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Sample records for model relating cell

  1. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem cells and neurogenesis in relation to Alzheimer's disease Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Jacobs, E.H.; Hoeijmakers, L.; Lesuis, S.L.; Krugers, H.; Korosi, A.; Kuhn, H.G.; Boekhoorn, K.; Kuhn, H.G.; Eisch, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder associated with progressive cognitive decline and extensive neuropathology throughout the brain. Its main features include limited cell loss in selected subregions, generalized brain atrophy, and gradual accumulation of β-amyloid

  3. Stem cells and neurogenesis in relation to Alzheimer's disease Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Lucassen; E.H. Jacobs; L. Hoeijmakers; S.L. Lesuis; H. Krugers; A. Korosi; H.G. Kuhn; K. Boekhoorn

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder associated with progressive cognitive decline and extensive neuropathology throughout the brain. Its main features include limited cell loss in selected subregions, generalized brain atrophy, and gradual accumulation of β-amyloid p

  4. Cell Models and Their Application for Studying Adipogenic Differentiation in Relation to Obesity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Rupérez, Azahara Iris; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Gil, Angel; Aguilera, Concepción María

    2016-01-01

    Over the last several years, the increasing prevalence of obesity has favored an intense study of adipose tissue biology and the precise mechanisms involved in adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. Adipocyte commitment and differentiation are complex processes, which can be investigated thanks to the development of diverse in vitro cell models and molecular biology techniques that allow for a better understanding of adipogenesis and adipocyte dysfunction associated with obesity. The aim of the present work was to update the different animal and human cell culture models available for studying the in vitro adipogenic differentiation process related to obesity and its co-morbidities. The main characteristics, new protocols, and applications of the cell models used to study the adipogenesis in the last five years have been extensively revised. Moreover, we depict co-cultures and three-dimensional cultures, given their utility to understand the connections between adipocytes and their surrounding cells in adipose tissue. PMID:27376273

  5. Cell Models and Their Application for Studying Adipogenic Differentiation in Relation to Obesity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Ruiz-Ojeda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, the increasing prevalence of obesity has favored an intense study of adipose tissue biology and the precise mechanisms involved in adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis. Adipocyte commitment and differentiation are complex processes, which can be investigated thanks to the development of diverse in vitro cell models and molecular biology techniques that allow for a better understanding of adipogenesis and adipocyte dysfunction associated with obesity. The aim of the present work was to update the different animal and human cell culture models available for studying the in vitro adipogenic differentiation process related to obesity and its co-morbidities. The main characteristics, new protocols, and applications of the cell models used to study the adipogenesis in the last five years have been extensively revised. Moreover, we depict co-cultures and three-dimensional cultures, given their utility to understand the connections between adipocytes and their surrounding cells in adipose tissue.

  6. Inflammation and Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Immunopathological and Ultrastructural Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Ardeljan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD remains elusive despite the characterization of many factors contributing to the disease in its late-stage phenotypes. AMD features an immune system in flux, as shown by changes in macrophage polarization with age, expression of cytokines and complement, microglial accumulation with age, etc. These point to an allostatic overload, possibly due to a breakdown in self vs. non-self when endogenous compounds and structures acquire the appearance of non-self over time. The result is inflammation and inflammation-mediated cell death. While it is clear that these processes ultimately result in degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor, the prevalent type of cell death contributing to the various phenotypes is unknown. Both molecular studies as well as ultrastructural pathology suggest pyroptosis, and perhaps necroptosis, are the predominant mechanisms of cell death at play, with only minimal evidence for apoptosis. Herein, we attempt to reconcile those factors identified by experimental AMD models and integrate these data with pathology observed under the electron microscope—particularly observations of mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA leakage, autophagy, and cell death.

  7. A vertex-based model relating cell shape and mechanical stress in an epithelium

    CERN Document Server

    Nestor-Bergmann, Alexander; Woolner, Sarah; Jensen, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Using a popular vertex-based model to describe a spatially disordered planar epithelial monolayer, we examine the relationship between cell shape and mechanical stress at the cell and tissue level. Deriving expressions for stress tensors starting from an energetic formulation of the model, we show that the principal axes of stress for an individual cell align with the principal axes of shape, and we determine the bulk effective tissue pressure when the monolayer is isotropic at the tissue level. Using simulations for a monolayer that is not under peripheral stress, we fit parameters of the model to experimental data for Xenopus embryonic tissue. The model predicts that mechanical interactions can generate mesoscopic patterns within the monolayer that exhibit long-range correlations in cell shape. The model also suggests that the orientation of mechanical and geometric cues for processes such as cell division are likely to be strongly correlated in real epithelia.

  8. Embryonic stem cells as an ectodermal cellular model of human p63-related dysplasia syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rostagno, P.; Wolchinsky, Z.; Vigano, A.M.; Shivtiel, S.; Zhou, H.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Ferone, G.; Missero, C.; Mantovani, R.; Aberdam, D.; Virolle, T.

    2010-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the TP63 transcription factor underlie the molecular basis of several similar autosomal dominant ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes. Here we provide a novel cellular model derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells that recapitulates in vitro the main steps of embryonic skin d

  9. A CFD model for analysis of performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive three–dimensional, multi–phase, non-isothermal model of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM fuel cell that incorporates significant physical processes and key parameters affecting the fuel cell performance. The model construction involves equations derivation, boundary conditions setting, and solution algorithm flow chart. Equations in gas flow channels, gas diffusion layers (GDLs, catalyst layers (CLs, and membrane as well as equations governing cell potential and hygro-thermal stresses are described. The algorithm flow chart starts from input of the desired cell current density, initialization, iteration of the equations solution, and finalizations by calculating the cell potential. In order to analyze performance, water and thermal distribution, and mechanical related failure in the cell, the equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD code. Performance analysis includes a performance curve which plots the cell potential (Volt against nominal current density (A/cm2 as well as losses. Velocity vectors of gas and liquid water, liquid water saturation, and water content profile are calculated. Thermal distribution is then calculated together with hygro-thermal stresses and deformation. The CFD model was executed under boundary conditions of 20°C room temperature, 35% relative humidity, and 1 MPA pressure on the lower surface. Parameters values of membrane electrode assembly (MEA and other base conditions are selected. A cell with dimension of 1 mm x 1 mm x 50 mm is used as the object of analysis. The nominal current density of 1.4 A/cm2 is given as the input of the CFD calculation. The results show that the model represents well the performance curve obtained through experiment. Moreover, it can be concluded that the model can help in understanding complex process in the cell which is hard to be studied experimentally, and also provides computer aided tool for design and optimization of PEM

  10. An in vitro model for spontaneous angiogenesis using rat mesenteric endothelial cells: possible therapeutic perspective for obesity and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Kamran; Khodarahmi, Reza; Ghadami, Seyyed Abolghasem

    2013-08-01

    Abnormal obesity and the related diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, are the main causes of mortality, around the world. A key feature of the adipogenesis and obesity is angiogenesis-dependent tissue growth accompanied with extracellular remodeling. In this way, suppression of angiogenesis may be a key point for preventing the adipogenesis. In the present study, to provide a deeper insight to understand obesity and screening for more effective therapeutics, we have developed a three-dimensional in vitro model of microvessel formation under collagen matrix culture using endothelial cells, extracted from a suitable tissue. In a successful approach for developing an angiogenesis model, the rat mesenteric microvascular endothelial cells (RMMECs) were isolated, coated on dextran beads and then suspended in collagen gel. Additionally, the proliferation as well as migration of endothelial cells were analyzed and compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). RMMECs showed remarkable migration ability and had higher growth during the logarithmic growth phase, when compared with HUVECs. Also, no significance differences in morphogenesis were observed between HUVECs and RMMECs. The model may be useful in providing insights to develop potential intervention strategies in vivo against obesity-related disorders. Targeting endothelial cells is an interesting and exciting possibility that may be raised in further investigations.

  11. A Bigraph Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauquier, Maxime; Schürmann, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on relations for bigraphical reactive system [Milner09]. Its defining characteristics are that validity and reaction relations are captured as traces in a multi-set rewriting system. The relational model is derived from Milner's graphical definition...

  12. Auditory sensitivity and the outer hair cell system in the CBA mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2010-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss is a highly prevalent sensory disorder, from both the clinical and animal model perspectives. Understanding of the neurophysiologic, structural, and molecular biologic bases of age-related hearing loss will facilitate development of biomedical therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow, or reverse its progression. Thus, increased understanding of relationships between aging of the cochlear (auditory portion of the inner ear) hair cell system and decline in overall hearing ability is necessary. The goal of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that there would be correlations between physiologic measures of outer hair cell function (otoacoustic emission levels) and hearing sensitivity (auditory brainstem response thresholds), starting in middle age. For the CBA mouse, a useful animal model of age-related hearing loss, it was found that correlations between these two hearing measures occurred only for high sound frequencies in middle age. However, in old age, a correlation was observed across the entire mouse range of hearing. These findings have implications for improved early detection of progression of age-related hearing loss in middle-aged mammals, including mice and humans, and distinguishing peripheral etiologies from central auditory system decline.

  13. Sutherlandia frutescens prevents changes in diabetes-related gene expression in a fructose-induced insulin resistant cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S; Roux, S; Koekemoer, T; van de Venter, M; Dealtry, G

    2013-03-27

    The African medicinal plant Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. (Fabaceae) is traditionally used to treat diabetes and has been shown to have anti-diabetic properties in animal models. The present study investigated the capacity of an aqueous extract of Sutherlandia frutescens to prevent insulin resistance (a precursor of type 2 diabetes) in a human liver cell culture and to identify genes regulated by Sutherlandia frutescens treatment. A combination of insulin and fructose was used to generate an in vitro model of insulin resistance in human liver cells to compare untreated control, insulin resistant and Sutherlandia frutescens treated insulin resistant cultures. Insulin resistance and its prevention by Sutherlandia frutescens were measured by glucose uptake, gluconeogenesis and lipid accumulation in the cell cultures. Changes in gene expression were quantified using the RT(2)Profiler(TM) PCR Array of 84 diabetes-related genes. The insulin resistant Chang liver cells took up significantly less 2-[(3)H]-deoxyglucose (pdiabetic action for Sutherlandia frutescens, reflecting the multiple bioactive compounds previously identified in aqueous extracts of Sutherlandia frutescens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An in vivo-like tumor stem cell-related glioblastoma in vitro model for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Nørregaard, Annette

    the effects of new drugs on tumor cells including tumor stem cells. Implantation of glioblastoma cells into organotypic brain slice cultures has previously been published as a model system, but not using a stem cell favourable environment. Organotypic corticostriatal rat brain slice cultures were prepared......The discovery of tumor stem cells being highly resistant against therapy makes new demands to model systems suitable for evaluation of the effects of new drugs on tumor stem cells. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop an in vivo-like in vitro glioblastoma model for testing...... and cultured in a serum containing medium replaced after three days with a serum-free stem cell medium. Thereafter fluorescent DiI labelled glioblastoma spheroids from the cell line U87 and the tumor stem cell line SJ-1 established in our laboratory were implanted into the brain slices between cortex...

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy and modeling of interface properties related to organic photovoltaic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahlman, Mats; Sehati, Parisa; Osikowicz, Wojciech; Braun, Slawomir; Jong, de Michel P.; Brocks, Geert

    2013-01-01

    In this short review, we will give examples on how photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) assisted by models on interface energetics can be used to study properties important to bulk heterojunction type organic photovoltaic devices focusing on the well-known bulk heterojunction blend of poly(3-hexylthioph

  16. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (1-36 Enhances Beta Cell Regeneration and Increases Beta Cell Mass in a Mouse Model of Partial Pancreatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Mozar

    Full Text Available Finding ways to stimulate the regeneration of endogenous pancreatic beta cells is an important goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP, the full-length (1-139 and amino-terminal (1-36 peptides, enhance beta cell function, proliferation, and survival. Therefore, we hypothesize that PTHrP(1-36 has the potential to regenerate endogenous beta cells.The partial pancreatectomy (PPx mouse model of beta cell injury was used to test this hypothesis. Male Balb/c mice underwent either sham-operation or PPx, and were subsequently injected with PTHrP(1-36 (160μg/kg or vehicle (veh, for 7, 30, or 90 days. The four groups of mice, sham-veh, sham-PTHrP, PPx-veh, and PPx-PTHrP were assessed for PTHrP and receptor expression, and glucose and beta cell homeostasis.PTHrP-receptor, but not the ligand, was significantly up-regulated in islets from mice that underwent PPx compared to sham-operated mice. This suggests that exogenous PTHrP could further enhance beta cell regeneration after PPx. PTHrP did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, or insulin sensitivity, in either sham or PPx mice. Glucose tolerance improved in the PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice only in the early stages of treatment. As hypothesized, there was a significant increase in beta cell proliferation in PPx-PTHrP mice at days 7 and 30; however, this was normalized by day 90, compared to PPx-veh mice. Enhanced beta cell proliferation translated to a marked increase in beta cell mass at day 90, in PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice.PTHrP(1-36 significantly enhances beta cell regeneration through increased beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass after PPx. Future studies will determine the potential of PTHrP to enhance functional beta cell mass in the setting of diabetes.

  17. Development and characterization of a hydrogen peroxide-resistant cholangiocyte cell line: A novel model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanan, Raynoo [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Techasen, Anchalee [Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Faculty of Associated Medical Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hou, Bo [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Jamnongkan, Wassana; Armartmuntree, Napat [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Yongvanit, Puangrat, E-mail: puangrat@kku.ac.th [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Murata, Mariko, E-mail: mmurata@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Oxidative stress is a cause of inflammation–related diseases, including cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma is a liver cancer with bile duct epithelial cell phenotypes. Our previous studies in animal and human models indicated that oxidative stress is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma development. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can generate hydroxyl radicals, which damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to cell death. However, some cells can survive by adapting to oxidative stress conditions, and selective clonal expansion of these resistant cells would be involved in oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to establish H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell line from an immortal cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) by chronic treatment with low-concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (25 μM). After 72 days of induction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell lines (ox-MMNK1-L) were obtained. The ox-MMNK1-L cell line showed H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant properties, increasing the expression of the anti-oxidant genes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and superoxide dismutase-3 (SOD3) and the enzyme activities of CAT and intracellular SODs. Furthermore, the resistant cells showed increased expression levels of an epigenetics-related gene, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), when compared to the parental cells. Interestingly, the ox-MMNK1-L cell line had a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than the MMNK1 normal cell line. Moreover, ox-MMNK1-L cells showed pseudopodia formation and the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion (multi-layers) under additional oxidative stress (100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). These findings suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cells can be used as a model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis through molecular changes such as alteration of gene expression and epigenetic changes. - Highlights: • An H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant ox-MMNK1-L cells was established from

  18. Adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium ameliorates antidepression-related behaviors in the mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiromitsu; Jin, Yu; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kanno, Takeshi; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-16

    The present study investigated the effect of adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) on behavioral disorders in 5xFAD transgenic mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swim tests for 5xFAD mice was shorter than that for wild-type mice. Intravenous injection with ASC-CM restored the shortened immobility time for 5xFAD mice to the normal levels or to an extent, being still persistent 4 weeks after injection. ASC-CM significantly suppressed phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hypothalamus of 5xFAD mice, without affecting Tau phosphorylation, as compared with that for control 5xFAD mice without ASC-CM injection. ASC-CM did not affect cell surface localization of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits NR1, -2A, and -2B both in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of 5xFAD mice. The results of the present study show that ASC-CM ameliorates antidepression-related behaviors in 5xFAD mice, perhaps by inhibiting Akt and activating GSK-3β. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Sagunja-Tang Improves Lipid Related Disease in a Postmenopausal Rat Model and HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroe Go

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Sagunja-tang on the lipid related disease in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia and lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced HepG2 cells. In in vivo study using menopausal hyperlipidemia rats, Sagunja-tang reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor, media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis score, when compared to menopausal hyperlipidemia control rats. In HepG2 cells, Sagunja-tang significantly decreased the lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density/very-low-density lipoprotein levels. Moreover, Sagunja-tang reversed the methyl-β-cyclodextrin-induced decrease in the protein levels of critical molecule involved in cholesterol synthesis, sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, and low-density lipoprotein receptor and inhibited protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase as well as activity. Phosphorylation level of AMP-activated protein kinase was stimulated by Sagunja-tang. These results suggest that Sagunja-tang has effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation through regulation of cholesterol synthesis and AMPK activity in vitro. These observations support the idea that Sagunja-tang is bioavailable both in vivo and in vitro and could be developed as a preventive and therapeutic agent of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal females.

  20. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  1. Altered cell cycle-related gene expression in brain and lymphocytes from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease [amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (PS1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras, Noemí; Bartolomé, Fernando; Alquézar, Carolina; Antequera, Desireé; Muñoz, Úrsula; Carro, Eva; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2012-09-01

    Cumulative evidence indicates that aberrant re-expression of many cell cycle-related proteins and inappropriate neuronal cell cycle control are critical events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Evidence of cell cycle activation in post-mitotic neurons has also been observed in murine models of AD, despite the fact that most of these mice do not show massive loss of neuronal bodies. Dysfunction of the cell cycle appears to affect cells other than neurons, as peripheral cells, such as lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with AD, show an altered response to mitogenic stimulation. We sought to determine whether cell cycle disturbances are present simultaneously in both brain and peripheral cells from the amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin 1 (PS1) mouse model of AD, in order to validate the use of peripheral cells from patients not only to study cell cycle abnormalities as a pathogenic feature of AD, but also as a means to test novel therapeutic approaches. By using cell cycle pathway-specific RT(2)Profiler™ PCR Arrays, we detected changes in a number of cell cycle-related genes in brain as well as in lymphocytes from APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, we found enhanced 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into DNA in lymphocytes from APP/PS1 mice, and increased expression of the cell proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cdkn2a, as detected by immunohistochemistry in cortical neurons of the APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, the cell cycle-related changes in brain and blood cells reported here support the mitosis failure hypothesis in AD and validate the use of peripheral cells as surrogate tissue to study the molecular basis of AD pathogenesis.

  2. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters expression of neurogenesis-related genes in an ex vivo cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christina R; Allan, Andrea M

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can lead to long-lasting changes in functional and genetic programs of the brain, which may underlie behavioral alterations seen in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Aberrant fetal programming during gestational alcohol exposure is a possible mechanism by which alcohol imparts teratogenic effects on the brain; however, current methods used to investigate the effects of alcohol on development often rely on either direct application of alcohol in vitro or acute high doses in vivo. In this study, we used our established moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) model, resulting in maternal blood alcohol content of approximately 20 mM, and subsequent ex vivo cell culture to assess expression of genes related to neurogenesis. Proliferating and differentiating neural progenitor cell culture conditions were established from telencephalic tissue derived from embryonic day (E) 15-17 tissue exposed to alcohol via maternal drinking throughout pregnancy. Gene expression analysis on mRNA derived in vitro was performed using a microarray, and quantitative PCR was conducted for genes to validate the microarray. Student's t tests were performed for statistical comparison of each exposure under each culture condition using a 95% confidence interval. Eleven percent of genes on the array had significantly altered mRNA expression in the prenatal alcohol-exposed neural progenitor culture under proliferating conditions. These include reduced expression of Adora2a, Cxcl1, Dlg4, Hes1, Nptx1, and Vegfa and increased expression of Fgf13, Ndn, and Sox3; bioinformatics analysis indicated that these genes are involved in cell growth and proliferation. Decreased levels of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a were also found under proliferating conditions. Under differentiating conditions, 7.3% of genes had decreased mRNA expression; these include Cdk5rap3, Gdnf, Hey2, Heyl, Pard6b, and Ptn, which are associated with survival and differentiation as indicated by bioinformatics analysis

  3. Effect of parathyroid hormone-related protein in an in vitro hypertrophy model for mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael B; Fischer, Maria; Zellner, Johannes; Berner, Arne; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Kujat, Richard; Prantl, Lukas; Nerlich, Michael; Tuan, Rocky S; Angele, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) express markers of hypertrophic chondrocytes during chondrogenic differentiation. We tested the suitability of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a regulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy in embryonic cartilage development, for the suppression of hypertrophy in an in vitro hypertrophy model of chondrifying MSCs. Chondrogenesis was induced in human MSCs in pellet culture for two weeks and for an additional two weeks cultures were either maintained in standard chondrogenic medium or transferred to a hypertrophy-enhancing medium. PTHrP(1-40) was added to the medium throughout the culture period at concentrations from 1 to 1,000 pM. Pellets were harvested on days one, 14 and 28 for biochemical and histological analysis. Hypertrophic medium clearly enhanced the hypertrophic phenotype, with increased cell size, and strong alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and type X collagen staining. In chondrogenic medium, 1-100 pM PTHrP(1-40) did not inhibit chondrogenic differentiation, whereas 1,000 pM PTHrP(1-40) significantly reduced chondrogenesis. ALP activity was dose-dependently reduced by PTHrP(1-40) at 10-1,000 pM in chondrogenic conditions. Under hypertrophy-enhancing conditions, PTHrP(1-40) did not inhibit the induction of the hypertrophy. At the highest concentration (1,000 pM) in the hypertrophic group, aggregates were partially dedifferentiated and differentiated areas of these aggregates maintained their hypertrophic appearance. PTHrP(1-40) treatment dose-dependently reduced ALP expression in MSC pellets cultured under standard chondrogenic conditions and is thus beneficial for the maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype in this medium condition. When cultured under hypertrophy-enhancing conditions, PTHrP(1-40) could not diminish the induced enhancement of hypertrophy in the MSC pellets.

  4. Oxidative stress and age-related changes in T cells: is thalassemia a model of accelerated immune system aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatreh-Samani, Mahdi; Esmaeili, Nafiseh; Soleimani, Masoud; Asadi-Samani, Majid; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Shirzad, Hedayatolah

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload in β-thalassemia major occurs mainly due to blood transfusion, an essential treatment for β-thalassemia major patients, which results in oxidative stress. It has been thought that oxidative stress causes elevation of immune system senescent cells. Under this condition, cells normally enhance in aging, which is referred to as premature immunosenescence. Because there is no animal model for immunosenescence, most knowledge on the immunosenescence pattern is based on induction of immunosenescence. In this review, we describe iron overload and oxidative stress in β-thalassemia major patients and how they make these patients a suitable human model for immunosenescence. We also consider oxidative stress in some kinds of chronic virus infections, which induce changes in the immune system similar to β-thalassemia major. In conclusion, a therapeutic approach used to improve the immune system in such chronic virus diseases, may change the immunosenescence state and make life conditions better for β-thalassemia major patients.

  5. Rethinking cell growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafri, Moshe; Metzl-Raz, Eyal; Jonas, Felix; Barkai, Naama

    2016-11-01

    The minimal description of a growing cell consists of self-replicating ribosomes translating the cellular proteome. While neglecting all other cellular components, this model provides key insights into the control and limitations of growth rate. It shows, for example, that growth rate is maximized when ribosomes work at full capacity, explains the linear relation between growth rate and the ribosome fraction of the proteome and defines the maximal possible growth rate. This ribosome-centered model also highlights the challenge of coordinating cell growth with related processes such as cell division or nutrient production. Coordination is promoted when ribosomes don't translate at maximal capacity, as it allows escaping strict exponential growth. Recent data support the notion that multiple cellular processes limit growth. In particular, increasing transcriptional demand may be as deleterious as increasing translational demand, depending on growth conditions. Consistent with the idea of trade-off, cells may forgo maximal growth to enable more efficient interprocess coordination and faster adaptation to changing conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. On the Relative Relevance of Subject-Specific Geometries and Degeneration-Specific Mechanical Properties for the Study of Cell Death in Human Intervertebral Disk Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M.; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F.; van Rijsbergen, Marc M.; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration. PMID:25717471

  7. On the relative relevance of subject-specific geometries and degeneration-specific mechanical properties for the study of cell death in human intervertebral disk models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandrino, Andrea; Pozo, José M; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Frangi, Alejandro F; van Rijsbergen, Marc M; Ito, Keita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Dao, Tien Tuan; Ho Ba Tho, Marie-Christine; Noailly, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Capturing patient- or condition-specific intervertebral disk (IVD) properties in finite element models is outmost important in order to explore how biomechanical and biophysical processes may interact in spine diseases. However, disk degenerative changes are often modeled through equations similar to those employed for healthy organs, which might not be valid. As for the simulated effects of degenerative changes, they likely depend on specific disk geometries. Accordingly, we explored the ability of continuum tissue models to simulate disk degenerative changes. We further used the results in order to assess the interplay between these simulated changes and particular IVD morphologies, in relation to disk cell nutrition, a potentially important factor in disk tissue regulation. A protocol to derive patient-specific computational models from clinical images was applied to different spine specimens. In vitro, IVD creep tests were used to optimize poro-hyperelastic input material parameters in these models, in function of the IVD degeneration grade. The use of condition-specific tissue model parameters in the specimen-specific geometrical models was validated against independent kinematic measurements in vitro. Then, models were coupled to a transport-cell viability model in order to assess the respective effects of tissue degeneration and disk geometry on cell viability. While classic disk poro-mechanical models failed in representing known degenerative changes, additional simulation of tissue damage allowed model validation and gave degeneration-dependent material properties related to osmotic pressure and water loss, and to increased fibrosis. Surprisingly, nutrition-induced cell death was independent of the grade-dependent material properties, but was favored by increased diffusion distances in large IVDs. Our results suggest that in situ geometrical screening of IVD morphology might help to anticipate particular mechanisms of disk degeneration.

  8. [Quercetin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in a model of glucose-oxygen deprivation in astrocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Lanlan; Yuan, Zhaohu; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Bingyi

    2013-09-01

    To study the effect of quercetin on gene expression in astrocytes after glucose-oxygen deprivation and the underlying mechanism. The primary cultured astrocytes were randomly divided into glucose-oxygen deprivation group (only treated with glucose-oxygen deprivation for 4 hours) and glucose-oxygen deprivation combined with quercetin-treated group (glucose-oxygen deprivation for 4 hours combined with quercetin treatment for 24 hours). Their mRNA expressions were analyzed by the large-scale oligo microarray. The differential genes obtained were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with the glucose-oxygen deprivation group, the glucose-oxygen deprivation combined with quercetin-treated group presented the changes in the expressions of 31 genes that were related to cell cycle, of which 5 genes were up-regulated and 26 were down-regulated. Six of those differential genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR and the result of their differential expressions was consistent with that by large-scale oligo microarray. Quercetin can regulate some of cell cycle-related genes in astrocytes after glucose-oxygen deprivation.

  9. Agouti Related Peptide Secreted Via Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Upregulates Proteasome Activity in an Alzheimer’s Disease Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na Kyung; Park, Sang Eon; Kwon, Soo Jin; Shim, Sangmi; Byeon, Yeji; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Na, Duk L.; Chang, Jong Wook

    2017-01-01

    The activity of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is downregulated in aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of the Agouti-related peptide (AgRP), which is secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), in terms of its effect on the regulation of proteasome activity in AD. When SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells were co-cultured with MSCs isolated from human Wharton’s Jelly (WJ-MSC), their proteasome activity was significantly upregulated. Further analysis of the conditioned media after co-culture allowed us to identify significant concentrations of a neuropeptide, called AgRP. The stereotactic delivery of either WJ-MSCs or AgRP into the hippocampi of C57BL6/J and 5XFAD mice induced a significant increase of proteasome activity and suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Collectively, these findings suggest strong therapeutic potential for WJ-MSCs and AgRP to enhance proteasome activity, thereby potentially reducing abnormal protein aggregation and delaying the clinical progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28051110

  10. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), JRC, Ispra (Italy); Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe [Oncohematology Laboratory, Department of Woman and Child Health, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); Gaspar, John Antonydas [Center of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Neurophysiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), JRC, Ispra (Italy); Sachinidis, Agapios [Center of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Institute of Neurophysiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne, E-mail: susanne.bremer@jrc.ec.europa.eu [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  11. Relative survival multistate Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszti, Ella; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Alioum, Ahmadou; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2012-02-10

    Prognostic studies often have to deal with two important challenges: (i) separating effects of predictions on different 'competing' events and (ii) uncertainty about cause of death. Multistate Markov models permit multivariable analyses of competing risks of, for example, mortality versus disease recurrence. On the other hand, relative survival methods help estimate disease-specific mortality risks even in the absence of data on causes of death. In this paper, we propose a new Markov relative survival (MRS) model that attempts to combine these two methodologies. Our MRS model extends the existing multistate Markov piecewise constant intensities model to relative survival modeling. The intensity of transitions leading to death in the MRS model is modeled as the sum of an estimable excess hazard of mortality from the disease of interest and an 'offset' defined as the expected hazard of all-cause 'natural' mortality obtained from relevant life-tables. We evaluate the new MRS model through simulations, with a design based on registry-based prognostic studies of colon cancer. Simulation results show almost unbiased estimates of prognostic factor effects for the MRS model. We also applied the new MRS model to reassess the role of prognostic factors for mortality in a study of colorectal cancer. The MRS model considerably reduces the bias observed with the conventional Markov model that does not permit accounting for unknown causes of death, especially if the 'true' effects of a prognostic factor on the two types of mortality differ substantially.

  12. Progressive Motor Neuron Pathology and the Role of Astrocytes in a Human Stem Cell Model of VCP-Related ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor neurons (MNs and astrocytes (ACs are implicated in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, but their interaction and the sequence of molecular events leading to MN death remain unresolved. Here, we optimized directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into highly enriched (> 85% functional populations of spinal cord MNs and ACs. We identify significantly increased cytoplasmic TDP-43 and ER stress as primary pathogenic events in patient-specific valosin-containing protein (VCP-mutant MNs, with secondary mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Cumulatively, these cellular stresses result in synaptic pathology and cell death in VCP-mutant MNs. We additionally identify a cell-autonomous VCP-mutant AC survival phenotype, which is not attributable to the same molecular pathology occurring in VCP-mutant MNs. Finally, through iterative co-culture experiments, we uncover non-cell-autonomous effects of VCP-mutant ACs on both control and mutant MNs. This work elucidates molecular events and cellular interplay that could guide future therapeutic strategies in ALS.

  13. Elucidation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related pathways in a triple-negative breast cancer cell line model by multi-omics interactome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Josch K; Christensen, Anne G; Batra, Richa; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Barbosa, Eudes; Larsen, Martin R; Beck, Hans C; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Azevedo, Vasco; Ditzel, Henrik J; Baumbach, Jan

    2014-11-01

    In life sciences, and particularly biomedical research, linking aberrant pathways exhibiting phenotype-specific alterations to the underlying physical condition or disease is an ongoing challenge. Computationally, a key approach for pathway identification is data enrichment, combined with generation of biological networks. This allows identification of intrinsic patterns in the data and their linkage to a specific context such as cellular compartments, diseases or functions. Identification of aberrant pathways by traditional approaches is often limited to biological networks based on either gene expression, protein expression or post-translational modifications. To overcome single omics analysis, we developed a set of computational methods that allow a combined analysis of data collections from multiple omics fields utilizing hybrid interactome networks. We apply these methods to data obtained from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line model, combining data sets of gene and protein expression as well as protein phosphorylation. We focus on alterations associated with the phenotypical differences arising from epithelial-mesenchymal transition in two breast cancer cell lines exhibiting epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like morphology, respectively. Here we identified altered protein signaling activity in a complex biologically relevant network, related to focal adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells. We found dysregulated functional network modules revealing altered phosphorylation-dependent activity in concordance with the phenotypic traits and migrating potential of the tested model. In addition, we identified Ser267 on zyxin, a protein coupled to actin filament polymerization, as a potential in vivo phosphorylation target of cyclin-dependent kinase 1.

  14. Object-relational mapping model

    OpenAIRE

    Žukauskas, Arūnas

    2007-01-01

    This work is analyzing problems, arising because of sematical gap between relational and object-oriented approaches and discusses how to utilize object-relational mapping for solving this problem. After analysis of object-relational mapping framework (further – ORM) principles and features of existing ORM frameworks a model is suggested, that allows to implement ORM by utilizing MVP principles in a way that retains major portion of both approach pros and is perfect for transitioning existing ...

  15. Characterization of the caspase cascade in a cell culture model of SOD1-related familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: expression, activation and therapeutic effects of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathasivam, S; Grierson, A J; Shaw, P J

    2005-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that apoptosis or a similar programmed cell death pathway is the mechanism of cell death responsible for motor neurone degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Knowledge of the relative importance of different caspases in the cell death process is at present incomplete. In addition, there is little information on the critical point of the death pathway when the process of dying becomes irreversible. In this study, using the well-established NSC34 motor neurone-like cell line stably transfected with empty vector, normal or mutant human Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), we have characterized the activation of the caspase cascade in detail, revealing that the activation of caspases-9, -3 and -8 are important in motor neurone death and that the presence of mutant SOD1 causes increased activation of components of the apoptotic cascade under both basal culture conditions and following oxidative stress induced by serum withdrawal. Activation of the caspases identified in the cellular model has been confirmed in the G93A SOD1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, investigation of the effects of anti-apoptotic neuroprotective agents including specific caspase inhibitors, minocycline and nifedipine, have supported the importance of the mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic pathway in the death process and revealed that the upstream caspase cascade needs to be inhibited if useful neuro-protection is to be achieved.

  16. Physical models of cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys the most recent advances in physics-inspired cell movement models. This synergetic, cross-disciplinary effort to increase the fidelity of computational algorithms will lead to a better understanding of the complex biomechanics of cell movement, and stimulate progress in research on related active matter systems, from suspensions of bacteria and synthetic swimmers to cell tissues and cytoskeleton.Cell motility and collective motion are among the most important themes in biology and statistical physics of out-of-equilibrium systems, and crucial for morphogenesis, wound healing, and immune response in eukaryotic organisms. It is also relevant for the development of effective treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer, and for the design of bioactive surfaces for cell sorting and manipulation. Substrate-based cell motility is, however, a very complex process as regulatory pathways and physical force generation mechanisms are intertwined. To understand the interplay between adhesion, force ...

  17. Histopathological Analysis from Gallic Acid Administration on Hippocampal Cell Density, Depression, and Anxiety Related Behaviors in A Trimethyltin Intoxication Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Moghadas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study investigated the effects of gallic acid (GA administration on trimethyltin chloride (TMT induced anxiety, depression, and hippocampal neurodegeneration in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the rats received intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of TMT (8 mg/kg. The animals received either GA (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg or saline as the vehicle for 14 consecutive days. We measured depression and anxiety levels of the rats by conducting the behavioral tail suspension (TST, elevatedplusmaze (EPM, and novelty suppressed feeding (NSF tests. Histological analyses were then used to determine the cell densities of different hippocampal subdivisions. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: GA administration ameliorated anxiety and depression in the behavioral tests. The cell densities in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and DG hippocampal subdivisionsfrom GA-treated rats were higher than saline treated rats. Conclusion: GA treatment against TMT-induced hippocampal degeneration altered cellular loss in the hippocampus and ameliorated the depression-anxiety state in rats.

  18. A Model for International Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Since the end of the Cold War, the new international environment has required a new model of relationship between major countries. The basis of the new relations is to safeguard one's own national interests while respecting the national interests of the other country. The process of establishing such rela-

  19. Elucidation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related pathways in a triple-negative breast cancer cell line model by multi-omics interactome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauling, Josch K; Christensen, Anne G; Batra, Richa

    2014-01-01

    obtained from a triple-negative breast cancer cell line model, combining data sets of gene and protein expression as well as protein phosphorylation. We focus on alterations associated with the phenotypical differences arising from epithelial-mesenchymal transition in two breast cancer cell lines...

  20. Applying the Transactional Stress and Coping Model to Sickle Cell Disorder and Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus: Identifying Psychosocial Variables Related to Adjustment and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Lochman, John E.

    2005-01-01

    This review paper examines the literature on psychosocial factors associated with adjustment to sickle cell disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in children through the framework of the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model. The transactional stress and coping model views adaptation to a childhood chronic illness as mediated by…

  1. Single-cell model of prokaryotic cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abner, Kristo; Aaviksaar, Tõnis; Adamberg, Kaarel; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-01-21

    One of the recognized prokaryotic cell cycle theories is Cooper-Helmstetter (CH) theory which relates start of DNA replication to particular (initiation) cell mass, cell growth and division. Different aspects of this theory have been extensively studied in the past. In the present study CH theory was applied at single cell level. Universal equations were derived for different cell parameters (cell mass and volume, surface area, DNA amount and content) depending on constructivist cell cycle parameters (unit mass, replication and division times, cell age, cell cycle duration) based on selected growth laws of cell mass (linear, exponential). The equations derived can be integrated into single-cell models for the analysis and design of bacterial cells. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A low protein diet during pregnancy provokes a lasting shift of hepatic expression of genes related to cell cycle throughout ontogenesis in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oster Michael

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rodent models and in humans the impact of gestational diets on the offspring's phenotype was shown experimentally and epidemiologically. Adverse environmental conditions during fetal development provoke an intrauterine adaptive response termed 'fetal programming', which may lead to both persistently biased responsiveness to extrinsic factors and permanent consequences for the organismal phenotype. This leads to the hypothesis that the offspring's transcriptome exhibits short-term and long-term changes, depending on the maternal diet. In order to contribute to a comprehensive inventory of genes and functional networks that are targets of nutritional programming initiated during fetal life, we applied whole-genome microarrays for expression profiling in a longitudinal experimental design covering prenatal, perinatal, juvenile, and adult ontogenetic stages in a porcine model. Pregnant sows were fed either a gestational low protein diet (LP, 6% CP or an adequate protein diet (AP, 12% CP. All offspring was nursed by foster sows receiving standard diets. After weaning, all offspring was fed standard diets ad libitum. Results Analyses of the hepatic gene expression of the offspring at prenatal (94 dies post conceptionem, dpc and postnatal stages (1, 28, 188 dies post natum, dpn included comparisons between dietary groups within stages as well as comparisons between ontogenetic stages within diets to separate diet-specific transcriptional changes and maturation processes. We observed differential expression of genes related to lipid metabolism (e.g. Fatty acid metabolism, Biosynthesis of steroids, Synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, FA elongation in mitochondria, Bile acid synthesis and cell cycle regulation (e.g. Mitotic roles of PLK, G1/S checkpoint regulation, G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulation. Notably, at stage 1 dpn no regulation of a distinct pathway was found in LP offspring. Conclusions The transcriptomic

  3. A randomized controlled pilot study of VO2 max testing: a potential model for measuring relative in vivo efficacy of different red blood cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott; Lockhart, Evelyn L; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Campbell, Mary L; Natoli, Michael J; Jamnik, Veronika K; Carter, Timothy R; Moon, Richard E

    2017-03-01

    Randomized trials, for example, RECESS, comparing "young" (median, 7-day) versus "middle-aged" (median, 28-day) red blood cells (RBCs), showed no difference in outcome. These data are important; however, they do not inform us about the safety and effectiveness of the oldest RBCs, which some patients receive. It may not be feasible to conduct a clinical trial randomizing patients to receive the oldest blood. Therefore, we propose strenuous exercise (VO2 max testing) as a model to study the relative efficacy to increase oxygen delivery to tissue of different RBC products, for example, extremes of storage duration. In this pilot study, eight healthy subjects had 2 units of leukoreduced RBCs collected by apheresis in AS-3 using standard methods. Subjects were randomized to receive both (2) units of their autologous RBCs at either 7 or 42 days after blood collection. VO2 max testing on a cycle ergometer was performed 2 days before (Monday) and 2 days after (Friday) the transfusion visit (Wednesday). This design avoids confounding effects on intravascular volume from the 2-unit blood transfusion. The primary outcome was the difference in VO2 max between Friday and Monday (delta VO2 max). VO2 max increased more in the 7-day RBC arm (8.7 ± 6.9% vs. 1.9 ± 6.5%, p = 0.202 for comparison between arms). Exercise duration (seconds) increased in the 7-day RBC arm (8.4 ± 1.7%) but actually decreased in the 42-day arm (-2.6 ± 3.6%, p = 0.002). This pilot study suggests that VO2 max testing has potential as a rigorous and quantitative in vivo functional assay of RBC function. Our preliminary results suggest that 42-day RBCs are inferior to 7-day RBCs at delivering oxygen to tissues. © 2016 AABB.

  4. Relative Roles of CD90 and c‐Kit to the Regenerative Efficacy of Cardiosphere‐Derived Cells in Humans and in a Mouse Model of Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Hensley, M. Taylor; Shen, Deliang; Sun, Baiming; Middleton, Ryan; Liu, Weixin; Smith, Rachel R.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background The regenerative potential of cardiosphere‐derived cells (CDCs) for ischemic heart disease has been demonstrated in mice, rats, pigs, and a recently completed clinical trial (CADUCEUS). CDCs are CD105+ stromal cells of intrinsic cardiac origin, but the antigenic characteristics of the active fraction remain to be defined. CDCs contain a small minority of c‐kit+ cells, which have been argued to be cardiac progenitors, and a variable fraction of CD90+ cells whose bioactivity is unclear. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from the CADUCEUS trial and a prospective mouse study to elucidate the roles of c‐kit+ and CD90+ cells in human CDCs. Here, we show, surprisingly, that c‐kit expression has no relationship to CDCs' therapeutic efficacy in humans, and depletion of c‐kit+ cells does not undermine the structural and functional benefits of CDCs in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI). In contrast, CD90 expression negatively correlates with the therapeutic benefit of CDCs in humans (ie, higher CD90 expression associated with lower efficacy). Depletion of CD90+ cells augments the functional potency of CDCs in murine MI. CD90− CDCs secrete lower levels of inflammatory cytokines and can differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The majority population of CDCs (CD105+/CD90−/c‐kit−) constitutes the active fraction, both in terms of therapeutic efficacy and in the ability to undergo cardiomyogenic differentiation. The c‐kit+ fraction is neither necessary for, nor contributory to, the regenerative efficacy of CDCs. PMID:25300435

  5. Risk factors and model for predicting toxicity-related treatment discontinuation in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted therapy: Results from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymakcalan, Marina D; Xie, Wanling; Albiges, Laurence; North, Scott A; Kollmannsberger, Christian K; Smoragiewicz, Martin; Kroeger, Nils; Wells, J Connor; Rha, Sun-Young; Lee, Jae Lyun; McKay, Rana R; Fay, André P; De Velasco, Guillermo; Heng, Daniel Y C; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted therapies are standard treatment for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC); however, toxicities can lead to drug discontinuation, which can affect patient outcomes. This study was aimed at identifying risk factors for toxicity and constructing the first model to predict toxicity-related treatment discontinuation (TrTD) in mRCC patients treated with VEGF-targeted therapies. The baseline characteristics, treatment outcomes, and toxicity data were collected for 936 mRCC patients receiving first-line VEGF-targeted therapy from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium. A competing risk regression model was used to identify risk factors for TrTD, and it accounted for other causes as competing risks. Overall, 198 (23.8%) experienced TrTD. Sunitinib was the most common VEGF-targeted therapy (77%), and it was followed by sorafenib (18.4%). The median time on therapy was 7.1 months for all patients and 4.4 months for patients with TrTD. The most common toxicities leading to TrTD included fatigue, diarrhea, and mucositis. In a multivariate analysis, significant predictors for TrTD were a baseline age ≥60 years, a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) factors to predict the risk of TrTD. In the largest series to date, age, GFR, number of metastatic sites, and baseline sodium level were found to be independent risk factors for TrTD in mRCC patients receiving VEGF-targeted therapy. Based on the number of risk factors present, a model for predicting TrTD was built to be used as a tool for toxicity monitoring in clinical practice. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  6. Modeling: driving fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Francis

    2002-05-01

    Fuel cells were invented in 1839 by Sir William Grove, a Welsh judge and gentleman scientist, as a result of his experiments on the electrolysis of water. To put it simply, fuel cells are electrochemical devices that take hydrogen gas from fuel, combine it with oxygen from the air, and generate electricity and heat, with water as the only by-product.

  7. Cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Paul

    2003-12-01

    LRS Bianchi type-I space-time filled with perfect fluid is considered here with deceleration parameter as variable. The metric potentials and are functions of as well as . Assuming '/=(), where prime denotes differentiation with respect to , it was found that =('/) and =(), where =() and is the scale factor which is a function of only. The value of Hubble’s constant 0 was found to be less than half for non-flat model and is equal to 1.3 for a flat model.

