 10°C colder Arctic fjord, does not support the existence of important shifts in population balances over this temperature range. Rather, it suggests a quite resilient microbial food web when adapted to in situ temperature. The sensitivity of the model response to its mesozooplankton component suggests, however, that the seasonal vertical migration of Arctic copepods may be a strong forcing factor on Arctic microbial food webs.

  13. The ability of a GCM-forced hydrological model to reproduce global discharge variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperna Weiland, F.C.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Kwadijk, J.C.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2010-01-01

    Data from General Circulation Models (GCMs) are often used to investigate hydrological impacts of climate change. However GCM data are known to have large biases, especially for precipitation. In this study the usefulness of GCM data for hydrological studies, with focus on discharge variability

  14. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Rapp, MD

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model.

  15. Reproducibility of a novel model of murine asthma-like pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, L; Kim, J; Bolgos, G L; Siddiqui, J; Remick, D G

    2004-05-01

    Sensitization to cockroach allergens (CRA) has been implicated as a major cause of asthma, especially among inner-city populations. Endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria has also been investigated for its role in attenuating or exacerbating the asthmatic response. We have created a novel model utilizing house dust extract (HDE) containing high levels of both CRA and endotoxin to induce pulmonary inflammation (PI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A potential drawback of this model is that the HDE is in limited supply and preparation of new HDE will not contain the exact components of the HDE used to define our model system. The present study involved testing HDEs collected from various homes for their ability to cause PI and AHR. Dust collected from five homes was extracted in phosphate buffered saline overnight. The levels of CRA and endotoxin in the supernatants varied from 7.1 to 49.5 mg/ml of CRA and 1.7-6 micro g/ml of endotoxin in the HDEs. Following immunization and two pulmonary exposures to HDE all five HDEs induced AHR, PI and plasma IgE levels substantially higher than normal mice. This study shows that HDE containing high levels of cockroach allergens and endotoxin collected from different sources can induce an asthma-like response in our murine model.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT, ANALYSIS AND MODELLING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2010 ... We obtain a good agreement between the resolution of the nonlinear equation of heat and the results obtained by the experimentation. . Keywords: Emissivity, Température, optimal Linearisation, finite elements. 1. ..... basse température, Rapport de Stage de D.E.A, Université Paris 12 – Val de Marne.

  17. Energy and nutrient deposition and excretion in the reproducing sow: model development and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2014-01-01

    requirements for maintenance, and fetal and maternal growth were described. In the lactating module, a factorial approach was used to estimate requirements for maintenance, milk production, and maternal growth. The priority for nutrient partitioning was assumed to be in the order of maintenance, milk...... production, and maternal growth with body tissue losses constrained within biological limits. Global sensitivity analysis showed that nonlinearity in the parameters was small. The model outputs considered were the total protein and fat deposition, average urinary and fecal N excretion, average methane...... emission, manure carbon excretion, and manure production. The model was evaluated using independent data sets from the literature using root mean square prediction error (RMSPE) and concordance correlation coefficients. The gestation module predicted body fat gain better than body protein gain, which...

  18. Evaluation of Nitinol staples for the Lapidus arthrodesis in a reproducible biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Alexander Russell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new Shape Memory Alloy staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable 1st Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n=5 per group were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load, stiffness and plantar gapping were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (p < 0.05. Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. Shape memory alloy staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  19. Evaluation of Nitinol Staples for the Lapidus Arthrodesis in a Reproducible Biomechanical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Nicholas A; Regazzola, Gianmarco; Aiyer, Amiethab; Nomura, Tomohiro; Pelletier, Matthew H; Myerson, Mark; Walsh, William R

    2015-01-01

    While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new shape memory alloy (SMA) staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable first tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n = 5 per group) were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested non-destructively in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending, and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load (newton), stiffness (newton per millimeter), and plantar gapping (millimeter) were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a statistically significant increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities with P values range from 0.016 to 0.000. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero (P = 0.037) and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (P = 0.045). Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. SMA staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  20. Can lagrangian models reproduce the migration time of European eel obtained from otolith analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Díaz, L.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2017-12-01

    European eel can be found at the Bay of Biscay after a long migration across the Atlantic. The duration of migration, which takes place at larval stage, is of primary importance to understand eel ecology and, hence, its survival. This duration is still a controversial matter since it can range from 7 months to > 4 years depending on the method to estimate duration. The minimum migration duration estimated from our lagrangian model is similar to the duration obtained from the microstructure of eel otoliths, which is typically on the order of 7-9 months. The lagrangian model showed to be sensitive to different conditions like spatial and time resolution, release depth, release area and initial distribution. In general, migration showed to be faster when decreasing the depth and increasing the resolution of the model. In average, the fastest migration was obtained when only advective horizontal movement was considered. However, faster migration was even obtained in some cases when locally oriented random migration was taken into account.

  1. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm. The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap.

  2. geoKepler Workflow Module for Computationally Scalable and Reproducible Geoprocessing and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, C.; Block, J.; Crawl, D.; Graham, J.; Gupta, A.; Nguyen, M.; de Callafon, R.; Smarr, L.; Altintas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF-funded WIFIRE project has developed an open-source, online geospatial workflow platform for unifying geoprocessing tools and models for for fire and other geospatially dependent modeling applications. It is a product of WIFIRE's objective to build an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. geoKepler includes a set of reusable GIS components, or actors, for the Kepler Scientific Workflow System (https://kepler-project.org). Actors exist for reading and writing GIS data in formats such as Shapefile, GeoJSON, KML, and using OGC web services such as WFS. The actors also allow for calling geoprocessing tools in other packages such as GDAL and GRASS. Kepler integrates functions from multiple platforms and file formats into one framework, thus enabling optimal GIS interoperability, model coupling, and scalability. Products of the GIS actors can be fed directly to models such as FARSITE and WRF. Kepler's ability to schedule and scale processes using Hadoop and Spark also makes geoprocessing ultimately extensible and computationally scalable. The reusable workflows in geoKepler can be made to run automatically when alerted by real-time environmental conditions. Here, we show breakthroughs in the speed of creating complex data for hazard assessments with this platform. We also demonstrate geoKepler workflows that use Data Assimilation to ingest real-time weather data into wildfire simulations, and for data mining techniques to gain insight into environmental conditions affecting fire behavior. Existing machine learning tools and libraries such as R and MLlib are being leveraged for this purpose in Kepler, as well as Kepler's Distributed Data Parallel (DDP) capability to provide a framework for scalable processing. geoKepler workflows can be executed via an iPython notebook as a part of a Jupyter hub at UC San Diego for sharing and reporting of the scientific analysis and results from

  3. Realizing the Living Paper using the ProvONE Model for Reproducible Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. B.; Jones, C. S.; Ludäscher, B.; Missier, P.; Walker, L.; Slaughter, P.; Schildhauer, M.; Cuevas-Vicenttín, V.

    2015-12-01

    Science has advanced through traditional publications that codify research results as a permenant part of the scientific record. But because publications are static and atomic, researchers can only cite and reference a whole work when building on prior work of colleagues. The open source software model has demonstrated a new approach in which strong version control in an open environment can nurture an open ecosystem of software. Developers now commonly fork and extend software giving proper credit, with less repetition, and with confidence in the relationship to original software. Through initiatives like 'Beyond the PDF', an analogous model has been imagined for open science, in which software, data, analyses, and derived products become first class objects within a publishing ecosystem that has evolved to be finer-grained and is realized through a web of linked open data. We have prototyped a Living Paper concept by developing the ProvONE provenance model for scientific workflows, with prototype deployments in DataONE. ProvONE promotes transparency and openness by describing the authenticity, origin, structure, and processing history of research artifacts and by detailing the steps in computational workflows that produce derived products. To realize the Living Paper, we decompose scientific papers into their constituent products and publish these as compound objects in the DataONE federation of archival repositories. Each individual finding and sub-product of a reseach project (such as a derived data table, a workflow or script, a figure, an image, or a finding) can be independently stored, versioned, and cited. ProvONE provenance traces link these fine-grained products within and across versions of a paper, and across related papers that extend an original analysis. This allows for open scientific publishing in which researchers extend and modify findings, creating a dynamic, evolving web of results that collectively represent the scientific enterprise. The

  4. A discrete particle model reproducing collective dynamics of a bee swarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Sara; Colombi, Annachiara; Scianna, Marco

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we present a microscopic discrete mathematical model describing collective dynamics of a bee swarm. More specifically, each bee is set to move according to individual strategies and social interactions, the former involving the desire to reach a target destination, the latter accounting for repulsive/attractive stimuli and for alignment processes. The insects tend in fact to remain sufficiently close to the rest of the population, while avoiding collisions, and they are able to track and synchronize their movement to the flight of a given set of neighbors within their visual field. The resulting collective behavior of the bee cloud therefore emerges from non-local short/long-range interactions. Differently from similar approaches present in the literature, we here test different alignment mechanisms (i.e., based either on an Euclidean or on a topological neighborhood metric), which have an impact also on the other social components characterizing insect behavior. A series of numerical realizations then shows the phenomenology of the swarm (in terms of pattern configuration, collective productive movement, and flight synchronization) in different regions of the space of free model parameters (i.e., strength of attractive/repulsive forces, extension of the interaction regions). In this respect, constraints in the possible variations of such coefficients are here given both by reasonable empirical observations and by analytical results on some stability characteristics of the defined pairwise interaction kernels, which have to assure a realistic crystalline configuration of the swarm. An analysis of the effect of unconscious random fluctuations of bee dynamics is also provided. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute multi-sgRNA knockdown of KEOPS complex genes reproduces the microcephaly phenotype of the stable knockout zebrafish model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Jobst-Schwan

    Full Text Available Until recently, morpholino oligonucleotides have been widely employed in zebrafish as an acute and efficient loss-of-function assay. However, off-target effects and reproducibility issues when compared to stable knockout lines have compromised their further use. Here we employed an acute CRISPR/Cas approach using multiple single guide RNAs targeting simultaneously different positions in two exemplar genes (osgep or tprkb to increase the likelihood of generating mutations on both alleles in the injected F0 generation and to achieve a similar effect as morpholinos but with the reproducibility of stable lines. This multi single guide RNA approach resulted in median likelihoods for at least one mutation on each allele of >99% and sgRNA specific insertion/deletion profiles as revealed by deep-sequencing. Immunoblot showed a significant reduction for Osgep and Tprkb proteins. For both genes, the acute multi-sgRNA knockout recapitulated the microcephaly phenotype and reduction in survival that we observed previously in stable knockout lines, though milder in the acute multi-sgRNA knockout. Finally, we quantify the degree of mutagenesis by deep sequencing, and provide a mathematical model to quantitate the chance for a biallelic loss-of-function mutation. Our findings can be generalized to acute and stable CRISPR/Cas targeting for any zebrafish gene of interest.

  6. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  7. Efficient and reproducible myogenic differentiation from human iPS cells: prospects for modeling Miyoshi Myopathy in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihito Tanaka

    Full Text Available The establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs has enabled the production of in vitro, patient-specific cell models of human disease. In vitro recreation of disease pathology from patient-derived hiPSCs depends on efficient differentiation protocols producing relevant adult cell types. However, myogenic differentiation of hiPSCs has faced obstacles, namely, low efficiency and/or poor reproducibility. Here, we report the rapid, efficient, and reproducible differentiation of hiPSCs into mature myocytes. We demonstrated that inducible expression of myogenic differentiation1 (MYOD1 in immature hiPSCs for at least 5 days drives cells along the myogenic lineage, with efficiencies reaching 70-90%. Myogenic differentiation driven by MYOD1 occurred even in immature, almost completely undifferentiated hiPSCs, without mesodermal transition. Myocytes induced in this manner reach maturity within 2 weeks of differentiation as assessed by marker gene expression and functional properties, including in vitro and in vivo cell fusion and twitching in response to electrical stimulation. Miyoshi Myopathy (MM is a congenital distal myopathy caused by defective muscle membrane repair due to mutations in DYSFERLIN. Using our induced differentiation technique, we successfully recreated the pathological condition of MM in vitro, demonstrating defective membrane repair in hiPSC-derived myotubes from an MM patient and phenotypic rescue by expression of full-length DYSFERLIN (DYSF. These findings not only facilitate the pathological investigation of MM, but could potentially be applied in modeling of other human muscular diseases by using patient-derived hiPSCs.

  8. Efficient and Reproducible Myogenic Differentiation from Human iPS Cells: Prospects for Modeling Miyoshi Myopathy In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihito; Woltjen, Knut; Miyake, Katsuya; Hotta, Akitsu; Ikeya, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishino, Tokiko; Shoji, Emi; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Manabe, Yasuko; Fujii, Nobuharu; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Era, Takumi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Kimura, En; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has enabled the production of in vitro, patient-specific cell models of human disease. In vitro recreation of disease pathology from patient-derived hiPSCs depends on efficient differentiation protocols producing relevant adult cell types. However, myogenic differentiation of hiPSCs has faced obstacles, namely, low efficiency and/or poor reproducibility. Here, we report the rapid, efficient, and reproducible differentiation of hiPSCs into mature myocytes. We demonstrated that inducible expression of myogenic differentiation1 (MYOD1) in immature hiPSCs for at least 5 days drives cells along the myogenic lineage, with efficiencies reaching 70–90%. Myogenic differentiation driven by MYOD1 occurred even in immature, almost completely undifferentiated hiPSCs, without mesodermal transition. Myocytes induced in this manner reach maturity within 2 weeks of differentiation as assessed by marker gene expression and functional properties, including in vitro and in vivo cell fusion and twitching in response to electrical stimulation. Miyoshi Myopathy (MM) is a congenital distal myopathy caused by defective muscle membrane repair due to mutations in DYSFERLIN. Using our induced differentiation technique, we successfully recreated the pathological condition of MM in vitro, demonstrating defective membrane repair in hiPSC-derived myotubes from an MM patient and phenotypic rescue by expression of full-length DYSFERLIN (DYSF). These findings not only facilitate the pathological investigation of MM, but could potentially be applied in modeling of other human muscular diseases by using patient-derived hiPSCs. PMID:23626698

  9. TU-AB-BRC-05: Creation of a Monte Carlo TrueBeam Model by Reproducing Varian Phase Space Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Grady, K; Davis, S; Seuntjens, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create a Varian TrueBeam 6 MV FFF Monte Carlo model using BEAMnrc/EGSnrc that accurately reproduces the Varian representative dataset, followed by tuning the model’s source parameters to accurately reproduce in-house measurements. Methods: A BEAMnrc TrueBeam model for 6 MV FFF has been created by modifying a validated 6 MV Varian CL21EX model. Geometric dimensions and materials were adjusted in a trial and error approach to match the fluence and spectra of TrueBeam phase spaces output by the Varian VirtuaLinac. Once the model’s phase space matched Varian’s counterpart using the default source parameters, it was validated to match 10 × 10 cm"2 Varian representative data obtained with the IBA CC13. The source parameters were then tuned to match in-house 5 × 5 cm"2 PTW microDiamond measurements. All dose to water simulations included detector models to include the effects of volume averaging and the non-water equivalence of the chamber materials, allowing for more accurate source parameter selection. Results: The Varian phase space spectra and fluence were matched with excellent agreement. The in-house model’s PDD agreement with CC13 TrueBeam representative data was within 0.9% local percent difference beyond the first 3 mm. Profile agreement at 10 cm depth was within 0.9% local percent difference and 1.3 mm distance-to-agreement in the central axis and penumbra regions, respectively. Once the source parameters were tuned, PDD agreement with microDiamond measurements was within 0.9% local percent difference beyond 2 mm. The microDiamond profile agreement at 10 cm depth was within 0.6% local percent difference and 0.4 mm distance-to-agreement in the central axis and penumbra regions, respectively. Conclusion: An accurate in-house Monte Carlo model of the Varian TrueBeam was achieved independently of the Varian phase space solution and was tuned to in-house measurements. KO acknowledges partial support by the CREATE Medical Physics Research

  10. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  11. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  12. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2018-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  14. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  15. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  16. Bad Behavior: Improving Reproducibility in Behavior Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Anne M; Cheng, Xinyi; Altieri, Stefanie C; Yang, Hongyan

    2018-01-24

    Systems neuroscience research is increasingly possible through the use of integrated molecular and circuit-level analyses. These studies depend on the use of animal models and, in many cases, molecular and circuit-level analyses. Associated with genetic, pharmacologic, epigenetic, and other types of environmental manipulations. We illustrate typical pitfalls resulting from poor validation of behavior tests. We describe experimental designs and enumerate controls needed to improve reproducibility in investigating and reporting of behavioral phenotypes.

  17. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  18. Understanding Leadership: An Experimental-Experiential Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Books about leadership are dangerous to readers who fantasize about being leaders or apply leadership ideas as if they were proven formulas. As an antidote, I offer an experimental framework in which any leadership-management model can be tested to gain experiential understanding of the model. As a result one can gain reality-based insights about…

  19. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal eGoswami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e. that require the hippocampus or not the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze. Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma, PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  20. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sonal; Samuel, Sherin; Sierra, Olga R; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e., that require the hippocampus or not) the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM). Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  1. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  2. Coupled RipCAS-DFLOW (CoRD) Software and Data Management System for Reproducible Floodplain Vegetation Succession Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. A.; Miller, S.; Gregory, A.; Cadol, D. D.; Stone, M. C.; Sheneman, L.

    2016-12-01

    We present the Coupled RipCAS-DFLOW (CoRD) modeling system created to encapsulate the workflow to analyze the effects of stream flooding on vegetation succession. CoRD provides an intuitive command-line and web interface to run DFLOW and RipCAS in succession over many years automatically, which is a challenge because, for our application, DFLOW must be run on a supercomputing cluster via the PBS job scheduler. RipCAS is a vegetation succession model, and DFLOW is a 2D open channel flow model. Data adaptors have been developed to seamlessly connect DFLOW output data to be RipCAS inputs, and vice-versa. CoRD provides automated statistical analysis and visualization, plus automatic syncing of input and output files and model run metadata to the hydrological data management system HydroShare using its excellent Python REST client. This combination of technologies and data management techniques allows the results to be shared with collaborators and eventually published. Perhaps most importantly, it allows results to be easily reproduced via either the command-line or web user interface. This system is a result of collaboration between software developers and hydrologists participating in the Western Consortium for Watershed Analysis, Visualization, and Exploration (WC-WAVE). Because of the computing-intensive nature of this particular workflow, including automating job submission/monitoring and data adaptors, software engineering expertise is required. However, the hydrologists provide the software developers with a purpose and ensure a useful, intuitive tool is developed. Our hydrologists contribute software, too: RipCAS was developed from scratch by hydrologists on the team as a specialized, open-source version of the Computer Aided Simulation Model for Instream Flow and Riparia (CASiMiR) vegetation model; our hydrologists running DFLOW provided numerous examples and help with the supercomputing system. This project is written in Python, a popular language in the

  3. Validity, reliability, and reproducibility of linear measurements on digital models obtained from intraoral and cone-beam computed tomography scans of alginate impressions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiranto, Matthew G.; Engelbrecht, W. Petrie; Nolthenius, Heleen E. Tutein; van der Meer, W. Joerd; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Digital 3-dimensional models are widely used for orthodontic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the validity, reliability, and reproducibility of digital models obtained from the Lava Chairside Oral scanner (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) and cone-beam computed tomography scans

  4. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models

  5. DMFC anode polarization: Experimental analysis and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, A.; Marchesi, R. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-01-03

    Anode two-phase flow has an important influence on DMFC performance and methanol crossover. In order to elucidate two-phase flow influence on anode performance, in this work, anode polarization is investigated combining experimental and modelling approach. A systematic experimental analysis of operating conditions influence on anode polarization is presented. Hysteresis due to operating condition is observed; experimental results suggest that it arises from methanol accumulation and has to be considered in evaluating DMFC performances and measurements reproducibility. A model of DMFC anode polarization is presented and utilised as tool to investigate anode two-phase flow. The proposed analysis permits one to produce a confident interpretation of the main involved phenomena. In particular, it confirms that methanol electro-oxidation kinetics is weakly dependent on methanol concentration and that methanol transport in gas phase produces an important contribution in anode feeding. Moreover, it emphasises the possibility to optimise anode flow rate in order to improve DMFC performance and reduce methanol crossover. (author)

  6. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF THE PRIMARY MALE HYPOGONADISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kulikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of the new methods of treatment of primary male hypogonadism is an urgent medical problem. Its solution requires a suitable experimental model of the disease. Aim: The creation of new experimental model of primary male hypogonadism. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on the male Wistar rats, hypogonadism was modeled by temporary ligation of the distal part of the spermatic cord. Results: It was shown that three-day ligation of the spermatic cord led to persistent disturbance of the testosterone-producing and reproductive functions. These manifestations were reversible at shorter duration of the exposure. Conclusion: The created model of primary male hypogonadism is characterized by the persistent testosterone-producing and reproductive functions disturbance, technical availability, non-toxicity to the other organs and systems. Availability of the model provides new opportunities for the development of approaches to treating diseases of the reproductive organs in men.

  8. Reproducing multi-model ensemble average with Ensemble-averaged Reconstructed Forcings (ERF) in regional climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian, A.; Fomenko, L.; Wang, G.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-model ensemble (MME) average is considered the most reliable for simulating both present-day and future climates. It has been a primary reference for making conclusions in major coordinated studies i.e. IPCC Assessment Reports and CORDEX. The biases of individual models cancel out each other in MME average, enabling the ensemble mean to outperform individual members in simulating the mean climate. This enhancement however comes with tremendous computational cost, which is especially inhibiting for regional climate modeling as model uncertainties can originate from both RCMs and the driving GCMs. Here we propose the Ensemble-based Reconstructed Forcings (ERF) approach to regional climate modeling that achieves a similar level of bias reduction at a fraction of cost compared with the conventional MME approach. The new method constructs a single set of initial and boundary conditions (IBCs) by averaging the IBCs of multiple GCMs, and drives the RCM with this ensemble average of IBCs to conduct a single run. Using a regional climate model (RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5), we tested the method over West Africa for multiple combination of (up to six) GCMs. Our results indicate that the performance of the ERF method is comparable to that of the MME average in simulating the mean climate. The bias reduction seen in ERF simulations is achieved by using more realistic IBCs in solving the system of equations underlying the RCM physics and dynamics. This endows the new method with a theoretical advantage in addition to reducing computational cost. The ERF output is an unaltered solution of the RCM as opposed to a climate state that might not be physically plausible due to the averaging of multiple solutions with the conventional MME approach. The ERF approach should be considered for use in major international efforts such as CORDEX. Key words: Multi-model ensemble, ensemble analysis, ERF, regional climate modeling

  9. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  10. Reproducibility of image quality for moving objects using respiratory-gated computed tomography. A study using a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Ishida, Masaya; Terunuma, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the reproducibility of computed tomography (CT) imaging quality in respiratory-gated radiation treatment planning is essential in radiotherapy of movable tumors. Seven series of regular and six series of irregular respiratory motions were performed using a thorax dynamic phantom. For the regular respiratory motions, the respiratory cycle was changed from 2.5 to 4 s and the amplitude was changed from 4 to 10 mm. For the irregular respiratory motions, a cycle of 2.5 to 4 or an amplitude of 4 to 10 mm was added to the base data (id est (i.e.) 3.5-s cycle, 6-mm amplitude) every three cycles. Images of the object were acquired six times using respiratory-gated data acquisition. The volume of the object was calculated and the reproducibility of the volume was decided based on the variety. The registered image of the object was added and the reproducibility of the shape was decided based on the degree of overlap of objects. The variety in the volumes and shapes differed significantly as the respiratory cycle changed according to regular respiratory motions. In irregular respiratory motion, shape reproducibility was further inferior, and the percentage of overlap among the six images was 35.26% in the 2.5- and 3.5-s cycle mixed group. Amplitude changes did not produce significant differences in the variety of the volumes and shapes. Respiratory cycle changes reduced the reproducibility of the image quality in respiratory-gated CT. (author)

  11. Hemorrhoids: an experimental model in monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plapler Hélio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids are a matter of concern due to a painful outcome. We describe a simple, easy and reliable experimental model to produce hemorrhoids in monkeys. METHODS: 14 monkeys (Cebus apella were used. After general anesthesia, hemorrhoids were induced by ligation of the inferior hemorrhoidal vein, which is very alike to humans. The vein was located through a perianal incision, dissected and ligated with a 3-0 vicryl. The skin was sutured with a 4-0 catgut thread. Animals were kept in appropriate cages and evaluated daily. RESULTS: Nine days later there were hemorrhoidal piles in the anus in fifty percent (50% of the animals. Outcome was unremarkable. There was no bleeding and all animals showed no signs of pain or suffering. CONCLUSION: This is an affordable and reliable experimental model to induce hemorrhoids for experimental studies.

  12. Experimental oligopolies modeling: A dynamic approach based on heterogeneous behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboni Baiardi, Lorenzo; Naimzada, Ahmad K.

    2018-05-01

    In the rank of behavioral rules, imitation-based heuristics has received special attention in economics (see [14] and [12]). In particular, imitative behavior is considered in order to understand the evidences arising in experimental oligopolies which reveal that the Cournot-Nash equilibrium does not emerge as unique outcome and show that an important component of the production at the competitive level is observed (see e.g.[1,3,9] or [7,10]). By considering the pioneering groundbreaking approach of [2], we build a dynamical model of linear oligopolies where heterogeneous decision mechanisms of players are made explicit. In particular, we consider two different types of quantity setting players characterized by different decision mechanisms that coexist and operate simultaneously: agents that adaptively adjust their choices towards the direction that increases their profit are embedded with imitator agents. The latter ones use a particular form of proportional imitation rule that considers the awareness about the presence of strategic interactions. It is noteworthy that the Cournot-Nash outcome is a stationary state of our models. Our thesis is that the chaotic dynamics arousing from a dynamical model, where heterogeneous players are considered, are capable to qualitatively reproduce the outcomes of experimental oligopolies.

  13. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  14. Does systematic variation improve the reproducibility of animal experiments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, R.M.; Guenther, A.; Engqvist, L.; Schmoll, T.

    2013-01-01

    Reproducibility of results is a fundamental tenet of science. In this journal, Richter et al.1 tested whether systematic variation in experimental conditions (heterogenization) affects the reproducibility of results. Comparing this approach with the current standard of ensuring reproducibility

  15. Experimental models of sepsis and septic shock: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido Alejandra G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients and trauma victims, mainly due to sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction. In contrast to preclinical studies, most clinical trials of promising new treatment strategies for sepsis have fails to demonstrate efficacy. Although many reasons could account for this discrepancy, the misinterpretation of preclinical data obtained from experimental studies, and especially the use of animal models that do not adequately mimic human sepsis may have been contributing factors. In this review, the benefits and limitations of various animal models of sepsis are discussed to clarify the extend to which findings are relevant to human sepsis, particularly with respect to the subsequent design and execution of clinical trials. Such models include intravascular infusion of endotoxin or live bacteria, bacterial peritonitis, cecal ligation and perforation, soft tissue infection, pneumonia or meningitis models, using different animal species including rats, mice, rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep and nonhuman primates. Despite several limitations, animal models remain essential in the development of all new therapies for sepsis and septic shock, because they provide fundamental information about the pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and mechanism of drug action that cannot be duplicated by other methods. New therapeutic agents should be studies in infection models, even after the initiation of the septic process. Furthermore, debility conditions need to be reproduced to avoid the exclusive use of healthy animals, which often do not represent the human septic patient.

  16. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  17. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  18. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  19. Ability of an ensemble of regional climate models to reproduce weather regimes over Europe-Atlantic during the period 1961-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Somot, S.; Déqué, M.

    2009-10-01

    One of the main concerns in regional climate modeling is to which extent limited-area regional climate models (RCM) reproduce the large-scale atmospheric conditions of their driving general circulation model (GCM). In this work we investigate the ability of a multi-model ensemble of regional climate simulations to reproduce the large-scale weather regimes of the driving conditions. The ensemble consists of a set of 13 RCMs on a European domain, driven at their lateral boundaries by the ERA40 reanalysis for the time period 1961-2000. Two sets of experiments have been completed with horizontal resolutions of 50 and 25 km, respectively. The spectral nudging technique has been applied to one of the models within the ensemble. The RCMs reproduce the weather regimes behavior in terms of composite pattern, mean frequency of occurrence and persistence reasonably well. The models also simulate well the long-term trends and the inter-annual variability of the frequency of occurrence. However, there is a non-negligible spread among the models which is stronger in summer than in winter. This spread is due to two reasons: (1) we are dealing with different models and (2) each RCM produces an internal variability. As far as the day-to-day weather regime history is concerned, the ensemble shows large discrepancies. At daily time scale, the model spread has also a seasonal dependence, being stronger in summer than in winter. Results also show that the spectral nudging technique improves the model performance in reproducing the large-scale of the driving field. In addition, the impact of increasing the number of grid points has been addressed by comparing the 25 and 50 km experiments. We show that the horizontal resolution does not affect significantly the model performance for large-scale circulation.

  20. Ability of an ensemble of regional climate models to reproduce weather regimes over Europe-Atlantic during the period 1961-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somot, S.; Deque, M. [Meteo-France CNRM/GMGEC CNRS/GAME, Toulouse (France); Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia

    2009-10-15

    One of the main concerns in regional climate modeling is to which extent limited-area regional climate models (RCM) reproduce the large-scale atmospheric conditions of their driving general circulation model (GCM). In this work we investigate the ability of a multi-model ensemble of regional climate simulations to reproduce the large-scale weather regimes of the driving conditions. The ensemble consists of a set of 13 RCMs on a European domain, driven at their lateral boundaries by the ERA40 reanalysis for the time period 1961-2000. Two sets of experiments have been completed with horizontal resolutions of 50 and 25 km, respectively. The spectral nudging technique has been applied to one of the models within the ensemble. The RCMs reproduce the weather regimes behavior in terms of composite pattern, mean frequency of occurrence and persistence reasonably well. The models also simulate well the long-term trends and the inter-annual variability of the frequency of occurrence. However, there is a non-negligible spread among the models which is stronger in summer than in winter. This spread is due to two reasons: (1) we are dealing with different models and (2) each RCM produces an internal variability. As far as the day-to-day weather regime history is concerned, the ensemble shows large discrepancies. At daily time scale, the model spread has also a seasonal dependence, being stronger in summer than in winter. Results also show that the spectral nudging technique improves the model performance in reproducing the large-scale of the driving field. In addition, the impact of increasing the number of grid points has been addressed by comparing the 25 and 50 km experiments. We show that the horizontal resolution does not affect significantly the model performance for large-scale circulation. (orig.)

  1. Reliability versus reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lautzenheiser, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Defect detection and reproducibility of results are two separate but closely related subjects. It is axiomatic that a defect must be detected from examination to examination or reproducibility of results is very poor. On the other hand, a defect can be detected on each of subsequent examinations for higher reliability and still have poor reproducibility of results

  2. The Need for Reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-06-27

    The purpose of this presentation is to consider issues of reproducibility, specifically it determines whether bitwise reproducible computation is possible, if computational research in DOE improves its publication process, and if reproducible results can be achieved apart from the peer review process?

  3. DMFC performance and methanol cross-over: Experimental analysis and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalegno, A.; Marchesi, R. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    A combined experimental and modelling approach is proposed to analyze methanol cross-over and its effect on DMFC performance. The experimental analysis is performed in order to allow an accurate investigation of methanol cross-over influence on DMFC performance, hence measurements were characterized in terms of uncertainty and reproducibility. The findings suggest that methanol cross-over is mainly determined by diffusion transport and affects cell performance partly via methanol electro-oxidation at the cathode. The modelling analysis is carried out to further investigate methanol cross-over phenomenon. A simple model evaluates the effectiveness of two proposed interpretations regarding methanol cross-over and its effects. The model is validated using the experimental data gathered. Both the experimental analysis and the proposed and validated model allow a substantial step forward in the understanding of the main phenomena associated with methanol cross-over. The findings confirm the possibility to reduce methanol cross-over by optimizing anode feeding. (author)

  4. Reproducibility of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake kinetics in brain tumors and influence of corticoid therapy: an experimental study in rat gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Schoeneck, Michael; Oliveira, Dennis; Willuweit, Antje [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Filss, Christian; Coenen, Heinz H.; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) is a well-established method for the diagnostics of brain tumors. This study investigates reproducibility of {sup 18}F-FET uptake kinetics in rat gliomas and the influence of the frequently used dexamethasone (Dex) therapy. F98 glioma or 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 31 Fischer rats. After 10-11 days of tumor growth, the animals underwent dynamic PET after injection of {sup 18}F-FET (baseline). Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving Dex injections, and all animals were reinvestigated 2 days later. Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake (18-61 min p.i.) and the slope of the time-activity-curves (TAC) (18-61 min p.i.) were evaluated using a Volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and reproducibility by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The slope of the tumor TACs showed high reproducibility with an ICC of 0.93. A systematic increase of the TBR in the repeated scans was noted (3.7 ± 2.8 %; p < 0.01), and appeared to be related to tumor growth as indicated by a significant correlation of TBR and tumor volume (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001). After correction for tumor growth TBR showed high longitudinal stability with an ICC of 0.84. Dex treatment induced a significant decrease of the TBR (-8.2 ± 6.1 %; p < 0.03), but did not influence the slope of the tumor TAC. TBR of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and tracer kinetics in brain tumors showed high longitudinal stability. Dex therapy may induce a minor decrease of the TBR; this needs further investigation. (orig.)

  5. Adjustment model of thermoluminescence experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno y Moreno, A.; Moreno B, A.

    2002-01-01

    This model adjusts the experimental results for thermoluminescence according to the equation: I (T) = I (a i * exp (-1/b i * (T-C i )) where: a i , b i , c i are the i-Th peak adjusted to a gaussian curve. The adjustments of the curve can be operated manual or analytically using the macro function and the solver.xla complement installed previously in the computational system. In this work it is shown: 1. The information of experimental data from a LiF curve obtained from the Physics Institute of UNAM which the data adjustment model is operated in the macro type. 2. A LiF curve of four peaks obtained from Harshaw information simulated in Microsoft Excel, discussed in previous works, as a reference not in macro. (Author)

  6. Measurement of cerebral blood flow by intravenous xenon-133 technique and a mobile system. Reproducibility using the Obrist model compared to total curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    and side-to-side asymmetry. Data were analysed according to the Obrist model and the results compared with those obtained using a model correcting for the air passage artifact. Reproducibility was of the same order of magnitude as reported using stationary equipment. The side-to-side CBF asymmetry...... was considerably more reproducible than CBF level. Using a single detector instead of five regional values averaged as the hemispheric flow increased standard deviation of CBF level by 10-20%, while the variation in asymmetry was doubled. In optimal measuring conditions the two models revealed no significant...... differences, but in low flow situations the artifact model yielded significantly more stable results. The present apparatus, equipped with 3-5 detectors covering each hemisphere, offers the opportunity of performing serial CBF measurements in situations not otherwise feasible....

  7. Synchronized mammalian cell culture: part II--population ensemble modeling and analysis for development of reproducible processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandt, Uwe; Barradas, Oscar Platas; Pörtner, Ralf; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The consideration of inherent population inhomogeneities of mammalian cell cultures becomes increasingly important for systems biology study and for developing more stable and efficient processes. However, variations of cellular properties belonging to different sub-populations and their potential effects on cellular physiology and kinetics of culture productivity under bioproduction conditions have not yet been much in the focus of research. Culture heterogeneity is strongly determined by the advance of the cell cycle. The assignment of cell-cycle specific cellular variations to large-scale process conditions can be optimally determined based on the combination of (partially) synchronized cultivation under otherwise physiological conditions and subsequent population-resolved model adaptation. The first step has been achieved using the physical selection method of countercurrent flow centrifugal elutriation, recently established in our group for different mammalian cell lines which is presented in Part I of this paper series. In this second part, we demonstrate the successful adaptation and application of a cell-cycle dependent population balance ensemble model to describe and understand synchronized bioreactor cultivations performed with two model mammalian cell lines, AGE1.HNAAT and CHO-K1. Numerical adaptation of the model to experimental data allows for detection of phase-specific parameters and for determination of significant variations between different phases and different cell lines. It shows that special care must be taken with regard to the sampling frequency in such oscillation cultures to minimize phase shift (jitter) artifacts. Based on predictions of long-term oscillation behavior of a culture depending on its start conditions, optimal elutriation setup trade-offs between high cell yields and high synchronization efficiency are proposed. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Development of a Three-Dimensional Hand Model Using Three-Dimensional Stereophotogrammetry: Assessment of Image Reproducibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge A Hoevenaren

    Full Text Available Using three-dimensional (3D stereophotogrammetry precise images and reconstructions of the human body can be produced. Over the last few years, this technique is mainly being developed in the field of maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, creating fusion images with computed tomography (CT data for precise planning and prediction of treatment outcome. Though, in hand surgery 3D stereophotogrammetry is not yet being used in clinical settings.A total of 34 three-dimensional hand photographs were analyzed to investigate the reproducibility. For every individual, 3D photographs were captured at two different time points (baseline T0 and one week later T1. Using two different registration methods, the reproducibility of the methods was analyzed. Furthermore, the differences between 3D photos of men and women were compared in a distance map as a first clinical pilot testing our registration method.The absolute mean registration error for the complete hand was 1.46 mm. This reduced to an error of 0.56 mm isolating the region to the palm of the hand. When comparing hands of both sexes, it was seen that the male hand was larger (broader base and longer fingers than the female hand.This study shows that 3D stereophotogrammetry can produce reproducible images of the hand without harmful side effects for the patient, so proving to be a reliable method for soft tissue analysis. Its potential use in everyday practice of hand surgery needs to be further explored.

