WorldWideScience

Sample records for model reflecting classical

  1. Some reflections on the role of semi-classical atomic models in the teaching and learning of introductory quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Colm

    2016-03-01

    The role of "semi-classical" (Bohr-Sommerfeld) and "semi-quantum-mechanical" (atomic orbital) models in the context of the teaching of atomic theory is considered. It is suggested that an appropriate treatment of such models can serve as a useful adjunct to quantum mechanical study of atomic systems.

  2. Grassmannization of classical models

    CERN Document Server

    Pollet, Lode; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V; Svistunov, Boris V

    2016-01-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick's theorem, and (ii) the Dyson's collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (and correlations) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. A proof-of-principle implement...

  3. Duality and self-duality of action in classical and quantum mechanics. Energy spectrum reflection symmetry of quasi-exactly solvable models, revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Kreshchuk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of duality reflects a link between the behaviour of a system in different regimes. The goal of this work is to expose the classical origins of such links, and to demonstrate how they come to life in some quasi-exactly solvable problems of quantum mechanics. By studying the global properties of the Riemannian surface of the classical momentum, we reveal that the abbreviated classical action possesses a symmetry which holds also at the quantum level and underlies the energy reflection symmetry of the quantum energy levels.

  4. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  5. Grassmannization of classical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet, Lode; Kiselev, Mikhail N.; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V.; Svistunov, Boris V.

    2016-11-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick’s theorem, and (ii) Dyson’s collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (as well as all correlation functions) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. Our work paves the way for studying lattice gauge theories by treating bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom on equal footing.

  6. Reflective ghost imaging with classical Gaussian-state light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyang Duan; Yunjie Xia

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources, and to provide their expressions. We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object, using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light, can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields, including a background term. Moreover, reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.%In this letter,we use quantum description and the Gaussian state to study reflective ghost imaging with two classical sources,and to provide their expressions.We find that the reflective ghost imaging of a rough-surfaced object,using Gaussian-state phase-insensitive or classically correlated phase-sensitive light,can be expressed in terms of the phase-insensitive or phase-sensitive cross-correlations between the two detected fields,including a background term.Moreover,reflective ghost imaging with two classical Gaussian-state lights is shown to have similar features as spatial resolution and field of view.

  7. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2007-01-01

    All phenomena in nature are characterized by motion; this is an essential property of matter, having infinitely many aspects. Motion can be mechanical, physical, chemical or biological, leading to various sciences of nature, mechanics being one of them. Mechanics deals with the objective laws of mechanical motion of bodies, the simplest form of motion. In the study of a science of nature mathematics plays an important role. Mechanics is the first science of nature which was expressed in terms of mathematics by considering various mathematical models, associated to phenomena of the surrounding nature. Thus, its development was influenced by the use of a strong mathematical tool; on the other hand, we must observe that mechanics also influenced the introduction and the development of many mathematical notions. In this respect, the guideline of the present book is precisely the mathematical model of mechanics. A special accent is put on the solving methodology as well as on the mathematical tools used; vectors, ...

  8. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶柏青; 王洪利

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to the limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical model and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  9. The revision of classical stock model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Bai-qing; WANG Hong-li

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of classical stock model, according to th e limitation of the model, the article puts forward the revision of classical mo del and enforces the applicability of the stock model.

  10. A Classical Model of Gravitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagener P.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A classical model of gravitation is proposed with time as an independent coordinate. The dynamics of the model is determined by a proposed Lagrangian. Applying the canonical equations of motion to its associated Hamiltonian gives conservation equa- tions of energy, total angular momentum and the z component of the angular momen- tum. These lead to a Keplerian orbit in three dimensions, which gives the observed values of perihelion precession and bending of light by a massive object. An expression for gravitational redshift is derived by accepting the local validity of special relativity at all points in space. Exact expressions for the GEM relations, as well as their associated Lorentz-type force, are derived. An expression for Mach’s Principle is also derived.

  11. Quantum Models of Classical World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hájíček

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our recent work on three notorious problems of non-relativistic quantum mechanics: realist interpretation, quantum theory of classical properties, and the problem of quantum measurement. A considerable progress has been achieved, based on four distinct new ideas. First, objective properties are associated with states rather than with values of observables. Second, all classical properties are selected properties of certain high entropy quantum states of macroscopic systems. Third, registration of a quantum system is strongly disturbed by systems of the same type in the environment. Fourth, detectors must be distinguished from ancillas and the states of registered systems are partially dissipated and lost in the detectors. The paper has two aims: a clear explanation of all new results and a coherent and contradiction-free account of the whole quantum mechanics including all necessary changes of its current textbook version.

  12. Wave Reflection Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Larsen, Brian Juul

    The investigation concerns the design of a new internal breakwater in the main port of Ibiza. The objective of the model tests was in the first hand to optimize the cross section to make the wave reflection low enough to ensure that unacceptable wave agitation will not occur in the port. Secondly...

  13. Clusters of classical water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2009-11-01

    The properties of clusters can be used as tests of models constructed for molecular simulation of water. We searched for configurations with minimal energies for a small number of molecules. We identified topologically different structures close to the absolute energy minimum of the system by calculating overlap integrals and enumerating hydrogen bonds. Starting from the dimer, we found increasing number of topologically different, low-energy arrangements for the trimer(3), the tetramer(6), the pentamer(6), and the hexamer(9). We studied simple models with polarizable point dipole. These were the BSV model [J. Brodholt et al., Mol. Phys. 86, 149 (1995)], the DC model [L. X. Dang and T. M. Chang, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8149 (1997)], and the GCP model [P. Paricaud et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 244511 (2005)]. As an alternative the SWM4-DP and the SWM4-NDP charge-on-spring models [G. Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 418, 245 (2006)] were also investigated. To study the impact of polarizability restricted to the plane of the molecule we carried out calculations for the SPC-FQ and TIP4P-FQ models, too [S. W. Rick et al., J. Chem. Phys. 101, 6141 (1994)]. In addition to them, justified by their widespread use even for near critical or surface behavior calculations, we identified clusters for five nonpolarizable models of ambient water, SPC/E [H. J. C. Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)], TIP4P [W. L. Jorgensen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 79, 926 (1983)], TIP4P-EW [H. W. Horn et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 9665 (2004)], and TIP4P/2005 [J. L. F. Abascal and C. Vega, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 234505 (2005)]. The fifth was a five-site model named TIP5P [M. W. Mahoney and W. L. Jorgensen, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8910 (2000)]. To see the impact of the vibrations we studied the flexible SPC model. [K. Toukan and A. Rahman, Phys. Rev. B 31, 2643 (1985)]. We evaluated the results comparing them with experimental data and quantum chemical calculations. The position of the negative

  14. Classic Grounded Theory to Analyse Secondary Data: Reality and Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Andrews

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on the experiences of two researchers and discusses how they conducted a secondary data analysis using classic grounded theory. The aim of the primary study was to explore first-time parents’ postnatal educational needs. A subset of the data from the primary study (eight transcripts from interviews with fathers was used for the secondary data analysis. The objectives of the secondary data analysis were to identify the challenges of using classic grounded theory with secondary data and to explore whether the re-analysis of primary data using a different methodology would yield a different outcome. Through the process of re-analysis a tentative theory emerged on ‘developing competency as a father’. Challenges encountered during this re-analysis included the small dataset, the pre-framed data, and limited ability for theoretical sampling. This re-analysis proved to be a very useful learning tool for author 1(LA, who was a novice with classic grounded theory.

  15. CLASSICAL RISK MODEL WITH THRESHOLD DIVIDEND STRATEGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Ming; Guo Junyi

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a threshold dividend strategy is used for classical risk model.Under this dividend strategy, certain probability of ruin, which occurs in case of constant barrier strategy, is avoided. Using the strong Markov property of the surplus process and the distribution of the deficit in classical risk model, the survival probability for this model is derived, which is more direct than that in Asmussen(2000, P195, Proposition 1.10). The occupation time of non-dividend of this model is also discussed by means of Martingale method.

  16. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  17. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  18. Classical electromagnetic model of surface states in topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-01-01

    A topological insulator is classically modeled as an isotropic dielectric-magnetic with a magnetoelectric pseudoscalar $\\Psi$ existing in its bulk while its surface is charge-free and current-free. An alternative model is obtained by setting $\\Psi\\equiv0$ and incorporating surface charge and current densities characterized by an admittance $\\gamma$. Analysis of plane-wave reflection and refraction due to a topological-insulator half space reveals that the parameters $\\Psi$ and $\\gamma$ arise identically in the reflection and transmission coefficients, implying that the two classical models cannot be distinguished on the basis of any scattering scenario. However, as $\\Psi$ disappears from the Maxwell equations applicable to any region occupied by the topological insulator, and because surface states exist on topological insulators as protected conducting states, the alternative model must be chosen.

  19. Classical electromagnetic model of surface states in topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Mackay, Tom G.

    2016-07-01

    A topological insulator is classically modeled as an isotropic material with a magnetoelectric pseudoscalar Ψ existing in its bulk while its surface is charge free and current free. An alternative model is obtained by setting Ψ≡0 and incorporating surface charge and current densities characterized by an admittance γ. Analysis of planewave reflection and refraction due to a topological-insulator half space reveals that the parameters Ψ and γ arise identically in the reflection and transmission coefficients, implying that the two classical models cannot be distinguished on the basis of any scattering scenario. However, as Ψ disappears from the Maxwell equations applicable to any region occupied by the topological insulator, and because surface states exist on topological insulators as protected conducting states, the alternative model must be chosen.

  20. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendon, Raymond Cori [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  1. Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-01

    We exploit a recently constructed mapping between quantum circuits and graphs in order to prove that circuits corresponding to certain planar graphs can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof uses an expression for the Ising model partition function in terms of quadratically signed weight enumerators (QWGTs), which are polynomials that arise naturally in an expansion of quantum circuits in terms of rotations involving Pauli matrices. We combine this expression with a known efficient classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson-Seymour theorem from graph theory. We give as an example a set of quantum circuits with a small number of non-nearest-neighbor gates which admit an efficient classical simulation.

  2. Classical Ising Models Realised on Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirio, Mauro; Brennen, G. K.; Twamley, J.; Iblisdir, S.; Boada, O.

    2012-02-01

    We describe a simple quantum algorithm acting on a register of qubits in d spatial dimensions which computes statistical properties of d+1 dimensional classical Ising models. The algorithm works by measuring scattering matrix elements for quantum processes and Wick rotating to provide estimates for real partition functions of classical systems. This method can be implemented in a straightforward way in ensembles of qubits, e.g. three dimensional optical lattices with only nearest neighbor Ising like interactions. By measuring noise in the estimate useful information regarding location of critical points and scaling laws can be extracted for classical Ising models, possibly with inhomogeneity. Unlike the case of quantum simulation of quantum hamiltonians, this algorithm does not require Trotter expansion of the evolution operator and thus has the advantage of being amenable to fault tolerant gate design in a straightforward manner. Through this setting it is possible to study the quantum computational complexity of the estimation of a classical partition function for a 2D Ising model with non uniform couplings and magnetic fields. We provide examples for the 2 dimensional case.

  3. Model predictive control classical, robust and stochastic

    CERN Document Server

    Kouvaritakis, Basil

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a textbook that brings together classical predictive control with treatment of up-to-date robust and stochastic techniques. Model Predictive Control describes the development of tractable algorithms for uncertain, stochastic, constrained systems. The starting point is classical predictive control and the appropriate formulation of performance objectives and constraints to provide guarantees of closed-loop stability and performance. Moving on to robust predictive control, the text explains how similar guarantees may be obtained for cases in which the model describing the system dynamics is subject to additive disturbances and parametric uncertainties. Open- and closed-loop optimization are considered and the state of the art in computationally tractable methods based on uncertainty tubes presented for systems with additive model uncertainty. Finally, the tube framework is also applied to model predictive control problems involving hard or probabilistic constraints for the cases of multiplic...

  4. Reflection principle for classical solutions of the homogeneous real Monge–Ampère equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Koskenoja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider reflection principle for classical solutions of the homogeneous real Monge–Ampère equation. We show that both the odd and the even reflected functions satisfy the Monge–Ampère equation if the second-order partial derivatives have continuous limits on the reflection boundary. In addition to sufficient conditions, we give some necessary conditions. Before stating the main results, we present elementary formulas for the reflected functions and study their differentiability properties across the reflection boundary. As an important special case, we finally consider extension of polynomials satisfying the homogeneous Monge–Ampère equation.

  5. Evaluating the TD model of classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvig, Elliot A; Sutton, Richard S; Kehoe, E James

    2012-09-01

    The temporal-difference (TD) algorithm from reinforcement learning provides a simple method for incrementally learning predictions of upcoming events. Applied to classical conditioning, TD models suppose that animals learn a real-time prediction of the unconditioned stimulus (US) on the basis of all available conditioned stimuli (CSs). In the TD model, similar to other error-correction models, learning is driven by prediction errors--the difference between the change in US prediction and the actual US. With the TD model, however, learning occurs continuously from moment to moment and is not artificially constrained to occur in trials. Accordingly, a key feature of any TD model is the assumption about the representation of a CS on a moment-to-moment basis. Here, we evaluate the performance of the TD model with a heretofore unexplored range of classical conditioning tasks. To do so, we consider three stimulus representations that vary in their degree of temporal generalization and evaluate how the representation influences the performance of the TD model on these conditioning tasks.

  6. VOTERS DECIDE. CLASSICAL MODELS OF ELECTORAL BEHAVIOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin SASU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The decision to vote and choosing among the candidates is a extremely important one with repercussions on everyday life by determining, in global mode, its quality for the whole society. Therefore the whole process by which the voter decide becomes a central concern. In this paper we intend to locate the determinants of the vote decision in the electoral behavior classical theoretical models developed over time. After doing synthesis of classical schools of thought on electoral behavior we conclude that it has been made a journey through the mind, soul and cheek, as follows: the mind as reason in theory developed by Downs, soul as preferably for an actor in Campbell's theory, etc. and cheek as an expression of the impossibility of detachment from social groups to which we belong in Lazarsfeld's theory.

  7. Some semi-classical issues in boundary sine-Gordon model

    CERN Document Server

    Kormos, M

    2002-01-01

    The semi-classical quantisation of the two lowest energy static solutions of boundary sine-Gordon model is considered. A relation between the Lagrangian and bootstrap parameters is established by comparing their quantum corrected energy difference and the exact one. This relation is also confirmed by studying the semi-classical limit of soliton reflections on the boundary.

  8. A classical cosmological model for triviality

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, H; Rashidi, R

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the triviality of $\\lambda\\phi^{4}$ theory in a classical gravitational model. Starting from a conformal invariant scalar tensor theory with a self-interaction term $\\lambda\\phi^{4}$, we investigate the effect of a conformal symmetry breaking emerging from the gravitational coupling of the large-scale distribution of matter in the universe. Taking in this cosmological symmetry breaking phase the infinite limit of the maximal length (the size of the universe) and the zero limit of the minimal length (the Planck length) implies triviality, i.e. a vanishing coupling constant $\\lambda$. It suggests that the activity of the self-interaction term $\\lambda\\phi^{4}$ in the cosmological context implies that the universe is finite and a minimal fundamental length exists.

  9. Classical interaction model for the water molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, András; Bartók, Albert

    2007-05-14

    The authors propose a new classical model for the water molecule. The geometry of the molecule is built on the rigid TIP5P model and has the experimental gas phase dipole moment of water created by four equal point charges. The model preserves its rigidity but the size of the charges increases or decreases following the electric field created by the rest of the molecules. The polarization is expressed by an electric field dependent nonlinear polarization function. The increasing dipole of the molecule slightly increases the size of the water molecule expressed by the oxygen-centered sigma parameter of the Lennard-Jones interaction. After refining the adjustable parameters, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to check the ability of the new model in the ice, liquid, and gas phases. They determined the density and internal energy of several ice polymorphs, liquid water, and gaseous water and calculated the heat capacity, the isothermal compressibility, the isobar heat expansion coefficients, and the dielectric constant of ambient water. They also determined the pair-correlation functions of ambient water and calculated the energy of the water dimer. The accuracy of theirs results was satisfactory.

  10. Macroeconomic Forecasts in Models with Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Białowolski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to construct a forecasting model oriented on predicting basic macroeconomic variables, namely: the GDP growth rate, the unemployment rate, and the consumer price inflation. In order to select the set of the best regressors, Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimators (BACE is employed. The models are atheoretical (i.e. they do not reflect causal relationships postulated by the macroeconomic theory and the role of regressors is played by business and consumer tendency survey-based indicators. Additionally, survey-based indicators are included with a lag that enables to forecast the variables of interest (GDP, unemployment, and inflation for the four forthcoming quarters without the need to make any additional assumptions concerning the values of predictor variables in the forecast period.  Bayesian Averaging of Classical Estimators is a method allowing for full and controlled overview of all econometric models which can be obtained out of a particular set of regressors. In this paper authors describe the method of generating a family of econometric models and the procedure for selection of a final forecasting model. Verification of the procedure is performed by means of out-of-sample forecasts of main economic variables for the quarters of 2011. The accuracy of the forecasts implies that there is still a need to search for new solutions in the atheoretical modelling.

  11. Higgs Triplet Model with Classically Conformal Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Okada, Hiroshi; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the minimal Higgs triplet model with a classically conformal invariance and with a gauged $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry. In our scenario, tiny masses of neutrinos are generated by a hybrid contribution from the type-I and type-II seesaw mechanisms. The shape of the Higgs potential at low energies is determined by solving one-loop renormalization group equations for all the scalar quartic couplings with a set of initial values of parameters at the Planck scale. We find a successful set of the parameters in which the $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism at the ${\\cal O}$(10) TeV scale, and the electroweak symmetry breaking is also triggered by the $U(1)_{B-L}$ breaking. Under this configuration, we can predict various low energy observables such as the mass spectrum of extra Higgs bosons, and the mixing angles. Furthermore, using these predicted mass parameters, we obtain upper limits on Yukawa couplings among an isospin triplet Higgs field and lepton...

  12. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a new prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by T...

  13. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ≃0.3 σ independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where σ is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Models on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, Gerard 't

    2015-08-06

    Arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there cannot be physical laws that require 'conspiracy'. It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In this report, several such counterexamples are shown. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. So now the question is asked: how can such a model feature 'conspiracy', and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations? Arguments concerning Bell's theorem are further sharpened.

  15. Classical conformality in the Standard Model from Coleman's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2016-01-01

    The classical conformality is one of the possible candidates for explaining the gauge hierarchy of the Standard Model. We show that it is naturally obtained from the Coleman's theory on baby universe.

  16. Predicting dislocation climb: Classical modeling versus atomistic simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Clouet, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The classical modeling of dislocation climb based on a continuous description of vacancy diffusion is compared to recent atomistic simulations of dislocation climb in body-centered cubic iron under vacancy supersaturation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 095501 (2010)]. A quantitative agreement is obtained, showing the ability of the classical approach to describe dislocation climb. The analytical model is then used to extrapolate dislocation climb velocities to lower dislocation...

  17. Classical models of the spin 1/2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.

    We proposed a Quaternionic mechanical system motivated by the Foucault pendulum as a classical model for the dynamics of the spin ½ system. We showed that this mechanical system contains the dynamics of the spin state of the electron under a uniform magnetic field as it is given by the Schrodinger-Pauli-Equation (SPE). We closed with a characterization of the dynamics of this generalized classical system by showing that it is equivalent with the dynamics of the Schrodinger Pauli Equation as long as the solutions to the generalized classical system are roots of the Lagrangian, that is the condition L = 0 holds.

  18. Multidimensional modelling of classical pulsating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Muthsam, Herbert J

    2016-01-01

    After an overview of general aspects of modelling the pulsation- convection interaction we present reasons why such simulations (in multidimensions) are needed but, at the same time, pose a considerable challenge. We then discuss, for several topics, what insights multidimensional simulations have either already provided or can be expected to yield in the future. We finally discuss properties of our ANTARES code. Many of these features can be expected to be characteristic of other codes which may possibly be applied to these physical questions in the foreseeable future.

  19. Quantum mechanics can reduce the complexity of classical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mile; Wiesner, Karoline; Rieper, Elisabeth; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-03-27

    Mathematical models are an essential component of quantitative science. They generate predictions about the future, based on information available in the present. In the spirit of simpler is better; should two models make identical predictions, the one that requires less input is preferred. Yet, for almost all stochastic processes, even the provably optimal classical models waste information. The amount of input information they demand exceeds the amount of predictive information they output. Here we show how to systematically construct quantum models that break this classical bound, and that the system of minimal entropy that simulates such processes must necessarily feature quantum dynamics. This indicates that many observed phenomena could be significantly simpler than classically possible should quantum effects be involved.

  20. Outline and Preliminary Evaluation of the Classical Digital Library Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCall, Steven L.; Cleveland, Ana D.; Gibson, Ian E.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the classical digital library model, which is derived from traditional practices of library and information science professionals, as an alternative to the database retrieval model. Reports preliminary results from an evaluation study of library and information professionals and endusers involved with primary care medicine. (AEF)

  1. THE NEW CLASSICAL THEORY AND THE REAL BUSINESS CYCLE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Simona HUDEA (CARAMAN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at describing some key elements of the new classical theory-related model, namely the Real Business Cycle, mainly describing the economy from the perspective of a perfectly competitive market, characterised by price, wage and interest rate flexibility. The rendered impulse-response functions, that help us in revealing the capacity of the model variables to return to their steady state under the impact of a structural shock, be it technology or monetary policy oriented, give points to the neutrality of the monetary entity decisions, therefore confirming the well-known classical dichotomy existing between the nominal and the real factors of the economy.

  2. A polynomial hybrid reflection model and measurement of its parameters based on images of sample

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Yang; Jiuqiang Han

    2007-01-01

    Reflectance model is a basic concept in computer vision. Some existing models combining the classical diffuse reflectance model and those for surfaces containing specular components can approximately describe real reflectance. But the ratio of diffuse and specular reflection decided manually has no clear meaning.We propose a new polynomial hybrid reflectance model. The reflectance map equation with a known shape (for example cylinder) as a sample is used to estimate parameters of the proposed reflectance model by least square regression algorithm. Then the reflectance parameters for surfaces of the same class of materials can be determined. Experiments are performed for a metal surface. The synthesis images produced by the proposed method and existing ones are compared with the real acquired image, and the results show that the proposed reflectance model is suitable for describing real reflectance.

  3. Event-chain Monte Carlo for classical continuous spin models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Manon; Mayer, Johannes; Krauth, Werner

    2015-10-01

    We apply the event-chain Monte Carlo algorithm to classical continuum spin models on a lattice and clarify the condition for its validity. In the two-dimensional XY model, it outperforms the local Monte Carlo algorithm by two orders of magnitude, although it remains slower than the Wolff cluster algorithm. In the three-dimensional XY spin glass model at low temperature, the event-chain algorithm is far superior to the other algorithms.

  4. Classical and Quantum Theory of Perturbations in Inflationary Universe Models

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenberger, R H; Mukhanov, V

    1993-01-01

    A brief introduction to the gauge invariant classical and quantum theory of cosmological perturbations is given. The formalism is applied to inflationary Universe models and yields a consistent and unified description of the generation and evolution of fluctuations. A general formula for the amplitude of cosmological perturbations in inflationary cosmology is derived.

  5. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  6. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under $SU(3)_C$ with masses lower than $1\\,{\\rm TeV}$, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than $2.6\\,{\\rm TeV}$.

  7. Bohmian mechanics, collapse models and the emergence of classicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroš, Marko; Donadi, Sandro; Bassi, Angelo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the emergence of classical trajectories in Bohmian mechanics, when a macroscopic object interacts with an external environment. We show that in such a case the conditional wave function of the system follows a dynamics which, under reasonable assumptions, corresponds to that of the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. As a consequence, Bohmian trajectories evolve classically. Our analysis also shows how the GRW (istantaneous) collapse process can be derived by an underlying continuous interaction of a quantum system with an external agent, thus throwing a light on how collapses can emerge from a deeper level theory.

  8. Item Construction Using Reflective, Formative, or Rasch Measurement Models: Implications for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Gischlar, Karen L.; Peterson, N. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Measures that accurately capture the phenomenon are critical to research and practice in group work. The vast majority of group-related measures were developed using the reflective measurement model rooted in classical test theory (CTT). Depending on the construct definition and the measure's purpose, the reflective model may not always be the…

  9. Baxter Magolda's Epistemological Reflection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Marianne T.

    1999-01-01

    Baxter Magolda's model emphasizes the importance of the patterns of knowing used by students, and how important those patterns are to the creation of learning environments that empower students both in and out of the classroom. This model can help student affairs educators create these kinds of learning environments. (Author/MKA)

  10. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phookan, C. K.; Kalita, K.

    2015-01-01

    We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  11. A model for explaining fusion suppression using classical trajectory method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phookan C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We adopt a semi-classical approach for explanation of projectile breakup and above barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. The cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by employing quantum mechanical ideas. Within this cut-off impact parameter for fusion, the fraction of projectiles undergoing breakup is determined using the method of classical trajectory in two-dimensions. For obtaining the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been proposed. We introduce a simple formula for explanation of fusion suppression. We find excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated fusion cross section. A slight modification of the above formula for fusion suppression is also proposed for a three-dimensional model.

  12. Modelling Of Flotation Processes By Classical Mathematical Methods - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Ivana; Miljanović, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Flotation process modelling is not a simple task, mostly because of the process complexity, i.e. the presence of a large number of variables that (to a lesser or a greater extent) affect the final outcome of the mineral particles separation based on the differences in their surface properties. The attempts toward the development of the quantitative predictive model that would fully describe the operation of an industrial flotation plant started in the middle of past century and it lasts to this day. This paper gives a review of published research activities directed toward the development of flotation models based on the classical mathematical rules. The description and systematization of classical flotation models were performed according to the available references, with emphasize exclusively given to the flotation process modelling, regardless of the model application in a certain control system. In accordance with the contemporary considerations, models were classified as the empirical, probabilistic, kinetic and population balance types. Each model type is presented through the aspects of flotation modelling at the macro and micro process levels.

  13. Does learning to reflect make better modelers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slinger, J.H.; Kwakkel, J.H.; Van der Niet, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we address the role of reflective skills in the development and training of new System Dynamics modelers at the tertiary education level. Over the last two years students at the Delft University of Technology have written a reflective essay on their experiences with the conceptualizati

  14. A Semi-Classical Model to Study Nuclear Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Martha; Chernomoretz, Ariel; Dorso, Claudio; Lopez, Jorge

    1999-10-01

    A semi-classical model based on the use of molecular dynamics has been developed for the study of heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies. The model reproduces nucleon-nucleon cross sections through the use of a two-body potential. The study covers several characteristics of heavy-ion collisions, such as formation of necks, and formation of intermediate residue. Preliminary results on the use of the model to study the caloric curve of nuclear matter and the temperature evolution of the system are also discussed.