  8. Stochastic models of cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradinaru, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Cell motility and migration are central to the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and errors during this process can lead to major diseases. Consequently, the mechanisms and phenomenology of cell motility are currently under intense study. In recent years, a new...... interdisciplinary field focusing on the study of biological processes at the nanoscale level, with a range of technological applications in medicine and biological research, has emerged. The work presented in this thesis is at the interface of cell biology, image processing, and stochastic modeling. The stochastic...... models introduced here are based on persistent random motion, which I apply to real-life studies of cell motility on flat and nanostructured surfaces. These models aim to predict the time-dependent position of cell centroids in a stochastic manner, and conversely determine directly from experimental...

  9. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Kruse, Kara L [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL; O' Quinn, Elizabeth [Wofford College; Woerner, Matthew M [ORNL; Beckerman, Barbara G [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  10. Simple model of cell crawling

    CERN Document Server

    Ohta, Takao; Sano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Based on symmetry consideration of migration and shape deformations, we formulate phenomenologically the dynamics of cell crawling in two dimensions. Forces are introduced to change the cell shape. The shape deformations induce migration of the cell on a substrate. For time-independent forces we show that not only a stationary motion but also a limit cycle oscillation of the migration velocity and the shape occurs as a result of nonlinear coupling between different deformation modes. Time-dependent forces are generated in a stochastic manner by utilizing the so-called coherence resonance of an excitable system. The present coarse-grained model has a flexibility that it can be applied, e.g., both to keratocyte cells and to Dictyostelium cells, which exhibit quite different dynamics from each other. The key factors for the motile behavior inherent in each cell type are identified in our model.

  11. Simple model of cell crawling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, T.; Tarama, M.; Sano, M.

    2016-04-01

    Based on symmetry consideration of migration and shape deformations, we formulate phenomenologically the dynamics of cell crawling in two dimensions. Forces are introduced to change the cell shape. The shape deformations induce migration of the cell on a substrate. For time-independent forces we show that not only a stationary motion but also a limit cycle oscillation of the migration velocity and the shape occurs as a result of nonlinear coupling between different deformation modes. Time-dependent forces are generated in a stochastic manner by utilizing the so-called coherence resonance of an excitable system. The present coarse-grained model has a flexibility that it can be applied, e.g., both to keratocyte cells and to Dictyostelium cells, which exhibit quite different dynamics from each other. The key factors for the motile behavior inherent in each cell type are identified in our model.

  12. Model cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Nylander, Tommy; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    The high complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development and application of a wide range of model membrane systems to study biochemical and biophysical aspects of membranes in situ under well defined conditions. The aim is to provide fundamental understanding of processes...... controlled by membrane structure, permeability and curvature as well as membrane proteins by using a wide range of biochemical, biophysical and microscopic techniques. This review gives an overview of some currently used model biomembrane systems. We will also discuss some key membrane protein properties...... that are relevant for protein-membrane interactions in terms of protein structure and how it is affected by membrane composition, phase behavior and curvature....

  13. Relative risk regression models with inverse polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yang; Woodward, Mark

    2013-08-30

    The proportional hazards model assumes that the log hazard ratio is a linear function of parameters. In the current paper, we model the log relative risk as an inverse polynomial, which is particularly suitable for modeling bounded and asymmetric functions. The parameters estimated by maximizing the partial likelihood are consistent and asymptotically normal. The advantages of the inverse polynomial model over the ordinary polynomial model and the fractional polynomial model for fitting various asymmetric log relative risk functions are shown by simulation. The utility of the method is further supported by analyzing two real data sets, addressing the specific question of the location of the minimum risk threshold.

  14. Modelling of Mammalian cells and cell culture processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoli, F R; Mantalaris, A; Asprey, S P

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures represent the major source for a number of very high-value biopharmaceutical products, including monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), viral vaccines, and hormones. These products are produced in relatively small quantities due to the highly specialised culture conditions and their susceptibility to either reduced productivity or cell death as a result of slight deviations in the culture conditions. The use of mathematical relationships to characterise distinct parts of the physiological behaviour of mammalian cells and the systematic integration of this information into a coherent, predictive model, which can be used for simulation, optimisation, and control purposes would contribute to efforts to increase productivity and control product quality. Models can also aid in the understanding and elucidation of underlying mechanisms and highlight the lack of accuracy or descriptive ability in parts of the model where experimental and simulated data cannot be reconciled. This paper reviews developments in the modelling of mammalian cell cultures in the last decade and proposes a future direction - the incorporation of genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data, taking advantage of recent developments in these disciplines and thus improving model fidelity. Furthermore, with mammalian cell technology dependent on experiments for information, model-based experiment design is formally introduced, which when applied can result in the acquisition of more informative data from fewer experiments. This represents only part of a broader framework for model building and validation, which consists of three distinct stages: theoretical model assessment, model discrimination, and model precision, which provides a systematic strategy from assessing the identifiability and distinguishability of a set of competing models to improving the parameter precision of a final validated model.

  15. Mathematical model of electrotaxis in osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Zwamborn, A P M

    2012-12-01

    Electrotaxis is the cell migration in the presence of an electric field (EF). This migration is parallel to the EF vector and overrides chemical migration cues. In this paper we introduce a mathematical model for the electrotaxis in osteoblastic cells. The model is evaluated using different EF strengths and different configurations of both electrical and chemical stimuli. Accordingly, we found that the cell migration speed is described as the combination of an electrical and a chemical term. Cell migration is faster when both stimuli orient cell migration towards the same direction. In contrast, a reduced speed is obtained when the EF vector is opposed to the direction of the chemical stimulus. Numerical relations were obtained to quantify the cell migration speed at each configuration. Additional calculations for the cell colonization of a substrate also show mediation of the EF strength. Therefore, the term electro-osteoconduction is introduced to account the electrically induced cell colonization. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model is suitable to be extended to other types of cells, and to numerically explore the influence of EF during wound healing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lifted Inference for Relational Continuous Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jaesik; Hill, David J

    2012-01-01

    Relational Continuous Models (RCMs) represent joint probability densities over attributes of objects, when the attributes have continuous domains. With relational representations, they can model joint probability distributions over large numbers of variables compactly in a natural way. This paper presents a new exact lifted inference algorithm for RCMs, thus it scales up to large models of real world applications. The algorithm applies to Relational Pairwise Models which are (relational) products of potentials of arity 2. Our algorithm is unique in two ways. First, it substantially improves the efficiency of lifted inference with variables of continuous domains. When a relational model has Gaussian potentials, it takes only linear-time compared to cubic time of previous methods. Second, it is the first exact inference algorithm which handles RCMs in a lifted way. The algorithm is illustrated over an example from econometrics. Experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms both a groundlevel inferenc...

  17. A Model of Egoistical Relative Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Faye

    1976-01-01

    Examines the theory of relative deprivation. This theory states, basically, that objective and subjective well-being are not isomorphically related, so that sometimes the better-off one is, the worse-off one feels subjectively. After a brief review of work in the area of relative deprivation, a formal model is developed. (Editor/RK)

  18. Region-specific changes in activities of cell death-related proteases and nitric oxide metabolism in rat brain in a chronic unpredictable stress model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkina, Anna; Rukhlenko, Alexey; Stepanichev, Mikhail; Levshina, Irina; Pasikova, Natalia; Onufriev, Mikhail; Moiseeva, Yulia; Piskunov, Alexey; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2012-12-01

    Effects of a chronic combined unpredictable stress on activities of two cell death-related proteases, calpain and cathepsin B, were studied along with indices of nitrergic system in rat brain structures. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 2-week-long combined stress (combination of unpaired flash light and moderate footshock associated with a white noise session). Stress resulted in a significant loss in the body and thymus weight and increased defecation in the open field test, though neither motor and exploratory activity, nor plasma corticosterone differed from the respective control levels. Decreased calpain activity and increased cathepsin B activity were demonstrated in the hippocampus of stressed rats (previously we have shown that caspase-3 activity was significantly suppressed in the brain of rats subjected to same type of stress). A significant reduction in the number of NOS-containing neurons was accompanied by a chronic stressinduced decline in NOS activity in the neocortex. Similar changes were observed in the hippocampus. However, levels of NO metabolites were elevated in both structures. Thus, stress-induced structural modifications in the brain may be mediated by disturbances in the nitrergic system and increased lysosomal proteolysis.

  19. Challenges in structural approaches to cell modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Wonpil; Liang, Jie; Olson, Arthur; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Vajda, Sandor; Vakser, Ilya A

    2016-07-31

    Computational modeling is essential for structural characterization of biomolecular mechanisms across the broad spectrum of scales. Adequate understanding of biomolecular mechanisms inherently involves our ability to model them. Structural modeling of individual biomolecules and their interactions has been rapidly progressing. However, in terms of the broader picture, the focus is shifting toward larger systems, up to the level of a cell. Such modeling involves a more dynamic and realistic representation of the interactomes in vivo, in a crowded cellular environment, as well as membranes and membrane proteins, and other cellular components. Structural modeling of a cell complements computational approaches to cellular mechanisms based on differential equations, graph models, and other techniques to model biological networks, imaging data, etc. Structural modeling along with other computational and experimental approaches will provide a fundamental understanding of life at the molecular level and lead to important applications to biology and medicine. A cross section of diverse approaches presented in this review illustrates the developing shift from the structural modeling of individual molecules to that of cell biology. Studies in several related areas are covered: biological networks; automated construction of three-dimensional cell models using experimental data; modeling of protein complexes; prediction of non-specific and transient protein interactions; thermodynamic and kinetic effects of crowding; cellular membrane modeling; and modeling of chromosomes. The review presents an expert opinion on the current state-of-the-art in these various aspects of structural modeling in cellular biology, and the prospects of future developments in this emerging field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arne Pommerening; Anders Muszta

    2015-01-01

    Background:Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form a consistent methodology for modelling relative growth rates. Methods:We review and combine existing methods of analysing and modelling relative growth rates and apply a combination of methods to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) stem-analysis data from North Wales (UK) and British Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesi (Mirb.) Franco) yield table data. Results:The results indicate that, by combining the approaches of different plant-growth analysis laboratories and using them simultaneously, we can advance and standardise the concept of relative plant growth. Particularly the growth multiplier plays an important role in modelling relative growth rates. Another useful technique has been the recent introduction of size-standardised relative growth rates. Conclusions:Modelling relative growth rates mainly serves two purposes, 1) an improved analysis of growth performance and efficiency and 2) the prediction of future or past growth rates. This makes the concept of relative growth ideally suited to growth reconstruction as required in dendrochronology, climate change and forest decline research and for interdisciplinary research projects beyond the realm of plant science.

  1. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Pommerening

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form a consistent methodology for modelling relative growth rates. Methods We review and combine existing methods of analysing and modelling relative growth rates and apply a combination of methods to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr. stem-analysis data from North Wales (UK and British Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco yield table data. Results The results indicate that, by combining the approaches of different plant-growth analysis laboratories and using them simultaneously, we can advance and standardise the concept of relative plant growth. Particularly the growth multiplier plays an important role in modelling relative growth rates. Another useful technique has been the recent introduction of size-standardised relative growth rates. Conclusions Modelling relative growth rates mainly serves two purposes, 1 an improved analysis of growth performance and efficiency and 2 the prediction of future or past growth rates. This makes the concept of relative growth ideally suited to growth reconstruction as required in dendrochronology, climate change and forest decline research and for interdisciplinary research projects beyond the realm of plant science.

  2. Mathematical Model for Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa ABD EL-BASIT

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of photovoltaic systems in an efficient manner requires a precise knowledge of the (I-V and (P-V characteristic curves of photovoltaic modules. So, the aim of the present paper is to estimate such characteristics based on different operating conditions. In this concern, a simple one diode mathematical model was implemented using MATLAB script. The output characteristics of PV cell depend on the environmental conditions. For any solar cell, the model parameters are function of the irradiance and the temperature values of the site where the panel is placed. In this paper, the numerical values of the equivalent circuit parameters are generated by the program. As well, the dependence of the cells electrical parameters are analyzed under the influence of different irradiance and temperature levels. The variation of slopes of the (I–V curves of a cell at short-circuit and open-circuit conditions with intensity of illumination in small span of intensity and different temperature levels have been applied to determine the cell parameters, shunt resistance, series resistance. The results show that the efficiency of solar cells has an inverse relationship with temperature, irradiance levels are affected by the change of the photo-generation current and the series resistance in the single diode model.

  3. Modelling familial dysautonomia in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gabsang; Studer, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable promise as a novel tool for modelling human disease and for drug discovery. While the generation of disease-specific iPS cells has become routine, realizing the potential of iPS cells in disease modelling poses challenges at multiple fronts. Such challenges include selecting a suitable disease target, directing the fate of iPS cells into symptom-relevant cell populations, identifying disease-related phenotypes and showing reversibility of...

  4. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory effects of steroids and arthritis-related biotherapies in an in vitro co-culture model with immune cells and synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Noack

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: During rheumatoid arthritis (RA, steroids and biotherapies are used alone and combined. Efficacy has been established in clinical trials but their differential effects at the cellular level are less documented. The aim was to study these cellular effects using an in vitro model with synoviocytes interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to reproduce the interactions in the RA synovium.Methods: Activated-PBMC were co-cultured with RA synoviocytes during 48h. A dose-response of methylprednisolone (MP was tested and different biotherapies (Infliximab, Etanercept, Adalimumab, Tocilizumab, Abatacept and Rituximab were added alone or in combination with MP. Cytokine production (IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-10 was measured by ELISA.Results: Addition of MP to co-cultures inhibited the production of all cytokines. The response to the biotherapies alone was treatment-dependent. IL-17 production was inhibited only by Tocilizumab (p=0.004 while IL-6 was decreased only by Infliximab (p≤0.002. IL-1β level was affected in all conditions (p≤0.03. IFN-γ production was mainly decreased by Infliximab (p=0.004, and IL-10 by Infliximab and Tocilizumab (p≤0.004. The combination MP and biotherapy did not induce an additional effect on pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibition. The combination MP and biotherapies induced a higher IL-10 secretion than MP alone, mainly with Rituximab.Conclusion: Steroids inhibited the secretion of all cytokines, and low doses were as potent. The anti-inflammatory effect of biotherapies was dependent on their mechanism of action. MP and biotherapy combination did not enhance the inhibitory effect on pro-inflammatory cytokines but could have a beneficial effect by increasing IL-10 production.

  5. Large animal models for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John; Roberts, R Michael; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2013-03-28

    The field of regenerative medicine is approaching translation to clinical practice, and significant safety concerns and knowledge gaps have become clear as clinical practitioners are considering the potential risks and benefits of cell-based therapy. It is necessary to understand the full spectrum of stem cell actions and preclinical evidence for safety and therapeutic efficacy. The role of animal models for gaining this information has increased substantially. There is an urgent need for novel animal models to expand the range of current studies, most of which have been conducted in rodents. Extant models are providing important information but have limitations for a variety of disease categories and can have different size and physiology relative to humans. These differences can preclude the ability to reproduce the results of animal-based preclinical studies in human trials. Larger animal species, such as rabbits, dogs, pigs, sheep, goats, and non-human primates, are better predictors of responses in humans than are rodents, but in each case it will be necessary to choose the best model for a specific application. There is a wide spectrum of potential stem cell-based products that can be used for regenerative medicine, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, and differentiated cellular progeny. The state of knowledge and availability of these cells from large animals vary among species. In most cases, significant effort is required for establishing and characterizing cell lines, comparing behavior to human analogs, and testing potential applications. Stem cell-based therapies present significant safety challenges, which cannot be addressed by traditional procedures and require the development of new protocols and test systems, for which the rigorous use of larger animal species more closely resembling human behavior will be required. In this article, we discuss the current status and challenges of and several major directions

  6. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  7. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  8. New Arylthioindoles and Related Bioisosteres at the Sulfur Bridging Group. 4. Synthesis, Tubulin Polymerization, Cell Growth Inhibition, and Molecular Modeling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Sarkar, Taradas; Bai, Ruoli; Edler, Michael C.; Saletti, Roberto; Coluccia, Antonio; Piscitelli, Francesco; Minelli, Lara; Gatti, Valerio; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Palermo, Vanessa; Mazzoni, Cristina; Falcone, Claudio; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Giansanti, Vincenzo; Campiglia, Pietro; Porta, Amalia; Maresca, Bruno; Hamel, Ernest; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Silvestri, Romano

    2009-01-01

    New arylthioindoles along with the corresponding ketone and methylene compounds were potent tubulin assembly inhibitors. As growth inhibitors of MCF-7 cells, sulfur derivatives were superior or sometimes equivalent to the ketones, while methylene derivatives were substantially less effective. Esters 24, 27–29, 36, 39,and 41 showed ~50% of inhibition on human HeLa and HCT116/chr3 cells at 0.5 μM, and these compounds inhibited the growth of HEK, M14, and U937 cells with IC50's in the 78–220 nM range. While murine macrophage J744.1 cell growth was significantly less affected (20% at higher concentrations), four other nontransformed cell lines remained sensitive to these esters. The effect of drug treatment on cell morphology was examined by time-lapse microscopy. In a protocol set up to evaluate toxicity on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 wild type strain, compounds 24 and 54 strongly reduced cell growth, and 29, 36, and 39 also showed significant inhibition. PMID:19601594

  9. Relating business modelling and enterprise architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes a methodology for creating business models, evaluating them, and relating them to enterprise architecture. The methodology consists of several steps, leading from an organization’s current situation to a target situation, via business models and enterprise architecture. Current

  10. Models and relations in economics and econometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina

    1999-01-01

    Based on a money market analysis using the cointegrated VAR model the paper demonstrates some possible pitfalls in macroeconomic inference as a direct consequence of inadequate stochastic model formulation. A number of questions related to concepts such as empirical and theoretical steady-states,...

  11. Relating business modelling and enterprise architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes a methodology for creating business models, evaluating them, and relating them to enterprise architecture. The methodology consists of several steps, leading from an organization’s current situation to a target situation, via business models and enterprise architecture.

  12. The generic model of General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsamparlis, Michael, E-mail: mtsampa@phys.uoa.g [Department of Physics, Section Astrophysics Astronomy Mechanics, University of Athens, University of Athens, Zografos 15783, Athens (Greece)

    2009-10-01

    We develop a generic spacetime model in General Relativity from which all existing model results are produced under specific assumptions, depending on the case. We classify each type of possible assumption, especially the role of observers and that of symmetries, and discuss their role in the development of a model. We apply the results in a step by step approach to the case of a Bianchi I spacetime and a string fluid.

  13. Voronoi cell patterns: Theoretical model and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-11-01

    We use a simple fragmentation model to describe the statistical behavior of the Voronoi cell patterns generated by a homogeneous and isotropic set of points in 1D and in 2D. In particular, we are interested in the distribution of sizes of these Voronoi cells. Our model is completely defined by two probability distributions in 1D and again in 2D, the probability to add a new point inside an existing cell and the probability that this new point is at a particular position relative to the preexisting point inside this cell. In 1D the first distribution depends on a single parameter while the second distribution is defined through a fragmentation kernel; in 2D both distributions depend on a single parameter. The fragmentation kernel and the control parameters are closely related to the physical properties of the specific system under study. We use our model to describe the Voronoi cell patterns of several systems. Specifically, we study the island nucleation with irreversible attachment, the 1D car-parking problem, the formation of second-level administrative divisions, and the pattern formed by the Paris Métro stations.

  14. A Predictive Model of Cell Traction Forces Based on Cell Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Lemmon, Christopher A.; Romer, Lewis H

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that the shape and size of a cell can influence how a cell spreads, develops focal adhesions, and exerts forces on the substrate. However, it is unclear how cell shape regulates these events. Here we present a computational model that uses cell shape to predict the magnitude and direction of forces generated by cells. The predicted results are compared to experimentally measured traction forces, and show that the model can predict traction force direction, relative m...

  15. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to study the response of energy homeostasis-related genes to acute changes in feeding conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caimari, A.; Oliver, P.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are readily accessible biological material and a potential tissue source to discover novel biomarkers of response to environmental exposures including nutrition. We analyzed whether PBMCs could reflect molecular changes that take place in response to differ

  16. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to study the response of energy homeostasis-related genes to acute changes in feeding conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caimari, A.; Oliver, P.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are readily accessible biological material and a potential tissue source to discover novel biomarkers of response to environmental exposures including nutrition. We analyzed whether PBMCs could reflect molecular changes that take place in response to differ

  17. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  18. PEM Fuel Cells - Fundamentals, Modeling and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Part I: Fundamentals Chapter 1: Introduction. Chapter 2: PEM fuel cell thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and performance. Chapter 3: PEM fuel cell components. Chapter 4: PEM fuel cell failure modes. Part II: Modeling and Simulation Chapter 5: PEM fuel cell models based on semi-empirical simulation. Chapter 6: PEM fuel cell models based on computational fluid dynamics. Part III: Applications Chapter 7: PEM fuel cell system design and applications.

  19. A new level set model for cell image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing-Feng; Hou, Kai; Bao, Shang-Lian; Chen, Chun

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we first determine three phases of cell images: background, cytoplasm and nucleolus according to the general physical characteristics of cell images, and then develop a variational model, based on these characteristics, to segment nucleolus and cytoplasm from their relatively complicated backgrounds. In the meantime, the preprocessing obtained information of cell images using the OTSU algorithm is used to initialize the level set function in the model, which can speed up the segmentation and present satisfactory results in cell image processing.

  20. A new level set model for cell image segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jing-Feng; Hou Kai; Bao Shang-Lian; Chen Chun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we first determine three phases of cell images: background, cytoplasm and nucleolus according to the general physical characteristics of cell images, and then develop a variational model, based on these characteristics, to segment nucleolus and cytoplasm from their relatively complicated backgrounds. In the meantime, the preprocessing obtained information of cell images using the OTSU algorithm is used to initialize the level set function in the model, which can speed up the segmentation and present satisfactory results in cell image processing.

  1. Modelling anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic anisotropic fluid sphere, (spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully modelled by suitable linear combinations of quite ordinary classical matter: an isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field, and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model that is used to mimic the anisotropic fluid sphere. Consequently, we can build physically reasonable matter models for almost any spherically symmetric spacetime.

  2. Modeling Relational Data via Latent Factor Blockmodel

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Sheng; Gallinari, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of modeling relational data, which appear in many applications such as social network analysis, recommender systems and bioinformatics. Previous studies either consider latent feature based models but disregarding local structure in the network, or focus exclusively on capturing local structure of objects based on latent blockmodels without coupling with latent characteristics of objects. To combine the benefits of the previous work, we propose a novel model that can simultaneously incorporate the effect of latent features and covariates if any, as well as the effect of latent structure that may exist in the data. To achieve this, we model the relation graph as a function of both latent feature factors and latent cluster memberships of objects to collectively discover globally predictive intrinsic properties of objects and capture latent block structure in the network to improve prediction performance. We also develop an optimization transfer algorithm based on the general...

  3. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  4. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  5. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiang; Yaoyun Zhang; Xiaolong Wang; Yang Qin; Wenying Han

    2015-01-01

    Distant supervision (DS) automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs), providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP). However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce...

  6. Relation Between the Cell Volume and the Cell Cycle Dynamics in Mammalian cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, A. C. G.; Oliveira, I. L.; Hauck, J. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to add and analyze an equation that represents the volume in a dynamical model of the mammalian cell cycle proposed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2011) [1]. The cell division occurs when the cyclinB/Cdkl complex is totally degraded (Tyson and Novak, 2011)[2] and it reaches a minimum value. At this point, the cell is divided into two newborn daughter cells and each one will contain the half of the cytoplasmic content of the mother cell. The equations of our base model are only valid if the cell volume, where the reactions occur, is constant. Whether the cell volume is not constant, that is, the rate of change of its volume with respect to time is explicitly taken into account in the mathematical model, then the equations of the original model are no longer valid. Therefore, every equations were modified from the mass conservation principle for considering a volume that changes with time. Through this approach, the cell volume affects all model variables. Two different dynamic simulation methods were accomplished: deterministic and stochastic. In the stochastic simulation, the volume affects every model's parameters which have molar unit, whereas in the deterministic one, it is incorporated into the differential equations. In deterministic simulation, the biochemical species may be in concentration units, while in stochastic simulation such species must be converted to number of molecules which are directly proportional to the cell volume. In an effort to understand the influence of the new equation a stability analysis was performed. This elucidates how the growth factor impacts the stability of the model's limit cycles. In conclusion, a more precise model, in comparison to the base model, was created for the cell cycle as it now takes into consideration the cell volume variation

  7. Measurement of relative permeability of fuel cell diffusion media

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, I.S.

    2010-06-01

    Gas diffusion layer (GDL) in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented and new correlations for in-plane relative permeability of water and air are established. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  9. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  10. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  11. SU-F-BRD-16: Relative Biological Effectiveness of Double-Strand Break Induction for Modeling Cell Survival in Pristine Proton Beams of Different Dose-Averaged Linear Energy Transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, C; Bronk, L [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UT Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Taleei, R; Guan, F; Patel, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High throughput in vitro experiments assessing cell survival following proton radiation indicate that both the alpha and the beta parameters of the linear quadratic model increase with increasing proton linear energy transfer (LET). We investigated the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of double-strand break (DSB) induction as a means of explaining the experimental results. Methods: Experiments were performed with two lung cancer cell lines and a range of proton LET values (0.94 – 19.4 keV/µm) using an experimental apparatus designed to irradiate cells in a 96 well plate such that each column encounters protons of different dose-averaged LET (LETd). Traditional linear quadratic survival curve fitting was performed, and alpha, beta, and RBE values obtained. Survival curves were also fit with a model incorporating RBE of DSB induction as the sole fit parameter. Fitted values of the RBE of DSB induction were then compared to values obtained using Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software and energy spectra calculated with Geant4. Other parameters including alpha, beta, and number of DSBs were compared to those obtained from traditional fitting. Results: Survival curve fitting with RBE of DSB induction yielded alpha and beta parameters that increase with proton LETd, which follows from the standard method of fitting; however, relying on a single fit parameter provided more consistent trends. The fitted values of RBE of DSB induction increased beyond what is predicted from MCDS data above proton LETd of approximately 10 keV/µm. Conclusion: In order to accurately model in vitro proton irradiation experiments performed with high throughput methods, the RBE of DSB induction must increase more rapidly than predicted by MCDS above LETd of 10 keV/µm. This can be explained by considering the increased complexity of DSBs or the nature of intra-track pairwise DSB interactions in this range of LETd values. NIH Grant 2U19CA021239-35.

  12. Stem Cell Transplantation Improves Aging-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eIkehara

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a complex process of damage accumulation, and has been viewed as experimentally and medically intractable. The number of patients with age-associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer has increased recently. Aging-related diseases are related to a deficiency of the immune system, which results from an aged thymus and bone marrow cells. Intra bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT is a useful method to treat intractable diseases. This review summarizes findings that IBM-BMT can improve and treat aging-related diseases, including T2DM, osteoporosis and AD, in animal models.

  13. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  14. Proceedings of the NETL Workshop on Fuel Cell Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Gemmen; J. R. Selman

    2000-04-18

    This workshop was the first U.S. DOE sponsored meeting devoted to fuel cell modeling. The workshop was attended by over 45 people from industry, universities, and the government. The goals of the meeting were to assess the status of fuel cell modeling, and determine how new developments in fuel cell modeling can improve cell design, stack design, and power system design. The primary focus was on cell and stack modeling. Following a review of DOE/NETL fuel cell related programs and activities, Professor Robert Selman (Illinois Institute of Technology) kicked off the technical portion of the workshop by presenting an overview of fuel cell phenomena and the status of fuel cell modeling. This overview provided the necessary background for establishing a common framework for discussing fuel cell modeling. A distinction was made between micro modeling, electrode modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and system modeling. It was proposed that all modeling levels be supported for further development. In addition, due to significant advances being made outside the U.S., it was proposed that dialog/exchange with other international researchers be established. Following the Overview Session, eight leading researchers in modeling gave individual presentations. These presentations provided additional information on the status and present direction of model developments. All these presentations can be found in Attachment A. Before the workshop, a survey was sent out requesting comments from the attendees. Results from this survey can be found in Attachment B. This survey was then used as initial talking points at the individual breakout sessions on the afternoon of the workshop. Breakouts were organized by microfundamental modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and systems modeling.

  15. Constitutive relations for multiphase flow modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, H.; Vaeth, L.; Thurnay, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    The constitutive relations that are used in the three-field fluid dynamics code IVA-KA for determining the drag in three-phase mixtures and the heat transferred by radiation are described together with some comparisons of calculational results with experiments. In these experiments (QUEOS), large quantities of solid particles are injected into water. Potential deficiencies of the present drag model are discussed. (author)

  16. Computational cell model based on autonomous cell movement regulated by cell-cell signalling successfully recapitulates the "inside and outside" pattern of cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajioka Itsuki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of multicellular organisms proceeds from a single fertilized egg as the combined effect of countless numbers of cellular interactions among highly dynamic cells. Since at least a reminiscent pattern of morphogenesis can be recapitulated in a reproducible manner in reaggregation cultures of dissociated embryonic cells, which is known as cell sorting, the cells themselves must possess some autonomous cell behaviors that assure specific and reproducible self-organization. Understanding of this self-organized dynamics of heterogeneous cell population seems to require some novel approaches so that the approaches bridge a gap between molecular events and morphogenesis in developmental and cell biology. A conceptual cell model in a computer may answer that purpose. We constructed a dynamical cell model based on autonomous cell behaviors, including cell shape, growth, division, adhesion, transformation, and motility as well as cell-cell signaling. The model gives some insights about what cellular behaviors make an appropriate global pattern of the cell population. Results We applied the model to "inside and outside" pattern of cell-sorting, in which two different embryonic cell types within a randomly mixed aggregate are sorted so that one cell type tends to gather in the central region of the aggregate and the other cell type surrounds the first cell type. Our model can modify the above cell behaviors by varying parameters related to them. We explored various parameter sets with which the "inside and outside" pattern could be achieved. The simulation results suggested that direction of cell movement responding to its neighborhood and the cell's mobility are important for this specific rearrangement. Conclusion We constructed an in silico cell model that mimics autonomous cell behaviors and applied it to cell sorting, which is a simple and appropriate phenomenon exhibiting self-organization of cell population. The model

  17. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Numerical Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ilseven, E

    2015-01-01

    In the Bona-Masso formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for Numerical Relativity. Our model is validated with well-established tests, showing good agreement with analytical solutions. Furthermore, we show that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improves. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach a linear scaling law for parallelisation with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  18. Mapping Relational Operations onto Hypergraph Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    ="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/>

    The relational model is the most commonly used data model for storing large datasets, perhaps due to the simplicity of the tabular format which had revolutionized database management systems. However, many real world objects are recursive and associative in nature which makes storage in the relational model difficult. The hypergraph model is a generalization of a graph model, where each hypernode can be made up of other nodes or graphs and each hyperedge can be made up of one or more edges. It may address the recursive and associative limitations of relational model

  19. Physical models of collective cell motility: from cell to tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camley, B. A.; Rappel, W.-J.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we review physics-based models of collective cell motility. We discuss a range of techniques at different scales, ranging from models that represent cells as simple self-propelled particles to phase field models that can represent a cell’s shape and dynamics in great detail. We also extensively review the ways in which cells within a tissue choose their direction, the statistics of cell motion, and some simple examples of how cell–cell signaling can interact with collective cell motility. This review also covers in more detail selected recent works on collective cell motion of small numbers of cells on micropatterns, in wound healing, and the chemotaxis of clusters of cells.

  20. Transport of trans-tiliroside (kaempferol-3-β-D-(6"-p-coumaroyl-glucopyranoside) and related flavonoids across Caco-2 cells, as a model of absorption and metabolism in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zijun; Morgan, Michael R A; Day, Andrea J

    2015-01-01

    1. Absorption and metabolism of tiliroside (kaempferol 3-β-D-(6"-p-coumaroyl)-glucopyranoside) and its related compounds kaempferol, kaempferol-3-glucoside and p-coumaric acid were investigated in the small intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Apparent permeation (Papp) was determined as 0.62 × 10(-6) cm/s, 3.1 × 10(-6) cm/s, 0 and 22.8 × 10(-6) cm/s, respectively. 2. Mechanistic study showed that the transportation of tiliroside, kaempferol-3-glucoside and p-coumaric acid in Caco-2 model were transporter(s) involved, while transportation of kaempferol was solely by passive diffusion mechanism. 3. Efflux transporters, multi-drug-resistance-associated protein-2 (MRP2), were shown to play a role in limiting the uptake of tiliroside. Inhibitors of MRP2, (MK571 and rifampicin) and co-incubation with kaempferol (10 μM), increased transfer from the apical to the basolateral side by three to five fold. 4. Metabolites of kaempferol-3-glucoside and p-coumaric acid were not detected in the current Caco-2 model, while tiliroside was metabolised to a limited extent, with two tiliroside mono-glucuronides identified; and kaempferol was metabolised to a higher extent, with three mono-glucuronides and two mono-sulfates identified. 5. In conclusion, tiliroside was metabolised and transported across Caco-2 cell membrane to a limited extent. Transportation could be increased by applying MRP2 inhibitors or co-incubation with kaempferol. It is proposed that tiliroside can be absorbed by human; future pharmacokinetics studies are warranted in order to determine the usefulness of tiliroside as a bioactive agent.

  1. A novel mechanotactic 3D modeling of cell morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaleddin Mousavi, Seyed; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    Cell morphology plays a critical role in many biological processes, such as cell migration, tissue development, wound healing and tumor growth. Recent investigations demonstrate that, among other stimuli, cells adapt their shapes according to their substrate stiffness. Until now, the development of this process has not been clear. Therefore, in this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) computational model for cell morphology has been developed. This model is based on a previous cell migration model presented by the same authors. The new model considers that during cell-substrate interaction, cell shape is governed by internal cell deformation, which leads to an accurate prediction of the cell shape according to the mechanical characteristic of its surrounding micro-environment. To study this phenomenon, the model has been applied to different numerical cases. The obtained results, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental works, indicate that cell morphology not only depends on substrate stiffness but also on the substrate boundary conditions. A cell located within an unconstrained soft substrate (several kPa) with uniform stiffness is unable to adhere to its substrate or to send out pseudopodia. When the substrate stiffness increases to tens of kPa (intermediate and rigid substrates), the cell can adequately adhere to its substrate. Subsequently, as the traction forces exerted by the cell increase, the cell elongates and its shape changes. Within very stiff (hard) substrates, the cell cannot penetrate into its substrate or send out pseudopodia. On the other hand, a cell is found to be more elongated within substrates with a constrained surface. However, this elongation decreases when the cell approaches it. It can be concluded that the higher the net traction force, the greater the cell elongation, the larger the cell membrane area, and the less random the cell alignment.

  2. Endothelial cell-driven regulation of CD9 or motility-related protein-1 expression in multiple myeloma cells within the murine 5T33MM model and myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruyne, E; Levin Andersen, Thomas; De Raeve, H;

    2006-01-01

    The cell surface expression of CD9, a glycoprotein of the tetraspanin family influencing several processes including cell motility and metastasis, inversely correlates with progression in several solid tumors. In the present work, we studied the expression and role of CD9 in multiple myeloma (MM)...... interaction of the cells with BMEC and that CD9 is involved in transendothelial invasion, thus possibly mediating homing and/or spreading of the MM cells........ These findings were also confirmed by immunohistochemistry in MM patients. Neutralizing anti-CD9 antibodies inhibited transendothelial invasion of CD9-expressing human MM5.1 and murine 5T33MMvivo cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that CD9 expression by the MM cells is upregulated in vivo by close...

  3. Modeling Rett Syndrome with Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Ryan M.; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) raised the exciting possibility of modeling diseases with patient-specific cells. Marchetto et al. (2010) now use iPSC technology to generate, characterize, and treat an in vitro model for the autism spectrum disorder, Rett syndrome.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  5. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intestinal parasitosis in relation to CD4+T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hylemariam Mihiretie Mengist

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasites (IPs are major concerns in most developing countries where HIV/AIDS cases are concentrated and almost 80% of AIDS patients die of AIDS-related infections. In the absence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, HIV/AIDS patients in developing countries unfortunately continue to suffer from the consequences of opportunistic and other intestinal parasites. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4+ T cells levels and anemia among HAART initiated and HAART naïve pediatric HIV patients in a Model ART center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.A prospective comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among HAART initiated and HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients attending a model ART center at Zewditu Memorial Hospital between August 05, 2013 and November 25, 2013. A total of 180 (79 HAART initiated and 101 HAART naïve children were included by using consecutive sampling. Stool specimen was collected and processed using direct wet mount, formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining techniques. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and associated risk factors. CD4+ T cells and complete blood counts were performed using BD FACScalibur and Cell-Dyn 1800, respectively. The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16 software. Logistic regressions were applied to assess any association between explanatory factors and outcome variables. P values < 0.05 were taken as statistically significant.The overall prevalence of IPs was 37.8% where 27.8% of HAART initiated and 45.5% of HAART naive pediatric HIV/AIDS patients were infected (p < 0.05. Cryptosporidium species, E. histolytica/dispar, Hook worm and Taenia species were IPs associated with CD4+ T cell counts <350 cells/μμL in HAART naive patients. The overall prevalence of anemia was 10% in HAART and 31.7% in non-HAART groups. Hook worm, S. stercoralis and H. nana were helminthes

  7. Cell cycle actions of parathyroid hormone-related protein in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgrain, Philippe R.; Quintana, Rick; Rascon, Yvette; Deftos, Leonard J.; Healy, Erin

    2009-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), a paraneoplastic protein expressed by two-thirds of human non-small cell lung cancers, has been reported to slow progression of lung carcinomas in mouse models and to lengthen survival of patients with lung cancer. This study investigated the effects of ectopic expression of PTHrP on proliferation and cell cycle progression of two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines that are normally PTHrP negative. Stable transfection with PTHrP decreased H1944 cell DNA synthesis, measured by thymidine incorporation, bromodeoxyuridine uptake, and MTT proliferation assay. A substantial fraction of PTHrP-positive cells was arrested in or slowly progressing through G1. Cyclin D2 and cyclin A2 protein levels were 60–70% lower in PTHrP-expressing cells compared with control cells (P PTHrP. Expression of other cyclins, including cyclins D1 and D3, and cyclin-dependent kinases was unaffected by PTHrP. PTHrP did not alter the phosphorylation state of Rb, but decreased cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2-cyclin A2 complex formation. Ectopic expression of PTHrP stimulated ERK phosphorylation. In MV522 cells, PTHrP had similar effects on DNA synthesis, cyclin A2 expression, pRb levels, CDK2-cyclin A2 association, and ERK activation. In summary, PTHrP appears to slow progression of lung cancer cells into S phase, possibly by decreasing activation of CDK2. Slower cancer cell proliferation could contribute to slower tumor progression and increased survival of patients with PTHrP-positive lung cancer. PMID:19633068

  8. Cell Division in the Light of Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-09-26

    Theoretical modeling is central to elucidating underlying principles of emergent properties of complex systems. In cell and developmental biology, the last 15 years have witnessed a convergence of empirical and modeling approaches for fresh perspectives. The role of cell division in coordinating size, shape, and fate in particular illustrates the ever-growing impact of modeling.

  9. Heterogeneous anisotropic complex structure gradual model and constitutive relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永; 宋健; 张志民

    2003-01-01

    Four new gradually delaminate models of the three-dimensional macro-/mesoscopic structure and delamination of the heterogeneous anisotropic composite (HAC) are set up by conducting research into its structure and performance. A general theory, which demonstrates the three-dimensional constitutive relation of the macro-/mesoscopic performance of this structure is further developed. The macroscopic expression of HAC is presented in terms of a Tanigawa delaminate homogeneous equivalent approach, the mesoscopic problems are analysed utilizing Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka theory, with the introduction of the representative volume elements of monolayer single unit cell and interlaminar double unit cells.According to the gradual continuity of the structure as a whole, great attention is given to the modelling and research of the interlaminar macroscopic and mesoscopic problems of HAC structure. Comparison with the existing solutions is made through calculation of typical cases.

  10. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Device and Materials Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells is a specialized text that compiles the mathematical details and results of both device and materials modeling in a single volume. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will likely have an impact on our way of life similar to the integrated circuit. The potential applications range from the micron scale to large scale industrial production. Successful integration of PEM fuel cells into the mass market will require new materials and a deeper understanding of the balance required to maintain various operational states. This book contains articles from scientists who contribute to fuel cell models from both the materials and device perspectives. Topics such as catalyst layer performance and operation, reactor dynamics, macroscopic transport, and analytical models are covered under device modeling. Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, an...

  11. Modeling the Shapes of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Umadevi I.; Robertson, Belinda M.

    2015-01-01

    A solid understanding of the structure and function of cells can help establish the foundation for learning advanced concepts in the biological sciences. The concept of the cell is introduced in middle school life science courses and is continued at the undergraduate level in college (NRC 2012; Reece et al. 2014). Cells are introduced to students…

  12. Modeling the Shapes of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Umadevi I.; Robertson, Belinda M.

    2015-01-01

    A solid understanding of the structure and function of cells can help establish the foundation for learning advanced concepts in the biological sciences. The concept of the cell is introduced in middle school life science courses and is continued at the undergraduate level in college (NRC 2012; Reece et al. 2014). Cells are introduced to students…

  13. Pertanggungjawaban Sosial Universitas: Implementasi Model Cycle Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sinatra Wijaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The competition among Higher Education is getting tougher. They need to do their best in order to maintain their existence and getting more students coming to their institutions. One way to achieve that goal is through carrying out Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR programs or University Social Responsibility (USR for university. This study tries to investigate the implementation of ‘Cycle Relations’ model in CSR to increase the intake of Higher Education. This study involved seven Higher Educations and nineteen High schools in Central Java. In collecting the data, it used a depth-interview method with all the related parties in this study. The result showed that most of the Higher Education institutions have implemented Corporate Social Responsibility program in various ways. Their target audience included the high schools, society, and parents.  From the model implementation, it showed that the CSR program did have an impact towards the intake in their institution. However, one important thing to consider is that the role of the teachers at schools was quite significant in influencing the students to choose which university to go.  This reflects that although the Higher Education institution have planned and carried out CSR programs according to what the target audiences’ need, it does not guarantee that it will have direct impact towards their intake because the influence of teacher is quite significant. It may have a bigger impact in long term as the target audiences know the quality and contribution of the Higher Education institutions.

  14. Pertanggungjawaban Sosial Universitas: Implementasi Model Cycle Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sinatra Wijaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The competition among Higher Education is getting tougher. They need to do their best in order to maintain their existence and getting more students coming to their institutions. One way to achieve that goal is through carrying out Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR programs or University Social Responsibility (USR for university. This study tries to investigate the implementation of ‘Cycle Relations’ model in CSR to increase the intake of Higher Education. This study involved seven Higher Educations and nineteen High schools in Central Java. In collecting the data, it used a depth-interview method with all the related parties in this study. The result showed that most of the Higher Education institutions have implemented Corporate Social Responsibility program in various ways. Their target audience included the high schools, society, and parents. From the model implementation, it showed that the CSR program did have an impact towards the intake in their institution. However, one important thing to consider is that the role of the teachers at schools was quite significant in influencing the students to choose which university to go. This reflects that although the Higher Education institution have planned and carried out CSR programs according to what the target audiences’ need, it does not guarantee that it will have direct impact towards their intake because the influence of teacher is quite significant. It may have a bigger impact in long term as the target audiences know the quality and contribution of the Higher Education institutions.

  15. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  16. AN ABSTRACT RELATIONAL MODEL AND NATURAL JOIN FUNCTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Akihiko

    1983-01-01

    A meta-model for database models called an abstract relational model which is obtained by a categorical abstraction of a relational model is proposed. This meta-model represents various database models, e.g. relational, network, hierarchical models as special cases. It is proved that a natural join is the right adjoint of a decomposition in the relational model. On the other hand, in our abstract relational model a natural join is defined as the right adjoint of a decomposition. A sufficient ...