  9. Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment (MICEE): standardised reporting for model reproducibility, interoperability, and data sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quinn, T. A.; Granite, S.; Allessie, M. A.; Antzelevitch, C.; Bollensdorff, C.; Bub, G.; Burton, R. A. B.; Cerbai, E.; Chen, P. S.; Delmar, M.; DiFrancesco, D.; Earm, Y. E.; Efimov, I. R.; Egger, M.; Entcheva, E.; Fink, M.; Fischmeister, R.; Franz, M. R.; Garny, A.; Giles, W. R.; Hannes, T.; Harding, S. E.; Hunter, P. J.; Iribe, G.; Jalife, J.; Johnson, C. R.; Kass, R. S.; Kodama, I.; Koren, G.; Lord, P.; Markhasin, V. S.; Matsuoka, S.; McCulloch, A. D.; Mirams, G. R.; Morley, G. E.; Nattel, S.; Noble, D.; Olesen, S. P.; Panfilov, A. V.; Trayanova, N. A.; Ravens, U.; Richard, S.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Rudy, Y.; Sachs, F.; Sachse, F. B.; Saint, D. A.; Schotten, U.; Solovyova, O.; Taggart, P.; Tung, L.; Varró, A.; Volders, P. G.; Wang, K.; Weiss, J. N.; Wettwer, E.; White, E.; Wilders, R.; Winslow, R. L.; Kohl, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac experimental electrophysiology is in need of a well-defined Minimum Information Standard for recording, annotating, and reporting experimental data. As a step towards establishing this, we present a draft standard, called Minimum Information about a Cardiac Electrophysiology Experiment

  10. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs

  11. Experimental In Vivo Models of Candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Segal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Candidiasis is a multifaceted fungal disease including mucosal-cutaneous, visceral, and disseminated infections caused by yeast species of the genus Candida. Candida infections are among the most common human mycoses. Candida species are the third to fourth most common isolates from bloodstream infections in neutropenic or immunocompromised hospitalized patients. The mucosal-cutaneous forms—particularly vaginal infections—have a high prevalence. Vaginitis caused by Candida species is the second most common vaginal infection. Hence, candidiasis is a major subject for research, including experimental in vivo models to study pathogenesis, prevention, or therapy of the disease. The following review article will focus on various experimental in vivo models in different laboratory animals, such as mammals (mice, rats, rabbits, the fruit fly–Drosophila melanogaster, the larvae of the moth Galleria mellonella, or the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The review will describe the induction of the different clinical forms of candidiasis in the various models and the validity of such models in mimicking the human clinical situations. The use of such models for the assessment of antifungal drugs, evaluation of potential vaccines to protect before candidiasis, exploration of Candida virulence factors, and comparison of pathogenicity of different Candida species will be included in the review. All of the above will be reported as based on published studies of numerous investigators as well as on the research of the author and his group.

  12. Experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junker, W.R.; Clark, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines the experimental modeling of eddy current inspection capabilities based upon the use of liquid mercury samples designed to represent metal components containing discontinuities. A brief summary of past work with mercury modeling and a detailed discussion of recent experiments designed to further evaluate the technique are presented. The main disadvantages of the mercury modeling concept are that mercury is toxic and must be handled carefully, liquid mercury can only be used to represent nonferromagnetic materials, and wetting and meniscus problems can distort the effective size of artificial discontinuities. Artificial discontinuities placed in a liquid mercury sample can be used to represent discontinuities in solid metallic structures. Discontinuity size and type cannot be characterized from phase angle and signal amplitude data developed with a surface scanning, pancake-type eddy current probe. It is concluded that the mercury model approach can greatly enhance the overall understanding and applicability of eddy current inspection techniques

  13. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  14. Models for Experimental High Density Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradecki, Tomasz; Swoboda, Julia; Nowak, Katarzyna; Dziechciarz, Klaudia

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the effects of research on models of high density housing. The authors present urban projects for experimental high density housing estates. The design was based on research performed on 38 examples of similar housing in Poland that have been built after 2003. Some of the case studies show extreme density and that inspired the researchers to test individual virtual solutions that would answer the question: How far can we push the limits? The experimental housing projects show strengths and weaknesses of design driven only by such indexes as FAR (floor attenuation ratio - housing density) and DPH (dwellings per hectare). Although such projects are implemented, the authors believe that there are reasons for limits since high index values may be in contradiction to the optimum character of housing environment. Virtual models on virtual plots presented by the authors were oriented toward maximising the DPH index and DAI (dwellings area index) which is very often the main driver for developers. The authors also raise the question of sustainability of such solutions. The research was carried out in the URBAN model research group (Gliwice, Poland) that consists of academic researchers and architecture students. The models reflect architectural and urban regulations that are valid in Poland. Conclusions might be helpful for urban planners, urban designers, developers, architects and architecture students.

  15. Experimental data and dose-response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Dose-response relationships for radiation carcinogenesis have been of interest to biologists, modelers, and statisticians for many years. Despite his interest there are few instances in which there are sufficient experimental data to allow the fitting of various dose-response models. In those experimental systems for which data are available the dose-response curves for tumor induction for the various systems cannot be described by a single model. Dose-response models which have been observed following acute exposures to gamma rays include threshold, quadratic, and linear models. Data on sex, age, and environmental influences of dose suggest a strong role of host factors on the dose response. With decreasing dose rate the effectiveness of gamma ray irradiation tends to decrease in essentially every instance. In those cases in which the high dose rate dose response could be described by a quadratic model, the effect of dose rate is consistent with predictions based on radiation effects on the induction of initial events. Whether the underlying reasons for the observed dose-rate effect is a result of effects on the induction of initial events or is due to effects on the subsequent steps in the carcinogenic process is unknown. Information on the dose response for tumor induction for high LET (linear energy transfer) radiations such as neutrons is even more limited. The observed dose and dose rate data for tumor induction following neutron exposure are complex and do not appear to be consistent with predictions based on models for the induction of initial events

  16. Experimental consequences of SU(3) symmetry in an sdg boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Y.; Brentano, P. von; Gelberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    Energies of collective levels in 178 Hf and 234 U are compared wth predictions of the SU(3) limiz of the sdg interacting boson model. All known positive parity states of 178 Hf below 1.8 MeV (with the expection of a 0 + band) have been satisfactorily reproduced. Most of the bands in 234 U are also described by the model. However, a few predicted states have no experimental counterpart. The introduction of the g-basons strongly reduces the previously observed discrepancies between experimental B(E2)'s in 238 U and the sd-IBM calculation. (orig.)

  17. Experimental consequences of SU(3) symmetry in an sdg boson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Y.; Brentano, P. von; Gelberg, A.

    1987-05-01

    Energies of collective levels in /sup 178/Hf and /sup 234/U are compared wth predictions of the SU(3) limiz of the sdg interacting boson model. All known positive parity states of /sup 178/Hf below 1.8 MeV (with the expection of a 0/sup +/ band) have been satisfactorily reproduced. Most of the bands in /sup 234/U are also described by the model. However, a few predicted states have no experimental counterpart. The introduction of the g-basons strongly reduces the previously observed discrepancies between experimental B(E2)'s in /sup 238/U and the sd-IBM calculation.

  18. Surface physics theoretical models and experimental methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mamonova, Marina V; Prudnikova, I A

    2016-01-01

    The demands of production, such as thin films in microelectronics, rely on consideration of factors influencing the interaction of dissimilar materials that make contact with their surfaces. Bond formation between surface layers of dissimilar condensed solids-termed adhesion-depends on the nature of the contacting bodies. Thus, it is necessary to determine the characteristics of adhesion interaction of different materials from both applied and fundamental perspectives of surface phenomena. Given the difficulty in obtaining reliable experimental values of the adhesion strength of coatings, the theoretical approach to determining adhesion characteristics becomes more important. Surface Physics: Theoretical Models and Experimental Methods presents straightforward and efficient approaches and methods developed by the authors that enable the calculation of surface and adhesion characteristics for a wide range of materials: metals, alloys, semiconductors, and complex compounds. The authors compare results from the ...

  19. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  20. Superficial tension: experimental model with simple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintori Ferreira, María Alejandra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work appears a didactic offer based on an experimental activity using materials of very low cost, orientated to achieving that the student understand and interpret the phenomenon of superficial tension together with the importance of the modeling in sciences. It has as principal aim of education bring the student over to the mechanics of the static fluids and the intermolecular forces, combining scientific contents with questions near to the student what provides an additional motivation to the reflection of the scientific investigation.

  1. Tracer transfer in consolidated porous medium and fractured porous medium: experimentations and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Costa, C.

    2007-07-01

    We try to identify and model physical and chemical mechanisms governing the water flow and the solute transport in fractured consolidated porous medium. An original experimental device was built. The 'cube' consists of an idealized fractured medium reproduced by piling up consolidated porous cubes of 5 cm edge. Meanwhile, columns of the homogeneous consolidated porous medium are studied. The same anionic tracing technique is used in both cases. Using a system analysis approach, we inject concentration pulses in the device to obtain breakthrough curves. After identifying the mass balance and the residence time, we fit the CD and the MIM models to the experimental data. The MIM model is able to reproduce experimental curves of the homogeneous consolidated porous medium better than the CD model. The mobile water fraction is in accordance with the porous medium geometry. The study of the flow rate influence highlights an interference dispersion regime. It was not possible to highlight the observation length influence in this case. On the contrary, we highlight the effect of the observation scale on the fractured and porous medium, comparing the results obtained on a small 'cube' and a big 'cube'. The CD model is not satisfactory in this case. Even if the MIM model can fit the experimental breakthrough curves, it was not possible to obtain unique parameters for the set of experiments. (author)

  2. 3D-modeling of the spine using EOS imaging system: Inter-reader reproducibility and reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Rehm

    Full Text Available To retrospectively assess the interreader reproducibility and reliability of EOS 3D full spine reconstructions in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS.73 patients with mean age of 17 years and a moderate AIS (median Cobb Angle 18.2° obtained low-dose standing biplanar radiographs with EOS. Two independent readers performed "full spine" 3D reconstructions of the spine with the "full-spine" method adjusting the bone contour of every thoracic and lumbar vertebra (Th1-L5. Interreader reproducibility was assessed regarding rotation of every single vertebra in the coronal (i.e. frontal, sagittal (i.e. lateral, and axial plane, T1/T12 kyphosis, T4/T12 kyphosis, L1/L5 lordosis, L1/S1 lordosis and pelvic parameters. Radiation exposure, scan-time and 3D reconstruction time were recorded.Interclass correlation (ICC ranged between 0.83 and 0.98 for frontal vertebral rotation, between 0.94 and 0.99 for lateral vertebral rotation and between 0.51 and 0.88 for axial vertebral rotation. ICC was 0.92 for T1/T12 kyphosis, 0.95 for T4/T12 kyphosis, 0.90 for L1/L5 lordosis, 0.85 for L1/S1 lordosis, 0.97 for pelvic incidence, 0.96 for sacral slope, 0.98 for sagittal pelvic tilt and 0.94 for lateral pelvic tilt. The mean time for reconstruction was 14.9 minutes (reader 1: 14.6 minutes, reader 2: 15.2 minutes, p<0.0001. The mean total absorbed dose was 593.4μGy ±212.3 per patient.EOS "full spine" 3D angle measurement of vertebral rotation proved to be reliable and was performed in an acceptable reconstruction time. Interreader reproducibility of axial rotation was limited to some degree in the upper and middle thoracic spine due the obtuse angulation of the pedicles and the processi spinosi in the frontal view somewhat complicating their delineation.

  3. Respiratory-Gated Helical Computed Tomography of Lung: Reproducibility of Small Volumes in an Ex Vivo Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, Juergen; Dinkel, Julien; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata M.Sc.; Thierfelder, Carsten; Mende, Ulrich; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motion-adapted radiotherapy with gated irradiation or tracking of tumor positions requires dedicated imaging techniques such as four-dimensional (4D) helical computed tomography (CT) for patient selection and treatment planning. The objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of spatial information for small objects on respiratory-gated 4D helical CT using computer-assisted volumetry of lung nodules in a ventilated ex vivo system. Methods and Materials: Five porcine lungs were inflated inside a chest phantom and prepared with 55 artificial nodules (mean diameter, 8.4 mm ± 1.8). The lungs were respirated by a flexible diaphragm and scanned with 40-row detector CT (collimation, 24 x 1.2 mm; pitch, 0.1; rotation time, 1 s; slice thickness, 1.5 mm; increment, 0.8 mm). The 4D-CT scans acquired during respiration (eight per minute) and reconstructed at 0-100% inspiration and equivalent static scans were scored for motion-related artifacts (0 or absent to 3 or relevant). The reproducibility of nodule volumetry (three readers) was assessed using the variation coefficient (VC). Results: The mean volumes from the static and dynamic inspiratory scans were equal (364.9 and 360.8 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.24). The static and dynamic end-expiratory volumes were slightly greater (371.9 and 369.7 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.019). The VC for volumetry (static) was 3.1%, with no significant difference between 20 apical and 20 caudal nodules (2.6% and 3.5%, p = 0.25). In dynamic scans, the VC was greater (3.9%, p = 0.004; apical and caudal, 2.6% and 4.9%; p = 0.004), with a significant difference between static and dynamic in the 20 caudal nodules (3.5% and 4.9%, p = 0.015). This was consistent with greater motion-related artifacts and image noise at the diaphragm (p <0.05). The VC for interobserver variability was 0.6%. Conclusion: Residual motion-related artifacts had only minimal influence on volumetry of small solid lesions. This indicates a high reproducibility of

  4. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  5. Experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasteghin K.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Propose a new experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits after partial bladder obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty North Folk male rabbits, weighting 1,700 to 2,820 g (mean: 2,162 g were studied. The animals were distributed in 2 experimental groups, formed by 15 rabbits each: Group 1 - clinical control. In this group there was no surgical intervention; Group 2 - bladder outlet obstruction. In this group, after anesthetizing the animal, urethral cannulation with Foley catheter 10F was performed and then an adjustable plastic bracelet was passed around the bladder neck. It was then adjusted in order to not constrict the urethra. The following parameters were studied in M1 - pre-operative period; M2 - 4 weeks post-operatively moments: 1- urine culture; 2- cystometric study; 3- serum creatinine and BUN. RESULTS: Bladder weight was 2.5 times larger in the group with obstruction than in the control group. Cystometric evaluation showed a significant increase in maximal vesical volume in the final moment at Group G2. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups studied. There was no statistically significant difference between maximal detrusor pressure and vesical compliance in the different moments or in the studied groups. There was an absence of uninhibited detrusor contractions in all the animals in group 1, and involuntary contractions were detected in 93% of group 2 animals. There was no significant variation in BUN and serum creatinine either among the groups or in the same group. CONCLUSIONS: We observed in the group with obstruction a bladder weight 2.5 higher than normal bladders. We detected involuntary contractions in 93% of the animals in group 2, establishing this experimental model as appropriate to secondary bladder instability and partial bladder outlet obstruction.

  6. Experimental Oral Candidiasis in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Yuthika H.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.

    2001-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is as much the final outcome of the vulnerability of the host as of the virulence of the invading organism. We review here the extensive literature on animal experiments mainly appertaining to the host predisposing factors that initiate and perpetuate these infections. The monkey, rat, and mouse are the choice models for investigating oral candidiasis, but comparisons between the same or different models appear difficult, because of variables such as the study design, the number of animals used, their diet, the differences in Candida strains, and the duration of the studies. These variables notwithstanding, the following could be concluded. (i) The primate model is ideal for investigating Candida-associated denture stomatitis since both erythematous and pseudomembranous lesions have been produced in monkeys with prosthetic plates; they are, however, expensive and difficult to obtain and maintain. (ii) The rat model (both Sprague-Dawley and Wistar) is well proven for observing chronic oral candidal colonization and infection, due to the ease of breeding and handling and their ready availability. (iii) Mice are similar, but in addition there are well characterized variants simulating immunologic and genetic abnormalities (e.g., athymic, euthymic, murine-acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficient models) and hence are used for short-term studies relating the host immune response and oral candidiasis. Nonetheless, an ideal, relatively inexpensive model representative of the human oral environment in ecological and microbiological terms is yet to be described. Until such a model is developed, researchers should pay attention to standardization of the experimental protocols described here to obtain broadly comparable and meaningful data. PMID:11292645

  7. Macroscopic Dynamic Modeling of Sequential Batch Cultures of Hybridoma Cells: An Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dewasme

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybridoma cells are commonly grown for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb. For monitoring and control purposes of the bioreactors, dynamic models of the cultures are required. However these models are difficult to infer from the usually limited amount of available experimental data and do not focus on target protein production optimization. This paper explores an experimental case study where hybridoma cells are grown in a sequential batch reactor. The simplest macroscopic reaction scheme translating the data is first derived using a maximum likelihood principal component analysis. Subsequently, nonlinear least-squares estimation is used to determine the kinetic laws. The resulting dynamic model reproduces quite satisfactorily the experimental data, as evidenced in direct and cross-validation tests. Furthermore, model predictions can also be used to predict optimal medium renewal time and composition.

  8. Experimental and theoretical requirements for fuel modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatesoupe, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    From a scientific point of view it may be considered that any event in the life of a fuel pin under irradiation should be perfectly well understood and foreseen from that deterministic point of view, the whole behaviour of the pin maybe analysed and dismantled with a specific function for every component part and each component part related to one basic phenomenon which can be independently studied on pure physical grounds. When extracted from the code structure the subroutine is studied for itself by specialists who try to keep as close as possible to the physics involved in the phenomenon; that often leads to an impressive luxury in details and a subsequent need for many unavailable input data. It might seem more secure to follow that approach since it tries to be firmly based on theoretical grounds. One should think so if the phenomenological situation in the pin were less complex than it is. The codes would not be adequate for off-normal operating conditions since for the accidental transient conditions the key-phenomena would not be the same as for steady-state or slow transient conditions. The orientation given to fuel modelling is based on our two main technological constraints which are: no fuel melting; no cladding failure; no excessive cladding deformation. In this context, the only relevant models are those which have a significant influence on the maximum temperatures in the fuel or on the cladding damage hence the selection between key models and irrelevant models which will next be done. A rather pragmatic view is kept on codification with a special focus on a few determinant aspects of fuel behaviour and no attention to models which are nothing but decorative. Fuel modeling is merely considered as a link between experimental knowledge; it serves as a guide for further improvements in fuel design and as so happens to be quite useful. On this basis the main lacks in of fuel behaviour is described. These are mainly concerning: thermal transfer through

  9. Integration of THM-experimental work and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintado, Xavier; Autio, Jorma; Koskinen, Kari

    2010-01-01

    strains. Some constitutive laws approximate all these phenomena. These laws relate gradients with fluxes in transport phenomena and stresses with strains in mechanical phenomena. The parameters necessary to establish these relations are necessary to reproduce correctly the clay barrier behaviour. This work uses CODE-BRIGHT (Coupled Deformation Brine, Gas and Heat Transport). This code was developed initially for studying multiphase flow in saline materials but some constitutive laws for rocks and clays have been implemented, so it is possible to simulate the clay barrier behaviour. The key aspects of the tests presented below are modelled and later compared to results. The experimental program to provide data and reference to observed behaviour has consisted of following tests: - Small scale laboratory tests: Provide the different parameters. Due the complexity of the processes which take place inside the samples, the numerical methods could be necessary for analyze the test results. Although there is the theoretical possibility to have more than one parameter from one test, it is better to consider one test for calculate one parameter and use the results to check rest of parameters. Sometimes, one test is used for one parameter but the measures allow to check other parameters. - Large scale laboratory tests: these tests are used to reproduce in small scale the phenomena which take place in the barrier. Modelling these tests is useful to understand better the processes inside the barrier under the qualitatively point of view and it is possible to quantify other phenomena like piping or crack formation although modelling these phenomena is quite difficult. - Large scale tests: With the parameters from the small scale laboratory tests and the validation of these parameters with the large scale laboratory tests, plus a better understanding of the phenomena, it is possible to design and simulate the large scale tests, where the conditions of the repository are reproduced. In

  10. Experimental study and modelling of transient boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    A failure in the control system of the power of a nuclear reactor can lead to a Reactivity Initiated Accident in a nuclear power plant. Then, a power peak occurs in some fuel rods, high enough to lead to the coolant film boiling. It leads to an important increase of the temperature of the rod. The possible risk of the clad failure is a matter of interest for the Institut de Radioprotection et de Securite Nucleaire. The transient boiling heat transfer is not yet understood and modelled. An experimental set-up has been built at the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT). Subcooled HFE-7000 flows vertically upward in a semi annulus test section. The inner half cylinder simulates the clad and is made of a stainless steel foil, heated by Joule effect. Its temperature is measured by an infrared camera, coupled with a high speed camera for the visualization of the flow topology. The whole boiling curve is studied in steady state and transient regimes: convection, onset of boiling, nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, film boiling and rewetting. The steady state heat transfers are well modelled by literature correlations. Models are suggested for the transient heat flux: the convection and nucleate boiling evolutions are self-similar during a power step. This observation allows to model more complex evolutions, as temperature ramps. The transient Hsu model well represents the onset of nucleate boiling. When the intensity of the power step increases, the film boiling begins at the same temperature but with an increasing heat flux. For power ramps, the critical heat flux decreases while the corresponding temperature increases with the heating rate. When the wall is heated, the film boiling heat transfer is higher than in steady state but it is not understood. A two-fluid model well simulates the cooling film boiling and the rewetting. (author)

  11. Testing Reproducibility in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, M. A.; Dudill, A. R.; Frey, P.; Venditti, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Reproducibility represents how closely the results of independent tests agree when undertaken using the same materials but different conditions of measurement, such as operator, equipment or laboratory. The concept of reproducibility is fundamental to the scientific method as it prevents the persistence of incorrect or biased results. Yet currently the production of scientific knowledge emphasizes rapid publication of previously unreported findings, a culture that has emerged from pressures related to hiring, publication criteria and funding requirements. Awareness and critique of the disconnect between how scientific research should be undertaken, and how it actually is conducted, has been prominent in biomedicine for over a decade, with the fields of economics and psychology more recently joining the conversation. The purpose of this presentation is to stimulate the conversation in earth sciences where, despite implicit evidence in widely accepted classifications, formal testing of reproducibility is rare.As a formal test of reproducibility, two sets of experiments were undertaken with the same experimental procedure, at the same scale, but in different laboratories. Using narrow, steep flumes and spherical glass beads, grain size sorting was examined by introducing fine sediment of varying size and quantity into a mobile coarse bed. The general setup was identical, including flume width and slope; however, there were some variations in the materials, construction and lab environment. Comparison of the results includes examination of the infiltration profiles, sediment mobility and transport characteristics. The physical phenomena were qualitatively reproduced but not quantitatively replicated. Reproduction of results encourages more robust research and reporting, and facilitates exploration of possible variations in data in various specific contexts. Following the lead of other fields, testing of reproducibility can be incentivized through changes to journal

  12. Reproducibility of Carbon and Water Cycle by an Ecosystem Process Based Model Using a Weather Generator and Effect of Temporal Concentration of Precipitation on Model Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, T.; Machimura, T.

    2014-12-01

    GCM is generally used to produce input weather data for the simulation of carbon and water cycle by ecosystem process based models under climate change however its temporal resolution is sometimes incompatible to requirement. A weather generator (WG) is used for temporal downscaling of input weather data for models, where the effect of WG algorithms on reproducibility of ecosystem model outputs must be assessed. In this study simulated carbon and water cycle by Biome-BGC model using weather data measured and generated by CLIMGEN weather generator were compared. The measured weather data (daily precipitation, maximum, minimum air temperature) at a few sites for 30 years was collected from NNDC Online weather data. The generated weather data was produced by CLIMGEN parameterized using the measured weather data. NPP, heterotrophic respiration (HR), NEE and water outflow were simulated by Biome-BGC using measured and generated weather data. In the case of deciduous broad leaf forest in Lushi, Henan Province, China, 30 years average monthly NPP by WG was 10% larger than that by measured weather in the growing season. HR by WG was larger than that by measured weather in all months by 15% in average. NEE by WG was more negative in winter and was close to that by measured weather in summer. These differences in carbon cycle were because the soil water content by WG was larger than that by measured weather. The difference between monthly water outflow by WG and by measured weather was large and variable, and annual outflow by WG was 50% of that by measured weather. The inconsistency in carbon and water cycle by WG and measured weather was suggested be affected by the difference in temporal concentration of precipitation, which was assessed.

  13. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  14. Modeling a nuclear reactor for experimental purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berta, V.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility is a scale model of a commercial PWR and is as fully functional and operational as the generic commercial counterpart. LOFT was designed and built for experimental purposes as part of the overall NRC reactor safety research program. The purpose of LOFT is to assess the capability of reactor safety systems to perform their intended functions during occurrences of off-normal conditions in a commercial nuclear reactor. Off-normal conditions arising from large and small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), operational transients, and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) were to be investigated. This paper describes the LOFT model of the generic PWR and summarizes the experiments that have been conducted in the context of the significant findings involving the complex transient thermal-hydraulics and the consequent effects on the commercial reactor analytical licensing techniques. Through these techniques the validity of the LOFT model as a scaled counterpart of the generic PWR is shown

  15. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Antunes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.Diversos estímulos podem ser utilizados para reproduzir características histológicas e funcionais do enfisema humano, uma das principais causas de incapacidade e morte. Uma vez que a fumaça de cigarro é a principal causa de enfisema em humanos, estudos experimentais têm tentado reproduzir esta situação. No entanto, esse é um método dispendioso e complicado para a indução do enfisema e, alternativas mais simples e eficazes, têm sido pesquisadas. Entre essas abordagens, enzimas elastolíticas vêm sendo amplamente utilizadas para reproduzir algumas das características do enfisema humano, tais como: aumento dos espaços a

  16. The use of real-time cell analyzer technology in drug discovery: defining optimal cell culture conditions and assay reproducibility with different adherent cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienzar, Franck A; Tilmant, Karen; Gerets, Helga H; Toussaint, Gaelle; Speeckaert, Sebastien; Hanon, Etienne; Depelchin, Olympe; Dhalluin, Stephane

    2011-07-01

    The use of impedance-based label-free technology applied to drug discovery is nowadays receiving more and more attention. Indeed, such a simple and noninvasive assay that interferes minimally with cell morphology and function allows one to perform kinetic measurements and to obtain information on proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity, and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the study was to further assess the usefulness of a real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) platform based on impedance in the context of quality control and data reproducibility. The data indicate that this technology is useful to determine the best coating and cellular density conditions for different adherent cellular models including hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, and hybrid neuroblastoma/neuronal cells. Based on 31 independent experiments, the reproducibility of cell index data generated from HepG2 cells exposed to DMSO and to Triton X-100 was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation close to 10%. Cell index data were also well reproduced when cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were exposed to 21 compounds three times (correlation >0.91, p technology appears to be a powerful and reliable tool in drug discovery because of the reasonable throughput, rapid and efficient performance, technical optimization, and cell quality control.

  17. Three-dimensional surgical modelling with an open-source software protocol: study of precision and reproducibility in mandibular reconstruction with the fibula free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Quilichini, J; Bandini, C M; Leyder, P; Hersant, B; Meningaud, J P

    2017-08-01

    Very few surgical teams currently use totally independent and free solutions to perform three-dimensional (3D) surgical modelling for osseous free flaps in reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the precision and technical reproducibility of a 3D surgical modelling protocol using free open-source software in mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flaps and surgical guides. Precision was assessed through comparisons of the 3D surgical guide to the sterilized 3D-printed guide, determining accuracy to the millimetre level. Reproducibility was assessed in three surgical cases by volumetric comparison to the millimetre level. For the 3D surgical modelling, a difference of less than 0.1mm was observed. Almost no deformations (free flap modelling was between 0.1mm and 0.4mm, and the average precision of the complete reconstructed mandible was less than 1mm. The open-source software protocol demonstrated high accuracy without complications. However, the precision of the surgical case depends on the surgeon's 3D surgical modelling. Therefore, surgeons need training on the use of this protocol before applying it to surgical cases; this constitutes a limitation. Further studies should address the transfer of expertise. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Harmony Search Algorithm for the Reproduction of Experimental Data in the Social Force Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Moh'd Alia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crowd dynamics is a discipline dealing with the management and flow of crowds in congested places and circumstances. Pedestrian congestion is a pressing issue where crowd dynamics models can be applied. The reproduction of experimental data (velocity-density relation and specific flow rate is a major component for the validation and calibration of such models. In the social force model, researchers have proposed various techniques to adjust essential parameters governing the repulsive social force, which is an effort at reproducing such experimental data. Despite that and various other efforts, the optimal reproduction of the real life data is unachievable. In this paper, a harmony search-based technique called HS-SFM is proposed to overcome the difficulties of the calibration process for SFM, where the fundamental diagram of velocity-density relation and the specific flow rate are reproduced in conformance with the related empirical data. The improvisation process of HS is modified by incorporating the global best particle concept from particle swarm optimization (PSO to increase the convergence rate and overcome the high computational demands of HS-SFM. Simulation results have shown HS-FSM’s ability to produce near optimal SFM parameter values, which makes it possible for SFM to almost reproduce the related empirical data.

  19. Optimal experimental design in an epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and down-regulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, F P; Baird, D; Feng, Q; Gutenkunst, R N; Waterfall, J J; Myers, C R; Brown, K S; Cerione, R A; Sethna, J P

    2007-05-01

    We apply the methods of optimal experimental design to a differential equation model for epidermal growth factor receptor signalling, trafficking and down-regulation. The model incorporates the role of a recently discovered protein complex made up of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Cbl, the guanine exchange factor (GEF), Cool-1 (beta -Pix) and the Rho family G protein Cdc42. The complex has been suggested to be important in disrupting receptor down-regulation. We demonstrate that the model interactions can accurately reproduce the experimental observations, that they can be used to make predictions with accompanying uncertainties, and that we can apply ideas of optimal experimental design to suggest new experiments that reduce the uncertainty on unmeasurable components of the system.

  20. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  1. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53–3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall. (paper)

  2. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m∙min-1 cutting speed and 0......). Process reproducibility was assessed as the ability of different operators to ensure a consistent rating of individual lubricants. Absolute average values as well as experimental standard deviations of the evaluation parameters were calculated, and uncertainty budgeting was performed. Results document...... a built-up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognize systematic error distorting the performance test....

  3. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m•min−1 cutting speed and 0......). Process reproducibility was assessed as the ability of different operators to ensure a consistent rating of individual lubricants. Absolute average values as well as experimental standard deviations of the evaluation parameters were calculated, and uncertainty budgeting was performed. Results document...... a built–up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognise systematic error distorting the performance test....

  4. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Rania M; Maal, Thomas J J; Breuning, K Hero; Bergé, Stefaan J; Mostafa, Yehya A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2011-02-09

    Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D) assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16) for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27) for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  5. Standard Model theory calculations and experimental tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.

    2015-01-01

    To present knowledge, all the physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be described in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Indeed the newly discovered Higgs boson with a mass close to 125 GeV seems to confirm the predictions of the SM. Thus, besides looking for direct manifestations of the physics beyond the SM, one of the primary missions of the LHC is to perform ever more stringent tests of the SM. This requires not only improved theoretical developments to produce testable predictions and provide experiments with reliable event generators, but also sophisticated analyses techniques to overcome the formidable experimental environment of the LHC and perform precision measurements. In the first section, we describe the state of the art of the theoretical tools and event generators that are used to provide predictions for the production cross sections of the processes of interest. In section 2, inclusive cross section measurements with jets, leptons and vector bosons are presented. Examples of differential cross sections, charge asymmetries and the study of lepton pairs are proposed in section 3. Finally, in section 4, we report studies on the multiple production of gauge bosons and constraints on anomalous gauge couplings

  6. IVIM: modeling, experimental validation and application to animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournet, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    This PhD thesis is centered on the study of the IVIM ('Intravoxel Incoherent Motion') MRI sequence. This sequence allows for the study of the blood microvasculature such as the capillaries, arterioles and venules. To be sensitive only to moving groups of spins, diffusion gradients are added before and after the 180 degrees pulse of a spin echo (SE) sequence. The signal component corresponding to spins diffusing in the tissue can be separated from the one related to spins travelling in the blood vessels which is called the IVIM signal. These two components are weighted by f IVIM which represents the volume fraction of blood inside the tissue. The IVIM signal is usually modelled by a mono-exponential (ME) function and characterized by a pseudo-diffusion coefficient, D*. We propose instead a bi-exponential IVIM model consisting of a slow pool, characterized by F slow and D* slow corresponding to the capillaries as in the ME model, and a fast pool, characterized by F fast and D* fast, related to larger vessels such as medium-size arterioles and venules. This model was validated experimentally and more information was retrieved by comparing the experimental signals to a dictionary of simulated IVIM signals. The influence of the pulse sequence, the repetition time and the diffusion encoding time was also studied. Finally, the IVIM sequence was applied to the study of an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. (author) [fr

  7. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Goswami, Sonal; Samuel, Sherin; Sierra, Olga R.; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situ...

  8. Skills of General Circulation and Earth System Models in reproducing streamflow to the ocean: the case of Congo river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M.; Caporaso, L.

    2017-12-01

    Although the importance of water resources in the context of climate change, it is still difficult to correctly simulate the freshwater cycle over the land via General Circulation and Earth System Models (GCMs and ESMs). Existing efforts from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) were mainly devoted to the validation of atmospheric variables like temperature and precipitation, with low attention to discharge.Here we investigate the present-day performances of GCMs and ESMs participating to CMIP5 in simulating the discharge of the river Congo to the sea thanks to: i) the long-term availability of discharge data for the Kinshasa hydrological station representative of more than 95% of the water flowing in the whole catchment; and ii) the River's still low influence by human intervention, which enables comparison with the (mostly) natural streamflow simulated within CMIP5.Our findings suggest how most of models appear overestimating the streamflow in terms of seasonal cycle, especially in the late winter and spring, while overestimation and variability across models are lower in late summer. Weighted ensemble means are also calculated, based on simulations' performances given by several metrics, showing some improvements of results.Although simulated inter-monthly and inter-annual percent anomalies do not appear significantly different from those in observed data, when translated into well consolidated indicators of drought attributes (frequency, magnitude, timing, duration), usually adopted for more immediate communication to stakeholders and decision makers, such anomalies can be misleading.These inconsistencies produce incorrect assessments towards water management planning and infrastructures (e.g. dams or irrigated areas), especially if models are used instead of measurements, as in case of ungauged basins or for basins with insufficient data, as well as when relying on models for future estimates without a preliminary quantification of model biases.

  9. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  10. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event-scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Measures, R; Hicks, D M; Brasington, J

    2016-08-01

    Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics-based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth-averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high-flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach-scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  11. Attempting to train a digital human model to reproduce human subject reach capabilities in an ejection seat aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zehner, G.F.; Hudson, J.A.; Oudenhuijzen, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1997 through 2002, the Air Force Research Lab and TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Business Unit Human Factors) were involved in a series of tests to quantify the accuracy of five Human Modeling Systems (HMSs) in determining accommodation limits of ejection seat aircraft. The results of these

  12. Developing a Collection of Composable Data Translation Software Units to Improve Efficiency and Reproducibility in Ecohydrologic Modeling Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschanowsky, C.; Flores, A. N.; FitzGerald, K.; Masarik, M. T.; Rudisill, W. J.; Aguayo, M.

    2017-12-01

    Dynamic models of the spatiotemporal evolution of water, energy, and nutrient cycling are important tools to assess impacts of climate and other environmental changes on ecohydrologic systems. These models require spatiotemporally varying environmental forcings like precipitation, temperature, humidity, windspeed, and solar radiation. These input data originate from a variety of sources, including global and regional weather and climate models, global and regional reanalysis products, and geostatistically interpolated surface observations. Data translation measures, often subsetting in space and/or time and transforming and converting variable units, represent a seemingly mundane, but critical step in the application workflows. Translation steps can introduce errors, misrepresentations of data, slow execution time, and interrupt data provenance. We leverage a workflow that subsets a large regional dataset derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and prepares inputs to the Parflow integrated hydrologic model to demonstrate the impact translation tool software quality on scientific workflow results and performance. We propose that such workflows will benefit from a community approved collection of data transformation components. The components should be self-contained composable units of code. This design pattern enables automated parallelization and software verification, improving performance and reliability. Ensuring that individual translation components are self-contained and target minute tasks increases reliability. The small code size of each component enables effective unit and regression testing. The components can be automatically composed for efficient execution. An efficient data translation framework should be written to minimize data movement. Composing components within a single streaming process reduces data movement. Each component will typically have a low arithmetic intensity, meaning that it requires about the same number of

  13. Preserve specimens for reproducibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krell, F.-T.; Klimeš, Petr; Rocha, L. A.; Fikáček, M.; Miller, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 539, č. 7628 (2016), s. 168 ISSN 0028-0836 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : reproducibility * specimen * biodiversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 40.137, year: 2016 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v539/n7628/full/539168b.html

  14. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  15. Interpretative intra- and interobserver reproducibility of Stress/Rest 99m Tc-steamboat's myocardial perfusion SPECT using semi quantitative 20-segment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazeli, M.; Firoozi, F.

    2002-01-01

    It well established that myocardial perfusion SPECT with 201 T L or 99 mTc-se sta mi bi play an important role diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are available for interpretation of images. The use of a semi quantitative scoring system in which each of 20 segments is scored according to a five-point scheme provides an approach to interpretation that is more systematic and reproducible than simple qualitative evaluation. Only a limited number of studies have dealt with the interpretive observer reproducibility of 99 mTc-steamboat's myocardial perfusion imaging. The aim of this study was to assess the intra-and inter observer variability of semi quantitative SPECT performed with this technique. Among 789 patients that underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT during last year 80 patients finally need to coronary angiography as gold standard. In this group of patients a semi quantitative visual interpretation was carried out using short axis and vertical long-axis myocardial tomograms and a 20-segments model. These segments we reassigned on six evenly spaced regions in the apical, mid-ventricular, and basal short-axis view and two apical segments on the mid-ventricular long-axis slice. Uptake in each segment was graded on a 5-point scale (0=normal, 1=equivocal, 2=moderate, 3=severe, 4=absence of uptake). The steamboat's images was interpreted separately w ice by two observers without knowledge of each other's findings or results of angiography. A SPECT study was judged abnormal if there were two or more segments with a stress score equal or more than 2. We con eluded that semi-quantitative visual analysis is a simple and reproducible method of interpretation

  16. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  17. Prospects of experimentally reachable beyond Standard Model ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-06

    Jan 6, 2016 ... Since then, the theory has been experimentally verified to a ... Despite the fact that SM has unravelled the gauge origin of fundamental forces and the structure of Universe while successfully confronting numerous ...