  15. Simulating the classical XY model with a laser network

    CERN Document Server

    Tamate, Shuhei; Marandi, Alireza; McMahon, Peter; Utsunomiya, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    Drawing fair samples from the Boltzmann distribution of a statistical model is a challenging task for modern digital computers. We propose a physical implementation of a Boltzmann sampler for the classical XY model by using a laser network. The XY spins are mapped onto the phases of multiple laser pulses in a fiber ring cavity and the steady-state distribution of phases naturally realizes the Boltzmann distribution of the corresponding XY model. We experimentally implement the laser network by using an actively mode-locked fiber laser with optical delay lines, and demonstrate Boltzmann sampling for a one-dimensional XY ring.

  16. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  17. Education and Happiness in Ancient Asian Wisdom: Reflections from Indian & Chinese Classics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore not only the principles and aims of education, but also the concepts and principles of happiness in ancient Asian wisdom, especially Indian and Chinese classics as well as religious sutras. In order to investigate this article systematically, three research questions are addressed: First, what are…

  18. Transference in view of a classical conditioning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Merav; Kacen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative metasynthetic study, addressing 33 transference case studies, that investigates the interrelationship of the transference concept from psychoanalysis and cognitive-behavioral concepts in an attempt to construct a theoretical platform for clinical integration. Relationship between categories analysis was used to compare Luborsky's (1998) transference components (wish, response from other, and response of self) and cognitive-behavioral ones. Results showed reciprocal relations between transference and classical conditioning. Furthermore, explicit occurrences of distorted thinking due to overgeneralization were found in more than 90% of the cases. A conceptual model describes transference as a conditioned response activated by thematic conditioning, a particular case of classical conditioning that repeatedly pairs a given interpersonal situation with internal thematic stimuli, thus shaping the person's narrative. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed as well.

  19. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  20. Operational dynamic modeling transcending quantum and classical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Denys I; Cabrera, Renan; Lompay, Robert R; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Rabitz, Herschel A

    2012-11-09

    We introduce a general and systematic theoretical framework for operational dynamic modeling (ODM) by combining a kinematic description of a model with the evolution of the dynamical average values. The kinematics includes the algebra of the observables and their defined averages. The evolution of the average values is drawn in the form of Ehrenfest-like theorems. We show that ODM is capable of encompassing wide-ranging dynamics from classical non-relativistic mechanics to quantum field theory. The generality of ODM should provide a basis for formulating novel theories.

  1. Two-flux transfer matrix model for predicting the reflectance and transmittance of duplex halftone prints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazauric, Serge; Hébert, Mathieu; Simonot, Lionel; Fournel, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a model allowing convenient calculation of the spectral reflectance and transmittance of duplex prints. It is based on flux transfer matrices and enables retrieving classical Kubelka-Munk formulas, as well as extended formulas for nonsymmetric layers. By making different assumptions on the flux transfers, we obtain two predictive models for the duplex halftone prints: the "duplex Clapper-Yule model," which is an extension of the classical Clapper-Yule model, and the "duplex primary reflectance-transmittance model." The two models can be calibrated from either reflectance or transmittance measurements; only the second model can be calibrated from both measurements, thus giving optimal accuracy for both reflectance and transmittance predictions. The conceptual differences between the two models are deeply analyzed, as well as their advantages and drawbacks in terms of calibration. According to the test carried out in this study with paper printed in inkjet, their predictive performances are good provided appropriate calibration options are selected.

  2. A Classical Realizability Model arising from a Stable Model of Untyped Lambda Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    Streicher, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We study a classical realizability model (in the sense of J.-L. Krivine) arising from a model of untyped lambda calculus in coherence spaces. We show that this model validates countable choice using bar recursion and bar induction.

  3. Theoretical model and quantification of reflectance photometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Huang; Youbao Zhang; Chengke Xie; Jianfeng Qu; Huijie Huang; Xiangzhao Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ The surface morphology of lateral flow (LF) strip is examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the diffuse reflection of porous strip with or without nanogold particles is investigated.Based on the scattering and absorption of nanogold particles, a reflectance photometer is developed for quantification of LF strip with nanogold particles as reporter.The integration of reflection optical density is to indicate the signals of test line and control line.As an example, serial dilutions of microalbunminuria (MAU) solution are used to calibrate the performance of the reflectance photometer.The dose response curve is fitted with a four-parameter logistic mathematical model for the determination of an unknown MAU concentration.The response curve spans a dynamic range of 5 to 200 μg/ml.The developed reflectance photometer can realize simple and quantitative detection of analyte on nanogold-labeled LF strip.

  4. Multiple View Stereo by Reflectance Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Sujung; Kim, Seong Dae; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg

    2012-01-01

    we argue that a visual metric based on a surface reflectance model should be founded on more observations than the degrees of freedom (dof) of the reflectance model. If (partly) specular surfaces are to be handled, this implies a model with at least two dof. In this paper, we propose to construct...... visual metrics of more than one dof using the DAISY methodology, which compares favorably to the state of the art in the experiments carried out. These experiments are based on a novel data set of eight scenes with diffuse and specular surfaces and accompanying ground truth. The performance of six...

  5. Improvements on Semi-Classical Distorted-Wave model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weili; Watanabe, Y.; Kuwata, R. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kohno, M.; Ogata, K.; Kawai, M.

    1998-03-01

    A method of improving the Semi-Classical Distorted Wave (SCDW) model in terms of the Wigner transform of the one-body density matrix is presented. Finite size effect of atomic nuclei can be taken into account by using the single particle wave functions for harmonic oscillator or Wood-Saxon potential, instead of those based on the local Fermi-gas model which were incorporated into previous SCDW model. We carried out a preliminary SCDW calculation of 160 MeV (p,p`x) reaction on {sup 90}Zr with the Wigner transform of harmonic oscillator wave functions. It is shown that the present calculation of angular distributions increase remarkably at backward angles than the previous ones and the agreement with the experimental data is improved. (author)

  6. Reflection of Classic Culture and Literature in Mohammad Reza Shafi\\'ee Kadkani’s Poem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yusef aziziyan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The literary legacy for a nation provides guarantee for its identity and personality literary tradition appears the basis of modernity in any realm especially literary modernity, for if otherwise, the literary modernity would be transitory and unsustainable. Modernity proves the presence of tradition in our contemporaneity. Though literary tradition looks forlorn in history during the deep and penetrating developments in the society, it, indeed, keeps on its presence in the contemporaneity whether directly or indirectly however it seems occasionally absent. Tradition, as an absent existence however omnipresent is what we require firmly although some may neglect it. The presence of literary legacy and tradition of the past in the poems of contemporary poets, especially those who inherit the legacy to greater extent, is not of an identical share. Undoubtedly the more a poet inherits the legacy, the more the legacy varies in his or her poems. However the poet is not always using the legacy consciously, for his gradual and vast familiarity with the literary legacy little by little becomes his mental treasures and thus acts as the constructive elements of his mental structure. It, through the poet's mental activities, moves to his consciousness on the basis of the process of association of ideas when the poet is actively unaware of its origin or even its relation to literary legacy and tradition. Among the contemporary poets, Shafi'ee Kadkani has benefitted from the legacy of classic literature to a great extent and it can be explicitly or implicitly understood in various forms in his poetical works whether in the context of thought and semantic or in thematisation, imagery and language combinations. The essay does not investigate exclusively the obvious part of the presence of tradition specifically in the form of classic thoughts and themes in his poems the part he himself occasionally denotes clearly. But it surveys the implicit

  7. Probing classically conformal $B-L$ model with gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jinno, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    We study the cosmological history of the classical conformal $B-L$ gauge extension of the standard model, in which the physical scales are generated via the Coleman-Weinberg-type symmetry breaking. Especially, we consider the thermal phase transition of the U$(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry in the early universe and resulting gravitational-wave production. Due to the classical conformal invariance, the phase transition tends to be a first-order one with ultra-supercooling, which enhances the strength of the produced gravitational waves. We show that, requiring (1) U$(1)_{B-L}$ is broken after the reheating, (2) the $B-L$ gauge coupling does not blow up below the Planck scale, (3) the thermal phase transition completes in almost all the patches in the universe, the gravitational wave spectrum can be as large as $\\Omega_{\\rm GW} \\sim 10^{-8}$ at the frequency $f \\sim 0.01$-$1$Hz for some model parameters, and a vast parameter region can be tested by future interferometer experiments such as eLISA, LISA, BBO and DECIGO.

  8. Majorana dark matter in a classically scale invariant model

    CERN Document Server

    Benic, Sanjin

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a classically scale invariant extension of the Standard Model with dark gauge $U(1)_X$ broken by doubly charge scalar $\\Phi$ leaving a remnant $Z_2$ symmetry. Dark fermions are introduced as dark matter candidates and for anomaly reasons we introduce two chiral fermions. Due to classical scale invariance, bare mass term that would mix these two states is absent and they end up as stable Majorana fermions $N_1$ and $N_2$. We calculate cross sections for $N_aN_a \\to \\phi\\phi$, $N_aN_a \\to X^\\mu \\phi$ and $N_2N_2 \\to N_1N_1$ annihilation channels. We put constraints to the model from the Higgs searches at the LHC, dark matter relic abundance and dark matter direct detection limits by LUX. The dark gauge boson plays a crucial role in the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism and has to be heavier then 680 GeV. The viable mass region for dark matter is from 470 GeV up to a few TeV. In the case when two Majorana fermions have different masses, two dark matter signals at direct detection experiments could provide a ...

  9. Multilayered models for electromagnetic reflection amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    The remote sensing of snowpack characteristics with surface installations or with an airborne system could have important applications in water resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayer snow models is analyzed. Normally incident plane waves are assumed at frequencies ranging from 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 10th power Hz, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice sheets. Layers are defined by a thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients, versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the reflection coefficient variations as a function of frequency.

  10. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  11. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  12. Large N classical dynamics of holographic matrix models

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, Curtis T; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Using a numerical simulation of the classical dynamics of the plane-wave and flat space matrix models of M-theory, we study the thermalization, equilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuations of these models as we vary the temperature and the size of the matrices, N. We present our numerical implementation in detail and several checks of its precision and consistency. We show evidence for thermalization by matching the time-averaged distributions of the matrix eigenvalues to the distributions of the appropriate Traceless Gaussian Unitary Ensemble of random matrices. We study the autocorrelations and power spectra for various fluctuating observables and observe evidence of the expected chaotic dynamics as well as a hydrodynamic type limit at large N, including near-equilibrium dissipation processes. These configurations are holographically dual to black holes in the dual string theory or M-theory and we discuss how our results could be related to the corresponding supergravity black hole solutions.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of classical spin models with chaotic billiards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2013-11-01

    It has recently been shown that the computing abilities of Boltzmann machines, or Ising spin-glass models, can be implemented by chaotic billiard dynamics without any use of random numbers. In this paper, we further numerically investigate the capabilities of the chaotic billiard dynamics as a deterministic alternative to random Monte Carlo methods by applying it to classical spin models in statistical physics. First, we verify that the billiard dynamics can yield samples that converge to the true distribution of the Ising model on a small lattice, and we show that it appears to have the same convergence rate as random Monte Carlo sampling. Second, we apply the billiard dynamics to finite-size scaling analysis of the critical behavior of the Ising model and show that the phase-transition point and the critical exponents are correctly obtained. Third, we extend the billiard dynamics to spins that take more than two states and show that it can be applied successfully to the Potts model. We also discuss the possibility of extensions to continuous-valued models such as the XY model.

  14. A Study of Classics-Reading Curriculum, Classics-Reading Promotion, and Classics-Reading Effect Modeling Exploration in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuen-An Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study are to test reliabilities and validities of classics-reading curriculum (CRC scale, classics-reading promotion (CRP scale, and classics-reading effect (CRE scale and to examine the relationships between CRC, CRP, and CRE in elementary schools through applying CORPS framework. The pilot sample and formal sample contain 141 and 500 participants from elementary school faculties and classics-reading volunteers in the north, central, south, and east regions of Taiwan. The findings indicate that Cronbach α coefficients of curriculum cognition (CC, curriculum teaching (CT, inside-school promotion (IP, outside-school promotion (EP, learning effect (LE, and class management effect (CME subscales are .88, .85, .93, .91, .91, .94, respectively, through exploratory factor analysis and they have good internal reliabilities and construct validities, respectively, through confirmatory factor analysis. Moreover, CC, CT, IP, and EP have positive influences on LE (standardized coefficients .34, .25, .14, and .22 and on CME (standardized coefficients .41, .14, .14, and .20, respectively. CC, CT, IP, and EP can explain 69% of LE and 61% of CME. The model is supported by the data. Lastly, this study proposes some suggestions regarding the classics-reading education for elementary schools.

  15. Modeling classic attenuation regulation of gene expression in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubetsky, Vassily A; Pirogov, Sergey A; Rubanov, Lev I; Seliverstov, Alexander V

    2007-02-01

    A model is proposed primarily for the classical RNA attenuation regulation of gene expression through premature transcription termination. The model is based on the concept of the RNA secondary structure macrostate within the regulatory region between the ribosome and RNA-polymerase, on hypothetical equation describing deceleration of RNA-polymerase by a macrostate and on views of transcription and translation initiation and elongation, under different values of the four basic model parameters which were varied. A special effort was made to select adequate model parameters. We first discuss kinetics of RNA folding and define the concept of the macrostate as a specific parentheses structure used to construct a conventional set of hairpins. The originally developed software that realizes the proposed model offers functionality to fully model RNA secondary folding kinetics. Its performance is compared to that of a public server described in Ref. 1. We then describe the delay in RNA-polymerase shifting to the next base or its premature termination caused by an RNA secondary structure or, herefrom, a macrostate. In this description, essential concepts are the basic and excited states of the polymerase first introduced in Ref. 2: the polymerase shifting to the next base can occur only in the basic state, and its detachment from DNA strand - only in excited state. As to the authors' knowledge, such a model incorporating the above-mentioned attenuation characteristics is not published elsewhere. The model was implemented in an application with command line interface for running in batch mode in Windows and Linux environments, as well as a public web server.(3) The model was tested with a conventional Monte Carlo procedure. In these simulations, the estimate of correlation between the premature transcription termination probability p and concentration c of charged amino acyl-tRNA was obtained as function p(c) for many regulatory regions in many bacterial genomes, as well as

  16. Neural network versus classical time series forecasting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Maria Elena; Safuan, Hamizah Mohd; Shab, Noorzehan Fazahiyah Md; Asrul, Mohd; Abdullah, Affendi; Mohamad, Nurul Asmaa Izzati; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2017-05-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) has advantage in time series forecasting as it has potential to solve complex forecasting problems. This is because ANN is data driven approach which able to be trained to map past values of a time series. In this study the forecast performance between neural network and classical time series forecasting method namely seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models was being compared by utilizing gold price data. Moreover, the effect of different data preprocessing on the forecast performance of neural network being examined. The forecast accuracy was evaluated using mean absolute deviation, root mean square error and mean absolute percentage error. It was found that ANN produced the most accurate forecast when Box-Cox transformation was used as data preprocessing.

  17. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  18. Test of the classic model for predicting endurance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James E; Howley, Edward T; Bassett, David R; Thompson, Dixie L; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2010-05-01

    To compare the classic physiological variables linked to endurance performance (VO2max, %VO2max at lactate threshold (LT), and running economy (RE)) with peak treadmill velocity (PTV) as predictors of performance in a 16-km time trial. Seventeen healthy, well-trained distance runners (10 males and 7 females) underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), RE, percentage of maximal oxygen uptake at the LT (%VO2max at LT), running velocity at LT, and PTV. Velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) was calculated from RE and VO2max. Three stepwise regression models were used to determine the best predictors (classic vs treadmill performance protocols) for the 16-km running time trial. Simple Pearson correlations of the variables with 16-km performance showed vVO2max to have the highest correlation (r = -0.972) and %VO2max at the LT the lowest (r = 0.136). The correlation coefficients for LT, VO2max, and PTV were very similar in magnitude (r = -0.903 to r = -0.892). When VO2max, %VO2max at LT, RE, and PTV were entered into SPSS stepwise analysis, VO2max explained 81.3% of the total variance, and RE accounted for an additional 10.7%. vVO2max was shown to be the best predictor of the 16-km performance, accounting for 94.4% of the total variance. The measured velocity at VO2max (PTV) was highly correlated with the estimated velocity at vVO2max (r = 0.8867). Among well-trained subjects heterogeneous in VO2max and running performance, vVO2max is the best predictor of running performance because it integrates both maximal aerobic power and the economy of running. The PTV is linked to the same physiological variables that determine vVO2max.

  19. Classical scale invariance in the inert doublet model

    CERN Document Server

    Plascencia, Alexis D

    2015-01-01

    The inert doublet model (IDM) is a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM) that can account for the dark matter in the universe. Naturalness arguments motivate us to study whether the model can be embedded into a theory with dynamically generated scales. In this work we study a classically scale invariant version of the IDM with a minimal hidden sector, which has a $U(1)_{\\text{CW}}$ gauge symmetry and a complex scalar $\\Phi$. The mass scale is generated in the hidden sector via the Coleman-Weinberg (CW) mechanism and communicated to the two Higgs doublets via portal couplings. Since the CW scalar remains light, acquires a vacuum expectation value and mixes with the SM Higgs boson, the phenomenology of this construction can be modified with respect to the traditional IDM. We analyze the impact of adding this CW scalar and the $Z'$ gauge boson on the calculation of the dark matter relic density and on the spin-independent nucleon cross section for direct detection experiments. Finally, by studying the RG ...

  20. Classical and Quantum Consistency of the DGP Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, A; Nicolis, Alberto; Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    We study the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model by the method of the boundary effective action. The truncation of this action to the bending mode \\pi consistently describes physics in a wide range of regimes both at the classical and at the quantum level. The Vainshtein effect, which restores agreement with precise tests of general relativity, follows straightforwardly. We give a simple and general proof of stability, i.e. absence of ghosts in the fluctuations, valid for most of the relevant cases, like for instance the spherical source in asymptotically flat space. However we confirm that around certain interesting self-accelerating cosmological solutions there is a ghost. We consider the issue of quantum corrections. Around flat space \\pi becomes strongly coupled below a macroscopic length of 1000 km, thus impairing the predictivity of the model. Indeed the tower of higher dimensional operators which is expected by a generic UV completion of the model limits predictivity at even larger length scales. We outline ...

  1. Near infrared biosensor based on Classical Electromagnetically Induced Reflectance (Cl-EIR) in a planar complementary metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafapour, Zohreh

    2017-03-01

    In the field of plasmonic metamaterials (MMs), the sub-wavelength metallic structures play a role similar to atoms in nature. Classical electromagnetically induced reflectance (Cl-EIR) is a classical phenomenon which is analogue to the EIR quantum phenomenon in atomic systems. A sensitive control of the Cl-EIR is crucial to a range of potential applications such as slowing light and biosensor. Here we report on our three-dimensional nanophotonic complementary planar metamaterial consisting of an array of three slot strips plasmonic that exhibits Cl-EIR phenomenon with magnetic and electric dipolar and quadruplar interaction between the plasmonic molecules. Simply by introducing symmetry broken of the proposed MM, the Cl-EIR can be dynamically tuned. We further demonstrate using a numerical simulation that the coupling between the plasmonic modes in one asymmetric case with changing the dielectric surrounding of the nano-structure to prove our design has a great potential for near-infrared localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing applications. The changing of the used metal in thin-film was also proposed to explain the coupling effects between the bright and dark modes of the Cl-EIR electromagnetic spectra on sensitivity of our proposed nano-structure in plasmonic sensing. This work paves a promising approach to achieve plasmonic sensing devices. Actually, the reflection of more than 97% is observed which is very high for the EIR effect. Furthermore, the figure of merit (FOM) of 17.3 and the group index of 413 are obtained. These mentioned characteristics make the proposed metamaterial with potential to apply for ultrafast switches, bio-sensors, and slow-light devices.

  2. An asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a permeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Goloshubin, G.

    2009-10-15

    Analysis of compression wave propagation in a poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection from a high-permeability layer in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of Biot's model of poroelasticity. A review of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and Darcy's law suggests an alternative new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The absolute value of this parameter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility and the wave frequency. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). Practical applications of the obtained asymptotic formulae are seismic modeling, inversion, and at-tribute analysis.

  3. Classical Wave Model of Quantum-Like Processing in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conjecture on quantum-like (QL) processing of information in the brain. It is not based on the physical quantum brain (e.g., Penrose) - quantum physical carriers of information. In our approach the brain created the QL representation (QLR) of information in Hilbert space. It uses quantum information rules in decision making. The existence of such QLR was (at least preliminary) confirmed by experimental data from cognitive psychology. The violation of the law of total probability in these experiments is an important sign of nonclassicality of data. In so called "constructive wave function approach" such data can be represented by complex amplitudes. We presented 1,2 the QL model of decision making. In this paper we speculate on a possible physical realization of QLR in the brain: a classical wave model producing QLR . It is based on variety of time scales in the brain. Each pair of scales (fine - the background fluctuations of electromagnetic field and rough - the cognitive image scale) induces the QL representation. The background field plays the crucial role in creation of "superstrong QL correlations" in the brain.

  4. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

  5. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  6. Preduction of transport properties of gases using classical nonspherical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlin, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The general formulation of the classical kinetic theory, which is needed to predict transport properties of gases in situations where the hydrodynamic equations are valid, is reviewed. A rigid convex model of tetrahedral symmetry is used to predict the Senftleben-Beenakker effect of a static magnetic field on the thermal conductivity and viscosity of pure CH/sub 4/, CD/sub 4/ and CF/sub 4/. The parameters of the model are optimized and are found to assume physically reasonable values. The calculations agree with experiment to a degree comparable to that of similar work on diatomic molecules. A generalized scattering cross section, ..gamma.., is defined which can be evaluated exactly for the limiting cases of a spherical soft potential and rigid ovaloids. For a general soft nonspherical interaction of the Kihara type, a suitable approximation for the momentum dependence is made with the following attributes: ..gamma.. reduces to the form for soft sphere and rigid ovaloid in the limits and the resulting matrix elements of the collision operator can be written in terms of the familiar ..cap omega..* integrals. This formulation is used to investigate thermal diffusion in binary isotopic mixtures of CO. Calculations are made in an 80/sup 0/K to 300/sup 0/K range which includes the inversion temperatures for all mixtures studied. Thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficients of CO are also calculated. The parameters of the model can be adjusted to account for the major features of the experimental data. The physical significance of the parameters is discussed. (auth)

  7. Non-classical method of modelling of vibrating mechatronic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białas, K.; Buchacz, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents non-classical method of modelling of mechatronic systems by using polar graphs. The use of such a method enables the analysis and synthesis of mechatronic systems irrespective of the type and number of the elements of such a system. The method id connected with algebra of structural numbers. The purpose of this paper is also introduces synthesis of mechatronic system which is the reverse task of dynamics. The result of synthesis is obtaining system meeting the defined requirements. This approach is understood as design of mechatronic systems. The synthesis may also be applied to modify the already existing systems in order to achieve a desired result. The system was consisted from mechanical and electrical elements. Electrical elements were used as subsystem reducing unwanted vibration of mechanical system. The majority of vibration occurring in devices and machines is harmful and has a disadvantageous effect on their condition. Harmful impact of vibration is caused by the occurrence of increased stresses and the loss of energy, which results in faster wear machinery. Vibration, particularly low-frequency vibration, also has a negative influence on the human organism. For this reason many scientists in various research centres conduct research aimed at the reduction or total elimination of vibration.

  8. Reliability assessment using degradation models: bayesian and classical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Afonso Freitas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reliability assessment of devices has been based on (accelerated life tests. However, for highly reliable products, little information about reliability is provided by life tests in which few or no failures are typically observed. Since most failures arise from a degradation mechanism at work for which there are characteristics that degrade over time, one alternative is monitor the device for a period of time and assess its reliability from the changes in performance (degradation observed during that period. The goal of this article is to illustrate how degradation data can be modeled and analyzed by using "classical" and Bayesian approaches. Four methods of data analysis based on classical inference are presented. Next we show how Bayesian methods can also be used to provide a natural approach to analyzing degradation data. The approaches are applied to a real data set regarding train wheels degradation.Tradicionalmente, o acesso à confiabilidade de dispositivos tem sido baseado em testes de vida (acelerados. Entretanto, para produtos altamente confiáveis, pouca informação a respeito de sua confiabilidade é fornecida por testes de vida no quais poucas ou nenhumas falhas são observadas. Uma vez que boa parte das falhas é induzida por mecanismos de degradação, uma alternativa é monitorar o dispositivo por um período de tempo e acessar sua confiabilidade através das mudanças em desempenho (degradação observadas durante aquele período. O objetivo deste artigo é ilustrar como dados de degradação podem ser modelados e analisados utilizando-se abordagens "clássicas" e Bayesiana. Quatro métodos de análise de dados baseados em inferência clássica são apresentados. A seguir, mostramos como os métodos Bayesianos podem também ser aplicados para proporcionar uma abordagem natural à análise de dados de degradação. As abordagens são aplicadas a um banco de dados real relacionado à degradação de rodas de trens.

  9. Classical-field model of the hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that all of the basic properties of the hydrogen atom can be consistently described in terms of classical electrodynamics if instead of considering the electron to be a particle, we consider an electrically charged classical wave field—an "electron wave"—which is held by the electrostatic field of the proton. It is shown that quantum mechanics must be considered not as a theory of particles but as a classical field theory in the spirit of classical electrodynamics. In this case, we are not faced with difficulties in interpreting the results of the theory. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, all of the well-known regularities of the spontaneous emission of the hydrogen atom are obtained, which is usually derived in the framework of quantum electrodynamics. It is shown that there are no discrete states and discrete energy levels of the atom: the energy of the atom and its states change continuously. An explanation of the conventional corpuscular-statistical interpretation of atomic phenomena is given. It is shown that this explanation is only a misinterpretation of continuous deterministic processes. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is obtained, which accounts for the inverse action of self-electromagnetic radiation of the electron wave and completely describes the spontaneous emissions of an atom.

  10. Wireless Fading Channel Models: From Classical to Stochastic Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Charalambous, Prof. Charalambos [University of Cyprus

    2010-01-01

    The wireless communications channel constitutes the basic physical link between the transmitter and the receiver antennas. Its modeling has been and continues to be a tantalizing issue, while being one of the most fundamental components based on which transmitters and receivers are designed and optimized. The ultimate performance limits of any communication system are determined by the channel it operates in. Realistic channel models are thus of utmost importance for system design and testing. In addition to exponential power path-loss, wireless channels suffer from stochastic short term fading (STF) due to multipath, and stochastic long term fading (LTF) due to shadowing depending on the geographical area. STF corresponds to severe signal envelope fluctuations, and occurs in densely built-up areas filled with lots of objects like buildings, vehicles, etc. On the other hand, LTF corresponds to less severe mean signal envelope fluctuations, and occurs in sparsely populated or suburban areas. In general, LTF and STF are considered as superimposed and may be treated separately. Ossanna was the pioneer to characterize the statistical properties of the signal received by a mobile user, in terms of interference of incident and reflected waves. His model was better suited for describing fading occurring mainly in suburban areas (LTF environments). It is described by the average power loss due to distance and power loss due to reflection of signals from surfaces, which when measured in dB's give rise to normal distributions, and this implies that the channel attenuation coefficient is log-normally distributed. Furthermore, in mobile communications, the LTF channel models are also characterized by their special correlation characteristics which have been reported. Clarke introduced the first comprehensive scattering model describing STF occurring mainly in urban areas. An easy way to simulate Clarke's model using a computer simulation is described. This model was

  11. Modeling classical swine fever outbreak-related outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar eYadav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF outbreak-related outcomes such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. The scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with a single-index premises at the onset of an outbreak and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N=6 and non-clustered (N=9 groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles epidemic duration (days was 224 (24, 343 in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251 and 210 (167, 302 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488 in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662 and 465 (295, 640 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distribution of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on management of swine operations and continuity of business so that potential losses could be

  12. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenshchik, A

    2013-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  13. Classical and Quantum Big Brake Cosmology for Scalar Field and Tachyonic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Alexander; Manti, Serena

    2015-01-01

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field. It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  14. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy) and L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin str. 2, 119334 Moscow (Russian Federation); Manti, S. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-02-21

    We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

  15. A Model for Integrating Computation in Undergraduate Physics: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computation. And yet, while computation is a crucial tool of practicing physicists, physics curricula do not generally reflect its importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration includes the construction of computational learning goals, the design of computational activities consistent with those goals, and the assessment of students' computational fluency. To assess students' computational fluency, we used open-ended computational projects in which students prepared reports describing a physical problem of their choosing. Many students chose projects from outside the domain of the course, and therefore, had to employ mathematical and computational techniques they had not yet been taught. After completing the project, most stud...