  17. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  18. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  19. 高血压病血瘀证相关 m iRNA 的筛选%Screening of hypertension/blood stasis syndrome-related miRNA in endo-thelial cell models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何铃; 方梅霞; 陈利国; 袁静; 周建华; 徐婧

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To screen the miRNA related to blood stasis syndrome and to explore the genetic mechanism of blood stasis syndrome in hypertension.METHODS:Human umbilical vein endothelial cell line CRL-1730 was co-cul-tured with the human sera from healthy normal controls and hypertension patients to establish a blood stasis-hypertension cell modela.The hypertension patients showed qi deficiency and blood stasis, qi stagnation and blood stasis, cold retaining and blood stasis, heat retaining and blood stasis and non-blood stasis syndromes.The endothelial cell models of blood stasis in hypertension were established.Target cells were collected for total RNA extraction.The techniques of Solexa ( high-throughput sequencing method) and digital gene expression profiling were applied for screening the target miRNA, and miRWalk software was used for online prediction the mRNA which might be the relevant target.qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the prediction.RESULTS:SAT1-Hsa-miR-199a-5p and ATF4-Hsa-miR-1283 were found to be highly expressed in these cell models.The expression of miR-1283 and miR-199a-5p was confirmed by qRT-PCR.CONCLUSION:miR-199a-5p and miR-1283 may be the relevant miRNA for the prediction of blood stasis syndrome in hypertension.%目的:筛选与高血压病血瘀证相关微小RNA( microRNA, miRNA),从基因组学探索高血压病血瘀证的发病机制。方法:运用高血压病气虚血瘀证、气滞血瘀证、寒凝血瘀证、热结血瘀证、非血瘀证患者和健康人的血清干预人脐静脉血管内皮细胞CRL-1730,建立高血压病血瘀证血管内皮细胞损伤模型;提取各组总RNA,采用Solexa高通量测序法和数字基因表达谱测序原理对各组样本进行测序分析,筛选各组间的差异表达miRNA和mR-NA,使用靶基因miRWalk预测软件对2者进行相关性的整合,筛选与血瘀证相关miRNA,qRT-PCR定量分析验证miRNA的表达。结果:整合气虚血瘀组与非血瘀组、气

  20. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  1. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  2. Mathematical model of electrotaxis in osteoblastic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanegas-Acosta, J.C.; Garzón-Alvarado, D.A.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Electrotaxis is the cell migration in the presence of an electric field (EF). This migration is parallel to the EF vector and overrides chemical migration cues. In this paper we introduce a mathematical model for the electrotaxis in osteoblastic cells. The model is evaluated using different EF stren

  3. Malaria modeling: In vitro stem cells vs in vivo models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian; Noulin

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of stem cell research and the possibility of generating cells that can be stably and permanently modified in their genome open a broad horizon in the world of in vitro modeling. The malaria field is gaining new opportunities from this importantbreakthrough and novel tools were adapted and opened new frontiers for malaria research. In addition to the new in vitro systems, in recent years there were also significant advances in the development of new animal models that allows studying the entire cell cycle of human malaria. In this paper, we review the different protocols available to study human Plasmodium species either by using stem cell or alternative animal models.

  4. Malaria modeling: In vitro stem cells vs in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulin, Florian

    2016-03-26

    The recent development of stem cell research and the possibility of generating cells that can be stably and permanently modified in their genome open a broad horizon in the world of in vitro modeling. The malaria field is gaining new opportunities from this important breakthrough and novel tools were adapted and opened new frontiers for malaria research. In addition to the new in vitro systems, in recent years there were also significant advances in the development of new animal models that allows studying the entire cell cycle of human malaria. In this paper, we review the different protocols available to study human Plasmodium species either by using stem cell or alternative animal models.

  5. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashant Khodade; Samta Malhotra; Nirmal Kumar; M Sriram Iyengar; N Balakrishnan; Nagasuma Chandra

    2007-08-01

    The biological cell, a natural self-contained unit of prime biological importance, is an enormously complex machine that can be understood at many levels. A higher-level perspective of the entire cell requires integration of various features into coherent, biologically meaningful descriptions. There are some efforts to model cells based on their genome, proteome or metabolome descriptions. However, there are no established methods as yet to describe cell morphologies, capture similarities and differences between different cells or between healthy and disease states. Here we report a framework to model various aspects of a cell and integrate knowledge encoded at different levels of abstraction, with cell morphologies at one end to atomic structures at the other. The different issues that have been addressed are ontologies, feature description and model building. The framework describes dotted representations and tree data structures to integrate diverse pieces of data and parametric models enabling size, shape and location descriptions. The framework serves as a first step in integrating different levels of data available for a biological cell and has the potential to lead to development of computational models in our pursuit to model cell structure and function, from which several applications can flow out.

  6. Handbook of latent variable and related models

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sik-Yum

    2011-01-01

    This Handbook covers latent variable models, which are a flexible class of models for modeling multivariate data to explore relationships among observed and latent variables.- Covers a wide class of important models- Models and statistical methods described provide tools for analyzing a wide spectrum of complicated data- Includes illustrative examples with real data sets from business, education, medicine, public health and sociology.- Demonstrates the use of a wide variety of statistical, computational, and mathematical techniques.

  7. Modeling battery cells under discharge using kinetic and stochastic battery models

    OpenAIRE

    Kaj, Ingemar; Konane, Victorien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we review several approaches to mathematical modeling of simple battery cells and develop these ideas further with emphasis on charge recovery and the response behavior of batteries to given external load. We focus on models which use few parameters and basic battery data, rather than detailed reaction and material characteristics of a specific battery cell chemistry, starting with the coupled ODE linear dynamics of the kinetic battery model. We show that a related system of PDE...

  8. Cell Phones: A Bibliometric Analysis Related to Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Recent reviews of the literature indicate that the scope of research on cell or mobile phones covers a vast typology (Piotrowski & Kass, 2013). The majority of this research is concentrated in the technology, education, and social sciences fields. However, there is a dearth of bibliometric studies on cell phones related to business. To that…

  9. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  10. Stochastic biophysical modeling of irradiated cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fornalski, Krzysztof Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a computational stochastic model of virtual cells irradiation, based on Quasi-Markov Chain Monte Carlo method and using biophysical input. The model is based on a stochastic tree of probabilities for each cell of the entire colony. Biophysics of the cells is described by probabilities and probability distributions provided as the input. The adaptation of nucleation and catastrophe theories, well known in physics, yields sigmoidal relationships for carcinogenic risk as a function of the irradiation. Adaptive response and bystander effect, incorporated into the model, improves its application. The results show that behavior of virtual cells can be successfully modeled, e.g. cancer transformation, creation of mutations, radioadaptation or radiotherapy. The used methodology makes the model universal and practical for simulations of general processes. Potential biophysical curves and relationships are also widely discussed in the paper. However, the presented theoretical model does not describe ...

  11. Stem cells: Potential therapy for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive failing of tissues and organs of the human body leading to a large number of age-related diseases. Regenerative medicine is an emerging clinical discipline that aims to employ cellular medicines (normal cells, ex vivo expanded cells, or tissue......-engineered organs) to restore the functions of damaged or defective tissues and organs and thus to "rejuvenate" the failing aging body. One of the most important sources for cellular medicine is embryonic and adult (somatic) stem cells (SSCs). One example of SCCs with enormous clinical potential is the mesenchymal...... stem cells (MSCs) that are present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial cells, and probably also neuron-like cells. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSCs are among the first...

  12. Retinal Cell Degeneration in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Niwa; Hitomi Aoki; Akihiro Hirata; Hiroyuki Tomita; Green, Paul G.; Akira Hara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of various retinal cell degeneration models in animal induced by chemicals (N-methyl-d-aspartate- and CoCl2-induced), autoimmune (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis), mechanical stress (optic nerve crush-induced, light-induced) and ischemia (transient retinal ischemia-induced). The target regions, pathology and proposed mechanism of each model are described in a comparative fashion. Animal models of retinal cell degeneration provide insi...

  13. Aging and Immortality in a Cell Proliferation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Antal, T; Trugman, S A; Redner, S

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a model of cell division in which the length of telomeres within the cell regulate their proliferative potential. At each cell division the ends of linear chromosomes change and a cell becomes senescent when one or more of its telomeres become shorter than a critical length. In addition to this systematic shortening, exchange of telomere DNA between the two daughter cells can occur at each cell division. We map this telomere dynamics onto a biased branching diffusion process with an absorbing boundary condition whenever any telomere reaches the critical length. As the relative effects of telomere shortening and cell division are varied, there is a phase transition between finite lifetime and infinite proliferation of the cell population. Using simple first-passage ideas, we quantify the nature of this transition.

  14. Modelling familial dysautonomia in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gabsang; Studer, Lorenz

    2011-08-12

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable promise as a novel tool for modelling human disease and for drug discovery. While the generation of disease-specific iPS cells has become routine, realizing the potential of iPS cells in disease modelling poses challenges at multiple fronts. Such challenges include selecting a suitable disease target, directing the fate of iPS cells into symptom-relevant cell populations, identifying disease-related phenotypes and showing reversibility of such phenotypes using genetic or pharmacological approaches. Finally, the system needs to be scalable for use in modern drug discovery. Here, we will discuss these points in the context of modelling familial dysautonomia (FD, Riley-Day syndrome, hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III (HSAN-III)), a rare genetic disorder in the peripheral nervous system. We have demonstrated three disease-specific phenotypes in FD-iPS-derived cells that can be partially rescued by treating cells with the plant hormone kinetin. Here, we will discuss how to use FD-iPS cells further in high throughput drug discovery assays, in modelling disease severity and in performing mechanistic studies aimed at understanding disease pathogenesis. FD is a rare disease but represents an important testing ground for exploring the potential of iPS cell technology in modelling and treating human disease.

  15. Mathematical modeling of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ruy; Gonzalez, Ernesto R.

    Fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane have been receiving more and more attention. Modeling plays an important role in the development of fuel cells. In this paper, the state-of-the-art regarding modeling of fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane is reviewed. Modeling has allowed detailed studies concerning the development of these cells, e.g. in discussing the electrocatalysis of the reactions and the design of water-management schemes to cope with membrane dehydration. Two-dimensional models have been used to represent reality, but three-dimensional models can cope with some important additional aspects. Consideration of two-phase transport in the air cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell seems to be very appropriate. Most fuel cells use hydrogen as a fuel. Besides safety concerns, there are problems associated with production, storage and distribution of this fuel. Methanol, as a liquid fuel, can be the solution to these problems and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are attractive for several applications. Mass transport is a factor that may limit the performance of the cell. Adsorption steps may be coupled to Tafel kinetics to describe methanol oxidation and methanol crossover must also be taken into account. Extending the two-phase approach to the DMFC modeling is a recent, important point.

  16. Stem cells in court: historical trends in US legal cases related to stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Andreia Martins; Turner, Leigh

    2017-04-01

    Using two legal research platforms, we identified 193 stem-cell-related legal cases that were decided in US courts. Classifying the cases by category, we examined historical trends in the types of legal cases related to stem cells. Major types of cases involved plaintiffs seeking to overturn denial of health insurance coverage decisions, disputes related to intellectual property, false advertising, breaches of contract, exposure to hazardous agents, regulatory decisions, stem cell procedures and professional standard of care, use of stems cells in research, and public funding of embryonic stem cell research. Analysis of court decisions provides insight into contemporary and historical legal issues related to stem cells and reveals the breadth of stem-cell-related cases now being decided by US courts.

  17. Boundary Relations, Unitary Colligations, and Functional Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrndt, Jussi; Hassi, Seppo; de Snoo, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new notion, the so-called boundary relation, has been introduced involving an analytic object, the so-called Weyl family. Weyl families and boundary relations establish a link between the class of Nevanlinna families and unitary relations acting from one Krein in space, a basic (state) sp

  18. Theoretical model of a photoelectrochemical solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, S.; Singh, S.L.; Khare, N.

    1986-03-01

    A Schottky barrier theoretical model for explaining the J-V characteristic of a photoelectrochemical solar cell (PESC) has been developed considering the effect of dark current, space-charge recombination, surface states, and detailed charge transfer kinetics at the interface. Both isoenergetic charge transfer and inelastic charge transfers (via surface states) at the interface have been considered and their relative importance are discussed. The theory has been applied to explain the (a) J-V characteristic for n-GaAs/SeS , SeS 2 junction and (b) Fermi-level pinning observed in GaAs PESC. The inelastic charge transfer via surfaces states has been shown to play an important role in deciding these characteristics.

  19. Health-related quality of life in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panepinto, Julie A

    2008-07-01

    Advances in drug therapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and technology have improved the morbidity and survival for those with sickle cell disease. The effect of this modern therapy on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of those with sickle cell disease is not known. HRQL provides an assessment of how an illness, its complications, and its treatment are experienced by a patient. This review will examine prior work in HRQL in sickle cell disease and the rationale for utilizing HRQL as an outcome to measure impact of treatment. In addition, issues to consider when reporting HRQL will be presented.

  20. Analyzing electrical activities of pancreatic β cells using mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chae Young; Powell, Trevor; Noma, Akinori

    2011-11-01

    Bursts of repetitive action potentials are closely related to the regulation of glucose-induced insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells. Mathematical studies with simple β-cell models have established the central principle that the burst-interburst events are generated by the interaction between fast membrane excitation and slow cytosolic components. Recently, a number of detailed models have been developed to simulate more realistic β cell activity based on expanded findings on biophysical characteristics of cellular components. However, their complex structures hinder our intuitive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, and it is becoming more difficult to dissect the role of a specific component out of the complex network. We have recently developed a new detailed model by incorporating most of ion channels and transporters recorded experimentally (the Cha-Noma model), yet the model satisfies the charge conservation law and reversible responses to physiological stimuli. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying bursting activity by applying mathematical analysis tools to representative simple and detailed models. These analyses include time-based simulation, bifurcation analysis and lead potential analysis. In addition, we introduce a new steady-state I-V (ssI-V) curve analysis. We also discuss differences in electrical signals recorded from isolated single cells or from cells maintaining electrical connections within multi-cell preparations. Towards this end, we perform simulations with our detailed pancreatic β-cell model.

  1. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  2. Modeling cell behavior: moving beyond intuition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jolicoeur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the launching of this new journal, we propose a forum to the community of researchers interested and involved in, or even simply questioning the why, what, how, and when of modeling cell or cell culture behavior. To start the discussion, we review some of the usual questions we are routinely asked on the pertinence of modeling cell behavior, and on who might benefit from conducting such work. To draw a global portrait, throughout this text we refer the reader to handbooks introducing the basics of modeling a biosystem, as well as to selected works that can help visualize the broad fields of applications.

  3. An In Vitro Nematic Model for Proliferating Cell Cultures

    CERN Document Server

    Pai, Sunil; Green, Morgaine; Cordeiro, Christine; Cabral, Elise; Chen, Bertha; Baer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Confluent populations of elongated cells give rise to ordered patterns seen in nematic phase liquid crystals. We correlate cell elongation and intercellular distance with intercellular alignment using an amorphous spin glass model. We compare in vitro time-lapse imaging with Monte Carlo simulation results by framing a novel hard ellipses model in terms of Boltzmann statistics. Furthermore, we find a statistically distinct alignment energy at quasi-steady state among fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and pluripotent cell populations when cultured in vitro. These findings have important implications in both non-invasive clinical screening of the stem cell differentiation process and in relating shape parameters to coupling in active crystal systems such as nematic cell monolayers.

  4. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  5. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  6. EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE-RELATED MOLECULES IN GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORM CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of immune- related molecules in glioblastoma multiform(GBM) cells. Methods: The expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC), β2-microglobulin, Fas, CD80 and CD86 molecules on the surface of GBM cells were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of TAP-1, TAP-2 and Tapasin in the GBM cells were evaluated by RT-PCR method. Results: MHC class Ⅰ, β2 microglobulin, TAP-1, TAP-2 and tapasin were expressed in most GBM cell lines. Except U87, there was no MHC class Ⅱ molecule expression on any of the other GBM cell lines. Fas was expressed on all the GBM cell lines examined. Conclusion: The mechanism by which GBM escapes immune surveillance may involve down regulation of expression of MHC class Ⅰ molecules and MHC class Ⅱ molecules. MHC class Ⅰpositive GBM may be the suitable target of immunotherapy.

  7. On a poroviscoelastic model for cell crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, L S; Whiteley, J P; Waters, S L; Oliver, J M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a minimal, one-dimensional, two-phase, viscoelastic, reactive, flow model for a crawling cell is presented. Two-phase models are used with a variety of constitutive assumptions in the literature to model cell motility. We use an upper-convected Maxwell model and demonstrate that even the simplest of two-phase, viscoelastic models displays features relevant to cell motility. We also show care must be exercised in choosing parameters for such models as a poor choice can lead to an ill-posed problem. A stability analysis reveals that the initially stationary, spatially uniform strip of cytoplasm starts to crawl in response to a perturbation which breaks the symmetry of the network volume fraction or network stress. We also demonstrate numerically that there is a steady travelling-wave solution in which the crawling velocity has a bell-shaped dependence on adhesion strength, in agreement with biological observation.

  8. On a poroviscoelastic model for cell crawling

    KAUST Repository

    Kimpton, L. S.

    2014-02-08

    In this paper a minimal, one-dimensional, two-phase, viscoelastic, reactive, flow model for a crawling cell is presented. Two-phase models are used with a variety of constitutive assumptions in the literature to model cell motility. We use an upper-convected Maxwell model and demonstrate that even the simplest of two-phase, viscoelastic models displays features relevant to cell motility. We also show care must be exercised in choosing parameters for such models as a poor choice can lead to an ill-posed problem. A stability analysis reveals that the initially stationary, spatially uniform strip of cytoplasm starts to crawl in response to a perturbation which breaks the symmetry of the network volume fraction or network stress. We also demonstrate numerically that there is a steady travelling-wave solution in which the crawling velocity has a bell-shaped dependence on adhesion strength, in agreement with biological observation.

  9. Modeling behavioral considerations related to information security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F. (Decision and Information Sciences); (SNL); (Univ. at Albany)

    2011-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model for the identification of threats to security systems. This model integrates judgment, decision-making, and learning theories to provide a unified framework for the behavioral study of upcoming threats.

  10. A Relational Scaffolding Model of Hybrid Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Jens O.; Tuckermann, Harald

    Two fundamental trends with important implications for today's management of organizations build the impetus for this paper. The first is the ubiquity of computer-mediated communication (CMC). The second is the revived interest for social relations and social networks at the workplace and its focus on relational processes in organizations.

  11. The social relations model for family data : A multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, TAB; Kenny, DA

    1999-01-01

    Multilevel models are proposed to study relational or dyadic data from multiple persons in families or other groups. The variable under study is assumed to refer to a dyadic relation between individuals in the groups. The proposed models are elaborations of the Social Relations Model. The different

  12. A Structured Population Model of Cell Differentiation

    CERN Document Server

    Doumic, Marie; Perthame, Benoit; Zubelli, Jorge P

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and analyze several aspects of a new model for cell differentiation. It assumes that differentiation of progenitor cells is a continuous process. From the mathematical point of view, it is based on partial differential equations of transport type. Specifically, it consists of a structured population equation with a nonlinear feedback loop. This models the signaling process due to cytokines, which regulate the differentiation and proliferation process. We compare the continuous model to its discrete counterpart, a multi-compartmental model of a discrete collection of cell subpopulations recently proposed by Marciniak-Czochra et al. in 2009 to investigate the dynamics of the hematopoietic system. We obtain uniform bounds for the solutions, characterize steady state solutions, and analyze their linearized stability. We show how persistence or extinction might occur according to values of parameters that characterize the stem cells self-renewal. We also perform numerical simulations and discuss the q...

  13. Spatial Modeling Tools for Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    34 iv Figure 5.1: Computational results for a diffusion problem on planar square thin film............ 36 Figure 5.2... Wisc . Open Microscopy Env. Pre-CoBi Model Lib. CFDRC CoBi Tools CFDRC CoBi Tools Simulation Environment JigCell Tools Figure 4.1: Cell biology

  14. Verifying Interlevel Relations within Organizational Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Sharpanskykh, A.; Treur, J.; Yolum, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the formal theoretical basis used for transformation of a non-executable external behavioral specification for an organizational model into an executable format, required for enabling verification techniques, is explained in detail.

  15. Verifying Interlevel Relations within Organizational Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Sharpanskykh, A.; Treur, J.; Yolum, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the formal theoretical basis used for transformation of a non-executable external behavioral specification for an organizational model into an executable format, required for enabling verification techniques, is explained in detail.

  16. Computational and Modeling Strategies for Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken; Kapustina, Maryna; Forest, M. Gregory

    A predictive simulation of the dynamics of a living cell remains a fundamental modeling and computational challenge. The challenge does not even make sense unless one specifies the level of detail and the phenomena of interest, whether the focus is on near-equilibrium or strongly nonequilibrium behavior, and on localized, subcellular, or global cell behavior. Therefore, choices have to be made clear at the outset, ranging from distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, specificity within each of these types, whether the cell is "normal," whether one wants to model mitosis, blebs, migration, division, deformation due to confined flow as with red blood cells, and the level of microscopic detail for any of these processes. The review article by Hoffman and Crocker [48] is both an excellent overview of cell mechanics and an inspiration for our approach. One might be interested, for example, in duplicating the intricate experimental details reported in [43]: "actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process," or to duplicate experimental evidence of traveling waves in cells recovering from actin depolymerization [42, 35]. Modeling studies of lamellipodial structure, protrusion, and retraction behavior range from early mechanistic models [84] to more recent deterministic [112, 97] and stochastic [51] approaches with significant biochemical and structural detail. Recent microscopic-macroscopic models and algorithms for cell blebbing have been developed by Young and Mitran [116], which update cytoskeletal microstructure via statistical sampling techniques together with fluid variables. Alternatively, whole cell compartment models (without spatial details) of oscillations in spreading cells have been proposed [35, 92, 109] which show positive and negative feedback

  17. Stem cell therapy for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Leslie M; Fong, Helen; Huang, Yadong

    2015-03-13

    Underlying cognitive declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the result of neuron and neuronal process losses due to a wide range of factors. To date, all efforts to develop therapies that target specific AD-related pathways have failed in late-stage human trials. As a result, an emerging consensus in the field is that treatment of AD patients with currently available drug candidates might come too late, likely as a result of significant neuronal loss in the brain. In this regard, cell-replacement therapies, such as human embryonic stem cell- or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells, hold potential for treating AD patients. With the advent of stem cell technologies and the ability to transform these cells into different types of central nervous system neurons and glial cells, some success in stem cell therapy has been reported in animal models of AD. However, many more steps remain before stem cell therapies will be clinically feasible for AD and related disorders in humans. In this review, we will discuss current research advances in AD pathogenesis and stem cell technologies; additionally, the potential challenges and strategies for using cell-based therapies for AD and related disorders will be discussed.

  18. Mathematical model of a cell size checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Vilela

    Full Text Available How cells regulate their size from one generation to the next has remained an enigma for decades. Recently, a molecular mechanism that links cell size and cell cycle was proposed in fission yeast. This mechanism involves changes in the spatial cellular distribution of two proteins, Pom1 and Cdr2, as the cell grows. Pom1 inhibits Cdr2 while Cdr2 promotes the G2 → M transition. Cdr2 is localized in the middle cell region (midcell whereas the concentration of Pom1 is highest at the cell tips and declines towards the midcell. In short cells, Pom1 efficiently inhibits Cdr2. However, as cells grow, the Pom1 concentration at midcell decreases such that Cdr2 becomes activated at some critical size. In this study, the chemistry of Pom1 and Cdr2 was modeled using a deterministic reaction-diffusion-convection system interacting with a deterministic model describing microtubule dynamics. Simulations mimicked experimental data from wild-type (WT fission yeast growing at normal and reduced rates; they also mimicked the behavior of a Pom1 overexpression mutant and WT yeast exposed to a microtubule depolymerizing drug. A mechanism linking cell size and cell cycle, involving the downstream action of Cdr2 on Wee1 phosphorylation, is proposed.

  19. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Three Related Kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Richard; Killick, Rowena; Barrows, Michelle; Stidworthy, Mark

    2017-02-11

    We report three kowari (Dasyuroides byrnei) with squamous cell carcinoma affecting the gingiva. These cases occurred in rapid succession in a related group of individuals of similar age, suggesting a familial tendency to this condition and a typical age of presentation. Other conditions affecting the oral cavity can mimic the appearance of oral squamous cell carcinoma in this species, and so knowledge of this condition can assist the veterinarian in making rapid decisions regarding prognosis and improving the welfare of these animals.

  20. Sericin protects against diabetes-induced injuries in sciatic nerve and related nerve cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjun Song; Zhenjun Yang; Meirong Zhong; Zhihong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Sericin from discarded silkworm cocoons of silk reeling has been used in different fields, such as cosmetology, skin care, nutrition, and oncology. The present study established a rat model of type 2 diabetes by consecutive intraperitoneal injections of low-dose (25 mg/kg) streptozotocin. After intragastrical perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly declined, and the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in L4–6 spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly increased. However, the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly decreased in model rats. These findings indicate that sericin protected the sciatic nerve and related nerve cells against injury in a rat type 2 diabetic model by upregulating the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells, and downregulating the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells.

  1. Malaria modeling: In vitro stem cells vs in vivo models

    OpenAIRE

    Noulin, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of stem cell research and the possibility of generating cells that can be stably and permanently modified in their genome open a broad horizon in the world of in vitro modeling. The malaria field is gaining new opportunities from this important breakthrough and novel tools were adapted and opened new frontiers for malaria research. In addition to the new in vitro systems, in recent years there were also significant advances in the development of new animal models that a...

  2. Decision tree modeling with relational views

    CERN Document Server

    Bentayeb, Fadila

    2002-01-01

    Data mining is a useful decision support technique that can be used to discover production rules in warehouses or corporate data. Data mining research has made much effort to apply various mining algorithms efficiently on large databases. However, a serious problem in their practical application is the long processing time of such algorithms. Nowadays, one of the key challenges is to integrate data mining methods within the framework of traditional database systems. Indeed, such implementations can take advantage of the efficiency provided by SQL engines. In this paper, we propose an integrating approach for decision trees within a classical database system. In other words, we try to discover knowledge from relational databases, in the form of production rules, via a procedure embedding SQL queries. The obtained decision tree is defined by successive, related relational views. Each view corresponds to a given population in the underlying decision tree. We selected the classical Induction Decision Tree (ID3) a...

  3. An electrostatic model for biological cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Faraggi, Eshel

    2010-01-01

    Probably the most fundamental processes for biological systems is their ability to create themselves through the use of cell division and cell differentiation. In this work a simple physical model is proposed for biological cell division. The model consists of a positive ionic gradient across the cell membrane, and concentration of charge at the nodes of the spindle and on the chromosomes. A simple calculation, based on Coulomb's Law, shows that under such circumstances a chromosome will tend to break up to its constituent chromatids and that the chromatids will be separated by a distance that is an order of thirty percent of the distance between the spindle nodes. Further repulsion between the nodes will tend to stretch the cell and eventually break the cell membrane between the separated chromatids, leading to cell division. The importance of this work is in continuing the understanding of the electromagnetic basis of cell division and providing it with an analytical model. A central implication of this and...

  4. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  5. A differential model of the complex cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, Miles; Horaud, Radu

    2011-09-01

    The receptive fields of simple cells in the visual cortex can be understood as linear filters. These filters can be modeled by Gabor functions or gaussian derivatives. Gabor functions can also be combined in an energy model of the complex cell response. This letter proposes an alternative model of the complex cell, based on gaussian derivatives. It is most important to account for the insensitivity of the complex response to small shifts of the image. The new model uses a linear combination of the first few derivative filters, at a single position, to approximate the first derivative filter, at a series of adjacent positions. The maximum response, over all positions, gives a signal that is insensitive to small shifts of the image. This model, unlike previous approaches, is based on the scale space theory of visual processing. In particular, the complex cell is built from filters that respond to the 2D differential structure of the image. The computational aspects of the new model are studied in one and two dimensions, using the steerability of the gaussian derivatives. The response of the model to basic images, such as edges and gratings, is derived formally. The response to natural images is also evaluated, using statistical measures of shift insensitivity. The neural implementation and predictions of the model are discussed.

  6. Cardiac Electromechanical Models: From Cell to Organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Trayanova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a multiphysics and multiscale system that has driven the development of the most sophisticated mathematical models at the frontiers of computation physiology and medicine. This review focuses on electromechanical (EM models of the heart from the molecular level of myofilaments to anatomical models of the organ. Because of the coupling in terms of function and emergent behaviors at each level of biological hierarchy, separation of behaviors at a given scale is difficult. Here, a separation is drawn at the cell level so that the first half addresses subcellular/single cell models and the second half addresses organ models. At the subcelluar level, myofilament models represent actin-myosin interaction and Ca-based activation. Myofilament models and their refinements represent an overview of the development in the field. The discussion of specific models emphasizes the roles of cooperative mechanisms and sarcomere length dependence of contraction force, considered the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling law. A model of electrophysiology and Ca handling can be coupled to a myofilament model to produce an EM cell model, and representative examples are summarized to provide an overview of the progression of field. The second half of the review covers organ-level models that require solution of the electrical component as a reaction-diffusion system and the mechanical component, in which active tension generated by the myocytes produces deformation of the organ as described by the equations of continuum mechanics. As outlined in the review, different organ-level models have chosen to use different ionic and myofilament models depending on the specific application; this choice has been largely dictated by compromises between model complexity and computational tractability. The review also addresses application areas of EM models such as cardiac resynchronization therapy and the role of mechano-electric coupling in arrhythmias and

  7. Cell reprogramming modelled as transitions in a hierarchy of cell cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Ryan; Annibale, Alessia; Kühn, Reimer

    2017-10-01

    We construct a model of cell reprogramming (the conversion of fully differentiated cells to a state of pluripotency, known as induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs) which builds on key elements of cell biology viz. cell cycles and cell lineages. Although reprogramming has been demonstrated experimentally, much of the underlying processes governing cell fate decisions remain unknown. This work aims to bridge this gap by modelling cell types as a set of hierarchically related dynamical attractors representing cell cycles. Stages of the cell cycle are characterised by the configuration of gene expression levels, and reprogramming corresponds to triggering transitions between such configurations. Two mechanisms were found for reprogramming in a two level hierarchy: cycle specific perturbations and a noise induced switching. The former corresponds to a directed perturbation that induces a transition into a cycle-state of a different cell type in the potency hierarchy (mainly a stem cell) whilst the latter is a priori undirected and could be induced, e.g. by a (stochastic) change in the cellular environment. These reprogramming protocols were found to be effective in large regimes of the parameter space and make specific predictions concerning reprogramming dynamics which are broadly in line with experimental findings.

  8. Hybrid multiscale modeling and prediction of cancer cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Habibi, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Understanding cancer development crossing several spatial-temporal scales is of great practical significance to better understand and treat cancers. It is difficult to tackle this challenge with pure biological means. Moreover, hybrid modeling techniques have been proposed that combine the advantages of the continuum and the discrete methods to model multiscale problems. In light of these problems, we have proposed a new hybrid vascular model to facilitate the multiscale modeling and simulation of cancer development with respect to the agent-based, cellular automata and machine learning methods. The purpose of this simulation is to create a dataset that can be used for prediction of cell phenotypes. By using a proposed Q-learning based on SVR-NSGA-II method, the cells have the capability to predict their phenotypes autonomously that is, to act on its own without external direction in response to situations it encounters. Computational simulations of the model were performed in order to analyze its performance. The most striking feature of our results is that each cell can select its phenotype at each time step according to its condition. We provide evidence that the prediction of cell phenotypes is reliable. Our proposed model, which we term a hybrid multiscale modeling of cancer cell behavior, has the potential to combine the best features of both continuum and discrete models. The in silico results indicate that the 3D model can represent key features of cancer growth, angiogenesis, and its related micro-environment and show that the findings are in good agreement with biological tumor behavior. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first hybrid vascular multiscale modeling of cancer cell behavior that has the capability to predict cell phenotypes individually by a self-generated dataset.

  9. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  10. Study of Photovoltaic Cells Engineering Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yu, Zhengping; Lu, Zhengyi; Li, Chenhui; Zhang, Ruilan

    2016-11-01

    The characteristic curve of photovoltaic cells is the theoretical basis of PV Power, which simplifies the existing mathematical model, eventually, obtains a mathematical model used in engineering. The characteristic curve of photovoltaic cells contains both exponential and logarithmic calculation. The exponential and logarithmic spread out through Taylor series, which includes only four arithmetic and use single chip microcontroller as the control center. The result shows that: the use of single chip microcontroller for calculating exponential and logarithmic functions, simplifies mathematical model of PV curve, also can meet the specific conditions’ requirement for engineering applications.

  11. Relative Motion Modeling and Autonomous Navigation Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Model Expansion; Earth Gravitational Perturbation; Goddard Mission Analysis Tool; GMAT ; Hamiltonian Methods; LEO Orbits; Lunar-solar Perturbations...54  4.1.3  Numerical Verification using GMAT and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) ......... 58  4.2  Non-Earth Gravitational...and short period ... 52  Figure 3. Difference between the Kaula and GMAT with 20x20 gravity field without J22 secular and short period terms

  12. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  13. Voronoi Cell Patterns: theoretical model and application to submonolayer growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego Luis; Einstein, T. L.

    2012-02-01

    We use a simple fragmentation model to describe the statistical behavior of the Voronoi cell patterns generated by a homogeneous and isotropic set of points in 1D and in 2D. In particular, we are interested in the distribution of sizes of these Voronoi cells. Our model is completely defined by two probability distributions in 1D and again in 2D, the probability to add a new point inside an existing cell and the probability that this new point is at a particular position relative to the preexisting point inside this cell. In 1D the first distribution depends on a single parameter while the second distribution is defined through a fragmentation kernel; in 2D both distributions depend on a single parameter. The fragmentation kernel and the control parameters are closely related to the physical properties of the specific system under study. We apply our model to describe the Voronoi cell patterns of island nucleation for critical island sizes i=0,1,2,3. Experimental results for the Voronoi cells of InAs/GaAs quantum dots are also described by our model.

  14. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Jeong; Yoon, Seo-Hyun; Han, Long-Shan; Zheng, Long-Tai; Jung, Kyung-Hee; Uhm, Yoon-Kyung; Lee, Je-Hyun; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Joo, Woo-Sang; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2005-09-07

    The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-related, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cycle-related, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes. We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL, 24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE11A), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells. These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells, and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  15. Modeling Natural Killer Cell Targeted Immunotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Di Santo, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models have extensively contributed to our understanding of human immunobiology and to uncover the underlying pathological mechanisms occurring in the development of diseases. However, mouse models do not reproduce the genetic and molecular complexity inherent in human disease conditions. Human immune system (HIS) mouse models that are susceptible to human pathogens and can recapitulate human hematopoiesis and tumor immunobiology provide one means to bridge the interspecies gap. Natural killer cells are the founding member of the innate lymphoid cell family. They exert a rapid and strong immune response against tumor and pathogen-infected cells. Their antitumor features have long been exploited for therapeutic purposes in the context of cancer. In this review, we detail the development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains and the models currently used in cancer research. We summarize the latest improvements in adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapies and the development of novel NK cell sources. Finally, we discuss the advantages of HIS mice to study the interactions between human NK cells and human cancers and to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  16. Radiobiological modeling with MarCell software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.

    1999-01-01

    A nonlinear system of differential equations that models the bone marrow cellular kinetics associated with radiation injury, molecular repair, and compensatory cell proliferation has been extensively documented. Recently, that model has been implemented as MarCell, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users with little knowledge of the original model to evaluate complex radiation exposure scenarios. The software allows modeling with the following radiations: tritium beta, 100 kVp X, 250 kVp X, 22 MV X, {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, 2 MeV electrons, triga neutrons, D-T neutrons, and 3 blends of mixed-field fission radiations. The possible cell lineages are stem, stroma, and leukemia/lymphoma, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive mathematical feature is that any protracted protocol can be expressed as an equivalent prompt dose for either the source used or for a reference, such as 250 kVp X rays or {sup 60}Co. Output from MarCell includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of cancer and leukemia based either on cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival plots as a function of time or dose; and 4-week recovery kinetics following treatment. In this article, the program`s applicability and ease of use are demonstrated by evaluating a medical total body irradiation protocol and a nuclear fallout scenario.

  17. Transcriptional Wiring of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Mutwil; Colin Ruprecht; Federico M. Giorgi; Martin Bringmann; Bj(o)rn Usadel; Staffan Persson

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the correspond-ing proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of anal-yses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  18. Glycoconjugates and Related Molecules in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Sasaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs form the inner lining of blood vessels. They are critically involved in many physiological functions, including control of vasomotor tone, blood cell trafficking, hemostatic balance, permeability, proliferation, survival, and immunity. It is considered that impairment of EC functions leads to the development of vascular diseases. The carbohydrate antigens carried by glycoconjugates (e.g., glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids, and proteoglycans mainly present on the cell surface serve not only as marker molecules but also as functional molecules. Recent studies have revealed that the carbohydrate composition of the EC surface is critical for these cells to perform their physiological functions. In this paper, we consider the expression and functional roles of endogenous glycoconjugates and related molecules (galectins and glycan-degrading enzymes in human ECs.

  19. Modeling patterns in count data using loglinear and related models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    This report explains the use of loglinear and logit models, for analyzing Poisson and binomial counts in the presence of explanatory variables. The explanatory variables may be unordered categorical variables or numerical variables, or both. The report shows how to construct models to fit data, and how to test whether a model is too simple or too complex. The appropriateness of the methods with small data sets is discussed. Several example analyses, using the SAS computer package, illustrate the methods.

  20. Relating masses and mixing angles. A model-independent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Saldana-Salazar, Ulises Jesus [CINVESTAV (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    In general, mixing angles and fermion masses are seen to be independent parameters of the Standard Model. However, exploiting the observed hierarchy in the masses, it is viable to construct the mixing matrices for both quarks and leptons in terms of the corresponding mass ratios only. A closer view on the symmetry properties leads to potential realizations of that approach in extensions of the Standard Model. We discuss the application in the context of flavored multi-Higgs models.

  1. Bonded-cell model for particle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Emilien; Sornay, Philippe; Radjai, Farhang

    2015-02-01

    Particle degradation and fracture play an important role in natural granular flows and in many applications of granular materials. We analyze the fracture properties of two-dimensional disklike particles modeled as aggregates of rigid cells bonded along their sides by a cohesive Mohr-Coulomb law and simulated by the contact dynamics method. We show that the compressive strength scales with tensile strength between cells but depends also on the friction coefficient and a parameter describing cell shape distribution. The statistical scatter of compressive strength is well described by the Weibull distribution function with a shape parameter varying from 6 to 10 depending on cell shape distribution. We show that this distribution may be understood in terms of percolating critical intercellular contacts. We propose a random-walk model of critical contacts that leads to particle size dependence of the compressive strength in good agreement with our simulation data.

  2. The semiotics of control and modeling relations in complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslyn, C

    2001-01-01

    We provide a conceptual analysis of ideas and principles from the systems theory discourse which underlie Pattee's semantic or semiotic closure, which is itself foundational for a school of theoretical biology derived from systems theory and cybernetics, and is now being related to biological semiotics and explicated in the relational biological school of Rashevsky and Rosen. Atomic control systems and models are described as the canonical forms of semiotic organization, sharing measurement relations, but differing topologically in that control systems are circularly and models linearly related to their environments. Computation in control systems is introduced, motivating hierarchical decomposition, hybrid modeling and control systems, and anticipatory or model-based control. The semiotic relations in complex control systems are described in terms of relational constraints, and rules and laws are distinguished as contingent and necessary functional entailments, respectively. Finally, selection as a meta-level of constraint is introduced as the necessary condition for semantic relations in control systems and models.

  3. No role for mast cells in obesity-related metabolic dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Chmelař

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related adipose tissue (AT inflammation that promotes metabolic dysregulation is associated with increased AT mast cell numbers. Mast cells are potent inducers of inflammatory responses and could potentially contribute to obesity-induced AT inflammation and metabolic dysregulation. Conflicting findings were reported on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction in mast cell-deficient mice, thus creating a controversy that has not been resolved up to date. Whereas traditional Kit hypomorphic mast cell-deficient strains featured reduced diet-induced obesity and diabetes, a Kit-independent model of mast cell deficiency, Cpa3Cre/+ mice, displayed no alterations in obesity and insulin sensitivity. Herein, we analyzed diet-induced obesity in Mcpt5-Cre R-DTA mice, in which the lack of mast cells is caused by a principle different from mast cell deficiency in Cpa3Cre/+ mice or Kit mutations. We observed no difference between mast cell-deficient and –proficient mice in diet-induced obesity with regards to weight gain, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, metabolic parameters, hepatic steatosis and AT or liver inflammation. We conclude that mast cells play no essential role in obesity and related pathologies.

  4. Bonded-cell model for particle fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Duc-Hanh; Azéma, Émilien; Sornay, Philippe; Radjaï, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Particle degradation and fracture play an important role in natural granular flows and in many applications of granular materials. We analyze the fracture properties of two-dimensional disklike particles modeled as aggregates of rigid cells bonded along their sides by a cohesive Mohr-Coulomb law and simulated by the contact dynamics method. We show that the compressive strength scales with tensile strength between cells but depends also on the friction coefficient and ...

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells and Parkinson's disease: modelling and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jinsha; Li, Jie; Liu, Ling; Han, Chao; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by progressive neuronal loss in different regions of the central nervous system, contributing to brain dysfunction in the relevant patients. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for PD patients, including with foetal ventral mesencephalic cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Moreover, stem cells can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases in order to screen potential medication and explore their mechanisms of disease. However, related ethical issues, immunological rejection and lack of canonical grafting protocols limit common clinical use of stem cells. iPSCs, derived from reprogrammed somatic cells, provide new hope for cell replacement therapy. In this review, recent development in stem cell treatment for PD, using hiPSCs, as well as the potential value of hiPSCs in modelling for PD, have been summarized for application of iPSCs technology to clinical translation for PD treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Basic relations for the period variation models of variable stars

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Gráf, Tomáš; Zejda, Miloslav; Zhu, Liying; Qian, Shen-Bang

    2012-01-01

    Models of period variations are basic tools for period analyzes of variable stars. We introduce phase function and instant period and formulate basic relations and equations among them. Some simple period models are also presented.

  7. The script model in relation to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, A

    1999-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate autistic children's scripts for social routines. Scripts specify familiar events in terms of who does what, when, to whom, and why. Scripts are verbalizations of mental event representations, containing and organizing generalized knowledge of how the world works. Scripts are presumed to be of vital importance for the development of shared meaning, communication, and social behaviour. In this study, children with autism were asked to explain well-known social routines, such as how you shop in a supermarket, make a cake or celebrate a birthday. The scripts of the 12 children with non-retarded autism were compared to scripts of matched normal control children. Despite the fact that all of the participating children with autism had an IQ above 90 and a mental age between 8 and 14, a significant difference in autistic and normal control children's ability to generate scripts for familiar social routines was found. The results are discussed in relation to the same children's ability to pass theory-of-mind tests and their verbal intelligence.

  8. Modeling traction forces in collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Juliane; Basan, Markus; Hayes, Ryan L.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is an important process in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We have developed a particle-based simulation for collective cell migration that describes flow patterns and finger formation at the tissue edge observed in wound healing experiments. We can apply methods for calculating intercellular stress to our simulation model, and have thereby provided evidence for the validity of a stress reconstitution method from traction forces used in experiments. To accurately capture experimentally measured traction forces and stresses in the tissue, which are mostly tensile, we have to include intracellular acto-myosin contraction into our simulation. We can then reproduce the experimentally observed behavior of cells moving around a circular obstacle, and suggest underlying mechanisms for cell-cell alignment and generation of traction force patterns.

  9. Computational Modeling of Cell Survival Using VHDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Jain1,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The model for cell survival has been implemented using VeryHigh Speed Integrated Circuit Hardware DescriptionLanguage (VHDL (Xilinx Tool taking three input signals:Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, Epidermal growth factor(EGF and Insulin. Cell survival has been regulated by theinteraction of five proteins viz P13K, TNFR1, EGFR, IRS andIKK in a network. In the absence of any one, in protein networkleads to cell death. For the EGF input signal the proteins likeMEK, ERK, AkT, Rac & JNK have been important forregulation of cell survival. Similarly for TNF and Insulin inputsignal proteins like NFκB, AkT, XIAP, JNK, MAP3K & MK2and MEK, ERK, AkT, Rac, mTOR & JNK respectively havebeen important for regulation of cell survival.