  18. A CRPS-IgG-transfer-trauma model reproducing inflammatory and positive sensory signs associated with complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tékus, Valéria; Hajna, Zsófia; Borbély, Éva; Markovics, Adrienn; Bagoly, Teréz; Szolcsányi, János; Thompson, Victoria; Kemény, Ágnes; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Goebel, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The aetiology of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a highly painful, usually post-traumatic condition affecting the limbs, is unknown, but recent results have suggested an autoimmune contribution. To confirm a role for pathogenic autoantibodies, we established a passive-transfer trauma model. Prior to undergoing incision of hind limb plantar skin and muscle, mice were injected either with serum IgG obtained from chronic CRPS patients or matched healthy volunteers, or with saline. Unilateral hind limb plantar skin and muscle incision was performed to induce typical, mild tissue injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia, paw swelling, heat and cold sensitivity, weight-bearing ability, locomotor activity, motor coordination, paw temperature, and body weight were investigated for 8days. After sacrifice, proinflammatory sensory neuropeptides and cytokines were measured in paw tissues. CRPS patient IgG treatment significantly increased hind limb mechanical hyperalgesia and oedema in the incised paw compared with IgG from healthy subjects or saline. Plantar incision induced a remarkable elevation of substance P immunoreactivity on day 8, which was significantly increased by CRPS-IgG. In this IgG-transfer-trauma model for CRPS, serum IgG from chronic CRPS patients induced clinical and laboratory features resembling the human disease. These results support the hypothesis that autoantibodies may contribute to the pathophysiology of CRPS, and that autoantibody-removing therapies may be effective treatments for long-standing CRPS. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reproducibility of ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, J.-C.; Thomas, Andre; Launay, J.-P.; Martin, Pierre

    The reproducibility of amplitude quotations for both artificial and natural reflectors was studied for several combinations of instrument/search unit, all being of the same type. This study shows that in industrial inspection if a range of standardized equipment is used, a margin of error of about 6 decibels has to be taken into account (confidence interval of 95%). This margin is about 4 to 5 dB for natural or artificial defects located in the central area and about 6 to 7 dB for artificial defects located on the back surface. This lack of reproducibility seems to be attributable first to the search unit and then to the instrument and operator. These results were confirmed by analysis of calibration data obtained from 250 tests performed by 25 operators under shop conditions. The margin of error was higher than the 6 dB obtained in the study [fr

  20. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M Nada

    Full Text Available Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16 for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27 for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  1. Reproducibility of haemodynamical simulations in a subject-specific stented aneurysm model--a report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, A G; Augsburger, L; Cebral, J R; Ohta, M; Rüfenacht, D A; Balossino, R; Benndorf, G; Hose, D R; Marzo, A; Metcalfe, R; Mortier, P; Mut, F; Reymond, P; Socci, L; Verhegghe, B; Frangi, A F

    2008-07-19

    This paper presents the results of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge (VISC) 2007, an international initiative whose aim was to establish the reproducibility of state-of-the-art haemodynamical simulation techniques in subject-specific stented models of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). IAs are pathological dilatations of the cerebral artery walls, which are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates due to subarachnoid haemorrhage following rupture. The deployment of a stent as flow diverter has recently been indicated as a promising treatment option, which has the potential to protect the aneurysm by reducing the action of haemodynamical forces and facilitating aneurysm thrombosis. The direct assessment of changes in aneurysm haemodynamics after stent deployment is hampered by limitations in existing imaging techniques and currently requires resorting to numerical simulations. Numerical simulations also have the potential to assist in the personalized selection of an optimal stent design prior to intervention. However, from the current literature it is difficult to assess the level of technological advancement and the reproducibility of haemodynamical predictions in stented patient-specific models. The VISC 2007 initiative engaged in the development of a multicentre-controlled benchmark to analyse differences induced by diverse grid generation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. The challenge also represented an opportunity to provide a survey of available technologies currently adopted by international teams from both academic and industrial institutions for constructing computational models of stented aneurysms. The results demonstrate the ability of current strategies in consistently quantifying the performance of three commercial intracranial stents, and contribute to reinforce the confidence in haemodynamical simulation, thus taking a step forward towards the introduction of simulation tools to support diagnostics and

  2. The effects of profound hypothermia on pancreas ischemic injury: a new experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha-Santos, Vinicius; Ferro, Oscar Cavalcante; Pantanali, Carlos Andrés; Seixas, Marcel Povlovistsch; Pecora, Rafael Antonio Arruda; Pinheiro, Rafael Soares; Claro, Laura Carolina López; Abdo, Emílio Elias; Chaib, Eleazar; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR) has a key role in pancreas surgery and transplantation. Most experimental models evaluate the normothermic phase of the IR. We proposed a hypothermic model of pancreas IR to evaluate the benefic effects of the cold ischemic phase. We performed a reproducible model of hypothermic pancreatic IR. The ischemia was induced in the pancreatic tail portion (1-hour ischemia, 4-hour reperfusion) in 36 Wistar rats. They are divided in 3 groups as follows: group 1 (control), sham; group 2, normothermic IR; and group 3, hypothermic IR. In group 3, the temperature was maintained as close to 4.5°C. After reperfusion, serum amylase and lipase levels, inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6), and pancreas histology were evaluated. In pancreatic IR groups, amylase, cytokines, and histological damage were significantly increased when compared with group 1. In the group 3, we observed a significant decrease in tumor necrosis factor α (P = 0.004) and interleukin 6 (P = 0.001) when compared with group 2. We did not observe significant difference in amylase (P = 0.867), lipase (P = 0.993), and histology (P = 0.201). In our experimental model, we reproduced the cold phase of pancreas IR, and the pancreas hypothermia reduced the inflammatory mediators after reperfusion.

  3. Intravenous nitroglycerin as an experimental model of vascular headache. Basic characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    1989-01-01

    To develop a reliable experimental model of vascular headache, we studied the dose-response relationship between headache and i.v. nitroglycerin (NTG) in 10 healthy subjects. NTG was infused intravenously over periods of 10 min separated by wash-out periods. Doses of 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 and 2......) at various doses and declined rapidly after NTG discontinuation. Wash-out periods of 10-20 min were sufficient. The reproducibility of headache intensity and character was satisfactory in the retest experiment. There were no unpleasant side effects and no visible flushing. Thus blindness was maintained. I...

  4. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted with the goal of quantifying auditory attributes which underlie listener preference for multichannel reproduced sound. Short musical excerpts were presented in mono, stereo and several multichannel formats to a panel of forty selected listeners. Scaling of auditory attributes......, as well as overall preference, was based on consistency tests of binary paired-comparison judgments and on modeling the choice frequencies using probabilistic choice models. As a result, the preferences of non-expert listeners could be measured reliably at a ratio scale level. Principal components derived...

  5. Modeling an Excitable Biosynthetic Tissue with Inherent Variability for Paired Computational-Experimental Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay A Gokhale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand how excitable tissues give rise to arrhythmias, it is crucially necessary to understand the electrical dynamics of cells in the context of their environment. Multicellular monolayer cultures have proven useful for investigating arrhythmias and other conduction anomalies, and because of their relatively simple structure, these constructs lend themselves to paired computational studies that often help elucidate mechanisms of the observed behavior. However, tissue cultures of cardiomyocyte monolayers currently require the use of neonatal cells with ionic properties that change rapidly during development and have thus been poorly characterized and modeled to date. Recently, Kirkton and Bursac demonstrated the ability to create biosynthetic excitable tissues from genetically engineered and immortalized HEK293 cells with well-characterized electrical properties and the ability to propagate action potentials. In this study, we developed and validated a computational model of these excitable HEK293 cells (called "Ex293" cells using existing electrophysiological data and a genetic search algorithm. In order to reproduce not only the mean but also the variability of experimental observations, we examined what sources of variation were required in the computational model. Random cell-to-cell and inter-monolayer variation in both ionic conductances and tissue conductivity was necessary to explain the experimentally observed variability in action potential shape and macroscopic conduction, and the spatial organization of cell-to-cell conductance variation was found to not impact macroscopic behavior; the resulting model accurately reproduces both normal and drug-modified conduction behavior. The development of a computational Ex293 cell and tissue model provides a novel framework to perform paired computational-experimental studies to study normal and abnormal conduction in multidimensional excitable tissue, and the methodology of modeling

  6. Experimental study and modelling of selenite sorption onto illite and smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missana, T; Alonso, U; García-Gutiérrez, M

    2009-06-15

    This study provides a large set of experimental selenite sorption data for pure smectite and illite. Similar sorption behavior existed in both clays: linear within a large range of the Se concentrations investigated (from 1x10(-10) to 1x10(-3) M); and independent of ionic strength. Selenite sorption was also analysed in the illite/smectite system with the clays mixed in two different proportions, as follows: (a) 30% illite-70% smectite and (b) 43% illite-57% smectite. The objective of the study was to provide the simplest model possible to fit the experimental data, a model also capable of describing selenite sorption in binary illite/smectite clay systems. Selenite sorption data, separately obtained in the single mineral systems, were modeled using both a one- and a two-site non-electrostatic model that took into account the formation of two complexes at the edge sites of the clay. Although the use of a two-site model slightly improved the fit of data at a pH below 4, the simpler one-site model reproduced satisfactorily all the sorption data from pH 3 to 8. The complexation constants obtained by fitting sorption data of the individual minerals were incorporated into a model to predict the adsorption of selenium in the illite/smectite mixtures; the model's predictions were consistent with the experimental adsorption data.

  7. Models of experimental saccular aneurysms of carotid arteries in canine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haixia; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the availability by making experimental saccular aneurysm models of carotid arteries in canine similar to human intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Twenty healthy canines with experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully by surgery. Results: Forty experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries were created successfully with 36 aneurysms and parent arteries maintaining patency with each other and four spontaneously occluded confirmed by angiography. Model successful rate reached 90%. Conclusions: Experimental saccular side-wall aneurysms of carotid arteries in canines were one of best models created for simulating human intracranial aneurysms. (authors)

  8. Magnet stability and reproducibility

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, N

    2010-01-01

    Magnet stability and reproducibility have become increasingly important as greater precision and beams with smaller dimension are required for research, medical and other purpose. The observed causes of mechanical and electrical instability are introduced and the engineering arrangements needed to minimize these problems discussed; the resulting performance of a state-of-the-art synchrotron source (Diamond) is then presented. The need for orbit feedback to obtain best possible beam stability is briefly introduced, but omitting any details of the necessary technical equipment, which is outside the scope of the presentation.

  9. Reproducible research in palaeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The reproducibility of research findings is attracting increasing attention across all scientific disciplines. In palaeomagnetism as elsewhere, computer-based analysis techniques are becoming more commonplace, complex, and diverse. Analyses can often be difficult to reproduce from scratch, both for the original researchers and for others seeking to build on the work. We present a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program designed to make reproducibility easier. Part of the problem is the divide between interactive and scripted (batch) analysis programs. An interactive desktop program with a graphical interface is a powerful tool for exploring data and iteratively refining analyses, but usually cannot operate without human interaction. This makes it impossible to re-run an analysis automatically, or to integrate it into a larger automated scientific workflow - for example, a script to generate figures and tables for a paper. In some cases the parameters of the analysis process itself are not saved explicitly, making it hard to repeat or improve the analysis even with human interaction. Conversely, non-interactive batch tools can be controlled by pre-written scripts and configuration files, allowing an analysis to be 'replayed' automatically from the raw data. However, this advantage comes at the expense of exploratory capability: iteratively improving an analysis entails a time-consuming cycle of editing scripts, running them, and viewing the output. Batch tools also tend to require more computer expertise from their users. PuffinPlot is a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program which aims to bridge this gap. First released in 2012, it offers both an interactive, user-friendly desktop interface and a batch scripting interface, both making use of the same core library of palaeomagnetic functions. We present new improvements to the program that help to integrate the interactive and batch approaches, allowing an analysis to be interactively explored and refined

  10. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses.......We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  11. Experimental modeling of swirl flows in power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtork, S. I.; Litvinov, I. V.; Gesheva, E. S.; Tsoy, M. A.; Skripkin, S. G.

    2018-03-01

    The article presents an overview of the methods and approaches to experimental modeling of various thermal and hydropower units - furnaces of pulverized coal boilers and flow-through elements of hydro turbines. The presented modeling approaches based on a combination of experimentation and rapid prototyping of working parts may be useful in optimizing energy equipment to improve safety and efficiency of industrial energy systems.

  12. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  13. Experimental models of the gut microbiome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Abbeele, P. van den

    2013-01-01

    The human gut contains a diverse microbiota with large potential to influence health. Given the difficulty to access the main sites of the gut, in vitro models have been developed to dynamically monitor microbial processes at the site of metabolic activity. These models range from simple batch

  14. Modelling impacts of performance on the probability of reproducing, and thereby on productive lifespan, allow prediction of lifetime efficiency in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, H N; Blavy, P; Martin, O; Schmidely, P; Friggens, N C

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive success is a key component of lifetime efficiency - which is the ratio of energy in milk (MJ) to energy intake (MJ) over the lifespan, of cows. At the animal level, breeding and feeding management can substantially impact milk yield, body condition and energy balance of cows, which are known as major contributors to reproductive failure in dairy cattle. This study extended an existing lifetime performance model to incorporate the impacts that performance changes due to changing breeding and feeding strategies have on the probability of reproducing and thereby on the productive lifespan, and thus allow the prediction of a cow's lifetime efficiency. The model is dynamic and stochastic, with an individual cow being the unit modelled and one day being the unit of time. To evaluate the model, data from a French study including Holstein and Normande cows fed high-concentrate diets and data from a Scottish study including Holstein cows selected for high and average genetic merit for fat plus protein that were fed high- v. low-concentrate diets were used. Generally, the model consistently simulated productive and reproductive performance of various genotypes of cows across feeding systems. In the French data, the model adequately simulated the reproductive performance of Holsteins but significantly under-predicted that of Normande cows. In the Scottish data, conception to first service was comparably simulated, whereas interval traits were slightly under-predicted. Selection for greater milk production impaired the reproductive performance and lifespan but not lifetime efficiency. The definition of lifetime efficiency used in this model did not include associated costs or herd-level effects. Further works should include such economic indicators to allow more accurate simulation of lifetime profitability in different production scenarios.

  15. Retrospective Correction of Physiological Noise: Impact on Sensitivity, Specificity, and Reproducibility of Resting-State Functional Connectivity in a Reading Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri; Krishnamurthy, Lisa C; Schwam, Dina M; Ealey, Ashley; Shin, Jaemin; Greenberg, Daphne; Morris, Robin D

    2018-03-01

    It is well accepted that physiological noise (PN) obscures the detection of neural fluctuations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) magnetic resonance imaging. However, a clear consensus for an optimal PN correction (PNC) methodology and how it can impact the rsFC signal characteristics is still lacking. In this study, we probe the impact of three PNC methods: RETROICOR: (Glover et al., 2000 ), ANATICOR: (Jo et al., 2010 ), and RVTMBPM: (Bianciardi et al., 2009 ). Using a reading network model, we systematically explore the effects of PNC optimization on sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of rsFC signals. In terms of specificity, ANATICOR was found to be effective in removing local white matter (WM) fluctuations and also resulted in aggressive removal of expected cortical-to-subcortical functional connections. The ability of RETROICOR to remove PN was equivalent to removal of simulated random PN such that it artificially inflated the connection strength, thereby decreasing sensitivity. RVTMBPM maintained specificity and sensitivity by balanced removal of vasodilatory PN and local WM nuisance edges. Another aspect of this work was exploring the effects of PNC on identifying reading group differences. Most PNC methods accounted for between-subject PN variability resulting in reduced intersession reproducibility. This effect facilitated the detection of the most consistent group differences. RVTMBPM was most effective in detecting significant group differences due to its inherent sensitivity to removing spatially structured and temporally repeating PN arising from dense vasculature. Finally, results suggest that combining all three PNC resulted in "overcorrection" by removing signal along with noise.

  16. Microbial community development in a dynamic gut model is reproducible, colon region specific, and selective for Bacteroidetes and Clostridium cluster IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Abbeele, Pieter; Grootaert, Charlotte; Marzorati, Massimo; Possemiers, Sam; Verstraete, Willy; Gérard, Philippe; Rabot, Sylvie; Bruneau, Aurélia; El Aidy, Sahar; Derrien, Muriel; Zoetendal, Erwin; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Smidt, Hauke; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2010-08-01

    Dynamic, multicompartment in vitro gastrointestinal simulators are often used to monitor gut microbial dynamics and activity. These reactors need to harbor a microbial community that is stable upon inoculation, colon region specific, and relevant to in vivo conditions. Together with the reproducibility of the colonization process, these criteria are often overlooked when the modulatory properties from different treatments are compared. We therefore investigated the microbial colonization process in two identical simulators of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (SHIME), simultaneously inoculated with the same human fecal microbiota with a high-resolution phylogenetic microarray: the human intestinal tract chip (HITChip). Following inoculation of the in vitro colon compartments, microbial community composition reached steady state after 2 weeks, whereas 3 weeks were required to reach functional stability. This dynamic colonization process was reproducible in both SHIME units and resulted in highly diverse microbial communities which were colon region specific, with the proximal regions harboring saccharolytic microbes (e.g., Bacteroides spp. and Eubacterium spp.) and the distal regions harboring mucin-degrading microbes (e.g., Akkermansia spp.). Importantly, the shift from an in vivo to an in vitro environment resulted in an increased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, whereas Clostridium cluster IX (propionate producers) was enriched compared to clusters IV and XIVa (butyrate producers). This was supported by proportionally higher in vitro propionate concentrations. In conclusion, high-resolution analysis of in vitro-cultured gut microbiota offers new insight on the microbial colonization process and indicates the importance of digestive parameters that may be crucial in the development of new in vitro models.

  17. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Duffy, Chris; Arheimer, Berit

    2017-04-01

    Reproducibility is a foundational principle in scientific research. The ability to independently re-run an experiment helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings, and evolve (or reject) hypotheses and models of how environmental systems function, and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. Yet in computational hydrology (and in environmental science more widely) the code and data that produces published results are not regularly made available, and even if they are made available, there remains a multitude of generally unreported choices that an individual scientist may have made that impact the study result. This situation strongly inhibits the ability of our community to reproduce and verify previous findings, as all the information and boundary conditions required to set up a computational experiment simply cannot be reported in an article's text alone. In Hutton et al 2016 [1], we argue that a cultural change is required in the computational hydrological community, in order to advance and make more robust the process of knowledge creation and hypothesis testing. We need to adopt common standards and infrastructures to: (1) make code readable and re-useable; (2) create well-documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; (3) make code and workflows available, easy to find, and easy to interpret, using code and code metadata repositories. To create change we argue for improved graduate training in these areas. In this talk we reflect on our progress in achieving reproducible, open science in computational hydrology, which are relevant to the broader computational geoscience community. In particular, we draw on our experience in the Switch-On (EU funded) virtual water science laboratory (http://www.switch-on-vwsl.eu/participate/), which is an open platform for collaboration in hydrological experiments (e.g. [2]). While we use computational hydrology as

  18. [An experimental model of transgastric ooforectomy using a porcine model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomulescu, V; Gheorghe, C; Piţigoi, D; Kosa, A; Ciocarlan, M; Pietrăreanu, D; Turcu, F; Copăescu, C; Droc, G; Popescu, H; Grigorescu, B; Stănciulea, O; Herlea, V; Popescu, I

    2010-01-01

    Transabdominal routes for surgery entail general anaesthesia with its inherent risks and complications (prolonged hospital stay, abdominal incisions that may be difficult in obese patients). Minimally invasive procedures require shorter hospitalization, have shorter recovery periods, less postoperative discomfort, and lower morbidity and complications. The purpose of this study was to use a porcine model to determine the feasibility and the safety of organ resection (oophorectomy and tubectomy). 10 Big White pigs between 25-30 kg underwent transgastric ooforectomy. The first 5 cases were performed in a hybrid procedure (laparoscopic-NOTES) in order to have a better control and supervise the maneuvers done by the mobile endoscope and to guide in the abdominal cavity. Adnexectomy was possible in all ten experiments. Full operative time (from starting endoscopy to complete gastrectomy closing) was 180 min to 270 min. The gastric defect closing was the most difficult manoever lasting from 10 min with OTSC clips to 100 using endoloops and clips. The animals have tolerated well the experiments and there have been no remarkable incidents during our 10 experments. In only one case a bleeding from gastotomy required electric coagulation. Transgastric ooforectomy in an experimental model is a procedure that requires advanced laparoscopical and endoscopical skills. Our early results are promissing. Its application in humans needs further confirmation of the method.

  19. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  20. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  1. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-01-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and dive...

  2. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  3. Experimental modeling of a deoiling hydrocyclone system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bram, Mads Valentin; Hassan, Abdiladif Ahmed; Hansen, Dennis Severin

    2015-01-01

    responses of PDR via dedicated experiments a set of first-order-plus-dead-time (FOPDT) models that represent the main characteristics of the concerned hydrocyclone system is developed and analyzed for the entire operating range. The obtained multiple FOPDT models can illustrate the system performance...... acrylic hydrocyclone was tested as proof of concept for obtaining its steady-state and dynamic performances. The steady-state performance is able to provide the proportional correlation between PDR and flow split which is essential for optimizing steady-state separation efficiency. By analyzing step...

  4. Experimental and modelling studies of infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes a study of infiltration in the unsaturated soil with the objective of estimating the recharge to a phreatic aquifer. The study area is at the border of the city of Milan (Northern Italy), which draws water for both domestic and industrial purposes from ground water resources located beneath the urban area. The rate of water pumping from the aquifer system has been varying during the XX century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. This caused variations with time of the depth of the water table below the ground surface and in turn some emergencies: the two most prominent episodes correspond to the middle '70s, when the water table in the city centre was about 30 m below the undisturbed natural conditions, and to the last decade, when the water table has raised at a rate of approximately 1 m/year and caused infiltrations in deep constructions (garages and building foundations, the underground railways, etc.). We have developed four ground water flow models at different scales, which share some characteristics: they are based on quasi-3D approximation (horizontal flow in the aquifers and vertical flow in the aquitards), conservative finite-differences schemes for regular grid with square cells in the horizontal plane and are implemented with proprietary computer codes. Among the problems that were studied for the development of these models, I recall some numerical problems, related to the behaviour of the phreatic aquifer under conditions of strong exploitation. Model calibration and validation for ModMil has been performed with a two-stage process, i.e., using some of the available data for model calibration and the remaining data for model validation. The application of geophysical exploration techniques, in particular seismic and geo-electrical prospecting, has been very useful to complete the data and information on the hydro-geological structure obtained from stratigraphic logs

  5. Lung cancer risk models from experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present analyses of data based on methods that adequately account for time-related factors and competiting risks, and that yield results that are expressed in a form comparable to results obtained from recent analyses of epidemiological studies of humans exposed to radon and radon daughters. These epidemiological analyses have modeled the hazard, or age-specific death rates, as a function of factors such as dose and dose rate, time from exposure, and time from cessation of exposure. The starting point for many of the analyses of human data has been the constant relative risk modeling which the age-specific death rates are assumed to be a function of cumulative dose, and the risks due to exposure are assumed to be proportional to the age-specific baseline death rates. However, departures from this initial model, such as dependence of risks on age at risk and/or time from exposure, have been investigated. These analyses have frequently been based on a non-parametric model that requires minimal assumptions regarding the baseline risks and their dependence on age

  6. Isothermal coarse mixing: experimental and CFD modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, M.A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Hall, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    A plane, two-dimensional flow apparatus has been built which uses a jet of solid 6mm diameter balls to model a jet of molten drops falling into a tank of water to study premixing prior to a vapour explosion. Preliminary experiments with unheated stainless steel balls are here compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations by the code CHYMES. (6 figures) (Author)

  7. New experimental model of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegin, G B; Kalinina, A R; Ponomarenko, N A; Ovsepyan, A A; Smirnov, S V; Tsybenko, V V; Homeriki, S G

    2001-06-01

    NSO/1 (P3x63Ay 8Ut) and SP20 myeloma cells were inoculated to BALB/c OlaHsd mice. NSO/1 cells allowed adequate stage-by-stage monitoring of tumor development. The adequacy of this model was confirmed in experiments with conventional cytostatics: prospidium and cytarabine caused necrosis of tumor cells and reduced animal mortality.

  8. Experimental and modelling studies of the shape memory properties of amorphous polymer network composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, J S; Diani, J; Gilormini, P

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have become an important way to leverage improvements in the development of applications featuring shape memory polymers (SMPs). In this study, an amorphous SMP matrix has been filled with different types of reinforcements. An experimental set of results is presented and then compared to three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations. Thermomechanical shape memory cycles were performed in uniaxial tension. The fillers effect was studied in stress-free and constrained-strain recoveries. Experimental observations indicate complete shape recovery and put in evidence the increased sensitivity of constrained length stress recoveries to the heating ramp on the tested composites. The simulations reproduced a simplified periodic reinforced composite and used a model for the matrix material that has been previously tested on regular SMPs. The latter combines viscoelasticity at finite strain and time-temperature superposition. The simulations easily allow representation of the recovery properties of a reinforced SMP. (paper)

  9. Experimental Validation of a Permeability Model for Enrichment Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellano, Pablo; Brasnarof, Daniel; Florido Pablo

    2003-01-01

    An experimental loop with a real scale diffuser, in a single enrichment-stage configuration, was operated with air at different process conditions, in order to characterize the membrane permeability.Using these experimental data, an analytical geometric-and-morphologic-based model was validated.It is conclude that a new set of independent measurements, i.e. enrichment, is necessary in order to fully characterize diffusers, because of its internal parameters are not univocally determinated with permeability experimental data only

  10. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, Ω b , remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that Ω b ∼ 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming Ω total = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since Ω visible b . Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M x approx-gt 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z 0 coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for ν-masses may imply that the ν τ is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs

  12. Experimental modeling methods in Industrial Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Trebuňa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic approaches to a management system of the present industrial practice, forcing businesses to address management issues in-house continuous improvement of production and non-production processes. Experience has repeatedly demonstrated the need for a system approach not only in analysis but also in the planning and actual implementation of these processes. Therefore, the contribution is focused on the description of the modeling in industrial practice by a system approach, in order to avoid erroneous application of the decision to the implementation phase, and thus prevent any longer applying methods "attempt - fallacy".

  13. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  14. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  15. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanallah, K; Castellanos, A [Departamento de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Pontiga, F; Fernandez-Rueda, A [Departamento de FIsica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-03-21

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  16. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanallah, K; Castellanos, A; Pontiga, F; Fernandez-Rueda, A

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanallah, K; Pontiga, F; Fernández-Rueda, A; Castellanos, A

    2009-03-01

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Experimental photoallergic contact dermatitis: a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, H.C. Jr.; Kaidbey, K.

    1982-01-01

    We have induced photoallergic contact dermatitis in mice to 3,3',4',5 tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCSA), chlorpromazine and 6-methylcoumarin. These compounds are known to produce photoallergic contact dermatitis in humans. The photoallergic contact dermatitis reaction in the mouse is immunologically specific viz. mice photosensitized to TCSA react, by photochallenge, to that compound and not to chlorpromazine, and conversely. The reaction requires UVA at both sensitization and challenge. It appears to be T-cell mediated in that it can be passively transferred to syngeneic mice by lymph node cells from actively sensitized mice, the histology of the reactions resembles that of classic allergic contact dermatitis in mice, challenge reactions are seen at 24 but not at 4 hr, and photoallergic contact dermatitis can be induced in B-cell deficient mice. The availability of a mouse model for the study of photo-ACD will facilitate the identification of pertinent control mechanisms and may aid in the management of the disease. It is likely that a bioassay for photoallergens of humans can be based on this mouse model

  19. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  20. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, E.; Lormand, G.; Gobin, P.F.; Fougeres, R.

    1993-01-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.)

  1. Experimental Tests of the Algebraic Cluster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Moshe

    2018-02-01

    The Algebraic Cluster Model (ACM) of Bijker and Iachello that was proposed already in 2000 has been recently applied to 12C and 16O with much success. We review the current status in 12C with the outstanding observation of the ground state rotational band composed of the spin-parity states of: 0+, 2+, 3-, 4± and 5-. The observation of the 4± parity doublet is a characteristic of (tri-atomic) molecular configuration where the three alpha- particles are arranged in an equilateral triangular configuration of a symmetric spinning top. We discuss future measurement with electron scattering, 12C(e,e’) to test the predicted B(Eλ) of the ACM.

  2. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  3. Reproducing early Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure by modeling the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Wolfgang; Fu, Yunjiao; Ilger, Jan-Michael

    2012-10-01

    The well defined composition of the Comanche rock's carbonate (Magnesite0.62Siderite0.25Calcite0.11Rhodochrosite0.02) and its host rock's composition, dominated by Mg-rich olivine, enable us to reproduce the atmospheric CO2partial pressure that may have triggered the formation of these carbonates. Hydrogeochemical one-dimensional transport modeling reveals that similar aqueous rock alteration conditions (including CO2partial pressure) may have led to the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops (Gusev Crater) and also in the ultramafic rocks exposed in the Nili Fossae region. Hydrogeochemical conditions enabling the formation of Mg-rich solid solution carbonate result from equilibrium species distributions involving (1) ultramafic rocks (ca. 32 wt% olivine; Fo0.72Fa0.28), (2) pure water, and (3) CO2partial pressures of ca. 0.5 to 2.0 bar at water-to-rock ratios of ca. 500 molH2O mol-1rock and ca. 5°C (278 K). Our modeled carbonate composition (Magnesite0.64Siderite0.28Calcite0.08) matches the measured composition of carbonates preserved in the Comanche rocks. Considerably different carbonate compositions are achieved at (1) higher temperature (85°C), (2) water-to-rock ratios considerably higher and lower than 500 mol mol-1 and (3) CO2partial pressures differing from 1.0 bar in the model set up. The Comanche rocks, hosting the carbonate, may have been subjected to long-lasting (>104 to 105 years) aqueous alteration processes triggered by atmospheric CO2partial pressures of ca. 1.0 bar at low temperature. Their outcrop may represent a fragment of the upper layers of an altered olivine-rich rock column, which is characterized by newly formed Mg-Fe-Ca solid solution carbonate, and phyllosilicate-rich alteration assemblages within deeper (unexposed) units.

  4. Refined Dummy Atom Model of Mg(2+) by Simple Parameter Screening Strategy with Revised Experimental Solvation Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Feng, Wei; Tan, Tianwei

    2015-12-28

    Metal ions play an important role in the catalysis of metalloenzymes. To investigate metalloenzymes via molecular modeling, a set of accurate force field parameters for metal ions is highly imperative. To extend its application range and improve the performance, the dummy atom model of metal ions was refined through a simple parameter screening strategy using the Mg(2+) ion as an example. Using the AMBER ff03 force field with the TIP3P model, the refined model accurately reproduced the experimental geometric and thermodynamic properties of Mg(2+). Compared with point charge models and previous dummy atom models, the refined dummy atom model yields an enhanced performance for producing reliable ATP/GTP-Mg(2+)-protein conformations in three metalloenzyme systems with single or double metal centers. Similar to other unbounded models, the refined model failed to reproduce the Mg-Mg distance and favored a monodentate binding of carboxylate groups, and these drawbacks needed to be considered with care. The outperformance of the refined model is mainly attributed to the use of a revised (more accurate) experimental solvation free energy and a suitable free energy correction protocol. This work provides a parameter screening strategy that can be readily applied to refine the dummy atom models for metal ions.

  5. Multiphysics modelling and experimental validation of high concentration photovoltaic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theristis, Marios; Fernández, Eduardo F.; Sumner, Mike; O'Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A multiphysics modelling approach for concentrating photovoltaics was developed. • An experimental campaign was conducted to validate the models. • The experimental results were in good agreement with the models. • The multiphysics modelling allows the concentrator’s optimisation. - Abstract: High concentration photovoltaics, equipped with high efficiency multijunction solar cells, have great potential in achieving cost-effective and clean electricity generation at utility scale. Such systems are more complex compared to conventional photovoltaics because of the multiphysics effect that is present. Modelling the power output of such systems is therefore crucial for their further market penetration. Following this line, a multiphysics modelling procedure for high concentration photovoltaics is presented in this work. It combines an open source spectral model, a single diode electrical model and a three-dimensional finite element thermal model. In order to validate the models and the multiphysics modelling procedure against actual data, an outdoor experimental campaign was conducted in Albuquerque, New Mexico using a high concentration photovoltaic monomodule that is thoroughly described in terms of its geometry and materials. The experimental results were in good agreement (within 2.7%) with the predicted maximum power point. This multiphysics approach is relatively more complex when compared to empirical models, but besides the overall performance prediction it can also provide better understanding of the physics involved in the conversion of solar irradiance into electricity. It can therefore be used for the design and optimisation of high concentration photovoltaic modules.

  6. Experimental tests of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1998-01-01

    The title implies an impossibly broad field, as the Standard Model includes the fermion matter states, as well as the forces and fields of SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). For practical purposes, I will confine myself to electroweak unification, as discussed in the lectures of M. Herrero. Quarks and mixing were discussed in the lectures of R. Aleksan, and leptons and mixing were discussed in the lectures of K. Nakamura. I will essentially assume universality, that is flavor independence, rather than discussing tests of it. I will not pursue tests of QED beyond noting the consistency and precision of measurements of α EM in various processes including the Lamb shift, the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron, and the quantum Hall effect. The fantastic precision and agreement of these predictions and measurements is something that convinces people that there may be something to this science enterprise. Also impressive is the success of the ''Universal Fermi Interaction'' description of beta decay processes, or in more modern parlance, weak charged current interactions. With one coupling constant G F , most precisely determined in muon decay, a huge number of nuclear instabilities are described. The slightly slow rate for neutron beta decay was one of the initial pieces of evidence for Cabbibo mixing, now generalized so that all charged current decays of any flavor are covered

  7. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

  8. Proposal and experimental validation of analytical models for seismic and vibration isolation devices in nuclear and non-nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serino, G.; Bonacina, G.; Bettinali, F.

    1993-01-01

    Two analytical-experimental models of HDLRBs having different levels of approximations are presented. Comparison with available experimental data shows that a non-linear hysteretic model, defined by three rubber parameters only, allows a very good complete simulation of the dynamic behavior of the isolation devices. A simpler equivalent linear viscous model reproduces less exactly the experimental behavior, but permits a good prediction of peak response values in the earthquake analysis of an isolated structure, if bearing stiffness and damping parameters are properly selected. The models have been used in preliminary design and subsequent check of the isolation system of two different types of Gas-Insulated Electric Substations (GIS), in view of possible future installation of isolated GISes in areas of high seismic risk. (author)

  9. Mutant mice: experimental organisms as materialised models in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Lara; Keuck, Lara K

    2013-09-01

    Animal models have received particular attention as key examples of material models. In this paper, we argue that the specificities of establishing animal models-acknowledging their status as living beings and as epistemological tools-necessitate a more complex account of animal models as materialised models. This becomes particularly evident in animal-based models of diseases that only occur in humans: in these cases, the representational relation between animal model and human patient needs to be generated and validated. The first part of this paper presents an account of how disease-specific animal models are established by drawing on the example of transgenic mice models for Alzheimer's disease. We will introduce an account of validation that involves a three-fold process including (1) from human being to experimental organism; (2) from experimental organism to animal model; and (3) from animal model to human patient. This process draws upon clinical relevance as much as scientific practices and results in disease-specific, yet incomplete, animal models. The second part of this paper argues that the incompleteness of models can be described in terms of multi-level abstractions. We qualify this notion by pointing to different experimental techniques and targets of modelling, which give rise to a plurality of models for a specific disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphofunctional analysis of experimental model of esophageal achalasia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirov, A G; Raginov, I S; Burmistrov, M V; Chelyshev, Y A; Khasanov, R Sh; Moroshek, A A; Grigoriev, P N; Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedyarov, M A

    2010-10-01

    We carried out a detailed analysis of rat model of esophageal achalasia previously developed by us. Manifest morphological and functional disorders were observed in experimental achalasia: hyperplasia of the squamous epithelium, reduced number of nerve fibers, excessive growth of fibrous connective tissue in the esophageal wall, high contractile activity of the lower esophageal sphincter, and reduced motility of the longitudinal muscle layer. Changes in rat esophagus observed in experimental achalasia largely correlate with those in esophageal achalasia in humans. Hence, our experimental model can be used for the development of new methods of disease treatment.

  11. The experimental and shell model approach to 100Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grawe, H.; Maier, K.H.; Fitzgerald, J.B.; Heese, J.; Spohr, K.; Schubart, R.; Gorska, M.; Rejmund, M.

    1995-01-01

    The present status of experimental approach to 100 Sn and its shell model structure is given. New developments in experimental techniques, such as low background isomer spectroscopy and charged particle detection in 4π are surveyed. Based on recent experimental data shell model calculations are used to predict the structure of the single- and two-nucleon neighbours of 100 Sn. The results are compared to the systematic of Coulomb energies and spin-orbit splitting and discussed with respect to future experiments. (author). 51 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  12. Experimental study and modelling of the high temperature mechanical behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, A.