  16. Construction of classical and quantum integrable field models unravelling hidden possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anjan Kundu

    2015-11-01

    Reviewing briefly the concept of classical and quantum integrable systems, we propose an alternative Lax operator approach, leading to quasi-higher-dimensional integrable model, unravelling some hidden dimensions in integrable systems. As an example, we construct a novel integrable quasi-two-dimensional NLS equation at the classical and the quantum levels with intriguing application in rogue wave modelling.

  17. Combining sigma-lognormal modeling and classical features for analyzing graphomotor performances in kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Thérésa; Rémi, Céline; Plamondon, Réjean; Vaillant, Jean; O'Reilly, Christian

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the advantage of using the kinematic theory of rapid human movements as a complementary approach to those based on classical dynamical features to characterize and analyze kindergarten children's ability to engage in graphomotor activities as a preparation for handwriting learning. This study analyzes nine different movements taken from 48 children evenly distributed among three different school grades corresponding to pupils aged 3, 4, and 5 years. On the one hand, our results show that the ability to perform graphomotor activities depends on kindergarten grades. More importantly, this study shows which performance criteria, from sophisticated neuromotor modeling as well as more classical kinematic parameters, can differentiate children of different school grades. These criteria provide a valuable tool for studying children's graphomotor control learning strategies. On the other hand, from a practical point of view, it is observed that school grades do not clearly reflect pupils' graphomotor performances. This calls for a large-scale investigation, using a more efficient experimental design based on the various observations made throughout this study regarding the choice of the graphic shapes, the number of repetitions and the features to analyze. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspects of modelling classical or synchronous modelling with Solid Edge ST 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goanta Adrian Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current situation of the design activity is dependent on both the level of training of the human resources and the financial resources of companies required purchasing the design software packages and complex calculation equipment. Consequently, the situation is very diverse in the sense that there are design cases using only drawing software but also classical 3D or synchronous modelling situations, simple or integrated into software packages that meet the Product Lifecycle Management (PLM principles. The natural tendency in modelling and design is primarily to the high computing power integrated software or somewhat simplified versions that, however, allow at least FEA modelling, simulation and the related 2D documentation. The paper presents some aspects of modernity in synchronous modelling as compared to the classic one, made with 2016 version of Solid Edge software from SIEMENS. Basically there were studied and analysed aspects of modelling ease, speed of changes and also optimization of commands in the modelling process of the same piece in the two versions mentioned: classic and synchronous. It is also presented the alternative path from one method to another within the same process of piece modelling, depending on the advantages provided by each method. In other words, the work is based on a case study of modelling a piece under the two modelling versions of which some aspects were highlighted and conclusions were drawn.

  19. Classical and quantum cosmology of Born-Infeld type models

    CERN Document Server

    Kamenshchik, Alexander; Kwidzinski, Nick

    2016-01-01

    We discuss Born-Infeld type fields (tachyon fields) in classical and quantum cosmology. We first partly review and partly extend the discussion of the classical solutions and focus in particular on the occurrence of singularities. For quantization, we employ geometrodynamics. In the case of constant potential, we discuss both Wheeler-DeWitt quantization and reduced quantization. We are able to give various solutions and discuss their asymptotics. For the case of general potential, we transform the Wheeler-DeWitt equation to a form where it leads to a difference equation. Such a difference equation was previously found in the quantization of black holes. We give explicit results for the cases of constant potential and inverse square potential and point out special features possessed by solutions of the difference equation.

  20. Classical and quantum cosmology of Born-Infeld type models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Alexander; Kiefer, Claus; Kwidzinski, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We discuss Born-Infeld type fields (tachyon fields) in classical and quantum cosmology. We first partly review and partly extend the discussion of the classical solutions and focus in particular on the occurrence of singularities. For quantization, we employ geometrodynamics. In the case of constant potential, we discuss both Wheeler-DeWitt quantization and reduced quantization. We are able to give various solutions and discuss their asymptotics. For the case of general potential, we transform the Wheeler-DeWitt equation to a form where it leads to a difference equation. Such a difference equation was previously found in the quantization of black holes. We give explicit results for the cases of constant potential and inverse squared potential and point out special features possessed by solutions of the difference equation.

  1. The classical Stefan problem basic concepts, modelling and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, SC

    2003-01-01

    This volume emphasises studies related toclassical Stefan problems. The term "Stefan problem" isgenerally used for heat transfer problems with phase-changes suchas from the liquid to the solid. Stefan problems have somecharacteristics that are typical of them, but certain problemsarising in fields such as mathematical physics and engineeringalso exhibit characteristics similar to them. The term``classical" distinguishes the formulation of these problems fromtheir weak formulation, in which the solution need not possessclassical derivatives. Under suitable assumptions, a weak solutioncould be as good as a classical solution. In hyperbolic Stefanproblems, the characteristic features of Stefan problems arepresent but unlike in Stefan problems, discontinuous solutions areallowed because of the hyperbolic nature of the heat equation. Thenumerical solutions of inverse Stefan problems, and the analysis ofdirect Stefan problems are so integrated that it is difficult todiscuss one without referring to the other. So no...

  2. Comment on "Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W P; Baidakov, Vladimir G

    2016-08-01

    A critical analysis of several statements concerning experimental studies, molecular dynamics simulations, and the theoretical interpretation of bubble nucleation processes is performed. In particular, it is shown that the Tolman equation does not supply us, in general, with a satisfactory theoretically founded description of the curvature dependence of the surface tension and the dependence of the steady-state nucleation rate of bubbles and droplets on supersaturation in the framework of classical nucleation theory.

  3. Canopy reflectance modelling of semiarid vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janet

    1994-01-01

    Three different types of remote sensing algorithms for estimating vegetation amount and other land surface biophysical parameters were tested for semiarid environments. These included statistical linear models, the Li-Strahler geometric-optical canopy model, and linear spectral mixture analysis. The two study areas were the National Science Foundation's Jornada Long Term Ecological Research site near Las Cruces, NM, in the northern Chihuahuan desert, and the HAPEX-Sahel site near Niamey, Niger, in West Africa, comprising semiarid rangeland and subtropical crop land. The statistical approach (simple and multiple regression) resulted in high correlations between SPOT satellite spectral reflectance and shrub and grass cover, although these correlations varied with the spatial scale of aggregation of the measurements. The Li-Strahler model produced estimated of shrub size and density for both study sites with large standard errors. In the Jornada, the estimates were accurate enough to be useful for characterizing structural differences among three shrub strata. In Niger, the range of shrub cover and size in short-fallow shrublands is so low that the necessity of spatially distributed estimation of shrub size and density is questionable. Spectral mixture analysis of multiscale, multitemporal, multispectral radiometer data and imagery for Niger showed a positive relationship between fractions of spectral endmembers and surface parameters of interest including soil cover, vegetation cover, and leaf area index.

  4. Asymmetric 6-vertex model and classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider system of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Liashyk, A; Zabrodin, A; Zotov, A

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the correspondence between models solved by Bethe ansatz and classical integrable systems of Calogero type. We illustrate the correspondence by the simplest example of the inhomogeneous asymmetric 6-vertex model parametrized by trigonometric (hyperbolic) functions.

  5. Biomechanical investigation of the classic metaphyseal lesion using an immature porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Angela; Bertocci, Gina; Kaczor, Kim; Smalley, Craig; Pierce, Mary Clyde

    2015-05-01

    The classic metaphyseal lesion is highly associated with abuse in infants. Classic metaphyseal lesions, also referred to as corner or bucket-handle fractures, are fractures through the metaphyseal region of the long bones near the growth plate. Knowledge of the biomechanics and mechanisms necessary to produce a classic metaphyseal lesion may provide insight into the injury causation associated with this unique fracture type. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate loading conditions necessary to create a classic metaphyseal lesion using an immature porcine model. Twenty-four pelvic limb specimens from 7-day-old and 3-day-old piglets were tested in lateral bending (varus and valgus) using an electromechanical testing machine. All specimens were loaded dynamically in four-point bending at a rate of 100 inches/min. Microcomputed tomography was performed on specimens before and after testing. Pre- and posttest CT images were compared to assess whether fracture had occurred. Fractures resembling classic metaphyseal lesions were identified in 12 of the 24 specimens. Microcomputed tomography images revealed trabecular disruptions visually similar to classic metaphyseal lesions in children. Metaphyseal fractures, consistent with clinical classic metaphyseal lesions, resulted from a single loading event delivering varus or valgus bending to the stifle (knee). A classic metaphyseal lesion is a unique type of fracture with specific morphologic characteristics. Therefore, we suggest using the term "classic metaphyseal fracture" in lieu of classic metaphyseal lesion to improve precision of terminology.

  6. Classical Anthropic Everett model: indeterminacy in a preordained multiverse

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Although ultimately motivated by quantum theoretical considerations, Everett's many-world idea remains valid, as an approximation, in the classical limit. However to be applicable it must in any case be applied in conjunction with an appropriate anthropic principle, whose precise formulation involves an anthropic quotient that can be normalised to unity for adult humans but that would be lower for infants and other animals. The outcome is a deterministic multiverse in which the only function of chance is the specification of one's particular identity.

  7. Spin-flux phase in the Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, DF; Yunoki, S

    2000-01-01

    We provide numerical evidence that a spin-flux phase exists as a ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical local spins on a square lattice. This state manifests itself as a double-e magnetic order in the classical spins with spin density at both (0, pi) and (pi ,0) and further exhibits

  8. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of ``quantum physical brain'' reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a var...

  9. Reflections on our Model Validation editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredehoeft, John D.; Konikow, Leonard F.

    2012-01-01

    This reprinted editorial from 1993 helps to celebrate the legacy of ideas that have influenced generations of hydrogeologists. Drs. Bredehoeft and Konikow kindly provided the following reflections on their editorial.

  10. Reflectivity Model of Low Grazing Angle Radar Sea Clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Sheng; CHEN Jie; CAI Tao; TU Xu-yan

    2005-01-01

    The commonly used reflectivity models of radar sea clutter are summarized. Among these models, the adjusted Barton model and the adjusted Morchin model are compared. From the analysis result, the γ-p reflectivity model is presented for low grazing angle radar sea clutter by the adjustment of the original Barton reflectivity model. The model takes into account radar frequency, grazing angle, sea condition, and polarization property. The influences of these factors on the proposed model are analyzed. The model absorbs the merits from commonly used reflectivity models for sea clutter. It introduces several researchers' opinions, and extends them. And it accounts for the reflectivity at arbitrary radar frequency from VHF to X-band, arbitrary low grazing angle, arbitrary sea condition and different polarization property. One of the main results is the proposed γ-p reflectivity model can reflect the influence of polarization on sea clutter reflectivity to some extent. The proposed γ-p reflectivity model of low-angle radar-sea clutter is validated by comparing the simulated and statistically experimental data.

  11. Classical conformality in the Standard Model from Coleman’s theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2016-09-01

    The classical conformality (CC) is one of the possible candidates for explaining the gauge hierarchy of the Standard Model (SM). We show that it is naturally obtained from the Coleman’s theory on baby universe.

  12. Rodent Models of Non-classical Progesterone Action Regulating Ovulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda A. Mittelman-Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that steroid hormones act not only by binding to nuclear receptors that associate with specific response elements in the nucleus but also by binding to receptors on the cell membrane. In this newly discovered manner, steroid hormones can initiate intracellular signaling cascades which elicit rapid effects such as release of internal calcium stores and activation of kinases. We have learned much about the translocation and signaling of steroid hormone receptors from investigations into estrogen receptor α, which can be trafficked to, and signal from, the cell membrane. It is now clear that progesterone (P4 can also elicit effects that cannot be exclusively explained by transcriptional changes. Similar to E2 and its receptors, P4 can initiate signaling at the cell membrane, both through progesterone receptor and via a host of newly discovered membrane receptors (e.g., membrane progesterone receptors, progesterone receptor membrane components. This review discusses the parallels between neurotransmitter-like E2 action and the more recently investigated non-classical P4 signaling, in the context of reproductive behaviors in the rodent.

  13. Spherical Calogero model with oscillator/Coulomb potential: classical case

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Francisco; Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Nersessian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    We construct the Hamiltonians and symmetry generators of Calogero-oscillator and Calogero-Coulomb models on the N-dimensional sphere within the matrix-model reduction approach. Our method also produces the integrable Calogero-Coulomb-Stark model on the sphere and proves the integrability of the spin extensions of all these systems.

  14. Exploring Student Reflective Practice during a Mathematical Modelling Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Trevor; Sheehy, Joanne; Brown, Raymond; Kanasa, Harry

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to compare the reflective writings of two cohorts of students (Year 4/5 and Year 8/9) participating in mathematical modelling challenges. Whilst the reflections of the younger cohort were results oriented, the older cohort's reflections spoke more to the affective domain, group processes, the use of technology and the acquisition…

  15. What Can Be Learned from Classical Inventory Models? A Cross-Industry Exploratory Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey Rumyantsev; Serguei Netessine

    2007-01-01

    Classical inventory models offer a variety of insights into the optimal way to manage inventories of individual products. However, top managers and industry analysts are often concerned with the aggregate macroscopic view of a firm's inventory rather than with the inventories of individual products. Given that classical inventory models often do not account for many practical considerations that a company's management faces (e.g., competition, industry dynamics, business cycles, the financial...

  16. Tensor renormalization group approach to two-dimensional classical lattice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael; Nave, Cody P

    2007-09-21

    We describe a simple real space renormalization group technique for two-dimensional classical lattice models. The approach is similar in spirit to block spin methods, but at the same time it is fundamentally based on the theory of quantum entanglement. In this sense, the technique can be thought of as a classical analogue of the density matrix renormalization group method. We demonstrate the method - which we call the tensor renormalization group method - by computing the magnetization of the triangular lattice Ising model.

  17. Ray-Based Reflectance Model for Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Cuypers, Tom; Haber, Tom; Bekaert, Philippe; Raskar, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel method of simulating wave effects in graphics using ray--based renderers with a new function: the Wave BSDF (Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function). Reflections from neighboring surface patches represented by local BSDFs are mutually independent. However, in many surfaces with wavelength-scale microstructures, interference and diffraction requires a joint analysis of reflected wavefronts from neighboring patches. We demonstrate a simple method to compute the BSDF for the entire microstructure, which can be used independently for each patch. This allows us to use traditional ray--based rendering pipelines to synthesize wave effects of light and sound. We exploit the Wigner Distribution Function (WDF) to create transmissive, reflective, and emissive BSDFs for various diffraction phenomena in a physically accurate way. In contrast to previous methods for computing interference, we circumvent the need to explicitly keep track of the phase of the wave by using BSDFs that include positiv...

  18. A Statistical Approach to Modeling Indian Classical Music Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Soubhik; Roy, Sayan; Chauhan, Shivee; Tripathy, Sanjaya Shankar; Mahto, Kartik

    2008-01-01

    A raga is a melodic structure with fixed notes and a set of rules characterizing a certain mood endorsed through performance. By a vadi swar is meant that note which plays the most significant role in expressing the raga. A samvadi swar similarly is the second most significant note. However, the determination of their significance has an element of subjectivity and hence we are motivated to find some truths through an objective analysis. The paper proposes a probabilistic method of note detection and demonstrates how the relative frequency (relative number of occurrences of the pitch) of the more important notes stabilize far more quickly than that of others. In addition, a count for distinct transitory and similar looking non-transitory (fundamental) frequency movements (but possibly embedding distinct emotions!) between the notes is also taken depicting the varnalankars or musical ornaments decorating the notes and note sequences as rendered by the artist. They reflect certain structural properties of the r...

  19. Generalized continua as models for classical and advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This volume is devoted to an actual topic which is the focus world-wide of various research groups. It contains contributions describing the material behavior on different scales, new existence and uniqueness theorems, the formulation of constitutive equations for advanced materials. The main emphasis of the contributions is directed on the following items - Modelling and simulation of natural and artificial materials with significant microstructure, - Generalized continua as a result of multi-scale models, - Multi-field actions on materials resulting in generalized material models, - Theories including higher gradients, and - Comparison with discrete modelling approaches.

  20. Classical Logic and Quantum Logic with Multiple and Common Lattice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Pavičić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a proper propositional quantum logic and show that it has multiple disjoint lattice models, only one of which is an orthomodular lattice (algebra underlying Hilbert (quantum space. We give an equivalent proof for the classical logic which turns out to have disjoint distributive and nondistributive ortholattices. In particular, we prove that both classical logic and quantum logic are sound and complete with respect to each of these lattices. We also show that there is one common nonorthomodular lattice that is a model of both quantum and classical logic. In technical terms, that enables us to run the same classical logic on both a digital (standard, two-subset, 0-1-bit computer and a nondigital (say, a six-subset computer (with appropriate chips and circuits. With quantum logic, the same six-element common lattice can serve us as a benchmark for an efficient evaluation of equations of bigger lattice models or theorems of the logic.

  1. Special issue on computational models of classical conditioning guest editors' introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Eduardo; Schmajuk, Nestor

    2012-09-01

    In the present special issue, the performance of current computational models of classical conditioning was evaluated under three requirements: (1) Models were to be tested against a list of previously agreed-upon phenomena; (2) the parameters were fixed across simulations; and (3) the simulations used to test the models had to be made available. These requirements resulted in three major products: (a) a list of fundamental classical-conditioning results for which there is a consensus about their reliability; (b) the necessary information to evaluate each of the models on the basis of its ordinal successes in accounting for the experimental data; and (c) a repository of computational models ready to generate simulations. We believe that the contents of this issue represent the 2012 state of the art in computational modeling of classical conditioning and provide a way to find promising avenues for future model development.

  2. Formal Relationships Between Geometrical and Classical Models for Concurrency

    CERN Document Server

    Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of models for concurrent programs has been proposed during the past decades, each one focusing on various aspects of computations: trace equivalence, causality between events, conflicts and schedules due to resource accesses, etc. More recently, models with a geometrical flavor have been introduced, based on the notion of cubical set. These models are very rich and expressive since they can represent commutation between any bunch of events, thus generalizing the principle of true concurrency. While they seem to be very promising - because they make possible the use of techniques from algebraic topology in order to study concurrent computations - they have not yet been precisely related to the previous models, and the purpose of this paper is to fill this gap. In particular, we describe an adjunction between Petri nets and cubical sets which extends the previously known adjunction between Petri nets and asynchronous transition systems by Nielsen and Winskel.

  3. Modelling the spectral evolution of classical double radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Manolakou, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral evolution of powerful double radio galaxies (FR II's) is thought to be determined by the acceleration of electrons at the termination shock of the jet, their transport through the bright head region into the lobes and the production of the radio emission by synchrotron radiation in the lobes. Models presented to date incorporate some of these processes in prescribing the electron distribution which enters the lobes. We have extended these models to include a description of electron acceleration at the relativistic termination shock and a selection of transport models for the head region. These are coupled to the evolution of the electron spectrum in the lobes under the influence of losses due to adiabatic expansion, by inverse Compton scattering on the cosmic background radiation and by synchrotron radiation. The evolutionary tracks predicted by this model are compared to observation using the power/source-size (P-D) diagram. We find that the simplest scenario, in which accelerated particles suff...

  4. Fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-01

    We present a fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective plate. The theoretical model was derived, and simulation analysis of light intensity distribution, reflective plate width, and the distance between fiber probe and reflective plate were conducted in details. The three dimensional received light intensity distribution and the characteristic curve of light intensity were studied as functions of displacement of finite reflective plate. Experiments were carried out to verify the established model. The physical fundamentals and the effect of operating parameters on measuring system performance were revealed in the end.

  5. The smallest matrix black hole model in the classical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Berenstein, David

    2016-01-01

    We study the smallest non-trivial matrix model that can be considered to be a (toy) model of a black hole. The model consists of a pair of $2\\times 2$ traceless hermitian matrices with a commutator squared potential and an $SU(2)$ gauge symmetry, plus an $SO(2)$ rotation symmetry. We show that using the symmetries of the system, all but two of the variables can be separated. The two variables that remain display chaos and a transition from chaos to integrability when a parameter related to an $SO(2)$ angular momentum is tuned to a critical value. We compute the Lyapunov exponents near this transition and study the critical exponent of the Lyapunov exponents near the critical point. We compare this transition to extremal rotating black holes.

  6. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S.; Castelletto, S.; Aruldoss, C.; Scholten, R. E.; Roberts, A.

    2007-08-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  7. Nonlinear time reversal of classical waves: experiment and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Matthew; Taddese, Biniyam; Xiao, Bo; Antonsen, Thomas; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2013-12-01

    We consider time reversal of electromagnetic waves in a closed, wave-chaotic system containing a discrete, passive, harmonic-generating nonlinearity. An experimental system is constructed as a time-reversal mirror, in which excitations generated by the nonlinearity are gathered, time-reversed, transmitted, and directed exclusively to the location of the nonlinearity. Here we show that such nonlinear objects can be purely passive (as opposed to the active nonlinearities used in previous work), and we develop a higher data rate exclusive communication system based on nonlinear time reversal. A model of the experimental system is developed, using a star-graph network of transmission lines, with one of the lines terminated by a model diode. The model simulates time reversal of linear and nonlinear signals, demonstrates features seen in the experimental system, and supports our interpretation of the experimental results.

  8. Duals for classical inventory models via generalized geometric programming

    OpenAIRE

    Carlton H. Scott; Thomas R. Jefferson; Soheila Jorjani

    2004-01-01

    Inventory problems generally have a structure that can be exploited for computational purposes. Here, we look at the duals of two seemingly unrelated inventory models that suggest an interesting duality between discrete time optimal control and optimization over an ordered sequence of variables. Concepts from conjugate duality and generalized geometric programming are used to establish the duality.

  9. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

    2012-01-01

    A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

  10. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

    2012-01-01

    A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

  11. A model to predict the sound reflection from forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wunderli, J.M.; Salomons, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    A model is presented to predict the reflection of sound at forest edges. A single tree is modelled as a vertical cylinder. For the reflection at a cylinder an analytical solution is given based on the theory of scattering of spherical waves. The entire forest is represented by a line of cylinders

  12. A spectral directional reflectance model of row crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, F.J.; Gu, X.F.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, Q.; Yu, T.; Liu, Q.; Huang, H.A.; Qin, W.; Chen, Liangfu; Zhao, H.

    2010-01-01

    A computationally efficient reflectance model for row planted canopies is developed in this paper through separating the contributions of incident direct and diffuse radiation scattered by row canopies. The row model allows calculating the reflectance spectrum in any given direction for the optical

  13. A model to predict the sound reflection from forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wunderli, J.M.; Salomons, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    A model is presented to predict the reflection of sound at forest edges. A single tree is modelled as a vertical cylinder. For the reflection at a cylinder an analytical solution is given based on the theory of scattering of spherical waves. The entire forest is represented by a line of cylinders pl

  14. A spectral directional reflectance model of row crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, F.J.; Gu, X.F.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, Q.; Yu, T.; Liu, Q.; Huang, H.A.; Qin, W.; Chen, Liangfu; Zhao, H.

    2010-01-01

    A computationally efficient reflectance model for row planted canopies is developed in this paper through separating the contributions of incident direct and diffuse radiation scattered by row canopies. The row model allows calculating the reflectance spectrum in any given direction for the optical

  15. A Refinement of the Classical Order Point Model

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Moeeni; Stephen Replogle; Zariff Chaudhury; Ahmad Syamil

    2012-01-01

    Factors such as demand volume and replenishment lead time that influence production and inventory control systems are random variables. Existing inventory models incorporate the parameters (e.g., mean and standard deviation) of these statistical quantities to formulate inventory policies. In practice, only sample estimates of these parameters are available. The estimates are subject to sampling variation and hence are random variables. Whereas the effect of sampling variability on estimates o...

  16. Status of semi-classical distorted wave (SCDW) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y.; Higashi, H.; Kuwata, R.; Kawai, M. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kohno, M.

    1997-05-01

    The SCDW model to describe the preequilibrium MSD reaction was extended so as to include the 3-step process. The MSD calculations of {sup 58}Ni(p,p`x) at energies of 65, 120 and 200 MeV and {sup 90}Zr(p,p`x) at 160 MeV were carried out using the extended SCDW model and compared with the experimental data. The calculations with no free parameter showed overall good agreement with the experiment, although underprediction is seen at very small and backward angles. We found that the 2- and 3-step contributions were not so large enough to compensate the difference between the 1-step cross sections and the experimental ones at backward angles. The discrepancies seen at very small and large angles is possibly responsible for the local Fermi-gas model which does not work well in the nuclear surface region. The comparisons of the SCDW calculations with the AMD, QMD and FKK calculations led to an interesting result that the differences in the shape of 1-step angular distributions are remarkable among the models, but the multistep components are rather similar in the shape of angular distributions and the step-wise contribution is not so much different. The in-medium N-N cross sections were calculated in the nonrelativistic Brueckner framework with the Paris potential, and were parametrized as a function of the incident energy and the nuclear density. The SCDW calculation with the in-medium N-N cross sections was not so different from that with the free ones. (J.P.N.)

  17. Progress towards quantum simulating the classical O(2) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Hilbert space spanned by the eigenstates |n〉 of the “angular momentum” operator L = −i∂/∂θ with all positive and negative integer eigenvalues n. The...Ua = Ub = W are very large and positive , the on-site Hilbert space can then be restricted to the states satisfying nx = 2 at each site. All the other...gauge theory, to physical models potentially implementable on optical lattices and evolving at physical time. Using the tensor renormalization -group

  18. Semi-Classical Models for Virtual Antiparticle Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, David; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual particle-antiparticle pairs of massive elementary particle& are predicted in Quantum Field Theory (QFT) to appear from the vacuum and annihilate each other again within their Heisenberg lifetimes h/4mc(exp 2). In this work, semiclassical models of this process - for the cases of massive leptons, quarks, and the massive weak bosons W and Z - are constructed. It is shown that the dynamical lifetime of the particle- antiparticle system in each case equals the Heisenberg lifetime to good approximation, and obeys appropriate quantization conditions on the field fluctuation action. In other words, the dynamical lifetime of the semiclassical model agrees with QED and QCD to good approximation. But the formula for the dynamical lifetime in each model includes the force strength coupling constant (e in the lepton case, alpha(sup s) (q(exp 2)) in the quark cases), while the Heisenberg lifetime formula does not. Observing the agreement of the Heisenberg and dynamical lifetimes, we may derive the QED and QCD coupling constants in terms of h, c, and numerical factors only.