  10. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  11. Cell wall swelling, fracture mode, and the mechanical properties of cherry fruit skins are closely related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Knoche, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Cell wall swelling, fracture mode (along the middle lamellae vs. across cell walls), stiffness, and pressure at fracture of the sweet cherry fruit skin are closely related. Skin cracking is a common phenomenon in many crops bearing fleshy fruit. The objectives were to investigate relationships between the mode of fracture, the extent of cell wall swelling, and the mechanical properties of the fruit skin using sweet cherry (Prunus avium) as a model. Cracking was induced by incubating whole fruit in deionised water or by fracturing exocarp segments (ESs) in biaxial tensile tests. The fracture mode of epidermal cells was investigated by light microscopy. In biaxial tensile tests, the anticlinal cell walls of the ES fractured predominantly across the cell walls (rather than along) and showed no cell wall swelling. In contrast, fruit incubated in water fractured predominantly along the anticlinal epidermal cell walls and the cell walls were swollen. Swelling of cell walls also occurred when ESs were incubated in malic acid, in hypertonic solutions of sucrose, or in water. Compared to the untreated controls, these treatments resulted in more frequent fractures along the cell walls, lower pressures at fracture (p fracture), and lower moduli of elasticity (E, i.e., less stiff). Conversely, compared to the untreated controls, incubating the ES in CaCl2 and in high concentrations of ethanol resulted in thinner cell walls, in less frequent fractures along the cell walls, higher E and p fracture. Our study demonstrates that fracture mode, stiffness, and pressure at fracture are closely related to cell wall swelling. A number of other factors, including cultivar, ripening stage, turgor, CaCl2, and malic acid, exert their effects only indirectly, i.e., by affecting cell wall swelling.

  12. Amygdalin inhibits genes related to cell cycle in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hae-Jeong Park; Sung-Vin Yim; Joo-Ho Chung; Seon-Pyo Hong; Seo-Hyun Yoon; Long-Shan Han; Long-Tai Zheng; Kyung-Hee Jung; Yoon-Kyung Uhm; Je-Hyun Lee; Ji-Seon Jeong; Woo-Sang Joo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The genes were divided into seven categories according to biological function; apoptosis-reiated, immune response-related, signal transduction-related, cell cyclerelated, cell growth-related, stress response-related and transcription-related genes.METHODS: We compared the gene expression profiles of SNU-C4 cells between amygdalin-treated (5 mg/mL,24 h) and non-treated groups using cDNA microarray analysis. We selected genes downregulated in cDNA microarray and investigated mRNA levels of the genes by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Microarray showed that amygdalin downregulated especially genes belonging to cell cycle category: exonuclease 1 (EXO1), ATP-binding cassette, sub-family F, member 2 (ABCF2), MRE11 meiotic recombination 11 homolog A (MRE114), topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1), and FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin-associated protein 1 (FRAP1). RT-PCR analysis revealed that mRNA levels of these genes were also decreased by amygdalin treatment in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that amygdalin have an anticancer effect via downregulation of cell cycle-related genes in SNU-C4 human colon cancer cells,and might be used for therapeutic anticancer drug.

  13. Anions Govern Cell Volume: A Case Study of Relative Astrocytic and Neuronal Swelling in Spreading Depolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hübel

    Full Text Available Cell volume changes are ubiquitous in normal and pathological activity of the brain. Nevertheless, we know little about the dynamics of cell and tissue swelling, and the differential changes in the volumes of neurons and glia during pathological states such as spreading depolarizations (SD under ischemic and non-ischemic conditions, and epileptic seizures. By combining the Hodgkin-Huxley type spiking dynamics, dynamic ion concentrations, and simultaneous neuronal and astroglial volume changes into a comprehensive model, we elucidate why glial cells swell more than neurons in SD and the special case of anoxic depolarization (AD, and explore the relative contributions of the two cell types to tissue swelling. Our results demonstrate that anion channels, particularly Cl-, are intrinsically connected to cell swelling and blocking these currents prevents changes in cell volume. The model is based on a simple and physiologically realistic description. We introduce model extensions that are either derived purely from first physical principles of electroneutrality, osmosis, and conservation of particles, or by a phenomenological combination of these principles and known physiological facts. This work provides insights into numerous studies related to neuronal and glial volume changes in SD that otherwise seem contradictory, and is broadly applicable to swelling in other cell types and conditions.

  14. Modelling Knowledge Systems using Relation Nets and Hypernets

    OpenAIRE

    Rooyen, Hendrik O. van; Geldenhuys, Aletta E.; Stetter, Franz

    2004-01-01

    In the book "Knowledge Representation and Relation Nets" we introduced a structural model called a Relation Net and a special relation net called a Concept Relationship Knowledge Structure (CRKS). In this work we broaden the notion of a relation net to produce a new but associated structural model, a Hypernet. We show that the general theory of hypernets has applications in the acquisition/learning, representation, retrieval, accommodation and assimilation, management and communication/teachi...

  15. Incorporating concern for relative wealth into economic models

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    This article develops a simple model that captures a concern for relative standing, or status. This concern is instrumental, in the sense that individuals do not get utility directly from their relative standing, but, rather, the concern is induced because their relative standing affects their consumption of standard commodities. The article investigates the consequences of a concern for relative wealth in models in which individuals are making labor/leisure decisions. The analysis shows how ...

  16. Stem cell treatment for age-related neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurković J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The belief in the inability of neurogenesis, that is the inability to create new neurons after embryonic and early postnatal development of the central nervous system, was rejected in the mid-nineties, when the existence of neurogenesis in restricted areas of CNS adult mammals, including humans, was discovered.Transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives into respective tissues or organs is considered as one of the most promising remedies for many incurable diseases.In this review, we summarized current knowledge and present and future perspectives andchallenges regarding stem cells treatment for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, as the most common age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Andrographolide inhibits hepatoma cells growth and affects the expression of cell cycle related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Liu, Tian-Yu; Xu, Chong; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2009-09-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the toxic effects of andrographolide (Andro) on hepatoma cells and elucidate its preliminary mechanisms. After cells were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-50 micromol x L(-1)) for 24 h, cell viability was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Furthermore, after hepatoma cells (Hep3B and HepG2) were treated with different concentrations of Andro (0-30 micromol x L(-1)) for 14 d, the number of colony formation was accounted under microscope. Cell cycle related proteins such as Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin B and Cyclin D1 were detected with Western blotting assay and the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. MTT results showed that Andro induced growth inhibition of hepatoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner but had no significant effects on human normal liver L-02 cells. Andro dramatically decreased the colony formation of hepatoma cells in the concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, Andro induced a decrease of Hep3B cells at the G0-G1 phase and a concomitant accumulation of cells at G2-M phase. At the molecular level, Western blotting results showed that Andro decreased the expression of Cdc-2, phosphorylated-Cdc-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B proteins in a time-dependent manner, which are all cell cycle related proteins. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Andro specifically inhibited the growth of hepatoma cells and cellular cell cycle related proteins were possibly involved in this process.

  18. Identification of the major expressed S-layer and cell surface-layer-related proteins in the model methanogenic archaea: Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro and Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlin, Lars; Leon, Deborah R; Kim, Unmi; Loo, Joseph A; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Gunsalus, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Many archaeal cell envelopes contain a protein coat or sheath composed of one or more surface exposed proteins. These surface layer (S-layer) proteins contribute structural integrity and protect the lipid membrane from environmental challenges. To explore the species diversity of these layers in the Methanosarcinaceae, the major S-layer protein in Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro was identified using proteomics. The Mbar_A1758 gene product was present in multiple forms with apparent sizes of 130, 120, and 100 kDa, consistent with post-translational modifications including signal peptide excision and protein glycosylation. A protein with features related to the surface layer proteins found in Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A and Methanosarcina mazei Goel was identified in the M. barkeri genome. These data reveal a distinct conserved protein signature with features and implied cell surface architecture in the Methanosarcinaceae that is absent in other archaea. Paralogous gene expression patterns in two Methanosarcina species revealed abundant expression of a single S-layer paralog in each strain. Respective promoter elements were identified and shown to be conserved in mRNA coding and upstream untranslated regions. Prior M. acetivorans genome annotations assigned S-layer or surface layer associated roles of eighty genes: however, of 68 examined none was significantly expressed relative to the experimentally determined S-layer gene.

  19. Roles Nrf2 Plays in Myeloid Cells and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Kobayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Keap1-Nrf2 system protects animals from oxidative and electrophilic stresses. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces the expression of genes essential for detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS and cytotoxic electrophiles. Keap1 is a stress sensor protein that binds to and ubiquitinates Nrf2 under unstressed conditions, leading to the rapid proteasomal degradation of Nrf2. Upon exposure to stress, Keap1 is modified and inactivated, which allows Nrf2 to accumulate and activate the transcription of a battery of cytoprotective genes. Antioxidative and detoxification activities are important for many types of cells to avoid DNA damage and cell death. Accumulating lines of recent evidence suggest that Nrf2 is also required for the primary functions of myeloid cells, which include phagocytosis, inflammation regulation, and ROS generation for bactericidal activities. In fact, results from several mouse models have shown that Nrf2 expression in myeloid cells is required for the proper regulation of inflammation, antitumor immunity, and atherosclerosis. Moreover, several molecules generated upon inflammation activate Nrf2. Although ROS detoxification mediated by Nrf2 is assumed to be required for anti-inflammation, the entire picture of the Nrf2-mediated regulation of myeloid cell primary functions has yet to be elucidated. In this review, we describe the Nrf2 inducers characteristic of myeloid cells and the contributions of Nrf2 to diseases.

  20. Using Stem Cells to Model Diseases of the Outer Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Yvon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degeneration arises from the loss of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. It is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide with limited effective treatment options. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (IPSC-derived retinal cells and tissues from individuals with retinal degeneration is a rapidly evolving technology that holds a great potential for its use in disease modelling. IPSCs provide an ideal platform to investigate normal and pathological retinogenesis, but also deliver a valuable source of retinal cell types for drug screening and cell therapy. In this review, we will provide some examples of the ways in which IPSCs have been used to model diseases of the outer retina including retinitis pigmentosa (RP, Usher syndrome (USH, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, gyrate atrophy (GA, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL, Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD and age related macular degeneration (AMD.

  1. Malaria in Africa: vector species' niche models and relative risk maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moffett

    Full Text Available A central theoretical goal of epidemiology is the construction of spatial models of disease prevalence and risk, including maps for the potential spread of infectious disease. We provide three continent-wide maps representing the relative risk of malaria in Africa based on ecological niche models of vector species and risk analysis at a spatial resolution of 1 arc-minute (9 185 275 cells of approximately 4 sq km. Using a maximum entropy method we construct niche models for 10 malaria vector species based on species occurrence records since 1980, 19 climatic variables, altitude, and land cover data (in 14 classes. For seven vectors (Anopheles coustani, A. funestus, A. melas, A. merus, A. moucheti, A. nili, and A. paludis these are the first published niche models. We predict that Central Africa has poor habitat for both A. arabiensis and A. gambiae, and that A. quadriannulatus and A. arabiensis have restricted habitats in Southern Africa as claimed by field experts in criticism of previous models. The results of the niche models are incorporated into three relative risk models which assume different ecological interactions between vector species. The "additive" model assumes no interaction; the "minimax" model assumes maximum relative risk due to any vector in a cell; and the "competitive exclusion" model assumes the relative risk that arises from the most suitable vector for a cell. All models include variable anthrophilicity of vectors and spatial variation in human population density. Relative risk maps are produced from these models. All models predict that human population density is the critical factor determining malaria risk. Our method of constructing relative risk maps is equally general. We discuss the limits of the relative risk maps reported here, and the additional data that are required for their improvement. The protocol developed here can be used for any other vector-borne disease.

  2. Research on evaluations of several grey relational models adapt to grey relational axioms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Naiming; Liu Sifeng

    2009-01-01

    Grey relational analysis is an important part of the grey systems theory, and it is the basis of the grey clustering analysis, grey decision-making and grey controlling. To research whether grey relational models satisfy the four grey relational theorems, several kinds of grey relational models are commented. Some problems including the properties of normality, pair symmetry and wholeness are discussed. The phenomenon that the lower value of almost each grey relational model is not equal to zero is proved. The contradiction problems between the properties of wholeness and pair symmetry are verified. Finally, several propositions are constructed to explain the above problems.

  3. Age-related accumulation of T cells with markers of relatively stronger autoreactivity leads to functional erosion of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Stojakovic, Milica; Dewan, Ramita; Le Bouder, Gama; Jankovic, Dragana; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2012-02-09

    Thymic involution is a prominent characteristic of an aging immune system. When thymic function is reduced/absent, the peripheral T cell pool is subject to the laws of peripheral T cell homeostasis that favor survival/expansion of T cell receptors with relatively higher functional avidity for self-peptide/MHC complexes. Due to difficulties in assessing the TCR avidity in polyclonal population of T cells, it is currently not known whether high avidity T cells preferentially survive in aging individuals, and what impact this might have on the function of the immune system and development of autoimmune diseases. The phenotype of T cells from aged mice (18-24 months) indicating functional TCR avidity (CD3 and CD5 expression) correlates with the level of preserved thymic function. In mice with moderate thymic output (> 30% of peripheral CD62L(hi) T cells), T cells displayed CD3(low)CD5(hi) phenotype characteristic for high functional avidity. In old mice with drastically low numbers of CD62L(hi) T cells reduced CD5 levels were found. After adult thymectomy, T cells of young mice developed CD3(low)CD5(hi) phenotype, followed by a CD3(low)CD5(low) phenotype. Spleens of old mice with the CD3(low)/CD5(hi) T cell phenotype displayed increased levels of IL-10 mRNA, and their T cells could be induced to secrete IL-10 in vitro. In contrast, downmodulation of CD5 was accompanied with reduced IL-10 expression and impaired anti-CD3 induced proliferation. Irrespective of the CD3/CD5 phenotype, reduced severity of experimental allergic myelitis occurred in old mice. In MTB TCRβ transgenic mice that display globally elevated TCR avidity for self peptide/MHC, identical change patterns occurred, only at an accelerated pace. These findings suggest that age-associated dysfunctions of the immune system could in part be due to functional erosion of T cells devised to protect the hosts from the prolonged exposure to T cells with high-avidity for self.

  4. Age-related accumulation of T cells with markers of relatively stronger autoreactivity leads to functional erosion of T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatari-Calderone Zohreh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymic involution is a prominent characteristic of an aging immune system. When thymic function is reduced/absent, the peripheral T cell pool is subject to the laws of peripheral T cell homeostasis that favor survival/expansion of T cell receptors with relatively higher functional avidity for self-peptide/MHC complexes. Due to difficulties in assessing the TCR avidity in polyclonal population of T cells, it is currently not known whether high avidity T cells preferentially survive in aging individuals, and what impact this might have on the function of the immune system and development of autoimmune diseases. Results The phenotype of T cells from aged mice (18-24 months indicating functional TCR avidity (CD3 and CD5 expression correlates with the level of preserved thymic function. In mice with moderate thymic output (> 30% of peripheral CD62Lhi T cells, T cells displayed CD3lowCD5hi phenotype characteristic for high functional avidity. In old mice with drastically low numbers of CD62Lhi T cells reduced CD5 levels were found. After adult thymectomy, T cells of young mice developed CD3lowCD5hi phenotype, followed by a CD3lowCD5low phenotype. Spleens of old mice with the CD3low/CD5hi T cell phenotype displayed increased levels of IL-10 mRNA, and their T cells could be induced to secrete IL-10 in vitro. In contrast, downmodulation of CD5 was accompanied with reduced IL-10 expression and impaired anti-CD3 induced proliferation. Irrespective of the CD3/CD5 phenotype, reduced severity of experimental allergic myelitis occurred in old mice. In MTB TCRβ transgenic mice that display globally elevated TCR avidity for self peptide/MHC, identical change patterns occurred, only at an accelerated pace. Conclusions These findings suggest that age-associated dysfunctions of the immune system could in part be due to functional erosion of T cells devised to protect the hosts from the prolonged exposure to T cells with high-avidity for self.

  5. Two-phase relative permeability models in reservoir engineering calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, S.; Hicks, P.J.; Ertekin, T.

    1999-01-15

    A comparison of ten two-phase relative permeability models is conducted using experimental, semianalytical and numerical approaches. Model predicted relative permeabilities are compared with data from 12 steady-state experiments on Berea and Brown sandstones using combinations of three white mineral oils and 2% CaCl1 brine. The model results are compared against the experimental data using three different criteria. The models are found to predict the relative permeability to oil, relative permeability to water and fractional flow of water with varying degrees of success. Relative permeability data from four of the experimental runs are used to predict the displacement performance under Buckley-Leverett conditions and the results are compared against those predicted by the models. Finally, waterflooding performances predicted by the models are analyzed at three different viscosity ratios using a two-dimensional, two-phase numerical reservoir simulator. (author)

  6. Variable Relation Parametric Model on Graphics Modelon for Collaboration Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-de; ZHAO Han; LI Yan-feng

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to variable relation parametric model for collaboration design based on the graphic modelon has been put forward. The paper gives a parametric description model of graphic modelon, and relating method for different graphic modelon based on variable constraint. At the same time, with the aim of engineering application in the collaboration design, the autonmous constraint in modelon and relative constraint between two modelons are given. Finally, with the tool of variable and relation dbase, the solving method of variable relating and variable-driven among different graphic modelon in a part, and doubleacting variable relating parametric method among different parts for collaboration are given.

  7. Modeling cell-in-cell structure into its biological significance

    OpenAIRE

    He, M-f; Wang, S.; Wang, Y; Wang, X-N.

    2013-01-01

    Although cell-in-cell structure was noted 100 years ago, the molecular mechanisms of ‘entering' and the destination of cell-in-cell remain largely unclear. It takes place among the same type of cells (homotypic cell-in-cell) or different types of cells (heterotypic cell-in-cell). Cell-in-cell formation affects both effector cells and their host cells in multiple aspects, while cell-in-cell death is under more intensive investigation. Given that cell-in-cell has an important role in maintainin...

  8. Accelerate Climate Models with the IBM Cell Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Duffy, D.; Clune, T.; Williams, S.; Suarez, M.; Halem, M.

    2008-12-01

    Ever increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate models demand continual computing power increases. The IBM Cell processor's order-of- magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive for fulfilling this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics: 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (~50% total computation time), (2) has a high computational load relative to data traffic to/from main memory, and (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran code) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20, manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns, and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process more than 3000 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is ~6.76x, ~8.91x, ~9.85x faster than a core on Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2 respectively. Our analysis shows that the Cell could also speed up the dynamics component (~25% total computation time). We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes the Cell processor very competitive, at least as an accelerator. We will report our experience in porting both the C and Fortran codes and will discuss our work in porting other climate model components.

  9. The obesity-related pathology and Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yusuke; Yokote, Koutaro; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2017-04-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with obesity plays a major role in the development of metabolic diseases, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Among Th subsets, Th17 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, steroid-resistant asthma, and multiple sclerosis. Accumulating data suggest that reciprocal interactions between the metabolic systems and immune system play pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated diseases. We herein outline the developing principles in the control of T cell differentiation and function via their cellular metabolism. Also discussed are recent findings that changes in the intracellular metabolism, including fatty acid metabolism, affect the Th17 cell function in obese individuals. Finally, we will also highlight the unique molecular mechanism involved in the activation of retinoid-related orphan receptor-gamma-t (RORγt) by intracellular metabolism and discuss a new therapeutic approach for treating autoimmune disorders through the inhibition of RORγt.

  10. Relation of cell proliferation to expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, A; Strohmeier, R; Kaufmann, M; Kuhl, H

    2000-08-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) agonist [(3)H]Ro5-4864 has been shown to bind with high affinity to the human breast cancer cell line BT-20. Therefore, we investigated different human breast cancer cell lines with regard to binding to [(3)H]Ro5-4864 and staining with the PBR-specific monoclonal antibody 8D7. Results were correlated with cell proliferation characteristics. In flow cytometric analysis, the estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines BT-20, MDA-MB-435-S, and SK-BR-3 showed significantly higher PBR expression (relative fluorescence intensity) than the ER-positive cells T47-D, MCF-7 and BT-474 (Pdiazepam-binding inhibitor are possibly involved in the regulation of cell proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines.

  11. Modeling cell dynamics under mobile phone radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Tullio Antonio; Balduzzo, Maurizio; Milone, Francesco Ferro; Nofrate, Valentina

    2007-04-01

    Perturbations by pulse-modulated microwave radiation from GSM mobile phones on neuron cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying activation of brain states and electroencephalographic epiphenomena. As the employ of UMTS phones seems to reveal other symptoms, a unified phenomenological framework is needed. In order to explain possible effects of mobile phone radiation on cell oscillations, GSM and UMTS low-frequency envelopes have been detected, recorded and used as input in cell models. Dynamical systems endowed with contiguous regular and chaotic regimes suitable to produce stochastic resonance can both account for the perturbation of the neuro-electrical activity and even for the low intensity of the signal perceived by high sensitive subjects. Neuron models of this kind can be employed as a reductionist hint for the mentioned phenomenology. The Hindmarsh-Rose model exhibits frequency enhancement and regularization phenomena induced by weak GSM and UMTS. More realistic simulations of cell membrane gating and calcium oscillations have been performed with the help of an adaptation of the Chay-Keizer dynamical system. This scheme can explain the suspected subjective sensitivity to mobile phone signals under the thermal threshold, in terms of cell calcium regularity mechanisms. Concerning the two kinds of emission, the stronger occupation of the ELF band of last generation UMTS phones is compensated by lower power emitted.

  12. Modeling sarcomagenesis using multipotent mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rene Rodriguez; Ruth Rubio; Pablo Menendez

    2012-01-01

    Because of their unique properties,multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent one of the most promising adult stem cells being used worldwide in a wide array of clinical applications.Overall,compelling evidence supports the long-term safety of ex vivo expanded human MSCs,which do not seem to transform spontaneously.However,experimental data reveal a link between MSCs and cancer,and MSCs have been reported to inhibit or promote tumor growth depending on yet undefined conditions.Interestingly,solid evidence based on transgenic mice and genetic intervention of MSCs has placed these cells as the most likely cell of origin for certain sarcomas.This research area is being increasingly explored to develop accurate MSC-based models of sarcomagenesis,which will be undoubtedly valuable in providing a better understanding about the etiology and pathogenesis of mesenchymal cancer,eventually leading to the development of more specific therapies directed against the sarcoma-initiating cell.Unfortunately,still little is known about the mechanisms underlying MSC transformation and further studies are required to develop bona fide sarcoma models based on human MSCs.Here,we comprehensively review the existing MSC-based models of sarcoma and discuss the most common mechanisms leading to tumoral transformation of MSCs and sarcomagenesis.

  13. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed.

  14. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-03-07

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we generalize our recently developed model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as "bipedal" motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic "crawlers" and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials.

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Related Lymphoproliferations After Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Simona; Metafuni, Elisabetta; Bellesi, Silvia; Chiusolo, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus related lymphoproliferative disorders are a rare but potentially fatal complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation with an incidence of 1–3% and occurring within 6 months after transplantation. The most relevant risk factors include the use of in vivo T-cell depletion with antithymocyte globulin, HLA disparities between donor and recipient, donor type, splenectomy etc. The higher the numbers of risk factors the higher the risk of developing Epstein-Barr virus related lymphoproliferative disorders. Monitoring EBV viremia after transplantation is of value and it should be applied to high risk patients since it allows pre-emptive therapy initiation at specified threshold values and early treatment. This strategy might reduce mortality which was >80% prior to the implementation of anti-EBV therapy. Treatment of EBV-LPD after allogeneic SCT may consist of anti-B-cell therapy (rituximab), adoptive T-cell immunotherapy or both. Rituximab treatment should be considered the first treatment option, preferably guided by intensive monitoring of EBV DNA while reduction of immunosuppression should be carefully evaluated for the risk of graft versus host disease. PMID:21416005

  16. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell function in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The activity of melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion retinal cells (ipRGC) can be assessed by a means of pupil responses to bright blue (appr.480 nm) light. Due to age related factors in the eye, particularly, structural changes of the lens, less light reaches retina. The aim...... of this study was to examine how age and in vivo measured lens transmission of blue light might affect pupil light responses, in particular, mediated by the ipRGC....

  17. Nonhuman primate model in clinical modeling of diseases for stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourav R Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonhuman primates (NHPs are alike humans in size, behavior, physiology, biochemistry, and immunology. Given close similarities to humans, the NHP model offers exceptional opportunities to understand the biological mechanisms and translational applications with direct relevance to human conditions. Here, we evaluate the opportunities and limitations of NHPs as animal models for translational regenerative medicine. NHP models of human disease propose exceptional opportunities to advance stem cell-based therapy by addressing pertinent translational concerns related to this research. Nonetheless, the value of these primates must be carefully assessed, taking into account the expense of specialized equipment and requirement of highly specialized staff. Well-designed initial fundamental studies in small animal models are essential before translating research into NHP models and eventually into human trials. In addition, we suggest that applying a directed and collaborative approach, as seen in the evolution of stroke NHP models, will greatly benefit the translation of stem cell therapy in other NHP disease models.

  18. Polyamines in relation to growth in carrot cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, K M; Phillips, R

    1988-09-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed.

  19. Polyamines in Relation to Growth in Carrot Cell Cultures 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Kevin M.; Phillips, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Changes in polyamine metabolism were investigated in relation to growth of cell suspension cultures of carrot (Daucus carota, cv Chantenay). Changes in levels of the major amines putrescine and spermidine throughout the culture period correlated poorly with changes in fresh weight, but a closer correlation with the minor component spermine was observed. The arginine decarboxylase (ADC) inhibitor difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) strongly and specifically inhibited ADC activity in the supernatant, reduced the major amine (putrescine) by 95% and the total amine content by 80%. It had no effect on cell number and stimulated fresh weight by over 25% through increased cell expansion. Spermine content, in contrast, increased with DFMA concentration in parallel with fresh weight increases. Difluoromethylornithine strongly inhibited ornithine decarboxylase activity in the pellet, but had little effect on either polyamine levels or culture growth. It was concluded that little evidence for a correlation between free polyamines and cell number in carrot cultures could be detected, but that a possible correlation between spermine content and cell expansion was observed. PMID:16666271

  20. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single-cell

  1. Spatiotemporal Relations and Modeling Motion Classes by Combined Topological and Directional Relations Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Salamat; El-hadi Zahzah

    2012-01-01

    Defining spatiotemporal relations and modeling motion events are emerging issues of current research. Motion events are the subclasses of spatiotemporal relations, where stable and unstable spatio-temporal topological relations and temporal order of occurrence of a primitive event play an important role. In this paper, we proposed a theory of spatio-temporal relations based on topological and orientation perspective. This theory characterized the spatiotemporal relations into different classe...

  2. Resveratrol Ameliorates Dysregulation of Th1, Th2, Th17, and T Regulatory Cell-Related Transcription Factor Signaling in a BTBR T + tf/J Mouse Model of Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Saleh A; Alzahrani, Mohammad Zeed; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Nadeem, Ahmed; Zoheir, Khairy M A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef; Ahmad, Sheikh Fayaz

    2017-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder. It is characterized by impaired social communication, abnormal social interactions, and repetitive behaviors and/or restricted interests. BTBR T + tf/J (BTBR) inbred mice are commonly used as a model for ASD. Resveratrol is used widely as a beneficial therapeutic in the treatment of an extensive array of pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the effect of resveratrol administration (20 and 40 mg/kg) was evaluated in both BTBR and C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Behavioral (self-grooming), Foxp3, T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt, and IL-17A in CD4(+) T cells were assessed. Our study showed that BTBR control mice exhibited a distinct immune profile from that of the B6 control mice. BTBR mice were characterized by lower levels of Foxp3(+) and higher levels of RORγt(+), T-bet(+), and GATA-3(+) production in CD4(+) T cells when compared with B6 control. Resveratrol (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment to B6 and BTBR mice showed substantial induction of Foxp3(+) and reduction of T-bet(+), GATA-3(+), and IL-17A(+) expression in CD4(+) cells when compared with the respective control groups. Moreover, resveratrol treatment resulted in upregulated expression of Foxp3 mRNA and decreased expression levels of T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt, and IL-17A in the spleen and brain tissues. Western blot analysis confirmed that resveratrol treatment decreased the protein expression of T-bet, GATA-3, RORγ, and IL-17 and that it increased Foxp3 in B6 and BTBR mice. Our results suggest that autism is associated with dysregulation of transcription factor signaling that can be corrected by resveratrol treatment.

  3. Nuclear multidrug-resistance related protein 1 contributes to multidrug-resistance of mucoepidermoid carcinoma mainly via regulating multidrug-resistance protein 1: a human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells model and Spearman's rank correlation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolei Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 are both membrane-bound drug transporters. In contrast to MDR1, MRP1 also transports glutathione (GSH and drugs conjugated to GSH. Due to its extraordinary transport properties, MRP1/ABCC1 contributes to several physiological functions and pathophysiological incidents. We previously found that nuclear translocation of MRP1 contributes to multidrug-resistance (MDR of mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC. The present study investigated how MRP1 contributes to MDR in the nuclei of MEC cells. METHODS: Western blot and RT-PCR was carried out to investigate the change of multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1 in MC3/5FU cells after MRP1 was downregulated through RNA interference (RNAi. Immunohistochemistry (IHC staining of 127 cases of MEC tissues was scored with the expression index (EI. The EI of MDR1 and MRP1 (or nuclear MRP1 was analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation analysis. Using multiple tumor tissue assays, the location of MRP1 in other tissues was checked by HIC. Luciferase reporter assays of MDR1 promoter was carried out to check the connection between MRP1 and MDR1 promoter. RESULTS: MRP1 downregulation led to a decreased MDR1 expression in MC3/5FU cells which was caused by decreased activity of MDR1 promoter. IHC study of 127 cases of MEC tissues demonstrated a strong positive correlation between nuclear MRP1 expression and MDR1 expression. Furthermore, IHC study of multiple tumor tissue array sections showed that although nuclear MRP1 widely existed in MEC tissues, it was not found in normal tissues or other tumor tissues. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that nuclear MRP1 contributes to MDR mainly through regulating MDR1 expression in MEC. And the unique location of MRP1 made it an available target in identifying MEC from other tumors.

  4. System level modeling and component level control of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xingjian

    This dissertation investigates the fuel cell systems and the related technologies in three aspects: (1) system-level dynamic modeling of both PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); (2) condition monitoring scheme development of PEM fuel cell system using model-based statistical method; and (3) strategy and algorithm development of precision control with potential application in energy systems. The dissertation first presents a system level dynamic modeling strategy for PEM fuel cells. It is well known that water plays a critical role in PEM fuel cell operations. It makes the membrane function appropriately and improves the durability. The low temperature operating conditions, however, impose modeling difficulties in characterizing the liquid-vapor two phase change phenomenon, which becomes even more complex under dynamic operating conditions. This dissertation proposes an innovative method to characterize this phenomenon, and builds a comprehensive model for PEM fuel cell at the system level. The model features the complete characterization of multi-physics dynamic coupling effects with the inclusion of dynamic phase change. The model is validated using Ballard stack experimental result from open literature. The system behavior and the internal coupling effects are also investigated using this model under various operating conditions. Anode-supported tubular SOFC is also investigated in the dissertation. While the Nernst potential plays a central role in characterizing the electrochemical performance, the traditional Nernst equation may lead to incorrect analysis results under dynamic operating conditions due to the current reverse flow phenomenon. This dissertation presents a systematic study in this regard to incorporate a modified Nernst potential expression and the heat/mass transfer into the analysis. The model is used to investigate the limitations and optimal results of various operating conditions; it can also be utilized to perform the

  5. Immunohistochemical characterization of hepatic stem cell-related cells in developing human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; HU Yong; WANG Jian; ZHOU Ji; ZHANG Taiping; YU Hongyu

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the expression characteristics of the various kinds of possible markers in hepatic stem cells(HSCs)and other HSC-related cells in human fetal liver in various developmental stages.It is significant to investigate the immunohistochemical expression for better understanding of the origin,difierentiation and migration of HSCs in the developing human liver.H-E staining and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expression of hepatic/cholangiocellular differentiation markers(AFF,GST-π,CK7,CK19)and hematopoietic stem cell markers(CD34 and c-kit)in several kinds of HSC-related cells in thirty cases of fetal liver samples (4-35 weeks after pregnancy).AFP expression appears in fetal hepatocytes at four weeks'gestation.It Deaks at 16-24 weeks'gestation and decreases gradually afterwards.Finally,weak signals were only found in some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells.GST-π was detected in hepatic cord cells from the sixth week and in the ductal plate cells from the eighth week.Twenty-six weeks later,only some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells show positive signals.CK19 expression peaks during the 6th-11th weeks in hepatic cord cells and decreases gradually afterwards,except for the ductal plates.CK7 expression was limited in the ductal plate cells and bile ducts cells from the 14th week.CD34 and c-kit were detected at the eighth week in some ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic cords/mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.After 21 weeks.CD34 and c-kit were found only in ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.Fetal hepatocytes at 4-16 weeks'gestation are mainly constituted by HSCs characterized with bi-potential differentiation capacity.At 16 weeks'gestation,most hepatic cord cells begin to differentiate into hepatocytes and abundant HSCs remain in ductal plate(the origin site of Hering canals).It is also indicated mat the

  6. On grey relation projection model based on projection pursuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuo; Yang Shanlin; Ma Xijun

    2008-01-01

    Multidimensional grey relation projection value can be synthesized as one-dimensional projection value by u-sing projection pursuit model.The larger the projection value is,the better the model.Thus,according to the projection value,the best one can be chosen from the model aggregation.Because projection pursuit modeling based on accelera-ting genetic algorithm can simplify the implementation procedure of the projection pursuit technique and overcome its complex calculation as well as the difficulty in implementing its program,a new method can be obtained for choosing the best grey relation projection model based on the projection pursuit technique.

  7. Stochastic magnetic measurement model for relative position and orientation estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic magnetic measurement model that can be used to estimate relative position and orientation. The model predicts the magnetic field generated by a single source coil at the location of the sensor. The model was used in a fusion filter that predicts the change of positio

  8. Stochastic magnetic measurement model for relative position and orientation estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic magnetic measurement model that can be used to estimate relative position and orientation. The model predicts the magnetic field generated by a single source coil at the location of the sensor. The model was used in a fusion filter that predicts the change of positio

  9. Comparing Structural Brain Connectivity by the Infinite Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Herlau, Tue; Dyrby, Tim;

    2013-01-01

    The growing focus in neuroimaging on analyzing brain connectivity calls for powerful and reliable statistical modeling tools. We examine the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) as a tool to identify and compare structure in brain connectivity graphs by contrasting its performance on graphs from...... modeling tool for the identification of structure and quantification of similarity in graphs of brain connectivity in general....

  10. What cycles the cell? -Robust autonomous cell cycle models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Orit; Louzoun, Yoram

    2009-12-01

    The cell cycle is one of the best studied cellular mechanisms at the experimental and theoretical levels. Although most of the important biochemical components and reactions of the cell cycle are probably known, the precise way the cell cycle dynamics are driven is still under debate. This phenomenon is not atypical to many other biological systems where the knowledge of the molecular building blocks and the interactions between them does not lead to a coherent picture of the appropriate dynamics. We here propose a methodology to develop plausible models for the driving mechanisms of embryonic and cancerous cell cycles. We first define a key property of the system (a cyclic behaviour in the case of the embryonic cell cycle) and set mathematical constraints on the types of two variable simplified systems robustly reproducing such a cyclic behaviour. We then expand these robust systems to three variables and reiterate the procedure. At each step, we further limit the type of expanded systems to fit the known microbiology until a detailed description of the system is obtained. This methodology produces mathematical descriptions of the required biological systems that are more robust to changes in the precise function and rate constants. This methodology can be extended to practically any type of subcellular mechanism.

  11. Non linear behaviour of cell tensegrity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Conclusio, D.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2012-05-01

    Tensegrity models for the cytoskeleton structure of living cells is largely used nowadays for interpreting the biochemical response of living tissues to mechanical stresses. Microtubules, microfilaments and filaments are the microscopic cell counterparts of struts (microtubules) and cables (microfilaments and filaments) in the macroscopic world: the formers oppose to compression, the latters to tension, thus yielding an overall structure, light and highly deformable. Specific cell surface receptors, such as integrins, act as the coupling elements that transmit the outside mechanical stress state into the cell body. Reversible finite deformations of tensegrity structures have been widely demonstrated experimentally and in a number of living cell simulations. In the present paper, the bistability behaviour of two general models, the linear bar oscillator and the icosahedron, is studied, as they are both obtained from mathematical simulation, the former, and from larger scale experiments, the latter. The discontinuity in the frequency response of the oscillation amplitude and the lateral bending of the resonance curves are put in evidence, as it grows larger as the driving amplitude increases, respectively.

  12. Optimization methods and silicon solar cell numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardini, K.; Jacobsen, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    An optimization algorithm for use with numerical silicon solar cell models was developed. By coupling an optimization algorithm with a solar cell model, it is possible to simultaneously vary design variables such as impurity concentrations, front junction depth, back junction depth, and cell thickness to maximize the predicted cell efficiency. An optimization algorithm was developed and interfaced with the Solar Cell Analysis Program in 1 Dimension (SCAP1D). SCAP1D uses finite difference methods to solve the differential equations which, along with several relations from the physics of semiconductors, describe mathematically the performance of a solar cell. A major obstacle is that the numerical methods used in SCAP1D require a significant amount of computer time, and during an optimization the model is called iteratively until the design variables converge to the values associated with the maximum efficiency. This problem was alleviated by designing an optimization code specifically for use with numerically intensive simulations, to reduce the number of times the efficiency has to be calculated to achieve convergence to the optimal solution.

  13. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  14. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  15. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and related phenol compounds redirect the amyloidogenic aggregation pathway of ataxin-3 towards non-toxic aggregates and prevent toxicity in neural cells and Caenorhabditis elegans animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Cristina; Pellistri, Francesca; Natalello, Antonino; Vertemara, Jacopo; Bonanomi, Marcella; Gatta, Elena; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; De Gioia, Luca; Airoldi, Cristina; Regonesi, Maria E; Tortora, Paolo

    2017-09-01

    The protein ataxin-3 (ATX3) triggers an amyloid-related neurodegenerative disease when its polyglutamine stretch is expanded beyond a critical threshold. We formerly demonstrated that the polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could redirect amyloid aggregation of a full-length, expanded ATX3 (ATX3-Q55) towards non-toxic, soluble, SDS-resistant aggregates. Here, we have characterized other related phenol compounds, although smaller in size, i.e. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGC), and gallic acid (GA). We analysed the aggregation pattern of ATX3-Q55 and of the N-terminal globular Josephin domain (JD) by assessing the time course of the soluble protein, as well its structural features by FTIR and AFM, in the presence and the absence of the mentioned compounds. All of them redirected the aggregation pattern towards soluble, SDS-resistant aggregates. They also prevented the appearance of ordered side-chain hydrogen bonding in ATX3-Q55, which is the hallmark of polyQ-related amyloids. Molecular docking analyses on the JD highlighted three interacting regions, including the central, aggregation-prone one. All three compounds bound to each of them, although with different patterns. This might account for their capability to prevent amyloidogenesis. Saturation transfer difference NMR experiments also confirmed EGCG and EGC binding to monomeric JD. ATX3-Q55 pre-incubation with any of the three compounds prevented its calcium-influx-mediated cytotoxicity towards neural cells. Finally, all the phenols significantly reduced toxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain expressing an expanded ATX3. Overall, our results show that the three polyphenols act in a substantially similar manner. GA, however, might be more suitable for antiamyloid treatments due to its simpler structure and higher chemical stability. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Lens Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Cell Density in Human Age-related Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xialin Liu; Yizhi Liu; Jianliang Zheng; Qiang Huang; Huling Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the potential effect of the lens epithelial cell proliferation in age-related cataract.Methods: In vitro cell proliferation was assayed by MTT method to evaluate the lens epithelial cell density, index, and proliferation capacity in normal lens and all kinds of age-related cataract. Capsulotomy specimens from all kinds of patients who underwent cataract phacoemulsification extraction surgery were compared with the lens epithelial specimens from non-cataract lenses of Eye Bank eyes.Results: Lens epithelial cell density of central anterior capsule (LECD) in female normal lens was higher than that in male, LECD in nuclear cataract( > NⅢ ) was higher than that in normal lens, but in the mature cortical cataract, LF CD was lower. Mitotic index of three kinds of age-related cataracts in vivo had no statistical difference, neither did cell proliferation capacity of cultivated cells in vitro.Conclusion: The individual difference of lens epithelial cell density and proliferation capacity in vivo may be an important underlying cause for senile cataract in the cellular level, especially for nuclear cataract.

  17. A dynamic model of tomato fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanwoua, J.; Visser, de P.H.B.; Heuvelink, E.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we developed a model of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit growth integrating cell division, cell growth and endoreduplication. The fruit was considered as a population of cells grouped in cell classes differing in their initial cell age and cell mass. The model describes fruit gr

  18. Multiway modeling and analysis in stem cell systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenberg Scott L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology refers to multidisciplinary approaches designed to uncover emergent properties of biological systems. Stem cells are an attractive target for this analysis, due to their broad therapeutic potential. A central theme of systems biology is the use of computational modeling to reconstruct complex systems from a wealth of reductionist, molecular data (e.g., gene/protein expression, signal transduction activity, metabolic activity, etc.. A number of deterministic, probabilistic, and statistical learning models are used to understand sophisticated cellular behaviors such as protein expression during cellular differentiation and the activity of signaling networks. However, many of these models are bimodal i.e., they only consider row-column relationships. In contrast, multiway modeling techniques (also known as tensor models can analyze multimodal data, which capture much more information about complex behaviors such as cell differentiation. In particular, tensors can be very powerful tools for modeling the dynamic activity of biological networks over time. Here, we review the application of systems biology to stem cells and illustrate application of tensor analysis to model collagen-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Results We applied Tucker1, Tucker3, and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC models to identify protein/gene expression patterns during extracellular matrix-induced osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. In one case, we organized our data into a tensor of type protein/gene locus link × gene ontology category × osteogenic stimulant, and found that our cells expressed two distinct, stimulus-dependent sets of functionally related genes as they underwent osteogenic differentiation. In a second case, we organized DNA microarray data in a three-way tensor of gene IDs × osteogenic stimulus × replicates, and found that application of tensile strain to a

  19. Exploring leptin antagonism in ophthalmic cell models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Scolaro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests that angiogenic and pro-inflammatory cytokine leptin might be implicated in ocular neovascularization. However, the potential of inhibiting leptin function in ophthalmic cells has never been explored. Here we assessed mitogenic, angiogenic, and signaling leptin activities in retinal and corneal endothelial cells and examined the capability of a specific leptin receptor (ObR antagonist, Allo-aca, to inhibit these functions. METHODS AND RESULTS: The experiments were carried out in monkey retinal (RF/6A and bovine corneal (BCE endothelial cells. Leptin at 50-250 ng/mL stimulated the growth of both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal mitogenic response (35±7 and 27±3% in RF6A and BCE cells, respectively was noted at 24 h of 250 ng/mL leptin treatments. Leptin-dependent proliferation was reduced to base levels with 10 and 100 nM Allo-aca in BCE and RF6A cells, respectively. In both cell lines, leptin promoted angiogenic responses, with the maximal increase in tube formation (163±10 and 133±8% in RF6A and BCE cultures, respectively observed under a 250 ng/mL leptin treatment for 3 h. Furthermore, in both cell lines 250 ng/mL leptin modulated the activity or expression of several signaling molecules involved in proliferation, inflammatory activity and angiogenesis, such as STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2, COX2, and NFκB. In both cell lines, leptin-induced angiogenic and signaling responses were significantly inhibited with 100 nM Allo-aca. We also found that leptin increased its own mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines, and this autocrine effect was abolished by 100-250 nM Allo-aca. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide new insights into the role of leptin in ocular endothelial cells and represent the first original report on targeting ObR in ophthalmic cell models.

  20. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, N.M.; Ross, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Materials Sciences Division, University of California, 94720 Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  1. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  2. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  3. Plasma cell endocytosis: is it related to immunoglobulin secretion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakoff, A; Vassalli, P; Montesano, R

    1981-12-01

    Mouse plasma cells have been exposed to a wide range of soluble and adsorptive macromolecular tracers for 10 min to 4 h to explore the possibility of membrane recycling related to the high secretory rate of these nonregulated secretory cells. Electron microscopic examination showed in all cases labeling of multivesicular and multilamellar bodies and a lesser labeling of smooth-surfaced vesicles. Using cationized ferritin as tracer, an additional very restricted labeling of Golgi cisternae was observed. Comparable labeling patterns were observed when immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion was blocked with the Golgi-specific pertrurbant, monensin, and in the case of poorly differentiated B immunoblasts which secrete little or no Ig. Our observations therefore emphasize that available approaches cannot yet determine whether a mandatory circuit of vesicular traffic couples Ig exocytosis to endocytosis.