    2012-01-01

    The strength of metals, and therefore their maximum operating temperature, can be improved by oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS). Numerous research studies are carried out at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in order to develop a cladding tube material for Gen IV nuclear power reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels appear to be the most promising candidates for such application, which demands a minimum operating temperature of 650 C. The present dissertation intends to improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of ODS steels, in terms of creep lifetime and mechanical anisotropy. The methodology of this work includes mechanical tests between room temperature and 900 C as well as macroscopic and polycrystalline modelling. These tests are carried out on a Fe-14Cr1W0,26Ti + 0,3 Y 2 O 3 ODS ferritic steel processed at CEA by mechanical alloying and hot extrusion. The as-received material is a bar with a circular section. The mechanical tests reveal the high mechanical strength of this steel at high temperature. A strong influence of the strain rate on the ductility and the mechanical strength is also observed. A macroscopic mechanical model has been developed on the basis of some experimental statements such as the high kinematic contribution to the flow stress. This model has a strong ability to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of the studied material. Two different polycrystalline models have also been developed in order to reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of the material. They are based on its specific grain morphology and crystallographic texture. The discrepancy between the predictions of both models and experimental results reveal the necessity to formulate alternate assumptions on the deformation mechanisms of ODS ferritic steels. (author) [fr

  13. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r...... ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 'pain' model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect......Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  14. Review for 'Nattoh' model and experimental findings during cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki

    1993-01-01

    A review is described for the Nattoh model that provides the framework of the mechanisms of cold fusion. The model classifies the reactions into two categories: fundamental and associated reactions. The former involves the new 'hydrogen-catalyzed' fusion reaction and the chain-reactions of hydrogens. And extremely exciting physics are involved in the latter. Furthermore experimental findings are described. (author)

  15. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Michaël [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vinken, Mathieu, E-mail: mvinken@vub.ac.be [Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. - Highlights: • The murine APAP model is very close to what is observed in patients. • The Gal/ET model is useful to study TNFα-mediated apoptotic signaling mechanisms. • Fas receptor activation is an effective model of apoptosis and secondary necrosis. • The ConA model is a relevant model of auto-immune hepatitis and viral hepatitis. • Multiple time point evaluation needed in experimental models of acute liver injury.

  16. Modelling of PEM Fuel Cell Performance: Steady-State and Dynamic Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoia San Martín

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the modelling of a commercial 1.2 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, based on interrelated electrical and thermal models. The electrical model proposed is based on the integration of the thermodynamic and electrochemical phenomena taking place in the FC whilst the thermal model is established from the FC thermal energy balance. The combination of both models makes it possible to predict the FC voltage, based on the current demanded and the ambient temperature. Furthermore, an experimental characterization is conducted and the parameters for the models associated with the FC electrical and thermal performance are obtained. The models are implemented in Matlab Simulink and validated in a number of operating environments, for steady-state and dynamic modes alike. In turn, the FC models are validated in an actual microgrid operating environment, through the series connection of 4 PEMFC. The simulations of the models precisely and accurately reproduce the FC electrical and thermal performance.

  17. Numerical Validation of a Vortex Model against ExperimentalData on a Straight-Bladed Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Dyachuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic blade motion during operation of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs imposes challenges on the simulations models of the aerodynamics of VAWTs. A two-dimensional vortex model is validated against the new experimental data on a 12-kW straight-bladed VAWT, which is operated at an open site. The results on the normal force on one blade are analyzed. The model is assessed against the measured data in the wide range of tip speed ratios: from 1.8 to 4.6. The predicted results within one revolution have a similar shape and magnitude as the measured data, though the model does not reproduce every detail of the experimental data. The present model can be used when dimensioning the turbine for maximum loads.

  18. Using an experimental model for the study of therapeutic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniella Soares; Marta, Ilda Estéfani Ribeiro; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; de Quadros, Andreza Urba; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos

    2013-02-01

    to verify whether the Paw Edema Model can be used in investigations about the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation by measuring the variables pain, edema and neutrophil migration. this is a pilot and experimental study, involving ten male mice of the same genetic strain and divided into experimental and control group, submitted to the chemical induction of local inflammation in the right back paw. The experimental group received a daily administration of Therapeutic Touch for 15 minutes during three days. the data showed statistically significant differences in the nociceptive threshold and in the paw circumference of the animals from the experimental group on the second day of the experiment. the experiment model involving animals can contribute to study the effects of Therapeutic Touch on inflammation, and adjustments are suggested in the treatment duration, number of sessions and experiment duration.

  19. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  20. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  1. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  2. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  3. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR

  4. Undefined cellulase formulations hinder scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Michael E; Abbas, Charles A; Baker, John O; Bayer, Edward A; Bomble, Yannick J; Brunecky, Roman; Chen, Xiaowen; Felby, Claus; Jeoh, Tina; Kumar, Rajeev; McCleary, Barry V; Pletschke, Brett I; Tucker, Melvin P; Wyman, Charles E; Decker, Stephen R

    2017-01-01

    In the shadow of a burgeoning biomass-to-fuels industry, biological conversion of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars in a cost-effective manner is key to the success of second-generation and advanced biofuel production. For the effective comparison of one cellulase preparation to another, cellulase assays are typically carried out with one or more engineered cellulase formulations or natural exoproteomes of known performance serving as positive controls. When these formulations have unknown composition, as is the case with several widely used commercial products, it becomes impossible to compare or reproduce work done today to work done in the future, where, for example, such preparations may not be available. Therefore, being a critical tenet of science publishing, experimental reproducibility is endangered by the continued use of these undisclosed products. We propose the introduction of standard procedures and materials to produce specific and reproducible cellulase formulations. These formulations are to serve as yardsticks to measure improvements and performance of new cellulase formulations.

  5. Reproducibility in a multiprocessor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofatto, Ralph A; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W; Eisley, Noel A; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M; Haring, Rudolf A; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V; Liebsch, Thomas A; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D; Senger, Robert M; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-11-26

    Fixing a problem is usually greatly aided if the problem is reproducible. To ensure reproducibility of a multiprocessor system, the following aspects are proposed; a deterministic system start state, a single system clock, phase alignment of clocks in the system, system-wide synchronization events, reproducible execution of system components, deterministic chip interfaces, zero-impact communication with the system, precise stop of the system and a scan of the system state.

  6. Modelling the dynamics of an experimental host-pathogen microcosm within a hierarchical Bayesian framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lunn

    Full Text Available The advantages of Bayesian statistical approaches, such as flexibility and the ability to acknowledge uncertainty in all parameters, have made them the prevailing method for analysing the spread of infectious diseases in human or animal populations. We introduce a Bayesian approach to experimental host-pathogen systems that shares these attractive features. Since uncertainty in all parameters is acknowledged, existing information can be accounted for through prior distributions, rather than through fixing some parameter values. The non-linear dynamics, multi-factorial design, multiple measurements of responses over time and sampling error that are typical features of experimental host-pathogen systems can also be naturally incorporated. We analyse the dynamics of the free-living protozoan Paramecium caudatum and its specialist bacterial parasite Holospora undulata. Our analysis provides strong evidence for a saturable infection function, and we were able to reproduce the two waves of infection apparent in the data by separating the initial inoculum from the parasites released after the first cycle of infection. In addition, the parameter estimates from the hierarchical model can be combined to infer variations in the parasite's basic reproductive ratio across experimental groups, enabling us to make predictions about the effect of resources and host genotype on the ability of the parasite to spread. Even though the high level of variability between replicates limited the resolution of the results, this Bayesian framework has strong potential to be used more widely in experimental ecology.

  7. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, J. J.; Wang, I.-N.

    2010-01-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimen...

  8. Confrontation of thermoluminescence models in lithium fluoride with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewiadomski, T.

    1976-12-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of lithium fluoride depend on numerous factors and are much more complex than those of other phosphors. The so far developed fragmentary models are meant to explain the relationships between crystal defect structure and the processes involved in TL. An attempt has been made to compare these models with the veryfied experimental data and to point out the observations which are inconsistant with the models. (author)

  9. Experimental Validation of a Dynamic Model for Lightweight Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gasparetto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the main topics in robotics research is dynamic performance improvement by means of a lightening of the overall system structure. The effective motion and control of these lightweight robotic systems occurs with the use of suitable motion planning and control process. In order to do so, model-based approaches can be adopted by exploiting accurate dynamic models that take into account the inertial and elastic terms that are usually neglected in a heavy rigid link configuration. In this paper, an effective method for modelling spatial lightweight industrial robots based on an Equivalent Rigid Link System approach is considered from an experimental validation perspective. A dynamic simulator implementing the formulation is used and an experimental test-bench is set-up. Experimental tests are carried out with a benchmark L-shape mechanism.

  10. A sEMG model with experimentally based simulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Katherine A; Shimada, Hiroshima; Kumar, Dinesh K; Arjunan, Sridhar P

    2010-01-01

    A differential, time-invariant, surface electromyogram (sEMG) model has been implemented. While it is based on existing EMG models, the novelty of this implementation is that it assigns more accurate distributions of variables to create realistic motor unit (MU) characteristics. Variables such as muscle fibre conduction velocity, jitter (the change in the interpulse interval between subsequent action potential firings) and motor unit size have been considered to follow normal distributions about an experimentally obtained mean. In addition, motor unit firing frequencies have been considered to have non-linear and type based distributions that are in accordance with experimental results. Motor unit recruitment thresholds have been considered to be related to the MU type. The model has been used to simulate single channel differential sEMG signals from voluntary, isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle. The model has been experimentally verified by conducting experiments on three subjects. Comparison between simulated signals and experimental recordings shows that the Root Mean Square (RMS) increases linearly with force in both cases. The simulated signals also show similar values and rates of change of RMS to the experimental signals.

  11. Reproducible research: a minority opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Reproducible research, a growing movement within many scientific fields, including machine learning, would require the code, used to generate the experimental results, be published along with any paper. Probably the most compelling argument for this is that it is simply following good scientific practice, established over the years by the greats of science. The implication is that failure to follow such a practice is unscientific, not a label any machine learning researchers would like to carry. It is further claimed that misconduct is causing a growing crisis of confidence in science. That, without this practice being enforced, science would inevitably fall into disrepute. This viewpoint is becoming ubiquitous but here I offer a differing opinion. I argue that far from being central to science, what is being promulgated is a narrow interpretation of how science works. I contend that the consequences are somewhat overstated. I would also contend that the effort necessary to meet the movement's aims, and the general attitude it engenders would not serve well any of the research disciplines, including our own.

  12. Experimental modeling of injectivity loss; Modelagem experimental da perda de injetividade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonato, Adriano Jose do Amaral Mello; Silva, Pedro Glauto de Farias e; Gomes, Vanessa Limeira Azevedo; Santos, Adriano dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Produced water reinjection, suspended particles are retained in the porous media causing formation damage and injectivity decline. In general the retention of the particles occurs near the side of injection, this fact occurs in most cases, due to the size exclusion. The modeling of filtration and the consequent formation damage is essential to the project management of water injection in oil reservoirs. Thus, mathematical models are studied to better predict the distribution of particles throughout the porous media and determine the parameters of adjustment to injectivity decline. Among these models, there is the classic model which consists in determining these parameters (coefficient of filtration and formation damage). The methodology used in modeling is given from the equations the mass conservation, kinetic particle retention, the modified Darcy equation and the function formation damage. This study aimed to improve experimental modeling, including development of software for acquisition and processing of experimental data, considering the variable number of pressure measurements along the sample. The software was developed using the Labview 2011 platform and allows the determination of relevant parameters to predict injectivity loss in water injection wells. Furthermore, based on the traditional model of filtration in porous media (including depth filtration and formation of the external plaster), the software was applied to predict injectivity loss in addition to the properties of the grout. Finally, the classical models for transporting suspensions and damage to the formation were observed. (author)

  13. Investigation of approximate models of experimental temperature characteristics of machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, I. V.; Polyakov, A. N.

    2018-05-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of various approaches to the approximation of experimental data and the creation of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machines with the aim of finding ways to reduce the time of their field tests and reducing the temperature error of the treatments. The main methods of research which the authors used in this work are: the full-scale thermal testing of machines; realization of various approaches at approximation of experimental temperature characteristics of machine tools by polynomial models; analysis and evaluation of modelling results (model quality) of the temperature characteristics of machines and their derivatives up to the third order in time. As a result of the performed researches, rational methods, type, parameters and complexity of simulation mathematical models of thermal processes in machine tools are proposed.

  14. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  15. Optimality models in the age of experimental evolution and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J J; Wang, I-N

    2010-09-01

    Optimality models have been used to predict evolution of many properties of organisms. They typically neglect genetic details, whether by necessity or design. This omission is a common source of criticism, and although this limitation of optimality is widely acknowledged, it has mostly been defended rather than evaluated for its impact. Experimental adaptation of model organisms provides a new arena for testing optimality models and for simultaneously integrating genetics. First, an experimental context with a well-researched organism allows dissection of the evolutionary process to identify causes of model failure--whether the model is wrong about genetics or selection. Second, optimality models provide a meaningful context for the process and mechanics of evolution, and thus may be used to elicit realistic genetic bases of adaptation--an especially useful augmentation to well-researched genetic systems. A few studies of microbes have begun to pioneer this new direction. Incompatibility between the assumed and actual genetics has been demonstrated to be the cause of model failure in some cases. More interestingly, evolution at the phenotypic level has sometimes matched prediction even though the adaptive mutations defy mechanisms established by decades of classic genetic studies. Integration of experimental evolutionary tests with genetics heralds a new wave for optimality models and their extensions that does not merely emphasize the forces driving evolution.

  16. Team Modelling: Review of Experimental Scenarios and Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    les auteurs ont réuni et examiné des scénarios ayant servi dans le cadre d’études antérieures sur les équipes, ils ont développé d’importants...cognition, perception, sensation, motor action and knowledge, that embody a principled underlying theory or framework for human information...Processing) integrates Qinetiq’s (POP) model with DRDC’s IP/PCT (Perceptual Control Theory ) models. In particular, the POP/IP model includes the

  17. Instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Watanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animal models offer possibilities of physiology knowledge, pathogenesis of disease and action of drugs that are directly related to quality nursing care. This integrative review describes the current state of the instrumental and ethical aspects of experimental research with animal models, including the main recommendations of ethics committees that focus on animal welfare and raises questions about the impact of their findings in nursing care. Data show that, in Brazil, the progress in ethics for the use of animals for scientific purposes was consolidated with Law No. 11.794/2008 establishing ethical procedures, attending health, genetic and experimental parameters. The application of ethics in handling of animals for scientific and educational purposes and obtaining consistent and quality data brings unquestionable contributions to the nurse, as they offer subsidies to relate pathophysiological mechanisms and the clinical aspect on the patient.

  18. Constitutive Model Calibration via Autonomous Multiaxial Experimentation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-17

    ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current...Abstract Modern plasticity models contain numerous parameters that can be difficult and time consuming to fit using current methods. Additional...complexity, is a difficult and time consuming process that has historically be a separate process from the experimental testing. As such, additional

  19. Experimental Analysis and Model Validation of an Opaque Ventilated Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, F. Peci; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Heiselberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Natural ventilation is a convenient way of reducing energy consumption in buildings. In this study an experimental module of an opaque ventilated façade (OVF) was built and tested for assessing its potential of supplying free ventilation and air preheating for the building. A numerical model was ...

  20. Capillary microreactors for lactic acid extraction: experimental and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important biobased chemical and, among others, is used for the production of poly-lactic acid. Down-stream processing using state of the art technology is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. In this presentation, experimental and modeling studies

  1. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  2. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  3. Novel sensors for food inspection modelling, fabrication and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdul Rahman, Mohd Syaifudin; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses presents recent developments of novel planar interdigital sensors for food inspection. It covers the fundamentals of sensors, their design, modelling and simulations, fabrications, characterizations, experimental investigations and analyses. This book will be useful for the engineers and researchers especially higher undergraduate, postgraduate students as well as practitioners working on the development of Electromagnetic Sensors.

  4. Production process reproducibility and product quality consistency of transient gene expression in HEK293 cells with anti-PD1 antibody as the model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Han, Lei; Zong, Huifang; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of reproducibility and consistency of process and product quality is one of the most crucial issues in using transient gene expression (TGE) technology for biopharmaceutical development. In this study, we challenged the production consistency of TGE by expressing nine batches of recombinant IgG antibody in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to evaluate reproducibility including viable cell density, viability, apoptotic status, and antibody yield in cell culture supernatant. Product quality including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability was assessed as well. In addition, major glycan forms of antibody from different batches of production were compared to demonstrate glycosylation consistency. Glycan compositions of the antibody harvested at different time periods were also measured to illustrate N-glycan distribution over the culture time. From the results, it has been demonstrated that different TGE batches are reproducible from lot to lot in overall cell growth, product yield, and product qualities including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability. Furthermore, major N-glycan compositions are consistent among different TGE batches and conserved during cell culture time.

  5. Robust Bayesian Experimental Design for Conceptual Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H. V.; Tsai, F. T. C.

    2015-12-01

    A robust Bayesian optimal experimental design under uncertainty is presented to provide firm information for model discrimination, given the least number of pumping wells and observation wells. Firm information is the maximum information of a system can be guaranteed from an experimental design. The design is based on the Box-Hill expected entropy decrease (EED) before and after the experiment design and the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) framework. A max-min programming is introduced to choose the robust design that maximizes the minimal Box-Hill EED subject to that the highest expected posterior model probability satisfies a desired probability threshold. The EED is calculated by the Gauss-Hermite quadrature. The BMA method is used to predict future observations and to quantify future observation uncertainty arising from conceptual and parametric uncertainties in calculating EED. Monte Carlo approach is adopted to quantify the uncertainty in the posterior model probabilities. The optimal experimental design is tested by a synthetic 5-layer anisotropic confined aquifer. Nine conceptual groundwater models are constructed due to uncertain geological architecture and boundary condition. High-performance computing is used to enumerate all possible design solutions in order to identify the most plausible groundwater model. Results highlight the impacts of scedasticity in future observation data as well as uncertainty sources on potential pumping and observation locations.

  6. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peter; Dada, Joseph O; Jameson, Daniel; Spasic, Irena; Swainston, Neil; Carroll, Kathleen; Dunn, Warwick; Khan, Farid; Malys, Naglis; Messiha, Hanan L; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Weichart, Dieter; Winder, Catherine; Wishart, Jill; Broomhead, David S; Goble, Carole A; Gaskell, Simon J; Kell, Douglas B; Westerhoff, Hans V; Mendes, Pedro; Paton, Norman W

    2010-11-29

    The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  7. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  8. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  9. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-07

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility.

  10. Tracer transfer in consolidated porous medium and fractured porous medium: experimentations and modelling; Transferts d'un traceur en milieu poreux consolide et en milieu poreux fissure: experimentations et modelisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Costa, C

    2007-07-15

    We try to identify and model physical and chemical mechanisms governing the water flow and the solute transport in fractured consolidated porous medium. An original experimental device was built. The 'cube' consists of an idealized fractured medium reproduced by piling up consolidated porous cubes of 5 cm edge. Meanwhile, columns of the homogeneous consolidated porous medium are studied. The same anionic tracing technique is used in both cases. Using a system analysis approach, we inject concentration pulses in the device to obtain breakthrough curves. After identifying the mass balance and the residence time, we fit the CD and the MIM models to the experimental data. The MIM model is able to reproduce experimental curves of the homogeneous consolidated porous medium better than the CD model. The mobile water fraction is in accordance with the porous medium geometry. The study of the flow rate influence highlights an interference dispersion regime. It was not possible to highlight the observation length influence in this case. On the contrary, we highlight the effect of the observation scale on the fractured and porous medium, comparing the results obtained on a small 'cube' and a big 'cube'. The CD model is not satisfactory in this case. Even if the MIM model can fit the experimental breakthrough curves, it was not possible to obtain unique parameters for the set of experiments. (author)

  11. Modeling RERTR experimental fuel plates using the PLATE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Brazener, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modeling results using the PLATE dispersion fuel performance code are presented for the U-Mo/Al experimental fuel plates from the RERTR-1, -2, -3 and -5 irradiation tests. Agreement of the calculations with experimental data obtained in post-irradiation examinations of these fuels, where available, is shown to be good. Use of the code to perform a series of parametric evaluations highlights the sensitivity of U-Mo dispersion fuel performance to fabrication variables, especially fuel particle shape and size distributions. (author)

  12. Physics of human cooperation: experimental evidence and theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Angel

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, many physicists have used evolutionary game theory combined with a complex systems perspective in an attempt to understand social phenomena and challenges. Prominent among such phenomena is the issue of the emergence and sustainability of cooperation in a networked world of selfish or self-focused individuals. The vast majority of research done by physicists on these questions is theoretical, and is almost always posed in terms of agent-based models. Unfortunately, more often than not such models ignore a number of facts that are well established experimentally, and are thus rendered irrelevant to actual social applications. I here summarize some of the facts that any realistic model should incorporate and take into account, discuss important aspects underlying the relation between theory and experiments, and discuss future directions for research based on the available experimental knowledge.

  13. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  14. Development of experimental alloxan model of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Semenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main causes that lead to the disability of diabetic patients is diabetic retinopathy (DR. The relevance of the problem of DR necessitates the development of optimal experimental models on experimental animals to find effective ways of correcting this pathology. The purpose of our work was to develop an experimental alloxan model of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM for the study of DR, which would not result in the lethal outcome of experimental animals under the action of alloxan; histological examination of changes in the tissues of the eyeball in the reproduction of the DM model for the selection of new effective methods for the metabolic treatment of DR in the early stages. Materials and methods. The experiment was carried out on white outbred Wistar rats weighing 180–200 g. The first group consisted of 20 animals that were not subjected to any influence, served as a control; second group — 30 animals, in which DM was modeled by administration of alloxan and fructose. Results. When modeling DR, vessel changes in the form of wall fibrosis, edema of the endothelium and vasospasm were found. There was also a decrease in the amount of pigment granules, dystrophic changes in the cells of the ganglionic layer and a layer of retinal rods and cones, which coincides with the descriptions of damage to the coats of the eyeball in patients with DM. Conclusions. In our studies, we have calculated the optimal dose of alloxan administration, which does not lead to the death of rats (the lethality of rats was absent and is an effective model not only of DM in general, but also of DR.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  16. Experimental validation of a Bayesian model of visual acuity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dalimier, Eugénie

    2009-01-01

    Based on standard procedures used in optometry clinics, we compare measurements of visual acuity for 10 subjects (11 eyes tested) in the presence of natural ocular aberrations and different degrees of induced defocus, with the predictions given by a Bayesian model customized with aberrometric data of the eye. The absolute predictions of the model, without any adjustment, show good agreement with the experimental data, in terms of correlation and absolute error. The efficiency of the model is discussed in comparison with image quality metrics and other customized visual process models. An analysis of the importance and customization of each stage of the model is also given; it stresses the potential high predictive power from precise modeling of ocular and neural transfer functions.

  17. Uterus transplantation: Experimental animal models and recent experience in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadık Şahin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Uterus transplantation has been considered as an alternative management modality in the last few years for adoption or gestational surrogacy for women with absence of uterus due to congenital or acquired reasons. Surrogacy is legal in only a few countries because of ethical, social and legal issues. Up to date, a total of 11 uterus transplantation cases have been reported in which uteri were harvested from ten live donors and one donor with brain death. After unsuccessful attempt of first uterus transplantation, many studies have been conducted in animals and these experimental models enabled our knowledge to increase on this topic. First experimental studies were performed in rodents; later uterus transplantation was accomplished in sheep, pigs and rabbits. Recently, researches in non-human primates have led the experience regarding transplantation technique and success to improve. In this review, we reviewed the experimental animal researches in the area of uterus transplantation and recent experience in humans.

  18. The rabbit as an experimental model in laryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro, Christiano de Giacomo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the research in laryngology we normally use animal models. The animal experimentation may also contribute largely for this evolution, mainly for the easy access compared to human larynxes and for they are more easily controlled. Objective: The objective of this work is to analyze the laryngofissure with vocal cords graft as an experimental surgical technique in male adult rabbits. Method: We studied 46 New Zealand albino rabbits submitted to microsurgery in both vocal cords with autologous unilateral or bilateral graft of fat or fascia. Results: There were 4 losses of 3 animals until the first week of the postoperative period and another after 19 days after surgery. In the subsequent animals there were no infection, hematoma or sutures dehiscence. Conclusion: The study enables the conclusion that the experimental laryngofissure in rabbits is a safe method that may be used for laryngological studies.

  19. Genetic algorithms and experimental discrimination of SUSY models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allanach, B.C.; Quevedo, F.; Grellscheid, D.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce genetic algorithms as a means to estimate the accuracy required to discriminate among different models using experimental observables. We exemplify the technique in the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. If supersymmetric particles are discovered, models of supersymmetry breaking will be fit to the observed spectrum and it is beneficial to ask beforehand: what accuracy is required to always allow the discrimination of two particular models and which are the most important masses to observe? Each model predicts a bounded patch in the space of observables once unknown parameters are scanned over. The questions can be answered by minimising a 'distance' measure between the two hypersurfaces. We construct a distance measure that scales like a constant fraction of an observable, since that is how the experimental errors are expected to scale. Genetic algorithms, including concepts such as natural selection, fitness and mutations, provide a solution to the minimisation problem. We illustrate the efficiency of the method by comparing three different classes of string models for which the above questions could not be answered with previous techniques. The required accuracy is in the range accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) when combined with a future linear collider (LC) facility. The technique presented here can be applied to more general classes of models or observables. (author)

  20. [Experimental model of tooth decay as an educational tool for school-age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo Silva, Thiago Fernando; Feitosa, José Leonilson; Medeiros Dantas, Rodrigo Maristony; Dantas de Medeiros, Fabianna da Conceição; Cavalcanti Lima, Isabela Pinheiro; Guerra Seabra, Eduardo José

    2016-04-01

    Objective This work consisted of the construction of an educational in vitro model of dental caries that started with an adaptation of Miller's classic experiment. Methods In a sterilized and sealed glass jar, a sample paste of human saliva was collected and a substrate of manufactured sugar (sucrose) was added. In addition, a human tooth with healthy dental crown extracted in dental treatment but otherwise healthy was added. Research phase I had the negative control sample test (tooth + saliva without added) and the others were opened after 1, 2, 3 and 4 months of incubation. This phase was essential for the next experimental time development. In phase II, two saliva donors with poor levels of oral health habits were recruited. The incubation time (defined by phase I) was 2 and 3 months for each donor. Results This research data gives the possibility of building educational materials about the etiology of tooth decay and its clinical evolution. It also makes possible the production of an explanatory sheet about how to reproduce this experimental model to be used by school children in secondary education. Conclusions Doing this kind of work together at school can help reduce inequities in oral health, especially since there is an approximation toward the discourses, facilitating the process of information dissemination.

  1. Morphological and functional determinants of fluoxetine (Prozac)-induced pulmonary disease in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelozzi, Marco A; Leick-Maldonado, Edna A; Parra, Edwin R; Martins, Mílton A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C; Capelozzi, Vera L

    2007-05-14

    Fluoxetine treatment effects were determined by evaluating respiratory mechanics (elastance/resistance) and exhaled nitric oxide, as well as mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell recruitment into the lungs, in an experimental guinea pig model. Guinea pigs were divided into four groups: Fl (fluoxetine only, n=7); Fl+Sw (fluoxetine and forced swimming, n=7); Ns+Sw (normal saline and forced swimming, n=8); and Ns (normal saline only, n=8). Treated animals received oral fluoxetine (10 mg/(kg day)) for 30 consecutive days. On day 31, all animals were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated so that respiratory system elastance and resistance, as well exhaled nitric oxide, could be determined. The lungs were then excised en bloc for histological and immunohistochemical evaluation. Forced swimming induced bronchodilation in untreated animals and bronchoconstriction in fluoxetine-treated animals. Fluoxetine treatment was also associated with mononuclear infiltration (predominantly into alveolar walls) and neutrophil recruitment. In addition, levels of exhaled nitric oxide, an inflammatory marker, were higher in fluoxetine-treated animals. Swimming-induced stress also amplified mononuclear cell recruitment to the lungs. These results show that, in this experimental model, fluoxetine treatment reproduces the pathology of chronic interstitial pneumonia in humans.

  2. Transvaginal ultrasound ovarian diathermy: sheep as an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel Anita M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some techniques of transvaginal ovarian drilling have been previously described. Nevertheless a monopolar transvaginal ovarian cauterization, that use the expertise and safety of transvaginal puncture for oocyte captation seems to be an easier and feasible approach. The aim of this study was to develop a minimally invasive ovarian cauterization technique under transvaginal ultrasound control, and to evaluate the safety of the transvaginal ovarian monopolar cauterization, female sheep at reproductive age were used as an experimental model. Findings An experimental study was performed in a university research center. Seventeen female sheep (15 Corriedale e 2 Suffolk in reproductive age were submitted to transvaginal ovarian cauterization with a monopolar Valleylab Force 2 electrocautery. Macroscopic and microscopic lesions were assessed. Ovarian size were 1.31 cm2 ± 0,43 (Corriedale and 3.41 cm2 ± 0,64 (Suffolk. From 30 ovaries from Corriedale sheep punctured, only 3 were cauterized, presenting macroscopic and typical microscopic lesion. In the Suffolk sheep group, only one ovary was cauterized. No lesion could be found in the needle path. Conclusions This is the first experimental animal model described for ovarian cauterization needle guided by transvaginal ultrasound. The sheep does not seem to be the ideal animal model to study this technique. Another animal model, whose ovaries are better identified by transvaginal ultrasound should be sought for this technique, theoretically less invasive, before it could be offered safely to women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  3. Experimental designs for autoregressive models applied to industrial maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amo-Salas, M.; López-Fidalgo, J.; Pedregal, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Some time series applications require data which are either expensive or technically difficult to obtain. In such cases scheduling the points in time at which the information should be collected is of paramount importance in order to optimize the resources available. In this paper time series models are studied from a new perspective, consisting in the use of Optimal Experimental Design setup to obtain the best times to take measurements, with the principal aim of saving costs or discarding useless information. The model and the covariance function are expressed in an explicit form to apply the usual techniques of Optimal Experimental Design. Optimal designs for various approaches are computed and their efficiencies are compared. The methods working in an application of industrial maintenance of a critical piece of equipment at a petrochemical plant are shown. This simple model allows explicit calculations in order to show openly the procedure to find the correlation structure, needed for computing the optimal experimental design. In this sense the techniques used in this paper to compute optimal designs may be transferred to other situations following the ideas of the paper, but taking into account the increasing difficulty of the procedure for more complex models. - Highlights: • Optimal experimental design theory is applied to AR models to reduce costs. • The first observation has an important impact on any optimal design. • Either the lack of precision or small starting observations claim for large times. • Reasonable optimal times were obtained relaxing slightly the efficiency. • Optimal designs were computed in a predictive maintenance context

  4. Effects of Erdosteine on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Banu; Karapolat, Sami; Gurleyik, Emin; Yasar, Mehmet

    2017-10-01

    To create acute pancreatitis condition experimentally in rats using cerulein, and to reveal histopathological effects in pancreatic tissue with erdosteine. An experimental study. Department of General Surgery, Duzce University, Turkey, from June to October 2014. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. No procedures were applied to Group 1. The rats in Group 2 and Group 3 were injected cerulein, to establish an experimental pancreatitis model and the blood amylase and lipase values were examined. The rats in Group 3 were given 10 mg/kg erdosteine. This treatment was continued for another 2 days and the rats were sacrificed. The pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically for edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization. The lipase and amylase values and the histopathological examination of pancreatic tissues evidenced that the experimental acute pancreatitis model was established and edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization were observed in the pancreatic tissues. The statistical results suggest that erdosteine can decrease the edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and vacuolization scores in the tissues. The severity of acute pancreatitis, induced by cerulein in rats, is reduced with the use of erdosteine.

  5. Experimental animal data and modeling of late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This section is restricted to radiation-induced life shortening and cancer and mainly to studies with external radiation. The emphasis will be on the experimental data that are available and the experimental systems that could provide the type of data with which to either formulate or test models. Genetic effects which are of concern are not discussed in this section. Experimental animal radiation studies fall into those that establish general principles and those that demonstrate mechanisms. General principles include the influence of dose, radiation quality, dose rate, fractionation, protraction and such biological factors as age and gender. The influence of these factors are considered as general principles because they are independent, at least qualitatively, of the species studied. For example, if an increase in the LET of the radiation causes an increased effectiveness in cancer induction in a mouse a comparable increase in effectiveness can be expected in humans. Thus, models, whether empirical or mechanistic, formulated from experimental animal data should be generally applicable

  6. Validation of the newborn larynx modeling with aerodynamical experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollas, R; Giordano, J; Garrel, R; Medale, M; Caminat, P; Giovanni, A; Ouaknine, M; Triglia, J M

    2009-06-01

    Many authors have studied adult's larynx modelization, but the mechanisms of newborn's voice production have very rarely been investigated. After validating a numerical model with acoustic data, studies were performed on larynges of human fetuses in order to validate this model with aerodynamical experiments. Anatomical measurements were performed and a simplified numerical model was built using Fluent((R)) with the vocal folds in phonatory position. The results obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and high-frame rate particle image velocimetry (HFR-PIV), on an experimental bench with excised human fetus larynges. It appears that computing with first cry physiological parameters leads to a model which is close to those obtained in experiments with real organs.

  7. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  8. Peltier cells as temperature control elements: Experimental characterization and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, Gianluca A.; La Carrubba, Vincenzo; Brucato, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    The use of Peltier cells to realize compact and precise temperature controlled devices is under continuous extension in recent years. In order to support the design of temperature control systems, a simplified modeling of heat transfer dynamics for thermoelectric devices is presented. By following a macroscopic approach, the heat flux removed at the cold side of Peltier cell can be expressed as Q . c =γ(T c −T c eq ), where γ is a coefficient dependent on the electric current, T c and T c eq are the actual and steady state cold side temperature, respectively. On the other hand, a microscopic modeling approach was pursued via finite element analysis software packages. To validate the models, an experimental apparatus was designed and build-up, consisting in a sample vial with the surfaces in direct contact with Peltier cells. Both modeling approaches led to reliable prediction of transient and steady state sample temperature. -- Highlights: • Simplified modeling of heat transfer dynamics in Peltier cells. • Coupled macroscopic and microscopic approach. • Experimental apparatus: temperature control of a sample vial. • Both modeling approaches predict accurately the transient and steady state sample temperature

  9. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  10. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Chantoin, P.; Kolev, I.

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: 1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: 2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; 3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; 4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items

  11. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Chantoin, P; Kolev, I [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: (1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: (2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; (3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; (4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items.

  12. An Interactive Multimedia Based Instruction in Experimental Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten; Nielsen, J.N.; Østergaard, J.

    1997-01-01

    A CD-ROM based interactive multimedia instruction in experimental modelling for Danish Engineering School teachers is described. The content is based on a new sensitivity approach for direct estimation of physical parameters in linear and nonlinear dynamic systems. The presentation is inspired of...... of Solomans=s inventory of learning styles. To enhance active learning and motivation by real life problems, the simulation tool Matlab is integrated in the authoring program Medi8or....

  13. Numerical modeling of nitrogen oxide emission and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecowka Lech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of nitrogen reduction in combustion process with application of primary method are presented in paper. The reduction of NOx emission, by the recirculation of combustion gasses, staging of fuel and of air was investigated, and than the reduction of NOx emission by simultaneous usage of the mentioned above primary method with pulsatory disturbances.The investigations contain numerical modeling of NOx reduction and experimental verification of obtained numerical calculation results.

  14. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of glycerol pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Frassoldati, A.; Bartocci, P.; Cinti, G.; Quagliarini, F.; Bidini, G.; Ranzi, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Glycerol pyrolysis can produce about 44–48%v hydrogen at 750–800 °C. • A simplified 452 reactions kinetic model of glycerol pyrolysis has been developed. • The model has good agreement with experimental data. • Non condensable gas yields can reach 70%. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, is an important potential source of hydrogen. The obtained high calorific value gas can be used either as a fuel for combined heat and power (CHP) generation or as a transportation fuel (for example hydrogen to be used in fuel cells). Optimal process conditions can improve glycerol pyrolysis by increasing gas yield and hydrogen concentration. A detailed kinetic mechanism of glycerol pyrolysis, which involves 137 species and more than 4500 reactions, was drastically simplified and reduced to a new skeletal kinetic scheme of 44 species, involved in 452 reactions. An experimental campaign with a batch pyrolysis reactor was properly designed to further validate the original and the skeletal mechanisms. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental data strongly suggest the presence of a catalytic process promoting steam reforming of methane. High pyrolysis temperatures (750–800 °C) improve process performances and non-condensable gas yields of 70%w can be achieved. Hydrogen mole fraction in pyrolysis gas is about 44–48%v. The skeletal mechanism developed can be easily used in Computational Fluid Dynamic software, reducing the simulation time.

  15. Experimental Testing and Model Validation of a Decoupled-Phase On-Load Tap Changer Transformer in an Active Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchino, Antonio; Hu, Junjie; Coppo, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of single-phase small generation units and electric vehicles connected to distribution grids, system operators are facing challenges related to local unbalanced voltage rise or drop issues, which may lead to a violation of the allowed voltage band. To address...... this problem, distribution transformers with on-load tapping capability are under development. This paper presents model and experimental validation of a 35 kVA three-phase power distribution transformer with independent on-load tap changer control capability on each phase. With the purpose of investigating...... to reproduce the main feature of an unbalanced grid. The experimental activities are recreated in by carrying out dynamics simulation studies, aiming at validating the implemented models of both the transformer as well as the other grid components. Phase-neutral voltages’ deviations are limited, proving...