  19. An Analogue Model for Teaching Reflection and Refraction of Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Harry E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a concrete model for teaching the concepts of reflection and refraction without the use of formal mathematics. The model has been tested in five sections of a physics course for nonscience majors at Towson State University, Baltimore, Maryland. (HM)

  20. Reflection on Middle School Classical Chinese Teaching%关于中学文言文教学的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙梅

    2012-01-01

    文言文教学应该和现代文教学一样,必须始终不渝地走“言”“文”有机结合的教学途径,让学生在对话中学“文”,在领会中学“言”。本文对中学文言文教学进行了探讨。%Classical Chinese teaching should be similar to modem Chinese teaching and we must adopt teaching way combining "language" and "contents", so that students can learn "contents" in conversation and learn "language" in experience. This paper makes a discussion on middle school classical Chinese teaching,

  1. Classical integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  2. Consideration the lists of winners, as reflection of changes in the Ancient Olympic Games (in archaic and classic periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasianenko O.G.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The author has realized the historical analysis of one of the information sources about Ancient Olympic games, namely lists of winners. Had presented the description of geographical information, characterizing the sportsmen's place of origin, and also social origin of afore-named, allows to conduct parallels in consideration of the studied information with political and cultural changes in Greek civilization in archaic and classic periods which had a direct influence on the Olympic Games.

  3. Classical Cepheid pulsation models --- VI. The Hertzsprung progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, G.; Marconi, M.; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2000-08-01

    We present the results of an extensive theoretical investigation on the pulsation behavior of Bump Cepheids. We constructed several sequences of full amplitude, nonlinear, convective models by adopting a chemical composition typical of Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids (Y=0.25, Z=0.008) and stellar masses ranging from M/M⊙ =6.55 to 7.45. We find that theoretical light and velocity curves reproduce the HP, and indeed close to the blue edge the bump is located along the descending branch, toward longer periods it crosses at first the luminosity/velocity maximum and then it appears along the rising branch. In particular, we find that the predicted period at the HP center is PHP = 11.24∓0.46 d and that such a value is in very good agreement with the empirical value estimated by adopting the Fourier parameters of LMC Cepheid light curves i.e. PHP = 11.2 ∓ 0.8 d (Welch et al. 1997). Moreover, light and velocity amplitudes present a "double-peaked" distribution which is in good qualitative agreement with observational evidence on Bump Cepheids. It turns out that both the skewness and the acuteness typically show a well-defined minimum at the HP center and the periods range from PHP = 10.73 ∓ 0.97 d to PHP = 11.29 ∓ 0.53 d which are in good agreement with empirical estimates. We also find that the models at the HP center are located within the resonance region but not on the 2:1 resonance line (P2/P0 = 0.5), and indeed the P2/P0 ratios roughly range from 0.51 (cool models) to 0.52 (hot models). Interestingly enough, the predicted Bump Cepheid masses, based on a Mass-Luminosity (ML) relation which neglects the convective core overshooting, are in good agreement with the empirical masses of Galactic Cepheids estimated by adopting the Baade-Wesselink method (Gieren 1989). As a matter of fact, the observed mass at the HP center -P ≍ 11.2 d- is 6.9 ∓ 0.9 M⊙, while the predicted mass is 7.0 ∓ 0.45 M⊙. Even by accounting for the metallicity difference

  4. Development of a unified viscoplasticity constitutive model based on classical plasticity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Ping; LIU ChangChun; L(U) HeXiang

    2009-01-01

    The traditional unified viscoplasticity constitutive model can be only applied to metal materials. The study of the unified constitutive theory for metal materials has discovered the correlation between the classical plasticity theory and the unified viscoplasticity constitutive model, thus leading to the con-cepts of the classic plastic potential and yield surface in the unified constitutive model. Moreover, this research has given the continuous expression of the classical plastic multiplier and presented the corresponding constructive method, which extends its physical significance and lays down a good foundation for the application of the unified constitutive theory to the material analysis in more fields.This paper also introduces the unified constitutive model for metal materials and geo-materials. The numerical simulation indicates that the construction should be both reasonable and practical.

  5. Development of a unified viscoplasticity constitutive model based on classical plasticity theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The traditional unified viscoplasticity constitutive model can be only applied to metal materials.The study of the unified constitutive theory for metal materials has discovered the correlation between the classical plasticity theory and the unified viscoplasticity constitutive model,thus leading to the con-cepts of the classic plastic potential and yield surface in the unified constitutive model.Moreover,this research has given the continuous expression of the classical plastic multiplier and presented the corresponding constructive method,which extends its physical significance and lays down a good foundation for the application of the unified constitutive theory to the material analysis in more fields.This paper also introduces the unified constitutive model for metal materials and geo-materials.The numerical simulation indicates that the construction should be both reasonable and practical.

  6. Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    du Gay, Paul; Vikkelsø, Signe

    2012-01-01

    -readings of two classic, but partially forgotten contributions within organization theory – the work of Wilfred R. Bion on group assumptions and the work of Elliott Jaques on ‘requisite organisation’ – we suggest that contemporary discussion of organizational change could benefit considerably from regaining...

  7. BREN: Body Reflection Essence-Neuter Model for Separation of Reflection Components

    CERN Document Server

    Je, Changsoo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel reflection color model consisting of body essence and (mixed) neuter, and present an effective method for separating dichromatic reflection components using a single image. Body essence is an entity invariant to interface reflection, and has two degrees of freedom unlike hue and maximum chromaticity. As a result, the proposed method is insensitive to noise and proper for colors around CMY (cyan, magenta, and yellow) as well as RGB (red, green, and blue), contrary to the maximum chromaticity-based methods. Interface reflection is separated by using a Gaussian function, which removes a critical thresholding problem. Furthermore, the method does not require any region segmentation. Experimental results show the efficacy of the proposed model and method.

  8. Comparison of the Beckmann model with bidirectional reflectance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The Beckmann model is compared with recently reported bidirectional reflectance measurements. Comparisons revealed that monochromatic specular and bidirectional reflectance measurements are not adequately described by corresponding results evaluated from the model using mechanically acquired surface roughness parameters (rms height and rms slope). Significant improvement between measurements and predictions of the model is observed when optically acquired surface roughness parameters are used. Specular reflectance measurements for normal to intermediate polar angles of incidence are adequately represented by the model provided values of optical roughness multiplied by cosine of polar angle of incidence are less than 27 times average optical rms slope.

  9. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Michael M.; Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A.; Zhang, Xiyun; Havlin, Shlomo; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ˜ 106) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  10. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danziger, Michael M., E-mail: michael.danziger@biu.ac.il; Havlin, Shlomo [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya, 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya, 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Xiyun [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Boccaletti, Stefano [CNR-Institute of Complex Systems, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); The Italian Embassy in Israel, 25 Hamered Street, 68125 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10{sup 6}) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  11. Completeness of the classical 2D Ising model and universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Nest, M; Dür, W; Briegel, H J

    2008-03-21

    We prove that the 2D Ising model is complete in the sense that the partition function of any classical q-state spin model (on an arbitrary graph) can be expressed as a special instance of the partition function of a 2D Ising model with complex inhomogeneous couplings and external fields. In the case where the original model is an Ising or Potts-type model, we find that the corresponding 2D square lattice requires only polynomially more spins with respect to the original one, and we give a constructive method to map such models to the 2D Ising model. For more general models the overhead in system size may be exponential. The results are established by connecting classical spin models with measurement-based quantum computation and invoking the universality of the 2D cluster states.

  12. Modeling shales and marls reflections by autoregression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Umairia; Ching, Dennis Ling Chuan; Daud, Hanita; Januarisma, Vikri

    2016-11-01

    Seismic modeling is pervasive in exploring the subsurface structure. The propagation of elastic waves in homogenous medium has to be modeled to create synthetic seismograms. A numerical solution of partial differential equations describes the propagation phenomenon in elastic medium under the initial and boundary condition that is Clayton Engquist (CE). The subsurface discontinuities like fractures effect the seismic reflections that are used for subsurface imaging. A fractured velocity model with shales and marls sedimentary rocks is built and common depth point (CDP) seismograms with single shot are preprocessed by automatic gain control. The subsurface reflections are modeled by using the first-order autoregressive (AR(1)) model. A comparison of synthetic and real data AR model is made on the basis of average reflectivity, R2 and means square error (MSE). The real data has smaller average reflectivity, -1.80e-10, 93.966% explained variation i.e. R2 and 1.71e-07 minimum MSE.

  13. Extension of Some Classical Results on Ruin Probability to Delayed Renewal Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Su; Tao Jiang; Qi-he Tang

    2002-01-01

    Embrechts and Veraverbeke[2] investigated the renewal risk model and gave a tail equivalence relationship of the ruin probabilities ψ(x) under the assumption that the claim size is heavy-tailed, which is regarded as a classical result in the context of extremal value theory. In this note we extend this result to the delayed renewal risk model.

  14. A novel approach to modeling spacecraft spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, Alexander; Bédard, Donald

    2016-10-01

    Simulated spectrometric observations of unresolved resident space objects are required for the interpretation of quantities measured by optical telescopes. This allows for their characterization as part of regular space surveillance activity. A peer-reviewed spacecraft reflectance model is necessary to help improve the understanding of characterization measurements. With this objective in mind, a novel approach to model spacecraft spectral reflectance as an overall spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) is presented. A spacecraft's overall sBRDF is determined using its triangular-faceted computer-aided design (CAD) model and the empirical sBRDF of its homogeneous materials. The CAD model is used to determine the proportional contribution of each homogeneous material to the overall reflectance. Each empirical sBRDF is contained in look-up tables developed from measurements made over a range of illumination and reflection geometries using simple interpolation and extrapolation techniques. A demonstration of the spacecraft reflectance model is provided through simulation of an optical ground truth characterization using the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment-1 Engineering Model nanosatellite as the subject. Validation of the reflectance model is achieved through a qualitative comparison of simulated and measured quantities.

  15. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  16. a Bidirectional Reflectance Model for Non-Random Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welles, Jonathan Mark

    The general array model (GAR) is extended to calculate bidirectional reflectance (reflectance as a function of angle of view and angle of illumination) of a plant stand. The new model (BIGAR) defines the plant canopy as one or more foliage-containing ellipsoids arranged in any desired pattern. Foliage is assumed randomly distributed within each ellipsoid, with a specified distribution of inclination angles and random azimuthal orientation distribution. A method of specifying sub-ellipsoids that contain foliage of varying properties is discussed. Foliage is assumed to scatter radiation in a Lambertian fashion. The soil bidirectional reflectance is modelled separately as a boundary condition. The reflectance of any given grid point within the plant stand is calculated from the incident radiation (direct beam, diffuse sky, and diffuse scattered from the soil and foliage) and a view weighting factor that is based upon how much of the view is occupied by that particular grid point. Integrating this over a large number of grid locations provides a prediction of the bidirectional reflectance. Model predictions are compared with measurements in corn and soybean canopies at three stages of growth. The model does quite well in predicting the general shape and dynamics of the measured bidirectional reflectance factors, and rms errors are typically 10% to 15% (relative) of the integrated reflectance value. The effect of rows is evident in both the measurements and the model in the early part of the growing season. The presence of tassles in the corn may be the cause of unpredicted row effects later in the season. Predicted nadir reflectances are accurate for soybean, but are low for full cover corn. The presence of specular reflection causes the model to slightly underpredict reflectances looking toward the sun at large solar zenith angles.

  17. A Cartesian quasi-classical model to nonequilibrium quantum transport: the Anderson impurity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Levy, Tal J; Swenson, David W H; Rabani, Eran; Miller, William H

    2013-03-14

    We apply the recently proposed quasi-classical approach for a second quantized many-electron Hamiltonian in Cartesian coordinates [B. Li and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 154107 (2012)] to correlated nonequilibrium quantum transport. The approach provides accurate results for the resonant level model for a wide range of temperatures, bias, and gate voltages, correcting the flaws of our recently proposed mapping using action-angle variables. When electron-electron interactions are included, a Gaussian function scheme is required to map the two-electron integrals, leading to quantitative results for the Anderson impurity model. In particular, we show that the current mapping is capable of capturing quantitatively the Coulomb blockade effect and the temperature dependence of the current below and above the blockade.

  18. A model for incorporating computation without changing the course: An example from middle-division classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Pollock, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    Although much of the research done by modern physicists would be impossible without the use of computers, today's physics curricula do not generally reflect their importance and utility. To more tightly connect undergraduate preparation with professional practice, we integrated computational instruction into middle-division classical mechanics at the University of Colorado Boulder. Our model for integration works with the constraints of faculty who do not specialize in computation by placing a strong emphasis on an adaptable curriculum. It also includes the construction of learning goals and the design of activities consistent with those goals, including assessment of student computational fluency. We present critiques of our model as we work to develop an effective and sustainable model for computational instruction in the undergraduate curriculum.

  19. Bianchi I model in terms of non-standard LQC: Classical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dzierzak, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological singularities of the Bianchi I universe are analyzed in the setting of loop geometry underlying the loop quantum cosmology. We solve the Hamiltonian constraint of the theory and find the Lie algebra of elementary observables. Physical compound observables are defined in terms of elementary ones. Modification of classical theory by holonomy around a loop removes the singularities. However, our model has a free parameter that cannot be determined within our method. Testing the model by the data of observational cosmology may be possible after quantization of our modified classical theory.

  20. “Taksim” in Traditional Turkish Classical Music within the context of reflection of gender on instrumental performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mümtaz Hakan Sakar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Improvisation skill is the sign of “mastership” for any musician regardless of the type of music he/she is involved in. Taksim, at the beginning of “fasıl” phenomenon in Traditional Turkish Classical Music, is a type of improvisation which has specific rules and forms like as in Western Art Music and jazz. Therefore, “taksim”, as an instrumental practice of which its’ performer is called “creator”, “master” and thus “musician”, is seen as a male dominated practice. This study focuses on gender differences existing in the performance of taksim practice and aims to reveal how the practice is effected by gender culture. The data regarding the research are acquired through ethnographic observations and interviews and are conceptually analyzed. 

  1. Using the classical linear regression model in analysis of the dependences of conveyor belt life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Andrejiová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the classical linear regression model of the dependence of conveyor belt life on some selected parameters: thickness of paint layer, width and length of the belt, conveyor speed and quantity of transported material. The first part of the article is about regression model design, point and interval estimation of parameters, verification of statistical significance of the model, and about the parameters of the proposed regression model. The second part of the article deals with identification of influential and extreme values that can have an impact on estimation of regression model parameters. The third part focuses on assumptions of the classical regression model, i.e. on verification of independence assumptions, normality and homoscedasticity of residuals.

  2. Comparison of a Modified and Classic Fama-French Model for the Polish Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbański Stanisław

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a comparison of the results of return, risk, and risk price simulation by a modified and classic Fama-French model. The modified model defines the new ICAPM state variable as a function of the structure of a company’s past financial results. The model tests are run on the basis of stocks listed on the Warsaw Stock Exchange. In light of the classic model the risk price, on the tested market, turned out univariate due to HML, however, in light of the modified model, risk price turned out to be threedimensional due to the proposed factors, and market portfolio. The factors of the modified model, compared with the HML and SMB, are widely perceived by portfolio managers, and the simulation results indicate a greater possibility to use this pricing application by large institutional investors.

  3. Reflectance and transmittance model for recto-verso halftone prints

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, M.; R. D. Hersch

    2006-01-01

    We propose a spectral prediction model for predicting the reflectance and transmittance of recto-verso halftone prints. A recto-verso halftone print is modeled as a diffusing substrate surrounded by two inked interfaces in contact with air (or with another medium). The interaction of light with the print comprises three components: (a) the attenuation of the incident light penetrating the print across the inked interface, (b) the internal reflectance and internal transmittance that accounts f...

  4. A person-centered communication and reflection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Harder, Ingegerd; Kirkevold, Marit

    2008-01-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) is regarded as an ideal in chronic illness care but is difficult to implement in practice. Communication and reflection play an important role and need further investigation. Using grounded theory, we studied patient-provider interaction in a difficult and advanced area......: managing poorly controlled diabetes. A person-centered communication and reflection model was developed, identifying SDM in chronic care to be a question of professionals gaining insight into patients' decisions, rather than the opposite. The model reveals important choices in communication and reflection...

  5. A non-classical Mindlin plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-07-01

    A non-classical model for a Mindlin plate resting on an elastic foundation is developed in a general form using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter Winkler-Pasternak foundation model. It includes all five kinematic variables possible for a Mindlin plate. The equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions are obtained simultaneously through a variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle, and the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are treated in a unified manner. The newly developed model contains one material length-scale parameter to describe the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to account for the surface energy effect, and two foundation parameters to capture the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the new model includes the Mindlin plate models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases, recovers the Kirchhoff plate model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects, and degenerates to the Timoshenko beam model including the microstructure effect. To illustrate the new Mindlin plate model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulae derived.

  6. S-matrix Fluctuations in a model with Classical Diffusion and Quantum Localization

    CERN Document Server

    Borgonovi, F; Borgonovi, Fausto; Guarneri, Italo

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: The statistics of S-matrix fluctuations are numerically investigated on a model for irregular quantum scattering in which a classical chaotic diffusion takes place within the interaction region. Agreement with various random-matrix theoretic predictions is discussed in the various regimes (ballistic, diffusive, localized).

  7. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  8. Inhibition of classical complement activation attenuates liver ischaemia and reperfusion injury in a rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.H.M. Heijnen; I.H. Straatsburg; N.D. Padilla; G.J. Mierlo; C.E. Hack; T.M. van Gulik

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We evaluated inhibition of the classical pathway of complement using C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) in a model of 70% partial liver I/R injury in male Wistar rats (n = 35). C1-inh was administered at 10

  9. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CP^(N-1) model

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O E; Jones, D R T

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP^(N-1) model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied.

  10. Classical integrability of the O(N) nonlinear $\\sigma$ model on a half-line

    CERN Document Server

    Corrigan, E

    1996-01-01

    The classical integrability the O(N) nonlinear sigma model on a half-line is examined, and the existence of an infinity of conserved charges in involution is established for the free boundary condition. For the case N=3 other possible boundary conditions are considered briefly.

  11. Lack of predictability of classical animal models for hypolipidemic activity: A good time for mice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, B.R.; Princen, H.M.G.

    1998-01-01

    Hypolipidemic drugs that are efficacious in man are not always active in classical animal models of dyslipidemia. Inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase (statins) do not lower plasma cholesterol in rats, but yet this species was alone in providing activity for fibrate-type drugs. Nicotinic acid possesses m

  12. General classical solutions in the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O.; Jack, I.; Jones, D.R.T

    2002-10-31

    We give an explicit construction of general classical solutions for the noncommutative CP{sup N-1} model in two dimensions, showing that they correspond to integer values for the action and topological charge. We also give explicit solutions for the Dirac equation in the background of these general solutions and show that the index theorem is satisfied.

  13. THE POSITIVE SOLUTION OF CLASSICAL GELFAND MODEL WITH COEFFICIENT THAT CHANGE SIGN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚庆六

    2002-01-01

    The existence and iteration of positive solution for classical Gelfand models areconsidered, where the coefficient of nonlinear term is allowed to change sign in [ 0, 1 ]. Byusing the monotone iterative technique, an existence theorem of positive solution isobtained, corresponding iterative process and convergence rate are given. This iterativeprocess starts off with zero function, hence the process is simple, feasible and effective.

  14. A semiclassical model for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for classically forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong-Thanh; Herman, Michael F

    2009-02-01

    A semiclassical surface hopping model is presented for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for the case in which the avoided crossing point is in the classically forbidden regions. The exact potentials and coupling are replaced with simple functional forms that are fitted to the values, evaluated at the turning point in the classical motion, of the Born-Oppenheimer potentials, the nonadiabatic coupling, and their first few derivatives. For the one-dimensional model considered, reasonably accurate results for transition probabilities are obtained down to around 10(-10). The possible extension of this model to many dimensional problems is discussed. The fact that the model requires only information at the turning point, a point that the trajectories encounter would be a significant advantage in many dimensional problems over Landau-Zener type models, which require information at the avoided crossing seam, which is in the forbidden region where the trajectories do not go.

  15. Applications of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Applications of Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamical Systems is a reference on the new field of relativistic optics, examining topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles. Based on 30 years of research, this unique book connects the properties of quantum equations to corresponding classical equations used to calculate the energetic values and the symmetry properties of atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems. In addition, it examines applications for these methods, and for the calculation of

  16. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nilsson, Börje; Nordebo, Sven

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 [22] played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favour of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favour of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient g(2) (0), is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models g(2)(0) >= 1. In TSD the coefficient g(2)(0) decreases as 1/ɛ2d, where ɛd > 0 is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient g(2) (0) essentially less than 1. The TSD-prediction can be tested experimentally in new Grangier type experiments presenting a detailed monitoring of dependence of the coefficient g(2)(0) on the detection threshold. Structurally our model has some similarity with the prequantum model of Grossing et al. Subquantum stochasticity is composed of the two counterparts: a stationary process in the space of internal degrees of freedom and the random walk type motion describing the temporal dynamics.

  17. Comparison of Bayesian and Classical Analysis of Weibull Regression Model: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İmran KURT ÖMÜRLÜ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare performances of classical Weibull Regression Model (WRM and Bayesian-WRM under varying conditions using Monte Carlo simulations. Material and Methods: It was simulated the generated data by running for each of classical WRM and Bayesian-WRM under varying informative priors and sample sizes using our simulation algorithm. In simulation studies, n=50, 100 and 250 were for sample sizes, and informative prior values using a normal prior distribution with was selected for b1. For each situation, 1000 simulations were performed. Results: Bayesian-WRM with proper informative prior showed a good performance with too little bias. It was found out that bias of Bayesian-WRM increased while priors were becoming distant from reliability in all sample sizes. Furthermore, Bayesian-WRM obtained predictions with more little standard error than the classical WRM in both of small and big samples in the light of proper priors. Conclusion: In this simulation study, Bayesian-WRM showed better performance than classical method, when subjective data analysis performed by considering of expert opinions and historical knowledge about parameters. Consequently, Bayesian-WRM should be preferred in existence of reliable informative priors, in the contrast cases, classical WRM should be preferred.

  18. Modeling vibrational resonance in linear hydrocarbon chain with a mixed quantum-classical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-04-07

    The quantum dynamics of a vibrational excitation in a linear hydrocarbon model system is studied with a new mixed quantum-classical method. The method is suited to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum primary part coupled to a classical bath. The dynamics of the primary part is governed by the quantum corrected propagator, with the corrections defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth order propagators. The corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The ability of the method to describe dynamics of multidimensional systems has been tested. The results obtained by the method have been compared to previous quantum simulations performed with the quasiadiabatic path integral method.

  19. Classical, Semi-classical and Quantum Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Poor, H; Scully, Marlan

    2012-01-01

    David Middleton was a towering figure of 20th Century engineering and science and one of the founders of statistical communication theory. During the second World War, the young David Middleton, working with Van Fleck, devised the notion of the matched filter, which is the most basic method used for detecting signals in noise. Over the intervening six decades, the contributions of Middleton have become classics. This collection of essays by leading scientists, engineers and colleagues of David are in his honor and reflect the wide  influence that he has had on many fields. Also included is the introduction by Middleton to his forthcoming book, which gives a wonderful view of the field of communication, its history and his own views on the field that he developed over the past 60 years. Focusing on classical noise modeling and applications, Classical, Semi-Classical and Quantum Noise includes coverage of statistical communication theory, non-stationary noise, molecular footprints, noise suppression, Quantum e...

  20. Quantum Reading of a Classical Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    We consider a digital memory where each memory cell is a mirror with two possible reflectivities (used to encode a bit of information). Adopting this model, we show that a non-classical source of light, possessing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, can retrieve the stored information more efficiently than every classical source. The improvement brought by this quantum reading of the memory can be dramatic for high reflectivities and can be tested with current technology.

  1. Relativistic reflection: Review and recent developments in modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauser, T.; García, J.; Wilms, J.

    2016-05-01

    Measuring relativistic reflection is an important tool to study the innermost regions of the an accreting black hole system. In the following we present a brief review on the different aspects contributing to the relativistic reflection. The combined approach is for the first time incorporated in the new ``relxill'' model. The advantages of this more self-consistent approach are briefly summarized. A special focus is put on the new definition of the intrinsic reflection fraction in the lamp post geometry, which allows to draw conclusions about the primary source of radiation in these system. Additionally the influence of the high energy cutoff of the primary source on the reflection spectrum is motivated, revealing the remarkable capabilities of constraining E_cut by measuring relativistic reflection spectra from NuSTAR, preferably with lower energy coverage.

  2. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy ...

  3. Is the audiologic status of professional musicians a reflection of the noise exposure in classical orchestral music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, Edeltraut; Rudel, Lars; Richter, Frank

    2008-07-01

    The sound in classical orchestral music is louder than noise emissions allowed by national rules in industry. We wanted to assess the audiologic status of professional musicians at different ages of their careers and to look for a coherence of declined hearing ability and the sound emissions in order to substantiate advices for hearing protection and occupational medicine in musicians. Data from questionnaires (anamnestic data on sound exposure in profession and leisure times, use of hearing protection, self-evaluation of hearing function and hearing deficits), audiometric data and amplitudes of OAE were evaluated from 109 professional musicians aged 30-69 years from three major German orchestras and from 110 students of an academy of music (aged 11-19 years). Sound emissions of the whole orchestra and of single instruments/instrument groups were measured at the orchestra stages and pits during rehearsals and performances. None of the musicians was engaged in noisy hobbies and only a few used hearing protectors regularly. More than 50% of the musicians had a hearing loss of 15 dB(A) and more. Highest losses were found among the strings and the brass players. DPOAE amplitudes coincidently declined with the duration of performing music in the orchestras. Professional musicians aged older than 60 years had a significantly greater hearing loss at 4 and 6 kHz than those aged 30-39 years. Among the strings in one orchestra a dominant hearing deficit in the left ears was observed. Musicians need the same health care for their hearing as workers in noisy industry. A better education on the hearing hazards (use of hearing protectors) as well as sound protection in the rehearsal rooms is necessary. Hearing loss in professional musicians should be accepted as an occupational disease.

  4. Critical properties of the classical Heisenberg and XY models : A mean field renormalization group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sadeghi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available  Using both mean field renormalization group (MFRG and Surface-Bulk MFRG (SBMFRG, we study the critical behavior of the classical Heisenberg and XY models on a simple cubic lattice. Critical temperatures as well as critical exponents, characteristic the universality classes of these two models were calculated, analytically for1, 2, 3 and 4 spin clusters. The results are in good agreement with higher accurate methods such as Monte Carlo and High- temperature series.