  4. Relating structure and function of inner hair cell ribbon synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, C; Moser, T

    2015-07-01

    In the mammalian cochlea, sound is encoded at synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Each SGN receives input from a single IHC ribbon-type active zone (AZ) and yet SGNs indefatigably spike up to hundreds of Hz to encode acoustic stimuli with submillisecond precision. Accumulating evidence indicates a highly specialized molecular composition and structure of the presynapse, adapted to suit these high functional demands. However, we are only beginning to understand key features such as stimulus-secretion coupling, exocytosis mechanisms, exo-endocytosis coupling, modes of endocytosis and vesicle reformation, as well as replenishment of the readily releasable pool. Relating structure and function has become an important avenue in addressing these points and has been applied to normal and genetically manipulated hair cell synapses. Here, we review some of the exciting new insights gained from recent studies of the molecular anatomy and physiology of IHC ribbon synapses.

  5. Relating cell and tissue mechanics: implications and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Karoly; Damon, Brook; Marga, Françoise; Doaga, Octavian; Mironov, Vladimir; Kosztin, Ioan; Markwald, Roger; Forgacs, Gabor

    2008-09-01

    The Differential Adhesion Hypothesis (DAH) posits that differences in adhesion provide the driving force for morphogenetic processes. A manifestation of differential adhesion is tissue liquidity and a measure for it is tissue surface tension. In terms of this property, DAH correctly predicts global developmental tissue patterns. However, it provides little information on how these patterns arise from the movement and shape changes of cells. We provide strong qualitative and quantitative support for tissue liquidity both in true developmental context and in vitro assays. We follow the movement and characteristic shape changes of individual cells in the course of specific tissue rearrangements leading to liquid-like configurations. Finally, we relate the measurable tissue-liquid properties to molecular entities, whose direct determination under realistic three-dimensional culture conditions is not possible. Our findings confirm the usefulness of tissue liquidity and provide the scientific underpinning for a novel tissue engineering technology.

  6. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  7. Electrical equivalent model of intermediate band solar cell using PSpice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Lakehal; Z Dibi; N Lakhdar; A Dendouga

    2015-08-01

    Intermediate band solar cells (IBSCS) is a relatively new solar cell concept. The theoretical conversion efficiency limit for IBSCS is predicted to be 63.2% with blackbody illumination and 65.1% with AM1.5 spectrum, comparable to the theoretical efficiency for optimized triple junction solar cells with efficiencies of 63.8% and 67.0% under blackbody and AM1.5 illumination, respectively. This paper presents a structure of IBSC based on ZnTe:O. The proposed model uses irradiance and temperature as input parameters and the output characteristics of the structure are used as a prototypical example. So, in this work the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the analog behavior modeling (ABM) of PSpice are implemented in order to model the IBSC. In addition, we have used the bias matrix and the weights matrix obtained by training to establish the IBSCS model on PSPICE simulator. This method represents an advantage by using a small representative database. Therefore, the obtained results of our model can be used in an electrical simulator. Thus, this method can be extended to other solar cells for motivating experimental efforts to realize these promising photovoltaic devices for low cost and high efficiency.

  8. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  9. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  10. Health-related quality of life after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Monica; Kolva, Elissa; Cimini, Laura; Jin, Zhezhen; Satwani, Prakash; Savone, Mirko; George, Diane; Garvin, James; Paz, Mary Llenell; Briamonte, Courtney; Cruz-Arrieta, Eduvigis; Sands, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary hemoglobinopathy that affects over 100,000 people in the United States. Patients with SCD are known to experience suboptimal health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In addition to the physical manifestations of SCD, psychological and social stress, along with academic difficulties, secondary to the chronicity of the disease and its complications often affect patients with SCD. Although medical therapy of SCD has improved, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remains the only curative therapy. The objective of this study was to measure HRQoL before and after allo-HCT by assessing physical, psychological, and social functioning in patients with SCD who have undergone reduced-toxicity conditioning (busulfan/fludarabine/alemtuzumab) followed by allo-HCT. Patients < 21 years of age undergoing allo-HCT (matched siblings and unrelated donors) for SCD and their primary caregiver were enrolled using either the English or Spanish version of the PedsQoL 4.0. Data were collected at 3 time points: before allo-HCT and on days 180 and 365 after allo-HCT. The change in HRQoL from baseline was assessed with unadjusted and adjusted mixed-effects models in which subjects were treated as random effects, and variance component structure was used. Seventeen patients and 23 primary caregivers were enrolled and reported a mean overall HRQoL of 66.05 (SD, 15.62) and 72.20 (SD, 15.50) at baseline, respectively. In the patient-reported analysis with adjusted mixed-effects models, the estimated improvements in overall HRQoL were 4.45 (SE, 4.98; P = .380) and 16.58 (SE, 5.06; P = .003) at 180 and 365 days, respectively, after allo-HCT. For parent-reported overall HRQoL, the estimated improvements were 1.57 (SE, 4.82; P = .747) and 9.28 (SE, 4.62; P = .053) at 180 and 365 days, respectively, after allo-HCT. Similar results were found across the physical, social, and emotional HRQoL domains with mixed-effects models after adjustment

  11. Extending the Relational Model to Deal with Probabilistic Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zongmin; ZHANG W. J; MA W. Y.

    2000-01-01

    According to the soundness and completeness of information in databases, the expressive form and the semantics of incomplete information are discussed in this paper. On the basis of the discussion, the current studies on incomplete data in relational databases are reviewed. In order to represent stochastic uncertainty in most general sense in the real world, probabilistic data are introduced into relational databases. An extended relational data model is presented to express and manipulate probabilistic data and the operations in relational algebra based on the extended model are defined in this paper.

  12. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Gyorödi; Robert Gyorödi; Roxana Sotoc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. W...

  13. Modeling malaria infected cells in microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffiee, Amir Hossein; Dabiri, Sadegh; Motavalizadeh Ardekani, Arezoo

    2016-11-01

    Plasmodim (P.) falciparum is one of the deadliest types of malaria species that invades healthy red blood cells (RBC) in human blood flow. This parasite develops through 48-hour intra-RBC process leading to significant morphological and mechanical (e.g., stiffening) changes in RBC membrane. These changes have remarkable effects on blood circulation such as increase in flow resistance and obstruction in microcirculation. In this work a computational framework is developed to model RBC suspension in blood flow using front-tracking technique. The present study focuses on blood flow behavior under normal and infected circumstances and predicts changes in blood rheology for different levels of parasitemia and hematocrit. This model allows better understanding of blood flow circulation up to a single cell level and provides us with realistic and deep insight into hematologic diseases such as malaria.

  14. Interaction of Defensins with Model Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lori K.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Yang, Lihua; Mishra, Abhijit; Gordon, Vernita D.; Selsted, Michael E.; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) comprise a key component of innate immunity for a wide range of multicellular organisms. For many AMPs, activity comes from their ability to selectively disrupt and lyse bacterial cell membranes. There are a number of proposed models for this action, but the detailed molecular mechanism of selective membrane permeation remains unclear. Theta defensins are circularized peptides with a high degree of selectivity. We investigate the interaction of model bacterial and eukaryotic cell membranes with theta defensins RTD-1, BTD-7, and compare them to protegrin PG-1, a prototypical AMP, using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The relationship between membrane composition and peptide induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. By comparing the membrane phase behavior induced by these different peptides we will discuss the importance of amino acid composition and placement on membrane rearrangement.

  15. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  16. Relative importance of secondary settling tank models in WWTP simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained in a study using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 (BSM1) show that a one-dimensional secondary settling tank (1-D SST) model structure and its parameters are among the most significant sources of uncertainty in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) simulations [Ramin et al., 2011......]. The sensitivity results consistently indicate that the prediction of sludge production is most sensitive to the variation of the settling parameters. In the present study, we use the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), a plant-wide benchmark, that combines the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1......) with the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). We use BSM2 as a vehicle to compare two different 1-D SST models, and to assess the relative significance of their performance on WWTP simulation model outputs. The two 1-D SST models assessed include the firstorder model by Takács et al. [1991] and the second...

  17. Epigenetic features of testicular germ cell tumours in relation to epigenetic characteristics of foetal germ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dina Graae; Skakkebæk, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Foetal development of germ cells is a unique biological process orchestrated by cellular specification, migration and niche development in concert with extensive epigenetic and transcriptional programs. Many of these processes take place early in foetal life and are hence very difficult to study....... In this review, we will focus on current knowledge of the epigenetics of CIS cells and relate it to the epigenetic changes occurring in early developing germ cells of mice during specification, migration and colonization. We will focus on DNA methylation and some of the best studied histone modifications like H3......K9me2, H3K27me3 and H3K9ac. We also show that CIS cells contain high levels of H3K27ac, which is known to mark active enhancers. Proper epigenetic reprogramming seems to be a pre-requisite of normal foetal germ cell development and we propose that alterations in these programs may be a pathogenic...

  18. Computational Model for Internal Relative Humidity Distributions in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwosen Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model is developed for predicting nonuniform internal relative humidity distribution in concrete. Internal relative humidity distribution is known to have a direct effect on the nonuniform drying shrinkage strains. These nonuniform drying shrinkage strains result in the buildup of internal stresses, which may lead to cracking of concrete. This may be particularly true at early ages of concrete since the concrete is relatively weak while the difference in internal relative humidity is probably high. The results obtained from this model can be used by structural and construction engineers to predict critical drying shrinkage stresses induced due to differential internal humidity distribution. The model uses finite elment-finite difference numerical methods. The finite element is used to space discretization while the finite difference is used to obtain transient solutions of the model. The numerical formulations are then programmed in Matlab. The numerical results were compared with experimental results found in the literature and demonstrated very good agreement.

  19. Spatio-temporal Data Model Based on Relational Database System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the entity-relation data model for integrating spatio-temporal data is designed.In the design,spatio-temporal data can be effectively stored and spatiao-temporal analysis can be easily realized.

  20. Model, Materialism, and Immanent Utopia in Relational Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

      This paper seeks to contribute to the development of socio-aesthetics by analysing the notion of model established in the discourse of relational art--that is of course with special reference to French art critic Nicolas Bourriad's theoretical writings. His seminal book, Relational Aesthetics (RA......) metaphor where social reality is staged and facilitated in order to document and present its development. At the same time however, the notion of model is difficult to dissociate from Bourriaud's materialism which draws on such different figures as the late Althusser, Lucretius, and Deleuze and which...... is tied up with a principle of immanence which is crucial for the understanding of Bourriaud's and many of his related artists' sense of utopia and avant-garde. Setting off from an analysis of the concept of model in RA, I would like to demonstrate the relationship between relational form, model...

  1. Alefacept (anti-CD2 causes a selective reduction in circulating effector memory T cells (Tem and relative preservation of central memory T cells (Tcm in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novitskaya Inna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alefacept (anti-CD2 biological therapy selectively targets effector memory T cells (Tem in psoriasis vulgaris, a model Type 1 autoimmune disease. Methods Circulating leukocytes were phenotyped in patients receiving alefacept for moderate to severe psoriasis. Results In all patients, this treatment caused a preferential decrease in effector memory T cells (CCR7- CD45RA- (mean 63% reduction for both CD4+ and CD8+ Tem, while central memory T cells (Tcm (CCR7+CD45RA- were less affected, and naïve T cells (CCR7+CD45RA+ were relatively spared. Circulating CD8+ effector T cells and Type 1 T cells (IFN-γ-producing were also significantly reduced. Conclusion Alefacept causes a selective reduction in circulating effector memory T cells (Tem and relative preservation of central memory T cells (Tcm in psoriasis.

  2. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  3. Tracking immune-related cell responses to drug delivery microparticles in 3D dense collagen matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obarzanek-Fojt, Magdalena; Curdy, Catherine; Loggia, Nicoletta; Di Lena, Fabio; Grieder, Kathrin; Bitar, Malak; Wick, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the therapeutic purpose, the impact of drug delivery microparticles on the local tissue and inflammatory responses remains to be further elucidated specifically for reactions mediated by the host immune cells. Such immediate and prolonged reactions may adversely influence the release efficacy and intended therapeutic pathway. The lack of suitable in vitro platforms limits our ability to gain insight into the nature of immune responses at a single cell level. In order to establish an in vitro 3D system mimicking the connective host tissue counterpart, we utilized reproducible, compressed, rat-tail collagen polymerized matrices. THP1 cells (human acute monocytic leukaemia cells) differentiated into macrophage-like cells were chosen as cell model and their functionality was retained in the dense rat-tail collagen matrix. Placebo microparticles were later combined in the immune cell seeded system during collagen polymerization and secreted pro-inflammatory factors: TNFα and IL-8 were used as immune response readout (ELISA). Our data showed an elevated TNFα and IL-8 secretion by macrophage THP1 cells indicating that Placebo microparticles trigger certain immune cell responses under 3D in vivo like conditions. Furthermore, we have shown that the system is sensitive to measure the differences in THP1 macrophage pro-inflammatory responses to Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) microparticles with different API release kinetics. We have successfully developed a tissue-like, advanced, in vitro system enabling selective "readouts" of specific responses of immune-related cells. Such system may provide the basis of an advanced toolbox enabling systemic evaluation and prediction of in vivo microparticle reactions on human immune-related cells.

  4. A multiscale model for red blood cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Dirk

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is the derivation of a continuum model for mechanics of red blood cells via multiscale analysis. On the microscopic level, we consider realistic discrete models in terms of energy functionals defined on networks/lattices. Using concepts of Gamma-convergence, convergence results as well as explicit homogenisation formulae are derived. Based on a characterisation via energy functionals, appropriate macroscopic stress-strain relationships (constitutive equations) can be determined. Further, mechanical moduli of the derived macroscopic continuum model are directly related to microscopic moduli. As a test case we consider optical tweezers experiments, one of the most common experiments to study mechanical properties of cells. Our simulations of the derived continuum model are based on finite element methods and account explicitly for membrane mechanics and its coupling with bulk mechanics. Since the discretisation of the continuum model can be chosen freely, rather than it is given by the topology of the microscopic cytoskeletal network, the approach allows a significant reduction of computational efforts. Our approach is highly flexible and can be generalised to many other cell models, also including biochemical control.

  5. Personality, Relationship Conflict, and Teamwork-Related Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A.; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models. PMID:25372143

  6. Personality, relationship conflict, and teamwork-related mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models.

  7. Neural Network Model for the Constitutive Relations of Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Jing; Wang Jing-tao

    2003-01-01

    The soil constitutive relation is one of the important issues in soil mechanics. It is very difficult to establish mathematical models because of the complexity of soil mechanical behavior. We propose a new method of neural network analysis for establishing soil constitutive models. Based on triaxial experiments of sand in the laboratory, the nonlinear constitutive models of sand expressed by the neural network were set up. In comparison with Duncan-Chang's model, the neural network method for sand modeling has been proved to be more convenient, accurate and it has a strong fault-tolerance function.

  8. Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage lines model inflammatory monocytic cells with important similarity to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Marcela; Osorio, Fabiola; Robinson, Matthew J; Davies, Luke C; Dierkes, Nicola; Jones, Simon A; Reis e Sousa, Caetano; Taylor, Philip R

    2011-02-01

    We have examined the potential to generate bona fide macrophages (MØ) from conditionally immortalised murine bone marrow precursors. MØ can be derived from Hoxb8 conditionally immortalised macrophage precursor cell lines (MØP) using either M-CSF or GM-CSF. When differentiated in GM-CSF (GM-MØP) the resultant cells resemble GM-CSF bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) in morphological phenotype, antigen phenotype and functional responses to microbial stimuli. In spite of this high similarity between the two cell types and the ability of GM-MØP to effectively present antigen to a T-cell hybridoma, these cells are comparatively poor at priming the expansion of IFN-γ responses from naïve CD4(+) T cells. The generation of MØP from transgenic or genetically aberrant mice provides an excellent opportunity to study the inflammatory role of GM-MØP, and reduces the need for mouse colonies in many studies. Hence differentiation of conditionally immortalised MØPs in GM-CSF represents a unique in vitro model of inflammatory monocyte-like cells, with important differences from bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, which will facilitate functional studies relating to the many 'sub-phenotypes' of inflammatory monocytes.

  9. A Granular Computing Model Based on Tolerance relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guo-yin; HU Feng; HUANG Hai; WU Yu

    2005-01-01

    Granular computing is a new intelligent computing theory based on partition of problem concepts. It is an important problem in Rough Set theory to process incomplete information systems directly. In this paper, a granular computing model based on tolerance relation for processing incomplete information systems is developed. Furthermore, a criteria condition for attribution necessity is proposed in this model.

  10. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Shuchi Dave

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type IX string cosmological models in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition ρ= i.e. rest energy density for a cloud of strings is equal to the string tension density. The various physical and geometrical aspects of the models are also discussed.

  11. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  12. Computational Models of Relational Processes in Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Graeme S.; Andrews, Glenda; Wilson, William H.; Phillips, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of relational knowledge is a core process in cognitive development. Relational knowledge is dynamic and flexible, entails structure-consistent mappings between representations, has properties of compositionality and systematicity, and depends on binding in working memory. We review three types of computational models relevant to…

  13. Computational Models of Relational Processes in Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Graeme S.; Andrews, Glenda; Wilson, William H.; Phillips, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of relational knowledge is a core process in cognitive development. Relational knowledge is dynamic and flexible, entails structure-consistent mappings between representations, has properties of compositionality and systematicity, and depends on binding in working memory. We review three types of computational models relevant to…

  14. The Social Relations Model in Family Studies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelsheim, Veroni I.; Dekovic, Maja; Buist, Kirsten L.; Cook, William L.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Relations Model (SRM) allows for examination of family relations on three different levels: the individual level (actor and partner effects), the dyadic level (relationship effects), and the family level (family effect). The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of SRM family studies and identify general patterns in the…

  15. Off-shell BCJ Relation in Nonlinear Sigma Model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Hanqing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate relations among tree-level off-shell currents in nonlinear sigma model. Under Cayley parametrization, we propose and prove a general revised BCJ relation for even-point currents. Unlike the on-shell BCJ relation, the off-shell one behaves quite differently from Yang-Mills theory although the algebraic structure is the same. After performing the permutation summation in the revised BCJ relation, the sum is non-vanishing, instead, it equals to the sum of sub-current products with the BCJ coefficients under a specific ordering, which is presented by an explicit formula. Taking on-shell limit, this identity is reduced to the on-shell BCJ relation, and thus provides the full off-shell correspondence of tree-level BCJ relation in nonlinear sigma model.

  16. Modeling Morphogenesis in silico and in vitro: Towards Quantitative, Predictive, Cell-based Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.H. Merks (Roeland); P. Koolwijk

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractCell-based, mathematical models help make sense of morphogenesis—i.e. cells organizing into shape and pattern—by capturing cell behavior in simple, purely descriptive models. Cell-based models then predict the tissue-level patterns the cells produce collectively. The first

  17. Relative stability of network states in Boolean network models of gene regulation in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Joseph Xu; Samal, Areejit; d'Hérouël, Aymeric Fouquier; Price, Nathan D; Huang, Sui

    2016-01-01

    Progress in cell type reprogramming has revived the interest in Waddington's concept of the epigenetic landscape. Recently researchers developed the quasi-potential theory to represent the Waddington's landscape. The Quasi-potential U(x), derived from interactions in the gene regulatory network (GRN) of a cell, quantifies the relative stability of network states, which determine the effort required for state transitions in a multi-stable dynamical system. However, quasi-potential landscapes, originally developed for continuous systems, are not suitable for discrete-valued networks which are important tools to study complex systems. In this paper, we provide a framework to quantify the landscape for discrete Boolean networks (BNs). We apply our framework to study pancreas cell differentiation where an ensemble of BN models is considered based on the structure of a minimal GRN for pancreas development. We impose biologically motivated structural constraints (corresponding to specific type of Boolean functions) and dynamical constraints (corresponding to stable attractor states) to limit the space of BN models for pancreas development. In addition, we enforce a novel functional constraint corresponding to the relative ordering of attractor states in BN models to restrict the space of BN models to the biological relevant class. We find that BNs with canalyzing/sign-compatible Boolean functions best capture the dynamics of pancreas cell differentiation. This framework can also determine the genes' influence on cell state transitions, and thus can facilitate the rational design of cell reprogramming protocols.

  18. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chih Chen; Shing-Han Li; Chien-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to ...

  19. VMP1 related autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells: VMP1 regulates cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Qinyi [Department of Ultrasonograph, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); Zhou, Hao; Chen, Yan [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Shen, Chenglong [Department of General Surgery, Changshu No. 2 People’s Hospital, Changshu (China); He, Songbing; Zhao, Hua; Wang, Liang [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Wan, Daiwei, E-mail: 372710369@qq.com [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Gu, Wen, E-mail: 505339704@qq.com [Department of General Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •This research confirmed VMP1 as a regulator of autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We proved the pro-survival role of VMP1-mediated autophagy in colorectal cancer cell lines. •We found the interaction between VMP1 and BECLIN1 also existing in colorectal cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1) is an autophagy-related protein and identified as a key regulator of autophagy in recent years. In pancreatic cell lines, VMP1-dependent autophagy has been linked to positive regulation of apoptosis. However, there are no published reports on the role of VMP1 in autophagy and apoptosis in colorectal cancers. Therefore, to address this gap of knowledge, we decided to interrogate regulation of autophagy and apoptosis by VMP1. We have studied the induction of autophagy by starvation and rapamycin treatment in colorectal cell lines using electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting. We found that starvation-induced autophagy correlated with an increase in VMP1 expression, that VMP1 interacted with BECLIN1, and that siRNA mediated down-regulation of VMP1-reduced autophagy. Next, we examined the relationship between VMP1-dependent autophagy and apoptosis and found that VMP1 down-regulation sensitizes cells to apoptosis and that agents that induce apoptosis down-regulate VMP1. In conclusion, similar to its reported role in other cell types, VMP1 is an important regulator of autophagy in colorectal cell lines. However, in contrast to its role in pancreatic cell lines, in colorectal cancer cells, VMP1-dependent autophagy appears to be pro-survival rather than pro-cell death.

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors of Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3 related kinase (ATR) sensitize lymphoma cells to UVA radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biskup, Edyta; Naym, David Gram; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and require more aggressive therapies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this project was to investigate whether inhibition of Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3 related kinase (ATR) may enhance efficacy of phototherapy. METHODS: CTCL cell lines (MyLa2000, SeAx and Mac2a) served as in vitro cell models. ATR and Chk1 were...

  1. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gyorödi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. We will also present the advantages of using a non-relational database compared to a relational database integrated in a web-based application, which needs to manipulate a big amount of data.

  2. Ganglioside and related-sphingolipid profiles are altered in a cellular model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Anastasia; Ingrand, Sabrina; Barrier, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Sphingolipid-related issues are increasingly discussed to contribute to the neuropathological process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, gangliosides and related-sphingolipids (ceramides, neutral glycosphingolipids and sphingomyelins) were analyzed in neuroglioma (H4) cells expressing the Swedish mutation of the human amyloid precursor protein (H4APPsw) and compared with those of wild-type control H4 cells. These cells were chosen since H4APPsw cells were previously reported to reproduce well some essential features of AD. We found that H4APPsw cells exhibited a striking elevation of the simplest ganglioside GM3, an abnormality that was consistently reported in AD patients and animal models of AD. Concomitantly, the levels of both lactosylceramide (the immediate metabolic precursor of GM3) and ganglioside GD1a increased, suggesting a deregulation in the biosynthesis of gangliosides in the H4APPsw cells. Moreover, while the total ceramide level remained unaltered in H4APPsw cells, a shift in ceramide composition from long chain - to very long chain fatty acid-ceramide species was recorded. Because sphingolipid alterations occurring in H4APPsw cells were similar to those observed in transgenic mice and in human brains, this cellular model might be useful to further explore the complex role of sphingolipids in AD pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. From the Complete Yang Model to Snyder's Model, de Sitter Special Relativity and Their Duality

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hong-Tu; Guo, Han-Ying

    2008-01-01

    By means of Dirac procedure, we re-examine Yang's quantized space-time model, its relation to Snyder's model, the de Sitter special relativity and their UV-IR duality. Starting from a dimensionless dS_5-space in a 5+1-d Mink-space a complete Yang model at both classical and quantum level can be presented and there really exist Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and the duality.

  4. From the Complete Yang Model to Snyder's Model, de Sitter Special Relativity and Their Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hong-Tu; HUANG Chao-Guang; GUO Han-Ying

    2008-01-01

    @@ By means of the Dirac procedure, we re-examine Yang's quantized space-time model, its relation to Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and their UV-IR duality. Starting from a dimensionless dS5-space in a (5+1)-dimensional Mink-space a complete Yang model at both classical and quantum level can be presented and there really exists Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and the duality.

  5. Modeling Anomalous Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reenen, Stephan; Kemerink, Martijn; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites are distinct from most other semiconductors because they exhibit characteristics of both electronic and ionic motion. Accurate understanding of the optoelectronic impact of such properties is important to fully optimize devices and be aware of any limitations of perovskite solar cells and broader optoelectronic devices. Here we use a numerical drift-diffusion model to describe device operation of perovskite solar cells. To achieve hysteresis in the modeled current-voltage characteristics, we must include both ion migration and electronic charge traps, serving as recombination centers. Trapped electronic charges recombine with oppositely charged free electronic carriers, of which the density depends on the bias-dependent ion distribution in the perovskite. Our results therefore show that reduction of either the density of mobile ionic species or carrier trapping at the perovskite interface will remove the adverse hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. This gives a clear target for ongoing research effort and unifies previously conflicting experimental observations and theories.

  6. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.

  8. How the relative permittivity of solar cell materials influences solar cell performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Huss-Hansen, Mathias K.; Hansen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    The relative permittivity of the materials constituting heterojunction solar cells is usually not considered as a design parameter when searching for novel combinations of heterojunction materials. In this work, we investigate the validity of such an approach. Specifically, we show the effect of ...

  9. In-silico models of stem cell and developmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Yaki

    2014-01-08

    Understanding how developmental systems evolve over time is a key question in stem cell and developmental biology research. However, due to hurdles of existing experimental techniques, our understanding of these systems as a whole remains partial and coarse. In recent years, we have been constructing in-silico models that synthesize experimental knowledge using software engineering tools. Our approach integrates known isolated mechanisms with simplified assumptions where the knowledge is limited. This has proven to be a powerful, yet underutilized, tool to analyze the developmental process. The models provide a means to study development in-silico by altering the model's specifications, and thereby predict unforeseen phenomena to guide future experimental trials. To date, three organs from diverse evolutionary organisms have been modeled: the mouse pancreas, the C. elegans gonad, and partial rodent brain development. Analysis and execution of the models recapitulated the development of the organs, anticipated known experimental results and gave rise to novel testable predictions. Some of these results had already been validated experimentally. In this paper, I review our efforts in realistic in-silico modeling of stem cell research and developmental biology and discuss achievements and challenges. I envision that in the future, in-silico models as presented in this paper would become a common and useful technique for research in developmental biology and related research fields, particularly regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and cancer therapeutics.

  10. Novel roles of plant RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) protein in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; de Mendoza, Alex; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-06-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein was identified as a human tumour suppressor protein that controls various stages of cell proliferation through the interaction with members of the E2F family of transcription factors. It was originally thought to be specific to animals but plants contain homologues of Rb, called RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR). In fact, the Rb-E2F module seems to be a very early acquisition of eukaryotes. The activity of RBR depends on phosphorylation of certain amino acid residues, which in most cases are well conserved between plant and animal proteins. In addition to its role in cell-cycle progression, RBR has been shown to participate in various cellular processes such as endoreplication, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodelling, cell growth, stem cell biology, and differentiation. Here, we discuss the most recent advances to define the role of RBR in cell proliferation and asymmetric cell division. These and other reports clearly support the idea that RBR is used as a landing platform of a plethora of cellular proteins and complexes to control various aspects of cell physiology and plant development.

  11. Infinite Multiple Membership Relational Modeling for Complex Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiplemembership latent feature model for networks. Contrary to existing...... multiplemembership models that scale quadratically in the number of vertices the proposedmodel scales linearly in the number of links admittingmultiple-membership analysis in large scale networks. We demonstrate a connection between the single membership relational model and multiple membership models and show...

  12. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to clarify the extension of Technology Acceptance Model. Besides, the application areas are elaborated including electronic service, mobile data service, self-service technology, electronic learning and so on. Finally, the article concluded the conclusions and future research direction.

  13. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we present a phase-field model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as ``bipedal'' motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic ``crawlers'' and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. A Relation-Based Modeling Method for Workshop Reconfiguration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pan-jing; QIN Xian-sheng; WANG Ke-qin; LI Min

    2004-01-01

    To respond to the changes in the market rapidly, the workshop has become an ever-changing dynamic environment in regard to personnel change and organization alternation, etc. Therefore it is necessary to reconfigure the workshop system. In this paper, we present the point of view that the closer the relations are among elements in the system, the closer they should be connected with each other when they are integrated in designing and structural modeling of the workshop system. At first, this paper discusses the relationship among elements in the workshop system and events describing the relationship, and provides a technical overview of the expression, definition and classification of relationship. This paper focuses on the steps and algorithm to evaluate the degree of closeness of relations among elements in systems, and emphasizes the modeling methods for workshop reconfiguration by use of a fuzzy cluster. In light of the above steps and methods, types and contents of basic relationships among elements should be determined, and a standard relation tree should be set up. Then, correlation coefficients are calculated by the standard relation tree, and a fuzzy relation matrix is built up. After that, the structure modeling of the workshop equipment system can be completed through a fuzzy cluster. The paper eads with an application of a FMS ( Flexible Manufactuing System) function system modeling. Results of the modeling and calculations are presented.

  15. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  16. The Convoy Model: Explaining Social Relations From a Multidisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Toni C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Social relations are a key aspect of aging and the life course. In this paper, we trace the scientific origins of the study of social relations, focusing in particular on research grounded in the convoy model. Design and Methods: We first briefly review and critique influential historical studies to illustrate how the scientific study of social relations developed. Next, we highlight early and current findings grounded in the convoy model that have provided key insights into theory, method, policy, and practice in the study of aging. Results: Early social relations research, while influential, lacked the combined approach of theoretical grounding and methodological rigor. Nevertheless, previous research findings, especially from anthropology, suggested the importance of social relations in the achievement of positive outcomes. Considering both life span and life course perspectives and grounded in a multidisciplinary perspective, the convoy model was developed to unify and consolidate scattered evidence while at the same time directing future empirical and applied research. Early findings are summarized, current evidence presented, and future directions projected. Implications: The convoy model has provided a useful framework in the study of aging, especially for understanding predictors and consequences of social relations across the life course. PMID:24142914

  17. Optimization methods and silicon solar cell numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardini, K.

    1986-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of an optimization algorithm for use with a solar cell model. It is possible to simultaneously vary design variables such as impurity concentrations, front junction depth, back junctions depth, and cell thickness to maximize the predicted cell efficiency. An optimization algorithm has been developed and interfaced with the Solar Cell Analysis Program in 1 Dimension (SCAPID). SCAPID uses finite difference methods to solve the differential equations which, along with several relations from the physics of semiconductors, describe mathematically the operation of a solar cell. A major obstacle is that the numerical methods used in SCAPID require a significant amount of computer time, and during an optimization the model is called iteratively until the design variables converge to the value associated with the maximum efficiency. This problem has been alleviated by designing an optimization code specifically for use with numerically intensive simulations, to reduce the number of times the efficiency has to be calculated to achieve convergence to the optimal solution. Adapting SCAPID so that it could be called iteratively by the optimization code provided another means of reducing the cpu time required to complete an optimization. Instead of calculating the entire I-V curve, as is usually done in SCAPID, only the efficiency is calculated (maximum power voltage and current) and the solution from previous calculations is used to initiate the next solution.

  18. Model-based fault diagnosis in PEM fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobet, T.; de Lira, S.; Puig, V.; Quevedo, J. [Automatic Control Department (ESAII), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Rambla Sant Nebridi 10, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Feroldi, D.; Riera, J.; Serra, M. [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (IRI), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) Parc Tecnologic de Barcelona, Edifici U, Carrer Llorens i Artigas, 4-6, Planta 2, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this work, a model-based fault diagnosis methodology for PEM fuel cell systems is presented. The methodology is based on computing residuals, indicators that are obtained comparing measured inputs and outputs with analytical relationships, which are obtained by system modelling. The innovation of this methodology is based on the characterization of the relative residual fault sensitivity. To illustrate the results, a non-linear fuel cell simulator proposed in the literature is used, with modifications, to include a set of fault scenarios proposed in this work. Finally, it is presented the diagnosis results corresponding to these fault scenarios. It is remarkable that with this methodology it is possible to diagnose and isolate all the faults in the proposed set in contrast with other well known methodologies which use the binary signature matrix of analytical residuals and faults. (author)

  19. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  20. Indeterminate direction relation model based on fuzzy description framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The indetermination of direction relation is a hot topic for fuzzy GIS researchers. The existing models only study the effects of indetermination of spatial objects,but ignore the uncertainty of direction reference framework. In this paper,first a for-malized representation model of indeterminate spatial objects is designed based on quadruple (x,y,A,μ),then a fuzzy direction reference framework is constructed by revising the cone method,in which the partitions of direction tiles are smooth and continuous,and two neighboring sections are overlapped in the transitional zones with fuzzy method. Grounded on these,a fuzzy description model for indeterminate direction relation is proposed in which the uncertainty of all three parts (source object,reference object and reference frame) is taken into account simultaneously. In the end,case studies are implemented to test the rationality and validity of the model.

  1. Modeling turkey growth with the relative growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; Potts, W J; Bacon, W L; Nestor, K E

    1998-01-01

    Six sigmoidal growth curves and two growth curves derived from a two-phase relative growth rate model were evaluated, using an experimental body-weight data from male and female turkeys of two genetic lines; a fast-growing (F) line and a randombred control (RBC) line from which the F line was developed. When their root mean square error was compared to the root mean square error of the local regression smoother, all sigmoidal growth curves: the logistic, Gompertz, von Bertalanffy, Richards, Weibull, and Morgan-Mercer-Flodin growth curves demonstrated a lack of fit. The primary source of the systematic lack of fit was identified with nonparametric estimates of the relative growth rate (the growth rate as a fraction of the body weight) of 20 turkeys. When the relative growth rate was estimated from the above sigmoidal growth curves, none could accommodate features of the nonparametric estimates of the relative growth rate. Based on the feature of the relative growth rate, two new growth curves were derived from a segmented two-phase model. Both models, in which the relative growth rate decreases in two linear phases with slopes of beta1 and beta2 joined together at time=kappa, gave growth curves that fit the experimental data acceptably. The linear-linear model with the smooth transition rendered better fit over the model with the abrupt transition. When the growth curves of male and female turkeys were compared, beta1, beta2, and kappa were smaller in males. When the F line was compared to the RBC line, beta1 and kappa were smaller and beta2 was closer to zero, indicating that the relative growth rate declined rapidly until about 61 days of age in the F line, while it declined less rapidly until about 71 days of age in the RBC line.

  2. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  3. A Mathematical Model of a Direct Propane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Khakdaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous mathematical model for direct propane fuel cells (DPFCs was developed. Compared to previous models, it provides better values for the current density and the propane concentration at the exit from the anode. This is the first DPFC model to correctly account for proton transport based on the combination of the chemical potential gradient and the electrical potential gradient. The force per unit charge from the chemical potential gradient (concentration gradient that pushes protons from the anode to the cathode is greater than that from the electrical potential gradient that pushes them in the opposite direction. By including the chemical potential gradient, we learn that the proton concentration gradient is really much different than that predicted using the previous models that neglected the chemical potential gradient. Also inclusion of the chemical potential gradient made this model the first one having an overpotential gradient (calculated from the electrical potential gradient with the correct slope. That is important because the overpotential is exponentially related to the reaction rate (current density. The model described here provides a relationship between the conditions inside the fuel cell (proton concentration, overpotential and its performance as measured externally by current density and propane concentration.

  4. An alternative model of cancer cell growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Jayant S

    2007-04-01

    I propose an alternative model of cancer in which metastasis need not all arise out of spread from the "original" tumour. The model assumes that cancer cells arise from stem cells that best grow in the organ of their differentiation. When the internal milieu allows it they also grow at other sites as well, thus complementing the conventional (spreading) metastatic process. Several phenomena in the natural history of cancer, especially breast cancer, that challenge the conventional model, fit well after inclusion of the new model. These are (a) a very modest benefit of screening (b) frequent sparing of lungs from haematogenous metastasis (c) presence of occult cancers in autopsy studies (d) only a modest effect of local treatment (e) relative ineffectiveness of high-dose chemotherapy (f) constant time between surgery and peak of hazard of relapse irrespective of stage of the tumour. All these phenomena are much easier to explain when one rejects the dogma that all metastasis arise only from the primary tumour. This paper is aimed only to suggest an alternative perspective of natural history of solid tumours--to stimulate research on the complex internal milieu that allows cancer cells to develop in new light.

  5. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of cell cycle-related proteins by F-box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nana; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-04-01

    F-box proteins, subunits of SKP1-cullin 1-F-box protein (SCF) type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, have been validated to play a crucial role in governing various cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. Recently, a wealth of evidence has emerged that F-box proteins is critically involved in tumorigenesis in part through governing the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cell cycle proteins, and dysregulation of this process leads to aberrant cell cycle progression and ultimately, tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this review, we describe the critical role of F-box proteins in the timely regulation of cell cycle. Moreover, we discuss how F-box proteins involve in tumorigenesis via targeting cell cycle-related proteins using biochemistry studies, engineered mouse models, and pathological gene alternations. We conclude that inhibitors of F-box proteins could have promising therapeutic potentials in part through controlling of aberrant cell cycle progression for cancer therapies.

  6. Thermodynamics of Paint Related Systems with Engineering Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Thomas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2001-01-01

    Paints are complex materials composed of polymers (binders) dissolved in one or more solvents, pigments, and other additives. The thermodynamics of such systems is essential, for example, for selecting improved solvents and understanding a number of phenomena related especially! to adhesion...... to solid surfaces and drying. Many engineering models have been applied over the last decades for solutions with commoditity polymers. In this work the performance of some of these models is investigated for paint-related systems, focusing on those drying by the so-called " lacquer mechanism " (evaporation...

  7. Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar Yadav; Vineet Kumar Yadav; Lallan Yadav

    2011-04-01

    Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity are investigated. To get the exact solution of Einstein’s field equations, we have taken some scale transformations used by Camci et al [Astrophys. Space Sci. 275, 391 (2001)]. It is shown that Einstein’s field equations are solvable for any arbitrary cosmic scale function. Solutions for particular forms of cosmic scale functions are also obtained. Some physical and geometrical aspects of the models are discussed.

  8. Hildegard E. Peplau and the model interpersonal relations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramšak-Pajk, Jožica

    2015-01-01

    The first part of the article shortly introduces Hildegard Peplau and defines her theory of interpersonal relations between nurse and patient. The four phases of the theory and the different roles, which the nurse takes through them, are described. In conclusion the article discusses the possibility of the application of the model of interpersonal relations to the nursing process. The conclusion emphasizes the value of the use of the mentioned modeland effective communication between nurse an...

  9. CellMiner: a relational database and query tool for the NCI-60 cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold William C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the high-throughput omic technologies have made it possible to profile cells in a large number of ways at the DNA, RNA, protein, chromosomal, functional, and pharmacological levels. A persistent problem is that some classes of molecular data are labeled with gene identifiers, others with transcript or protein identifiers, and still others with chromosomal locations. What has lagged behind is the ability to integrate the resulting data to uncover complex relationships and patterns. Those issues are reflected in full form by molecular profile data on the panel of 60 diverse human cancer cell lines (the NCI-60 used since 1990 by the U.S. National Cancer Institute to screen compounds for anticancer activity. To our knowledge, CellMiner is the first online database resource for integration of the diverse molecular types of NCI-60 and related meta data. Description CellMiner enables scientists to perform advanced querying of molecular information on NCI-60 (and additional types through a single web interface. CellMiner is a freely available tool that organizes and stores raw and normalized data that represent multiple types of molecular characterizations at the DNA, RNA, protein, and pharmacological levels. Annotations for each project, along with associated metadata on the samples and datasets, are stored in a MySQL database and linked to the molecular profile data. Data can be queried and downloaded along with comprehensive information on experimental and analytic methods for each data set. A Data Intersection tool allows selection of a list of genes (proteins in common between two or more data sets and outputs the data for those genes (proteins in the respective sets. In addition to its role as an integrative resource for the NCI-60, the CellMiner package also serves as a shell for incorporation of molecular profile data on other cell or tissue sample types. Conclusion CellMiner is a relational database tool for

  10. Choose Your Cell Model Wisely: The In Vitro Nanoneurotoxicity of Differentially Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Neural Cell Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Freya; Valdepérez, Daniel; Pelaz, Beatriz; Wang, Tianqiang; Doak, Shareen H; Manshian, Bella B; Soenen, Stefaan J; Parak, Wolfgang J; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2017-03-31

    Currently, there is a large interest in the labeling of neural stem cells (NSCs) with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to allow MRI-guided detection after transplantation in regenerative medicine. For such biomedical applications, excluding nanotoxicity is key. Nanosafety is primarily evaluated in vitro where an immortalized or cancer cell line of murine origin is often applied, which is not necessarily an ideal cell model. Previous work revealed clear neurotoxic effects of PMA-coated IONPs in distinct cell types that could potentially be applied for nanosafety studies regarding neural cell labeling. Here, we aimed to assess if DMSA-coated IONPs could be regarded as a safer alternative for this purpose and how the cell model impacted our nanosafety optimization study. Hereto, we evaluated cytotoxicity, ROS production, calcium levels, mitochondrial homeostasis and cell morphology in six related neural cell types, namely neural stem cells, an immortalized cell line and a cancer cell line from human and murine origin. The cell lines mostly showed similar responses to both IONPs, which were frequently more pronounced for the PMA-IONPs. Of note, ROS and calcium levels showed opposite trends in the human and murine NSCs, indicating the importance of the species. Indeed, the human cell models were overall more sensitive than their murine counterpart. Despite the clear cell type-specific nanotoxicity profiles, our multiparametric approach revealed that the DMSA-IONPs outperformed the PMA-IONPs in terms of biocompatibility in each cell type. However, major cell type-dependent variations in the observed effects additionally warrant the use of relevant human cell models.

  11. Particle-based model to simulate the micromechanics of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Liedekerke, P.; Tijskens, E.; Ramon, H.; Ghysels, P.; Samaey, G.; Roose, D.

    2010-06-01

    This paper is concerned with addressing how biological cells react to mechanical impulse. We propose a particle based model to numerically study the mechanical response of these cells with subcellular detail. The model focuses on a plant cell in which two important features are present: (1) the cell’s interior liquidlike phase inducing hydrodynamic phenomena, and (2) the cell wall, a viscoelastic solid membrane that encloses the protoplast. In this particle modeling framework, the cell fluid is modeled by a standard smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. For the viscoelastic solid phase (cell wall), a discrete element method (DEM) is proposed. The cell wall hydraulic conductivity (permeability) is built in through a constitutive relation in the SPH formulation. Simulations show that the SPH-DEM model is in reasonable agreement with compression experiments on an in vitro cell and with analytical models for the basic dynamical modes of a spherical liquid filled shell. We have performed simulations to explore more complex situations such as relaxation and impact, thereby considering two cell types: a stiff plant type and a soft animal-like type. Their particular behavior (force transmission) as a function of protoplasm and cell wall viscosity is discussed. We also show that the mechanics during and after cell failure can be modeled adequately. This methodology has large flexibility and opens possibilities to quantify problems dealing with the response of biological cells to mechanical impulses, e.g., impact, and the prediction of damage on a (sub)cellular scale.