  16. Survey of experimental tests of the IBA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of experimental tests of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) Model is presented covering even and odd mass nuclei in the region from A approx. 80 to A approx. 230. Both positive and negative parity states with both high and low spin are discussed. Topics included concern energy levels, electromagnetic transition rates, two nucleon transfer and inelastic scattering. Special attention is given to nuclear symmetries and transitional regions. Comparison with other models is made where appropriate. The distinction between IBA-1 and IBA-2 is discussed including their respective areas of applicability

  17. Dynamic Modeling of Wind Turbine Gearboxes and Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune

    Grinding corrections are often applied to gear teeth, which will alter the load distribution across the tooth. Grinding corrections will also change the load sharing between neighboring tooth pairs, and in turn the gear mesh stiffness. In this thesis, a model for calculating the gear mesh stiffness...... is presented. The model takes into account the effects of load and applied grinding corrections. The results are verified by comparing to simulated and experimental results reported in the existing literature. Using gear data loosely based on a 1 MW wind turbine gearbox, the gear mesh stiffness is expanded...

  18. Finite element modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lughmani, W A; Bouazza-Marouf, K; Ashcroft, I

    2013-01-01

    Bone drilling is an essential part of many orthopaedic surgery procedures, including those for internal fixation and for attaching prosthetics. Estimation and control of bone drilling forces are critical to prevent drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a 3D finite element (FE) model for prediction of thrust forces experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the dynamic characteristics involved in the process along with the accurate geometrical considerations. The average critical thrust forces and torques obtained using FE analysis, for set of machining parameters are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results

  19. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J.; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J.; Reinero, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher’s degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed “hidden moderators”) between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility. PMID:27217556

  20. Experimental/analytical approaches to modeling, calibrating and optimizing shaking table dynamics for structural dynamic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetti, Tomaso

    This thesis presents an Experimental/Analytical approach to modeling and calibrating shaking tables for structural dynamic applications. This approach was successfully applied to the shaking table recently built in the structural laboratory of the Civil Engineering Department at Rice University. This shaking table is capable of reproducing model earthquake ground motions with a peak acceleration of 6 g's, a peak velocity of 40 inches per second, and a peak displacement of 3 inches, for a maximum payload of 1500 pounds. It has a frequency bandwidth of approximately 70 Hz and is designed to test structural specimens up to 1/5 scale. The rail/table system is mounted on a reaction mass of about 70,000 pounds consisting of three 12 ft x 12 ft x 1 ft reinforced concrete slabs, post-tensioned together and connected to the strong laboratory floor. The slip table is driven by a hydraulic actuator governed by a 407 MTS controller which employs a proportional-integral-derivative-feedforward-differential pressure algorithm to control the actuator displacement. Feedback signals are provided by two LVDT's (monitoring the slip table relative displacement and the servovalve main stage spool position) and by one differential pressure transducer (monitoring the actuator force). The dynamic actuator-foundation-specimen system is modeled and analyzed by combining linear control theory and linear structural dynamics. The analytical model developed accounts for the effects of actuator oil compressibility, oil leakage in the actuator, time delay in the response of the servovalve spool to a given electrical signal, foundation flexibility, and dynamic characteristics of multi-degree-of-freedom specimens. In order to study the actual dynamic behavior of the shaking table, the transfer function between target and actual table accelerations were identified using experimental results and spectral estimation techniques. The power spectral density of the system input and the cross power spectral

  1. Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber: Mathematical Modelling with Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Mikułowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of mechanical energy absorbers utilized in engineering structures are hydraulic dampers, since they are simple and highly efficient and have favourable volume to load capacity ratio. However, there exist fields of applications where a threat of toxic contamination with the hydraulic fluid contents must be avoided, for example, food or pharmacy industries. A solution here can be a Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber (PAA, which is characterized by a high dissipation efficiency and an inactive medium. In order to properly analyse the characteristics of a PAA, an adequate mathematical model is required. This paper proposes a concept for mathematical modelling of a PAA with experimental verification. The PAA is considered as a piston-cylinder device with a controllable valve incorporated inside the piston. The objective of this paper is to describe a thermodynamic model of a double chamber cylinder with gas migration between the inner volumes of the device. The specific situation considered here is that the process cannot be defined as polytropic, characterized by constant in time thermodynamic coefficients. Instead, the coefficients of the proposed model are updated during the analysis. The results of the experimental research reveal that the proposed mathematical model is able to accurately reflect the physical behaviour of the fabricated demonstrator of the shock absorber.

  2. Ultraviolet radiation-induced carcinogenesis: mechanisms and experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Balupillai, Agilan; Govindhasamy, Kanimozhi; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Muthusamy, Ganesan; Robert, Beualah Mary; Nagarajan, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a very prominent environmental toxic agent. UVR has been implicated in the initiation and progression of photocarcinogenesis. UVR exposure elicits numerous cellular and molecular events which include the generation of inflammatory mediators, DNA damage, epigenetic modifications, and oxidative damages mediated activation of signaling pathways. UVR-initiated signal transduction pathways are believed to be responsible for tumor promotion effects. UVR-induced carcinogenic mechanism has been well studied using various animal and cellular models. Human skin-derived dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and melanocytes served as excellent cellular model systems for the understanding of UVR-mediated carcinogenic events. Apart from this, scientists developed reconstituted three-dimensional normal human skin equivalent models for the study of UVR signaling pathways. Moreover, hairless mice such as SKH-1, devoid of Hr gene, served as a valuable model for experimental carcinogenesis. Scientists have also used transgenic mice and dorsal portion shaved Swiss albino mice for UVR carcinogenesis studies. In this review, we have discussed the current progress in the study on ultraviolet B (UVB)-mediated carcinogenesis and outlined appropriate experimental models for both ultraviolet A- and UVB-mediated carcinogenesis. (author)

  3. ITK: Enabling Reproducible Research and Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Michael McCormick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility verification is essential to the practice of the scientific method. Researchers report their findings, which are strengthened as other independent groups in the scientific community share similar outcomes. In the many scientific fields where software has become a fundamental tool for capturing and analyzing data, this requirement of reproducibility implies that reliable and comprehensive software platforms and tools should be made available to the scientific community. The tools will empower them and the public to verify, through practice, the reproducibility of observations that are reported in the scientific literature.Medical image analysis is one of the fields in which the use of computational resources, both software and hardware, are an essential platform for performing experimental work. In this arena, the introduction of the Insight Toolkit (ITK in 1999 has transformed the field and facilitates its progress by accelerating the rate at which algorithmic implementations are developed, tested, disseminated and improved. By building on the efficiency and quality of open source methodologies, ITK has provided the medical image community with an effective platform on which to build a daily workflow that incorporates the true scientific practices of reproducibility verification.This article describes the multiple tools, methodologies, and practices that the ITK community has adopted, refined, and followed during the past decade, in order to become one of the research communities with the most modern reproducibility verification infrastructure. For example, 207 contributors have created over 2400 unit tests that provide over 84% code line test coverage. The Insight Journal, an open publication journal associated with the toolkit, has seen over 360,000 publication downloads. The median normalized closeness centrality, a measure of knowledge flow, resulting from the distributed peer code review system was high, 0.46.

  4. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-11-01

    A chemical model of glass corrosion will be used to predict the rates of release of radionuclides from borosilicate glass waste forms in high-level waste repositories. The model will be used both to calculate the rate of degradation of the glass, and also to predict the effects of chemical interactions between the glass and repository materials such as spent fuel, canister and container materials, backfill, cements, grouts, and others. Coupling between the degradation processes affecting all these materials is expected. Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  5. Evaluation of single- and dual-porosity models for reproducing the release of external and internal tracers from heterogeneous waste-rock piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, S; Pedretti, D; Mayer, K U; Smith, L; Beckie, R D

    2018-05-30

    Accurate predictions of solute release from waste-rock piles (WRPs) are paramount for decision making in mining-related environmental processes. Tracers provide information that can be used to estimate effective transport parameters and understand mechanisms controlling the hydraulic and geochemical behavior of WRPs. It is shown that internal tracers (i.e. initially present) together with external (i.e. applied) tracers provide complementary and quantitative information to identify transport mechanisms. The analysis focuses on two experimental WRPs, Piles 4 and Pile 5 at the Antamina Mine site (Peru), where both an internal chloride tracer and externally applied bromide tracer were monitored in discharge over three years. The results suggest that external tracers provide insight into transport associated with relatively fast flow regions that are activated during higher-rate recharge events. In contrast, internal tracers provide insight into mechanisms controlling solutes release from lower-permeability zones within the piles. Rate-limited diffusive processes, which can be mimicked by nonlocal mass-transfer models, affect both internal and external tracers. The sensitivity of the mass-transfer parameters to heterogeneity is higher for external tracers than for internal tracers, as indicated by the different mean residence times characterizing the flow paths associated with each tracer. The joint use of internal and external tracers provides a more comprehensive understanding of the transport mechanisms in WRPs. In particular, the tracer tests support the notion that a multi-porosity conceptualization of WRPs is more adequate for capturing key mechanisms than a dual-porosity conceptualization. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Additive Manufacturing: Reproducibility of Metallic Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the properties of five different metals/alloys (Al-12Si, Cu-10Sn and 316L—face centered cubic structure, CoCrMo and commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti—hexagonal closed packed structure fabricated by selective laser melting. The room temperature tensile properties of Al-12Si samples show good consistency in results within the experimental errors. Similar reproducible results were observed for sliding wear and corrosion experiments. The other metal/alloy systems also show repeatable tensile properties, with the tensile curves overlapping until the yield point. The curves may then follow the same path or show a marginal deviation (~10 MPa until they reach the ultimate tensile strength and a negligible difference in ductility levels (of ~0.3% is observed between the samples. The results show that selective laser melting is a reliable fabrication method to produce metallic materials with consistent and reproducible properties.

  7. Experimental evaluation of analytical penumbra calculation model for wobbled beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Yusa, Ken; Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2004-01-01

    The goal of radiotherapy is not only to apply a high radiation dose to a tumor, but also to avoid side effects in the surrounding healthy tissue. Therefore, it is important for carbon-ion treatment planning to calculate accurately the effects of the lateral penumbra. In this article, for wobbled beams under various irradiation conditions, we focus on the lateral penumbras at several aperture positions of one side leaf of the multileaf collimator. The penumbras predicted by an analytical penumbra calculation model were compared with the measured results. The results calculated by the model for various conditions agreed well with the experimental ones. In conclusion, we found that the analytical penumbra calculation model could predict accurately the measured results for wobbled beams and it was useful for carbon-ion treatment planning to apply the model

  8. Reproducibility of somatosensory spatial perceptual maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbergen, Peter; Buitenweg, Jan R; Trojan, Jörg; Veltink, Peter H

    2013-02-01

    Various studies have shown subjects to mislocalize cutaneous stimuli in an idiosyncratic manner. Spatial properties of individual localization behavior can be represented in the form of perceptual maps. Individual differences in these maps may reflect properties of internal body representations, and perceptual maps may therefore be a useful method for studying these representations. For this to be the case, individual perceptual maps need to be reproducible, which has not yet been demonstrated. We assessed the reproducibility of localizations measured twice on subsequent days. Ten subjects participated in the experiments. Non-painful electrocutaneous stimuli were applied at seven sites on the lower arm. Subjects localized the stimuli on a photograph of their own arm, which was presented on a tablet screen overlaying the real arm. Reproducibility was assessed by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the mean localizations of each electrode site and the slope and offset of regression models of the localizations, which represent scaling and displacement of perceptual maps relative to the stimulated sites. The ICCs of the mean localizations ranged from 0.68 to 0.93; the ICCs of the regression parameters were 0.88 for the intercept and 0.92 for the slope. These results indicate a high degree of reproducibility. We conclude that localization patterns of non-painful electrocutaneous stimuli on the arm are reproducible on subsequent days. Reproducibility is a necessary property of perceptual maps for these to reflect properties of a subject's internal body representations. Perceptual maps are therefore a promising method for studying body representations.

  9. A new dietary model to study colorectal carcinogenesis: experimental design, food preparation, and experimental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, P; Liberman, V; Lubin, F; Angel, S; Owen, R; Trostler, N; Shkolnik, T; Kritchevsky, D

    1996-01-01

    Experimental dietary studies of human colorectal carcinogenesis are usually based on the AIN-76A diet, which is dissimilar to human food in source, preparation, and content. The aims of this study were to examine the feasibility of preparing and feeding rats the diet of a specific human population at risk for colorectal neoplasia and to determine whether changes in the colonic morphology and metabolic contents would differ from those resulting from a standard rat diet. The mean daily food intake composition of a previously evaluated adenoma patient case-control study was used for the "human adenoma" (HA) experimental diet. Foods were prepared as for usual human consumption and processed by dehydration to the physical characteristics of an animal diet. Sixty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized and fed ad libitum the HA or the AIN-76A diet. Every eight weeks, eight rats from each group were sacrificed, and the colons and contents were examined. Analysis of the prepared food showed no significant deleterious changes; food intake and weight gain were similar in both groups. Compared with the controls, the colonic contents of rats fed the HA diet contained significantly less calcium, concentrations of neutral sterols, total lipids, and cholic and deoxycholic acids were increased, and there were no colonic histological changes other than significant epithelial hyperproliferation. This initial study demonstrated that the HA diet can be successfully processed for feeding to experimental animals and is acceptable and adequate for growth but induces significant metabolic and hyperproliferative changes in the rat colon. This dietary model may be useful for studies of human food, narrowing the gap between animal experimentation and human nutritional research.

  10. Experimental model of cultured keratinocytes Modelo experimental de cultura de queratinócitos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Gragnani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioengineering research is essential in the development of ideal combination of biomaterials and cultured cells to produce the permanent wound coverage. The experimental model of cultured keratinocytes presents all steps of the culture, since the isolation of the keratinocytes, preparation of the human acellular dermis, preparation of the composite skin graft and their elevation to the air-liquid interface. The research in cultured keratinocytes model advances in two main ways: 1. optimization of the methods in vitro to the skin cells culture and proliferation and 2. developing biomaterials that present similar skin properties.A pesquisa em bioengenharia é primordial no desenvolvimento da combinação ideal de biomateriais e células cultivadas para produzir a cobertura definitiva das lesões. O modelo experimental da cultura de queratinócitos apresenta toda as etapas do cultivo, desde o isolamento dos queratinócitos, preparação da derme acelular humana, do enxerto composto e da sua elevação à interface ar-líquido. A pesquisa em modelo de cultura de queratinócitos desenvolve-se em duas vias principais: 1. otimização dos métodos in vitro para cultivo e proliferação de células da pele e 2. desenvolvimento de biomateriais que mimetizem as propriedades da pele.

  11. Numerical modelling of negative discharges in air with experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, T N; Golosnoy, I O; Lewin, P L; Georghiou, G E

    2011-01-01

    Axisymmetric finite element models have been developed for the simulation of negative discharges in air without and with the presence of dielectrics. The models are based on the hydrodynamic drift-diffusion approximation. A set of continuity equations accounting for the movement, generation and loss of charge carriers (electrons, positive and negative ions) is coupled with Poisson's equation to take into account the effect of space and surface charges on the electric field. The model of a negative corona discharge (without dielectric barriers) in a needle-plane geometry is analysed first. The results obtained show good agreement with experimental observations for various Trichel pulse characteristics. With dielectric barriers introduced into the discharge system, the surface discharge exhibits some similarities and differences to the corona case. The model studies the dynamics of volume charge generation, electric field variations and charge accumulation over the dielectric surface. The predicted surface charge density is consistent with experimental results obtained from the Pockels experiment in terms of distribution form and magnitude.

  12. Modeling and experimental tests of a copper thermosyphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Dias dos Santos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical energy, solar energy, and/or direct combustion of a fuel are the most common thermal sources for home water heating. In recent years, the use of solar energy has become popular because it is a renewable and economic energy source. Among the solar collectors, those assisted by thermosyphons are more efficient; therefore, they can enhance the heat transfer to water. A thermosyphon is basically a sealed tube filled with a working fluid and, normally, it has three regions: the evaporator, the adiabatic section and the condenser. The great advantage of this device is that the thermal resistance to heat transfer between its regions is very small, and as a result, there is a small temperature difference. This article aims to model a thermosyphon by using correlations based on its operation limits. This modeling will be used as a design tool for compact solar collectors assisted by thermosyphons. Based on the results obtained with the mathematical modeling, one copper thermosyphon, with deionized water as the working fluid, was developed and experimentally tested. The tests were carried out for a heat load varying from 30 to 60W in a vertical position. The theoretical and experimental results were compared to verify the mathematical model.

  13. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Curran, Henry J.; Polo-Có rdoba, Á ngel David; Pitz, William J.; Dagaut, P.; Togbé , Casimir; Sarathy, Mani; Mehl, Marco; Agudelo, John Ramiro; Bustamante, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  14. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  15. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, F.

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  16. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2017-12-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  17. Experimental study of mass boiling in a porous medium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript presents a pore-scale experimental study of convective boiling heat transfer in a two-dimensional porous medium. The purpose is to deepen the understanding of thermohydraulics of porous media saturated with multiple fluid phases, in order to enhance management of severe accidents in nuclear reactors. Indeed, following a long-lasting failure in the cooling system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) or a boiling water reactor (BWR) and despite the lowering of the control rods that stops the fission reaction, residual power due to radioactive decay keeps heating up the core. This induces water evaporation, which leads to the drying and degradation of the fuel rods. The resulting hot debris bed, comparable to a porous heat-generating medium, can be cooled down by reflooding, provided a water source is available. This process involves intense boiling mechanisms that must be modelled properly. The experimental study of boiling in porous media presented in this thesis focuses on the influence of different pore-scale boiling regimes on local heat transfer. The experimental setup is a model porous medium made of a bundle of heating cylinders randomly placed between two ceramic plates, one of which is transparent. Each cylinder is a resistance temperature detector (RTD) used to give temperature measurements as well as heat generation. Thermal measurements and high-speed image acquisition allow the effective heat exchanges to be characterized according to the observed local boiling regimes. This provides precious indications precious indications for the type of correlations used in the non-equilibrium macroscopic model used to model reflooding process. (author) [fr

  18. Experimental validation of solid rocket motor damping models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, Cristina; Fransen, Sebastiaan; Mastroddi, Franco; Coppotelli, Giuliano; Trequattrini, Francesco; De Vivo, Alessio

    2018-06-01

    In design and certification of spacecraft, payload/launcher coupled load analyses are performed to simulate the satellite dynamic environment. To obtain accurate predictions, the system damping properties must be properly taken into account in the finite element model used for coupled load analysis. This is typically done using a structural damping characterization in the frequency domain, which is not applicable in the time domain. Therefore, the structural damping matrix of the system must be converted into an equivalent viscous damping matrix when a transient coupled load analysis is performed. This paper focuses on the validation of equivalent viscous damping methods for dynamically condensed finite element models via correlation with experimental data for a realistic structure representative of a slender launch vehicle with solid rocket motors. A second scope of the paper is to investigate how to conveniently choose a single combination of Young's modulus and structural damping coefficient—complex Young's modulus—to approximate the viscoelastic behavior of a solid propellant material in the frequency band of interest for coupled load analysis. A scaled-down test article inspired to the Z9-ignition Vega launcher configuration is designed, manufactured, and experimentally tested to obtain data for validation of the equivalent viscous damping methods. The Z9-like component of the test article is filled with a viscoelastic material representative of the Z9 solid propellant that is also preliminarily tested to investigate the dependency of the complex Young's modulus on the excitation frequency and provide data for the test article finite element model. Experimental results from seismic and shock tests performed on the test configuration are correlated with numerical results from frequency and time domain analyses carried out on its dynamically condensed finite element model to assess the applicability of different equivalent viscous damping methods to describe

  19. Experimental Study and Modelling of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) and Polycarbonate Compressive Behavior from Low to High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Qoubaa, Z.; Colard, L.; Matadi Boumbimba, R.; Rusinek, A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns an experimental investigation of Polycarbonate and Poly (methyl methacrylate) compressive behavior from low to high strain rates. Experiments were conducted from 0.001/s to ≈ 5000/s for PC and from 0.001/s to ≈ 2000/s for PMMA. The true strain-stress behavior is established and analyzed at various stain rates. Both PC and PMMA mechanical behavior appears as known, to be strain rate and temperature dependent. The DSGZ model is selected for modelling the strain-stress curves while the yield stress is reproduced using the cooperative model and a modified Eyring equation based on Eyring first process theory. All the three models predictions are in agreement with experiments performed on PC and PMMA.

  20. Experimental investigations and modelling of sodium-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheiss, G.F.; Deeg, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    The use of sodium as a coolant in liquid metal fast breeder reactors, fusion reactors, and solar plants requires special consideration of its chemical reactivity and related safety problems in the case of sodium leckage. On contact between hot sodium and concrete an interaction takes place resulting in energy release and hydrogen generation, which may contribute to containment loading by pressurization in a hypothetical accident situation. For this reason, sodium-concrete interactions were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiments revealed important effects of quartzitic material within the concrete and of the sodium temperature on the interaction mechanisms, the energy release and the consequent hydrogen production. The numerical model shows good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.) [de

  1. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of thermoplastic composites induction welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Barbara; Nele, Luigi; Galise, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a numerical simulation and experimental test of the induction welding of continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFRTPCs) was provided. The thermoplastic Polyamide 66 (PA66) with carbon fiber fabric was used. Using a dedicated software (JMag Designer), the influence of the fundamental process parameters such as temperature, current and holding time was investigated. In order to validate the results of the simulations, and therefore the numerical model used, experimental tests were carried out, and the temperature values measured during the tests were compared with the aid of an optical pyrometer, with those provided by the numerical simulation. The mechanical properties of the welded joints were evaluated by single lap shear tests.

  2. Fatigue crack propagation: Probabilistic models and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucia, A.C.; Jovanovic, A.

    1987-01-01

    The central aim of the LWR Primary Circuit Component Life Prediction Project, going on at JRC-Ispra, is to develop and check a 'procedure' (encompassing monitoring and inspection, data collection and analysis, prediction) allowing the quantitatives estimation of the accumulation of structural damage and of the residual lifetime. The ongoing activity matches theoretical development and experimentation, the latter being at present essentially based on a test-rig for room-temperature fatigue cycling of 1:5 scaled models of pressure vessels. During Phase I of fatigue testing of vessel R2, different pieces of information coming from material characterization, non-destructive inspection, continuous monitoring, stress analysis, have been merged and used to infere the future behaviour of the structure. The prediction of residual lifetime (cycles to failure), based on the outcomes of the ultrasonic continuous monitoring and made by means of the COVASTOL code, was in quite good agreement with experimental evidence. (orig./HP)

  3. Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-600 GeV. The solid curve reflects the observed experimental limits for the production of a Higgs of each possible mass value (horizontal axis). The region for which the solid curve dips below the horizontal line at the value of 1 is excluded with a 95% confidence level (CL). The dashed curve shows the expected limit in the absence of the Higgs boson, based on simulations. The green and yellow bands correspond (respectively) to 68%, and 95% confidence level regions from the expected limits. Higgs masses in the narrow range 123-130 GeV are the only masses not excluded at 95% CL

  4. Experimental model of the burn wound topical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Čabaravdić

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Clinical research of drugs is a researching step subsequent to the preclinical studies in experimental animals. The aim of our research was to evaluate animal model of wound healing process after the burninducement and effects of the ointment containing natural plants on the process of burn healing.MATERIAL AND METHODS:Burn wounds were experimentally induced in two species of experimental animals which were treated with topically applied herbal preparation with concomitant monitoring of the healing process. Experimental groups (1 of 15 animals each (mice and rats, while control group (2 of 10 animals each (mice and rats that were not being treated with herbal ointment. After the hair removal, burn was induced on the back of animals by heated brass seal. Different clinical symptoms including oedema of surrounding tissue, redness, exudation, size of the burn surface, histological and microbiological findings were monitored on the days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21. A statistically significant difference was observed throughout descriptive statistics and paired Student's t-test.CONCLUSION:Physiological healing processes of the acute burn wound following the topical application of herbal preparation can be monitored on the utilized animal model. A three-week treatment resulted in the 90% of completed epithelization in both animal species, indicating the effectiveness of topically applied herbal preparation.

  5. Short note: the experimental geopotential model XGM2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pail, R.; Fecher, T.; Barnes, D.; Factor, J. F.; Holmes, S. A.; Gruber, T.; Zingerle, P.

    2018-04-01

    As a precursor study for the upcoming combined Earth Gravitational Model 2020 (EGM2020), the Experimental Gravity Field Model XGM2016, parameterized as a spherical harmonic series up to degree and order 719, is computed. XGM2016 shares the same combination methodology as its predecessor model GOCO05c (Fecher et al. in Surv Geophys 38(3): 571-590, 2017. doi: 10.1007/s10712-016-9406-y). The main difference between these models is that XGM2016 is supported by an improved terrestrial data set of 15^' × 15^' gravity anomaly area-means provided by the United States National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), resulting in significant upgrades compared to existing combined gravity field models, especially in continental areas such as South America, Africa, parts of Asia, and Antarctica. A combination strategy of relative regional weighting provides for improved performance in near-coastal ocean regions, including regions where the altimetric data are mostly unchanged from previous models. Comparing cumulative height anomalies, from both EGM2008 and XGM2016 at degree/order 719, yields differences of 26 cm in Africa and 40 cm in South America. These differences result from including additional information of satellite data, as well as from the improved ground data in these regions. XGM2016 also yields a smoother Mean Dynamic Topography with significantly reduced artifacts, which indicates an improved modeling of the ocean areas.

  6. Statistical approach for uncertainty quantification of experimental modal model parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, M.; Peeters, B.; Kahsin, M.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials are widely used in manufacture of aerospace and wind energy structural components. These load carrying structures are subjected to dynamic time-varying loading conditions. Robust structural dynamics identification procedure impose tight constraints on the quality of modal models...... represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled aerospace and wind energy structural components made of composite materials. The proposed method is demonstrated on two application cases of a small and large wind turbine blade........ This paper aims at a systematic approach for uncertainty quantification of the parameters of the modal models estimated from experimentally obtained data. Statistical analysis of modal parameters is implemented to derive an assessment of the entire modal model uncertainty measure. Investigated structures...

  7. A two-Higgs-doublet model facing experimental hints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crivellin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physics beyond the Standard Model has so far eluded our experimental probes. Nevertheless, a number of interesting anomalies have accumulated that can be taken as hints towards new physics: BaBar, Belle, and LHCb have found deviations of approximately 3:8σ in B → Dτν and B → D*τν; the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon differs by about 3σ from the theoretic prediction; the branching ratio for τ → μνν is about 2σ above the Standard Model expectation; and CMS and ATLAS found hints for a non-zero decay rate of h → μτ at 2.6σ. Here we consider these processes within a lepton-specific two-Higgs doublet model with additional non-standard Yukawa couplings and show how (and which of these excesses can be accommodated.

  8. Electrode-tissues interface: modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M; Laaziri, Y; Mounaim, F; Elzayat, E; Corcos, J; Elhilali, M M

    2007-01-01

    The electrode-tissues interface (ETI) is one of the key issues in implantable devices such as stimulators and sensors. Once the stimulator is implanted, safety and reliability become more and more critical. In this case, modeling and monitoring of the ETI are required. We propose an empirical model for the ETI and a dedicated integrated circuit to measure its corresponding complex impedance. These measurements in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 100 kHz were achieved in acute dog experiments. The model demonstrates a closer fitting with experimental measurements. In addition, a custom monitoring device based on a stimuli current generator has been completed to evaluate the phase shift and voltage across the electrodes and to transmit wirelessly the values to an external controller. This integrated circuit has been fabricated in a CMOS 0.18 μm process, which consumes 4 mW only during measurements and occupies an area of 1 mm 2 . (review article)

  9. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  10. Genotypic variability enhances the reproducibility of an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcu, Alexandru; Puga-Freitas, Ruben; Ellison, Aaron M; Blouin, Manuel; Scheu, Stefan; Freschet, Grégoire T; Rose, Laura; Barot, Sebastien; Cesarz, Simone; Eisenhauer, Nico; Girin, Thomas; Assandri, Davide; Bonkowski, Michael; Buchmann, Nina; Butenschoen, Olaf; Devidal, Sebastien; Gleixner, Gerd; Gessler, Arthur; Gigon, Agnès; Greiner, Anna; Grignani, Carlo; Hansart, Amandine; Kayler, Zachary; Lange, Markus; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Le Galliard, Jean-François; Lukac, Martin; Mannerheim, Neringa; Müller, Marina E H; Pando, Anne; Rotter, Paula; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Seyhun, Rahme; Urban-Mead, Katherine; Weigelt, Alexandra; Zavattaro, Laura; Roy, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Many scientific disciplines are currently experiencing a 'reproducibility crisis' because numerous scientific findings cannot be repeated consistently. A novel but controversial hypothesis postulates that stringent levels of environmental and biotic standardization in experimental studies reduce reproducibility by amplifying the impacts of laboratory-specific environmental factors not accounted for in study designs. A corollary to this hypothesis is that a deliberate introduction of controlled systematic variability (CSV) in experimental designs may lead to increased reproducibility. To test this hypothesis, we had 14 European laboratories run a simple microcosm experiment using grass (Brachypodium distachyon L.) monocultures and grass and legume (Medicago truncatula Gaertn.) mixtures. Each laboratory introduced environmental and genotypic CSV within and among replicated microcosms established in either growth chambers (with stringent control of environmental conditions) or glasshouses (with more variable environmental conditions). The introduction of genotypic CSV led to 18% lower among-laboratory variability in growth chambers, indicating increased reproducibility, but had no significant effect in glasshouses where reproducibility was generally lower. Environmental CSV had little effect on reproducibility. Although there are multiple causes for the 'reproducibility crisis', deliberately including genetic variability may be a simple solution for increasing the reproducibility of ecological studies performed under stringently controlled environmental conditions.

  11. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkourmpis, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.gkourmpis@borealisgroup.com [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Geoffrey R. [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Centre for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development, Institute Polytechnic Leiria, Marinha Grande (Portugal)

    2014-02-07

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120–400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for Cî—¸C and C î—» C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  12. Experimental and numerical modeling of sulfur plugging in carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, PO Box 17555, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2000-05-01

    Sour gas, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide, is produced in large amounts from many oil and gas reservoirs in the United Arab Emirates. In addition to creating problems in production lines, the precipitation of elemental sulfur in vicinity of the wellbore is often reported to cause wellbore damage. While there have been several studies performed on the role of solid deposition in gas reservoirs, the role of sulfur deposition in oil reservoirs has not been investigated. This paper presents experimental results along with a comprehensive wellbore model that predicts sulfur precipitation as well as plugging. Two separate sets of experiments, one for a gas phase system and another for a crude oil system, were conducted to investigate the deposition of elemental sulfur in (linear) carbonate cores. The gas flow tests were conducted with elemental sulfur being carried with nitrogen through limestone cores. Changes in gas flow rate were monitored while the injection pressure was held constant. A series of experiments generated valuable data for plugging with elemental sulfur. X-ray diffraction tests provided evidence of sulfur deposition along the cores. The oil flow tests were carried out to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in a carbonate core. The crude oil was de-asphalted before conducting these tests in order to isolate the effect of asphaltene plugging. Significant plugging was observed and was found to be dependent on flow rate and initial sulfur concentration. This information was used in a phenomenological model that was incorporated in the wellbore numerical model. The data for the numerical model were obtained from both test tube and oil flow experiments. By using a phenomenological model, the wellbore plugging was modeled with an excellent match (with experimental results)

  13. Neuroinflammatory targets and treatments for epilepsy validated in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Bauer, Sebastian; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Dingledine, Raymond; Gorter, Jan A; Henshall, David C; Kaufer, Daniela; Koh, Sookyong; Löscher, Wolfgang; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Mishto, Michele; Norwood, Braxton A; Palma, Eleonora; Poulter, Michael O; Terrone, Gaetano; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence that has accumulated over the past decade strongly supports the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of human epilepsy. Specific inflammatory molecules and pathways have been identified that influence various pathologic outcomes in different experimental models of epilepsy. Most importantly, the same inflammatory pathways have also been found in surgically resected brain tissue from patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. New antiseizure therapies may be derived from these novel potential targets. An essential and crucial question is whether targeting these molecules and pathways may result in anti-ictogenesis, antiepileptogenesis, and/or disease-modification effects. Therefore, preclinical testing in models mimicking relevant aspects of epileptogenesis is needed to guide integrated experimental and clinical trial designs. We discuss the most recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies validating a number of therapeutic approaches against inflammatory mechanisms in animal models that could represent novel avenues for drug development in epilepsy. Finally, we suggest future directions to accelerate preclinical to clinical translation of these recent discoveries. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Tyre tread-block friction: modelling, simulation and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallaschek, Jörg; Wies, Burkard

    2013-07-01

    Pneumatic tyres are used in vehicles since the beginning of the last century. They generate braking and steering forces for bicycles, motor cycles, cars, busses, trucks, agricultural vehicles and aircraft. These forces are generated in the usually very small contact area between tyre and road and their performance characteristics are of eminent importance for safety and comfort. Much research has been addressed to optimise tyre design with respect to footprint pressure and friction. In this context, the development of virtual tyre prototypes, that is, simulation models for the tyre, has grown to a science in its own. While the modelling of the structural dynamics of the tyre has reached a very advanced level, which allows to take into account effects like the rate-independent inelasticity of filled elastomers or the transient 3D deformations of the ply-reinforced tread, shoulder and sidewalls, little is known about the friction between tread-block elements and road. This is particularly obvious in the case when snow, ice, water or a third-body layer are present in the tyre-road contact. In the present paper, we give a survey on the present state of knowledge in the modelling, simulation and experimental validation of tyre tread-block friction processes. We concentrate on experimental techniques.

  15. Hepatoprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca on experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, M; Girija, K; Lakshman, K; Divya, T

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of stem of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) in CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity models in rats. Hepatoprotective activity of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of stem of M. paradisiaca was demonstrated by using two experimentally induced hepatotoxicity models. Administration of hepatotoxins (CCl4 and paracetamol) showed significant biochemical and histological deteriorations in the liver of experimental animals. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract (500 mg/kg), more significantly and to a lesser extent the alcoholic extract (250 mg/kg) and aqueous extract (500 mg/kg), reduced the elevated levels of the serum enzymes like serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels and alcoholic and aqueous extracts reversed the hepatic damage towards the normal, which further evidenced the hepatoprotective activity of stem of M. paradisiaca. The alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. and aqueous extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. of stem of M. paradisiaca have significant effect on the liver of CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity animal models.

  16. Experimental dynamic characterizations and modelling of disk vibrations for HDDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chee Khiang; Ong, Eng Hong; Guo, Guoxiao; Qian, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the rotational speed of spindle motors in HDDs (Hard-Disk Drives) are increasing to improve high data throughput and decrease rotational latency for ultra-high data transfer rates. However, the disk platters are excited to vibrate at their natural frequencies due to higher air-flow excitation as well as eccentricities and imbalances in the disk-spindle assembly. These factors contribute directly to TMR (Track Mis-Registration) which limits achievable high recording density essential for future mobile HDDs. In this paper, the natural mode shapes of an annular disk mounted on a spindle motor used in current HDDs are characterized using FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis and verified with SLDV (Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer) measurements. The identified vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the disk ODS (Operating Deflection Shapes) at corresponding disk mode shapes are modelled as repeatable disturbance components for servo compensation in HDDs. Our experimental results show that the SLDV measurements are accurate in capturing static disk mode shapes without the need for intricate air-flow aero-elastic models, and the proposed disk ODS vibration model correlates well with experimental measurements from a LDV.

  17. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of 2-methylbutanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-05-01

    2-Methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) is one of several next-generation biofuels that can be used as an alternative fuel or blending component for combustion engines. This paper presents new experimental data for 2-methylbutanol, including ignition delay times in a high-pressure shock tube and premixed laminar flame speeds in a constant volume combustion vessel. Shock tube ignition delay times were measured for 2-methylbutanol/air mixtures at three equivalence ratios, temperatures ranging from 750 to 1250. K, and at nominal pressures near 20 and 40. bar. Laminar flame speed data were obtained using the spherically propagating premixed flame configuration at pressures of 1, 2, and 5. bar. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 2-methylbutanol oxidation was developed including high- and low-temperature chemistry based on previous modeling studies on butanol and pentanol isomers. The proposed model was tested against new and existing experimental data at pressures of 1-40. atm, temperatures of 740-1636. K, equivalence ratios of 0.25-2.0. Reaction path and sensitivity analyses were conducted for identifying key reactions at various combustion conditions, and to obtain better understanding of the combustion characteristics of larger alcohols.

  18. Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Morgan-Martins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Portal hypertension is a complication secondary to cirrhosis that is characterized by increased blood flow and/or vascular resistance in the portal system, causing the appearance of a hyperdynamic collateral circulation. Partial portal vein ligation is an experimental model used in rats to study the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in pre-hepatic portal hypertension. Estrogen E2 is an antioxidant molecule with various physiological actions. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antioxidant activity of endogenous estrogen in an experimental model of partial portal vein ligation by comparing intact with castrated rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats, weighing on average 250 g were used and divided into four groups: sham-operated (SO; intact (I with partial portal vein ligation (I + PPVL, castrated (C and castrated with partial ligation of the vein (C + PPVL. Day 1: castration or sham-operation; day 7, PPVL surgery; on day 15 post-PPVL, portal pressure in the mesenteric vein of rats was measured on polygraph Letica. Lipid peroxidation in the stomach was assessed using the technique of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Statistical analysis was done with ANOVA - Student-Newman-Keuls (mean ± SE, and P<0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: Portal pressure was significantly increased in C + PPVL as compared to the other groups. There was no significant difference in the group of intact rats. TBARS showed significant damage in C and C + PPVL in relation to others. Antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the castrated rats with subsequent PPVL as compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that estrogen E2 plays a protective role in intact compared with castrated rats because it presents hydrophenolic radicals in its molecule, thus acting as an antioxidant in this experimental model.