  5. Coupled-channel cavity QED model and Semi-classical solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Ling-hua; KONG Ling-bo; LIU Min; ZHAN Ming-sheng

    2004-01-01

    A semi-classical scheme is presented to solve the coupled-channel cavity QED (CQED) model. Such model exhibits remarkable characteristics as shown by numerical calculations. A relation between the swing or angular velocity of the detuning and the motion of the atoms is discussed. With the augmentation of the optical field intensity or frequency, the atoms are trapped firstly and then they move stochastically and finally chaos sets in.

  6. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Nedorezov

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population). For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time). Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between i...

  7. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nordebo, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 \\cite{Grangier} played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favor of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favor of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0),$ is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models $g^{(2)}(0)\\geq 1.$ In TSD the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0)$ decreases as $1/{\\cal E}_d^2,$ where ${\\cal E}_d>0$ is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient $g^{(2)}...

  8. Quantum groups as generalized gauge symmetries in WZNW models. Part I. The classical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiivanov, L.; Furlan, P.

    2017-07-01

    Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten (WZNW) models over compact Lie groups G constitute the best studied class of (two dimensional, 2 D) rational conformal field theories (RCFTs). A WZNW chiral state space is a finite direct sum of integrable representations of the corresponding affine (current) algebra, and the correlation functions of primary fields are monodromy invariant combinations of left times right sector conformal blocks solving the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equation. However, even in this very well understood case of 2 D RCFT, the "internal" (gauge) symmetry that governs the ensuing fusion rules remains unclear. On the other hand, the canonical approach to the classical chiral WZNW theory developed by Faddeev, Alekseev, Shatashvili, Gawedzki and Falceto reveals its Poisson-Lie symmetry. After a covariant quantization, the latter gives rise to an associated quantum group symmetry which naturally requires an extension of the state space. This paper contains a review of earlier work on the subject with a special emphasis, in the case G = SU( n), on the emerging chiral "WZNW zero modes" which provide an adequate algebraic description of the internal symmetry structure of the model. Combining further left and right zero modes, one obtains a specific dynamical quantum group, the structure of its Fock representation resembling the axiomatic approach to gauge theories in which a "restricted" quantum group plays the role of a generalized gauge symmetry.

  9. A reflective model for organizational assessment and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Edward; Scoble, Kathleen B

    2003-12-01

    A visionary academic medical center in Colombia, South America, engaged the Institute for Nursing Healthcare Leadership in a multifaceted project for the overall goal of strengthening the model of professional practice. The authors describe a reflective model for organizational assessment that steered the in-depth assessment of the organization. The model combines the constructs of culture, theory, patterns, and phenomenon with an iterative process. The organizational reflection process is applied to assessing key nursing roles and the nursing care delivery system. Recommendations and interventions that emerged from the assessment are included.

  10. Personal Coaching: Reflection on a Model for Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kerryn

    2015-01-01

    The article "Personal Coaching: A Model for Effective Learning" (Griffiths, 2006) appeared in the "Journal of Learning Design" Volume 1, Issue 2 in 2006. Almost ten years on, Kerryn Griffiths reflects upon her original article. Specifically, Griffiths looks back at the combined coaching-learning model she suggested in her…

  11. Improving Intercultural Competence in the Classroom: A Reflective Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing Betty

    2016-01-01

    To meet the increased demand for international business education that prepares college students for studying, living, or working overseas, I propose a four-stage reflective development model to be used in the traditional classroom context to enhance intercultural competence for undergraduate students. I employ the model in a personal development…

  12. Improving Intercultural Competence in the Classroom: A Reflective Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing Betty

    2016-01-01

    To meet the increased demand for international business education that prepares college students for studying, living, or working overseas, I propose a four-stage reflective development model to be used in the traditional classroom context to enhance intercultural competence for undergraduate students. I employ the model in a personal development…

  13. Models Based Practices in Physical Education: A Sociocritical Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Dillon; Fitzpatrick, Katie; McGlashan, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on models-based practices in physical education using a sociocritical lens. Drawing links between neoliberal moves in education, and critical approaches to the body and physicality, we take a view that models are useful tools that are worth integrating into physical education, but we are apprehensive to suggest they…

  14. Reflection in variational models for linear water waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klopman, Gert; Dingemans, Maarten W.

    2010-01-01

    The reflection characteristics are analysed for a series of Hamiltonian water-wave models. These variational models have been derived by applying a Boussinesq-like approach to the vertical flow-structure. Both parabolic and hyperbolic-cosine approximations to the vertical structure are considered. M

  15. A behavioral stages model of classical (Pavlovian) conditioning: application to cognitive aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D A

    1999-01-01

    In the present article, it is argued that a five-stage sequential model of the behavioral and neurophysiological events that occur when organisms are exposed to signals predicting significant events suggests that classical conditioning produces multiple memory traces involving both excitatory and inhibitory processes. Further, these multiple brain structures and associated neurophysiological mechanisms are beginning to be understood; thus, using Pavlovian conditioning techniques to study aging and cognitive functions may provide insights into which brain structures or mechanisms are responsible for more general age-related declines in associative learning and memory. The evidence for this model is briefly reviewed and studies suggesting age-related effects on classical conditioning of various response systems are described within the context of the brain structures implicated by the model.

  16. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro A. De-Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast, which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  17. The unfolded protein response has a protective role in yeast models of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Souza, Evandro A; Pimentel, Felipe S A; Machado, Caio M; Martins, Larissa S; da-Silva, Wagner S; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Masuda, Claudio A

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the GALT gene (GAL7 in yeast), which encodes the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase. Here we show that the unfolded protein response pathway is triggered by galactose in two yeast models of galactosemia: lithium-treated cells and the gal7Δ mutant. The synthesis of galactose-1-phosphate is essential to trigger the unfolded protein response under these conditions because the deletion of the galactokinase-encoding gene GAL1 completely abolishes unfolded protein response activation and galactose toxicity. Impairment of the unfolded protein response in both yeast models makes cells even more sensitive to galactose, unmasking its cytotoxic effect. These results indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced under galactosemic conditions and underscores the importance of the unfolded protein response pathway to cellular adaptation in these models of classic galactosemia.

  18. Detecting gravitational decoherence with clocks: Limits on temporal resolution from a classical channel model of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Khosla, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The notion of time is given a different footing in Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity, treated as a parameter in the former and being an observer dependent property in the later. From a operational point of view time is simply the correlation between a system and a clock, where an idealized clock can be modelled as a two level systems. We investigate the dynamics of clocks interacting gravitationally by treating the gravitational interaction as a classical information channel. In particular, we focus on the decoherence rates and temporal resolution of arrays of $N$ clocks showing how the minimum dephasing rate scales with $N$, and the spatial configuration. Furthermore, we consider the gravitational redshift between a clock and massive particle and show that a classical channel model of gravity predicts a finite dephasing rate from the non-local interaction. In our model we obtain a fundamental limitation in time accuracy that is intrinsic to each clock.

  19. Electroweak symmetry breaking through bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Naoyuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2015-01-01

    We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The $U(1)_{B-L}$ symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. We analyze the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, and find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. The requirements for the perturbativity of the running c...

  20. [Application of classical isothermal adsorption models in heavy metal ions/ diatomite system and related problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Wu, Qing-Ding; Wang, Ping; Li, Ke-Lin; Lei, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2013-11-01

    In order to fully understand adsorption nature of Cu2+, Zn2+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite, and to find problems of classical isothermal adsorption models' application in liquid/solid system, a series of isothermal adsorption tests were conducted. As results indicate, the most suitable isotherm models for describing adsorption of Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Fe3+ onto natural diatomite are Tenkin, Tenkin, Langmuir, Tenkin, Freundlich and Freundlich, respectively, the adsorption of each ion onto natural diatomite is mainly a physical process, and the adsorption reaction is favorable. It also can be found that, when using classical isothermal adsorption models to fit the experimental data in liquid/solid system, the equilibrium adsorption amount q(e) is not a single function of ion equilibrium concentration c(e), while is a function of two variables, namely c(e) and the adsorbent concentration W0, q(e) only depends on c(e)/W(0). Results also show that the classical isothermal adsorption models have a significant adsorbent effect, and their parameter values are unstable, the simulation values of parameter differ greatly from the measured values, which is unhelpful for practical use. The tests prove that four-adsorption-components model can be used for describing adsorption behavior of single ion in nature diatomite-liquid system, its parameters k and q(m) have constant values, which is favorable for practical quantitative calculation in a given system.

  1. Leptogenesis and Neutrino Oscillations in the Classically Conformal Standard Model with the Higgs Portal

    CERN Document Server

    Khoze, Valentin V

    2013-01-01

    The Standard Model with an added Higgs portal interaction and no explicit mass terms is a classically scale-invariant theory. In this case the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking can be induced radiatively by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism operational in a hidden sector, and then transmitted to the Standard Model through the Higgs portal. The smallness of the generated values for the Higgs vev and mass, compared to the UV cutoff of our classically scale-invariant effective theory, is naturally explained by this mechanism. We show how these classically conformal models can generate the baryon asymmetry of the Universe without the need of introducing mass scales by hand or their resonant fine-tuning. The minimal model we consider is the Standard Model coupled to the Coleman-Weinberg scalar field charged under the $U(1)_{B-L}$ gauge group. Anomaly cancellation requires automatic inclusion of three generations of right-handed neutrinos. Their GeV-scale Majorana masses are induced by the Coleman-Weinberg field ...

  2. Experimental Evidence of the Superiority of the Prevalence Model of Conceptual Change over the Classical Models and Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Patrice; Sauriol, Érik; Riopel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study investigated the effects on 558 grades five and six students of three different teaching conditions: the "classical" model of conceptual change (for which cognitive conflict is considered as a precondition to the transformation of knowledge), the "prevalence" model of conceptual change (in which…

  3. Model for the Interpretation of Hyperspectral Remote-Sensing Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zhongping; Carder, Kendall L.; Hawes, Steve K.; Steward, Robert G.; Peacock, Thomas G.; Davis, Curtiss O.

    1994-01-01

    Remote-sensing reflectance is easier to interpret for the open ocean than for coastal regions because the optical signals are highly coupled to the phytoplankton (e.g., chlorophyll) concentrations. For estuarine or coastal waters, variable terrigenous colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), suspended sediments, and bottom reflectance, all factors that do not covary with the pigment concentration, confound data interpretation. In this research, remote-sensing reflectance models are suggested for coastal waters, to which contributions that are due to bottom reflectance, CDOM fluorescence, and water Raman scattering are included. Through the use of two parameters to model the combination of the backscattering coefficient and the Q factor, excellent agreement was achieved between the measured and modeled remote-sensing reflectance for waters from the West Florida Shelf to the Mississippi River plume. These waters cover a range of chlorophyll of 0.2-40 mg/cu m and gelbstoff absorption at 440 nm from 0.02-0.4/m. Data with a spectral resolution of 10 nm or better, which is consistent with that provided by the airborne visible and infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) and spacecraft spectrometers, were used in the model evaluation.

  4. Electromagnetic reflection from multi-layered snow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linlor, W. I.; Jiracek, G. R.

    1975-01-01

    The remote sensing of snow-pack characteristics with surface installations or an airborne system could have important applications in water-resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayered snow models is analyzed in this paper. Normally incident plane waves at frequencies ranging from 1 MHz to 10 GHz are assumed, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice layers. Layers are defined by thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the variations of reflection coefficient as a function of frequency.

  5. A Hamiltonian theory of adaptive resolution simulations of classical and quantum models of nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Karsten; Donadio, Davide; Kremer, Kurt; Potestio, Raffaello

    2015-03-01

    Quantum delocalization of atomic nuclei strongly affects the physical properties of low temperature systems, such as superfluid helium. However, also at room temperature nuclear quantum effects can play an important role for molecules composed by light atoms. An accurate modeling of these effects is possible making use of the Path Integral formulation of Quantum Mechanics. In simulations, this numerically expensive description can be restricted to a small region of space, while modeling the remaining atoms as classical particles. In this way the computational resources required can be significantly reduced. In the present talk we demonstrate the derivation of a Hamiltonian formulation for a bottom-up, theoretically solid coupling between a classical model and a Path Integral description of the same system. The coupling between the two models is established with the so-called Hamiltonian Adaptive Resolution Scheme, resulting in a fully adaptive setup in which molecules can freely diffuse across the classical and the Path Integral regions by smoothly switching their description on the fly. Finally, we show the validation of the approach by means of adaptive resolution simulations of low temperature parahydrogen. Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz, Germany.

  6. The Comparison of Educational Intervention Effect Using BASNEF and Classic Models on Improving Assertion Skill Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazavehei, Smm; Sharifirad, Ghr; Kargar, M

    2008-06-28

    To compare the effectiveness of BASNEF and Classic educational models to improve the assertion skill level of high school boy students. The 60 high school male students from Shiraz City, Fars Province Iran, were participated in this study. They were randomly divided in two groups (groups A and B). The group A attended in designed educational planning based on BASNEF model and group B attended in classic educational program. The both groups had participated in six session educational activity (2 hours each session) during the four weeks. The data collected using questionnaire before and after one-month intervention. The mean score of knowledge, attitude, enabling factors, social norms, and Rathus Assertion Test were not significant statistically between two groups before and after intervention. However, the mean scores of all mentioned variables in group A and only knowledge and assertion variables in group B changed significantly after intervention. In addition, the comparison of the mean scores and the means of scores difference of all variables changed significantly between two groups after intervention. Performing BASNEF educational model, in accordance with its main parts (knowledge, attitude, social norms, and enabling factors) is more effective than performing classic educational model to improve high school boy students' assertion.

  7. "Generalized" algebraic Bethe ansatz, Gaudin-type models and Zp-graded classical r-matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2016-12-01

    We consider quantum integrable systems associated with reductive Lie algebra gl (n) and Cartan-invariant non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices. We show that under certain restrictions on the form of classical r-matrices "nested" or "hierarchical" Bethe ansatz usually based on a chain of subalgebras gl (n) ⊃ gl (n - 1) ⊃ . . . ⊃ gl (1) is generalized onto the other chains or "hierarchies" of subalgebras. We show that among the r-matrices satisfying such the restrictions there are "twisted" or Zp-graded non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices. We consider in detail example of the generalized Gaudin models with and without external magnetic field associated with Zp-graded non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices and find the spectrum of the corresponding Gaudin-type hamiltonians using nested Bethe ansatz scheme and a chain of subalgebras gl (n) ⊃ gl (n -n1) ⊃ gl (n -n1 -n2) ⊃ gl (n - (n1 + . . . +np-1)), where n1 +n2 + . . . +np = n.

  8. Experimental challenges to theories of classical conditioning: application of an attentional model of storage and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmajuk, Nestor A; Larrauri, José A

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have recently challenged the accuracy of traditional models of classical conditioning that account for some experimental data in terms of a storage deficit. Among other results, it has been reported that extinction of the blocking or overshadowing stimulus results in the recovery of the response to the blocked or overshadowed stimulus, backward blocking shows spontaneous recovery, extinction of the training context results in the recovery from latent inhibition, interposing a delay between conditioning and testing in latent inhibition increases latent inhibition, and latent inhibition antagonizes overshadowing. An existing neural network model of classical conditioning (N. A. Schmajuk, Y. Lam, & J. A. Gray, 1996), which includes an attentional mechanism controlling both storage and retrieval of associations, is able to quantitatively describe these results.

  9. From classical genetics to quantitative genetics to systems biology: modeling epistasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Aylor

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression data has been used in lieu of phenotype in both classical and quantitative genetic settings. These two disciplines have separate approaches to measuring and interpreting epistasis, which is the interaction between alleles at different loci. We propose a framework for estimating and interpreting epistasis from a classical experiment that combines the strengths of each approach. A regression analysis step accommodates the quantitative nature of expression measurements by estimating the effect of gene deletions plus any interaction. Effects are selected by significance such that a reduced model describes each expression trait. We show how the resulting models correspond to specific hierarchical relationships between two regulator genes and a target gene. These relationships are the basic units of genetic pathways and genomic system diagrams. Our approach can be extended to analyze data from a variety of experiments, multiple loci, and multiple environments.

  10. Graviton propagator asymptotics and the classical limit of ELPR/FK spin foam models

    CERN Document Server

    Mikovic, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    We study the classical limit of ELPR/FK spin foam models by computing the large-distance asymptotics of the spin foam graviton propagator. This is done by analyzing the large-spin asymptotics of the boundary spin-network wavefunction which corresponds to a flat space. By using the stationary phase method we determine the wavefunction asymptotics, which then determines the large-distance asymptotics of the corresponding graviton propagator. We show that the graviton propagator behaves for large distances as the inverse distance to the fourth power, which implies that general relativity is not the classical limit of the ELPR/FK spin foam models. Our result is a direct consequence of the large-spin asymptotics of the ELPR/FK spin-foam vertex amplitude and we show that the vertex amplitude can be modified such that the new amplitude has the desired asymptotics.

  11. Effective model hierarchies for dynamic and static classical density functional theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majaniemi, S [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, PO Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Provatas, N [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S-4L7 (Canada); Nonomura, M, E-mail: maj@fyslab.hut.f [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The origin and methodology of deriving effective model hierarchies are presented with applications to solidification of crystalline solids. In particular, it is discussed how the form of the equations of motion and the effective parameters on larger scales can be obtained from the more microscopic models. It will be shown that tying together the dynamic structure of the projection operator formalism with static classical density functional theories can lead to incomplete (mass) transport properties even though the linearized hydrodynamics on large scales is correctly reproduced. To facilitate a more natural way of binding together the dynamics of the macrovariables and classical density functional theory, a dynamic generalization of density functional theory based on the nonequilibrium generating functional is suggested.

  12. Direct detection of singlet dark matter in classically scale-invariant standard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Endo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical scale invariance is one of the possible solutions to explain the origin of the electroweak scale. The simplest extension is the classically scale-invariant standard model augmented by a multiplet of gauge singlet real scalar. In the previous study it was shown that the properties of the Higgs potential deviate substantially, which can be observed in the International Linear Collider. On the other hand, since the multiplet does not acquire vacuum expectation value, the singlet components are stable and can be dark matter. In this letter we study the detectability of the real singlet scalar bosons in the experiment of the direct detection of dark matter. It is shown that a part of this model has already been excluded and the rest of the parameter space is within the reach of the future experiment.

  13. Comparison Analysis of Model Predictive Controller with Classical PID Controller For pH Control Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Balaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available pH control plays a important role in any chemical plant and process industries. For the past four decades the classical PID controller has been occupied by the industries. Due to the faster computing   technology in the industry demands a tighter advanced control strategy. To fulfill the needs and requirements Model Predictive Control (MPC is the best among all the advanced control algorithms available in the present scenario. The study and analysis has been done for First Order plus Delay Time (FOPDT model controlled by Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and MPC using the Matlab software. This paper explores the capability of the MPC strategy, analyze and compare the control effects with conventional control strategy in pH control. A comparison results between the PID and MPC is plotted using the software. The results clearly show that MPC provide better performance than the classical controller.

  14. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  15. Snapshot Observation for 2D Classical Lattice Models by Corner Transfer Matrix Renormalization Group

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, K.; Otani, R.; Nishio, Y; Gendiar, A.; Nishino, T

    2004-01-01

    We report a way of obtaining a spin configuration snapshot, which is one of the representative spin configurations in canonical ensemble, in a finite area of infinite size two-dimensional (2D) classical lattice models. The corner transfer matrix renormalization group (CTMRG), a variant of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), is used for the numerical calculation. The matrix product structure of the variational state in CTMRG makes it possible to stochastically fix spins each by ea...

  16. Classical XY model with conserved angular momentum is an archetypal non-Newtonian fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R M L; Hall, Craig A; Simha, R Aditi; Welsh, Tom S

    2015-04-03

    We find that the classical one-dimensional XY model, with angular-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics, mimics the non-Newtonian flow regimes characteristic of soft matter when subjected to counterrotating boundaries. An elaborate steady-state phase diagram has continuous and first-order transitions between states of uniform flow, shear-banding, solid-fluid coexistence and slip planes. Results of numerical studies and a concise mean-field constitutive relation offer a paradigm for diverse nonequilibrium complex fluids.

  17. Classical and quantum dynamics of a model for atomic-molecular Bose--Einstein condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Filho, Gilberto Nascimento; Tonel, Arlei Prestes; Foerster, Angela; Links, Jon(Centre for Mathematical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, 4072, Australia)

    2005-01-01

    We study a model for a two-mode atomic-molecular Bose--Einstein condensate. Starting with a classical analysis we determine the phase space fixed points of the system. It is found that bifurcations of the fixed points naturally separate the coupling parameter space into four regions. The different regions give rise to qualitatively different dynamics. We then show that this classification holds true for the quantum dynamics.

  18. Extending the kinetic solution of the classic Michaelis-Menten model of enzyme action

    OpenAIRE

    BISPO, Jose Ailton Conceicao; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; SOUZA, Volnei Brito de; SILVA, Joao Batista de Almeida e; CARVALHO, Giovani Brandao Mafra de

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of studies of enzyme-mediated reactions has been to provide comparative and quantitative information on enzyme-catalyzed reactions under distinct conditions. The classic Michaelis-Menten model (Biochem Zeit 49:333, 1913) for enzyme kinetic has been widely used to determine important parameters involved in enzyme catalysis, particularly the Michaelis-Menten constant (K (M) ) and the maximum velocity of reaction (V (max) ). Subsequently, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms ...

  19. Quantum-classical model of retinal photoisomerization reaction in visual pigment rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Shigaev, A S; Feldman, T B; Nadtochenko, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2016-11-01

    A quantum-classical model of photoisomerization of the visual pigment rhodopsin chromophore is proposed. At certain (and more realistic) parameter value combinations, the model is shown to accurately reproduce a number of independent experimental data on the photoreaction dynamics: the quantum yield, the time to reach the point of conical intersection of potential energy surfaces, the termination time of the evolution of quantum subsystem, as well as the characteristic low frequencies of retinal molecular lattice fluctuations during photoisomerization. In addition, the model behavior is in good accordance with experimental data about coherence and local character of quantum transition.

  20. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  1. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia P. Jumbo-Lucioni

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT. Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and, by

  2. Oxidative stress contributes to outcome severity in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia P; Hopson, Marquise L; Hang, Darwin; Liang, Yongliang; Jones, Dean P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2013-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a genetic disorder that results from profound loss of galactose-1P-uridylyltransferase (GALT). Affected infants experience a rapid escalation of potentially lethal acute symptoms following exposure to milk. Dietary restriction of galactose prevents or resolves the acute sequelae; however, many patients experience profound long-term complications. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms that underlie pathophysiology in classic galactosemia remain unclear. Recently, we developed a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia and demonstrated that, like patients, GALT-null Drosophila succumb in development if exposed to galactose but live if maintained on a galactose-restricted diet. Prior models of experimental galactosemia have implicated a possible association between galactose exposure and oxidative stress. Here we describe application of our fly genetic model of galactosemia to the question of whether oxidative stress contributes to the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null animals. Our first approach tested the impact of pro- and antioxidant food supplements on the survival of GALT-null and control larvae. We observed a clear pattern: the oxidants paraquat and DMSO each had a negative impact on the survival of mutant but not control animals exposed to galactose, and the antioxidants vitamin C and α-mangostin each had the opposite effect. Biochemical markers also confirmed that galactose and paraquat synergistically increased oxidative stress on all cohorts tested but, interestingly, the mutant animals showed a decreased response relative to controls. Finally, we tested the expression levels of two transcripts responsive to oxidative stress, GSTD6 and GSTE7, in mutant and control larvae exposed to galactose and found that both genes were induced, one by more than 40-fold. Combined, these results implicate oxidative stress and response as contributing factors in the acute galactose sensitivity of GALT-null Drosophila and

  3. Calibration and scaling of GRACE, GOCO03S and classical hydrosphere models for further model combination preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birylo, Monika; Kuczynska-Siehien, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    Equivalent water thickness (EWT) observation is a crucial part of a water cycle monitoring. A phenomenon which is going to be analyzed is an elementary natural issue. Monitoring and understanding of the water cycle phenomenon is an important part of economy, can provide a possibility of drought and flood prediction, atmosphere monitoring, river state, storage of drink water. Evaluating a method of a modern, effective and accurate water cycle monitoring will give an opportunity to prevent many disasters. Authors will test a new hydrosphere model that will be a combination of gradiometric and classical hydrosphere models. A sample area will be a territory of Poland, but an idea is to evaluate a method that can be used globally. Two satellite models will give a modern, almost in real-time presentation, while classical models will give details. The aim of the paper is to calibrate and scale to the same level all mentioned models as a basis for further model combination preparation.

  4. Modeling of the Propagation of Seismic Waves in Non-Classical Media: Reduced Cosserat Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grekova, E.; Kulesh, M.; Herman, G.; Shardakov, I.

    2006-12-01

    In rock mechanics, elastic wave propagation is usually modeled in terms of classical elasticity. There are situations, however, when rock behaviour is still elastic but cannot be described by the classical model. In particular, current effective medium theories, based on classical elasticity, do not properly describe strong dispersive or attenuative behaviour of wave propagation observed sometimes. The approach we have taken to address this problem is to introduce supplementary and independent degrees of freedom of material particles, in our case rotational ones. Various models of this kind are widely used in continuum mechanics: Cosserat theory, micropolar model of Eringen, Cosserat pseudocontinuum, reduced Cosserat continuum etc. We have considered the reduced Cosserat medium where the couple stress is zero, while the rotation vector is independent of the translational displacement. In this model, the stress depends on the rotation of a particle relatively to the background continuum of mass centers, but it does not depend on the relative rotation of two neighboring particles. This model seems to be adequate for the description of granular media, consolidated soils, and rocks with inhomogeneous microstructure. A real inhomogeneous medium is considered as effective homogeneous enriched continuum, where proper rotational dynamics of inhomogeneities are taken into account by means of rotation of a particle of the enriched continuum. We have obtained and analyzed theoretical solutions for this model describing the propagation of body waves and surface waves. We have shown both the dispersive character of these waves in elastic space and half space, and the existence of forbidden frequency zones. These results can be used for the preparation, execution, and interpretation of seismic experiments, which would allow one to determine whether (and in which situations) polar theories are important in rock mechanics, and to help with the identification of material parameters

  5. Reflections on Wittrock's Generative Model of Learning: A Motivation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I examine developments in research on achievement motivation and comment on how those developments are reflected in Wittrock's generative model of learning. Specifically, I focus on the roles of prior knowledge, the generation of knowledge, and beliefs about ability. Examples from Wittrock's theory and from current motivational…

  6. A Simple Cloud Reflectance Model for Ship Tracks in Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A Simple Cloud Reflectance Model 01 for Ship Tracks in Clouds I OTIOSt 9L1, FIF MAR 16 1992J R. A. Siquig Forecast Guidance and Naval Systems...because of increased absorption. Note that this is based on the results for four wavelengths. Because of the undulatory nature of the imaginary part of

  7. Blood components and OCT reflectivity evaluated in animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji; Shirasawa, Makoto; Yamashita, Takehiro; Uchino, Eisuke; Terasaki, Hiroto

    2014-12-01

    To see the relationship between blood components and optical coherence tomography (OCT) reflectivity using an animal model in which the aqueous humor was substituted by different experimental solutions without changing the integrity of the retina. The aqueous humor of an enucleated swine eye was replaced with plasma obtained from healthy volunteers. The OCT reflectivity of the anterior chamber filled with each plasma was calculated from individual OCT images, and was expressed by an arbitrary unit (AU). The concentration of blood components such as cholesterol, hemoglobin (Hb) and bilirubin of each individual was measured, and the correlation between each of them and the OCT reflectivity of aqueous humor in an enucleated swine eye was analyzed. Using the same model, the effects of the single plasma component on OCT reflectivity were examined. Blood samples were obtained from 24 individuals. OCT reflectivity was 30.68 ± 14.8 AU (average ± SD), ranging from 11.11 to 60.31 AU. OCT reflectivity correlated significantly with the concentration of triglycerides (R = 0.634, p = 0.001) and total cholesterol (R = 0.488, p = 0.015) using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. While a partial correlation analysis showed that it correlated significantly with triglyceride (R = 0.60, p = 0.003), but not total cholesterol. OCT reflectivity was highest in a balanced salt solution (BSS) with Hb (average 42.05 AU), followed by fibrinogen (8.08 AU), bilirubin (6.12 AU) and γ-globulin (2.85 AU). Albumin did not increase the reflectivity of the BSS with a normal concentration (1.11 AU) compared to the control BSS alone (0.73 AU). OCT reflectivity was most strongly affected by the presence of triglycerides among the blood components. Some molecules such as Hb and fibrinogen significantly increase the OCT reflectivity. This information should be helpful for interpreting the OCT findings correctly.