  12. Preface of the "Symposium on Mathematical Models and Methods to investigate Heterogeneity in Cell and Cell Population Biology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairambault, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This session investigates hot topics related to mathematical representations of cell and cell population dynamics in biology and medicine, in particular, but not only, with applications to cancer. Methods in mathematical modelling and analysis, and in statistical inference using single-cell and cell population data, should contribute to focus this session on heterogeneity in cell populations. Among other methods are proposed: a) Intracellular protein dynamics and gene regulatory networks using ordinary/partial/delay differential equations (ODEs, PDEs, DDEs); b) Representation of cell population dynamics using agent-based models (ABMs) and/or PDEs; c) Hybrid models and multiscale models to integrate single-cell dynamics into cell population behaviour; d) Structured cell population dynamics and asymptotic evolution w.r.t. relevant traits; e) Heterogeneity in cancer cell populations: origin, evolution, phylogeny and methods of reconstruction; f) Drug resistance as an evolutionary phenotype: predicting and overcoming it in therapeutics; g) Theoretical therapeutic optimisation of combined drug treatments in cancer cell populations and in populations of other organisms, such as bacteria.

  13. A Rigorous Sharp Interface Limit of a Diffuse Interface Model Related to Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Elisabetta; Scala, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the rigorous sharp interface limit of a diffuse interface model related to the dynamics of tumor growth, when a parameter ɛ, representing the interface thickness between the tumorous and non-tumorous cells, tends to zero. More in particular, we analyze here a gradient-flow-type model arising from a modification of the recently introduced model for tumor growth dynamics in Hawkins-Daruud et al. (Int J Numer Math Biomed Eng 28:3-24, 2011) (cf. also Hilhorst et al. Math Models Methods Appl Sci 25:1011-1043, 2015). Exploiting the techniques related to both gradient flows and gamma convergence, we recover a condition on the interface Γ relating the chemical and double-well potentials, the mean curvature, and the normal velocity.

  14. Concise Review: Musculoskeletal Stem Cells to Treat Age-Related Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Jeffrey; Davies, John E; Stanford, William L

    2017-08-18

    Age-related (type-II) osteoporosis is a common and debilitating condition driven in part by the loss of bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their osteoblast progeny, leading to reduced bone formation. Current pharmacological regiments targeting age-related osteoporosis do not directly treat the disease by increasing bone formation, but instead use bisphosphonates to reduce bone resorption-a treatment designed for postmenopausal (type-I) osteoporosis. Recently, the bone regenerative capacity of MSCs has been found within a very rare population of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) residing within the larger heterogeneous BM-MSC pool. The osteoregenerative potential of SSCs would be an ideal candidate for cell-based therapies to treat degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis. However, to date, clinical and translational studies attempting to improve bone formation through cell transplantation have used the larger, nonspecific, MSC pool. In this review, we will outline the physiological basis of age-related osteoporosis, as well as discuss relevant preclinical studies that use exogenous MSC transplantation with the aim of treating osteoporosis in murine models. We will also discuss results from specific clinical trials aimed at treating other systemic bone diseases, and how the discovery of SSC could help realize the full regenerative potential of MSC therapy to increase bone formation. Finally, we will outline how ancillary clinical trials could be initiated to assess MSC/SSC-mediated bone formation gains in existing and potentially unrelated clinical trials, setting the stage for a dedicated clinical investigation to treat age-related osteoporosis. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  15. Solar granulation and statistical crystallography: A modeling approach using size-shape relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The irregular polygonal pattern of solar granulation is analyzed for size-shape relations using statistical crystallography. In contrast to previous work which has assumed perfectly hexagonal patterns for granulation, more realistic accounting of cell (granule) shapes reveals a broader basis for quantitative analysis. Several features emerge as noteworthy: (1) a linear correlation between number of cell-sides and neighboring shapes (called Aboav-Weaire's law); (2) a linear correlation between both average cell area and perimeter and the number of cell-sides (called Lewis's law and a perimeter law, respectively) and (3) a linear correlation between cell area and squared perimeter (called convolution index). This statistical picture of granulation is consistent with a finding of no correlation in cell shapes beyond nearest neighbors. A comparative calculation between existing model predictions taken from luminosity data and the present analysis shows substantial agreements for cell-size distributions. A model for understanding grain lifetimes is proposed which links convective times to cell shape using crystallographic results.

  16. New Correlation Duality Relations for the Planar Potts Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.; Wu, F. Y.

    2002-05-01

    We introduce a new method to generate duality relations for correlation functions of the Potts model on a planar graph. The method extends previously known results, by allowing the consideration of the correlation function for arbitrarily placed vertices on the graph. We show that generally it is linear combinations of correlation functions, not the individual correlations, that are related by dualities. The method is illustrated in several non-trivial cases, and the relation to earlier results is explained. A graph-theoretical formulation of our results in terms of rooted dichromatic, or Tutte, polynomials is also given.

  17. An Improved Direction Relation Detection Model for Spatial Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yucai; YI Baolin

    2004-01-01

    Direction is a common spatial concept that is used in our daily life. It is frequently used as a selection condition in spatial queries. As a result, it is important for spatial databases to provide a mechanism for modeling and processing direction queries and reasoning. Depending on the direction relation matrix, an inverted direction relation matrix and the concept of direction pre- dominance are proposed to improve the detection of direction relation between objects. Direction predicates of spatial systems are also extended. These techniques can improve the veracity of direction queries and reasoning. Experiments show excellent efficiency and performance in view of direction queries.

  18. A Physics-based Analytical Model for Perovskite Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xingshu; Asadpour, Reza; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Perovskites are promising next-generation absorber materials for low-cost and high-efficiency solar cells. Although perovskite cells are configured similar to the classical solar cells, their operation is unique and requires development of a new physical model for characterization, optimization of the cells, and prediction of the panel performance. In this paper, we develop such a physics-based analytical model to describe the operation of different types of perovskite solar cells, explicitly...

  19. A transient model to simulate HTPEM fuel cell impedance spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved transient fuel cell model applied to the simulation of high temperature PEM fuel cell impedance spectra. The model is developed using a 2D finite volume method approach. The model is resolved along the channel and across the membrane. The model considers...

  20. Infinite multiple membership relational modeling for complex networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiple-membership latent feature model for networks. Contrary to exist......Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiple-membership latent feature model for networks. Contrary...... to existing multiplemembership models that scale quadratically in the number of vertices the proposed model scales linearly in the number of links admitting multiple-membership analysis in large scale networks. We demonstrate a connection between the single membership relational model and multiple membership...

  1. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  2. Transcriptional analysis of fracture healing and the induction of embryonic stem cell-related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bais

    Full Text Available Fractures are among the most common human traumas. Fracture healing represents a unique temporarily definable post-natal process in which to study the complex interactions of multiple molecular events that regulate endochondral skeletal tissue formation. Because of the regenerative nature of fracture healing, it is hypothesized that large numbers of post-natal stem cells are recruited and contribute to formation of the multiple cell lineages that contribute to this process. Bayesian modeling was used to generate the temporal profiles of the transcriptome during fracture healing. The temporal relationships between ontologies that are associated with various biologic, metabolic, and regulatory pathways were identified and related to developmental processes associated with skeletogenesis, vasculogenesis, and neurogenesis. The complement of all the expressed BMPs, Wnts, FGFs, and their receptors were related to the subsets of transcription factors that were concurrently expressed during fracture healing. We further defined during fracture healing the temporal patterns of expression for 174 of the 193 genes known to be associated with human genetic skeletal disorders. In order to identify the common regulatory features that might be present in stem cells that are recruited during fracture healing to other types of stem cells, we queried the transcriptome of fracture healing against that seen in embryonic stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Approximately 300 known genes that are preferentially expressed in ESCs and approximately 350 of the known genes that are preferentially expressed in MSCs showed induction during fracture healing. Nanog, one of the central epigenetic regulators associated with ESC stem cell maintenance, was shown to be associated in multiple forms or bone repair as well as MSC differentiation. In summary, these data present the first temporal analysis of the transcriptome of an endochondral bone formation process

  3. Global assemblages and structural models of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Rather than consigning assemblages to the micro-politics of international relations, the chapter argues that assemblages can also be seen to play a role in the ‘grand’ structures of international relations. Structural IR theory normally only considers how subjects are ordered – hierarchically......, anarchically, in core-periphery relations or in terms of networks. However, not only subjects but also assemblages – the bringing together of previously unconnected elements into novel constellations – play a critical role in structuring international relations. More specifically, one sub......-category of assemblages – those constructed as malleable and governable which I call ‘governance-objects’ – is central to structure in international relations. The chapter begins with standard definitions of what structures are – patterns of interaction between elements – and briefly covers the range of models currently...

  4. Goldberger-treiman relation in the renormalized sigma model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, H.J.

    1972-01-01

    The regularization and renormalization of the full sigma model is worked out explicitly in the tree and one-loop approximation. Various renormalized quantities relevant for chiral symmetry breaking are listed. The numerically calculated Goldberger-Treiman relation is also compared with experiment.

  5. Student Mental Models Related to Expansion and Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan; Emen, Ayse Yagmur

    2014-01-01

    Following up on the effects of learning environments is essential to learning. The aim of this study was to examine students' mental models related to the concepts of expansion and contraction of materials. The population of the case study consisted of 155 students in a city center in Turkey. The data was gathered using open-ended questions that…

  6. Refined functional relations for the elliptic SOS model

    CERN Document Server

    Galleas, W

    2012-01-01

    In this work we refine the method of [1] and obtain a novel kind of functional equation determining the partition function of the elliptic SOS model with domain wall boundaries. This functional relation is originated from the dynamical Yang-Baxter algebra and its solution is given in terms of multiple contour integrals.

  7. Assigning Grammatical Relations with a Back-off Model

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, E F

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based method to assign grammatical subject/object relations to ambiguous German constructs. It makes use of an unsupervised learning procedure to collect training and test data, and the back-off model to make assignment decisions.

  8. Insect antifeedant activity of clerodane diterpenes and related model compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Gebbinck, E.A.; Jansen, B.J.M.; Groot, de Æ.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive compilation of all test results on the insect antifeedant activity of clerodane diterpenes and related model compounds is reported. To increase the compatibility of data from different sources, some of the results reported in the literature have been converted into a standardized for

  9. Biomechanics of epithelial cell islands analyzed by modeling and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Coburn, Luke; Noppe, Adrian; Caldwell, Benjamin J; Moussa, Elliott; Yap, Chloe; Priya, Rashmi; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Roberts, Anthony P; Yap, Alpha S; Neufeld, Zoltan; Gomez, Guillermo A

    2016-01-01

    We generated a new computational approach to analyze the biomechanics of epithelial cell islands that combines both vertex and contact-inhibition-of-locomotion models to include both cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Examination of the distribution of cell protrusions (adhesion to the substrate) in the model predicted high order profiles of cell organization that agree with those previously seen experimentally. Cells acquired an asymmetric distribution of protrusions (and traction forces) that decreased when moving from the edge to the island center. Our in silico analysis also showed that tension on cell-cell junctions (and monolayer stress) is not homogeneous across the island. Instead it is higher at the island center and scales up with island size, which we confirmed experimentally using laser ablation assays and immunofluorescence. Moreover, our approach has the minimal elements necessary to reproduce mechanical crosstalk between both cell-cell and cell substrate adhesion systems. We found that an i...

  10. Murine cerebrovascular cells as a cell culture model for cerebral amyloid angiopathy: isolation of smooth muscle and endothelial cells from mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Sebastien A; Sahoo, Susmita; Jung, Sonia S; Levy, Efrat

    2012-01-01

    The use of murine cerebrovascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells has not been widely employed as a cell culture model for the investigation of cellular mechanisms involved in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Difficulties in isolation and propagation of murine cerebrovascular cells and insufficient yields for molecular and cell culture studies have deterred investigators from using mice as a source for cerebrovascular cells in culture. Instead, cerebrovascular cells from larger mammals are preferred and several methods describing the isolation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human, canine, rat, and guinea pig have been published. In recent years, several transgenic mouse lines showing CAA pathology have been established; consequently murine cerebrovascular cells derived from these animals can serve as a key cellular model to study CAA. Here, we describe a procedure for isolating murine microvessels that yields healthy smooth muscle and endothelial cell populations and produce sufficient material for experimental purposes. Murine smooth muscle cells isolated using this protocol exhibit the classic "hill and valley" morphology and are immunoreactive for the smooth muscle cell marker α-actin. Endothelial cells display a "cobblestone" pattern phenotype and show the characteristic immunostaining for the von Willebrand factor and the factor VIII-related antigen. In addition, we describe methods designed to preserve these cells by storage in liquid nitrogen and reestablishing viable cell cultures. Finally, we compare our methods with protocols designed to isolate and maintain human cerebrovascular cell cultures.

  11. A sub-cellular viscoelastic model for cell population mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Jamali

    Full Text Available Understanding the biomechanical properties and the effect of biomechanical force on epithelial cells is key to understanding how epithelial cells form uniquely shaped structures in two or three-dimensional space. Nevertheless, with the limitations and challenges posed by biological experiments at this scale, it becomes advantageous to use mathematical and 'in silico' (computational models as an alternate solution. This paper introduces a single-cell-based model representing the cross section of a typical tissue. Each cell in this model is an individual unit containing several sub-cellular elements, such as the elastic plasma membrane, enclosed viscoelastic elements that play the role of cytoskeleton, and the viscoelastic elements of the cell nucleus. The cell membrane is divided into segments where each segment (or point incorporates the cell's interaction and communication with other cells and its environment. The model is capable of simulating how cells cooperate and contribute to the overall structure and function of a particular tissue; it mimics many aspects of cellular behavior such as cell growth, division, apoptosis and polarization. The model allows for investigation of the biomechanical properties of cells, cell-cell interactions, effect of environment on cellular clusters, and how individual cells work together and contribute to the structure and function of a particular tissue. To evaluate the current approach in modeling different topologies of growing tissues in distinct biochemical conditions of the surrounding media, we model several key cellular phenomena, namely monolayer cell culture, effects of adhesion intensity, growth of epithelial cell through interaction with extra-cellular matrix (ECM, effects of a gap in the ECM, tensegrity and tissue morphogenesis and formation of hollow epithelial acini. The proposed computational model enables one to isolate the effects of biomechanical properties of individual cells and the

  12. Computational modelling of multi-cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaleddin Mousavi, Seyed; Doblaré, Manuel; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    Cell migration is a vital process in many biological phenomena ranging from wound healing to tissue regeneration. Over the past few years, it has been proven that in addition to cell-cell and cell-substrate mechanical interactions (mechanotaxis), cells can be driven by thermal, chemical and/or electrical stimuli. A numerical model was recently presented by the authors to analyse single cell migration in a multi-signalling substrate. That work is here extended to include multi-cell migration due to cell-cell interaction in a multi-signalling substrate under different conditions. This model is based on balancing the forces that act on the cell population in the presence of different guiding cues. Several numerical experiments are presented to illustrate the effect of different stimuli on the trajectory and final location of the cell population within a 3D heterogeneous multi-signalling substrate. Our findings indicate that although multi-cell migration is relatively similar to single cell migration in some aspects, the associated behaviour is very different. For instance, cell-cell interaction may delay single cell migration towards effective cues while increasing the magnitude of the average net cell traction force as well as the local velocity. Besides, the random movement of a cell within a cell population is slightly greater than that of single cell migration. Moreover, higher electrical field strength causes the cell slug to flatten near the cathode. On the other hand, as with single cell migration, the existence of electrotaxis dominates mechanotaxis, moving the cells to the cathode or anode pole located at the free surface. The numerical results here obtained are qualitatively consistent with related experimental works.

  13. Solvable Models on Noncommutative Spaces with Minimal Length Uncertainty Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Our main focus is to explore different models in noncommutative spaces in higher dimensions. We provide a procedure to relate a three dimensional q-deformed oscillator algebra to the corresponding algebra satisfied by canonical variables describing non-commutative spaces. The representations for the corresponding operators obey algebras whose uncertainty relations lead to minimal length, areas and volumes in phase space, which are in principle natural candidates of many different approaches of quantum gravity. We study some explicit models on these types of noncommutative spaces, first by utilising the perturbation theory, later in an exact manner. In many cases the operators are not Hermitian, therefore we use PT -symmetry and pseudo-Hermiticity property, wherever applicable, to make them self-consistent. Apart from building mathematical models, we focus on the physical implications of noncommutative theories too. We construct Klauder coherent states for the perturbative and nonperturbative noncommutative ha...

  14. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders; Kroon, Aart

    2010-01-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay...... thickness. Autocompaction was incorporated in the model, and shown to play a major role for the translation of accretion rates measured as length per unit time to accumulation rates measured as mass per area per unit time. This is important, even for shallow salt marsh deposits for which it is demonstrated...... that mass depth down core can be directly related to the bulk dry density of the surface layer by means of a logarithmic function. The results allow for an evaluation of the use of marker horizons in the topmost layers and show that it is important to know the level of the marker in relation to the salt...

  15. Three-dimensional numerical model of cell morphology during migration in multi-signaling substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jamaleddin Mousavi

    Full Text Available Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell's physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively

  16. Dispersion Relations for Electroweak Observables in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of $SO(5)/SO(4)$ composite Higgs models. It is shown how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. The dispersion relation for the parameter $\\epsilon_3$ is then used to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the 1-loop level. Finally, it is shown that the sign of the contribution to the $\\hat S$ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite, but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  17. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  18. A Mathematical Model of Baculovirus Infection on Insect Cells at Low Multiplicity of Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Hong ZHANG; Josée C. MERCHUK

    2004-01-01

    The expression efficiency of the insect cells-baculovirus system used for insecticidal virus production and the expression of medically useful foreign genes is closely related with the dynamics of infection. The present studies develop a model of the dynamic process of insect cell infection with baculovirus at low multiplicity of infection (MOI), which is based on the multi-infection cycles of insect cell infection at low MOI. A mathematical model for the amount of viruses released from primary infected cells and the amount of free viruses before secondary infected cells release viruses has been developed. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental data confirms qualitatively that this model is highly reasonable before secondary infected cells release viruses. This model is considered as a base for further modeling the entire complicated infection process.

  19. Power-Law Modeling of Cancer Cell Fates Driven by Signaling Data to Reveal Drug Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Min; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular signals are captured and transmitted by signaling proteins inside a cell. An important type of cellular responses to the signals is the cell fate decision, e.g., apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanisms of cell fate regulation are still unclear, thus comprehensive and detailed kinetic models are not yet available. Alternatively, data-driven models are promising to bridge signaling data with the phenotypic measurements of cell fates. The traditional linear model for data-driven modeling of signaling pathways has its limitations because it assumes that the a cell fate is proportional to the activities of signaling proteins, which is unlikely in the complex biological systems. Therefore, we propose a power-law model to relate the activities of all the measured signaling proteins to the probabilities of cell fates. In our experiments, we compared our nonlinear power-law model with the linear model on three cancer datasets with phosphoproteomics and cell fate measurements, which demonstrated that the nonlinear model has superior performance on cell fates prediction. By in silico simulation of virtual protein knock-down, the proposed model is able to reveal drug effects which can complement traditional approaches such as binding affinity analysis. Moreover, our model is able to capture cell line specific information to distinguish one cell line from another in cell fate prediction. Our results show that the power-law data-driven model is able to perform better in cell fate prediction and provide more insights into the signaling pathways for cancer cell fates than the linear model. PMID:27764199

  20. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Matsumoto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs. We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases.

  2. Potential of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Cai, Hui; Gong, Jie; Del Priore, Lucian

    2016-12-08

    The field of stem cell biology has rapidly evolved in the last few decades. In the area of regenerative medicine, clinical applications using stem cells hold the potential to be a powerful tool in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases, in particular, disorders of the eye. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising technologies that can potentially provide an unlimited source of cells for cell replacement therapy in the treatment of retinal degenerative disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), Stargardt disease, and other disorders. ESCs and iPSCs have been used to generate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells and their functional behavior has been tested in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Additionally, iPSC-derived RPE cells provide an autologous source of cells for therapeutic use, as well as allow for novel approaches in disease modeling and drug development platforms. Clinical trials are currently testing the safety and efficacy of these cells in patients with AMD. In this review, the current status of iPSC disease modeling of AMD is discussed, as well as the challenges and potential of this technology as a viable option for cell replacement therapy in retinal degeneration.

  3. Inventory of environmental impact models related to energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Dailey, N.S.; Johnson, C.A.; Martin, F.M. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    The purpose of this inventory is to identify and collect data on computer simulations and computational models related to the environmental effects of energy source development, energy conversion, or energy utilization. Information for 33 data fields was sought for each model reported. All of the information which could be obtained within the time alloted for completion of the project is presented for each model listed. Efforts will be continued toward acquiring the needed information. Readers who are interested in these particular models are invited to contact ESIC for assistance in locating them. In addition to the standard bibliographic information, other data fields of interest to modelers, such as computer hardware and software requirements, algorithms, applications, and existing model validation information, are included. Indexes are provided for contact person, acronym, keyword, and title. The models are grouped into the following categories: atmospheric transport, air quality, aquatic transport, terrestrial food chains, soil transport, aquatic food chains, water quality, dosimetry, and human effects, animal effects, plant effects, and generalized environmental transport. Within these categories, the models are arranged alphabetically by last name of the contact person.

  4. System-level modeling and simulation of the cell culture microfluidic biochip ProCell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    -defined micro-channels using valves and pumps. We present an approach to the system-level modeling and simulation of a cell culture microfluidic biochip called ProCell, Programmable Cell Culture Chip. ProCell contains a cell culture chamber, which is envisioned to run 256 simultaneous experiments (viewed...

  5. Stem cell based therapies for age-related macular degeneration: The promises and the challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Danhong; Chader, Gerald J; Falabella, Paulo; Stefanini, Francisco; Rowland, Teisha; Clegg, Dennis O; Kashani, Amir H; Hinton, David R; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in developed countries. AMD is classified as either neovascular (NV-AMD) or non-neovascular (NNV-AMD). Cumulative damage to the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris leads to dysfunction and loss of RPE cells. This causes degeneration of the overlying photoreceptors and consequential vision loss in advanced NNV-AMD (Geographic Atrophy). In NV-AMD, abnormal growth of capillaries under the retina and RPE, which leads to hemorrhage and fluid leakage, is the main cause of photoreceptor damage. Although a number of drugs (e.g., anti-VEGF) are in use for NV-AMD, there is currently no treatment for advanced NNV-AMD. However, replacing dead or dysfunctional RPE with healthy RPE has been shown to rescue dying photoreceptors and improve vision in animal models of retinal degeneration and possibly in AMD patients. Differentiation of RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-RPE) and from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-RPE) has created a potentially unlimited source for replacing dead or dying RPE. Such cells have been shown to incorporate into the degenerating retina and result in anatomic and functional improvement. However, major ethical, regulatory, safety, and technical challenges have yet to be overcome before stem cell-based therapies can be used in standard treatments. This review outlines the current knowledge surrounding the application of hESC-RPE and iPSC-RPE in AMD. Following an introduction on the pathogenesis and available treatments of AMD, methods to generate stem cell-derived RPE, immune reaction against such cells, and approaches to deliver desired cells into the eye will be explored along with broader issues of efficacy and safety. Lastly, strategies to improve these stem cell-based treatments will be discussed.

  6. A Survey of Probabilistic Models for Relational Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsourelakis, P S

    2006-10-13

    Traditional data mining methodologies have focused on ''flat'' data i.e. a collection of identically structured entities, assumed to be independent and identically distributed. However, many real-world datasets are innately relational in that they consist of multi-modal entities and multi-relational links (where each entity- or link-type is characterized by a different set of attributes). Link structure is an important characteristic of a dataset and should not be ignored in modeling efforts, especially when statistical dependencies exist between related entities. These dependencies can in fact significantly improve the accuracy of inference and prediction results, if the relational structure is appropriately leveraged (Figure 1). The need for models that can incorporate relational structure has been accentuated by new technological developments which allow us to easily track, store, and make accessible large amounts of data. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in statistical models for dealing with richly interconnected, heterogeneous data, fueled largely by information mining of web/hypertext data, social networks, bibliographic citation data, epidemiological data and communication networks. Graphical models have a natural formalism for representing complex relational data and for predicting the underlying evolving system in a dynamic framework. The present survey provides an overview of probabilistic methods and techniques that have been developed over the last few years for dealing with relational data. Particular emphasis is paid to approaches pertinent to the research areas of pattern recognition, group discovery, entity/node classification, and anomaly detection. We start with supervised learning tasks, where two basic modeling approaches are discussed--i.e. discriminative and generative. Several discriminative techniques are reviewed and performance results are presented. Generative methods are discussed in a separate survey. A

  7. Interleukin-1 loop model for pathogenesis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ichiro; Matsushita, Michiko; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Nagata, Keiko; Horie, Yasushi; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Imamura, Toshihiko; Morimoto, Akira; Imashuku, Shinsaku; Gogusev, Jean; Jaubert, Francis; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Takashi; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-02-22

    We propose Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an inflammatory process that is prolonged by mutations. We hypothesize that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infection triggers an interleukin-1 (IL-1) activation loop that underlies the pathogenesis of LCH. Langerhans cells (LCs) are antigen presenting cells in the skin. When LCs encounter exogenous antigens, they migrate from the epidermis into draining lymphoid tissues to initiate T-cell activity. It has been proposed that LC migration-related factors, including E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinase, and Notch ligand induce LCH activity. We found that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, which binds IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, is expressed at a significantly higher level in LCH affecting multiple organ systems (MS-LCH) than in LCH affecting a single organ system (SS-LCH). IL-1 stimulates T helper 17 cells and their signature cytokine IL-17 had been a matter of controversy. We detected higher levels of IL-17A receptor expression in MS-LCH than in SS-LCH and proposed an IL-17 endocrine model that could settle the controversy. IL-1 is the first cytokine secreted in response to sensitizers and promotes LC migration from sentinel tissues. Myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), downstream of the IL-1 receptor, has functions in both RAS signaling and inflammation, leading to human cell transformation. In 2010, an activating mutation in the B-rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma gene (BRAF) V600E was found in LCH. This BRAF mutation induces phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that may play an important role with MyD88 in LCH pathogenesis. However, phosphorylated ERK (pERK) is rapidly dephosphorylated by dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), and limited proliferation is predicted in BRAF mutant cells. MyD88 binds pERK via its D-domain, thereby preventing pERK-DUSP6 interaction and maintaining ERK in an active, phosphorylated state. We detected MCPyV-DNA in the peripheral blood

  8. Micrasterias as a Model System in Plant Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular freshwater alga Micrasterias denticulata is an exceptional organism due to its complex star-shaped, highly symmetric morphology and has thus attracted the interest of researchers for many decades. As a member of the Streptophyta, Micrasterias is not only genetically closely related to higher land plants but shares common features with them in many physiological and cell biological aspects. These facts, together with its considerable cell size of about 200 μm, its modest cultivation conditions and the uncomplicated accessibility particularly to any microscopic techniques, make Micrasterias a very well suited cell biological plant model system. The review focuses particularly on cell wall formation and composition, dictyosomal structure and function, cytoskeleton control of growth and morphogenesis as well as on ionic regulation and signal transduction. It has been also shown in the recent years that Micrasterias is a highly sensitive indicator for environmental stress impact such as heavy metals, high salinity, oxidative stress or starvation. Stress induced organelle degradation, autophagy, adaption and detoxification mechanisms have moved in the center of interest and have been investigated with modern microscopic techniques such as 3-D- and analytical electron microscopy as well as with biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. This review is intended to summarize and discuss the most important results obtained in Micrasterias in the last 20 years and to compare the results to similar processes in higher plant cells. PMID:27462330

  9. Micrasterias as a model system in plant cell biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Luetz-Meindl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular freshwater alga Micrasterias denticulata is an exceptional organism due to its extraordinary star-shaped, highly symmetric morphology and has thus attracted the interest of researchers for many decades. As a member of the Streptophyta, Micrasterias is not only genetically closely related to higher land plants but shares common features with them in many physiological and cell biological aspects. These facts, together with its considerable cell size of about 200 µm, its modest cultivation conditions and the uncomplicated accessibility particularly to any microscopic techniques, make Micrasterias a very well suited cell biological plant model system. The review focuses particularly on cell wall formation and composition, dictyosomal structure and function, cytoskeleton control of growth and morphogenesis as well as on ionic regulation and signal transduction. It has been also shown in the recent years that Micrasterias is a highly sensitive indicator for environmental stress impact such as heavy metals, high salinity, oxidative stress or starvation. Stress induced organelle degradation, autophagy, adaption and detoxification mechanisms have moved in the center of interest and have been investigated with modern microscopic techniques such as 3-D- and analytical electron microscopy as well as with biochemical, physiological and molecular approaches. This review is intended to summarize and discuss the most important results obtained in Micrasterias in the last 20 years and to compare the results to similar processes in higher plant cells.

  10. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging.

  11. Modelling electrolyte conductivity in a water electrolyzer cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael; Kirkegaard, Julius Bier

    2012-01-01

    An analytical model describing the hydrogen gas evolution under natural convection in an electrolyzer cell is developed. Main purpose of the model is to investigate the electrolyte conductivity through the cell under various conditions. Cell conductivity is calculated from a parallel resistor app...... for electrolyte conductivity from combinations of pressure, current density and electrolyte width among others....

  12. Three-Dimensional Numerical Model of Cell Morphology during Migration in Multi-Signaling Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Seyed Jamaleddin; Hamdy Doweidar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Cell Migration associated with cell shape changes are of central importance in many biological processes ranging from morphogenesis to metastatic cancer cells. Cell movement is a result of cyclic changes of cell morphology due to effective forces on cell body, leading to periodic fluctuations of the cell length and cell membrane area. It is well-known that the cell can be guided by different effective stimuli such as mechanotaxis, thermotaxis, chemotaxis and/or electrotaxis. Regulation of intracellular mechanics and cell’s physical interaction with its substrate rely on control of cell shape during cell migration. In this notion, it is essential to understand how each natural or external stimulus may affect the cell behavior. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D) computational model is here developed to analyze a free mode of cell shape changes during migration in a multi-signaling micro-environment. This model is based on previous models that are presented by the same authors to study cell migration with a constant spherical cell shape in a multi-signaling substrates and mechanotaxis effect on cell morphology. Using the finite element discrete methodology, the cell is represented by a group of finite elements. The cell motion is modeled by equilibrium of effective forces on cell body such as traction, protrusion, electrostatic and drag forces, where the cell traction force is a function of the cell internal deformations. To study cell behavior in the presence of different stimuli, the model has been employed in different numerical cases. Our findings, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental observations, indicate that adding a new stimulus to the cell substrate pushes the cell to migrate more directionally in more elongated form towards the more effective stimuli. For instance, the presence of thermotaxis, chemotaxis and electrotaxis can further move the cell centroid towards the corresponding stimulus, respectively, diminishing the

  13. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  14. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  15. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic fl...

  16. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gubitosi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of 2, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  17. Assessing Accuracy of Waveform Models against Numerical Relativity Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pürrer, Michael; LVC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We compare currently available phenomenological and effective-one-body inspiral-merger-ringdown models for gravitational waves (GW) emitted from coalescing black hole binaries against a set of numerical relativity waveforms from the SXS collaboration. Simplifications are used in the construction of some waveform models, such as restriction to spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, no inclusion of higher harmonics in the GW radiation, no modeling of eccentricity and the use of effective parameters to describe spin precession. In contrast, NR waveforms provide us with a high fidelity representation of the ``true'' waveform modulo small numerical errors. To focus on systematics we inject NR waveforms into zero noise for early advanced LIGO detector sensitivity at a moderately optimistic signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss where in the parameter space the above modeling assumptions lead to noticeable biases in recovered parameters.

  18. Validation of noise models for single-cell transcriptomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grün, Dominic; Kester, Lennart; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell transcriptomics has recently emerged as a powerful technology to explore gene expression heterogeneity among single cells. Here we identify two major sources of technical variability: sampling noise and global cell-to-cell variation in sequencing efficiency. We propose noise models to co

  19. A suitable model plant for control of the set fuel cell-DC/DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andujar, J.M.; Segura, F.; Vasallo, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, E.P.S. La Rabida, Universidad de Huelva, Ctra. Huelva - Palos de la Frontera, S/N, 21819 La Rabida - Palos de la Frontera Huelva (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    In this work a state and transfer function model of the set made up of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell and a DC/DC converter is developed. The set is modelled as a plant controlled by the converter duty cycle. In addition to allow setting the plant operating point at any point of its characteristic curve (two interesting points are maximum efficiency and maximum power points), this approach also allows the connection of the fuel cell to other energy generation and storage devices, given that, as they all usually share a single DC bus, a thorough control of the interconnected devices is required. First, the state and transfer function models of the fuel cell and the converter are obtained. Then, both models are related in order to achieve the fuel cell+DC/DC converter set (plant) model. The results of the theoretical developments are validated by simulation on a real fuel cell model. (author)

  20. Process modeling of fuel cell vehicle power system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN LiMing; LIN ZhaoJia; MA ZiFeng

    2009-01-01

    Constructed here is a mathematic model of PEM Fuel Cell Vehicle Power System which is composed of fuel supply model, fuel cell stack model and water-heat management model. The model was developed by Matiab/Simulink to evaluate how the major operating variables affect the output performances. Itshows that the constructed model can represent characteristics of the power system closely by comparing modeling results with experimental data, and it can be used in the study and design of fuel cell vehicle power system.

  1. Direct relations between morphology and transport in Boolean models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Christian; Wirner, Frank; Klatt, Michael A; Hirneise, Daniel; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Mecke, Klaus; Bechinger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    We study the relation of permeability and morphology for porous structures composed of randomly placed overlapping circular or elliptical grains, so-called Boolean models. Microfluidic experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations allow us to evaluate a power-law relation between the Euler characteristic of the conducting phase and its permeability. Moreover, this relation is so far only directly applicable to structures composed of overlapping grains where the grain density is known a priori. We develop a generalization to arbitrary structures modeled by Boolean models and characterized by Minkowski functionals. This generalization works well for the permeability of the void phase in systems with overlapping grains, but systematic deviations are found if the grain phase is transporting the fluid. In the latter case our analysis reveals a significant dependence on the spatial discretization of the porous structure, in particular the occurrence of single isolated pixels. To link the results to percolation theory we performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Euler characteristic of the open cluster, which reveals different regimes of applicability for our permeability-morphology relations close to and far away from the percolation threshold.

  2. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-18

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  3. Chromatin remodeling and stem cell theory of relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jan; Quesenberry, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    The field of stem cell biology is currently being redefined. Stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) differentiation has been considered hierarchical in nature, but recent data suggest that there is no progenitor/stem cell hierarchy, but rather a reversible continuum. The stem cell (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic) phenotype, the total differentiation capacity (hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic), gene expression as well as other stem cell functional characteristics (homing, receptor and adhesion molecule expression) vary throughout a cell-cycle transit widely. This seems to be dependent on shifting chromatin and gene expression with cell-cycle transit. The published data on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and also RNAi, the major regulators of gene expression, conjoins very well and provides an explanation for the major issues of stem cell biology. Those features of stem cells mentioned above can be rather difficult to apprehend when a classical hierarchy biology view is applied, but they become clear and easier to understand once they are correlated with the underlining epigenetic changes. We are entering a new era of stem cell biology the era of "chromatinomics." We are one step closer to the practical use of cellular therapy for degenerative diseases.

  4. Validation of transgenic models of breast cancer: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and Brca1-mutation-related breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frech, M S; Jones, L P; Furth, P A

    2005-08-01

    Available mouse models of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and BRCA1-mutation-related breast cancer are reviewed. The best validated mouse models of human DCIS are the conditional estrogen receptor α in mammary tissue (CERM) model initiated by deregulated estrogen receptor α and the serial explant mouse model initiated by p53 deficiency. At present the most useful and best validated mouse model of BRCA1-mutation-related breast cancer uses the cre-lox system to make a conditional Brca1 deletion targeted to mammary epithelial cells. The major shortcoming of the non-conditional Brca1 models is the high incidence of non-mammary tumor development. The use of mammary gland transplants or explants from these mice into nude hosts is one approach that could be used to circumvent this deficiency. Development and validation of a Brca1-mutation-related mouse model of basal cell breast cancer is an important next step.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of clinical significance of stem-cell related factors in renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Libin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C-MYC, LIN28, OCT4, KLF4, NANOG and SOX2 are stem cell related factors. We detected whether these factors express in renal cell carcinoma (RCC tissues to study their correlations with the clinical and pathological characteristics. Methods The expressions of c-MYC, LIN28, SOX2, KLF4, OCT4 and NANOG in 30 RCC patients and 5 non-RCC patients were detected with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR. The data were analyzed with Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and x2 test. Results In RCC group, c-MYC expression was significantly higher in RCC tissues compared with normal tissues (P 0.05. Also the expression levels of all above factors were not significantly changed in non-RCC group (P > 0.05. Conclusions The present analysis strongly suggests that altered expression of several stem cell related factors may play different roles in RCC. C-MYC may function as an oncogene and OCT4, KLF4, NANOG and SOX2 as tumor suppressors.

  6. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Xu, Hui [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Brawn, Shelly [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    was not achieved. We have simulated fuel cell performance, current distribution and water distribution at various values of the water uptake, membrane diffusivity, and electro-osmotic drag coefficient (EODC) and compared modeling results with segmented-cell data for both serpentine and parallel flow-fields. We have developed iterations of fuel cell flow fields to achieve specific water transport and thermal management targets. This work demonstrated the importance of membrane diffusivity on fuel cell performance, the necessity of a high membrane diffusion coefficient, and the desirability of a low EODC at low levels of relative humidity.

  7. Epistemology and Rosen's Modeling Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dress, W.B.

    1999-11-07

    Rosen's modeling relation is embedded in Popper's three worlds to provide an heuristic tool for model building and a guide for thinking about complex systems. The utility of this construct is demonstrated by suggesting a solution to the problem of pseudo science and a resolution of the famous Bohr-Einstein debates. A theory of bizarre systems is presented by an analogy with entangled particles of quantum mechanics. This theory underscores the poverty of present-day computational systems (e.g., computers) for creating complex and bizarre entities by distinguishing between mechanism and organism.

  8. Modeling of humidity-related reliability in enclosures with electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Reliability of electronics that operate outdoor is strongly affected by environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Fluctuations of these parameters can lead to water condensation inside enclosures. Therefore, modelling of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed...... to predict humidity-related reliability of a printed circuit board (PCB) located in a cabinet by combining structural reliability methods and non-linear diffusion models. This framework can, thus, be used for reliability prediction from a climatic point-of-view. The proposed numerical approach is then tested...

  9. Modeling the variability of firing rate of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, M W

    1992-12-01

    Impulse trains simulating the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells were generated by digital realizations of the integrate-and-fire model. If the mean rate were set by a "bias" level added to "noise," the variability of firing would be related to the mean firing rate as an inverse square root law; the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells deviate systematically from such a relationship. A more realistic relationship can be obtained if the integrate-and-fire mechanism is "leaky"; with this refinement, the integrate-and-fire model captures the essential features of the data. However, the model shows that the distribution of intervals is insensitive to that of the underlying variability. The leakage time constant, threshold, and distribution of the noise are confounded, rendering the model unspecifiable. Another aspect of variability is presented by the variance of responses to repeated discrete stimuli. The variance of response rate increases with the mean response amplitude; the nature of that relationship depends on the duration of the periods in which the response is sampled. These results have defied explanation. But if it is assumed that variability depends on mean rate in the way observed for maintained discharges, the variability of responses to abrupt changes in lighting can be predicted from the observed mean responses. The parameters that provide the best fits for the variability of responses also provide a reasonable fit to the variability of maintained discharges.

  10. Recent advances in andrology-related stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Shwun Lin; Zhong-Cheng Xin; Chun-Hua Deng; Hongxiu Ning; Ouiting Lin; Tom F. Lue

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell types. Although embryonic stem cells (BSC) have greater differentiation potential than adult stem cells, the former is lagging in reaching clinical applications because of ethical concerns and governmental restrictions.Bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) are the best-studied adult stem cells (ASC) and have the potential to treat a wide variety of diseases, including erectile dysfunction (ED) and male infertility. More recently discovered adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSC) are virtually identical to bone marrow stem cells in differentiation and therapeutic potential,but are easier and safer to obtain, can be harvested in larger quantities, and have the associated benefit of reducing obesity. Therefore, ADSC appear to be a better choice for future clinical applications. We have previously shown that ESC could restore the erectile function of neurogenic ED in rats, and we now have evidence that ADSC could do so as well. We are also investigating whether ADSC can differentiate into Leydig, Sertoli and male germ cells. The eventual goal is to use ADSC to treat male infertility and testosterone deficiency.

  11. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  12. The cell representation of the three-band Hubbard model

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalenko, V A; Marinaro, M; Digor, D F; Grecu, D

    2002-01-01

    The d-p model is reformulated in the representation of the Wannier orthogonalized copper and oxygen orbitals. The exact account of the holes hybridization on the oxygen ions is accomplished in this work in contrast to the other ones. Two diagonalized fermion cells of the oxygen holes mode are used for this purpose alongside with the copper holes mode. These diagonalized modes are characterized by essentially different local energies, that noticeably affects the theory results. The noncommutation of the oxygen Hamiltonian diagonalization operation and the Wannier orbitals orthogonalization by the copper lattice nodes is noted. The cell orbital of the oxygen holes, related to the CuO sub 4 ion complex, proves to be the superposition of these two diagonalized orbitals on our approach. The obtained Hamiltonian constitutes the components sum, the members whereof have the different number of the copper lattice nodes indices. The local component is the high set one. All main states of the cluster representation are ...

  13. Probabilistic delay differential equation modeling of event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Dirk; Starke, Ludger

    2016-08-01

    "Dynamic causal models" (DCMs) are a promising approach in the analysis of functional neuroimaging data due to their biophysical interpretability and their consolidation of functional-segregative and functional-integrative propositions. In this theoretical note we are concerned with the DCM framework for electroencephalographically recorded event-related potentials (ERP-DCM). Intuitively, ERP-DCM combines deterministic dynamical neural mass models with dipole-based EEG forward models to describe the event-related scalp potential time-series over the entire electrode space. Since its inception, ERP-DCM has been successfully employed to capture the neural underpinnings of a wide range of neurocognitive phenomena. However, in spite of its empirical popularity, the technical literature on ERP-DCM remains somewhat patchy. A number of previous communications have detailed certain aspects of the approach, but no unified and coherent documentation exists. With this technical note, we aim to close this gap and to increase the technical accessibility of ERP-DCM. Specifically, this note makes the following novel contributions: firstly, we provide a unified and coherent review of the mathematical machinery of the latent and forward models constituting ERP-DCM by formulating the approach as a probabilistic latent delay differential equation model. Secondly, we emphasize the probabilistic nature of the model and its variational Bayesian inversion scheme by explicitly deriving the variational free energy function in terms of both the likelihood expectation and variance parameters. Thirdly, we detail and validate the estimation of the model with a special focus on the explicit form of the variational free energy function and introduce a conventional nonlinear optimization scheme for its maximization. Finally, we identify and discuss a number of computational issues which may be addressed in the future development of the approach.

  14. Set up Alzheimer's Disease Cell Apoptosis Model with PC-12 Cell Induced by Aβ25-35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚利; 王中卫; 宋潍; 杨林

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To prepare an apoptosis cell model of Alzheimer Disease ( AD ) by PC-12 cells treated with β-amyloid protein (Aβ). Methods: PC-12 cells were incubated with differ-ent concentrations of Aβ25-35 for different duration in vitro. The cell viability was detected by MTT as-say. Morphological features of apoptosis were analyzed with Hoechst 33258/Prorlidium iodide dual staining, The level of intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) was calculated by Fura-2 / AM fluorescence ratio imaging. Results: ① The viability of PC-12 cells was significantly decreased in prolrrrtion to concentration of Aβ25-35 and duration of exposure to Aβ25-35. ②The apoplotic cells appeared in a time and concentration-dependent manner, and the maximal apoptosis happened at 48 h after execute to 20μmol/ L of Aβ25-35 and 36 h to 30μmol/ L. Cell death reached the peak at 12-24 h later than the apoptotic peak. ③([Ca2+]i) of PC-12 cells was increased in prolrrrtion to duration of exposure to the same concentration of Aβ25-35. The time of the highest increase rate of [Ca2+]i was about 12 h earlier than that of apoptosis. Conclusion : An AD cell model using the PC-12 cells induced with Aβ25-35 displays aseries of chanqes related to apoptosis, which may be related to elevation of [Ca2+]i.