  19. Protection of estrogen in portal hypertension gastropathy: an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Martins, Maria Isabel; Jacques, Simone Iahnig; Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Marques, Camila Moraes; Marroni, Cláudio Augusto; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a complication secondary to cirrhosis that is characterized by increased blood flow and/or vascular resistance in the portal system, causing the appearance of a hyperdynamic collateral circulation. Partial portal vein ligation is an experimental model used in rats to study the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in pre-hepatic portal hypertension. Estrogen E2 is an antioxidant molecule with various physiological actions. To evaluate the antioxidant activity of endogenous estrogen in an experimental model of partial portal vein ligation by comparing intact with castrated rats. Twenty Wistar rats, weighing on average 250 g were used and divided into four groups: sham-operated (SO); intact (I) with partial portal vein ligation (I + PPVL), castrated (C) and castrated with partial ligation of the vein (C + PPVL). Day 1: castration or sham-operation; day 7, PPVL surgery; on day 15 post-PPVL, portal pressure in the mesenteric vein of rats was measured on polygraph Letica. Lipid peroxidation in the stomach was assessed using the technique of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Statistical analysis was done with ANOVA - Student-Newman-Keuls (mean ± SE), and P<0.05 was considered as significant. Portal pressure was significantly increased in C + PPVL as compared to the other groups. There was no significant difference in the group of intact rats. TBARS showed significant damage in C and C + PPVL in relation to others. Antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased in the castrated rats with subsequent PPVL as compared to the other groups. We suggest that estrogen E2 plays a protective role in intact compared with castrated rats because it presents hydrophenolic radicals in its molecule, thus acting as an antioxidant in this experimental model.

  20. Multiscale modelling and experimentation of hydrogen embrittlement in aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi, Sathiskumar

    Pulse plated nickel and nickel based superalloys have been used extensively in the Ariane 5 space launcher engines. Large structural Ariane 5 space launcher engine components such as combustion chambers with complex microstructures have usually been manufactured using electrodeposited nickel with advanced pulse plating techniques with smaller parts made of nickel based superalloys joined or welded to the structure to fabricate Ariane 5 space launcher engines. One of the major challenges in manufacturing these space launcher components using newly developed materials is a fundamental understanding of how different materials and microstructures react with hydrogen during welding which can lead to hydrogen induced cracking. The main objective of this research has been to examine and interpret the effects of microstructure on hydrogen diffusion and hydrogen embrittlement in (i) nickel based superalloy 718, (ii) established and (iii) newly developed grades of pulse plated nickel used in the Ariane 5 space launcher engine combustion chamber. Also, the effect of microstructures on hydrogen induced hot and cold cracking and weldability of three different grades of pulse plated nickel were investigated. Multiscale modelling and experimental methods have been used throughout. The effect of microstructure on hydrogen embrittlement was explored using an original multiscale numerical model (exploiting synthetic and real microstructures) and a wide range of material characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, 2D and 3D electron back scattering diffraction, in-situ and ex-situ hydrogen charged slow strain rate tests, thermal spectroscopy analysis and the Varestraint weldability test. This research shows that combined multiscale modelling and experimentation is required for a fundamental understanding of microstructural effects in hydrogen embrittlement in these materials. Methods to control the susceptibility to hydrogen induced hot and cold cracking and

  1. Experimental measurements and modelling of the WEGA boundary layer plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Shaer, M.; Ichtchenko, G.

    1983-02-01

    The boundary layer of the WEGA Tokamak has been investigated by using specific diagnostics: movable 4 mm microwave interferometer, several types of movable and fixed probes, Katsumata probe, and multigrid electrostatic analyzer. During the RF heating at the lower hybrid frequency, some modifications in the parameters of the boundary layer are observed which are interpreted by the ponderomotive force effects. A comparison between the measured reflection coefficients of the grill waveguides and their predicted values by a coupling theory (not taking into account the real conditions facing the Grill) is presented. A diffusion model was also made to describe this particular region and to fit the experimental results

  2. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  3. Reproducibility of brain ADC histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Buchem, M.A. van; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Schaap, J.A.; Hoogenraad, F.G.C.; Wheeler-Kingshott, C.A.M.; Tofts, P.S.; Cessie, S. le

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of differences in acquisition technique on whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters, as well as to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in 7 healthy subjects with b-values 0-800, 0-1000, and 0-1500 s/mm 2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DWI with b-values 0-1000 s/mm 2 . All sequences were repeated with and without repositioning. The peak location, peak height, and mean ADC of the ADC histograms and mean ADC of a region of interest (ROI) in the white matter were compared using paired-sample t tests. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using paired-sample t tests, and repeatability coefficients were reported. With increasing maximum b-values, ADC histograms shifted to lower values, with an increase in peak height (p<0.01). With FLAIR DWI, the ADC histogram shifted to lower values with a significantly higher, narrower peak (p<0.01), although the ROI mean ADC showed no significant differences. For scan-rescan reproducibility, no significant differences were observed. Different DWI pulse sequences give rise to different ADC histograms. With a given pulse sequence, however, ADC histogram analysis is a robust and reproducible technique. Using FLAIR DWI, the partial-voluming effect of cerebrospinal fluid, and thus its confounding effect on histogram analyses, can be reduced

  4. Establishment of selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Jihai; Gu Xiulian; Chao Shengwu; Zhang Peng; Fan Ruilin; Wang Li'na; Wang Lulu; Wang Ling; Li Bo; Chen Taotao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish a selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model in experimental sheep suitable for animal experiment. Methods: By using Seldinger's technique the catheter sheath was placed in both the femoral vein and femoral artery in ten sheep. Under C-arm DSA guidance the catheter was inserted through the catheter sheath into the pulmonary artery. Via the catheter appropriate amount of sheep autologous blood clots was injected into the selected pulmonary arteries. The selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model was thus established. Pulmonary angiography was performed to check the results. The pulmonary arterial pressure, femoral artery pressure,heart rates and partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO 2 ) were determined both before and after the treatment. The above parameters obtained after the procedure were compared with the recorded parameters measured before the procedure, and the sheep model quality was evaluated. Results: The baseline of pulmonary arterial pressure was (27.30 ± 9.58) mmHg,femoral artery pressure was (126.4 ± 13.72) mmHg, heart rate was (103 ± 15) bpm and PaO 2 was (87.7 ± 12.04) mmHg. Sixty minutes after the injection of (30 ± 5) ml thrombotic agglomerates, the pulmonary arterial pressures rose to (52 ± 49) mmHg, femoral artery pressures dropped to (100 ± 21) mmHg. The heart rates went up to (150 ± 26) bpm. The PaO 2 fell to (25.3 ± 11.2) mmHg. After the procedure the above parameters were significantly different from that measured before the procedure in all ten animals (P < 0.01). The pulmonary arteriography clearly demonstrated that the selected pulmonary arteries were successfully embolized. Conclusion: The anatomy of sheep's femoral veins,vena cava system, pulmonary artery and right heart system are suitable for the establishment of the catheter passage, for this reason, selected acute pulmonary thromboembolism model can be easily created in experimental sheep. The technique is feasible and the model

  5. CFD Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Solar Still

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Tahir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth is the densest planet of the solar system with total area of 510.072 million square Km. Over 71.68% of this area is covered with water leaving a scant area of 28.32% for human to inhabit. The fresh water accounts for only 2.5% of the total volume and the rest is the brackish water. Presently, the world is facing chief problem of lack of potable water. This issue can be addressed by converting brackish water into potable through a solar distillation process and solar still is specially assigned for this purpose. Efficiency of a solar still explicitly depends on its design parameters, such as wall material, chamber depth, width and slope of the zcondensing surface. This study was aimed at investigating the solar still parameters using CFD modeling and experimental validation. The simulation data of ANSYS-FLUENT was compared with actual experimental data. A close agreement among the simulated and experimental results was seen in the presented work. It reveals that ANSYS-FLUENT is a potent tool to analyse the efficiency of the new designs of the solar distillation systems.

  6. Computational and experimental model of transdermal iontophorethic drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Saveljic, Igor; Rac, Vladislav; Graells, Beatriz Olalde; Bijelic, Goran

    2017-11-30

    The concept of iontophoresis is often applied to increase the transdermal transport of drugs and other bioactive agents into the skin or other tissues. It is a non-invasive drug delivery method which involves electromigration and electroosmosis in addition to diffusion and is shown to be a viable alternative to conventional administration routs such as oral, hypodermic and intravenous injection. In this study we investigated, experimentally and numerically, in vitro drug delivery of dexamethasone sodium phosphate to porcine skin. Different current densities, delivery durations and drug loads were investigated experimentally and introduced as boundary conditions for numerical simulations. Nernst-Planck equation was used for calculation of active substance flux through equivalent model of homogeneous hydrogel and skin layers. The obtained numerical results were in good agreement with experimental observations. A comprehensive in-silico platform, which includes appropriate numerical tools for fitting, could contribute to iontophoretic drug-delivery devices design and correct dosage and drug clearance profiles as well as to perform much faster in-silico experiments to better determine parameters and performance criteria of iontophoretic drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.

    2009-01-01

    -erythrulose. Experiments were performed using automated microwell studies at the 150 or 800 mu L scale. The derived kinetic parameters were then verified in a second round of experiments where model predictions showed excellent agreement with experimental data obtained under conditions not included in the original......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments....... These can be both time consuming and expensive when working with the types of non-natural chiral intermediates important in pharmaceutical syntheses. This paper presents ail automated microscale approach to the rapid and cost effective generation of reliable kinetic models useful for bioconversion process...

  8. Establishment of a head injury by club model in rabbits and experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yunxing; Xi Huanjiu; Zhang Jing; Li Hongwei; Yin Zhiyong; Zhao Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish an animal model to replicate the injury by club in forensic medicine. Methods: Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were divided into control group (n=4), minor injury group (n=10), and severe injury group (n=10). Based on the BIM-Ⅱ Horizontal Bio-impact Machine, a self-designed iron bar was used to produce head injury by club. Six hours after injury, all the rabbits were subjected to a CT examination and dissected to observe the injury morphology and undergo routine pathological examination. Four control, six minor and severe rabbits were given moisture content examination. Results: Varying degrees of positive signs of the nervous system were observed in all the injured rabbits within 6 hours. The mortality rate was 1/10 in the minor injury group and 6/10 in the severe injury group. The morphological changes consisted of different levels of scalp hematoma, skull fracture, epidural hematoma, subdural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain injury. The difference in moisture content between the three groups was of statistical significance. Conclusion: Under the rigidly-controlled experimental condition, this animal model produces good reproducibility and stable results. Meanwhile, it can simulate the morphology of injury by club and be used to study the mechanism of injury by club in forensic medicine. (authors)

  9. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk

    fundamental knowledge of the transport and electrochemical processes of PEM fuel cells and to provide methods for obtaining high quality data for PEM fuel cell simulation model validation. In this thesis three different areas of experimental characterization techniques was investigated, they include: Stack...... for obtaining very detailed data of the manifold flow. Moreover, the tools complement each other well, as high quality validation data can be obtained from PIV measurements to verify CFD models. AC Impedance Spectroscopy was used to thoroughly characterize a HTPEM single cell. The measurement method...... was furthermore transferred onto a Labview platform, which signiffcantly improves the exibility and lowers the cost of using this method. This technique is expected to bea very important future tool, used both for material characterization, celldiagnostic, system optimization and as a control input parameter...

  10. Experimental validation of models for Plasma Focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Palomino, Luis; Gonzalez, Jose; Clausse, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Plasma Focus(PF) Devices are thermonuclear pulsators that produce short pulsed radiation (X-ray, charged particles and neutrons). Since Filippov and Mather, investigations have been used to study plasma properties. Nowadays the interest about PF is focused in technology applications, related to the use of these devices as pulsed neutron sources. In the numerical calculus the Inter institutional PLADEMA (PLAsmas DEnsos MAgnetizados) network is developing three models. Each one is useful in different engineering stages of the Plasma Focus design. One of the main objectives in this work is a comparative study on the influence of the different parameters involved in each models. To validate these results, several experimental measurements under different geometry and initial conditions were performed. (author)

  11. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  12. An experimental and modeling study of n-octanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first investigation on the combustion chemistry of n-octanol, a long chain alcohol. Ignition delay times were determined experimentally in a high-pressure shock tube, and stable species concentration profiles were obtained in a jet stirred reactor for a range of initial conditions. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the oxidation of n-octanol at both low and high temperatures, and the model shows good agreement with the present dataset. The fuel\\'s combustion characteristics are compared to those of n-alkanes and to short chain alcohols to illustrate the effects of the hydroxyl moiety and the carbon chain length on important combustion properties. Finally, the results are discussed in detail. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  13. Experimentally supported mathematical modeling of continuous baking processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette

    and temperature) and control the process (air flow, temperature, and humidity) are therefore emphasized. The oven is furthermore designed to work outside the range of standard tunnel ovens, making it interesting for manufacturers of both baking products and baking equipment. A mathematical model describing......The scope of the PhD project was to increase knowledge on the process-to-product interactions in continuous tunnel ovens. The work has focused on five main objectives. These objectives cover development of new experimental equipment for pilot plant baking experiments, mathematical modeling of heat...... and mass transfer in a butter cookie product, and evaluation of quality assessment methods. The pilot plant oven is a special batch oven designed to emulate continuous convection tunnel oven baking. The design, construction, and validation of the oven has been part of the project and is described...

  14. Simulator for candu600 fuel handling system. the experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, N.; Predescu, D.; Valeca, S.

    2013-01-01

    A main way to increase the nuclear plant safety is related to selection and continuous training of the operation staff. In this order, the computer programs for training, testing and evaluation of the knowledge get, or training simulators including the advanced analytical models of the technological systems are using. The Institute for Nuclear Research from Pitesti, Romania intend to design and build an Fuel Handling Simulator at his F/M Head Test Rig facility, that will be used for training of operating personnel. This paper presents simulated system, advantages to use the simulator, and the experimental model of simulator, that has been built to allows setting of the requirements and fabrication details, especially for the software kit that will be designed and implement on main simulator. (authors)

  15. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform.

  16. Experimental Human Cell and Tissue Models of Pemphigus

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wier, Gerda; Pas, Hendri H.; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2010-01-01

    Pemphigus is a chronic mucocutaneous autoimmune bullous disease that is characterized by loss of cell-cell contact in skin and/or mucous membranes. Past research has successfully identified desmosomes as immunological targets and has demonstrated that acantholysis is initiated through direct binding of IgG. The exact mechanisms of acantholysis, however, are still missing. Experimental model systems have contributed considerably to today's knowledge and are still a favourite tool of research. In this paper we will describe to what extent human cell and tissue models represent the in vivo situation, for example, organ cultures of human skin, keratinocyte cultures, and human skin grafted on mice and, furthermore, how suitable they are to study the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Organ cultures closely mimic the architecture of the epidermis but are less suitable to answer posed biochemical questions. Cultured keratinocyte monolayers are convenient in this respect, but their desmosomal make-up in terms of adhesion molecules does not exactly reflect the in vivo situation. Reconstituted skin is a relatively new model that approaches organ culture. In models of human skin grafted on mice, acantholysis can be studied in actual human skin but now with all the advantages of an animal model. PMID:20585596

  17. Experimental and modeling investigation on structure H hydrate formation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazraeno, M. Seyfi; Varaminian, F.; Vafaie sefti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Applying affinity model for the formation kinetics of sH hydrate and two stage kinetics. • Performing the experiments of hydrate formation of sH with MCP. • A unique path for the SH hydrate formation. - Abstract: In this work, the kinetics of crystal H hydrate and two stage kinetics formation is modeled by using the chemical affinity model for the first time. The basic idea is that there is a unique path for each experiment by which the crystallization process decays the affinity. The experiments were performed at constant temperatures of 274.15, 275.15, 275.65, 276.15 and 277.15 K. The initial pressure of each experiment is up to 25 bar above equilibrium pressure of sI. Methylcyclohexane (MCH), methylcyclopentane (MCP) and tert-butyl methyl ether (TBME) are used as sH former and methane is used as a help gas. The parameters of the affinity model (A r and t k ) are determined and the results show that the parameter of (A r )/(RT) has not a constant value when temperature changes in each group of experiments. The results indicate that this model can predict experimental data very well at several conditions

  18. Maternal hypothyroidism: An overview of current experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Mahboubeh; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2017-10-15

    Maternal hypothyroidism (MH) is the most common cause of transient congenital hypothyroidism. Different animal models are used for assessing developmental effects of MH in offspring. The severity and status of hypothyroidism in animal models must be a reflection of the actual conditions in humans. To obtain comparable results with different clinical conditions, which lead to MH in humans, several factors have been suggested for researchers to consider before designing the experimental models. Regarding development of fetal body systems during pregnancy, interference at different times provides different results and the appropriate time for induction of hypothyroidism should be selected based on accurate time of development of the system under assessment. Other factors that should be taken into consideration include, physiological and biochemical differences between humans and other species, thyroid hormone-independent effects of anti-thyroid drugs, circadian rhythms in TSH secretion, sex differences, physical and psychological stress. This review addresses essential guidelines for selecting and managing the optimal animal model for MH as well as discussing the pros and cons of currently used models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    models and vague linguistic preferences has greatly limited the usefulness and predictive validity of existing preference models. A fuzzy set preference model that uses linguistic variables and a fully interactive implementation should be able to simultaneously address these issues and substantially improve the accuracy of demand estimates. The parallel implementation of crisp and fuzzy conjoint models using identical data not only validates the fuzzy set model but also provides an opportunity to assess the impact of fuzzy set definitions and individual attribute choices implemented in the interactive methodology developed in this research. The generalized experimental tools needed for conjoint models can also be applied to many other types of intelligent systems.

  20. Experimental model for research on the blood-ocular barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Jea, Seung Youn; Park, Jae Sung; Jung, Yeon Joo [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Woo [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Rae [Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    The eyeball has 2 blood-ocular barriers, i.e, the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if triolein emulsion could disrupt the barriers, and we wanted to suggest as an experimental model for future blood-ocular barrier studies. The triolein emulsion was made of 0.1 ml triolein and 20 ml normal saline, and this was infused into the carotid artery of ten cats (the experimental group). As a control group, only normal saline was infused in another ten cats. Precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 30 minutes and 3 hours after embolization in both groups. The signal intensities were evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively in the anterior and posterior chambers and also in the vitreus fluid. Statistical analysis was performed by employing the Kruskal Wallist test, Dunn's Multiple Comparison test and the wilcoxon signed rank test. In the control group, no contrast enhancement was demonstrated in the anterior or posterior chamber or in the vitreus fluid of the ipsilateral or contralateral eyeball on the 30 minutes MR images. The anterior chambers of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs revealed delayed contrast enhancement on the 3 hour MR images. In the experimental group, the 30 minute-postembolization MR images were not different from those of the control group. The 30 minute-postembolization MR images demonstrated delayed contrast enhancement in the anterior chamber of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs and in the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball. The delayed contrast enhancement of the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball was statistically significant ({rho} < 0.05). The present study demonstrated significant contrast enhancement in the posterior chamber with infusion of the triolein emulsion, and this can serve as a model for blood-aqueous barrier studies.

  1. Experimental model for research on the blood-ocular barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Jea, Seung Youn; Park, Jae Sung; Jung, Yeon Joo; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Byung Rae

    2006-01-01

    The eyeball has 2 blood-ocular barriers, i.e, the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if triolein emulsion could disrupt the barriers, and we wanted to suggest as an experimental model for future blood-ocular barrier studies. The triolein emulsion was made of 0.1 ml triolein and 20 ml normal saline, and this was infused into the carotid artery of ten cats (the experimental group). As a control group, only normal saline was infused in another ten cats. Precontrast and postcontrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 30 minutes and 3 hours after embolization in both groups. The signal intensities were evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively in the anterior and posterior chambers and also in the vitreus fluid. Statistical analysis was performed by employing the Kruskal Wallist test, Dunn's Multiple Comparison test and the wilcoxon signed rank test. In the control group, no contrast enhancement was demonstrated in the anterior or posterior chamber or in the vitreus fluid of the ipsilateral or contralateral eyeball on the 30 minutes MR images. The anterior chambers of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs revealed delayed contrast enhancement on the 3 hour MR images. In the experimental group, the 30 minute-postembolization MR images were not different from those of the control group. The 30 minute-postembolization MR images demonstrated delayed contrast enhancement in the anterior chamber of the ipsilateral and contralateral eyeballs and in the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball. The delayed contrast enhancement of the posterior chamber of the ipsilateral eyeball was statistically significant (ρ < 0.05). The present study demonstrated significant contrast enhancement in the posterior chamber with infusion of the triolein emulsion, and this can serve as a model for blood-aqueous barrier studies

  2. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  3. Sparse linear models: Variational approximate inference and Bayesian experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Matthias W

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of problems such as signal reconstruction, denoising, source separation, feature selection, and graphical model search are addressed today by posterior maximization for linear models with sparsity-favouring prior distributions. The Bayesian posterior contains useful information far beyond its mode, which can be used to drive methods for sampling optimization (active learning), feature relevance ranking, or hyperparameter estimation, if only this representation of uncertainty can be approximated in a tractable manner. In this paper, we review recent results for variational sparse inference, and show that they share underlying computational primitives. We discuss how sampling optimization can be implemented as sequential Bayesian experimental design. While there has been tremendous recent activity to develop sparse estimation, little attendance has been given to sparse approximate inference. In this paper, we argue that many problems in practice, such as compressive sensing for real-world image reconstruction, are served much better by proper uncertainty approximations than by ever more aggressive sparse estimation algorithms. Moreover, since some variational inference methods have been given strong convex optimization characterizations recently, theoretical analysis may become possible, promising new insights into nonlinear experimental design.

  4. Sparse linear models: Variational approximate inference and Bayesian experimental design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Matthias W [Saarland University and Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Campus E1.4, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-12-01

    A wide range of problems such as signal reconstruction, denoising, source separation, feature selection, and graphical model search are addressed today by posterior maximization for linear models with sparsity-favouring prior distributions. The Bayesian posterior contains useful information far beyond its mode, which can be used to drive methods for sampling optimization (active learning), feature relevance ranking, or hyperparameter estimation, if only this representation of uncertainty can be approximated in a tractable manner. In this paper, we review recent results for variational sparse inference, and show that they share underlying computational primitives. We discuss how sampling optimization can be implemented as sequential Bayesian experimental design. While there has been tremendous recent activity to develop sparse estimation, little attendance has been given to sparse approximate inference. In this paper, we argue that many problems in practice, such as compressive sensing for real-world image reconstruction, are served much better by proper uncertainty approximations than by ever more aggressive sparse estimation algorithms. Moreover, since some variational inference methods have been given strong convex optimization characterizations recently, theoretical analysis may become possible, promising new insights into nonlinear experimental design.

  5. Experimental Investigation and Theoretical Modeling of Nanosilica Activity in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations and theoretical modeling of the hydration reaction of nanosilica blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different nanosilica replacement ratios. The developments of chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength of Portland cement control specimens and nanosilica blended specimens were measured at different ages: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Due to the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica, the contents of calcium hydroxide in nanosilica blended pastes are considerably lower than those in the control specimens. Compared with the control specimens, the extent of compressive strength enhancement in the nanosilica blended specimens is much higher at early ages. Additionally, a blended cement hydration model that considers both the hydration reaction of cement and the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica is proposed. The properties of nanosilica blended concrete during hardening were evaluated using the degree of hydration of cement and the reaction degree of nanosilica. The calculated chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength were generally consistent with the experimental results.

  6. Tobacco experimental model to induce urinary bladder neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Colli Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop an experimental model of exposure to tobacco burning (cigarette products to assess the effects of its chronic use in relation to cancers of the bladder. METHODS: the animals were chronically exposed to the burning tobacco products in a semi-open chamber to simulate smoking. Thirty young Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one with 20 animals simulating smoking for six months, and ten not exposed control animals for the same period. After exposure by inhalation of cigarette smoke, animals were euthanized and subjected to histopathological study of the bladder wall. RESULTS: no tumor was found but mild and non significant alterations. The studies of hemo-oximetry (carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin and the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2 confirm that the animals were exposed to high concentrations of tobacco smoke and its derivatives. CONCLUSION: no bladder mucosal neoplasia was found in the pathological study of animals. The developed experimental models were highly efficient, practical and easy to use and can be used in other similar studies to determine the harmful effects caused by smoking.

  7. Application of Iterative Robust Model-based Optimal Experimental Design for the Calibration of Biocatalytic Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Daele, Timothy; Gernaey, Krist V.; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2017-01-01

    The aim of model calibration is to estimate unique parameter values from available experimental data, here applied to a biocatalytic process. The traditional approach of first gathering data followed by performing a model calibration is inefficient, since the information gathered during...... experimentation is not actively used to optimise the experimental design. By applying an iterative robust model-based optimal experimental design, the limited amount of data collected is used to design additional informative experiments. The algorithm is used here to calibrate the initial reaction rate of an ω......-transaminase catalysed reaction in a more accurate way. The parameter confidence region estimated from the Fisher Information Matrix is compared with the likelihood confidence region, which is a more accurate, but also a computationally more expensive method. As a result, an important deviation between both approaches...

  8. Numerical modelling and experimental validation of hydrodynamics of an emulsion in an extraction column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisant, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Industrial reprocessing of spent fuel is based on chemical separation processes by liquid-liquid extraction into pulsed column. The current context of sustainable development and acceptance of nuclear energy drive the industry to improve the efficiency of this process. Pulsed column efficiency is bound to the amount of available exchange surface, which depends on the geometrical parameters of the column and the operating conditions. A better design would improve the efficiency. In this context, the work presented in this manuscript revolves around physical and numerical modelling of the hydrodynamics of the emulsion coupled with the evolution of the interfacial area, as well as an experimental characterization of the quantities which describe the emulsion. The emulsion is modelled based on the work of D. LHUILLIER. It is an Eulerian approach which describes each phase as a continuous medium as well as the interface which is thought as a third phase moving continuously in the flow field. This thesis contributes to describe of the hydrodynamics of dispersed and continuous phases, in order to determine the slip velocity needed for the design. The written transport equation for interfacial area is based on the thesis of T. RANDRIAMANANTENA. The simulation of this physical model was performed using the method of finite elements (FEM) and implementation was carried out under the software CAST3M. The numerical simulation have shown their abilities to correctly reproduce the expected physical behaviour, in particular, they allow to obtain the slip velocity which is essential to the scale up. In a first experimental approach, the single phase flow has been studied in a pulsed column using particle image velocimetry (PIV), for different amplitude and frequency parameters. A method of synchronization between the recording and the pulsation cycle was used in order to achieve this study. The average behavior, for different regimes of pulsation, has been studied by this way. In

  9. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    This NEUP funded project, NEUP 12-3630, is for experimental, numerical and analytical studies on high-pressure steam condensation phenomena in a steel containment vessel connected to a water cooling tank, carried out at Oregon State University (OrSU) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison). In the three years of investigation duration, following the original proposal, the planned tasks have been completed: (1) Performed a scaling study for the full pressure test facility applicable to the reference design for the condensation heat transfer process during design basis accidents (DBAs), modified the existing test facility to route the steady-state secondary steam flow into the high pressure containment for controllable condensation tests, and extended the operations at negative gage pressure conditions (OrSU). (2) Conducted a series of DBA and quasi-steady experiments using the full pressure test facility to provide a reliable high pressure condensation database (OrSU). (3) Analyzed experimental data and evaluated condensation model for the experimental conditions, and predicted the prototypic containment performance under accidental conditions (UW-Madison). A film flow model was developed for the scaling analysis, and the results suggest that the 1/3 scaled test facility covers large portion of laminar film flow, leading to a lower average heat transfer coefficient comparing to the prototypic value. Although it is conservative in reactor safety analysis, the significant reduction of heat transfer coefficient (50%) could under estimate the prototypic condensation heat transfer rate, resulting in inaccurate prediction of the decay heat removal capability. Further investigation is thus needed to quantify the scaling distortion for safety analysis code validation. Experimental investigations were performed in the existing MASLWR test facility at OrST with minor modifications. A total of 13 containment condensation tests were conducted for pressure

  10. Experimental investigation and mathematical modeling of triode PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino, E.; Koilias, G.; Athanasiou, M.; Katsaounis, A.; Dimakopoulos, Y.; Tsamopoulos, J.; Vayenas, C.G.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The triode fuel cell operation was tested using novel comb-type electrode designs. •Triode operation enhances the PEMFC power output by up to 500%. •Power output enhancement exceeds auxiliary power by up to 20%. •Good agreement with mathematical model based on the laws of Kirchhoff. •Proton fluxes in the membrane found via solution of the Nernst Planck equation -- Abstract: The triode operation of humidified PEM fuel cells has been investigated both with pure H 2 and with CO poisoned H 2 feed over commercial Vulcan supported Pt(30%)-Ru(15%) anodes. It was found that triode operation, which involves the use of a third, auxiliary, electrode, leads to up to 400% power output increase with the same CO poisoned H 2 gas feed. At low current densities, the power increase is accompanied by an increase in overall thermodynamic efficiency. A mathematical model, based on Kirchhoff’s laws, has been developed which is in reasonably good agreement with the experimental results. In order to gain some additional insight into the mechanism of triode operation, the model has been also extended to describe the potential distribution inside the Nafion membrane via the numerical solution of the Nernst-Planck equation. Both model and experiment have shown the critical role of minimizing the auxiliary-anode or auxiliary-cathode resistance, and this has led to improved comb-shaped anode or cathode electrode geometries.

  11. Experimental study and modelling of iron ore reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to find new ways to drastically reduce the CO 2 emissions from the steel industry (ULCOS project), the reduction of iron ore by pure hydrogen in a shaft furnace was investigated. The work consisted of literature, experimental, and modelling studies. The chemical reaction and its kinetics were analysed on the basis of thermogravimetric experiments and physicochemical characterizations of partially reduced samples. A specific kinetic model was designed, which simulates the successive reactions, the different steps of mass transport, and possible iron sintering, at the particle scale. Finally, a 2-dimensional numerical model of a shaft furnace was developed. It depicts the variation of the solid and gas temperatures and compositions throughout the reactor. One original feature of the model is using the law of additive characteristic times for calculating the reaction rates. This allowed us to handle both the particle and the reactor scale, while keeping reasonable calculation time. From the simulation results, the influence of the process parameters was assessed. Optimal operating conditions were concluded, which reveal the efficiency of the hydrogen process. (author)

  12. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  13. The Non-Human Primate Experimental Glaucoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the current strengths and weaknesses of the non-human primate (NHP) experimental glaucoma (EG) model through sections devoted to its history, methods, important findings, alternative optic neuropathy models and future directions. NHP EG has become well established for studying human glaucoma in part because the NHP optic nerve head (ONH) shares a close anatomic association with the human ONH and because it provides the only means of systematically studying the very earliest visual system responses to chronic IOP elevation, i.e. the conversion from ocular hypertension to glaucomatous damage. However, NHPs are impractical for studies that require large animal numbers, demonstrate spontaneous glaucoma only rarely, do not currently provide a model of the neuropathy at normal levels of IOP, and cannot easily be genetically manipulated, except through tissue-specific, viral vectors. The goal of this summary is to direct NHP EG and non-NHP EG investigators to the previous, current and future accomplishment of clinically relevant knowledge in this model. PMID:26070984

  14. Evaluation of a musculoskeletal model with prosthetic knee through six experimental gait trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Mohammad; Stylianou, Antonis P; Guess, Trent M

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of the forces acting on musculoskeletal joint tissues during movement benefits tissue engineering, artificial joint replacement, and our understanding of ligament and cartilage injury. Computational models can be used to predict these internal forces, but musculoskeletal models that simultaneously calculate muscle force and the resulting loading on joint structures are rare. This study used publicly available gait, skeletal geometry, and instrumented prosthetic knee loading data [1] to evaluate muscle driven forward dynamics simulations of walking. Inputs to the simulation were measured kinematics and outputs included muscle, ground reaction, ligament, and joint contact forces. A full body musculoskeletal model with subject specific lower extremity geometries was developed in the multibody framework. A compliant contact was defined between the prosthetic femoral component and tibia insert geometries. Ligament structures were modeled with a nonlinear force-strain relationship. The model included 45 muscles on the right lower leg. During forward dynamics simulations a feedback control scheme calculated muscle forces using the error signal between the current muscle lengths and the lengths recorded during inverse kinematics simulations. Predicted tibio-femoral contact force, ground reaction forces, and muscle forces were compared to experimental measurements for six different gait trials using three different gait types (normal, trunk sway, and medial thrust). The mean average deviation (MAD) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) over one gait cycle are reported. The muscle driven forward dynamics simulations were computationally efficient and consistently reproduced the inverse kinematics motion. The forward simulations also predicted total knee contact forces (166Nphysiological motor control patterns during gait. Consequently, the simulations did not accurately predict medial/lateral tibio-femoral force distribution and muscle activation timing. Copyright

  15. Experimental and model based investigation of the links between snow bidirectional reflectance and snow microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Flin, F.; Malinka, A.; Brissaud, O.; Hagenmuller, P.; Dufour, A.; Lapalus, P.; Lesaffre, B.; Calonne, N.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.; Ando, E.

    2017-12-01

    Snow optical properties are unique among Earth surface and crucial for a wide range of applications. The bi-directional reflectance, hereafter BRDF, of snow is sensible to snow microstructure. However the complex interplays between different parameters of snow microstructure namely size parameters and shape parameters on reflectance are challenging to disentangle both theoretically and experimentally. An accurate understanding and modelling of snow BRDF is required to correctly process satellite data. BRDF measurements might also provide means of characterizing snow morphology. This study presents one of the very few dataset that combined bi-directional reflectance measurements over 500-2500 nm and X-ray tomography of the snow microstructure for three different snow samples and two snow types. The dataset is used to evaluate the approach from Malinka, 2014 that relates snow optical properties to the chord length distribution in the snow microstructure. For low and medium absorption, the model accurately reproduces the measurements but tends to slightly overestimate the anisotropy of the reflectance. The model indicates that the deviation of the ice chord length distribution from an exponential distribution, that can be understood as a characterization of snow types, does not impact the reflectance for such absorptions. The simulations are also impacted by the uncertainties in the ice refractive index values. At high absorption and high viewing/incident zenith angle, the simulations and the measurements disagree indicating that some of the assumptions made in the model are not met anymore. The study also indicates that crystal habits might play a significant role for the reflectance under such geometries and wavelengths. However quantitative relationship between crystal habits and reflectance alongside with potential optical methodologies to classify snow morphology would require an extended dataset over more snow types. This extended dataset can likely be obtained

  16. Autonomous learning derived from experimental modeling of physical laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabec, Igor

    2013-05-01

    This article deals with experimental description of physical laws by probability density function of measured data. The Gaussian mixture model specified by representative data and related probabilities is utilized for this purpose. The information cost function of the model is described in terms of information entropy by the sum of the estimation error and redundancy. A new method is proposed for searching the minimum of the cost function. The number of the resulting prototype data depends on the accuracy of measurement. Their adaptation resembles a self-organized, highly non-linear cooperation between neurons in an artificial NN. A prototype datum corresponds to the memorized content, while the related probability corresponds to the excitability of the neuron. The method does not include any free parameters except objectively determined accuracy of the measurement system and is therefore convenient for autonomous execution. Since representative data are generally less numerous than the measured ones, the method is applicable for a rather general and objective compression of overwhelming experimental data in automatic data-acquisition systems. Such compression is demonstrated on analytically determined random noise and measured traffic flow data. The flow over a day is described by a vector of 24 components. The set of 365 vectors measured over one year is compressed by autonomous learning to just 4 representative vectors and related probabilities. These vectors represent the flow in normal working days and weekends or holidays, while the related probabilities correspond to relative frequencies of these days. This example reveals that autonomous learning yields a new basis for interpretation of representative data and the optimal model structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  18. Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite-Derived LAI over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part I: Uncoupled DGVMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zeng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Leaf Area Index (LAI represents the total surface area of leaves above a unit area of ground and is a key variable in any vegetation model, as well as in climate models. New high resolution LAI satellite data is now available covering a period of several decades. This provides a unique opportunity to validate LAI estimates from multiple vegetation models. The objective of this paper is to compare new, satellite-derived LAI measurements with modeled output for the Northern Hemisphere. We compare monthly LAI output from eight land surface models from the TRENDY compendium with satellite data from an Artificial Neural Network (ANN from the latest version (third generation of GIMMS AVHRR NDVI data over the period 1986–2005. Our results show that all the models overestimate the mean LAI, particularly over the boreal forest. We also find that seven out of the eight models overestimate the length of the active vegetation-growing season, mostly due to a late dormancy as a result of a late summer phenology. Finally, we find that the models report a much larger positive trend in LAI over this period than the satellite observations suggest, which translates into a higher trend in the growing season length. These results highlight the need to incorporate a larger number of more accurate plant functional types in all models and, in particular, to improve the phenology of deciduous trees.

  19. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of an Active Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luís Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation methodology of the dynamic behavior of an active viscous damper. The damper has two flexible metallic bellows connected to a rigid reservoir filled with fluid. When one of the bellows is connected to a vibrating structure a periodic flow passes through a variable internal orifice and the damping effect is produced. The size of the orifice is adjusted by a controlled linear piezoelectric actuator that positions the conical core into a conical cavity. The device finite element structural model consists of the valve body and its conical core that are assumed rigid and the flexible bellows are represented by two pistons with elastic suspensions. The flow developed inside the damper is modeled considering the fluid-structure interation, using the Lagrangean-Eulerian formulation. To validate the proposed model a prototype was constructed and experimental tests and numerical simulations are accomplished in the time domain, applying harmonic excitations. The results are compared using curves that relate the damping coefficient with the orifice size and with the input velocity applied at the bellows face. However, for the proper control design and system operation, the direct use of the finite element model becomes unviable due to its high computational time. Then, a reduced second order discrete dynamic model for the damper was developed. The model parameters are identified by analysis in the frequency domain, using impulsive excitation force, for constant and variable orifice sizes. At low excitation frequencies, the damper prototype behaves like a single degree of freedom system which damping factor changes with the orifice size A fuzzy controller was designed and it generates the orifice reference size associated to the desired damping factor. The active system presented better performance when compared to the passive one.