  8. Multiscale modeling of light absorption in tissues: limitations of classical homogenization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottin, Stephane; Panasenko, Grigory; Ganesh, S Sivaji

    2010-12-31

    In biophotonics, the light absorption in a tissue is usually modeled by the Helmholtz equation with two constant parameters, the scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient. This classic approximation of "haemoglobin diluted everywhere" (constant absorption coefficient) corresponds to the classical homogenization approach. The paper discusses the limitations of this approach. The scattering coefficient is supposed to be constant (equal to one) while the absorption coefficient is equal to zero everywhere except for a periodic set of thin parallel strips simulating the blood vessels, where it is a large parameter ω. The problem contains two other parameters which are small: ε, the ratio of the distance between the axes of vessels to the characteristic macroscopic size, and δ, the ratio of the thickness of thin vessels and the period. We construct asymptotic expansion in two cases: ε --> 0, ω --> ∞, δ --> 0, ωδ --> ∞, ε2ωδ --> 0 and ε --> 0, ω --> ∞, δ --> 0, ε2ωδ --> ∞, and and prove that in the first case the classical homogenization (averaging) of the differential equation is true while in the second case it is wrong. This result may be applied in the biomedical optics, for instance, in the modeling of the skin and cosmetics.

  9. Electroweak vacuum stability in classically conformal $B-L$ extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arindam; Papapietro, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)$_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly free U(1)$_{B-L}$ gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)$_{B-L}$ Higgs field. Because of the classically conformal symmetry, all dimensional parameters are forbidden. The $B-L$ gauge symmetry is radiatively broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass for the $U(1)_{B-L}$ gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$ boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a small negative coupling between the SM Higgs doublet and the $B-L$ Higgs field, the negative mass term for the SM Higgs doublet is generated and the electroweak symmetry is broken. In this model context, we investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. It is known that in the classically conformal U(1)$_{B-L}$ extension of the SM, the electroweak vacuum remains unstable in the renormalization group analysis at the one-loop level. In this pape...

  10. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  11. Normalizing a relativistic model of X-ray reflection. Definition of the reflection fraction and its implementation in relxill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauser, T.; García, J.; Walton, , D. J.; Eikmann, W.; Kallman, T.; McClintock, J.; Wilms, J.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The only relativistic reflection model that implements a parameter relating the intensity incident on an accretion disk to the observed intensity is relxill. The parameter used in earlier versions of this model, referred to as the reflection strength, is unsatisfactory; it has been superseded by a parameter that provides insight into the accretion geometry, namely the reflection fraction. The reflection fraction is defined as the ratio of the coronal intensity illuminating the disk to the coronal intensity that reaches the observer. Methods: The relxill model combines a general relativistic ray-tracing code and a photoionization code to compute the component of radiation reflected from an accretion that is illuminated by an external source. The reflection fraction is a particularly important parameter for relativistic models with well-defined geometry, such as the lamp post model, which is a focus of this paper. Results: Relativistic spectra are compared for three inclinations and for four values of the key parameter of the lamp post model, namely the height above the black hole of the illuminating, on-axis point source. In all cases, the strongest reflection is produced for low source heights and high spin. A low-spin black hole is shown to be incapable of producing enhanced relativistic reflection. Results for the relxill model are compared to those obtained with other models and a Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusions: Fitting data by using the relxill model and the recently implemented reflection fraction, the geometry of a system can be constrained. The reflection fraction is independent of system parameters such as inclination and black hole spin. The reflection-fraction parameter was implemented with the name refl_frac in all flavours of the relxill model, and the non-relativistic reflection model xillver, in v0.4a (18 January 2016).

  12. A Computer Model for Bistatic Sea Surface Microwave Reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    height of the rough surface in the z-direction. The rough sea surface is then modeled as a two-dimensional Gaussian random surface according to Beckmann ...Bistatic RCS In Beckmann and Spizzichino, [1] an equation was derived for the bistatic RCS based on an evaluation of the statistical properties of the...x y G x y S x y x y     (10) In Eq. (10),  ( , )G x y accounts for the wave-slope statistics (the classical Beckmann and Spizzichino

  13. Local and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests in classical measurement error models

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2010-09-14

    We consider functional measurement error models, i.e. models where covariates are measured with error and yet no distributional assumptions are made about the mismeasured variable. We propose and study a score-type local test and an orthogonal series-based, omnibus goodness-of-fit test in this context, where no likelihood function is available or calculated-i.e. all the tests are proposed in the semiparametric model framework. We demonstrate that our tests have optimality properties and computational advantages that are similar to those of the classical score tests in the parametric model framework. The test procedures are applicable to several semiparametric extensions of measurement error models, including when the measurement error distribution is estimated non-parametrically as well as for generalized partially linear models. The performance of the local score-type and omnibus goodness-of-fit tests is demonstrated through simulation studies and analysis of a nutrition data set.

  14. A study of quantum mechanical probabilities in the classical Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, N; Scholkmann, F; Salari, V

    2015-03-01

    The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is a powerful model to explain different aspects of spike generation in excitable cells. However, the HH model was proposed in 1952 when the real structure of the ion channel was unknown. It is now common knowledge that in many ion-channel proteins the flow of ions through the pore is governed by a gate, comprising a so-called "selectivity filter" inside the ion channel, which can be controlled by electrical interactions. The selectivity filter (SF) is believed to be responsible for the selection and fast conduction of particular ions across the membrane of an excitable cell. Other (generally larger) parts of the molecule such as the pore-domain gate control the access of ions to the channel protein. In fact, two types of gates are considered here for ion channels: the "external gate", which is the voltage sensitive gate, and the "internal gate" which is the selectivity filter gate (SFG). Some quantum effects are expected in the SFG due to its small dimensions, which may play an important role in the operation of an ion channel. Here, we examine parameters in a generalized model of HH to see whether any parameter affects the spike generation. Our results indicate that the previously suggested semi-quantum-classical equation proposed by Bernroider and Summhammer (BS) agrees strongly with the HH equation under different conditions and may even provide a better explanation in some cases. We conclude that the BS model can refine the classical HH model substantially.

  15. Theory of quantum and classical connections in modeling atomic, molecular and electrodynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Popa, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    Quantum and Classical Connections in Modeling Atomic, Molecular and Electrodynamic Systems is intended for scientists and graduate students interested in the foundations of quantum mechanics and applied scientists interested in accurate atomic and molecular models. This is a reference to those working in the new field of relativistic optics, in topics related to relativistic interactions between very intense laser beams and particles, and is based on 30 years of research. The novelty of this work consists of accurate connections between the properties of quantum equations and correspon

  16. On Optimality of the Barrier Strategy for the Classical Risk Model with Interest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Fang; Rong Wu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimal dividend problem for a classical risk model with a constant force of interest. For such a risk model, a sufficient condition under which a barrier strategy is the optimal strategy is presented for general claim distributions. When claim sizes are exponentially distributed, it is shown that the optimal dividend policy is a barrier strategy and the maximal dividend-value function is a concave function. Finally, some known results relating to the distribution of aggregate dividends before ruin are extended.

  17. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Nedorezov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population. For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time. Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between individuals is analyzed.

  18. Does the cognitive reflection test measure cognitive reflection? A mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campitelli, Guillermo; Gerrans, Paul

    2014-04-01

    We used a mathematical modeling approach, based on a sample of 2,019 participants, to better understand what the cognitive reflection test (CRT; Frederick In Journal of Economic Perspectives, 19, 25-42, 2005) measures. This test, which is typically completed in less than 10 min, contains three problems and aims to measure the ability or disposition to resist reporting the response that first comes to mind. However, since the test contains three mathematically based problems, it is possible that the test only measures mathematical abilities, and not cognitive reflection. We found that the models that included an inhibition parameter (i.e., the probability of inhibiting an intuitive response), as well as a mathematical parameter (i.e., the probability of using an adequate mathematical procedure), fitted the data better than a model that only included a mathematical parameter. We also found that the inhibition parameter in males is best explained by both rational thinking ability and the disposition toward actively open-minded thinking, whereas in females this parameter was better explained by rational thinking only. With these findings, this study contributes to the understanding of the processes involved in solving the CRT, and will be particularly useful for researchers who are considering using this test in their research.

  19. Migration velocity modeling based on common reflection surface gather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振春; 姚云霞; 马在田; 王华忠

    2003-01-01

    The common-reflection-surface (CRS) stacking is a new seismic imaging method, which only depends on seismic three parameters and near-surface velocity instead of macro-velocity model. According to optimized three parameters obtained by CRS stacking, we derived an analytical relationship between three parameters and migration velocity field, and put forward CRS gather migration velocity modeling method, which realize velocity estimation by optimizing three parameters in CRS gather. The test of a sag model proved that this method is more effective and adaptable for velocity modeling of a complex geological body, and the accuracy of velocity analysis depends on the precision of optimized three parameters.

  20. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  1. Reflections from European examples on the teaching of modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cabassut

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations of European parliament and Rocard‘s report invite to develop the teaching of modelling. The European Commission programmes like LEMA, PRIMAS and STEAM support the development of resources, training and research on the teaching of modelling. We will study European examples about the teaching of modelling, from secondary and tertiary education and from pre-service and in-service teachers training. They point the different levels of determination and the different didactic questions related to students and teachers practices and to mathematical and didactical organisations. The example of the European program LEMA illustrates a teacher training course on modelling and the difficulties to implement a teaching of modelling. We will present some recent results of research bringing challenges for the teaching of modelling. The idea of this talk is to take examples in Europa about the teaching of modelling in order to reflect on this teaching. In a first time we will browse the institutional context from global to local where the teaching of modelling takes place by giving examples from Europe. Then we develop one of these examples, the LEMA project, in order to reflect on teaching of modelling by illustrating with recent researches.

  2. Modelling molecule-surface interactions--an automated quantum-classical approach using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbers, Claudia R; Johnston, Karen; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2011-06-14

    We present an automated and efficient method to develop force fields for molecule-surface interactions. A genetic algorithm (GA) is used to parameterise a classical force field so that the classical adsorption energy landscape of a molecule on a surface matches the corresponding landscape from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The procedure performs a sophisticated search in the parameter phase space and converges very quickly. The method is capable of fitting a significant number of structures and corresponding adsorption energies. Water on a ZnO(0001) surface was chosen as a benchmark system but the method is implemented in a flexible way and can be applied to any system of interest. In the present case, pairwise Lennard Jones (LJ) and Coulomb potentials are used to describe the molecule-surface interactions. In the course of the fitting procedure, the LJ parameters are refined in order to reproduce the adsorption energy landscape. The classical model is capable of describing a wide range of energies, which is essential for a realistic description of a fluid-solid interface.

  3. Asteroid thermal modeling in the presence of reflected sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhrvold, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    This study addresses thermal modeling of asteroids with a new derivation of the Near Earth Asteroid Thermal (NEATM) model which correctly accounts for the presence of reflected sunlight in short wave IR bands. Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation applies to this case and has important implications. New insight is provided into the ???? parameter in the NEATM model and it is extended to thermal models besides NEATM. The role of surface material properties on ???? is examined using laboratory spectra of meteorites and other asteroid compositional proxies; the common assumption that emissivity ????=0.9 in asteroid thermal models may not be justified and can lead to misestimating physical parameters. In addition, indeterminacy in thermal modeling can limit its ability to uniquely determine temperature and other physical properties. A new curve-fitting approach allows thermal modeling to be done independently of visible-band observational parameters, such as the absolute magnitude ????.

  4. Bosonic seesaw mechanism in a classically conformal extension of the Standard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Haba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We suggest the so-called bosonic seesaw mechanism in the context of a classically conformal U(1B−L extension of the Standard Model with two Higgs doublet fields. The U(1B−L symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism, which also generates the mass terms for the two Higgs doublets through quartic Higgs couplings. Their masses are all positive but, nevertheless, the electroweak symmetry breaking is realized by the bosonic seesaw mechanism. Analyzing the renormalization group evolutions for all model couplings, we find that a large hierarchy among the quartic Higgs couplings, which is crucial for the bosonic seesaw mechanism to work, is dramatically reduced toward high energies. Therefore, the bosonic seesaw is naturally realized with only a mild hierarchy, if some fundamental theory, which provides the origin of the classically conformal invariance, completes our model at some high energy, for example, the Planck scale. We identify the regions of model parameters which satisfy the perturbativity of the running couplings and the electroweak vacuum stability as well as the naturalness of the electroweak scale.

  5. Parametric models of reflectance spectra for dyed fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Daniel C.; Ramsey, Scott; Mayo, Troy; Lambrakos, Samuel G.; Peak, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    This study examines parametric modeling of NIR reflectivity spectra for dyed fabrics, which provides for both their inverse and direct modeling. The dye considered for prototype analysis is triarylamine dye. The fabrics considered are camouflage textiles characterized by color variations. The results of this study provide validation of the constructed parametric models, within reasonable error tolerances for practical applications, including NIR spectral characteristics in camouflage textiles, for purposes of simulating NIR spectra corresponding to various dye concentrations in host fabrics, and potentially to mixtures of dyes.

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of a Novel Classical Spin Model with a Tricritical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Tyler; Scalettar, Richard; Singh, Rajiv

    Recent experimental findings along with motivation from the well known Blume-Capel model has led to the development of a novel two-dimensional classical spin model defined on a square lattice. This model consists of two Ising spin species per site with each species interacting with its own kind as perpendicular one dimensional Ising chains along with complex and frustrating interactions between species. Probing this model with Mean Field Theory, Metropolis Monte Carlo, and Wang Landau sampling has revealed a rich phase diagram which includes a tricritical point separating a first order magnetic phase transition from a continuous one, along with three ordered phases. Away from the tricritical point, the expected 2D Ising critical exponents have been recovered. Ongoing work focuses on finding the tricritical exponents and their connection to a supersymmetric critical point.

  7. Time-Dependent Toroidal Compactification Proposals and the Bianchi Type I Model: Classical and Quantum Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Toledo Sesma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Under this approach, we present an isotropization mechanism for the Bianchi I cosmological model through the analysis of the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the Universe which in general keeps constant or runs into zero for late times. We also find that the presence of extra dimensions in this model can accelerate the isotropization process depending on the momenta moduli values. Finally, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW equation in the context of standard quantum cosmology.

  8. Mathematical modeling improves EC50 estimations from classical dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Elin; Lindgren, Isa; Lövfors, William; Lundengård, Karin; Cervin, Ida; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Altimiras, Jordi; Cedersund, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    The β-adrenergic response is impaired in failing hearts. When studying β-adrenergic function in vitro, the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50 ) is an important measure of ligand response. We previously measured the in vitro contraction force response of chicken heart tissue to increasing concentrations of adrenaline, and observed a decreasing response at high concentrations. The classical interpretation of such data is to assume a maximal response before the decrease, and to fit a sigmoid curve to the remaining data to determine EC50 . Instead, we have applied a mathematical modeling approach to interpret the full dose-response curve in a new way. The developed model predicts a non-steady-state caused by a short resting time between increased concentrations of agonist, which affect the dose-response characterization. Therefore, an improved estimate of EC50 may be calculated using steady-state simulations of the model. The model-based estimation of EC50 is further refined using additional time-resolved data to decrease the uncertainty of the prediction. The resulting model-based EC50 (180-525 nm) is higher than the classically interpreted EC50 (46-191 nm). Mathematical modeling thus makes it possible to re-interpret previously obtained datasets, and to make accurate estimates of EC50 even when steady-state measurements are not experimentally feasible. The mathematical models described here have been submitted to the JWS Online Cellular Systems Modelling Database, and may be accessed at http://jjj.bio.vu.nl/database/nyman. © 2015 FEBS.

  9. Modelling and validation of multiple reflections for enhanced laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, J.; Sklar, E.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of multiple internal reflections within a laser weld joint as functions of joint geometry and processing conditions have been characterized. A computer-based ray tracing model is used to predict the reflective propagation of laser beam energy focused into the narrow gap of a metal joint for the purpose of predicting the location of melting and coalescence to form a weld. Quantitative comparisons are made between simulation cases. Experimental results are provided for qualitative model validation. This method is proposed as a way to enhance process efficiency and design laser welds which display deep penetration and high depth-to-width aspect ratios without high powered systems or keyhole mode melting.

  10. Laws of reflection and Snell's law revisited by video modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-07-01

    Video modelling is being used, nowadays, as a tool for teaching and learning several topics in Physics. Most of these topics are related to kinematics. In this work we show how video modelling can be used for demonstrations and experimental teaching in optics, namely the laws of reflection and the well-known Snell's Law of light. Videos were recorded with a photo camera at 30 frames/s, and analysed with the open source software Tracker. Data collected from several frames was treated with the Data Tool module, and graphs were built to obtain relations between incident, reflected and refraction angles, as well as to determine the refractive index of Perspex. These videos can be freely distributed in the web and explored with students within the classroom, or as a homework assignment to improve student's understanding on specific contents. They present a large didactic potential for teaching basic optics in high school with an interactive methodology.

  11. Random exchange interaction effects on the phase transitions in frustrated classical Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. C.; Song, X.; Feng, J. J.; Zeng, M.; Gao, X. S.; Qin, M. H., E-mail: qinmh@scnu.edu.cn [Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Jia, X. T. [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2015-07-07

    In this work, the effects of the random exchange interaction on the phase transitions and phase diagrams of classical frustrated Heisenberg model are investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in order to simulate the chemical doping effect in real materials. It is observed that the antiferromagnetic transitions shift toward low temperature with the increasing magnitude of the random exchange interaction, which can be qualitatively understood from the competitions among local spin states. This study is related to the magnetic properties in the doped iron-based superconductors.

  12. Finite-size scaling study of the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1993-01-01

    We use the single-cluster Monte Carlo update algorithm to simulate the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model in the critical region on simple cubic lattices of size $L^3$ with $L=12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40$, and $48$. By means of finite-size scaling analyses we compute high-precision estimates of the critical temperature and the critical exponents, using extensively histogram reweighting and optimization techniques. Measurements of the autocorrelation time show the expected reduction of critical slowing down at the phase transition. This allows simulations on significantly larger lattices than in previous studies and consequently a better control over systematic errors in finite-size scaling analyses.

  13. Matrix Models and Eigenvalue Statistics for Truncations of Classical Ensembles of Random Unitary Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killip, Rowan; Kozhan, Rostyslav

    2017-02-01

    We consider random non-normal matrices constructed by removing one row and column from samples from Dyson's circular ensembles or samples from the classical compact groups. We develop sparse matrix models whose spectral measures match these ensembles. This allows us to compute the joint law of the eigenvalues, which have a natural interpretation as resonances for open quantum systems or as electrostatic charges located in a dielectric medium. Our methods allow us to consider all values of {β > 0}, not merely {β=1,2,4}.

  14. Classical Lagrangians and Finsler structures for the nonminimal fermion sector of the Standard-Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, M

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to finding classical point-particle equivalents for the fermion sector of the nonminimal Standard-Model Extension (SME). For a series of nonminimal operators, such Lagrangians are derived at first order in Lorentz violation using the algebraic concept of Gr\\"obner bases. Subsequently, the Lagrangians serve as a basis for reanalyzing the results of certain kinematic tests of Special Relativity that were carried out in the last century. Thereby, a number of new constraints on coefficients of the nonminimal SME is obtained. In the last part of the paper we point out connections to Finsler geometry.

  15. Classical Lagrangians and Finsler structures for the nonminimal fermion sector of the standard model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, M.

    2016-05-01

    This article is devoted to finding classical point-particle equivalents for the fermion sector of the nonminimal standard model extension (SME). For a series of nonminimal operators, such Lagrangians are derived at first order in Lorentz violation using the algebraic concept of Gröbner bases. Subsequently, the Lagrangians serve as a basis for reanalyzing the results of certain kinematic tests of special relativity that were carried out in the past century. Thereby, a number of new constraints on coefficients of the nonminimal SME is obtained. In the last part of the paper we point out connections to Finsler geometry.

  16. Non-classical solutions of a continuum model for rock descriptions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikhail A.Guzev

    2014-01-01

    The strain-gradient and non-Euclidean continuum theories are employed for construction of non-classical solutions of continuum models. The linear approximation of both models’ results in identical structures in terms of their kinematic and stress characteristics. The solutions obtained in this study exhibit a critical behaviour with respect to the external loading parameter. The conclusions are obtained based on an investigation of the solution for the scalar curvature in the non-Euclidean continuum theory. The proposed analysis enables us to use different theoretical approaches for description of rock critical behaviour under different loading conditions.

  17. A low-frequency asymptotic model of seismic reflection from a high-permeability layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, Gennady

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of compression wave propagation through a high-permeability layer in a homogeneous poroelastic medium predicts a peak of reflection in the low-frequency end of the spectrum. An explicit formula expresses the resonant frequency through the elastic moduli of the solid skeleton, the permeability of the reservoir rock, the fluid viscosity and compressibility, and the reservoir thickness. This result is obtained through a low-frequency asymptotic analysis of the Biot's model of poroelasticity. A new physical interpretation of some coefficients of the classical poroelasticity is a result of the derivation of the main equations from the Hooke's law, momentum and mass balance equations, and the Darcy's law. The velocity of wave propagation, the attenuation factor, and the wave number, are expressed in the form of power series with respect to a small dimensionless parameter. The latter is equal to the product of the kinematic reservoir fluid mobility, an imaginary unit, and the frequency of the signal. Retaining only the leading terms of the series leads to explicit and relatively simple expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a planar wave crossing an interface between two permeable media, as well as wave reflection from a thin highly-permeable layer (a lens). The practical implications of the theory developed here are seismic modeling, inversion, and attribute analysis.

  18. Deformed integrable $\\sigma$-models, classical $R$-matrices and classical exchange algebra on Drinfel'd doubles

    CERN Document Server

    Vicedo, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    We describe a unifying framework for the systematic construction of integrable deformations of integrable $\\sigma$-models within the Hamiltonian formalism. It applies equally to both the `Yang-Baxter' type as well as `gauged WZW' type deformations which were considered recently in the literature. As a byproduct, these two families of integrable deformations are shown to be Poisson-Lie T-dual of one another.

  19. Classically conformal U(1)' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Arindam; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)' extension of the Standard Model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly free U(1)' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1)' gauge symmetry is broken through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1)' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1)' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1)' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark ($m_t=173.34$ GeV) and the Higgs boson ($m_h=125.09$ GeV), we perform parameter scans t...

  20. Parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation for cloud and climate models based on classical nucleation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvorostyanov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation is developed based on extended classical nucleation theory including new equations for the critical radii of the ice germs, free energies and nucleation rates as the functions of the temperature and water saturation ratio simultaneously. By representing these quantities as separable products of the analytical functions of the temperature and supersaturation, analytical solutions are found for the integral-differential supersaturation equation and concentration of nucleated crystals. Parcel model simulations are used to illustrate the general behavior of various nucleation properties under various conditions, for justifications of the further key analytical simplifications, and for verification of the resulting parameterization.

    The final parameterization is based upon the values of the supersaturation that determines the current or maximum concentrations of the nucleated ice crystals. The crystal concentration is analytically expressed as a function of time and can be used for parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation both in the models with small time steps and for substep parameterization in the models with large time steps. The crystal concentration is expressed analytically via the error functions or elementary functions and depends only on the fundamental atmospheric parameters and parameters of classical nucleation theory. The diffusion and kinetic limits of the new parameterization agree with previous semi-empirical parameterizations.

  1. A Color Topographic Map Based on the Dichromatic Reflectance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Zavidovique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Topographic maps are an interesting alternative to edge-based techniques common in computer vision applications. Indeed, unlike edges, level lines are closed and less sensitive to external parameters. They provide a compact geometrical representation of images and they are, to some extent, robust to contrast changes. The aim of this paper is to propose a novel and vectorial representation of color topographic maps. In contrast with existing color topographic maps, it does not require any color conversion. For this purpose, our technique refers to the dichromatic reflectance model, which explains the distribution of colors as the mixture of two reflectance components, related either to the body or to the specular reflection. Thus, instead of defining the topographic map along the sole luminance direction in the RGB space, we propose to design color lines along each dominant color vector, from the body reflection. Experimental results show that this approach provides a better tradeoff between the compactness and the quality of a topographic map.

  2. A Color Topographic Map Based on the Dichromatic Reflectance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouiffès Michèle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topographic maps are an interesting alternative to edge-based techniques common in computer vision applications. Indeed, unlike edges, level lines are closed and less sensitive to external parameters. They provide a compact geometrical representation of images and they are, to some extent, robust to contrast changes. The aim of this paper is to propose a novel and vectorial representation of color topographic maps. In contrast with existing color topographic maps, it does not require any color conversion. For this purpose, our technique refers to the dichromatic reflectance model, which explains the distribution of colors as the mixture of two reflectance components, related either to the body or to the specular reflection. Thus, instead of defining the topographic map along the sole luminance direction in the RGB space, we propose to design color lines along each dominant color vector, from the body reflection. Experimental results show that this approach provides a better tradeoff between the compactness and the quality of a topographic map.

  3. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: Classical and quantum solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Toledo Sesma, L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we give the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and compare with Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to the lowest-order WKB approximation.