  15. Periodic migration in a physical model of cells on micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camley, Brian A.; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2013-01-01

    We extend a model for the morphology and dynamics of a crawling eukaryotic cell to describe cells on micropatterned substrates. This model couples cell morphology, adhesion, and cytoskeletal flow in response to active stresses induced by actin and myosin. We propose that protrusive stresses are only generated where the cell adheres, leading to the cell's effective confinement to the pattern. Consistent with experimental results, simulated cells exhibit a broad range of behaviors, including steady motion, turning, bipedal motion, and periodic migration, in which the cell crawls persistently in one direction before reversing periodically. We show that periodic motion emerges naturally from the coupling of cell polarization to cell shape by reducing the model to a simplified one-dimensional form that can be understood analytically. PMID:24160631

  16. A minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Franck; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2016-01-01

    How the cells break symmetry and organize their edge activity to move directionally is a fun- damental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly rely on gradients of regulatory factors and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe polarization of edge activity. Theses approaches, however, fail to explain cell behavior prior to the onset of polarization. Our analysis using the model system of polarizing and moving fish epidermal keratocytes suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organization of cell activity in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell center, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviors. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion, and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell center.

  17. Black Hole Demography: From scaling relations to models

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed paper I review our current knowledge of the local Black Hole (BH) scaling relations, and their impact on the determination of the local BH mass function. I particularly emphasize the remaining systematic uncertainties impinging upon a secure determination of the BH mass function and how progress can be made. I then review and discuss the evidence for a different time evolution for separate BH-galaxy scaling relations, and how these independent empirical evidences can be reconciled with the overall evolution of the structural properties of the host galaxies. I conclude discussing BH demography in the context of semi-empirical continuity accretion models, as well as more complex evolutionary models, emphasizing the general constraints we can set on them.

  18. A vector relational data modeling approach to Insider threat intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan F.; Anderson, Thomas S.

    2016-05-01

    We address the problem of detecting insider threats before they can do harm. In many cases, co-workers notice indications of suspicious activity prior to insider threat attacks. A partial solution to this problem requires an understanding of how information can better traverse the communication network between human intelligence and insider threat analysts. Our approach employs modern mobile communications technology and scale free network architecture to reduce the network distance between human sensors and analysts. In order to solve this problem, we propose a Vector Relational Data Modeling approach to integrate human "sensors," geo-location, and existing visual analytics tools. This integration problem is known to be difficult due to quadratic increases in cost associated with complex integration solutions. A scale free network integration approach using vector relational data modeling is proposed as a method for reducing network distance without increasing cost.

  19. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  20. Dynamic properties of fuzzy Petri net model and related analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恺卿; Azlan Mohd Zain; 莫礼平

    2015-01-01

    Fuzzy Petri net (FPN) has been extensively applied in industrial fields for knowledge-based systems or systems with uncertainty. Although the applications of FPN are known to be successful, the theoretical research of FPN is still at an initial stage. To pave a way for further study, this work explores related dynamic properties of FPN including reachability, boundedness, safeness, liveness and fairness. The whole methodology is divided into two phases. In the first phase, a comparison between elementary net system (EN_system) and FPN is established to prove that the FPN is an extensive formalism of Petri nets using a backwards-compatible extension method. Next, current research results of dynamic properties are utilized to analyze FPN model. The results illustrate that FPN model is bounded, safe, weak live and fair, and can support theoretical evidences for designing related decomposition algorithm.

  1. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  2. A transient fuel cell model to simulate HTPEM fuel cell impedance spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved transient fuel cell model applied to the simulation of high temperature PEM fuel cell impedance spectra. The model is developed using a 2D finite volume method approach. The model is resolved along the channel and across the membrane. The model considers d...

  3. Modeling the Color Magnitude Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Noelia; Castelli, Analia Smith; Bassino, Lilia P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The departure of galaxies in the bright end of the CMR with respect to the trend denoted by less luminous galaxies could be explained by the influence of minor mergers

  4. Relations between two-dimensional models from dimensional reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Natividade, C.P. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-12-31

    In this work we explore the consequences of dimensional reduction of the 3D Maxwell-Chern-Simons and some related models. A connection between topological mass generation in 3D and mass generation according to the Schwinger mechanism in 2D is obtained. Besides, a series of relationships are established by resorting to dimensional reduction and duality interpolating transformations. Nonabelian generalizations are also pointed out. (author) 10 refs.

  5. A biophysical model of cell adhesion mediated by immunoadhesin drugs and antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan N Gutenkunst

    Full Text Available A promising direction in drug development is to exploit the ability of natural killer cells to kill antibody-labeled target cells. Monoclonal antibodies and drugs designed to elicit this effect typically bind cell-surface epitopes that are overexpressed on target cells but also present on other cells. Thus it is important to understand adhesion of cells by antibodies and similar molecules. We present an equilibrium model of such adhesion, incorporating heterogeneity in target cell epitope density, nonspecific adhesion forces, and epitope immobility. We compare with experiments on the adhesion of Jurkat T cells to bilayers containing the relevant natural killer cell receptor, with adhesion mediated by the drug alefacept. We show that a model in which all target cell epitopes are mobile and available is inconsistent with the data, suggesting that more complex mechanisms are at work. We hypothesize that the immobile epitope fraction may change with cell adhesion, and we find that such a model is more consistent with the data, although discrepancies remain. We also quantitatively describe the parameter space in which binding occurs. Our model elaborates substantially on previous work, and our results offer guidance for the refinement of therapeutic immunoadhesins. Furthermore, our comparison with data from Jurkat T cells also points toward mechanisms relating epitope immobility to cell adhesion.

  6. Method of Numerical Modeling for Constitutive Relations of Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the method of numerical modeling for constitutive relations of clay, on the basis of the principle of interaction between plastic volumetric strain and plastic generalized shear strain, the two constitutive functionals that include the function of stress path were used as the basic framework of the constitutive model, which are able to demonstrate the dependence of stress path.The two partial differential cross terms appear in the expression of stress-strain increment relation, which are used to demonstrate the interaction between plastic volumetric strain and plastic generalized shear strain.The elasoplastic constitutive models of clay under two kinds of stress paths, CTC and TC, have been constructed using the triaxial test results.The three basic characteristics of deformation of soils, pressure sensitivity, dilatancy, and dependence of stress path, are well explained using these two models.Using visualization, the three-dimensional surfaces of shear and volume strains in the whole stress field under stress paths of CTC and TC are given.In addition, the two families of shear and volumetric yield loci under CTC and TC paths are plotted respectively.By comparing the results of deformation under these two stress paths, it has been found that, there are obvious differences in the strain peaks, the shapes of strain surfaces, and the trends of variation of volumetric yield loci, however both families of shear yield loci are similar.These results demonstrate that the influences of stress path on the constitutive relations of clay are considerably large and not negligible.The numerical modeling method that can sufficiently reflect the dependence of stress path is superior to the traditional one.

  7. Fluctuation relation based continuum model for thermoviscoplasticity in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.; Srinivasa, Arun

    2016-11-01

    A continuum plasticity model for metals is presented from considerations of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Of specific interest is the application of a fluctuation relation that subsumes the second law of thermodynamics en route to deriving the evolution equations for the internal state variables. The modelling itself is accomplished in a two-temperature framework that appears naturally by considering the thermodynamic system to be composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic vibrational subsystem corresponding to the atomic lattice vibrations and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom describing the motion of defects in a plastically deforming metal. An apparently physical nature of the present model derives upon considering the dislocation density, which characterizes the configurational subsystem, as a state variable. Unlike the usual constitutive modelling aided by the second law of thermodynamics that merely provides a guideline to select the admissible (though possibly non-unique) processes, the present formalism strictly determines the process or the evolution equations for the thermodynamic states while including the effect of fluctuations. The continuum model accommodates finite deformation and describes plastic deformation in a yield-free setup. The theory here is essentially limited to face-centered cubic metals modelled with a single dislocation density as the internal variable. Limited numerical simulations are presented with validation against relevant experimental data.

  8. Glia, mast cells and related: new therapeutic perspectives?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Orlandini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Glia exerts a pathogenic role in the development and maintenance of pain. In the past, glia was considered only support material; the glia is 70 to 90 percent of the CNS cells. Normally in a resting state, it is activated by substances released from central terminals of C fibers and releases cytokines that enhance excitatory synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (that is the basis of central sensitization, with allodynia-hyperalgesia. By analogy with the role of glia, it has been suggested the importance of the mast cell, a connective ubiquitous cell filled with granules that contain histamine, heparin, serotonin, and NGF as well as lipid droplets that contain hyaluronic acid and a cell membrane on which cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 and vanilloid are located. Nociceptive stimuli cause mast cell degranulation and the release of substances contained in the granules. ___________________________________________________

  9. Categorization of exchange fluxes explains the four relational models

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Maroussia

    2013-01-01

    The theory of Relational Models (RMs) posits four elementary models of relationships governing all human interactions, singly or in combination: Communal Sharing, Authority Ranking, Equality Matching, and Market Pricing. By considering two agents that can act in one out of three ways towards one another: give resource A, give resource B, or give nothing, we find four discrete categories of exchange fluxes that map unequivocally to the four RMs. This categorization shows that the RMs form an exhaustive set of all possible elementary exchanges. Hence, the fluxes categorization answers why there are just four RMs and explains their discreteness. By considering the costs associated with extracting resources, storing them and implementing each flux category, we are able to propose conditions under which each RM should evolve. We also logically deduce the singular nature of the Authority Ranking model. Our propositions are compatible with anthropological, ethnological and historical observations and can be tested a...

  10. L^2-theoretical study of the relation between the LIBOR market model and the HJM model

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuoka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In previous works, the author introduced metric spaces of term structure models to study the relation between the LIBOR market model and the HJM model. However that framework is not comprehensive, nor does it admit an extendable structure. This paper introduces a new metric space to better develop the perspective argument. A metric space is naturally constructed on the set of bond price processes such that the space allows many types of term structure models. This metric presents a general vi...

  11. Mouse models of SCN5A-related cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien eCharpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This paper reviews some of the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. It also points out that these models also have their own limitations. Overall, mouse models appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodelling of other genes that might participate to the overall phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity.

  12. Semiotic aspects of control and modeling relations in complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, C.

    1996-08-01

    A conceptual analysis of the semiotic nature of control is provided with the goal of elucidating its nature in complex systems. Control is identified as a canonical form of semiotic relation of a system to its environment. As a form of constraint between a system and its environment, its necessary and sufficient conditions are established, and the stabilities resulting from control are distinguished from other forms of stability. These result from the presence of semantic coding relations, and thus the class of control systems is hypothesized to be equivalent to that of semiotic systems. Control systems are contrasted with models, which, while they have the same measurement functions as control systems, do not necessarily require semantic relations because of the lack of the requirement of an interpreter. A hybrid construction of models in control systems is detailed. Towards the goal of considering the nature of control in complex systems, the possible relations among collections of control systems are considered. Powers arguments on conflict among control systems and the possible nature of control in social systems are reviewed, and reconsidered based on our observations about hierarchical control. Finally, we discuss the necessary semantic functions which must be present in complex systems for control in this sense to be present at all.

  13. Kinetic models in industrial biotechnology - Improving cell factory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Joachim; Cvijovic, Marija; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Nielsen, Jens; Jirstrand, Mats

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of industrial bioprocesses capitalize on living cells by using them as cell factories that convert sugars into chemicals. These processes range from the production of bulk chemicals in yeasts and bacteria to the synthesis of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cell lines. One of the tools in the continuous search for improved performance of such production systems is the development and application of mathematical models. To be of value for industrial biotechnology, mathematical models should be able to assist in the rational design of cell factory properties or in the production processes in which they are utilized. Kinetic models are particularly suitable towards this end because they are capable of representing the complex biochemistry of cells in a more complete way compared to most other types of models. They can, at least in principle, be used to in detail understand, predict, and evaluate the effects of adding, removing, or modifying molecular components of a cell factory and for supporting the design of the bioreactor or fermentation process. However, several challenges still remain before kinetic modeling will reach the degree of maturity required for routine application in industry. Here we review the current status of kinetic cell factory modeling. Emphasis is on modeling methodology concepts, including model network structure, kinetic rate expressions, parameter estimation, optimization methods, identifiability analysis, model reduction, and model validation, but several applications of kinetic models for the improvement of cell factories are also discussed.

  14. A stochastic model of a cell population with quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Peter

    2008-10-01

    A cell population in which cells are allowed to enter a quiescent (nonproliferating) phase is analyzed using a stochastic approach. A general branching process is used to model the population which, under very mild conditions, exhibits balanced exponential growth. A formula is given for the asymptotic fraction of quiescent cells, and a numerical example illustrates how convergence toward the asymptotic fraction exhibits a typical oscillatory pattern. The model is compared with deterministic models based on semigroup analysis of systems of differential equations.

  15. Experimental Measurement of Relative Permeability Functions for Fuel Cell GDL Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Hussaini, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    Gas diffusion layer in PEM fuel cells plays a pivotal role in water management. Modeling of liquid water transport through the GDL relies on knowledge of relative permeability functions in the in-plane and through-plane directions. In the present work, air and water relative permeabilities are experimentally determined as functions of saturation for typical GDL materials such as Toray-060, -090, -120 carbon paper and E-Tek carbon cloth materials in their plain, untreated forms. Saturation is measured using an ex-situ gravimetric method. Absolute and relative permeability functions in the two directions of interest are presented. Significant departure from the generally assumed cubic function of saturation is observed. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  16. Fibronectin-related substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, S; Yabana, T; Ichiyanagi, S; Chen, J; Yachi, A

    1990-01-01

    A novel substance located in the chief cells of human and rat gastric mucosa, which was detected immunologically by either polyclonal or monoclonal antihuman fibronectin (FN) antibodies, is reported. All three polyclonal antihuman FN antibodies used in this study reacted immunohistologically exclusively with the chief cells. Monoclonal antibody against C-terminal peptide or cell binding peptide reacted clearly with the human chief cells, but monoclonal antibodies against FN N-terminal and midmolecule failed to react with the cells. Western blot analysis of the rat gastric mucosal extract with polyclonal antihuman FN antibody showed that this substance has a molecular weight of about 70,000 Da. Therefore, this substance appears to be a fragment containing the C-terminal peptide of whole molecule FN and thus in the present study is named FN-related substance (FNRS). In a further study with ethanol-induced ulcer model of the rat, the physiological significance of FNRS was examined. The FNRS decreased remarkably, in a dose-dependent manner, in the fundic mucosa of the rats that ingested ethanol. The FNRS appeared to be associated with development of mucosal damage and repair, subsequently playing, in part, an important role in the gastric mucosal protection mechanism.

  17. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C; knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  18. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  19. Comparison between cylindrical and prismatic lithium-ion cell costs using a process based cost model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciez, Rebecca E.; Whitacre, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    The relative size and age of the US electric vehicle market means that a few vehicles are able to drive market-wide trends in the battery chemistries and cell formats on the road today. Three lithium-ion chemistries account for nearly all of the storage capacity, and half of the cells are cylindrical. However, no specific model exists to examine the costs of manufacturing these cylindrical cells. Here we present a process-based cost model tailored to the cylindrical lithium-ion cells currently used in the EV market. We examine the costs for varied cell dimensions, electrode thicknesses, chemistries, and production volumes. Although cost savings are possible from increasing cell dimensions and electrode thicknesses, economies of scale have already been reached, and future cost reductions from increased production volumes are minimal. Prismatic cells, which are able to further capitalize on the cost reduction from larger formats, can offer further reductions than those possible for cylindrical cells.

  20. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  1. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  2. Impacts of the IBM Cell Processor to Support Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Tom; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milt

    2008-01-01

    NASA is interested in the performance and cost benefits for adapting its applications to the IBM Cell processor. However, its 256KB local memory per SPE and the new communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. We selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics (approximately 50% computational time), (2) has a high computational load relative to transferring data from and to main memory, (3) performs independent calculations across multiple columns. We converted the baseline code (single-precision, Fortran) to C and ported it with manually SIMDizing 4 independent columns and found that a Cell with 8 SPEs can process 2274 columns per second. Compared with the baseline results, the Cell is approximately 5.2X, approximately 8.2X, approximately 15.1X faster than a core on Intel Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, respectively. We believe this dramatic performance improvement makes a hybrid cluster with Cell and traditional nodes competitive.

  3. A non-local evolution equation model of cell-cell adhesion in higher dimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Janet; Gourley, Stephen A; Webb, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    A model for cell-cell adhesion, based on an equation originally proposed by Armstrong et al. [A continuum approach to modelling cell-cell adhesion, J. Theor. Biol. 243 (2006), pp. 98-113], is considered. The model consists of a nonlinear partial differential equation for the cell density in an N-dimensional infinite domain. It has a non-local flux term which models the component of cell motion attributable to cells having formed bonds with other nearby cells. Using the theory of fractional powers of analytic semigroup generators and working in spaces with bounded uniformly continuous derivatives, the local existence of classical solutions is proved. Positivity and boundedness of solutions is then established, leading to global existence of solutions. Finally, the asymptotic behaviour of solutions about the spatially uniform state is considered. The model is illustrated by simulations that can be applied to in vitro wound closure experiments.

  4. Modelling planar cell polarity in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    During development, polarity is a common feature of many cell types. One example is the polarisation of whole fields of epithelial cells within the plane of the epithelium, a phenomenon called planar cell polarity (PCP). It is widespread in nature and plays important roles in development and physiology. Prominent examples include the epithelial cells of external structures of insects like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, polarised tissue morphogenesis in vertebrates and sensory hair cel...

  5. Theoretical models for T-cell vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Borghans, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    T cell vaccination (TCV) is a term for a whole collection of phenomena in which the injection of T cells provides protection against autoimmunity. Vaccination with T cells has been investigated for several autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, adjuvant arthritist

  6. Trichomes as models for studying plant cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changxian; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-06-01

    Trichomes, originating from epidermal cells, are present on nearly all terrestrial plants. They exist in diverse forms, are readily accessible, and serve as an excellent model system for analyzing the molecular mechanisms in plant cell differentiation, including cell fate choices, cell cycle control, and cell morphogenesis. In Arabidopsis, two regulatory models have been identified that function in parallel in trichome formation; the activator-inhibitor model and the activator-depletion model. Cotton fiber, a similar unicellular structure, is controlled by some functional homologues of Arabidopsis trichome-patterning genes. Multicellular trichomes, as in tobacco and tomato, may form through a distinct pathway from unicellular trichomes. Recent research has shown that cell cycle control participates in trichome formation. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of unicellular and multicellular trichomes, and discuss the integration of the cell cycle in its initiation and morphogenesis.

  7. Mathematical Model of an Inductive Measuring Cell for Contactless Conductometry

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, Yury S

    2013-01-01

    A research of inductive conductometric cell is presented. An equivalent circuit and a mathematical model of inductive cell are given in the article. The model takes into account sample-coil capacity (i.e. capacity formed by the coil and the sample under study) and eddy currents. It is sample-coil capacity that makes inductive cell applicable for measurement of electrical conductivity of low conductive samples (specific conductance is less than 1S/m). The model can be used to calculate impedance of inductive cell for different characteristics of sample, materials and dimensions of cell without numerical solving of partial differential equations. Results of numerical simulation were verified by experiment for several devices with inductive cell. Some features that an engineer has to hold in mind while designing a conductometer based on inductive cell are discussed. Presented model can be useful for those who study inductively coupled plasma.

  8. Modelling Neurodegenerative Diseases Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are being modelled in-vitro using human patient-specific, induced pluripotent stem cells and transgenic embryonic stem cells to determine more about disease mechanisms, as well as to discover new treatments for patients. Current research in modelling Alzheimer’s disease......, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinson’s disease using pluripotent stem cells is described, along with the advent of gene-editing, which has been the complimentary tool for the field. Current methods used to model these diseases are predominantly dependent on 2D cell culture methods. Outcomes reveal that only...... that includes studying more complex 3D cell cultures, as well as accelerating aging of the neurons, may help to yield stronger phenotypes in the cultured cells. Thus, the use and application of pluripotent stem cells for modelling disease have already shown to be a powerful approach for discovering more about...

  9. Mathematical models in cell biology and cancer chemotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Martin

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to show how mathematics can be applied to improve cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, most drugs used in treating cancer kill both normal and abnormal cells. However, more cancer cells than normal cells can be destroyed by the drug because tumor cells usually exhibit different growth kinetics than normal cells. To capitalize on this last fact, cell kinetics must be studied by formulating mathematical models of normal and abnormal cell growth. These models allow the therapeutic and harmful effects of cancer drugs to be simulated quantitatively. The combined cell and drug models can be used to study the effects of different methods of administering drugs. The least harmful method of drug administration, according to a given criterion, can be found by applying optimal control theory. The prerequisites for reading this book are an elementary knowledge of ordinary differential equations, probability, statistics, and linear algebra. In order to make this book self-contained, a chapter on...

  10. Modeling the Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2009-04-01

    A recent model for Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation is extended for a three-dimensional multi-agent-based model. The computational model includes six different types of autonomous agents: inflammatory cell, fibrosis, cardiomyocyte, proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor- α, Trypanosoma cruzi, and bone marrow stem cell. Only fibrosis is fixed and the other types of agents can move randomly through the empty spaces using the three-dimensional Moore neighborhood. Bone marrow stem cells can promote apoptosis in inflammatory cells, fibrosis regression and can differentiate in cardiomyocyte. T. cruzi can increase the number of inflammatory cells. Inflammatory cells and tumor necrosis factor- α can increase the quantity of fibrosis. Our results were compared with experimental data giving a fairly fit and they suggest that the inflammatory cells are important for the development of fibrosis.

  11. Microcanonical relation between continuous and discrete spin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare; Nerattini, Rachele

    2011-02-04

    A relation between a class of stationary points of the energy landscape of continuous spin models on a lattice and the configurations of an Ising model defined on the same lattice suggests an approximate expression for the microcanonical density of states. Based on this approximation we conjecture that if a O(n) model with ferromagnetic interactions on a lattice has a phase transition, its critical energy density is equal to that of the n=1 case, i.e., an Ising system with the same interactions. The conjecture holds true in the case of long-range interactions. For nearest-neighbor interactions, numerical results are consistent with the conjecture for n=2 and n=3 in three dimensions. For n=2 in two dimensions (XY model) the conjecture yields a prediction for the critical energy of the Berežinskij-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, which would be equal to that of the two-dimensional Ising model. We discuss available numerical data in this respect.

  12. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  13. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  14. Cell models lead to understanding of multi-cellular morphogenesis consisting of successive self-construction of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisao; Nagai, Tatsuzo

    2015-03-01

    Morphogenesis of multi-cellular organisms occurs through cell behaviours within a cell aggregate. Cell behaviours have been described using cell models involving equations of motion for cells. Cells in cell models construct shapes of the cell aggregate by themselves. Here, a history of cell models, the cell centre model and the vertex cell model, which we have constructed, are described. Furthermore, the application of these cell models is explained in detail. These cell models have been applied to transformation of cell aggregates to become spherical, formation of mammalian blastocysts and cell intercalation in elongating tissues. These are all elemental processes of morphogenesis and take place in succession during the whole developmental process. A chain of successive elemental processes leads to morphogenesis. Finally, we highlight that cell models are indispensable to understand the process whereby genes direct biological shapes.

  15. Stable, position-related responses to retinoic acid by chick limb-bud mesenchymal cells in serum-free cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, D F; Solursh, M; Langille, R M; Pang, L; Chen, W D

    1994-03-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) has dramatic effects on limb-skeletal patterning in vivo and may well play a pivotal role in normal limb morphogenesis. RA's effects on the expression of pattern-related genes in the developing limb are probably mediated by cytoplasmic RA-binding proteins and nuclear RA-receptors. Little is known, however, about how RA modifies specific cellular behaviors required for skeletal morphogenesis. Earlier studies supported a role for regional differences in RA concentration in generating the region-specific cell behaviors that lead to pattern formation. The present study explores the possibility that position-related, cell-autonomous differences in the way limb mesenchymal cells respond to RA might have a role in generating pattern-related cell behavior. Mesenchymal cells from different proximodistal regions of stage 21-22 and 23-24 chick wing-buds were grown in chemically defined medium and exposed to 5 or 50 ng/ml of RA for 4 days in high-density microtiter cultures. The effects of RA on chondrogenesis in these cultures clearly differed depending on the limb region from which the cells were isolated. Regional differences in RA's effects on growth over 4 days in these cultures were less striking. The region-dependent responses of these cells to RA proved relatively stable in culture despite ongoing cytodifferentiation. This serum-free culture model will be useful in exploring the mechanisms underlying the region-dependent responsiveness of these cells to RA.

  16. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  17. The relation between dermoscopy and histopathology of basal cell carcinoma*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroglu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinoma is the most frequent cancer in fair-skinned populations and dermoscopy is an important, non-invasive technique that aids in the diagnosis of Basal cell carcinoma. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between histopathological subtypes and dermoscopic features of Basal cell carcinoma. METHODS: This study included 98 patients with clinically and histopathologically confirmed Basal cell carcinomas. The dermoscopic features of the lesions from each patient were analyzed before the histopathological findings were evaluated. RESULTS: Dermoscopic structures were observed in all 98 patients and irregular vascularity was identified in 78 patients (79.6%). The most common vascular pattern was the presence of arborizing vessels (42 patients, 42.9%) followed by arborizing microvessels (21 patients, 21.4%) and short fine telangiectasias (SFTs; 15 patients, 15.3%). White streaks (38 patients, 38.8%), translucency (31 patients, 31.6%), a milky-pink to red background (42 patients, 42.9%), and erosion/ulceration (29 patients, 29.6%) were also observed. Pigmented islands were seen as blue-gray globules (7 patients, 7.1%) and blue-gray ovoid nests (42 patients, 42.9%). The pigment distribution pattern was maple leaf-like areas in 9 patients (9.2 %) and spoke wheel-like areas in 6 patients (6.1%). CONCLUSIONS: Basal cell carcinomas show a wide spectrum of dermoscopic features. Arborizing vessels were the most common dermoscopic findings in Basal cell carcinomas, while superficial Basal cell carcinomas displayed mainly milky-pink to red areas, and arborizing microvessels. The most common dermoscopic features of pigmented types were islands of pigment (blue-gray globules, blue-gray ovoid nests). In conclusion, dermoscopy can be used as a valuable tool for the diagnosis of Basal cell carcinomas and prediction of their histopathological subtypes. PMID:26131865

  18. Ethical, legal and social issues related to cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M

    2008-01-01

    The author analyses the implications of cell therapy from a legal study that regulates the use of embryonic material: the regulation of the obtaining of cells, of research with embryos and their research and therapeutic use. There is a detailed look at the provisions in the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine of the Council of Europe and concludes that "therapeutic cloning" is not prohibited in our legal regulation.

  19. Models of political public relations: Testing the situation in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jordi Xifra Triadú

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea that political communication strategies are an application of marketing strategies to political field is today commonly shared by specialists. For them public relations is viewed like a set of techniques that serves political parties and other actors of the political scene, concentrated on media relations. This instrumental perspective is not in keeping with structural dimension of public relations in political activity and communication of his actors: political parties, pressure groups and political leaders. In this point of view, during managing periods of governance or opposition and during electoral campaigns, the most applied communication form by political parties is structured in accordance with the major public relations models: press agent model, public information model, two way asymmetrical model, and two way symmetrical model. This research prove hypothesis in Catalonia according the results of a quantitative survey focused on inside professionals who provide services for the seven main political parties in this Spanish Autonomous Community.RESUMEN:La idea de que las estrategias de comunicación política constituyen una aplicación de las estrategias del marketing al ámbito político es hoy comúnmente compartida por los analistas. Para éstos, las relaciones públicas son percibidas como un conjunto de técnicas al servicio de los partidos políticos y de otros actores de la escena política concentradas en las relaciones con la prensa. Esta perspectiva instrumental no concuerda con la dimensión estructural de las relaciones públicas en la actividad política y comunicativa de sus actores: partidos políticos, grupos de presión y líderes. Desde este punto de vista, tanto en los periodos de gestión u oposición como en los electorales, la forma comunicativa más aplicada por los partidos políticos se estructura de acuerdo con los modelos tradicionales de las relaciones públicas: agente de prensa, información p

  20. Modelling and analysis of time-lags in some basic patterns of cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C T; Bocharov, G A; Paul, C A; Rihan, F A

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic approach for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively correct mathematical models of some biological phenomena with time-lags. Features of our approach are the development of a hierarchy of related models and the estimation of parameter values, along with their non-linear biases and standard deviations, for sets of experimental data. We demonstrate our method of solving parameter estimation problems for neutral delay differential equations by analyzing some models of cell growth that incorporate a time-lag in the cell division phase. We show that these models are more consistent with certain reported data than the classic exponential growth model. Although the exponential growth model provides estimates of some of the growth characteristics, such as the population-doubling time, the time-lag growth models can additionally provide estimates of: (i) the fraction of cells that are dividing, (ii) the rate of commitment of cells to cell division, (iii) the initial distribution of cells in the cell cycle, and (iv) the degree of synchronization of cells in the (initial) cell population.

  1. Stem Cells for Modeling and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingxi; Chen, Wanling; Tan, Sheng; Lin, Tongxiang

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, which is characterized by a low level of dopamine being expressing in the striatum and a deterioration of dopaminergic neurons (DAn) in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Generation of PD-derived DAn, including differentiation of human embryonic stem cells, human neural stem cells, human-induced pluripotent stem cells, and direct reprogramming, provides an ideal tool to model PD, creating the possibility of mimicking key essential pathological processes and charactering single-cell changes in vitro. Furthermore, thanks to the understanding of molecular neuropathogenesis of PD and new advances in stem-cell technology, it is anticipated that optimal functionally transplanted DAn with targeted correction and transgene-free insertion will be generated for use in cell transplantation. This review elucidates stem-cell technology for modeling PD and offering desired safe cell resources for cell transplantation therapy.

  2. Notch pathway is activated in cell culture and mouse models of mutant SOD1-related familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with suppression of its activation as an additional mechanism of neuroprotection for lithium and valproate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S-Y; Ren, M; Jiang, H-Z; Wang, J; Jiang, H-Q; Yin, X; Qi, Y; Wang, X-D; Dong, G-T; Wang, T-H; Yang, Y-Q; Feng, H-L

    2015-08-20

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an idiopathic and lethal neurodegenerative disease that currently has no effective treatment. A recent study found that the Notch signaling pathway was up-regulated in a TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) Drosophila model of ALS. Notch signaling acts as a master regulator in the central nervous system. However, the mechanisms by which Notch participates in the pathogenesis of ALS have not been completely elucidated. Recent studies have shown that the mood stabilizers lithium and valproic acid (VPA) are able to regulate Notch signaling. Our study sought to confirm the relationship between the Notch pathway and ALS and whether the Notch pathway contributes to the neuroprotective effects of lithium and VPA in ALS. We found that the Notch pathway was activated in in vitro and in vivo models of ALS, and suppression of Notch activation with a Notch signaling inhibitor, N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl)]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) and Notch1 siRNA significantly reduced neuronal apoptotic signaling, as evidenced by the up-regulation of Bcl-2 as well as the down-regulation of Bax and cytochrome c. We also found that lithium and VPA suppressed the Notch activation associated with the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) mutation, and the combination of lithium and VPA produced a more robust effect than either agent alone. Our findings indicate that the Notch pathway plays a critical role in ALS, and the neuroprotective effects of lithium and VPA against mutant SOD1-mediated neuronal damage are at least partially dependent on their suppression of Notch activation.

  3. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  4. An in vitro co-culture model of esophageal cells identifies ascorbic acid as a modulator of cell competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardiner Kristin L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary dynamics between interacting heterogeneous cell types are fundamental properties of neoplastic progression but can be difficult to measure and quantify. Cancers are heterogeneous mixtures of mutant clones but the direct effect of interactions between these clones is rarely documented. The implicit goal of most preventive interventions is to bias competition in favor of normal cells over neoplastic cells. However, this is rarely explicitly tested. Here we have developed a cell culture competition model to allow for direct observation of the effect of chemopreventive or therapeutic agents on two interacting cell types. We have examined competition between normal and Barrett's esophagus cell lines, in the hopes of identifying a system that could screen for potential chemopreventive agents. Methods One fluorescently-labeled normal squamous esophageal cell line (EPC2-hTERT was grown in competition with one of four Barrett's esophagus cell lines (CP-A, CP-B, CP-C, CP-D under varying conditions and the outcome of competition measured over 14 days by flow cytometry. Results We demonstrate that ascorbic acid (vitamin C can help squamous cells outcompete Barrett's cells in this system. We are also able to show that ascorbic acid's boost to the relative fitness of squamous cells was increased in most cases by mimicking the pH conditions of gastrointestinal reflux in the lower esophagus. Conclusions This model is able to integrate differential fitness effects on various cell types, allowing us to simultaneously capture effects on interacting cell types without having to perform separate experiments. This model system may be used to screen for new classes of cancer prevention agents designed to modulate the competition between normal and neoplastic cells.

  5. Modeling and control of fuel cell systems and fuel processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukrushpan, Jay Tawee

    Fuel cell systems offer clean and efficient energy production and are currently under intensive development by several manufacturers for both stationary and mobile applications. The viability, efficiency, and robustness of this technology depend on understanding, predicting, and controlling the unique transient behavior of the fuel cell system. In this thesis, we employ phenomenological modeling and multivariable control techniques to provide fast and consistent system dynamic behavior. Moreover, a framework for analyzing and evaluating different control architectures and sensor sets is provided. Two fuel cell related control problems are investigated in this study, namely, the control of the cathode oxygen supply for a high-pressure direct hydrogen Fuel Cell System (FCS) and control of the anode hydrogen supply from a natural gas Fuel Processor System (FPS). System dynamic analysis and control design is carried out using model-based linear control approaches. A system level dynamic model suitable for each control problem is developed from physics-based component models. The transient behavior captured in the model includes flow characteristics, inertia dynamics, lumped-volume manifold filling dynamics, time evolving spatially-homogeneous reactant pressure or mole fraction, membrane humidity, and the Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPOX) reactor temperature. The goal of the FCS control problem is to effectively regulate the oxygen concentration in the cathode by quickly and accurately replenishing oxygen depleted during power generation. The features and limitations of different control configurations and the effect of various measurement on the control performance are examined. For example, an observability analysis suggests using the stack voltage measurement as feedback to the observer-based controller to improve the closed loop performance. The objective of the FPS control system is to regulate both the CPOX temperature and anode hydrogen concentration. Linear

  6. Broad-minded links cell cycle-related kinase to cilia assembly and hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyuk Wan; Norman, Ryan X; Tran, John; Fuller, Kimberly P; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T

    2010-02-16

    Recent findings indicate that mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction occurs within primary cilia, although the cell biological mechanisms underlying both Shh signaling and ciliogenesis have not been fully elucidated. We show that an uncharacterized TBC domain-containing protein, Broad-minded (Bromi), is required for high-level Shh responses in the mouse neural tube. We find that Bromi controls ciliary morphology and proper Gli2 localization within the cilium. By use of a zebrafish model, we further show that Bromi is required for proper association between the ciliary membrane and axoneme. Bromi physically interacts with cell cycle-related kinase (CCRK), whose Chlamydomonas homolog regulates flagellar length. Biochemical and genetic interaction data indicate that Bromi promotes CCRK stability and function. We propose that Bromi and CCRK control the structure of the primary cilium by coordinating assembly of the axoneme and ciliary membrane, allowing Gli proteins to be properly activated in response to Shh signaling.

  7. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure

  8. Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia: Parental Relations, Parent-Child Relations, and Child Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the influence of a child with sickle-cell anemia on parental affiliation, parent-child relationships, and parents' perception of their child's behavior. In the sickle-cell group, parents' interpersonal relationship suffered; parent-child relationship and child behavior correlated significantly; and single-parent families estimated…

  9. Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia: Parental Relations, Parent-Child Relations, and Child Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the influence of a child with sickle-cell anemia on parental affiliation, parent-child relationships, and parents' perception of their child's behavior. In the sickle-cell group, parents' interpersonal relationship suffered; parent-child relationship and child behavior correlated significantly; and single-parent families estimated…

  10. Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens

    2012-01-01

    for HCV research and development of drugs and vaccines. Chimpanzees are the best model for studies of HCV infection and related innate and adaptive host immune responses. They can be used in immunogenicity and efficacy studies of HCV vaccines. The only small animal models of robust HCV infection are T......- and B- cell deficient mice with human chimeric livers. Although these mice cannot be used in studies of adaptive immunity, they have provided new insights into HCV neutralization, interactions between virus and receptors, innate host responses, and therapeutic approaches. Recent progress in developing...

  11. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  12. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  13. Relative binding affinity does not predict biological response to xenoestrogens in rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunck, E; Stemmann, N; Hopert, A; Wünsche, W; Frank, K; Vollmer, G

    2000-10-01

    The possible adverse effects of the so-called environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern. Developmental, endocrine and reproductive disorders in wildlife animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with estrogen-like activity (xenoestrogens); yet, the potential impact of environmental estrogens on human health is currently under debate also due to lack of data. A battery of in vitro assays exist for identifying compounds with estrogenic activity, but only a few models are available to assess estrogenic potency in a multiparametric analysis. We have recently established the endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line RUCA-I; it enables us to compare estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo as these cells are estrogen responsive in vitro and grow estrogen sensitive tumors if inoculated in syngeneic animals in vivo. Here we report in vitro data concerning (a) the relative binding affinity of the selected synthetic chemicals Bisphenol A, nonylphenol, p-tert-octylphenol, and o,p-DDT to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells and (b) the relative potency of these compounds in inducing increased production of complement C3, an endogenous estrogen-responsive gene. Competitive Scatchard analysis revealed that xenoestrogens bound with an at least 1000-fold lower affinity to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells than estradiol itself, thereby exhibiting the following affinity ranking, estradiol>nonylphenol>bisphenol A approximately p-tert-octylphenol>o,p-DDT. Despite these low binding affinities, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and p-tert-octylphenol increased production of complement C3 in a dose dependent manner. Compared with estradiol, only 100-fold higher concentrations were needed for all the compounds to achieve similar levels of induction, except o,p-DDT which was by far less potent. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the increased production of complement C3 was mediated by an increased transcription. In summary, cultured

  14. THE JOINT DISTRIBUTION OF BIVARIATE EXPONENTIAL UNDER LINEARLY RELATED MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norou Diawara

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, fundamental results of the joint distribution of the bivariate exponential distributions are established.  The positive support multivariate distribution theory is important in reliability and survival analysis, and we applied it to the case where more than one failure or survival is observed in a given study. Usually, the multivariate distribution is restricted to those with marginal distributions of a specified and familiar lifetime family. The family of exponential distribution contains the absolutely continuous and discrete case models with a nonzero probability on a set of measure zero. Examples are given, and estimators are developed and applied to simulated data. Our findings generalize substantially known results in the literature, provide flexible and novel approach for modeling related events that can occur simultaneously from one based event.

  15. On virtual states and generalized completeness relation in Friedrichs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    We study the well-known Friedrichs model, in which a discrete state is coupled to a continuum state. By examining the pole behaviors of the Friedrichs model in a specific form factor thoroughly, we find that, in general, when the bare discrete state is below the threshold of the continuum state, there should also be a virtual-state pole accompanying the bound-state pole originating from the bare discrete state as the coupling is turned on. There are also other second-sheet poles originating from the singularities of the form factor. We give a general argument for the existence of these two kinds of states. As the coupling is increased to a certain value, the second-sheet poles may merge and become higher-order poles. We then discuss the completeness relations incorporating bound states, virtual states, and resonant states corresponding to higher-order poles.

  16. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders; Kroon, Aart

    2010-01-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay...... rise, the marsh at the specific location will eventually drown, whereas - with a sea level rise below this level – it will grow towards the top of the rising tidal frame. The short term variation of salt marsh accretion was found to correlate well with variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation...... - relatively quickly grow above the level of the highest astronomical tide, whereas this - in practice - will never happen for the latter....

  17. A stellar model with diffusion in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Alho, Artur

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric stellar model in general relativity whose interior consists of a pressureless fluid undergoing microscopic velocity diffusion in a cosmological scalar field. We show that the diffusion dynamics compel the interior to be spatially homogeneous, by which one can infer immediately that within our model, and in contrast to the diffusion-free case, no naked singularities can form in the gravitational collapse. We then study the problem of matching an exterior Bondi type metric to the surface of the star and find that the exterior can be chosen to be a modified Vaidya metric with variable cosmological constant. Finally, we study in detail the causal structure of an explicit, self-similar solution.

  18. A linearized dispersion relation for orthorhombic pseudo-acoustic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xiaolei

    2012-11-04

    Wavefield extrapolation in acoustic orthorhombic anisotropic media suffers from wave-mode coupling and stability limitations in the parameter range. We introduce a linearized form of the dispersion relation for acoustic orthorhombic media to model acoustic wavefields. We apply the lowrank approximation approach to handle the corresponding space-wavenumber mixed-domain operator. Numerical experiments show that the proposed wavefield extrapolator is accurate and practically free of dispersions. Further, there is no coupling of qSv and qP waves, because we use the analytical dispersion relation. No constraints on Thomsen\\'s parameters are required for stability. The linearized expression may provide useful application for parameter estimation in orthorhombic media.

  19. Relative Energy of the Taub Cosmological Model in Teleparallel Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Korunur, M

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate the energy distribution (due to matter and fields including gravitation) associated with a spacetime model of Taub solution, we consider the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum definitions in the teleparallel gravity (the tetrad theory of gravitation). In the teleparallel gravity using Einstein and Landau-Lifshitz prescriptions, we find the same energy-momentum distribution which is calculated in general relativity by P. Harpen. We also find that the energy-momentum prescription of Bergmann-Thomson in the tetrad theory of gravitation and general relativity. This result agrees with the previous works of Virbhadra, Xulu, Vargas, Vagenas and Salti et al. and supports the viewpoints of Albrow and Tryon.

  20. Anisotropic Generalized Ghost Pilgrim Dark Energy Model in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Rao, V. U. M.; Aditya, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type- I Universe filled with matter and generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) has been studied in general theory of relativity. To obtain determinate solution of the field equations we have used scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar which leads to a relation between the metric potentials. Some well-known cosmological parameters (equation of state (EoS) parameter ( ω Λ), deceleration parameter ( q) and squared speed of sound {vs2}) and planes (ω _{Λ }-dot {ω }_{Λ } and statefinder) are constructed for obtained model. The discussion and significance of these parameters is totally done through pilgrim dark energy parameter ( β) and cosmic time ( t).

  1. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  2. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......_Ldelta_CR where sigma_L is strength, and at the same time constant flow stress, of the uncracked material while delta_CR is flow limit (displacement).Obviously predictions by the Dugdale model are most reliable for materials with stress-strain relations where flow can actually be described (or well approximated......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  3. Model Modification and Application on Carrying Capacity of Relative Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zehong; Dong Suocheng; Gao Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the retrospection of researches on carry-ing capacity, this article reviewed systematically the research progresses on carrying capacity of relative resources (CCRR).Then the viewpoint was put forward that CCRR is not an ap-propriate method of appraising the regional sustainability, but a sound way to obtain cognition for coordinating spatial loca-tion and flow of population and economy.However, as the most popular computing method of CCRR, the Weighting Linear Sum Model is defective in the random of weight choice and the neglect of matching among different resources.Therefore, this article established the Geometric Model on CCRR based on modifying Weighting Linear Sum Model, which can be used to appraise regions where resources are close matching.Em-ploying the Geometric Model, the article empirically analyzed the population and economic CCRR in Hubei Province from 1978 to 2006.The result indicates that the population in Hubei Province is overloading while the economic carrying capacity is abundant compared to the whole country, and the economic insufficiency restricts the population carrying capacity.In the future, Hubei Province will become one of the core developing zones which are characterized by economic conglomeration.

  4. Kinetic Relations for a Lattice Model of Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwetlick, Hartmut; Zimmer, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse travelling waves for a lattice model of phase transitions, specifically the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain with piecewise quadratic interaction potential. First, for fixed, sufficiently large subsonic wave speeds, we rigorously prove the existence of a family of travelling wave solutions. Second, it is shown that this family of solutions gives rise to a kinetic relation which depends on the jump in the oscillatory energy in the solution tails. Third, our constructive approach provides a very good approximate travelling wave solution.

  5. Modeling the mechanics of cells in the cell-spreading process driven by traction forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuqiang; Lai, King W. C.