  20. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-06-27

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super

  1. Experimental investigation and mechanistic modelling of dilute bubbly bulk boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutnjak, Josip

    2013-01-01

    During evaporation the geometric shape of the vapour is not described using thermodynamics. In bubbly flows the bubble shape is considered spheric with small diameters and changing into various shapes upon growth. The heat and mass transfer happens at the interfacial area. The forces acting on the bubbles depend on the bubble diameter and shape. In this work the prediction of the bubble diameter and/or bubble number density in bulk boiling was considered outside the vicinity of the heat input area. Thus the boiling effects that happened inside the nearly saturated bulk were under investigation. This situation is relevant for nuclear safety analysis concerning a stagnant coolant in the spent fuel pool. In this research project a new experimental set-up to investigate was built. The experimental set-up consists of an instrumented, partly transparent, high and slender boiling container for visual observation. The direct visual observation of the boiling phenomena is necessary for the identification of basic mechanisms, which should be incorporated in the simulation model. The boiling process has been recorded by means of video images and subsequently was evaluated by digital image processing methods, and by that data concerning the characteristics of the boiling process were generated for the model development and validation. Mechanistic modelling is based on the derivation of relevant mechanisms concluded from observation, which is in line with physical knowledge. In this context two mechanisms were identified; the growth/-shrink mechanism (GSM) of the vapour bubbles and sudden increases of the bubble number density. The GSM was implemented into the CFD-Code ANSYS-CFX using the CFX Expression Language (CEL) by calculation of the internal bubble pressure using the Young-Laplace-Equation. This way a hysteresis is realised as smaller bubbles have an increased internal pressure. The sudden increases of the bubble number density are explainable by liquid super

  2. Experimental Modeling of the Formation of Saucer-Shaped sills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Many magma intrusions in sedimentary basins are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features are observed in many places (i.e. South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; Siberia; Argentina). Sand injectites exhibit similar geometries. The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes in sedimentary basins. To understand such processes, we performed experimental modeling of saucer-shaped sill emplacement. The experiments consist of injecting a molten low viscosity vegetable oil (model magma) at a constant flow rate into a fine-grained Coulomb silica flour (model rock). When the oil starts intruding, the initially flat surface of the model inflates and forms a smooth dome. At the end of the experiment, the oil erupts at the edge of the dome. After the experiment, the oil cools and solidifies, the resulting solid intrusion is unburied and exposed, and its upper surface digitalized. For our purpose, we did our experiments without external deformation. We performed two series of experiments with varying depth of injection. The first series consisted of injection into a homogeneous medium. The resulting intrusions were cone-sheets and dykes. The second series consisted of heterogeneous models where the heterogeneity was a weak layer made of a flexible net. The resulting intrusions were made of (1) a horizontal basal sill emplaced along the weakness, and (2) inclined sheets nucleating at the edges of the basal sill and propagating upward and outward. The inclined sheets exhibited a convex shape, i.e. a decreasing slope outward. In addition, the deeper the sills emplaced, the larger they were. Our experimental results are consistent with saucer-shaped features in nature. We infer from our results that the transition between the basal sills and the inclined sheets results from a transition of emplacement processes. We suggest that the basal sill emplace by open (mode I) fracturing, whereas

  3. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  4. [Intestinal lengthening techniques: an experimental model in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibay González, Francisco; Díaz Martínez, Daniel Alberto; Valencia Flores, Alejandro; González Hernández, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    To compare two intestinal lengthening procedures in an experimental dog model. Intestinal lengthening is one of the methods for gastrointestinal reconstruction used for treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modification to the Bianchi's technique is an alternative. The modified technique decreases the number of anastomoses to a single one, thus reducing the risk of leaks and strictures. To our knowledge there is not any clinical or experimental report that studied both techniques, so we realized the present report. Twelve creole dogs were operated with the Bianchi technique for intestinal lengthening (group A) and other 12 creole dogs from the same race and weight were operated by the modified technique (Group B). Both groups were compared in relation to operating time, difficulties in technique, cost, intestinal lengthening and anastomoses diameter. There were no statistical difference in the anastomoses diameter (A = 9.0 mm vs. B = 8.5 mm, p = 0.3846). Operating time (142 min vs. 63 min) cost and technique difficulties were lower in group B (p anastomoses (of Group B) and intestinal segments had good blood supply and were patent along their full length. Bianchi technique and the modified technique offer two good reliable alternatives for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modified technique improved operating time, cost and technical issues.

  5. Tesla Coil Theoretical Model and its Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitkans Janis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a theoretical model of Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wire form, where the line voltage is measured across electrically neutral space. By applying the principle of equivalence of single-wire and two-wire schemes an equivalent two-wire scheme can be found for a single-wire scheme and the already known long line theory can be applied to the Tesla coil. A new method of multiple reflections is developed to characterize a signal in a long line. Formulas for calculation of voltage in Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance frequencies are proposed. The theoretical calculations are verified experimentally. Resonance frequencies of Tesla coil are measured and voltage standing wave characteristics are obtained for different output capacities in the single-wire mode. Wave resistance and phase coefficient of Tesla coil is obtained. Experimental measurements show good compliance with the proposed theory. The formulas obtained in this paper are also usable for a regular two-wire long line with distributed parameters.

  6. An experimental model for the surgical correction of tracheomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, A R; Burnett, C; DiMaio, T; Jaffe, B M

    1991-10-01

    Tracheomalacia may result from large intrathoracic goiters. Due to the chronic compression, particularly within the confines of the thoracic inlet, the tracheal wall weakens, with disintegration of some of the cartilaginous rings. Tracheomalacia can cause acute airway distress, particularly during the post-operative period, and may occasionally result in death. The other major cause of tracheomalacia is related to either prolonged endotracheal intubation or over-inflation of the tracheostomy cuff. While various techniques such as internal stenting, external support devices, tracheostomy, and tracheal resection have been used based on individual circumstances, no one method appears to be perfect. To further study this difficult problem, an experimental model of tracheomalacia was created in eight dogs. Six to seven rings of the tracheal cartilages were dissected submucosally. More than half of the circumference of the tracheal rings was resected. The tracheal walls were reconstructed with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. The grafts strengthened the tracheal wall without causing luminal constriction. Tracheostomy was not performed on any of the dogs. All dogs tolerated the procedure well and were extubated at the conclusion of the experiment. The dogs were followed for 4 to 6 months and then sacrificed so that the tracheal wall could be examined histologically. There was considerable fibrosis leading to stiff neotrachea. The results of this experimental technique for prosthetic reconstruction to counteract problems simulating tracheomalacia are very encouraging.

  7. Modelling concentration-analgesia relationships for morphine to evaluate experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Eva; Foster, David John Richard; Upton, Richard Neil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models for morphine in experimental pain induced by skin heat and muscle pressure, and to evaluate the experimental pain models with regard to assessment of morphine pharmacodynamics. In a randomized, double......-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 39 healthy volunteers received an oral dose of 30 mg morphine hydrochloride or placebo. Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of morphine and metabolites, and the analgesic effect of morphine on experimental pain in skin...... and muscle. Baseline pain metrics varied between individuals and occasions, and were described with interindividual and interoccasion variability. Placebo-response did not change with time. For both pain metrics, morphine effect was proportional to baseline pain and was described with a linear model...

  8. Experimental study and modelization of a propane storage tank depressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veneau, Tania

    1995-01-01

    The risks associated with the fast depressurization of propane storage tanks reveals the importance of the 'source term' determination. This term is directly linked, among others, to the characteristics of the jet developed downstream of the breach. The first aim of this work was to provide an original data bank concerning drop velocity and diameter distributions in a propane jet. For this purpose, a phase Doppler anemometer bas been implemented on an experimental set-up. Propane blowdowns have been performed with different breach sizes and several initial pressures in the storage tank. Drop diameter and velocity distributions have been investigated at different locations in the jet zone. These measurements exhibited the fragmentation and vaporisation trends in the jet. The second aim of this work concerned the 'source term'. lt required to study the coupling between the fluid behaviour inside the tank and the flow through the breach. This model took into account the phase exchange when flashing occurred in the tank. The flow at the breach was described with an homogeneous relaxation model. This coupled modelization has been successfully and exhaustively validated. lt originality lies on the application to propane flows. (author) [fr

  9. Computational reverse shoulder prosthesis model: Experimental data and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, A; Quental, C; Folgado, J; Ambrósio, J; Monteiro, J; Sarmento, M

    2015-09-18

    The reverse shoulder prosthesis aims to restore the stability and function of pathological shoulders, but the biomechanical aspects of the geometrical changes induced by the implant are yet to be fully understood. Considering a large-scale musculoskeletal model of the upper limb, the aim of this study is to evaluate how the Delta reverse shoulder prosthesis influences the biomechanical behavior of the shoulder joint. In this study, the kinematic data of an unloaded abduction in the frontal plane and an unloaded forward flexion in the sagittal plane were experimentally acquired through video-imaging for a control group, composed of 10 healthy shoulders, and a reverse shoulder group, composed of 3 reverse shoulders. Synchronously, the EMG data of 7 superficial muscles were also collected. The muscle force sharing problem was solved through the minimization of the metabolic energy consumption. The evaluation of the shoulder kinematics shows an increase in the lateral rotation of the scapula in the reverse shoulder group, and an increase in the contribution of the scapulothoracic joint to the shoulder joint. Regarding the muscle force sharing problem, the musculoskeletal model estimates an increased activity of the deltoid, teres minor, clavicular fibers of the pectoralis major, and coracobrachialis muscles in the reverse shoulder group. The comparison between the muscle forces predicted and the EMG data acquired revealed a good correlation, which provides further confidence in the model. Overall, the shoulder joint reaction force was lower in the reverse shoulder group than in the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Models of Investor Forecasting Behavior — Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bonetto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forecasting behaviors affect investors’ trading decisions and lead to qualitatively different asset price trajectories. It has been shown in the literature that the weights that investors place on observed asset price changes when forecasting future price changes, and the nature of their confidence when price changes are forecast, determine whether price bubbles, price crashes, and unpredictable price cycles occur. In this paper, we report the results of behavioral experiments involving multiple investors who participated in a market for a virtual asset. Our goal is to study investors’ forecast formation. We conducted three experimental sessions with different participants in each session. We fit different models of forecast formation to the observed data. There is strong evidence that the investors forecast future prices by extrapolating past price changes, even when they know the fundamental value of the asset exactly and the extrapolated forecasts differ significantly from the fundamental value. The rational expectations hypothesis seems inconsistent with the observed forecasts. The forecasting models of all participants that best fit the observed forecasting data were of the type that cause price bubbles and cycles in dynamical systems models, and price bubbles and cycles ended up occurring in all three sessions.

  11. Optimization of Experimental Model Parameter Identification for Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Morello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The smart grid approach is envisioned to take advantage of all available modern technologies in transforming the current power system to provide benefits to all stakeholders in the fields of efficient energy utilisation and of wide integration of renewable sources. Energy storage systems could help to solve some issues that stem from renewable energy usage in terms of stabilizing the intermittent energy production, power quality and power peak mitigation. With the integration of energy storage systems into the smart grids, their accurate modeling becomes a necessity, in order to gain robust real-time control on the network, in terms of stability and energy supply forecasting. In this framework, this paper proposes a procedure to identify the values of the battery model parameters in order to best fit experimental data and integrate it, along with models of energy sources and electrical loads, in a complete framework which represents a real time smart grid management system. The proposed method is based on a hybrid optimisation technique, which makes combined use of a stochastic and a deterministic algorithm, with low computational burden and can therefore be repeated over time in order to account for parameter variations due to the battery’s age and usage.

  12. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferretti, D.; Michelini, E.; Rosati, G.

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM

  13. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferretti, D., E-mail: daniele.ferretti@unipr.it [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Michelini, E. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Land Management Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, P.co Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Rosati, G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM.

  14. Tupaia belangeri as an experimental animal model for viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    Tupaias, or tree shrews, are small mammals that are similar in appearance to squirrels. The morphological and behavioral characteristics of the group have been extensively characterized, and despite previously being classified as primates, recent studies have placed the group in its own family, the Tupaiidae. Genomic analysis has revealed that the genus Tupaia is closer to humans than it is to rodents. In addition, tupaias are susceptible to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. The only other experimental animal that has been demonstrated to be sensitive to both of these viruses is the chimpanzee, but restrictions on animal testing have meant that experiments using chimpanzees have become almost impossible. Consequently, the development of the tupaia for use as an animal infection model could become a powerful tool for hepatitis virus research and in preclinical studies on drug development.

  15. Practical application of stereological methods in experimental kidney animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández García, María Teresa; Núñez Martínez, Paula; García de la Fuente, Vanessa; Sánchez Pitiot, Marta; Muñiz Salgueiro, María Del Carmen; Perillán Méndez, Carmen; Argüelles Luis, Juan; Astudillo González, Aurora

    The kidneys are vital organs responsible for excretion, fluid and electrolyte balance and hormone production. The nephrons are the kidney's functional and structural units. The number, size and distribution of the nephron components contain relevant information on renal function. Stereology is a branch of morphometry that applies mathematical principles to obtain three-dimensional information from serial, parallel and equidistant two-dimensional microscopic sections. Because of the complexity of stereological studies and the lack of scientific literature on the subject, the aim of this paper is to clearly explain, through animal models, the basic concepts of stereology and how to calculate the main kidney stereological parameters that can be applied in future experimental studies. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Hadronic models and experimental data for the neutrino beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Collazuol, G; Guglielmi, A M; Sala, P R

    2000-01-01

    The predictions of meson production by 450 GeV/c protons on Be using the Monte Carlo FLUKA standalone and GEANT-FLUKA and GEANT-GHEISHA in GEANT are compared with available experimental measurements. The comparison enlightens the improvements of the hadronic generator models of the present standalone code FLUKA with respect to the 1992 version which is embedded into GEANT-FLUKA. Worse results were obtained with the GHEISHA package. A complete simulation of the SPS neutrino beam line at CERN showed significant variations in the intensity and composition of the neutrino beam when FLUKA standalone instead of the GEANT-FLUKA package is used to simulate particle production in the Be target.

  17. Hadronic models and experimental data for the neutrino beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collazuol, G.; Ferrari, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    The predictions of meson production by 450 GeV/c protons on Be using the Monte Carlo FLUKA standalone and GEANT-FLUKA and GEANT-GHEISHA in GEANT are compared with available experimental measurements. The comparison enlightens the improvements of the hadronic generator models of the present standalone code FLUKA with respect to the 1992 version which is embedded into GEANT-FLUKA. Worse results were obtained with the GHEISHA package. A complete simulation of the SPS neutrino beam line at CERN showed significant variations in the intensity and composition of the neutrino beam when FLUKA standalone instead of the GEANT-FLUKA package is used to simulate particle production in the Be target

  18. Stratification of bubbly horizontal flows: modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hot films and optical probes enabled the acquisition of measurements in bubbly flows at 5, 20 and 40 diameters from the inlet of the vein on the METERO facility which test section is a horizontal circular pipe of 100 mm inner diameter. The distribution of the different phases, the existence of coalescence and sedimentation mechanisms, the influence of the liquid and gas flow rates, the radial and axial evolutions are analyzed thanks to fast camera videos and numerous and varied experimental results (void fraction, bubbles sizes, interfacial area, mean and fluctuating velocities and turbulent kinetic energy of the liquid phase). Some models, based on the idea that the flow reaches an equilibrium state sufficiently far from the inlet of the pipe, were developed to simulate mean interfacial area and turbulent kinetic energy transports in bubbly flows. (author)

  19. Experimental and numerical investigation of a simplified exhaust model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Vehovszky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A simplified experimental equipment was built to investigate heat radiation and free convection around hot exhaust pipe. Temperatures were measured on the surface of the pipe as like as on heat insulating and -reflecting aluminum shield. Special care was taken to the temperature measuring method: result proved that inappropriate fixing of measuring thermocouples lead to an error of up to 30 % in the temperature-increase values. A detailed 1D numerical model was set up and parametrized so as to the calculation results can be fitted to measured temperature values. In this way thermal properties of the surfaces – as emissivities, absorption coefficients and convective heat transfer coefficients – were determined for temperature sweeps and stationary state cases. The used methods are to be further improved for real automotive parts and higher temperatures.

  20. Gastroprotective effect of Senecio candicans DC on experimental ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasath, Lakshmanan; Raman, Jegadeesh; Nanjian, Raaman

    2012-03-06

    Senecio candicans DC (Asteraceae) is used as a remedy for gastric ulcer and stomach pain in the Nilgiris district, Tamil Nadu for which no scientific evidence exists. The present study was performed to evaluate the gastroprotective effects and acute oral toxicity of aqueous leaf extract of Senecio candicans (AESC) in experimental models. The antiulcerogenic activity of AESC was performed in two different ulcer models viz., pylorus-ligated model and ethanol-induced model using Wistar albino rats. Acute toxicity study was also performed to get information on the admissible dose for treatment of ulcer. Preliminary phytochemical screening of AESC was performed to find the active principles present, which are thus responsible for the antiulcerogenic activity. DPPH assay was performed to confirm the antioxidant activity of AESC. The acute toxicity study did not show any mortality up to 2500mg/kg b.w. of AESC. Both the ulcer models showed gastroprotective effect comparable to that of the standard Omeprazole. The results of antioxidant enzymes, histopathology sections, ATPase and mucus content of gastric secretion showed that several mechanisms are involved in the gastroprotective effect. The preliminary phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids and steroids in AESC. The DPPH assay confirmed the antioxidant activity of AESC. The traditional consumption of AESC for the treatment of gastric ulcer is thus true, the antioxidant constituents present in the extract plays a major role in the gastroprotective activity, but since Senecio species are known for the presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, a detailed study in future is required to describe the safe dose for a prolonged period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An experimental model of mycobacterial infection under corneal flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B.D. Adan

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop a new experimental animal model of infection with Mycobacterium chelonae in keratomileusis, we conducted a double-blind prospective study on 24 adult male New Zealand rabbits. One eye of each rabbit was submitted to automatic lamellar keratotomy with the automatic corneal shaper under general anesthesia. Eyes were immunosuppressed by a single local injection of methyl prednisolone. Twelve animals were inoculated into the keratomileusis interface with 1 µl of 10(6 heat-inactivated bacteria (heat-inactivated inoculum controls and 12 with 1 µl of 10(6 live bacteria. Trimethoprim drops (0.1%, w/v were used as prophylaxis for the surgical procedure every 4 h (50 µl, qid. Animals were examined by 2 observers under a slit lamp on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 11th, 16th, and 23rd postoperative days. Slit lamp photographs were taken to document clinical signs. Animals were sacrificed when corneal disease was detected and corneal samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Eleven of 12 experimental rabbits developed corneal disease, and M. chelonae could be isolated from nine rabbits. Eleven of the 12 controls receiving a heat-inactivated inoculum did not develop corneal disease. M. chelonae was not isolated from any of the control rabbits receiving a heat-inactivated inoculum, or from the healthy cornea of control rabbits. Corneal infection by M. chelonae was successfully induced in rabbits submitted to keratomileusis. To our knowledge, this is the first animal model of M. chelonae infection following corneal flaps for refractive surgery to be described in the literature and can be used for the analysis of therapeutic responses.

  2. Calcium Intervention Ameliorates Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Haghmorad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common inflammatory disease of the CNS. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a widely used model for MS. In the present research, our aim was to test the therapeutic efficacy of Calcium (Ca in an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this study the experiment was done on C57BL/6 mice. EAE was induced using 200 μg of the MOG35-55 peptide emulsified in CFA and injected subcutaneously on day 0 over two flank areas. In addition, 250 ng of pertussis toxin was injected on days 0 and 2. In the treatment group, 30 mg/kg Ca was administered intraperitoneally four times at regular 48 hour intervals. The mice were sacrificed 21 days after EAE induction and blood samples were taken from their hearts. The brains of mice were removed for histological analysis and their isolated splenocytes were cultured. Results: Our results showed that treatment with Ca caused a significant reduction in the severity of the EAE. Histological analysis indicated that there was no plaque in brain sections of Ca treated group of mice whereas 4 ± 1 plaques were detected in brain sections of controls. The density of mononuclear infiltration in the CNS of Ca treated mice was lower than in controls. The serum level of Nitric Oxide in the treatment group was lower than in the control group but was not significant. Moreover, the levels of IFN-γ in cell culture supernatant of splenocytes in treated mice were significantly lower than in the control group. Conclusion: The data indicates that Ca intervention can effectively attenuate EAE progression.

  3. Study of the behaviour of trace elements in estuaries: experimental approaches and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dange, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    the biogeochemistry of Cd, Co and Cs in the estuarine environment and the knowledge obtained on the field. Experiments performed both in laboratory and in situ were necessary to check the validity of the assumptions of the model and to evaluate model parameters, which cannot be measured directly like to the sorption properties of natural particles. Radiotracers ("1"0"9Cd, "5"7Co,"1"3"4Cs) were used to determine physico-chemical key processes and environmental variables that control the speciation and the fate of Cd, Co and Cs. This approach, based on the use of spike with various radionuclides, allowed us to evaluate the affinity constants of particles to the four estuaries for the studied metals (global intrinsic complexation and exchange constants) and also the exchangeable particulate fraction estimated from the comparison of measured natural metals coefficients of distribution and coefficient of distribution of their radioactive equivalents. Other parameters, which are necessary to build the model (specific surface area, concentration of active surface sites, mean intrinsic acid-base constants,...), were independently estimated by various experimental approaches, applied in laboratory to particle samples taken throughout estuaries (electrochemical measurements, nitrogen adsorption using the BET method,...). The results of the validation indicate that in spite of its simplifications, the model reproduces in a satisfactory way the dissolved/particulate distributions measured for Cd, Co and Cs. With a predictive aim, this type of model must be coupled with a hydro-sedimentary transport model. (author)

  4. Experimental identification and mathematical modeling of viscoplastic material behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, P.; Lion, A.

    1995-03-01

    Uniaxial torsion and biaxial torsion-tension experiments on thin-walled tubes were carried out to investigate the viscoplastic behavior of stainless steel XCrNi18.9. A series of monotonic tests under strain and stress control shows nonlinear rate dependence and suggests the existence of equilibrium states, which are asymptotically approached during relaxation and creep processes. Strain controlled cyclic experiments display various hardening and softening phenomena that depend on strain amplitude and mean strain. All experiments indicate that the equilibrium states within the material depend on the history of the input process, whereas the history-dependence of the relaxation and creep behavior appears less significant. From the experiments the design of a constitutive model of viscoplasticity is motivated: The basic assumption is a decomposition of the total stress into an equilibrium stress and a non-equilibrium overstress: At constant strain, the overstress relaxes to zero, where the relaxation time depends on the overstress in order to account for the nonlinear rate-dependence. The equilibrium stress is assumed to be a rate independent functional of the total strain history. Classical plasticity is utilized with a kinematic hardening rule of the Armstrong-Frederick type. In order to incorporate the amplitude-dependent hardening and softening behavior, a generalized arc length representation is applied [14]. The introduction of an additional kinematic hardening variable facilitates consideration of additional hardening effects resulting from the non-radiality of the input process. Apart from the common yield and loading criterion of classical plasticity, the proposed constitutive model does not contain any further distinction of different cases. The experimental data are sufficient to identify the material parameters of the constitutive model. The results of the identification procedure demonstrate the ability of the model to represent the observed phenomena

  5. Reproducibility of isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, D.

    1981-01-01

    The use of an accelerator as part of a mass spectrometer has improved the sensitivity for measuring low levels of long-lived radionuclides by several orders of magnitude. However, the complexity of a large tandem accelerator and beam transport system has made it difficult to match the precision of low energy mass spectrometry. Although uncertainties for accelerator measured isotope ratios as low as 1% have been obtained under favorable conditions, most errors quoted in the literature for natural samples are in the 5 to 20% range. These errors are dominated by statistics and generally the reproducibility is unknown since the samples are only measured once

  6. Adjustments in the Almod 3W2 code models for reproducing the net load trip test in Angra I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, C.T.M.; Madeira, A.A.; Pontedeiro, A.C.; Dominguez, L.

    1986-09-01

    The recorded traces got from the net load trip test in Angra I NPP yelded the oportunity to make fine adjustments in the ALMOD 3W2 code models. The changes are described and the results are compared against plant real data. (Author) [pt

  7. Ozone production in the reaction of T2 and O2 gas: A comparison of experimental results and model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failor, R.A.; Souers, P.C.; Magnotta, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ozone, predicted to be an important intermediate species in T 2 oxidation, was monitored in situ by UV absorption spectroscopy for 0.01-1.0 mol % T 2 in O 2 (1 atm, 298 K). These are the first measurements of a tritium oxidation reaction intermediate. The experimental results were compared with the predictions of the author's comprehensive model of tritium oxidation. The experimentally determined temporal variation in ozone concentration is qualitatively reproduced by the model. As predicted, the measured initial rate of ozone production varied linearly with the initial T 2 concentration ([T 2 ] o ), but with a value one-third of that predicted. The steady-state ozone concentration ([O 3 ] ss ) a factor of 4 larger than predicted for a 1.0% T 2 -O 2 mixture. Addition of H 2 to the T 2 O 2 mixture, to differentiate between the radiolytic and chemical behavior of the tritium, produced a decrease in [O 3 ] ss which was larger than predicted. Changing the reaction cell surface-to-volume ratio showed indications of minor surface removal of ozone. No reasonable variation in model input parameters brought both the predicted initial ozone production rates and steady-state concentrations of ozone into agreement with the experimental results. Though qualitative agreement was achieved, further studies, with emphasis on surface effects, are necessary to explain quantitative differences and gain a greater understanding of the oxidation mechanism. 27 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Experimental model for composite tissue allotransplantations Modelo experimental para alotransplantes de tecido composto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In homologous transplantation or allotranplantation of limbs, the great tissue diversity causes variability in the rejection process and, consequently, its immunology is very complex. Thus, limb transplantation is the most used prototype of compound tissue transplantation among the protocols of experimental studies. Composite tissue allotransplantation represents the experimental model to study the homologous transplantation (from an individual to another of vascularized, innervated musclecutaneous units, joints, bone or even the whole member. Groups of rats were undergone allogeneic hindlimb transplantation. The receptors were randomized and control groups were established as: Control Group A: Autograft controls (F344 rats had its limbs reimplanted and no immunosuppressive therapy. Control Group B: Allograft controls (BN rats limbs were transplanted to F344. Composite tissue homotransplantation allows the inclusion of innervated muscle-cutaneous units, joint and bone or even the hole limb, is considerably applicable in cases of congenital absence or deformity, trauma or greater resection due to malignant tumor. For many complex deformities, these transplantations would allow a more precise reconstruction than the current reconstruction techniques.Nos transplantes alógenos de membro a grande variabilidade de tecidos (pele, subcutâneo, músculo, osso, medula óssea, gânglios linfáticos, cartilagem, nervo, vasos, tendão, articulação leva a grande variação dentro do processo de rejeição e consequentemente a sua imunologia é bastante complexa. Os transplantes alógenos de tecido composto representam o modelo experimental para se estudar o transplante homólogo (de um indivíduo para outro de unidades músculo cutâneas inervadas, vascularizadas, articulações, osso ou mesmo de todo o membro. Os receptores foram randomizados e os grupos controle foram estabelecidos como: grupo controle A: transplante autógeno de membro em que ratos F344

  9. Experimental investigation of statistical models describing distribution of counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1992-01-01

    The binomial, Poisson and modified Poisson models which are used for describing the statistical nature of the distribution of counts are compared theoretically, and conclusions for application are considered. The validity of the Poisson and the modified Poisson statistical distribution for observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally for various measuring times. The experiments to measure the influence of the significant radioactive decay were performed with 89 Y m (T 1/2 =16.06 s), using a multichannel analyser (4096 channels) in the multiscaling mode. According to the results, Poisson statistics describe the counting experiment for short measuring times (up to T=0.5T 1/2 ) and its application is recommended. However, analysis of the data demonstrated, with confidence, that for long measurements (T≥T 1/2 ) Poisson distribution is not valid and the modified Poisson function is preferable. The practical implications in calculating uncertainties and in optimizing the measuring time are discussed. Differences between the standard deviations evaluated on the basis of the Poisson and binomial models are especially significant for experiments with long measuring time (T/T 1/2 ≥2) and/or large detection efficiency (ε>0.30). Optimization of the measuring time for paired observations yields the same solution for either the binomial or the Poisson distribution. (orig.)

  10. Towards interoperable and reproducible QSAR analyses: Exchange of datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spjuth, Ola; Willighagen, Egon L; Guha, Rajarshi; Eklund, Martin; Wikberg, Jarl Es

    2010-06-30

    QSAR is a widely used method to relate chemical structures to responses or properties based on experimental observations. Much effort has been made to evaluate and validate the statistical modeling in QSAR, but these analyses treat the dataset as fixed. An overlooked but highly important issue is the validation of the setup of the dataset, which comprises addition of chemical structures as well as selection of descriptors and software implementations prior to calculations. This process is hampered by the lack of standards and exchange formats in the field, making it virtually impossible to reproduce and validate analyses and drastically constrain collaborations and re-use of data. We present a step towards standardizing QSAR analyses by defining interoperable and reproducible QSAR datasets, consisting of an open XML format (QSAR-ML) which builds on an open and extensible descriptor ontology. The ontology provides an extensible way of uniquely defining descriptors for use in QSAR experiments, and the exchange format supports multiple versioned implementations of these descriptors. Hence, a dataset described by QSAR-ML makes its setup completely reproducible. We also provide a reference implementation as a set of plugins for Bioclipse which simplifies setup of QSAR datasets, and allows for exporting in QSAR-ML as well as old-fashioned CSV formats. The implementation facilitates addition of new descriptor implementations from locally installed software and remote Web services; the latter is demonstrated with REST and XMPP Web services. Standardized QSAR datasets open up new ways to store, query, and exchange data for subsequent analyses. QSAR-ML supports completely reproducible creation of datasets, solving the problems of defining which software components were used and their versions, and the descriptor ontology eliminates confusions regarding descriptors by defining them crisply. This makes is easy to join, extend, combine datasets and hence work collectively, but

  11. Towards interoperable and reproducible QSAR analyses: Exchange of datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spjuth Ola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background QSAR is a widely used method to relate chemical structures to responses or properties based on experimental observations. Much effort has been made to evaluate and validate the statistical modeling in QSAR, but these analyses treat the dataset as fixed. An overlooked but highly important issue is the validation of the setup of the dataset, which comprises addition of chemical structures as well as selection of descriptors and software implementations prior to calculations. This process is hampered by the lack of standards and exchange formats in the field, making it virtually impossible to reproduce and validate analyses and drastically constrain collaborations and re-use of data. Results We present a step towards standardizing QSAR analyses by defining interoperable and reproducible QSAR datasets, consisting of an open XML format (QSAR-ML which builds on an open and extensible descriptor ontology. The ontology provides an extensible way of uniquely defining descriptors for use in QSAR experiments, and the exchange format supports multiple versioned implementations of these descriptors. Hence, a dataset described by QSAR-ML makes its setup completely reproducible. We also provide a reference implementation as a set of plugins for Bioclipse which simplifies setup of QSAR datasets, and allows for exporting in QSAR-ML as well as old-fashioned CSV formats. The implementation facilitates addition of new descriptor implementations from locally installed software and remote Web services; the latter is demonstrated with REST and XMPP Web services. Conclusions Standardized QSAR datasets open up new ways to store, query, and exchange data for subsequent analyses. QSAR-ML supports completely reproducible creation of datasets, solving the problems of defining which software components were used and their versions, and the descriptor ontology eliminates confusions regarding descriptors by defining them crisply. This makes is easy to join

  12. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  13. Electrowetting on dielectric: experimental and model study of oil conductivity on rupture voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing; Tang, Biao; Dong, Baoqin; Li, Hui; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Yuanyuan; Dou, Yingying; Deng, Yong; Groenewold, Jan; Henzen, Alexander Victor; Zhou, Guofu

    2018-05-01

    Electrowetting on dielectric devices uses a conducting (water) and insulating (oil) liquid phase in conjunction on a dielectric layer. In these devices, the wetting properties of the liquid phases can be manipulated by applying an electric field. The electric field can rupture the initially flat oil film and promotes further dewetting of the oil. Here, we investigate a problem in the operation of electrowetting on dielectric caused by a finite conductivity of the oil. In particular, we find that the voltage at which the oil film ruptures is sensitive to the application of relatively low DC voltages prior to switching. Here, we systematically investigate this dependence using controlled driving schemes. The mechanism behind these history effects point to charge transport processes in the dielectric and the oil, which can be modeled and characterized by a decay time. To quantify the effects the typical response timescales have been measured with a high-speed video camera. The results have been reproduced in simulations. In addition, a simplified yet accurate equivalent circuit model is developed to analyze larger data sets more conveniently. The experimental data support the hypothesis that each pixel can be characterized by a single decay time. We studied an ensemble of pixels and found that they showed a rather broad distribution of decay times with an average value of about 440 ms. This decay time can be interpreted as a discharge timescale of the oil, not to be confused with discharge of the entire system which is generally much faster (<1 ms). Through the equivalent circuit model, we also found that variations in the fluoropolymer (FP) conductivity cannot explain the distribution of decay times, while variations in oil conductivity can.

  14. P2X7 receptor-mediated calcium dynamics in HEK293 cells: experimental characterization and modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Garbo, A; Alloisio, S; Nobile, M

    2012-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) induces ionotropic Ca 2+  signalling in different cell types. It plays an important role in the immune response and in the nervous system. Here, the mechanisms underlying intracellular Ca 2+  variations evoked by 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (BzATP), a potent agonist of the P2X7R, in transfected HEK293 cells, are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We propose a minimal model of P2X7R that is capable of reproducing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the experimental data. This approach was also adopted for the P2X7R variant, which lacks the entire C-terminus tail (trP2X7R). Then we introduce a biophysical model describing the Ca 2+  dynamics in HEK293. Our model gives an account of the ionotropic Ca 2+  influx evoked by BzATP on the basis of the kinetics model of P2X7R. To explain the complex Ca 2+  responses evoked by BzATP, the model predicted that an impairment in Ca 2+  extrusion flux through the plasma membrane is a key factor for Ca 2+ homeostasis in HEK293 cells. (paper)

  15. P2X7 receptor-mediated calcium dynamics in HEK293 cells: experimental characterization and modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Garbo, A.; Alloisio, S.; Nobile, M.

    2012-04-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) induces ionotropic Ca2 + signalling in different cell types. It plays an important role in the immune response and in the nervous system. Here, the mechanisms underlying intracellular Ca2 + variations evoked by 3‧-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (BzATP), a potent agonist of the P2X7R, in transfected HEK293 cells, are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We propose a minimal model of P2X7R that is capable of reproducing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the experimental data. This approach was also adopted for the P2X7R variant, which lacks the entire C-terminus tail (trP2X7R). Then we introduce a biophysical model describing the Ca2 + dynamics in HEK293. Our model gives an account of the ionotropic Ca2 + influx evoked by BzATP on the basis of the kinetics model of P2X7R. To explain the complex Ca2 + responses evoked by BzATP, the model predicted that an impairment in Ca2 + extrusion flux through the plasma membrane is a key factor for Ca2 + homeostasis in HEK293 cells.

  16. Integrated experimental and modeling assessment of potential effects of gas leakages on groundwater composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Schäfer, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    pyrite content, oxygen dissolution kinetics, groundwater composition including the carbonate buffer, and diffusive and advective transport parameters. The results of site-scale multiphase reactive transport modeling revealed the expected spatial distribution of redox-sensitive species such as oxygen, pyrite, and sulfate in an aquifer following a leakage. The changes in concentration of sulfate, dissolved oxygen, and H+ observed in the lab-scale experiments were qualitatively reproduced by the models applying the same boundary conditions on a site-scale. This integrated study acknowledged that the combination of experiments and models is a powerful tool to prognose the geochemical consequences of gas leakage on site scale. However, it is yet unknown how the passivation would be effected if the carbonate buffer depleted on the long term and under what circumstances a transition from the passivating pyrite oxidation process to the non-passivating process observed for instance in acid mine drainage setups occurs. These restrictions mark the limits of validity of our experimental and modeling concept. This conclusion suggests the feasibility of the presented integrated approach also when evaluating comparable scenarios on methane and hydrogen storage based on experimental results gathered similarly[2]. [1]Berta et al. Environ Earth Sci (2016) 75:1175, DOI 10.1007/s12665-016-5985-7. [2]Berta et al. First Break (2015) 33,93-95, ISSN 1365-2397. This work is part of the ANGUS+ project funded by the BMBF-FK03EK3022.