  4. Classical and quantum analysis of a hetero-triatomic molecular Bose-Einstein condensate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonel, A.P. [CCET da Universidade Federal do Pampa/Unipampa, Bag´e, RS (Brazil); Kuhn, C.C.N.; Foerster, A. [Instituto de F´ısica da UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, G. [Departamento de Físi a - UFS, São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Roditi, I.; Santos, Z.V.T. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    We investigate an integrable Hamiltonian modelling a hetero-triatomic-molecular Bose-Einstein condensate. This model describes a mixture of two species of atoms in different proportions, which can combine to form a triatomic molecule. Beginning with a classical analysis, we determine the fixed points of the system. Bifurcations of these points separate the parameter space into different regions. Three distinct scenarios are found, varying with the atomic population imbalance. This result suggests the ground state properties of the quantum model exhibits a sensitivity on the atomic population imbalance, which is confirmed by a quantum analysis using different approaches, such as the ground-state expectation values, the behaviour of the quantum dynamics, the energy gap and the ground state fidelity. (author)

  5. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: classical and quantum solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Socorro, J

    2015-01-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we gives the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and is compared with the Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to lowest-order WKB approximation.

  6. Forward- and Reverse-Traveling Waves in DP Phenomenology: Does Inverted Direction of Wave Propagation Occur in Classical Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Renata; Shera, Christopher A.; Moleti, Arturo; Botti, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Recent basilar-membrane (BM) vibration experiments show that the phase slope of the distortion product (DP) in the cochlear region in which a backward-traveling wave is expected is negative, which is typical of a forward-traveling wave, according to the predictions of quasi-linear approximate solutions of classical 1-D transmission-line cochlear models. This phase behavior has been interpreted as suggesting a strong deviation from the "classical" models of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) generation and transmission. In this paper, the DP phase inversion phenomenon is approached from a conservative point of view. The DP phase is calculated in a classical cochlear model. The main conclusion is that deviations from the classical model are not necessary to account for the observed phase behavior.

  7. Experimental study of a multiplicative model of multiple ionospheric reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkotan, S. F.; Zhuravlev, S. V.; Kosovtsov, Iu. N.

    1983-04-01

    An important parameter of a partially scattered ionospheric signal is the signal-noise energy parameter beta. A new method for determining beta sub n (where n is the multiplicity of reflection) has been proposed on the basis of the statistical multiplicative model of Mirkotan et al. (1981, 1982). This paper describes an experimental verification of the proposed method; data on beta sub n obtained by the traditional method and by the new method are compared. In addition, the validity of the multiplicative model is evaluated, and features of the mechanism responsible for the multiple scattering of an ionospheric signal are examined.

  8. Automorphisms and Generalized Involution Models of Finite Complex Reflection Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Marberg, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We prove that a finite complex reflection group has a generalized involution model, as defined by Bump and Ginzburg, if and only if each of its irreducible factors is either $G(r,p,n)$ with $\\gcd(p,n)=1$; $G(r,p,2)$ with $r/p$ odd; or $G_{23}$, the Coxeter group of type $H_3$. We additionally provide explicit formulas for all automorphisms of $G(r,p,n)$, and construct new Gelfand models for the groups $G(r,p,n)$ with $\\gcd(p,n)=1$.

  9. [Citizen constitution and social representations: reflecting about health care models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sílvio Eder Dias; Ramos, Flávia Regina Souza; Martins, Cleusa Rios; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Vasconcelos, Esleane Vilela

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a reflection on the meaning of the terms citizenship and health, addressing the Theory of Social Representations as a strategy for implementing and evaluating health care models in Brazil. First, a brief history about the concept of citizenship is presented; then the article addresses the principles of freedom and equality according to Kant; the third section of the article shows that health is as a right of the citizen and a duty of the state. Finally, the Theory of Social Representations is emphasized as a strategy to evaluate and implement the health services provided to citizens by the current health care models in Brazil.

  10. Spin Dynamics simulations of the dynamic properties of classical models for magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Alex; Landau, D. P.

    1998-03-01

    The Spin Dynamics simulation technique, which has had considerable success for the study of critical properties of classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets(A. Bunker, K. Chen, and D. P. Landau Phys. Rev. B) \\underline54, 9259 (1996), has been used to determine more general properties for a wider range of materials. A general spin dynamics program has been developed which can determine the dynamic structure factor, S(q,ω), in the [100], [110], and [111] directions for a wide range of classical magnetic models at any temperature desired. We have simulated the magnetic dynamics in the ordered phase of the isotropic Heisenberg model with both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling on L×L×L BCC and SC lattices. Outside of the critical regime relatively small lattice sizes of L = 12, 24 could be used. From our simulation we have determined the stiffness coefficient and the spin relaxation rate which were compared to both experimental(J. Als-Nielsen in Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena), ed. C. Domb, M. S. Green, Academic Press, (1976) and theoretical results. We have performed the same simulation with anisotropy appropriate for MnF2 and FeF_2. Research supported in part by the NSF

  11. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-07

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach.

  12. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  13. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B−L symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B−L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman–Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B−L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman–Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ→eγ, the current bound on the Z′ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  14. Classical and quantum mechanics of the nonrelativistic Snyder model in curved space

    CERN Document Server

    Mignemi, S

    2011-01-01

    The Snyder-de Sitter (SdS) model is a generalization of the Snyder model to a spacetime background of constant curvature. It is an example of noncommutative spacetime admitting two fundamental scales beside the speed of light, and is invariant under the action of the de Sitter group. Here, we consider its nonrelativistic counterpart, i.e. the Snyder model restricted to a three-dimensional sphere, and the related model obtained by considering the anti-Snyder model on a pseudosphere, that we call anti-Snyder-de Sitter (aSdS). We discuss the classical and the quantum mechanics of a free particle and of an oscillator in this framework. In analogy with the flat case, the properties of the SdS and aSdS model are rather different. In the SdS case, a lower bound on the localization in position and momentum space exists, which does not arise in the aSdS model. In both cases the energy of the harmonic oscillator acquires a dependence on the frequency, but the quantum mechanical aSdS oscillator admits only a finite numb...

  15. From classical Lagrangians to Hamilton operators in the Standard-Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In this article we investigate whether a theory based on a classical Lagrangian for the minimal Standard-Model Extension (SME) can be quantized such that the result is equal to the corresponding low-energy Hamilton operator obtained from the field-theory description. This analysis is carried out for the whole collection of minimal Lagrangians found in the literature. The upshot is that first quantization can be performed consistently. The unexpected observation is made that at first order in Lorentz violation and at second order in the velocity the Lagrangians are related to the Hamilton functions by a simple transformation. Under mild assumptions, it is shown that this holds universally. This result is used successfully to obtain classical Lagrangians for two complicated sectors of the minimal SME that have not been considered in the literature so far. Therefore, it will not be an obstacle anymore to derive such Lagrangians even for involved sets of coefficients - at least to the level of approximation state...

  16. Propafenone enhances the anticonvulsant action of classical antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Monika; Piskorska, Barbara; Borowicz-Reutt, Kinga K

    2016-06-01

    Antiarrhythmic and antiepileptic drugs share some mechanisms of actions. Therefore, possibility of interactions between these in epileptic patients with cardiac arrhythmias is quite considerable. Herein, we attempted to assess interactions between propafenone and four conventional antiepileptic drugs: carbamazepine, valproate, phenytoin and phenobarbital. Effects of propafenone on seizures were determined in the electroconvulsive threshold test in mice. Interactions between propafenone and antiepileptic drugs were estimated in the model of maximal electroshock. Motor coordination was evaluated in the chimney test, while long-term memory in the passive-avoidance task. Brain concentrations of antiepileptics were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Propafenone up to 50mg/kg did not affect the electroconvulsive threshold, significantly enhancing this parameter at doses of 60-90mg/kg. Applied at its subthreshold doses, propafenone potentiated the antielectroshock action of all four tested classical antiepileptics: carbamazepine, valproate, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Propafenone alone and in combinations with antiepileptics impaired neither motor performance nor long-term memory in mice. Propafenone did not change brain concentration of phenytoin and phenobarbital; however, it significantly decreased brain levels of carbamazepine and increased those of valproate. Propafenone exhibits its own anticonvulsant effect and enhances the action of classical antiepileptic drugs against electrically induced convulsions in mice. Further investigations are required to determine the effect of propafenone on antiepileptic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  17. From classical Lagrangians to Hamilton operators in the standard model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreck, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we investigate whether a theory based on a classical Lagrangian for the minimal Standard Model Extension (SME) can be quantized such that the result is equal to the corresponding low-energy Hamilton operator obtained from the field-theory description. This analysis is carried out for the whole collection of minimal Lagrangians found in the literature. The upshot is that the first quantization can be performed consistently. The unexpected observation is made that at first order in Lorentz violation and at second order in the velocity, the Lagrangians are related to the Hamilton functions by a simple transformation. Under mild assumptions, it is shown that this holds universally. That result is used successfully to obtain classical Lagrangians for two complicated sectors of the minimal SME that have not been considered in the literature so far. Therefore, it will not be an obstacle anymore to derive such Lagrangians even for involved sets of coefficients—at least to the level of approximation stated above.

  18. Inhibition of classical complement activation attenuates liver ischaemia and reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnen, B H M; Straatsburg, I H; Padilla, N D; Van Mierlo, G J; Hack, C E; Van Gulik, T M

    2006-01-01

    Activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We evaluated inhibition of the classical pathway of complement using C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) in a model of 70% partial liver I/R injury in male Wistar rats (n = 35). C1-inh was administered at 100, 200 or 400 IU/kg bodyweight, 5 min before 60 min ischaemia (pre-I) or 5 min before 24 h reperfusion (end-I). One hundred IU/kg bodyweight significantly reduced the increase of plasma levels of activated C4 as compared to albumin-treated control rats and attenuated the increase of alanine aminotransferase (ALT). These effects were not better with higher doses of C1-inh. Administration of C1-inh pre-I resulted in lower ALT levels and higher bile secretion after 24 h of reperfusion than administration at end-I. Immunohistochemical assessment indicated that activated C3, the membrane attack complex C5b9 and C-reactive protein (CRP) colocalized in hepatocytes within midzonal areas, suggesting CRP is a mediator of I/R-induced, classical complement activation in rats. Pre-ischaemic administration of C1-inh is an effective pharmacological intervention to protect against liver I/R injury.

  19. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  20. Reflectance Modeling for Real Snow Structures Using a Beam Tracing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schneebeli

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand reflective properties of snow, for example for remote sensing applications and for modeling of energy balances in snow packs. We present a method with which we can compare reflectance measurements and calculations for the same snow sample structures. Therefore, we first tomograph snow samples to acquire snow structure images (6 x 2 mm. Second, we calculated the sample reflectance by modeling the radiative transfer, using a beam tracing model. This model calculates the biconical reflectance (BR derived from an arbitrary number of incident beams. The incident beams represent a diffuse light source. We applied our method to four different snow samples: Fresh snow, metamorphosed snow, depth hoar, and wet snow. The results show that (i the calculated and measured reflectances agree well and (ii the model produces different biconical reflectances for different snow types. The ratio of the structure to the wavelength is large. We estimated that the size parameter is larger than 50 in all cases we analyzed. Specific surface area of the snow samples explains most of the difference in radiance, but not the different biconical reflectance distributions. The presented method overcomes the limitations of common radiative transfer models which use idealized grain shapes such as spheres, plates, needles and hexagonal particles. With this method we could improve our understanding for changes in biconical reflectance distribution associated with changes in specific surface area.

  1. Wigner Measures Approach to the Classical Limit of the Nelson Model: Convergence of Dynamics and Ground State Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Zied; Falconi, Marco

    2014-10-01

    We consider the classical limit of the Nelson model, a system of stable nucleons interacting with a meson field. We prove convergence of the quantum dynamics towards the evolution of the coupled Klein-Gordon-Schrödinger equation. Also, we show that the ground state energy level of nucleons, when is large and the meson field approaches its classical value, is given by the infimum of the classical energy functional at a fixed density of particles. Our study relies on a recently elaborated approach for mean field theory and uses Wigner measures.

  2. Global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions for a generalized quasilinear parabolic equation with application to a glioblastoma growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zijuan; Fan, Meng; Asiri, Asim M; Alzahrani, Ebraheem O; El-Dessoky, Mohamed M; Kuang, Yang

    2017-04-01

    This paper studies the global existence and uniqueness of classical solutions for a generalized quasilinear parabolic equation with appropriate initial and mixed boundary conditions. Under some practicable regularity criteria on diffusion item and nonlinearity, we establish the local existence and uniqueness of classical solutions based on a contraction mapping. This local solution can be continued for all positive time by employing the methods of energy estimates, Lp-theory, and Schauder estimate of linear parabolic equations. A straightforward application of global existence result of classical solutions to a density-dependent diffusion model of in vitro glioblastoma growth is also presented.

  3. [Classical taxomomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liubarskiĭ, G Iu

    2006-01-01

    different systems of characters. The diversity of current "classic" approaches calls for a unification within the frame of a more general theory. The development of such a theory can be achieved through the formulaiton of a substantial theory of organization that would reflect the formal unity of a taxon, i.e., a theory of meron organization that woud hepl establish the relationship of taxonomic systems developed for different merons.

  4. How to interpret the results of medical time series data analysis: Classical statistical approaches versus dynamic Bayesian network modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, Agnieszka; Druzdzel, Marek J.; Austin, R. Marshall

    2016-01-01

    Background: Classical statistics is a well-established approach in the analysis of medical data. While the medical community seems to be familiar with the concept of a statistical analysis and its interpretation, the Bayesian approach, argued by many of its proponents to be superior to the classical frequentist approach, is still not well-recognized in the analysis of medical data. Aim: The goal of this study is to encourage data analysts to use the Bayesian approach, such as modeling with graphical probabilistic networks, as an insightful alternative to classical statistical analysis of medical data. Materials and Methods: This paper offers a comparison of two approaches to analysis of medical time series data: (1) classical statistical approach, such as the Kaplan–Meier estimator and the Cox proportional hazards regression model, and (2) dynamic Bayesian network modeling. Our comparison is based on time series cervical cancer screening data collected at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center over 10 years. Results: The main outcomes of our comparison are cervical cancer risk assessments produced by the three approaches. However, our analysis discusses also several aspects of the comparison, such as modeling assumptions, model building, dealing with incomplete data, individualized risk assessment, results interpretation, and model validation. Conclusion: Our study shows that the Bayesian approach is (1) much more flexible in terms of modeling effort, and (2) it offers an individualized risk assessment, which is more cumbersome for classical statistical approaches. PMID:28163973

  5. Reply to "Comment on `Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models'"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the Comment by Schmelzer and Baidakov [Phys. Rev. E 94, 026801 (2016)]., 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.026801 They suggest that a more modern approach than the classic description by Tolman is necessary to model the surface tension of curved interfaces. Therefore we now consider the higher-order Helfrich correction, rather than the simpler first-order Tolman correction. Using a recent parametrization of the Helfrich correction provided by Wilhelmsen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064706 (2015)], 10.1063/1.4907588, we test this description against measurements from our simulations, and find an agreement stronger than what the pure Tolman description offers. Our analyses suggest a necessary correction of order higher than the second for small bubbles with radius ≲1 nm. In addition, we respond to other minor criticism about our results.

  6. Redshift in a six-dimensional classical Kaluza-Klein type model

    CERN Document Server

    Syska, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional theories still remain attractive from the point of view of better understanding fundamental interactions. In this paper a six-dimensional Kaluza-Klein type model at the classical, Einstein's gravity formulation is considered. The static spherically symmetric solution of the six-dimensional Einstein equations coupled to the Klein-Gordon equation with the massless dilatonic field is presented. As it is horizon free, it is fundamentally different from the four-dimensional Schwarzschild solution. The motion of test particles in such a spherically symmetric configuration is then analyzed. The presence of the dilatonic field has a similar dynamical effect as the existence of additional massive matter. The emphasis is put on some observable quantities like redshifts. It has been suggested that strange features of emission lines from galactic nuclei as well as quasar-galaxy associations may in fact be manifestations of the multidimensionality of the world.

  7. Non-classical diffusion model for heat and mass transfer in laser drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiulan Huai; Guoxiang Wang; Renqiu Jiang; Bin Li

    2004-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the laser drying process by employing a generalized, Maxwell-Cattaneo equation to treat both heat and mass transfer was presented. Calculations were performed to illustrate the non-classical transport of heat and moisture. The effect of the heat flux density and the initial moisture content on water removal was also investigated. The results indicate that the nonequilibrium mass diffusion plays an important role during the very early stages of moisture removal, especially at the surface of the medium. Away from the surface, the non-Fickian model shows a delay in the reduction of the moisture content. The calculation resuits also show that the initial moisture content of the medium has a considerable effect on water removal.

  8. Phase diagram of the classical Heisenberg model in a trimodal random field distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Filho, A.; Albuquerque, D. F. de; Santos-Filho, J. B.; Batista, T. S. Araujo

    2016-11-01

    The classical spin 1 / 2 Heisenberg model on a simple cubic lattice, with fluctuating bond interactions between nearest neighbors and in the presence of a random magnetic field, is investigated by effective field theory based on two-spin cluster. The random field is drawn from the asymmetric and anisotropic trimodal probability distribution. The fluctuating bond is extracted from the symmetric and anisotropic bimodal probability. We estimate the transition temperatures, and the phase diagram in the Tc- h, Tc- p and Tc - α planes. We observe that the temperature of the tricritical point decreases with the increase of disorder in exchange interactions until the system ceases to display tricritical behavior. The disorder of the interactions and reentrant phenomena depends on the trimodal distribution of the random field.

  9. Reply to "Comment on 'Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models' ".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2016-08-01

    We reply to the Comment by Schmelzer and Baidakov [Phys. Rev. E 94, 026801 (2016)].10.1103/PhysRevE.94.026801 They suggest that a more modern approach than the classic description by Tolman is necessary to model the surface tension of curved interfaces. Therefore we now consider the higher-order Helfrich correction, rather than the simpler first-order Tolman correction. Using a recent parametrization of the Helfrich correction provided by Wilhelmsen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064706 (2015)]JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.4907588, we test this description against measurements from our simulations, and find an agreement stronger than what the pure Tolman description offers. Our analyses suggest a necessary correction of order higher than the second for small bubbles with radius ≲1 nm. In addition, we respond to other minor criticism about our results.

  10. Charge transport in high mobility molecular semiconductors: classical models and new theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alessandro

    2011-05-01

    The theories developed since the fifties to describe charge transport in molecular crystals proved to be inadequate for the most promising classes of high mobility molecular semiconductors identified in the recent years, including for example pentacene and rubrene. After reviewing at an elementary level the classical theories, which still provide the language for the understanding of charge transport in these systems, this tutorial review outlines the recent experimental and computational evidence that prompted the development of new theories of charge transport in molecular crystals. A critical discussion will illustrate how very rarely it is possible to assume a charge hopping mechanism for high mobility organic crystals at any temperature. Recent models based on the effect of non-local electron-phonon coupling, dynamic disorder, coexistence of localized and delocalized states are reviewed. Additionally, a few more recent avenues of theoretical investigation, including the study of defect states, are discussed.

  11. Construction of cytopathic PK-15 cell model of classical swine fever virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    No cytopathic effect (CPE) can be observed on classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infected cell culture in vitro. This brings an obstacle to the researches on reciprocity between CSFV and host cells. Based on the construction of full-length genomic infectious Cdna clone of Chinese CSFV standard virulent Shimen strain, partial deletion is intro- duced into genomic Cdna to obtain a 7.5 kb subgenomic Cdna. A new subgenomic CSFV is derived from transfection with the subgenomic Cdna on PK-15 cells pre-infected by CSFV Shimen virus. Typical CPE induced by this subgenomic virus is observed on PK-15 cells. Coexistence of wild- type and subgenomic virus in cytopathic cell culture is dem- onstrated by RT-PCR detection in cytopathic cells. For conclusion, the construction of cytopathic cell model exploited a new way for researches on the molecular mechanism of CSFV pathogenesis.

  12. Applications of Generalizability Theory and Their Relations to Classical Test Theory and Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2017-01-23

    Although widely recognized as a comprehensive framework for representing score reliability, generalizability theory (G-theory), despite its potential benefits, has been used sparingly in reporting of results for measures of individual differences. In this article, we highlight many valuable ways that G-theory can be used to quantify, evaluate, and improve psychometric properties of scores. Our illustrations encompass assessment of overall reliability, percentages of score variation accounted for by individual sources of measurement error, dependability of cut-scores for decision making, estimation of reliability and dependability for changes made to measurement procedures, disattenuation of validity coefficients for measurement error, and linkages of G-theory with classical test theory and structural equation modeling. We also identify computer packages for performing G-theory analyses, most of which can be obtained free of charge, and describe how they compare with regard to data input requirements, ease of use, complexity of designs supported, and output produced. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily L; DuBoff, Brian; Feany, Mel B; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P) accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  14. Mediators of a long-term movement abnormality in a Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Ryan

    2012-11-01

    Despite neonatal diagnosis and life-long dietary restriction of galactose, many patients with classic galactosemia grow to experience significant long-term complications. Among the more common are speech, cognitive, behavioral, ovarian and neurological/movement difficulties. Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of these long-term complications remains obscure, hindering prognosis and attempts at improved intervention. As a first step to overcome this roadblock we have begun to explore long-term outcomes in our previously reported GALT-null Drosophila melanogaster model of classic galactosemia. Here we describe the first of these studies. Using a countercurrent device, a simple climbing assay, and a startle response test to characterize and quantify an apparent movement abnormality, we explored the impact of cryptic GALT expression on phenotype, tested the role of sublethal galactose exposure and galactose-1-phosphate (gal-1P accumulation, tested the impact of age, and searched for potential anatomical defects in brain and muscle. We found that about 2.5% residual GALT activity was sufficient to reduce outcome severity. Surprisingly, sublethal galactose exposure and gal-1P accumulation during development showed no effect on the adult phenotype. Finally, despite the apparent neurological or neuromuscular nature of the complication we found no clear morphological differences between mutants and controls in brain or muscle, suggesting that the defect is subtle and/or is physiologic rather than structural. Combined, our results confirm that, like human patients, GALT-null Drosophila experience significant long-term complications that occur independently of galactose exposure, and serve as a proof of principle demonstrating utility of the GALT-null Drosophila model as a tool for exploring genetic and environmental modifiers of long-term outcome in GALT deficiency.

  15. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian

    2010-01-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum and signifies a break with the Copenhagen interpretation-for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shine some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum-classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classical...

  16. BIM-based Modeling and Data Enrichment of Classical Architectural Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Ivan Apollonio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available EnIn this paper we presented a BIM-based approach for the documentation of Architectural Heritage. Knowledge of classical architecture is first extracted from the treatises for parametric modeling in object level. Then we established a profile library based on semantic studies to sweep out different objects. Variants grow out from the parametric models by editing or regrouping parameters based on grammars. Multiple data including material, structure and real-life state are enriched with respect to different research motivations. The BIM models are expected to ease the modeling process and provide comprehensive data shared among different platforms for further simulations.ItIn questo articolo è presentata una procedura definita nell'ambito dei sistemi BIM con l'obiettivo di documentare il Patrimonio Architettonico. I dati conoscitivi relativi all'architettura classica sono, in una prima fase, ottenuti dai trattati al fine di modellare in maniera parametrica a livello di oggetti. Successivamente è stata definita una libreria di profili, basata su principi semantici, dalla quale è possibile ottenere oggetti differenti. Dati di natura differente, relativi ad esempio ai materiali, alle strutture, allo stato di fatto, sono implementati in funzione delle differenti esigenze. I modelli BIM hanno la potenzialità di facilitare le procedure di modellazione e di fornire informazioni e dati completi che possono essere condivisi tra piattaforme differenti per ulteriori simulazioni ed analisi.

  17. Wave scattering through classically chaotic cavities in the presence of absorption: A maximum-entropy model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pier A Mello; Eugene Kogan

    2002-02-01

    We present a maximum-entropy model for the transport of waves through a classically chaotic cavity in the presence of absorption. The entropy of the -matrix statistical distribution is maximized, with the constraint $\\langle {\\rm Tr}SS^{\\dagger}\\rangle = n: n$ is the dimensionality of , and 0 ≤ ≤ 1. For = 1 the -matrix distribution concentrates on the unitarity sphere and we have no absorption; for = 0 the distribution becomes a delta function at the origin and we have complete absorption. For strong absorption our result agrees with a number of analytical calculations already given in the literature. In that limit, the distribution of the individual (angular) transmission and reflection coefficients becomes exponential – Rayleigh statistics – even for = 1. For ≫ 1 Rayleigh statistics is attained even with no absorption; here we extend the study to < 1. The model is compared with random-matrix-theory numerical simulations: it describes the problem very well for strong absorption, but fails for moderate and weak absorptions. The success of the model for strong absorption is understood in the light of a central-limit theorem. For weak absorption, some important physical constraint is missing in the construction of the model.

  18. Reflectance Prediction Modelling for Residual-Based Hyperspectral Image Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Gao, Junbin; Bossomaier, Terry

    2016-01-01

    A Hyperspectral (HS) image provides observational powers beyond human vision capability but represents more than 100 times the data compared to a traditional image. To transmit and store the huge volume of an HS image, we argue that a fundamental shift is required from the existing “original pixel intensity”-based coding approaches using traditional image coders (e.g., JPEG2000) to the “residual”-based approaches using a video coder for better compression performance. A modified video coder is required to exploit spatial-spectral redundancy using pixel-level reflectance modelling due to the different characteristics of HS images in their spectral and shape domain of panchromatic imagery compared to traditional videos. In this paper a novel coding framework using Reflectance Prediction Modelling (RPM) in the latest video coding standard High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) for HS images is proposed. An HS image presents a wealth of data where every pixel is considered a vector for different spectral bands. By quantitative comparison and analysis of pixel vector distribution along spectral bands, we conclude that modelling can predict the distribution and correlation of the pixel vectors for different bands. To exploit distribution of the known pixel vector, we estimate a predicted current spectral band from the previous bands using Gaussian mixture-based modelling. The predicted band is used as the additional reference band together with the immediate previous band when we apply the HEVC. Every spectral band of an HS image is treated like it is an individual frame of a video. In this paper, we compare the proposed method with mainstream encoders. The experimental results are fully justified by three types of HS dataset with different wavelength ranges. The proposed method outperforms the existing mainstream HS encoders in terms of rate-distortion performance of HS image compression. PMID:27695102

  19. Quantum Phase Transitions in the Sub-Ohmic Spin-Boson Model: Failure of the Quantum-Classical Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias; Tong, Ning-Hua; Bulla, Ralf

    2005-02-01

    The effective theories for many quantum phase transitions can be mapped onto those of classical transitions. Here we show that the naive mapping fails for the sub-Ohmic spin-boson model which describes a two-level system coupled to a bosonic bath with power-law spectral density, J(ω)∝ωs. Using an ɛ expansion we prove that this model has a quantum transition controlled by an interacting fixed point at small s, and support this by numerical calculations. In contrast, the corresponding classical long-range Ising model is known to display mean-field transition behavior for 0classical mapping is argued to arise from the long-ranged interaction in imaginary time in the quantum model.