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of cells and their mechanical interaction with the extracellular environments are main factors influencing cellular function, thus indicating the progression of cells in different disease states. By considering the mechanical interactions between cell adhesion molecules and the extracellular environment, we developed a cell mechanical model that can characterize the mechanical changes in cells during cell spreading. A cell model was established that consisted of various main subcellular components, including cortical cytoskeleton, nuclear envelope, actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules. We demonstrated the structural changes in subcellular components and the changes in spreading areas during cell spreading driven by traction forces. The simulation of nanoindentation tests was conducted by integrating the indenting force to the cell model. The force-indentation curve of the cells at different spreading states was simulated, and the results showed that cell stiffness increased with increasing traction forces, which were consistent with the experimental results. The proposed cell mechanical model provides a strategy to investigate the mechanical interactions of cells with the extracellular environments through the adhesion molecules and to reveal the cell mechanical properties at the subcellular level as cells shift from the suspended state to the adherent state.

  6. Cell-based modeling of cell-matrix interactions in angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merks Roeland M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-organization of endothelial cells into blood vessel networks and sprouts can be studied using computational, cell-based models. These take as input the behavior of individual, endothelial cells, as observed in experiments, and gives as output the resulting, collective behavior, i.e. the formation of shapes and tissue structures. Many cell-based models ignore the extracellular matrix, i.e., the fibrous or homogeneous materials that surround cells and gives tissue structural support. In this extended abstract, we highlight two approaches that we have taken to explore the role of the extracellular matrix in our cellular Potts models of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis: first we discuss a model considering chemical endothelial cell-matrix interactions, then we discuss a model that include mechanical cell-matrix interactions. We end by discussing some potential new directions.

  7. N-acylethanolamines and precursor phospholipids - Relation to cell injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    mitochondria, and direct inhibition of ceramidase. Anandamide (20:4-NAE) is formed as a minor component along with other NAEs during cell injury. Whether 20:4-NAE has a separate physiological role is at present not known, but some data suggest that 20:4-NAE may be formed, e.g. in the uterus, by a more......The present review focuses on the relationship between formation of N-acylethanolamine phospholipids (NAPEs) and N-acyletransferase (NAEs) catalyzed by N-acyltranferase and NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D, respectively, and cell injury in tissues like brain, heart, and testis. A number...

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Compression Process of Elastic Open-cell Foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The random models of open-cell foams that can reflect the actual cell geometrical properties are constructed with the Voronoi technique. The compression process of elastic open-cell foams is simulated with the nonlinear calculation module of finite element analysis program. In order to get the general results applicable to this kind of materials, the dimensionless compressive stress is used and the stress-strain curves of foam models with different geometrical properties are obtained. Then, the influences of open-cell geometrical properties, including the shape of strut cross section, relative density and cell shape irregularity, on the compressive nonlinear mechanical performance are analyzed. In addition, the numerical results are compared with the predicted results of cubic staggering model. Numerical results indicate that the simulated results reflect the compressive process of foams quite well and the geometrical properties of cell have significant influences on the nonlinear mechanical behavior of foams.

  9. Arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposit model: Chapter D in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model for arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposits. Presented within are geological, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics that differentiate this deposit type from porphyry copper and alkali-feldspar rhyolite-granite porphyry molybdenum deposits. The U.S. Geological Survey's effort to update existing mineral deposit models spurred this research, which is intended to supplement previously published models for this deposit type that help guide mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments.

  10. Modeling optimizes PEM fuel cell durability using three-dimensional multi-phase computational fluid dynamics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the damage mechanisms in the membrane and gas diffusion layers, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operating conditions and in real cell geometry (three-dimensional. In this work, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to simulate the hygro and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cell, which are occurring during the cell operation due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. A unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of hygro and thermal stresses into actual three-dimensional fuel cell model. The mechanical behaviour of the membrane, catalyst layers, and gas diffusion layers during the operation of a unit cell has been studied and investigated. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and stresses distribution that have limited experimental data. The results show that the non-uniform distribution of stresses, caused by the temperature gradient in the cell, induces localized bending stresses, which can contribute to delaminating between the membrane and the gas diffusion layers. These results may explain the occurrence of cracks and pinholes in the membrane during regular cell operation. This model is used to study the effect of operating, design, and material parameters on fuel cell hygro-thermal stresses in polymer membrane, catalyst layers, and gas diffusion layers. Detailed analyses of the fuel cell durability under various operating conditions have been

  11. ADVANCES IN THE MODEL OF CYLINDRICAL ALKALINE CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The advancement of a systematic investigation on the modeling of cylindrical alkaline cells is presented.Initial analysis utilizes thermodynamic and kinetic information to predict alkaline cell performance under low discharge rates.Subsequent modling has taken into consideration detailed information on the chemistry of electrode reactions,mass tranport of dissolved species,physical and chemical properties of the electrolyte and solid phases,and internal geonetry of cell systems.The model is capable of predicting alkaline cell performance under a variety of dicharge conditions.The model also provides information regarding internal cell changes during discharge.The model is the basis of a rational approach for the optimal design of cells.

  12. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...

  13. Physiological fidelity or model parsimony? The relative performance of reverse-toxicokinetic modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael A; Perkins, Edward J; Mayo, Michael L

    2017-03-11

    Physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models are often developed to facilitate in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) using a top-down, compartmental approach, favoring architectural simplicity over physiological fidelity despite the lack of general guidelines relating model design to dynamical predictions. Here we explore the impact of design choice (high vs. low fidelity) on chemical distribution throughout an animal's organ system. We contrast transient dynamics and steady states of three previously proposed PBTK models of varying complexity in response to chemical exposure. The steady states for each model were determined analytically to predict exposure conditions from tissue measurements. Steady state whole-body concentrations differ between models, despite identical environmental conditions, which originates from varying levels of physiological fidelity captured by the models. These differences affect the relative predictive accuracy of the inverted models used in exposure reconstruction to link effects-based exposure data with whole-organism response thresholds obtained from in vitro assay measurements. Our results demonstrate how disregarding physiological fideltiy in favor of simpler models affects the internal dynamics and steady state estimates for chemical accumulation within tissues, which, in turn, poses significant challenges for the exposure reconstruction efforts that underlie many IVIVE methods. Developing standardized systems-level models for ecological organisms would not only ensure predictive consistency among future modeling studies, but also ensure pragmatic extrapolation of in vivo effects from in vitro data or modeling exposure-response relationships.

  14. A Model for Compression-Weakening Materials and the Elastic Fields due to Contractile Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rosakis, Phoebus; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2014-01-01

    We construct a homogeneous, nonlinear elastic constitutive law, that models aspects of the mechanical behavior of inhomogeneous fibrin networks. Fibers in such networks buckle when in compression. We model this as a loss of stiffness in compression in the stress-strain relations of the homogeneous constitutive model. Problems that model a contracting biological cell in a finite matrix are solved. It is found that matrix displacements and stresses induced by cell contraction decay slower (with distance from the cell) in a compression weakening material, than linear elasticity would predict. This points toward a mechanism for long-range cell mechanosensing. In contrast, an expanding cell would induce displacements that decay faster than in a linear elastic matrix.

  15. A model for compression-weakening materials and the elastic fields due to contractile cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosakis, Phoebus; Notbohm, Jacob; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-12-01

    We construct a homogeneous, nonlinear elastic constitutive law that models aspects of the mechanical behavior of inhomogeneous fibrin networks. Fibers in such networks buckle when in compression. We model this as a loss of stiffness in compression in the stress-strain relations of the homogeneous constitutive model. Problems that model a contracting biological cell in a finite matrix are solved. It is found that matrix displacements and stresses induced by cell contraction decay slower (with distance from the cell) in a compression weakening material than linear elasticity would predict. This points toward a mechanism for long-range cell mechanosensing. In contrast, an expanding cell would induce displacements that decay faster than in a linear elastic matrix.

  16. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos. PMID:27403085

  17. Health related quality of life among adolescents with sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-02-15

    Feb 15, 2011 ... Key words: Sickle cell disease, adolescents, HRQoL, auality of life, disease ... Self- administered 'Short Form-36' questionnaire was used to assess HRQoL of the included groups. ..... First, the extended family pattern in ... that this may be due to the disease associated stigma and fear of disclosure as many.

  18. Dynamics of relative chromosome position during the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); A.F. Theil (Arjan); E. van Drunen (Ellen); N.G.J. Jaspers (Nicolaas); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C. Wyman (Claire); W. Vermeulen (Wim); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe position of chromosomal neighborhoods in living cells was followed using three different methods for marking chromosomal domains occupying arbitrary locations in the nucleus; photobleaching of GFP-labeled histone H2B, local UV-marked DNA, and photobleaching of fluorescently labeled

  19. Cancer screening: a mathematical model relating secreted blood biomarker levels to tumor sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M Lutz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing efforts and financial resources are being invested in early cancer detection research. Blood assays detecting tumor biomarkers promise noninvasive and financially reasonable screening for early cancer with high potential of positive impact on patients' survival and quality of life. For novel tumor biomarkers, the actual tumor detection limits are usually unknown and there have been no studies exploring the tumor burden detection limits of blood tumor biomarkers using mathematical models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model relating blood biomarker levels to tumor burden. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a linear one-compartment model, the steady state between tumor biomarker secretion into and removal out of the intravascular space was calculated. Two conditions were assumed: (1 the compartment (plasma is well-mixed and kinetically homogenous; (2 the tumor biomarker consists of a protein that is secreted by tumor cells into the extracellular fluid compartment, and a certain percentage of the secreted protein enters the intravascular space at a continuous rate. The model was applied to two pathophysiologic conditions: tumor biomarker is secreted (1 exclusively by the tumor cells or (2 by both tumor cells and healthy normal cells. To test the model, a sensitivity analysis was performed assuming variable conditions of the model parameters. The model parameters were primed on the basis of literature data for two established and well-studied tumor biomarkers (CA125 and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]. Assuming biomarker secretion by tumor cells only and 10% of the secreted tumor biomarker reaching the plasma, the calculated minimally detectable tumor sizes ranged between 0.11 mm(3 and 3,610.14 mm(3 for CA125 and between 0.21 mm(3 and 131.51 mm(3 for PSA. When biomarker secretion by healthy cells and tumor cells was assumed, the calculated tumor sizes leading to positive test results ranged

  20. Unidirectional cell crawling model guided by extracellular cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanjiang; Geng, Yuxu

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is a highly regulated and complex cellular process to maintain proper homeostasis for various biological processes. Extracellular environment was identified as the main affecting factors determining the direction of cell crawling. It was observed experimentally that the cell prefers migrating to the area with denser or stiffer array of microposts. In this article, an integrated unidirectional cell crawling model was developed to investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of unidirectional cell migration, which incorporates the dominating intracellular biochemical processes, biomechanical processes and the properties of extracellular micropost arrays. The interpost spacing and the stiffness of microposts are taken into account, respectively, to study the mechanism of unidirectional cell locomotion and the guidance of extracellular influence cues on the direction of unidirectional cell crawling. The model can explain adequately the unidirectional crawling phenomena observed in experiments such as "spatiotaxis" and "durotaxis," which allows us to obtain further insights into cell migration.

  1. A ferret model of COPD-related chronic bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, S. Vamsee; Kim, Hyunki; Byzek, Stephen A.; Tang, Li Ping; Trombley, John E.; Jackson, Patricia; Rasmussen, Lawrence; Wells, J. Michael; Libby, Emily Falk; Winter, Lindy; Samuel, Sharon L.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the US. The majority of COPD patients have symptoms of chronic bronchitis, which lacks specific therapies. A major impediment to therapeutic development has been the absence of animal models that recapitulate key clinical and pathologic features of human disease. Ferrets are well suited for the investigation of the significance of respiratory diseases, given prior data indicating similarities to human airway physiology and submucosal gland distribution. Here, we exposed ferrets to chronic cigarette smoke and found them to approximate complex clinical features of human COPD. Unlike mice, which develop solely emphysema, smoke-exposed ferrets exhibited markedly higher numbers of early-morning spontaneous coughs and sporadic infectious exacerbations as well as a higher level of airway obstruction accompanied by goblet cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and increased mucus expression in small airways, indicative of chronic bronchitis and bronchiolitis. Overall, we demonstrate the first COPD animal model exhibiting clinical and pathologic features of chronic bronchitis to our knowledge, providing a key advance that will greatly facilitate the preclinical development of novel treatments for this disease. PMID:27699245

  2. Toward Understanding Family-Related Characteristics of Young Adults with Sickle Cell Disease or Sickle Cell Trait in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E.; Gallo, Agatha M.; Molokie, Robert; Thompson, Alexis A.; Suarez, Marie L.; Yao, Yingwei; Dallas, Constance M.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives To describe the family-related characteristics of young adults with sickle cell disease or sickle cell trait prior to taking part in a randomized controlled trial on sickle cell reproductive health education. Background There is a critical need for educational programs that target the reproductive needs of young adults with sickle cell disease or trait. However, little is known about the family-related characteristics (i.e., demographic attributes and reproductive health behaviors) in which these young adults live. Design A descriptive cross-sectional analysis. Method At study enrollment, 234 young adults (mean age = 25.9 years, 65% female) completed the SCKnowIQ questionnaire. Descriptive statistics depict the demographic attributes and reproductive health behaviors of young adults with sickle cell disease (n = 138) or trait (n = 96). For group comparisons, independent t tests or Fisher’s tests were used, as appropriate. Results Young adults with sickle cell trait had significantly higher education, income, and health insurance than those with sickle cell disease. Both groups believed that sickle cell disease was a severe condition. A majority of young adults with sickle cell disease (65%) had no children compared to 42% of those with sickle cell trait. Most young adults (85% sickle cell disease, 82% sickle cell trait) were not planning a pregnancy in the next six months and many used condoms, withdrawal, or oral contraceptives. Conclusions Socioeconomic disparities exist between young adults with sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait. Future research that advances education about how and when to communicate appropriate genetic risk information to partners and children especially for young adults with sickle cell trait would be beneficial. Relevance to clinical practice Awareness of the similarities and differences in the family-related characteristics among young adults with sickle cell disease or trait can allow for more tailored

  3. Modelling of tandem cell temperature coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper discusses the temperature dependence of the basic solar-cell operating parameters for a GaInP/GaAs series-connected two-terminal tandem cell. The effects of series resistance and of different incident solar spectra are also discussed.

  4. Age-related declines and disease-associated variation in immune cell telomere length in a wild mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Beirne

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence, the deterioration of immune system capability with age, may play a key role in mediating age-related declines in whole-organism performance, but the mechanisms that underpin immunosenescence are poorly understood. Biomedical research on humans and laboratory models has documented age and disease related declines in the telomere lengths of leukocytes ('immune cells', stimulating interest their having a potentially general role in the emergence of immunosenescent phenotypes. However, it is unknown whether such observations generalise to the immune cell populations of wild vertebrates living under ecologically realistic conditions. Here we examine longitudinal changes in the mean telomere lengths of immune cells in wild European badgers (Meles meles. Our findings provide the first evidence of within-individual age-related declines in immune cell telomere lengths in a wild vertebrate. That the rate of age-related decline in telomere length appears to be steeper within individuals than at the overall population level raises the possibility that individuals with short immune cell telomeres and/or higher rates of immune cell telomere attrition may be selectively lost from this population. We also report evidence suggestive of associations between immune cell telomere length and bovine tuberculosis infection status, with individuals detected at the most advanced stage of infection tending to have shorter immune cell telomeres than disease positive individuals. While male European badgers are larger and show higher rates of annual mortality than females, we found no evidence of a sex difference in either mean telomere length or the average rate of within-individual telomere attrition with age. Our findings lend support to the view that age-related declines in the telomere lengths of immune cells may provide one potentially general mechanism underpinning age-related declines in immunocompetence in natural populations.

  5. Muscular dystrophy-related quantitative and chemical changes in adenohypophysis GH-cells in golden retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, A R; Nyengaard, J R; Jorge, A A L; Balieiro, J C C; Peixoto, C; Fioretto, E T; Ambrósio, C E; Miglino, M A; Zatz, M; Ribeiro, A A C M

    2007-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked lethal condition which affects a boy in every 3300 births. It is caused by the absence of dystrophin, a protein occurring especially within the musculoskeletal system and in neurons in specific regions of the central nervous system (CNS). Growth hormone (GH) inhibition is believed to decrease the severity of DMD and could perhaps be used in its treatment. However, the underlying pathological mechanism is not known. The golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD) represents an animal model in the study of DMD. In this paper we investigated the morphological aspects of the adenohypophysis as well as the total number and size of GH-granulated cells using design-based stereological methods in a limited number of dystrophic and healthy golden retrievers. GH-cells were larger (32.4%) in dystrophic dogs than in healthy animals (p=0.01) and they occupied a larger portion (62.5%) of the adenohypophysis volume (p=0.01) without changes in either adenohypophysis volume (p=0.893) or total number of GH-granulated cells (p=0.869). With regard to ultrastructure, granulated cells possessed double-layer electron-dense granules which were evenly distributed in the cytosol. Furthermore, these granules in dystrophic animals occupied a larger proportion of GH-granulated cell volume (66.9%; p=0.008) as well as of all GH-cells in the whole pars distalis of adenohypophysis (77.3%; p=0.035), albeit IGF-1 serum concentration was lower in severe cases. This suggests difficulties in the GH secretion that might possibly be associated to dystrophin absence. In contrast to earlier reports, our data suggest that a lower IGF-1 concentration may be more related to a severe, as opposed to a benign, clinical form of muscular dystrophy.

  6. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders T.; Kroon, Aart

    2010-05-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay thickness. Autocompaction was incorporated in the model, and shown to play a major role for the translation of accretion rates measured as length per unit time to accumulation rates measured as mass per area per unit time. This is important, even for shallow salt marsh deposits for which it is demonstrated that mass depth down core can be directly related to the bulk dry density of the surface layer by means of a logarithmic function. The results allow for an evaluation of the use of marker horizons in the topmost layers and show that it is important to know the level of the marker in relation to the salt marsh base. In general, deeper located markers will indicate successively smaller accretion rates with the same sediment input. Thus, stability analysis made on the basis of newly established marker horizons will be biased and indicate salt marsh stabilities far above the correct level. Running the model with a constant sea level revealed that balance between the inner and the outer salt marsh deposition can not be achieved within a reasonable time scale. Likewise it is shown that only one specific sea level rise provides equilibrium for a given location on the salt marsh. With a higher sea level rise, the marsh at the specific location will eventually drown, whereas - with a sea level rise below this level - it will grow towards the top of the rising tidal frame. The short term variation of salt marsh accretion was found to correlate well with variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation - the NAO winter index. Comparisons between the geomorphological development of wind tide affected salt marshes, like those present on the Danish North Sea coasts, and primary astronomically

  7. A host-parasite model for a two-type cell population

    CERN Document Server

    Alsmeyer, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    A host-parasite model is considered for a population of cells that can be of two types, A or B, and exhibits unilateral reproduction: while a B-cell always splits into two cells of the same type, the two daughter cells of an A-cell can be of any type. The random mechanism that describes how parasites within a cell multiply and are then shared into the daughter cells is allowed to depend on the hosting mother cell as well as its daughter cells. Focusing on the subpopulation of A-cells and its parasites, the model differs from the single-type model recently studied by Bansaye (2008) in that the sharing mechanism may be biased towards one of the two types. Main results are concerned with the nonextinctive case and provide information on the behavior, as $n\\to\\infty$, of the number A-parasites in generation n and the relative proportion of A- and B-cells in this generation which host a given number of parasites. As in (Bansaye,2008), proofs will make use of a so-called random cell line which, when conditioned to ...

  8. Mathematical modelling of cell aggregation in liver tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Green, John Edward E.

    2006-01-01

    A promising method for growing functional liver tissue in vitro involves culturing hepatocytes as spheroidal cell aggregates. In this thesis, we develop mathematical models of cell aggregation, and use them to determine how hepatocytes' interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) on which they are seeded, and with stellate cells, affect the process. Chapters 2-4 focus on the effect that cell-ECM coupling has on the aggregation process. We use a novel formulation that couples a mechani...

  9. Anti-apoptotic treatment in mouse models of age-related hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengchan Han; Oumei Wang; Quanxiang Cai

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL), or presbycusis, is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of the aged population. Genetic predisposition is one of the major factors in the development of AHL. Generally, AHL is associated with an age-dependent loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons and stria vascularis cells in the inner ear. Although the mechanisms leading to genetic hearing loss are not completely understood, caspase-family proteases function as important signals in the inner ear pathology. It is now accepted that mouse models are the best tools to study the mechanism of genetic hearing loss or AHL. Here, we provide a brief review of recent studies on hearing improvement in mouse models of AHL by anti-apoptotic treatment.

  10. Modeling of movement-related potentials using a fractal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uşakli, Ali Bülent

    2010-06-01

    In bio-signal applications, classification performance depends greatly on feature extraction, which is also the case for electroencephalogram (EEG) based applications. Feature extraction, and consequently classification of EEG signals is not an easy task due to their inherent low signal-to-noise ratios and artifacts. EEG signals can be treated as the output of a non-linear dynamical (chaotic) system in the human brain and therefore they can be modeled by their dimension values. In this study, the variance fractal dimension technique is suggested for the modeling of movement-related potentials (MRPs). Experimental data sets consist of EEG signals recorded during the movements of right foot up, lip pursing and a simultaneous execution of these two tasks. The experimental results and performance tests show that the proposed modeling method can efficiently be applied to MRPs especially in the binary approached brain computer interface applications aiming to assist severely disabled people such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in communication and/or controlling devices.

  11. Application distribution model and related security attacks in VANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaein, Navid; Kanti Datta, Soumya; Marecar, Irshad; Bonnet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model for application distribution and related security attacks in dense vehicular ad hoc networks (VANET) and sparse VANET which forms a delay tolerant network (DTN). We study the vulnerabilities of VANET to evaluate the attack scenarios and introduce a new attacker`s model as an extension to the work done in [6]. Then a VANET model has been proposed that supports the application distribution through proxy app stores on top of mobile platforms installed in vehicles. The steps of application distribution have been studied in detail. We have identified key attacks (e.g. malware, spamming and phishing, software attack and threat to location privacy) for dense VANET and two attack scenarios for sparse VANET. It has been shown that attacks can be launched by distributing malicious applications and injecting malicious codes to On Board Unit (OBU) by exploiting OBU software security holes. Consequences of such security attacks have been described. Finally, countermeasures including the concepts of sandbox have also been presented in depth.

  12. New extended standard model, dark matters and relativity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantized space model is newly introduced as the extended standard model. Four three-dimensional quantized spaces with total 12 dimensions are used to explain the universes including ours. Electric (EC), lepton (LC) and color (CC) charges are defined to be the charges of the x1x2x3, x4x5x6 and x7x8x9 warped spaces, respectively. Then, the lepton is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) correlated state which makes 3x3 = 9 leptons and the quark is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) - xk(CC) correlated state which makes 3x3x3 = 27 quarks. The new three bastons with the xi(EC) state are proposed as the dark matters seen in the x1x2x3 space, too. The matter universe question, three generations of the leptons and quarks, dark matter and dark energy, hadronization, the big bang, quantum entanglement, quantum mechanics and general relativity are briefly discussed in terms of this new model. The details can be found in the article titled as ``journey into the universe; three-dimensional quantized spaces, elementary particles and quantum mechanics at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/J_Hwang2''.

  13. New hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-min; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian

    2007-01-01

    Model and simulation are good tools for design optimization of fuel cell systems. This paper proposes a new hybrid model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The hybrid model includes physical component and black-box component. The physical component represents the well-known part of PEMFC, while artificial neural network (ANN) component estimates the poorly known part of PEMFC. The ANN model can compensate the performance of the physical model. This hybrid model is implemented on Matlab/Simulink software. The hybrid model shows better accuracy than that of the physical model and ANN model. Simulation results suggest that the hybrid model can be used as a suitable and accurate model for PEMFC.

  14. Hippocampal place cells construct reward related sequences through unexplored space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, H Freyja; Barry, Caswell; Saleem, Aman B; Hassabis, Demis; Spiers, Hugo J

    2015-06-26

    Dominant theories of hippocampal function propose that place cell representations are formed during an animal's first encounter with a novel environment and are subsequently replayed during off-line states to support consolidation and future behaviour. Here we report that viewing the delivery of food to an unvisited portion of an environment leads to off-line pre-activation of place cells sequences corresponding to that space. Such 'preplay' was not observed for an unrewarded but otherwise similar portion of the environment. These results suggest that a hippocampal representation of a visible, yet unexplored environment can be formed if the environment is of motivational relevance to the animal. We hypothesise such goal-biased preplay may support preparation for future experiences in novel environments.

  15. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  16. Cell and small animal models for phenotypic drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mihaly Szabo,1 Sara Svensson Akusjärvi,1 Ankur Saxena,1 Jianping Liu,2 Gayathri Chandrasekar,1 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor, and Cell Biology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden Abstract: The phenotype-based drug discovery (PDD approach is re-emerging as an alternative platform for drug discovery. This review provides an overview of the various model systems and technical advances in imaging and image analyses that strengthen the PDD platform. In PDD screens, compounds of therapeutic value are identified based on the phenotypic perturbations produced irrespective of target(s or mechanism of action. In this article, examples of phenotypic changes that can be detected and quantified with relative ease in a cell-based setup are discussed. In addition, a higher order of PDD screening setup using small animal models is also explored. As PDD screens integrate physiology and multiple signaling mechanisms during the screening process, the identified hits have higher biomedical applicability. Taken together, this review highlights the advantages gained by adopting a PDD approach in drug discovery. Such a PDD platform can complement target-based systems that are currently in practice to accelerate drug discovery. Keywords: phenotype, screening, PDD, discovery, zebrafish, drug

  17. Relation between seminal quality and oxidative balance in sperm cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patricio, António; Cruz, Daniel Filipe; Silva, Joana Vieira; Padrão, Ana; Correia, Bárbara Regadas; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Ferreira, Rita; Maia, Nuno; Almeida, Saul; Lourenço, João; Silva, Vladimiro; Fardilha, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: infertility is a clinical disorder affecting approximately 15% of reproductive-aged couples worldwide. Recently, the influence of oxidative stress (OS) in decreased semen quality has been discussed. OS corresponds to an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants defenses, present in the organism. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage biomolecules present in sperm cells and may lead to the loss of membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation or even to death by apoptosis. T...

  18. Optimization of the cell seeding density and modeling of cell growth and metabolism using the modified Gompertz model for microencapsulated animal cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-tao, Qi; Ying, Zhang; Juan, Ma; Xin, Guo; Yu-bing, Xie; Wei, Wang; Xiaojun, Ma

    2006-04-01

    Cell microencapsulation is one of the promising strategies for the in vitro production of proteins or in vivo delivery of therapeutic products. In order to design and fabricate the optimized microencapsulated cell system, the Gompertz model was applied and modified to describe the growth and metabolism of microencapsulated cell, including substrate consumption and product formation. The Gompertz model successfully described the cell growth kinetics and the modified Gompertz models fitted the substrate consumption and product formation well. It was demonstrated that the optimal initial cell seeding density was about 4-5 x 10(6) cells/mL of microcapsule, in terms of the maximum specific growth rate, the glucose consumption potential and the product formation potential calculated by the Gompertz and modified Gompertz models. Modeling of cell growth and metabolism in microcapsules provides a guideline for optimizing the culture of microencapsulated cells.

  19. Dissecting Germ Cell Metabolism through Network Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne S Whitmore

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathways are increasingly postulated to be vital in programming cell fate, including stemness, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The commitment to meiosis is a critical fate decision for mammalian germ cells, and requires a metabolic derivative of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA. Recent evidence showed that a pulse of RA is generated in the testis of male mice thereby triggering meiotic commitment. However, enzymes and reactions that regulate this RA pulse have yet to be identified. We developed a mouse germ cell-specific metabolic network with a curated vitamin A pathway. Using this network, we implemented flux balance analysis throughout the initial wave of spermatogenesis to elucidate important reactions and enzymes for the generation and degradation of RA. Our results indicate that primary RA sources in the germ cell include RA import from the extracellular region, release of RA from binding proteins, and metabolism of retinal to RA. Further, in silico knockouts of genes and reactions in the vitamin A pathway predict that deletion of Lipe, hormone-sensitive lipase, disrupts the RA pulse thereby causing spermatogenic defects. Examination of other metabolic pathways reveals that the citric acid cycle is the most active pathway. In addition, we discover that fatty acid synthesis/oxidation are the primary energy sources in the germ cell. In summary, this study predicts enzymes, reactions, and pathways important for germ cell commitment to meiosis. These findings enhance our understanding of the metabolic control of germ cell differentiation and will help guide future experiments to improve reproductive health.

  20. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  1. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell

  2. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  3. Recent Advances in Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic fuel cells convert the chemical energy of biofuels into electrical energy. Unlike traditional fuel cell types, which are mainly based on metal catalysts, the enzymatic fuel cells employ enzymes as catalysts. This fuel cell type can be used as an implantable power source for a variety of medical devices used in modern medicine to administer drugs, treat ailments and monitor bodily functions. Some advantages in comparison to conventional fuel cells include a simple fuel cell design and lower cost of the main fuel cell components, however they suffer from severe kinetic limitations mainly due to inefficiency in electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. In this review article, the major research activities concerned with the enzymatic fuel cells (anode and cathode development, system design, modeling by highlighting the current problems (low cell voltage, low current density, stability will be presented.

  4. Holoclone forming cells from pancreatic cancer cells enrich tumor initiating cells and represent a novel model for study of cancer stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is one of the direct causes of cancer-related death. High level of chemoresistance is one of the major obstacles of clinical treatment. In recent years, cancer stem cells have been widely identified and indicated as the origin of chemoresistance in multi-types of solid tumors. Increasing evidences suggest that cancer stem cells reside in the cells capable of forming holoclones continuously. However, in pancreatic cancer, holoclone-forming cells have not been characterized yet. Therefore, the goal of our present study was to indentify the holoclone-forming pancreatic cancer stem cells and develop an in vitro continuous colony formation system, which will greatly facilitate the study of pancreatic cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 was submitted to monoclonal cultivation to generate colonies. Based on the morphologies, colonies were classified and analyzed for their capacities of secondary colony formation, long-term survival in vitro, tumor formation in vivo, and drug resistance. Flowcytometry and quantitative RT-PCR were performed to detect the expression level of cancer stem cells associated cell surface markers, regulatory genes and microRNAs in distinct types of colonies. Three types of colonies with distinct morphologies were identified and termed as holo-, mero-, and paraclones, in which only holoclones generated descendant colonies of all three types in further passages. Compared to mero- and paraclones, holoclones possessed higher capacities of long-term survival, tumor initiation, and chemoresistance. The preferential expression of cancer stem cells related marker (CXCR4, regulatory genes (BMI1, GLI1, and GLI2 and microRNAs (miR-214, miR-21, miR-221, miR-222 and miR-155 in holoclones were also highlighted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the pancreatic tumor-initiating cells with high level of chemoresistance were enriched in holoclones

  5. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

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    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  6. Stochastic Model of Clogging in a Microfluidic Cell Sorter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fai, Thomas; Rycroft, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidic devices for sorting cells by deformability show promise for various medical purposes, e.g. detecting sickle cell anemia and circulating tumor cells. One class of such devices consists of a two-dimensional array of narrow channels, each column containing several identical channels in parallel. Cells are driven through the device by an applied pressure or flow rate. Such devices allows for many cells to be sorted simultaneously, but cells eventually clog individual channels and change the device properties in an unpredictable manner. In this talk, we propose a stochastic model for the failure of such microfluidic devices by clogging and present preliminary theoretical and computational results. The model can be recast as an ODE that exhibits finite time blow-up under certain conditions. The failure time distribution is investigated analytically in certain limiting cases, and more realistic versions of the model are solved by computer simulation.

  7. Evaluation of MCF10A as a Reliable Model for Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women worldwide. Various cell models have been developed to study breast cancer tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug sensitivity. The MCF10A human mammary epithelial cell line is a widely used in vitro model for studying normal breast cell function and transformation. However, there is limited knowledge about whether MCF10A cells reliably represent normal human mammary cells. MCF10A cells were grown in monolayer, suspension (mammosphere culture, three-dimensional (3D "on-top" Matrigel, 3D "cell-embedded" Matrigel, or mixed Matrigel/collagen I gel. Suspension culture was performed with the MammoCult medium and low-attachment culture plates. Cells grown in 3D culture were fixed and subjected to either immunofluorescence staining or embedding and sectioning followed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. Cells or slides were stained for protein markers commonly used to identify mammary progenitor and epithelial cells. MCF10A cells expressed markers representing luminal, basal, and progenitor phenotypes in two-dimensional (2D culture. When grown in suspension culture, MCF10A cells showed low mammosphere-forming ability. Cells in mammospheres and 3D culture expressed both luminal and basal markers. Surprisingly, the acinar structure formed by MCF10A cells in 3D culture was positive for both basal markers and the milk proteins β-casein and α-lactalbumin. MCF10A cells exhibit a unique differentiated phenotype in 3D culture which may not exist or be rare in normal human breast tissue. Our results raise a question as to whether the commonly used MCF10A cell line is a suitable model for human mammary cell studies.

  8. Modelling cell polarization driven by synthetic spatially graded Rac activation.

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    William R Holmes

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Rac is known to be an important regulator of cell polarization, cytoskeletal reorganization, and motility of mammalian cells. In recent microfluidic experiments, HeLa cells endowed with appropriate constructs were subjected to gradients of the small molecule rapamycin leading to synthetic membrane recruitment of a Rac activator and direct graded activation of membrane-associated Rac. Rac activation could thus be triggered independent of upstream signaling mechanisms otherwise responsible for transducing activating gradient signals. The response of the cells to such stimulation depended on exceeding a threshold of activated Rac. Here we develop a minimal reaction-diffusion model for the GTPase network alone and for GTPase-phosphoinositide crosstalk that is consistent with experimental observations for the polarization of the cells. The modeling suggests that mutual inhibition is a more likely mode of cell polarization than positive feedback of Rac onto its own activation. We use a new analytical tool, Local Perturbation Analysis, to approximate the partial differential equations by ordinary differential equations for local and global variables. This method helps to analyze the parameter space and behaviour of the proposed models. The models and experiments suggest that (1 spatially uniform stimulation serves to sensitize a cell to applied gradients. (2 Feedback between phosphoinositides and Rho GTPases sensitizes a cell. (3 Cell lengthening/flattening accompanying polarization can increase the sensitivity of a cell and stabilize an otherwise unstable polarization.

  9. A multi-phenotypic cancer model with cell plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Da; Wang, Yue; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    The conventional cancer stem cell (CSC) theory indicates a hierarchy of CSCs and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), that is, CSCs can differentiate into NSCCs but not vice versa. However, an alternative paradigm of CSC theory with reversible cell plasticity among cancer cells has received much attention very recently. Here we present a generalized multi-phenotypic cancer model by integrating cell plasticity with the conventional hierarchical structure of cancer cells. We prove that under very weak assumption, the nonlinear dynamics of multi-phenotypic proportions in our model has only one stable steady state and no stable limit cycle. This result theoretically explains the phenotypic equilibrium phenomena reported in various cancer cell lines. Furthermore, according to the transient analysis of our model, it is found that cancer cell plasticity plays an essential role in maintaining the phenotypic diversity in cancer especially during the transient dynamics. Two biological examples with experimental data show that the phenotypic conversions from NCSSs to CSCs greatly contribute to the transient growth of CSCs proportion shortly after the drastic reduction of it. In particular, an interesting overshooting phenomenon of CSCs proportion arises in three-phenotypic example. Our work may pave the way for modeling and analyzing the multi-phenotypic cell population dynamics with cell plasticity.

  10. [Development of human embryonic stem cell model for toxicity evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang-yan; Cao, Tong; Ouyang, Hong-wei; Peng, Shuang-qing; Deng, Xu-liang; Li, Sheng-lin; Liu, He; Zou, Xiao-hui; Fu, Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-ying; Zhan, Yuan

    2013-02-18

    The current international standard for toxicity screening of biomedical devices and materials recommend the use of immortalized cell lines because of their homogeneous morphologies and infinite proliferation which provide good reproducibility for in vitro cytotoxicity screening. However, most of the widely used immortalized cell lines are derived from animals and may not be representative of normal human cell behavior in vivo, in particular in terms of the cytotoxic and genotoxic response. Therefore, It is vital to develop a model for toxicity evaluation. In our studies, two Chinese human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines as toxicity model were established. hESC derived tissue/organ cell model for tissue/organ specific toxicity evaluation were developed. The efficiency and accuracy of using hESC model for cytoxicity, embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation were confirmed. The results indicated that hESCs might be good tools for toxicity testing and biosafety evaluation in vitro.

  11. Modelling Spread of Oncolytic Viruses in Heterogeneous Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2014-03-01

    One of the most promising areas in current cancer research and treatment is the use of viruses to attack cancer cells. A number of oncolytic viruses have been identified to date that possess the ability to destroy or neutralize cancer cells while inflicting minimal damage upon healthy cells. Formulation of predictive models that correctly describe the evolution of infected tumor systems is critical to the successful application of oncolytic virus therapy. A number of different models have been proposed for analysis of the oncolytic virus-infected tumor system, with approaches ranging from traditional coupled differential equations such as the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models, to contemporary modeling frameworks based on neural networks and cellular automata. Existing models are focused on tumor cells and the effects of virus infection, and offer the potential for improvement by including effects upon normal cells. We have recently extended the traditional framework to a 2-cell model addressing the full cellular system including tumor cells, normal cells, and the impacts of viral infection upon both populations. Analysis of the new framework reveals complex interaction between the populations and potential inability to simultaneously eliminate the virus and tumor populations.

  12. A data integration approach for cell cycle analysis oriented to model simulation in systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosca Ettore

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell cycle is one of the biological processes most frequently investigated in systems biology studies and it involves the knowledge of a large number of genes and networks of protein interactions. A deep knowledge of the molecular aspect of this biological process can contribute to making cancer research more accurate and innovative. In this context the mathematical modelling of the cell cycle has a relevant role to quantify the behaviour of each component of the systems. The mathematical modelling of a biological process such as the cell cycle allows a systemic description that helps to highlight some features such as emergent properties which could be hidden when the analysis is performed only from a reductionism point of view. Moreover, in modelling complex systems, a complete annotation of all the components is equally important to understand the interaction mechanism inside the network: for this reason data integration of the model components has high relevance in systems biology studies. Description In this work, we present a resource, the Cell Cycle Database, intended to support systems biology analysis on the Cell Cycle process, based on two organisms, yeast and mammalian. The database integrates information about genes and proteins involved in the cell cycle process, stores complete models of the interaction networks and allows the mathematical simulation over time of the quantitative behaviour of each component. To accomplish this task, we developed, a web interface for browsing information related to cell cycle genes, proteins and mathematical models. In this framework, we have implemented a pipeline which allows users to deal with the mathematical part of the models, in order to solve, using different variables, the ordinary differential equation systems that describe the biological process. Conclusion This integrated system is freely available in order to support systems biology research on the cell cycle and

  13. Cell Wall-Related Bionumbers and Bioestimates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, F.M.; de Koster, C.G.; Brul, S.

    2014-01-01

    Bionumbers and bioestimates are valuable tools in biological research. Here we focus on cell wall-related bionumbers and bioestimates of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the polymorphic, pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We discuss the linear relationship between cell size and cell p

  14. Triple co-culture cell model as an in vitro model for oral particulate vaccine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; De Rossi, C.; Lehr, C-M.

    A triple co-culture cell model of Caco-2 cells, dendritic cells and macrophages (Figure 1) has previously been developed for studying intestinal permeability in a state of inflammation [1],[2]. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of this cell model for testing...... the model antigen ovalbumin was spray dried to obtain a particulate vaccine model system for testing in the cell model. The precursors were shown to form cubosomes when dispersed in aqueous medium, and was therefore used as the vaccine formulation for testing on the co-cultures. After 11 days, the TEER...... values of the co-cultures were found to be 860-1340 Ω∙cm2; the formulations were incubated with the co-cultures at this time point. From confocal microscopy images, it was observed that the THP-1 cells (macrophages) migrated into the overlying Caco-2 cell monolayer when the co-cultures were incubated...

  15. Preon models, relativity, quantum mechanics and cosmology (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Preons are hypothetic constituents of the standard particles. They were initially assumed to have basically similar properties to those of conventional matter. But this is not necessarily the case: the ultimate constituents of matter may feel a different space-time from that of special relativity and exhibit mechanical properties different from those predicted by standard quantum mechanics. They can also play an important cosmological role (inflation, dark matter, dark energy...). It is even not obvious that energy and momentum would have to be conserved in such a scenario. In this series of papers, we review the subject using the superbradyon model as an example, and suggest new ways to explore possible tests of the preon hypothesis.

  16. Ambiguities and Symmetry Relations in a Free Fermion Model

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A

    1999-01-01

    We present a systematic study of one, two and three point functions of vector, axial-vector, scalar and pseudoscalar densities constructed in a free fermion model. The divergent content of the amplitudes are left in the form of (external momenta independent) 4-D integrals for which an appropriate regulating function is only implicitly assumed, and the integrals are not evaluated at any step of the calculation. The ambiguities and Symmetries Violations, in all cases, are shown to be associated with coefficients involving three relations between divergent integrals of the same degree of divergence. Setting these coefficients to zero is mandatory, e.g., for preserving gauge symmetry in QED. The implications for the ambiguities and symmetry violations are investigated. The results emerging from this alternative approach allow us to conclude that the traditional method used to establish the triangular anomalies could be questionable.

  17. DIFFERENT MODELS OF HEPATOTOXICITY AND RELATED LIVER DISEASES: A REVIEW

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    Singh Robin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver is among the most complex and important organs in the human body. Its primary function is to control the flow and safety of substances absorbed from the digestive system before distribution of these substances to the systemic circulatory system. Hepatotoxicity implies chemical-driven liver damage. Chemicals that cause liver injury are called hepatotoxins. Hepatic injury leads to disturbances in transport function of hepatocytes resulting in leakage of plasma membrane thereby causing an increased enzyme level in serum. There are many diseases that are related with hepatotoxicity caused by certain chemicals or hepatotoxins. Herbal medicines are great demand in various chemicals and drugs disordered hepatic, the developed world for primary health care because of their efficacy, safety, lesser side effects and narrow therapeutic window. This review focus on liver, its function, liver diseases and different models of hepatotoxicity.

  18. Relation between parthenolideinduced cytotoxicity and COX—2 expression in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinYL; OngCN

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the potential anti-tumor effects and its relative its relative mechanism of active component in chrysanthemum,on human nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC).Parthenolide(PN) was used as tested substance and exposed to NPC cell lines,CNE1 and CNE2.Cell toxicity indexes and cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) expression were determined.Results showed that in CNE1 cells,with high level COX-2,there were significant cytotoxicities after PN-treated.However,there were not inducible effects on CNE2 cells with low level COX-2.It was indicated that PN could induce cytotoxicity in NPC cell,which correlated with its intracellular COX-2 expression.

  19. Vertebral classification using localized pathology-related shape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewail, R.; Elsafi, A.; Durdle, N.

    2008-03-01

    Radiographs of the spine are frequently examined for assessment of vertebral abnormalities. Features like osteophytes (bony growth of vertebra's corners), and disc space narrowing are often used as visual evidence of osteoarthris or degenerative joint disease. These symptoms result in remarkable changes in the shapes of the vertebral body. Statistical analysis of anatomical structure has recently gained increased popularity within the medical imaging community, since they have the potential to enhance the automated diagnosis process. In this paper, we present a novel method for computer-assisted vertebral classification using a localized, pathology-related shape model. The new classification scheme is able to assess the condition of multiple vertebrae simultaneously, hence is possible to directly classify the whole spine anatomy according to the condition of interest (anterior osteophites). At the core of this method is a new localized shape model that uses concepts of sparsity, dimension reduction, and statistical independence to extract sets of localized modes of deformations specific to each of the vertebrae under investigation. By projection of the shapes onto any specific set of deformation modes (or basis), we obtain low-dimensional features that are most directly related to the pathology of the vertebra of interest. These features are then used as input to a support vector machine classifier to classify the vertebra under investigation as normal or upnormal. Experiments are conducted using contours from digital x-ray images of five vertebrae of lumbar spine. The accuracy of the classification scheme is assessed using the ROC curves. An average specifity of 96.8 % is achieved with a sensitivity of 80 %.

  20. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.