  17. A comprehensive study on rotation reversal in KSTAR: experimental observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, D. H.; Na, Yong-Su; Angioni, C.; Yang, S. M.; Kwon, J. M.; Jhang, Hogun; Camenen, Y.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, J. A.; Hahm, T. S.; KSTAR Team

    2017-12-01

    Dedicated experiments have been performed in KSTAR Ohmic plasmas to investigate the detailed physics of the rotation reversal phenomena. Here we adapt the more general definition of rotation reversal, a large change of the intrinsic toroidal rotation gradient produced by minor changes in the control parameters (Camenen et al 2017 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 59 034001), which is commonly observed in KSTAR regardless of the operating conditions. The two main phenomenological features of the rotation reversal are the normalized toroidal rotation gradient ({{u}\\prime} ) change in the gradient region and the existence of an anchor point. For the KSTAR Ohmic plasma database including the experiment results up to the 2016 experimental campaign, both features were investigated. First, the observations show that the locations of the gradient and the anchor point region are dependent on {{q}95} . Second, a strong dependence of {{u}\\prime} on {νeff} is clearly observed in the gradient region, whereas the dependence on R/{{L}{{Ti}}} , R/{{L}{{Te}}} , and R/{{L}{{ne}}} is unclear considering the usual variation of the normalized gradient length in KSTAR. The experimental observations were compared against several theoretical models. The rotation reversal might not occur due to the transition of the dominant turbulence from the trapped electron mode to the ion temperature gradient mode or the neoclassical equilibrium effect in KSTAR. Instead, it seems that the profile shearing effects associated with a finite ballooning tilting well reproduce the experimental observations of both the gradient region and the anchor point; the difference seems to be related to the magnetic shear and the q value. Further analysis implies that the increase of {{u}\\prime} in the gradient region with the increase of the collisionality would occur when the reduction of the momentum diffusivity is comparatively larger than the reduction of the residual stress. It is supported by the perturbative

  18. Soil pH controls the environmental availability of phosphorus: Experimental and mechanistic modelling approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devau, Nicolas; Cadre, Edith Le; Hinsinger, Philippe; Jaillard, Benoit; Gerard, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic P is the least mobile major nutrient in most soils and is frequently the prime limiting factor for plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the extraction of soil inorganic P with CaCl 2 (P-CaCl 2 ) and geochemical modelling were combined in order to unravel the processes controlling the environmentally available P (EAP) of a soil over a range of pH values (pH ∼ 4-10). Mechanistic descriptions of the adsorption of cations and anions by the soil constituents were used (1-pK Triple Plane, ion-exchange and NICA-Donnan models). These models are implemented into the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ. An additive approach was used for their application to the surface horizon of a Cambisol. The geochemical code accurately reproduced the concentration of extracted P at the different soil pH values (R 2 = 0.9, RMSE = 0.03 mg kg -1 ). Model parameters were either directly found in the literature or estimated by fitting published experimental results in single mineral systems. The strong agreement between measurements and modelling results demonstrated that adsorption processes exerted a major control on the EAP of the soil over a large range of pH values. An influence of the precipitation of P-containing mineral is discounted based on thermodynamic calculations. Modelling results indicated that the variations in P-CaCl 2 with soil pH were controlled by the deprotonation/protonation of the surface hydroxyl groups, the distribution of P surface complexes, and the adsorption of Ca and Cl from the electrolyte background. Iron-oxides and gibbsite were found to be the major P-adsorbing soil constituents at acidic and alkaline pHs, whereas P was mainly adsorbed by clay minerals at intermediate pH values. This study demonstrates the efficacy of geochemical modelling to understand soil processes, and the applicability of mechanistic adsorption models to a 'real' soil, with its mineralogical complexity and the additional contribution of soil organic matter.

  19. Soil pH controls the environmental availability of phosphorus: Experimental and mechanistic modelling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devau, Nicolas [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Cadre, Edith Le [Supagro, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Hinsinger, Philippe; Jaillard, Benoit [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France); Gerard, Frederic, E-mail: gerard@supagro.inra.fr [INRA, UMR 1222 Eco and Sols - Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Biogeochimie des Sols (INRA-IRD-SupAgro), Place Viala, F-34060 Montpellier (France)

    2009-11-15

    Inorganic P is the least mobile major nutrient in most soils and is frequently the prime limiting factor for plant growth in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the extraction of soil inorganic P with CaCl{sub 2} (P-CaCl{sub 2}) and geochemical modelling were combined in order to unravel the processes controlling the environmentally available P (EAP) of a soil over a range of pH values (pH {approx} 4-10). Mechanistic descriptions of the adsorption of cations and anions by the soil constituents were used (1-pK Triple Plane, ion-exchange and NICA-Donnan models). These models are implemented into the geochemical code Visual MINTEQ. An additive approach was used for their application to the surface horizon of a Cambisol. The geochemical code accurately reproduced the concentration of extracted P at the different soil pH values (R{sup 2} = 0.9, RMSE = 0.03 mg kg{sup -1}). Model parameters were either directly found in the literature or estimated by fitting published experimental results in single mineral systems. The strong agreement between measurements and modelling results demonstrated that adsorption processes exerted a major control on the EAP of the soil over a large range of pH values. An influence of the precipitation of P-containing mineral is discounted based on thermodynamic calculations. Modelling results indicated that the variations in P-CaCl{sub 2} with soil pH were controlled by the deprotonation/protonation of the surface hydroxyl groups, the distribution of P surface complexes, and the adsorption of Ca and Cl from the electrolyte background. Iron-oxides and gibbsite were found to be the major P-adsorbing soil constituents at acidic and alkaline pHs, whereas P was mainly adsorbed by clay minerals at intermediate pH values. This study demonstrates the efficacy of geochemical modelling to understand soil processes, and the applicability of mechanistic adsorption models to a 'real' soil, with its mineralogical complexity and the additional

  20. Development and characterization of an experimental model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rabbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Julián Arias-Mutis

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS has become one of the main concerns for public health because of its link to cardiovascular disease. Murine models have been used to study the effect of MetS on the cardiovascular system, but they have limitations for studying cardiac electrophysiology. In contrast, the rabbit cardiac electrophysiology is similar to human, but a detailed characterization of the different components of MetS in this animal is still needed. Our objective was to develop and characterize a diet-induced experimental model of MetS that allows the study of cardiovascular remodeling and arrhythmogenesis. Male NZW rabbits were assigned to control (n = 15 or MetS group (n = 16, fed during 28 weeks with high-fat, high-sucrose diet. We measured weight, morphological characteristics, blood pressure, glycaemia, standard plasma biochemistry and the metabolomic profile at weeks 14 and 28. Liver histological changes were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. A mixed model ANOVA or unpaired t-test were used for statistical analysis (P<0.05. Weight, abdominal contour, body mass index, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure increased in the MetS group at weeks 14 and 28. Glucose, triglycerides, LDL, GOT-AST, GOT/GPT, bilirubin and bile acid increased, whereas HDL decreased in the MetS group at weeks 14 and 28. We found a 40% increase in hepatocyte area and lipid vacuoles infiltration in the liver from MetS rabbits. Metabolomic analysis revealed differences in metabolites related to fatty acids, energetic metabolism and microbiota, compounds linked with cardiovascular disease. Administration of high-fat and high-sucrose diet during 28 weeks induced obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension, non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and metabolic alterations, thus reproducing the main clinical manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in humans. This experimental model should provide a valuable tool for studies into the mechanisms of cardiovascular

  1. Configuration and validation of an analytical model predicting secondary neutron radiation in proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; De Marzi, L; De Oliveira, A; Delacroix, S; Martinetti, F; Trompier, F; Clairand, I

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on the configuration and validation of an analytical model predicting leakage neutron doses in proton therapy. Using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, a facility-specific analytical model was built to reproduce out-of-field neutron doses while separately accounting for the contribution of intra-nuclear cascade, evaporation, epithermal and thermal neutrons. This model was first trained to reproduce in-water neutron absorbed doses and in-air neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), calculated using MCNPX. Its capacity in predicting out-of-field doses at any position not involved in the training phase was also checked. The model was next expanded to enable a full 3D mapping of H*(10) inside the treatment room, tested in a clinically relevant configuration and finally consolidated with experimental measurements. Following the literature approach, the work first proved that it is possible to build a facility-specific analytical model that efficiently reproduces in-water neutron doses and in-air H*(10) values with a maximum difference less than 25%. In addition, the analytical model succeeded in predicting out-of-field neutron doses in the lateral and vertical direction. Testing the analytical model in clinical configurations proved the need to separate the contribution of internal and external neutrons. The impact of modulation width on stray neutrons was found to be easily adjustable while beam collimation remains a challenging issue. Finally, the model performance agreed with experimental measurements with satisfactory results considering measurement and simulation uncertainties. Analytical models represent a promising solution that substitutes for time-consuming MC calculations when assessing doses to healthy organs. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental model of a wind energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasar, C.; Rat, C. L.; Prostean, O.

    2018-01-01

    The renewable energy domain represents an important issue for the sustainable development of the mankind in the actual context of increasing demand for energy along with the increasing pollution that affect the environment. A significant quota of the clean energy is represented by the wind energy. As a consequence, the developing of wind energy conversion systems (WECS) in order to achieve high energetic performances (efficiency, stability, availability, competitive cost etc) represents a topic of permanent actuality. Testing and developing of an optimized control strategy for a WECS direct implemented on a real energetic site is quite difficult and not cost efficient. Thus a more convenient solution consists in a flexible laboratory setup which requires an experimental model of a WECS. Such approach would allow the simulation of various real conditions very similar with existing energetic sites. This paper presents a grid-connected wind turbine emulator. The wind turbine is implemented through a real-time Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) emulator, which will be analyzed extensively in the paper. The HIL system uses software implemented in the LabVIEW programming environment to control an ABB ACS800 electric drive. ACS800 has the task of driving an induction machine coupled to a permanent magnet synchronous generator. The power obtained from the synchronous generator is rectified, filtered and sent to the main grid through a controlled inverter. The control strategy is implemented on a NI CompactRIO (cRIO) platform.

  3. Helicopter noise in hover: Computational modelling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Vorontsov, V. I.; Karabasov, S. A.; Anikin, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter rotor are calculated by a new method, to assess its applicability in assessing rotor performance in hovering. Direct solution of the Euler equations in a noninertial coordinate system is used to calculate the near-field flow around the spinning rotor. The far-field noise field is calculated by the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) method using permeable control surfaces that include the blade. For a multiblade rotor, the signal obtained is duplicated and shifted in phase for each successive blade. By that means, the spectral characteristics of the far-field noise may be obtained. To determine the integral aerodynamic characteristics of the rotor, software is written to calculate the thrust and torque characteristics from the near-field flow solution. The results of numerical simulation are compared with experimental acoustic and aerodynamic data for a large-scale model of a helicopter main rotor in an open test facility. Two- and four-blade configurations of the rotor are considered, in different hover conditions. The proposed method satisfactorily predicts the aerodynamic characteristics of the blades in such conditions and gives good estimates for the first harmonics of the noise. That permits the practical use of the proposed method, not only for hovering but also for forward flight.

  4. Experimental system model of a primary active fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deseigne, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Collective motion, such as flocks of birds or shoals of fish, is ubiquitous in nature. Such fundamentally out-of-equilibrium phenomena may be described with the new conceptual background of polar active matter, a system of polar particles which enables to use provided energy in order to move in their own directions. A 2D experimental system of vibrated polar disks that interact only by contact has been set up. These disks behave as random walkers, whose trajectories are characterized by a persistence length greater than their size and controlled by the angular fluctuations of their polarity. The interplay between the hard-core repulsion and the persistence of the motion leads to complex alignment modes. For instance, only 10 pc of the binary collisions correspond to an effective ferromagnetic alignment. Yet, spontaneous collective motion inside the system characterized by giant fluctuations of density have been observed. These results reveal the robustness of the polar order observed in theoretical and numerical models of 2D polar active matter on substrate

  5. Drying kinetics of RDF: Experimental investigation and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słomka-Polonis Karolina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to determine the drying characteristics of an oversized fraction of RDF alternative fuel using a laboratory scale hot air dryer at a variety air temperatures and a constant air velocity. For this research the industrial RDF was derived from a Regional Municipal Waste Treatment Facility near the city of Kraków, Poland. The samples of RDF were prepared in two forms: ovesized (unmodified condition and shreded in a two-drum crusher. In addition, the RDF was sorted into three groups of samples: paper, plastic, textiles. Each form of RDF and each group of samples were dried in hot air dryer at temperatures of 50, 70 i 90 °C and a constant air velocity of 1,5 [m·s-1]. The loss of the the samples mass were measured in a continues manner until the equilibrum moisture content was reached. The effective moisture diffusivity [m2·s-1] and activation energies [kJ·mol-1] was amounted. The analysis of the course of moisture content change concludes that that the drying of the RDF alternative fuel occured mainly in the II period of the process during which the transport of water content was carried out by diffusion. And, to a lesser extent, with the surface heat transfer in II period. Based on the calculated data there was a model determined which presented the best possible matching of the course of moisture content change.

  6. Orientation sensitive deformation in Zr alloys: experimental and modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Keskar, N.; Manikrishna, K.V.; Dey, G.K.; Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are used for fuel cladding and other structural components in pressurised heavy water nuclear reactors (PHWR's). Currently there is a lot of interest in developing alloys for structural components for higher temperature reactor operation. There is also need for development of cladding material with better corrosion and mechanical property of cladding material for higher and extended burn up applications. The performance of the cladding material is primarily influenced by the microstructural features of the material such as constituent phases their morphology, precipitates characteristics, nature of defects etc. Therefore, the microstructure is tailored as per the performance requirement by through controlled additions of alloying elements, thermo-mechanical- treatments. In order to obtain the desired microstructure, it is important to know the deformation behaviour of the material. Orientation dependent deformation behavior was studied in Zr using a combination of experimental and modeling (both discrete and atomistic dislocation dynamics) methods. Under the conditions of plane strain deformation, it was observed that single phase Zr, had significant extent of deformation heterogeneity based on local orientations. Discrete dislocation dynamics simulations incorporating multi slip systems had captured the orientation sensitive deformation. MD dislocations on the other hand brought the fundamental difference in various crystallographic orientations in determining the nucleating stress for the dislocations. The deformed structure has been characterized using X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction techniques. The various operating deformation mechanism will be discussed in this presentation. (author)

  7. Cerebral radiation necrosis: limits and prospects of experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis is the major CNS hazard of clinical treatment therapy involving delivery of high doses of radiation to the brain. It is generally irreversible and frequently leads to death from brain necrosis. Necrosis has been reported with total doses of 60 Gy, delivered in conventional fractions. Symptoms depend upon the volume of brain irradiated and are frequently those of an intracranial mass and may be present as an area of gliosis or frank necrosis. Possible causes include some direct effect of radiation on glial cells, vascular changes and the action of an immunological mechanism. The weight of evidence suggests that demyelination is important in the early delayed reaction, and that vascular changes gradually become more important in the late delayed reactions, from several months to years after treatment. The advent of sophisticated radiographic technologies such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography have facilitated serial non invasive examination of morphologic or physiologic parameters within the brain after irradiation. Limits and prospects of these technologies are reviewed in experimental animal models of late radiation injuries of the brain, which were carried out in many species ranging from mouse to monkey

  8. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  9. An experimental and modeling study of propene oxidation. Part 2: Ignition delay time and flame speed measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Sinéad M.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental data obtained in this study (Part II) complement the speciation data presented in Part I, but also offer a basis for extensive facility cross-comparisons for both experimental ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) observables. To improve our understanding of the ignition characteristics of propene, a series of IDT experiments were performed in six different shock tubes and two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions not previously studied. This work is the first of its kind to directly compare ignition in several different shock tubes over a wide range of conditions. For common nominal reaction conditions among these facilities, cross-comparison of shock tube IDTs suggests 20-30% reproducibility (2σ) for the IDT observable. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the data available for validation of propene oxidation models to higher pressures (2-40. atm) and lower temperatures (750-1750. K).Propene flames were studied at pressures from 1 to 20. atm and unburned gas temperatures of 295-398. K for a range of equivalence ratios and dilutions in different facilities. The present propene-air LFS results at 1. atm were also compared to LFS measurements from the literature. With respect to initial reaction conditions, the present experimental LFS cross-comparison is not as comprehensive as the IDT comparison; however, it still suggests reproducibility limits for the LFS observable. For the LFS results, there was agreement between certain data sets and for certain equivalence ratios (mostly in the lean region), but the remaining discrepancies highlight the need to reduce uncertainties in laminar flame speed experiments amongst different groups and different methods. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the burning rate characteristics of propene at elevated pressures (>5. atm).IDT and LFS measurements are compared to predictions of the chemical kinetic mechanism presented in Part I and good

  10. An experimental and modeling study of propene oxidation. Part 2: Ignition delay time and flame speed measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Burke, Siné ad M.; Burke, Ultan; Mc Donagh, Reuben; Mathieu, Olivier; Osorio, Irmis; Keesee, Charles L.; Morones, Aní bal; Petersen, Eric L.; Wang, Weijing; DeVerter, Trent A.; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.; Rhodes, Brandie; Hanson, Ronald K.; Davidson, David F.; Weber, Bryan W.; Sung, Chihjen; Santner, Jeffrey S.; Ju, Yiguang; Haas, Francis M.; Dryer, Frederick L.; Volkov, Evgeniy N.; Nilsson, Elna J K; Konnov, Alexander A.; Alrefae, Majed; Khaled, Fathi; Farooq, Aamir; Dirrenberger, Patricia; Glaude, Pierre Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, F.; Curran, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in this study (Part II) complement the speciation data presented in Part I, but also offer a basis for extensive facility cross-comparisons for both experimental ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) observables. To improve our understanding of the ignition characteristics of propene, a series of IDT experiments were performed in six different shock tubes and two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions not previously studied. This work is the first of its kind to directly compare ignition in several different shock tubes over a wide range of conditions. For common nominal reaction conditions among these facilities, cross-comparison of shock tube IDTs suggests 20-30% reproducibility (2σ) for the IDT observable. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the data available for validation of propene oxidation models to higher pressures (2-40. atm) and lower temperatures (750-1750. K).Propene flames were studied at pressures from 1 to 20. atm and unburned gas temperatures of 295-398. K for a range of equivalence ratios and dilutions in different facilities. The present propene-air LFS results at 1. atm were also compared to LFS measurements from the literature. With respect to initial reaction conditions, the present experimental LFS cross-comparison is not as comprehensive as the IDT comparison; however, it still suggests reproducibility limits for the LFS observable. For the LFS results, there was agreement between certain data sets and for certain equivalence ratios (mostly in the lean region), but the remaining discrepancies highlight the need to reduce uncertainties in laminar flame speed experiments amongst different groups and different methods. Moreover, this is the first study to investigate the burning rate characteristics of propene at elevated pressures (>5. atm).IDT and LFS measurements are compared to predictions of the chemical kinetic mechanism presented in Part I and good

  11. Comparison of Laboratory Experimental Data to XBeach Numerical Model Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Ebru; Baykal, Cuneyt; Guler, Isikhan; Sogut, Erdinc

    2016-04-01

    generating data sets for testing and validation of sediment transport relationships for sand transport in the presence of waves and currents. In these series, there is no structure in the basin. The second and third series of experiments were designed to generate data sets for development of tombolos in the lee of detached 4m-long rubble mound breakwater that is 4 m from the initial shoreline. The fourth series of experiments are conducted to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 4m-long T-head groin with the head section in the same location of the second and the third tests. The fifth series of experiments are used to investigate tombolo development in the lee of a 3-m-long rubble-mound breakwater positioned 1.5 m offshore of the initial shoreline. In this study, the data collected from the above mentioned five experiments are used to compare the results of the experimental data with XBeach numerical model results, both for the "no-structure" and "with-structure" cases regarding to sediment transport relationships in the presence of only waves and currents as well as the shoreline changes together with the detached breakwater and the T-groin. The main purpose is to investigate the similarities and differences between the laboratory experimental data behavior with XBeach numerical model outputs for these five cases. References: Baykal, C., Sogut, E., Ergin, A., Guler, I., Ozyurt, G.T., Guler, G., and Dogan, G.G. (2015). Modelling Long Term Morphological Changes with XBeach: Case Study of Kızılırmak River Mouth, Turkey, European Geosciences Union, General Assembly 2015, Vienna, Austria, 12-17 April 2015. Gravens, M.B. and Wang, P. (2007). "Data report: Laboratory testing of longshore sand transport by waves and currents; morphology change behind headland structures." Technical Report, ERDC/CHL TR-07-8, Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS. Roelvink, D., Reniers, A., van Dongeren, A., van Thiel de

  12. Effect of Initial Conditions on Reproducibility of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Hozo, Iztok

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that about half of currently published research cannot be reproduced. Many reasons have been offered as explanations for failure to reproduce scientific research findings- from fraud to the issues related to design, conduct, analysis, or publishing scientific research. We also postulate a sensitive dependency on initial conditions by which small changes can result in the large differences in the research findings when attempted to be reproduced at later times. Methods: We employed a simple logistic regression equation to model the effect of covariates on the initial study findings. We then fed the input from the logistic equation into a logistic map function to model stability of the results in repeated experiments over time. We illustrate the approach by modeling effects of different factors on the choice of correct treatment. Results: We found that reproducibility of the study findings depended both on the initial values of all independent variables and the rate of change in the baseline conditions, the latter being more important. When the changes in the baseline conditions vary by about 3.5 to about 4 in between experiments, no research findings could be reproduced. However, when the rate of change between the experiments is ≤2.5 the results become highly predictable between the experiments. Conclusions: Many results cannot be reproduced because of the changes in the initial conditions between the experiments. Better control of the baseline conditions in-between the experiments may help improve reproducibility of scientific findings. PMID:25132705

  13. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beirsdorfer, P; Crespo-Lopez-Urrutia, J R; Utter, S B.

    1999-01-01

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to place

  14. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Modeling Human Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Associated Changes in Drug Transporter Expression Using Experimental Rodent Models

    OpenAIRE

    Canet, Mark J.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Lake, April D.; Dzierlenga, Anika L.; Clarke, John D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease that can progress to the more advanced stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH has been shown to alter drug transporter regulation and may have implications in the development of adverse drug reactions. Several experimental rodent models have been proposed for the study of NASH, but no single model fully recapitulates all aspects of the human disease. The purpose of the current study was to determine whic...

  16. ReproPhylo: An Environment for Reproducible Phylogenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Szitenberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reproducibility of experiments is key to the scientific process, and particularly necessary for accurate reporting of analyses in data-rich fields such as phylogenomics. We present ReproPhylo, a phylogenomic analysis environment developed to ensure experimental reproducibility, to facilitate the handling of large-scale data, and to assist methodological experimentation. Reproducibility, and instantaneous repeatability, is built in to the ReproPhylo system and does not require user intervention or configuration because it stores the experimental workflow as a single, serialized Python object containing explicit provenance and environment information. This 'single file' approach ensures the persistence of provenance across iterations of the analysis, with changes automatically managed by the version control program Git. This file, along with a Git repository, are the primary reproducibility outputs of the program. In addition, ReproPhylo produces an extensive human-readable report and generates a comprehensive experimental archive file, both of which are suitable for submission with publications. The system facilitates thorough experimental exploration of both parameters and data. ReproPhylo is a platform independent CC0 Python module and is easily installed as a Docker image or a WinPython self-sufficient package, with a Jupyter Notebook GUI, or as a slimmer version in a Galaxy distribution.

  17. Experimental and numerical modeling of basalt textile reinforced mortar behavior under uniaxial tensile stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrinaga, Pello; Chastre, Carlos; Biscaia, Hugo C.; San-José, José T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Making more deepen the knowledge of textile reinforced mortar in tensile stress. • Analyzing the effect of the reinforcing ratio of the composite. • To compare results with Aveston–Cooper–Kelly theory. • To develop a numerical model based on a finite element code. • Considering the importance of the bond-slip law of the mortar-to-textile-interface. - Abstract: During the last years several projects and studies have improved the knowledge about textile reinforced mortar (TRM) technology. TRM has already been used in strengthening masonry and reinforced concrete structural elements such as walls, arches, columns and beams. This material is presented as a real alternative to the use of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) in situations where these composites have presented some drawbacks or their use is banned. Textile reinforced mortar show a complex mechanical behavior derived from the heterogeneity of the constituent materials. This paper aims to deepen the knowledge of this composite material in terms of tensile behavior. Following this scope, this paper presents an experimental campaign focused on thirty-one TRM specimens reinforced with four different reinforcing ratios. The results are analyzed and contrasted with two distinct models. (i) The Aveston–Cooper–Kelly theory (ACK) which is based on a tri-linear analytical approach; and (ii) a non-linear numerical simulation with a 3D finite element code. The finite element analysis (FEA) of the TRM tensile tests also showed no significant dependence on the basalt-to-mortar interface, i.e., the choice of a bond-slip curve in order to reproduce the bond stresses and slippages along the interface is irrelevant and it can be simply considered as rigid interface

  18. Inter- and intra-laboratory study to determine the reproducibility of toxicogenomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Devonshire, A S; Adeleye, Y A; Schutte, M E; Rodrigues, M R; Wilkes, T M; Sacco, M G; Gribaldo, L; Fabbri, M; Coecke, S; Whelan, M; Skinner, N; Bennett, A; White, A; Foy, C A

    2011-11-28

    The application of toxicogenomics as a predictive tool for chemical risk assessment has been under evaluation by the toxicology community for more than a decade. However, it predominately remains a tool for investigative research rather than for regulatory risk assessment. In this study, we assessed whether the current generation of microarray technology in combination with an in vitro experimental design was capable of generating robust, reproducible data of sufficient quality to show promise as a tool for regulatory risk assessment. To this end, we designed a prospective collaborative study to determine the level of inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility between three independent laboratories. All test centres (TCs) adopted the same protocols for all aspects of the toxicogenomic experiment including cell culture, chemical exposure, RNA extraction, microarray data generation and analysis. As a case study, the genotoxic carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 were used to generate three comparable toxicogenomic data sets. High levels of technical reproducibility were demonstrated using a widely employed gene expression microarray platform. While differences at the global transcriptome level were observed between the TCs, a common subset of B[a]P responsive genes (n=400 gene probes) was identified at all TCs which included many genes previously reported in the literature as B[a]P responsive. These data show promise that the current generation of microarray technology, in combination with a standard in vitro experimental design, can produce robust data that can be generated reproducibly in independent laboratories. Future work will need to determine whether such reproducible in vitro model(s) can be predictive for a range of toxic chemicals with different mechanisms of action and thus be considered as part of future testing regimes for regulatory risk assessment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A comprehensive experimental and modeling study of isobutene oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Chong-Wen

    2016-03-17

    Isobutene is an important intermediate in the pyrolysis and oxidation of higher-order branched alkanes, and it is also a component of commercial gasolines. To better understand its combustion characteristics, a series of ignition delay time (IDT) and laminar flame speed (LFS) measurements have been performed. In addition, flow reactor speciation data recorded for the pyrolysis and oxidation of isobutene is also reported. Predictions of an updated kinetic model described herein are compared with each of these data sets, as well as with existing jet-stirred reactor (JSR) species measurements. IDTs of isobutene oxidation were measured in four different shock tubes and in two rapid compression machines (RCMs) under conditions of relevance to practical combustors. The combination of shock tube and RCM data greatly expands the range of available validation data for isobutene oxidation models to pressures of 50 atm and temperatures in the range 666–1715 K. Isobutene flame speeds were measured experimentally at 1 atm and at unburned gas temperatures of 298–398 K over a wide range of equivalence ratios. For the flame speed results, there was good agreement between different facilities and the current model in the fuel-rich region. Ab initio chemical kinetics calculations were carried out to calculate rate constants for important reactions such as H-atom abstraction by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and the decomposition of 2-methylallyl radicals. A comprehensive chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed to describe the combustion of isobutene and is validated by comparison to the presently considered experimental measurements. Important reactions, highlighted via flux and sensitivity analyses, include: (a) hydrogen atom abstraction from isobutene by hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals, and molecular oxygen; (b) radical–radical recombination reactions, including 2-methylallyl radical self-recombination, the recombination of 2-methylallyl radicals with

  20. Experimental test of a four-level kinetic model for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer dye lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costela, A; Munnoz, J M; Douhal, A; Figuera, J M; Acuna, A U [Inst. de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' , C.S.I.C., Madrid (Spain)

    1989-11-01

    The nanosecond pulses of a dye laser oscillator based on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction (IPT) of salicylamide and 2'-hydroxylphenyl benzimidazole dyes have been studied as a function of several experimental parameters. To explain the operation of this laser a numerical four-level kinetic model was developed until the lasing properties of these dyes, in the presence of a variable oxygen concentration and pumped with a double pulse technique, could be reproduced. This was possible only by assuming that the efficiency of the laser is controlled by the absorption cross-section of a transient state with a lifetime in the nanosecond-picosecond range, which was tentatively identified as a ground state tautomeric species. (orig.).

  1. Solar-Powered Desalination: A Modelling and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Jimmy; Andrews, John

    2007-10-01

    materials were investigated: copper-nickel and a commercially available plastic. The modelling and design of a three effects MEE system is also discussed. The effects of the important design and operating parameters (recovery ratio, thermal energy, parasitic electrical energy, distillate production and solar collection area) controlling the cost of fresh water determined both from the computer simulation and experimental results are presented and analysed in this paper. Future work in the overall research program is also outlined.

  2. Modelo experimental de trauma medular agudo produzido por aparelho estereotáxico modificado Experimental model of acute spinal cord injury produced by modified steriotaxic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B.J. Torres

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram utilizados 55 ratos machos da espécie Rattus novergicus, variedade Wistar, com o objetivo de propor um modelo experimental de trauma medular produzido por aparelho estereotáxico modificado, capaz de reproduzir clinicamente lesões medulares padronizadas. Após realização de laminectomia dorsal de T13, utilizou-se peso compressivo de 50,5g (25 animais - grupo I ou 70,5g (30 animais - grupo II, durante cinco minutos, comprimindo a medula espinhal. Os animais foram assistidos durante oito dias, por meio de testes comportamentais para avaliar a sensibilidade dolorosa, a capacidade motora, o posicionamento tátil e proprioceptivo e a capacidade de manter-se em plano inclinado. No grupo I, observaram-se déficits neurológicos moderados e transitórios, que variaram entre os animais. No grupo II, foi possível obter um trauma padronizado, caracterizado por paraplegia bilateral e simétrica dos membros posteriores, perda de propriocepção e da sensibilidade dolorosa de todos os animais. A utilização do aparelho estereotáxico desenvolvido permite reproduzir clinicamente trauma medular padronizado em ratos, de maneira simples, econômica e satisfatória, o que poderá proporcionar avanços nas investigações terapêuticas, abrangendo doenças neurodegenerativas, como é o caso do trauma medular agudo.Fifty-five male rats (Rattus novergicus, Wistar variety, were used with the purpose of suggesting an experimental model of spinal cord trauma performed by using a modified stereotaxic equipment capable to reproduce clinically (standardized pattern spinal cord injury. After dorsal laminectomy of T13, a compression was performed with 50.5g (25 animals - group I or 70.5g (30 animals - group II during five minutes on spinal cord. The animals were assisted during eight days by behavioral tests to evaluate painful sensibility, motor capacity, proprioceptive and tactil placing, and stability on inclined plan. In the group I, moderate and transitory

  3. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Ryan

    analysis computationally taxing. A Probability Density Function (PDF) model for the concentration of scalars, as well as for the droplet number in different size bins, is developed. The growth of droplets as they evolve along the jet, for different downstream and radial positions, compared favorably with experimental measurements in the literature. We utilized a graphical processing unit with the PDF method to more efficiently compute the statistics of the droplet diameter in the non-uniform supersaturation field.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul C.K. Lam; Isaac K. Gamwo; Dimitri Gidaspow

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for gas-liquid-solid flow. A three dimensional transient computer code for the coupled Navier-Stokes equations for each phase was developed and is appended in this report. The principal input into the model is the viscosity of the particulate phase which was determined from a measurement of the random kinetic energy of the 800 micron glass beads and a Brookfield viscometer. The details are presented in the attached paper titled ''CFD Simulation of Flow and Turbulence in a Slurry Bubble Column''. This phase of the work is in press in a referred journal (AIChE Journal, 2002) and was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001) in New Orleans, May 27-June 1, 2001 (Paper No. 909). The computed time averaged particle velocities and concentrations agree with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements of velocities and concentrations, obtained using a combination of gamma-ray and X-ray densitometers, in a slurry bubble column, operated in the bubbly-coalesced fluidization regime with continuous flow of water. Both the experiment and the simulation show a down-flow of particles in the center of the column and up-flow near the walls and nearly uniform particle concentration. Normal and shear Reynolds stresses were constructed from the computed instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced instantaneous particle velocities. The PIV measurement and the simulation produced similar nearly flat horizontal profiles of turbulent kinetic energy of particles. To better understand turbulence we studied fluidization in a liquid-solid bed. This work was also presented at the Fourth International Conference on Multiphase Flow (ICMF 2001, Paper No. 910). To understand turbulence in risers, measurements were done in the IIT riser with 530 micron glass beads using a PIV

  5. Investigation of the Intra- and Interlaboratory Reproducibility of a Small Scale Standardized Supersaturation and Precipitation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Jakob; Madsen, Cecilie M; Teleki, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    order for the three model compounds using the SSPM (aprepitant > felodipine ≈ fenofibrate). The α-value is dependent on the experimental setup and can be used as a parameter to evaluate the uniformity of the data set. This study indicated that the SSPM was able to obtain the same rank order of the β...... compound available for absorption. However, due to the stochastic nature of nucleation, supersaturating drug delivery systems may lead to inter- and intrapersonal variability. The ability to define a feasible range with respect to the supersaturation level is a crucial factor for a successful formulation...... reproducibility study of felodipine was conducted, after which seven partners contributed with data for three model compounds; aprepitant, felodipine, and fenofibrate, to determine the interlaboratory reproducibility of the SSPM. The first part of the SSPM determines the apparent degrees of supersaturation (a...

  6. An experimental and modeling study of n-octanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming; Uygun, Yasar; Togbé , Casimir; Pitsch, Heinz G.; Olivier, Herbert; Dagaut, P.; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first investigation on the combustion chemistry of n-octanol, a long chain alcohol. Ignition delay times were determined experimentally in a high-pressure shock tube, and stable species concentration profiles were obtained

  7. Modeling and experimental validation of CO heterogeneous chemistry and electrochemistry in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurkiv, Vitaly

    2010-12-17

    In the present work experimental and numerical modeling studies of the heterogeneously catalyzed and electrochemical oxidation of CO at Nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode systems were performed to evaluate elementary charge-transfer reaction mechanisms taking place at the three-phase boundary of CO/CO{sub 2} gas-phase, Ni electrode, and YSZ electrolyte. Temperature-programmed desorption and reaction experiments along with density functional theory calculations were performed to determine adsorption/desorption and surface diffusion kinetics as well as thermodynamic data for the CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni and CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ systems. Based on these data elementary reaction based models with four different charge transfer mechanisms for the electrochemical CO oxidation were developed and applied in numerical simulations of literature experimental electrochemical data such as polarization curves and impedance spectra. Comparison between simulation and experiment demonstrated that only one of the four charge transfer mechanisms can consistently reproduce the electrochemical data over a wide range of operating temperatures and CO/CO{sub 2} gas compositions. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden experimentelle und numerische Untersuchungen zur heterogen katalysierten und elektrochemischen Oxidation von CO an Anodensystemen (bestehend aus Nickel und yttriumdotiertem Zirkoniumdioxid, YSZ) von Festoxidbrennstoffzellen (engl. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, SOFCs) ausgefuehrt, um den mikroskopischen Mechanismus der an der CO/CO{sub 2}-Gasphase/Ni-Elektrode/YSZ-Elektrolyt- Dreiphasen-Grenzflaeche ablaufenden Ladungsuebertragungsreaktion aufzuklaeren. Temperaturprogrammierte Desorptionsmessungen (TPD) und Temperaturprogrammierte Reaktionsmessungen (TPR) sowie Dichtefunktionaltheorierechnungen wurden ausgefuehrt, um adsorptions-, desorptions- und reaktionskinetische sowie thermodynamische Daten fuer die CO/CO{sub 2}/Ni- und CO/CO{sub 2}/YSZ

  8. Mechanisms of Osteoarthritic Pain. Studies in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Eitner

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain due to osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most frequent causes of chronic pain. However, the mechanisms of OA pain are poorly understood. This review addresses the mechanisms which are thought to be involved in OA pain, derived from studies on pain mechanisms in humans and in experimental models of OA. Three areas will be considered, namely local processes in the joint associated with OA pain, neuronal mechanisms involved in OA pain, and general factors which influence OA pain. Except the cartilage all structures of the joints are innervated by nociceptors. Although the hallmark of OA is the degradation of the cartilage, OA joints show multiple structural alterations of cartilage, bone and synovial tissue. In particular synovitis and bone marrow lesions have been proposed to determine OA pain whereas the contribution of the other pathologies to pain generation has been studied less. Concerning the peripheral neuronal mechanisms of OA pain, peripheral nociceptive sensitization was shown, and neuropathic mechanisms may be involved at some stages. Structural changes of joint innervation such as local loss and/or sprouting of nerve fibers were shown. In addition, central sensitization, reduction of descending inhibition, descending excitation and cortical atrophies were observed in OA. The combination of different neuronal mechanisms may define the particular pain phenotype in an OA patient. Among mediators involved in OA pain, nerve growth factor (NGF is in the focus because antibodies against NGF significantly reduce OA pain. Several studies show that neutralization of interleukin-1β and TNF may reduce OA pain. Many patients with OA exhibit comorbidities such as obesity, low grade systemic inflammation and diabetes mellitus. These comorbidities can significantly influence the course of OA, and pain research just began to study the significance of such factors in pain generation. In addition, psychologic and socioeconomic factors may aggravate

  9. Reproducibility in Research: Systems, Infrastructure, Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Crick

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The reproduction and replication of research results has become a major issue for a number of scientific disciplines. In computer science and related computational disciplines such as systems biology, the challenges closely revolve around the ability to implement (and exploit novel algorithms and models. Taking a new approach from the literature and applying it to a new codebase frequently requires local knowledge missing from the published manuscripts and transient project websites. Alongside this issue, benchmarking, and the lack of open, transparent and fair benchmark sets present another barrier to the verification and validation of claimed results. In this paper, we outline several recommendations to address these issues, driven by specific examples from a range of scientific domains. Based on these recommendations, we propose a high-level prototype open automated platform for scientific software development which effectively abstracts specific dependencies from the individual researcher and their workstation, allowing easy sharing and reproduction of results. This new e-infrastructure for reproducible computational science offers the potential to incentivise a culture change and drive the adoption of new techniques to improve the quality and efficiency – and thus reproducibility – of scientific exploration.