  20. Forward- and Reverse-Traveling Waves in DP Phenomenology: Does Inverted Direction of Wave Propagation Occur in Classical Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Renata; Shera, Christopher A.; Moleti, Arturo; Botti, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Recent basilar-membrane (BM) vibration experiments show that the phase slope of the distortion product (DP) in the cochlear region in which a backward-traveling wave is expected is negative, which is typical of a forward-traveling wave, according to the predictions of quasi-linear approximate solutions of classical 1-D transmission-line cochlear models. This phase behavior has been interpreted as suggesting a strong deviation from the “classical” models of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) generation and transmission. In this paper, the DP phase inversion phenomenon is approached from a conservative point of view. The DP phase is calculated in a classical cochlear model. The main conclusion is that deviations from the classical model are not necessary to account for the observed phase behavior. PMID:24376285

  1. Modelling binaural processes involved in simultaneous reflection masking: limitations of current models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    Masked thresholds were measured for a single test reflection, masked by the direct sound, as a function of the reflection delay. This was done for diotic as well as for dichotic stimulus presentations and all stimuli were presented via headphones. The input signal was a 200-ms long broadband noise....... The dichotic threshold decreased with increasing reflection delay indicating an increase in binaural detection performance with increasing reflection delay. Comparing the dichotic threshold to the corresponding diotic threshold, for delays below 7-10 ms, the dichotic threshold was found to be higher than...... the diotic threshold while it was lower than the diotic threshold for larger delays. Hence, the binaural system seems to deteriorate auditory detection performance for very early reflections and to enhance auditory detection performance for later reflections. Existing binaural (detection) models...

  2. SU(2)-Invariant Continuum Theory for an Unconventional Phase Transition in a Three-Dimensional Classical Dimer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Stephen; Chalker, J. T.

    2008-10-01

    We derive a continuum theory for the phase transition in a classical dimer model on the cubic lattice, observed in recent Monte Carlo simulations. Our derivation relies on the mapping from a three-dimensional classical problem to a two-dimensional quantum problem, by which the dimer model is related to a model of hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice. The dimer-ordering transition becomes a superfluid Mott insulator quantum phase transition at fractional filling, described by an SU(2)-invariant continuum theory.

  3. Usage Intention Framework Model: A Fuzzy Logic Interpretation of the Classical Utaut Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandaire, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    A fuzzy conjoint analysis (FCA: Turksen, 1992) model for enhancing management decision in the technology adoption domain was implemented as an extension to the UTAUT model (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003). Additionally, a UTAUT-based Usage Intention Framework Model (UIFM) introduced a closed-loop feedback system. The empirical evidence…

  4. Usage Intention Framework Model: A Fuzzy Logic Interpretation of the Classical Utaut Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandaire, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    A fuzzy conjoint analysis (FCA: Turksen, 1992) model for enhancing management decision in the technology adoption domain was implemented as an extension to the UTAUT model (Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003). Additionally, a UTAUT-based Usage Intention Framework Model (UIFM) introduced a closed-loop feedback system. The empirical evidence…

  5. Affine q-deformed symmetry and the classical Yang-Baxter σ-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delduc, F.; Kameyama, T.; Magro, M.; Vicedo, B.

    2017-03-01

    The Yang-Baxter σ-model is an integrable deformation of the principal chiral model on a Lie group G. The deformation breaks the G × G symmetry to U(1)rank( G) × G. It is known that there exist non-local conserved charges which, together with the unbroken U(1)rank( G) local charges, form a Poisson algebra [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], which is the semiclassical limit of the quantum group {U}_q(g) , with g the Lie algebra of G. For a general Lie group G with rank( G) > 1, we extend the previous result by constructing local and non-local conserved charges satisfying all the defining relations of the infinite-dimensional Poisson algebra [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], the classical analogue of the quantum loop algebra {U}_q(Lg) , where Lg is the loop algebra of g. Quite unexpectedly, these defining relations are proved without encountering any ambiguity related to the non-ultralocality of this integrable σ-model.

  6. High-temperature series analyses of the classical Heisenberg and XY model

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, J; Janke, W

    1993-01-01

    Although there is now a good measure of agreement between Monte Carlo and high-temperature series expansion estimates for Ising ($n=1$) models, published results for the critical temperature from series expansions up to 12{\\em th} order for the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg ($n=3$) and XY ($n=2$) model do not agree very well with recent high-precision Monte Carlo estimates. In order to clarify this discrepancy we have analyzed extended high-temperature series expansions of the susceptibility, the second correlation moment, and the second field derivative of the susceptibility, which have been derived a few years ago by L\\"uscher and Weisz for general $O(n)$ vector spin models on $D$-dimensional hypercubic lattices up to 14{\\em th} order in $K \\equiv J/k_B T$. By analyzing these series expansions in three dimensions with two different methods that allow for confluent correction terms, we obtain good agreement with the standard field theory exponent estimates and with the critical temperature estimates...

  7. A model for explaining fusion suppression using the classical trajectory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phookan, C. K.; Kalita, K.

    2013-12-01

    A two-dimensional classical trajectory model is used to explain the projectile breakup and above-barrier fusion suppression for the reactions 6Li+209Bi, 6Li+152Sm and 6Li+144Sm. To obtain the initial conditions of the equations of motion, a simplified model of the 6Li nucleus has been developed. Numerical solutions of the equations lead to the classification of orbits into breakup and no-breakup trajectories. The breakup fraction is studied as a function of the impact parameter. Using quantum mechanical arguments, the cut-off impact parameter for fusion is determined by proposing a sharp cut-off model which assumes that there is an angular momentum limit to fusion. We introduce a simple formula for the explanation of fusion suppression, according to which fusion suppression is given by the average of the breakup fractions evaluated at impact parameters ranging from head-on collision up to the cut-off impact parameter. We find that there is excellent agreement between the experimental fusion cross section (σexp) and the calculated fusion cross section (σcal) for the systems studied.

  8. Quasi-classical modeling of molecular quantum-dot cellular automata multidriver gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ehsan; Nejad, Shahram Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata (mQCA) has received considerable attention in nanoscience. Unlike the current-based molecular switches, where the digital data is represented by the on/off states of the switches, in mQCA devices, binary information is encoded in charge configuration within molecular redox centers. The mQCA paradigm allows high device density and ultra-low power consumption. Digital mQCA gates are the building blocks of circuits in this paradigm. Design and analysis of these gates require quantum chemical calculations, which are demanding in computer time and memory. Therefore, developing simple models to probe mQCA gates is of paramount importance. We derive a semi-classical model to study the steady-state output polarization of mQCA multidriver gates, directly from the two-state approximation in electron transfer theory. The accuracy and validity of this model are analyzed using full quantum chemistry calculations. A complete set of logic gates, including inverters and minority voters, are implemented to provide an appropriate test bench in the two-dot mQCA regime. We also briefly discuss how the QCADesigner tool could find its application in simulation of mQCA devices.

  9. A hybrid classical-quantum approach for ultra-scaled confined nanostructures : modeling and simulation*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietra Paola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hybrid classical-quantum model to study the motion of electrons in ultra-scaled confined nanostructures. The transport of charged particles, considered as one dimensional, is described by a quantum effective mass model in the active zone coupled directly to a drift-diffusion problem in the rest of the device. We explain how this hybrid model takes into account the peculiarities due to the strong confinement and we present numerical simulations for a simplified carbon nanotube. Nous proposons un modèle hybride classique-quantique pour décrire le mouvement des électrons dans des nanostructures très fortement confinées. Le transport des particules, consideré unidimensionel, est décrit par un modèle quantique avec masse effective dans la zone active couplé à un problème de dérive-diffusion dans le reste du domaine. Nous expliquons comment ce modèle hybride prend en compte les spécificités de ce très fort confinement et nous présentons des résultats numériques pour un nanotube de carbone simplifié.

  10. Classically conformal U(1)$^\\prime$ extended Standard Model and Higgs vacuum stability

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Satsuki; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2015-01-01

    We consider the minimal U(1)$^\\prime$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) with conformal invariance at the classical level, where in addition to the SM particle contents, three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1)$^\\prime$ Higgs field are introduced. In the presence of the three right-handed neutrinos, which are responsible for the seesaw mechanism, this model is free from all the gauge and gravitational anomalies. The U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge symmetry is radiatively broken via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, by which the U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge boson ($Z^\\prime$ boson) mass as well as the Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrinos are generated. The radiative U(1)$^\\prime$ symmetry breaking also induces a negative mass squared for the SM Higgs doublet to trigger the electroweak symmetry breaking. In this context, we investigate a possibility to solve the SM Higgs vacuum instability problem. The model includes only three free parameters (U(1)$^\\prime$ charge of the SM Higgs doublet, U(1)$^\\prime$ gauge ...

  11. Embedding inflation into the Standard Model - more evidence for classical scale invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Kannike, Kristjan; Raidal, Martti

    2014-01-01

    If cosmological inflation is due to a slowly rolling single inflation field taking trans-Planckian values as suggested by the BICEP2 measurement of primordial tensor modes in CMB, embedding inflation into the Standard Model challenges standard paradigm of effective field theories. Together with an apparent absence of Planck scale contributions to the Higgs mass and to the cosmological constant, BICEP2 provides further experimental evidence for the absence of large $M_{\\rm P}$ induced operators. We show that classical scale invariance, the paradigm that all fundamental scales in Nature are induced by quantum effects, solves the problem and allows for a remarkably simple scale-free Standard Model extension with inflaton without extending the gauge group. Due to trans-Planckian inflaton values and vevs, a dynamically induced Coleman-Weinberg-type inflaton potential of the model can predict tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ in a large range, converging around the prediction of chaotic $m^2\\phi^2$ inflation for a large t...

  12. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  13. Modeling the land surface reflectance for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A model for topographic correction and land surface reflectance estimation for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrian is presented.Considering a directional-directional reflectance that is used for direct solar irradiance correction and a hemispheric-directional reflectance that is used for atmospheric diffuse irradiance and terrain background reflected irradiance correction respectively,the directional reflectance-based model for topographic effects removing and land surface reflectance calculation is developed by deducing the directional reflectance with topographic effects and using a radiative transfer model.A canopy reflectance simulated by GOMS model and Landsat/TM raw data covering Jiangxi rugged area were taken to validate the performance of the model presented in the paper.The validation results show that the model presented here has a remarkable ability to correct topography and estimate land surface reflectance and also provides a technique method for sequently quantitative remote sensing application in terrain area.

  14. Modeling the land surface reflectance for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN JianGuang; LIU QinHuo; XIAO Qing; LIU Qiang; LI XiaoWen

    2008-01-01

    A model for topographic correction and land surface reflectance estimation for optical remote sensing data in rugged terrian is presented. Considering a directional-directional reflectance that is used for direct solar irradiance correction and a hemispheric-directional reflectance that is used for atmospheric diffuse irradiance and terrain background reflected irradiance correction respectively, the directional reflectance-based model for topographic effects removing and land surface reflectance calculation is developed by deducing the directional reflectance with topographic effects and using a radiative transfer model. A canopy reflectance simulated by GOMS model and Landsat/TM raw data covering Jiangxi rugged area were taken to validate the performance of the model presented in the paper. The validation results show that the model presented here has a remarkable ability to correct topography and estimate land surface reflectance and also provides a technique method for sequently quantitative remote sensing application in terrain area.

  15. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Firago, V. A.; Sobchuk, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions.

  16. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M; Firago, V A [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Sobchuk, A N [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2014-01-31

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions. (biophotonics)

  17. An Analysis of Cross Racial Identity Scale Scores Using Classical Test Theory and Rasch Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua; Beaujean, A. Alexander; Worrell, Frank C.; Watson, Stevie

    2013-01-01

    Item response models (IRMs) were used to analyze Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores. Rasch analysis scores were compared with classical test theory (CTT) scores. The partial credit model demonstrated a high goodness of fit and correlations between Rasch and CTT scores ranged from 0.91 to 0.99. CRIS scores are supported by both methods.…

  18. A simple polarizable model of water based on classical Drude oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Guillaume; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Roux, Benoît

    2003-09-01

    A simple polarizable water model is developed and optimized for molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid phase under ambient conditions. The permanent charge distribution of the water molecule is represented by three point charges: two hydrogen sites and one additional M site positioned along the HOH bisector. Electronic induction is represented by introducing a classical charged Drude particle attached to the oxygen by a harmonic spring. The oxygen site carries an equal and opposite charge, and is the center of an intermolecular Lennard-Jones interaction. The HOH gas-phase experimental geometry is maintained rigidly and the dipole of the isolated molecule is 1.85 D, in accord with experiment. The model is simulated by considering the dynamics of an extended Lagrangian in which a small mass is attributed to the Drude particles. It is parametrized to reproduce the salient properties of liquid water under ambient conditions. The optimal model, refered to as SWM4-DP for "simple water model with four sites and Drude polarizability," yields a vaporization enthalpy of 10.52 kcal/mol, a molecular volume of 29.93 Å3, a static dielectric constant of 79±5, a self-diffusion constant of (2.30±0.04)×10-5 cm2/s, and an air/water surface tension of 66.9±0.9 dyn/cm, all in excellent accord with experiments. The energy of the water dimer is -5.18 kcal/mol, in good accord with estimates from experiments and high level ab initio calculations. The polarizability of the optimal model is 1.04 Å3, which is smaller than the experimental value of 1.44 Å3 in the gas phase. It is likely that such a reduced molecular polarizability, which is essential to reproduce the properties of the liquid, arises from the energy cost of overlapping electronic clouds in the condensed phase due to Pauli's exclusion principle opposing induction.

  19. Optimal foraging on the roof of the world: Himalayan langurs and the classical prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Ken; Norconk, Marilyn A; Conklin-Brittain, Nancy L

    2010-03-01

    Optimal foraging theory has only been sporadically applied to nonhuman primates. The classical prey model, modified for patch choice, predicts a sliding "profitability threshold" for dropping patch types from the diet, preference for profitable foods, dietary niche breadth reduction as encounter rates increase, and that exploitation of a patch type is unrelated to its own abundance. We present results from a 1-year study testing these predictions with Himalayan langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) at Langtang National Park, Nepal. Behavioral data included continuous recording of feeding bouts and between-patch travel times. Encounter rates were estimated for 55 food types, which were analyzed for crude protein, lipid, free simple sugar, and fibers. Patch types were entered into the prey model algorithm for eight seasonal time periods and differing age-sex classes and nutritional currencies. Although the model consistently underestimated diet breadth, the majority of nonpredicted patch types represented rare foods. Profitability was positively related to annual/seasonal dietary contribution by organic matter estimates, whereas time estimates provided weaker relationships. Patch types utilized did not decrease with increasing encounter rates involving profitable foods, although low-ranking foods available year-round were taken predominantly when high-ranking foods were scarce. High-ranking foods were taken in close relation to encounter rates, while low-ranking foods were not. The utilization of an energetic currency generally resulted in closest conformation to model predictions, and it performed best when assumptions were most closely approximated. These results suggest that even simple models from foraging theory can provide a useful framework for the study of primate feeding behavior.

  20. Optimal foraging on the roof of the world: Himalayan langurs and the classical prey model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Ken; Norconk, Marilyn A.; Conklin-Brittain, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    Optimal foraging theory has only been sporadically applied to nonhuman primates. The classical prey model, modified for patch choice, predicts a sliding “profitability threshold” for dropping patch types from the diet, preference for profitable foods, dietary niche breadth reduction as encounter rates increase, and that exploitation of a patch type is unrelated to its own abundance. We present results from a one-year study testing these predictions with Himalayan langurs (Semnopithecus entellus) at Langtang National Park, Nepal. Behavioral data included continuous recording of feeding bouts and between-patch travel times. Encounter rates were estimated for 55 food types, which were analyzed for crude protein, lipid, free simple sugar, and fibers. Patch types were entered into the prey model algorithm for eight seasonal time periods and differing age-sex classes and nutritional currencies. Although the model consistently underestimated diet breadth, the majority of non-predicted patch types represented rare foods. Profitability was positively related to annual/seasonal dietary contribution by organic matter estimates, while time estimates provided weaker relationships. Patch types utilized did not decrease with increasing encounter rates involving profitable foods, although low-ranking foods available year-round were taken predominantly when high-ranking foods were scarce. High-ranking foods were taken in close relation to encounter rates, while low-ranking foods were not. The utilization of an energetic currency generally resulted in closest conformation to model predictions, and it performed best when assumptions were most closely approximated. These results suggest that even simple models from foraging theory can provide a useful framework for the study of primate feeding behavior. PMID:19844998

  1. Eyeblink Classical Conditioning and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – A Model Systems Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard G Schreurs

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  2. Eyeblink classical conditioning and post-traumatic stress disorder - a model systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Burhans, Lauren B

    2015-01-01

    Not everyone exposed to trauma suffers flashbacks, bad dreams, numbing, fear, anxiety, sleeplessness, hyper-vigilance, hyperarousal, or an inability to cope, but those who do may suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a major physical and mental health problem for military personnel and civilians exposed to trauma. There is still debate about the incidence and prevalence of PTSD especially among the military, but for those who are diagnosed, behavioral therapy and drug treatment strategies have proven to be less than effective. A number of these treatment strategies are based on rodent fear conditioning research and are capable of treating only some of the symptoms because the extinction of fear does not deal with the various forms of hyper-vigilance and hyperarousal experienced by people with PTSD. To help address this problem, we have developed a preclinical eyeblink classical conditioning model of PTSD in which conditioning and hyperarousal can both be extinguished. We review this model and discuss findings showing that unpaired stimulus presentations can be effective in reducing levels of conditioning and hyperarousal even when unconditioned stimulus intensity is reduced to the point where it is barely capable of eliciting a response. These procedures have direct implications for the treatment of PTSD and could be implemented in a virtual reality environment.

  3. Reconstruction of the standard model with classical conformal invariance in noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Masaki J S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the standard model with classical conformal invariance from the Yang--Mills--Higgs model in noncommutative geometry (NCG). In the ordinary context of the NCG, the {\\it distance matrix} $M_{nm}$ which corresponds to the vacuum expectation value of Higgs fields is taken to be finite. However, since $M_{nm}$ is arbitrary in this formulation, we can take all $M_{nm}$ to be zero. In the original composite scheme, the Higgs field itself vanishes with the condition $M_{nm} = 0$. Then, we adopt the elemental scheme, in which the gauge and the Higgs bosons are regarded as elemental fields. By these assumptions, all scalars do not have vevs at tree level. The symmetry breaking mechanism will be implemented by the Coleman--Weinberg mechanism. As a result, we show a possibility to solve the hierarchy problem in the context of NCG. Unfortunately, the Coleman--Weinberg mechanism does not work in the SM Higgs sector, because the Coleman--Weinberg effective potential becomes unbounded from below for ...

  4. Spin Foam Models for Quantum Gravity and semi-classical limit

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuis, Maité

    2011-01-01

    The spinfoam framework is a proposal for a regularized path integral for quantum gravity. Spinfoams define quantum space-time structures describing the evolution in time of the spin network states for quantum geometry derived from Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG). The construction of this covariant approach is based on the formulation of General Relativity as a topological theory plus the so-called simplicity constraints which introduce local degrees of freedom. The simplicity constraints are essential in turning the non-physical topological theory into 4d gravity. In this PhD manuscript, an original way to impose the simplicity constraints in 4d Euclidean gravity using harmonic oscillators is proposed and new coherent states, solutions of the constraints, are given. Moreover, a consistent spinfoam model for quantum gravity has to be connected to LQG and must have the right semi-classical limit. An explicit map between the spin network states of LQG and the boundary states of spinfoam models is given connecting the...

  5. Nonradiating normal modes in a classical many-body model of matter-radiation interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carati, A.; Galgani, L.

    2003-08-01

    We consider a classical model of matter-radiation interaction, in which the matter is represented by a system of infinitely many dipoles on a one-dimensional lattice, and the system is dealt with in the so-called dipole ( linearized) approximation. We prove that there exist normal-mode solutions of the complete system, so that in particular the dipoles, though performing accelerated motions, do not radiate energy. This comes about in virtue of an exact compensation which we prove to occur, for each dipole, between the “radiation reaction force” and a part of the retarded forces due to all the other dipoles. This fact corresponds to a certain identity which we name after Oseen, since it occurs that this researcher did actually propose it, already in the year 1916. We finally make a connection with a paper of Wheeler and Feynman on the foundations of electrodynamics. It turns out indeed that the Oseen identity, which we prove here in a particular model, is in fact a weak form of a general identity that such authors were assuming as an independent postulate.

  6. Classical antiparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costella, J.P.; McKellar, B.H.J.; Rawlinson, A.A.

    1997-03-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain. (authors). 13 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Classical antiparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Costella, J P; Rawlinson, A A; Costella, John P.; Kellar, Bruce H. J. Mc; Rawlinson, Andrew A.

    1997-01-01

    We review how antiparticles may be introduced in classical relativistic mechanics, and emphasize that many of their paradoxical properties can be more transparently understood in the classical than in the quantum domain.

  8. Participatory Model Construction and Model Use in Natural Resource Management: a Framework for Reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots, P.W.G.; Van Daalen, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we propose a framework which can assist analysts in their reflection on the requirements for a participatory modelling exercise in natural resource management. Firstly, we distinguish different types of formal models which may be developed, ranging from models that focus on (bio)phys

  9. Useful model organisms, indicators, or both? Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae reflecting environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Koivula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Classic studies have successfully linked single-species abundances, life-history traits, assemblage structures and biomass of carabid beetles to past and present, human-caused environmental impacts and variation in ‘natural’ conditions. This evidence has led many to suggest carabids to function as ‘indicators’ − a term that bears multiple meanings. Here, a conservation-oriented definition for an indicator is used, carabid indicator potential from seven views is evaluated, and ways to proceed in indicator research are discussed. (1 Carabid species richness poorly indicates the richness and abundance of other taxa, which underlines the importance of using multiple taxa in environmental assessments. The ability of assemblage indices and specialist or functional-group abundances to reflect rare species and habitats should be examined in detail. (2 Experimental evidence suggests that carabids may potentially serve as keystone indicators. (3 Carabids are sensitive to human-altered abiotic conditions, such as pesticide use in agro-ecosystems and heavy metal contamination of soils. Carabids might thus reflect ecological sustainability and ‘ecosystem health’. (4 Carabid assemblages host abundant species characteristic of particular habitat types or successional stages, which makes them promising dominance indicators. (5 Carabids reflect variation in ‘natural’ conditions, but vegetation and structural features are more commonly adopted as condition indicators. Carabids nevertheless provide yet another, equally accurate, view on the structure of the environment. (6 Carabids may function as early-warning signalers, as suggested by recent studies linking climate and carabid distributions. (7 Carabids reflect natural and human-caused disturbances and management, but the usefulness of these responses for conservation purposes requires further research. In summary, European carabids appear useful model organisms and possibly indicators because

  10. Simple Models and Methods for Estimating the UltrasonicReflectivity of Spot Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, William B.

    2006-10-15

    This paper describes models and methods for estimating theacoustic reflectivity of the welded interfaces between spot-welded sheetsfrom normal-incidence pulse-echo ultrasound signals. The simple geometryof the problem allows an abstraction that does not resort to complex waveequations. Instead, a reflectivity model predicts the timing andamplitude of the echoes arriving at the probe. This reflectivity model isnested in a signal processing model; recovering reflectivity firstrequires deconvolution to recover discrete impulses from the probesignal, then processing these with the reflectivity model. Reflectivitymaps of spot welds generated with this model show promise for predictingweld quality.

  11. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  12. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Γ of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter ξ at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A Fe relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/~javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  13. Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the icosahedron: influence of connectivity and the transition from the classical to the quantum limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, N P

    2015-02-25

    The antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the icosahedron presents unconventional properties at the classical and quantum level, which originate in the frustrated nature of the interactions between the spins. Here we examine the importance of the connectivity of the icosahedron for the appearance of a magnetization discontinuity as a function of an external field which separates two families of lowest energy configurations. We also investigate the transition from the classical to the quantum limit. The influence of connectivity on the magnetic properties is revealed by considering the cluster as being made up of a closed strip of a triangular lattice with two additional spins attached. The classical magnetization discontinuity is shown to evolve continuously from the discontinuity effected by these two spins when they are uncoupled to the cluster. In the second part the transition from the classical to the quantum limit is examined by focusing on the low energy spectrum, taking fully into account the spatial and the spin symmetry of the model in the characterization of the states. A symmetry analysis of the highly degenerate lowest energy classical manifold identifies as its direct fingerprint the low energy quantum states for spin magnitude as low as s = 1, with the latter following a tower of states behavior which relates to the icosahedron having a structure reminiscent of a depleted triangular lattice. The classical character of the AHM for small s is also detected on the ground state energy and correlation functions. On the other hand the classical magnetization discontinuity in a field eventually disappears for small s, after a weak reentrant behavior.

  14. Structural plasticity in the dentate gyrus- revisiting a classic injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederiy, Julia V; Westbrook, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The adult brain is in a continuous state of remodeling. This is nowhere more true than in the dentate gyrus, where competing forces such as neurodegeneration and neurogenesis dynamically modify neuronal connectivity, and can occur simultaneously. This plasticity of the adult nervous system is particularly important in the context of traumatic brain injury or deafferentation. In this review, we summarize a classic injury model, lesioning of the perforant path, which removes the main extrahippocampal input to the dentate gyrus. Early studies revealed that in response to deafferentation, axons of remaining fiber systems and dendrites of mature granule cells undergo lamina-specific changes, providing one of the first examples of structural plasticity in the adult brain. Given the increasing role of adult-generated new neurons in the function of the dentate gyrus, we also compare the response of newborn and mature granule cells following lesioning of the perforant path. These studies provide insights not only to plasticity in the dentate gyrus, but also to the response of neural circuits to brain injury.

  15. Classic Galactosemia: Study on the Late Prenatal Development of GALT Specific Activity in a Sheep Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Bierau, Jörgen; Lindhout, Martijn; Achten, Jelle; Kramer, Boris W; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2017-09-01

    Classic galactosemia results from deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT), a key enzyme of galactose metabolism. Despite early diagnosis and early postnatal therapeutic intervention, patients still develop neurologic and fertility impairments. Prenatal developmental toxicity has been hypothesized as a determinant factor of disease. In order to shed light on the importance of prenatal GALT activity, several studies have examined GALT activity throughout development. GALT was shown to increase with gestational age in 7-28 weeks human fetuses; later stages were not investigated. Prenatal studies in animals focused exclusively on brain and hepatic GALT activity. In this study, we aim to examine GALT specific activity in late prenatal and adult stages, using a sheep model. Galactosemia acute target-organs-liver, small intestine and kidney-had the highest late prenatal activity, whereas the chronic target-organs-brain and ovary-did not exhibit a noticeable pre- or postnatal different activity compared with nontarget organs. This is the first study on GALT specific activity in the late prenatal stage for a wide variety of organs. Our findings suggest that GALT activity cannot be the sole pathogenic factor accounting for galactosemia long-term complications, and that some organs/cells might have a greater susceptibility to galactose toxicity. Anat Rec, 300:1570-1575, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A classic model animal in the 21st century: recent lessons from the leech nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Daniel A

    2015-11-01

    The medicinal leech (genus Hirudo) is a classic model animal in systems neuroscience. The leech has been central to many integrative studies that establish how properties of neurons and their interconnections give rise to the functioning of the animal at the behavioral level. Leeches exhibit several discrete behaviors (such as crawling, swimming and feeding) that are each relatively simple. Importantly, these behaviors can all be studied - at least at a basal level - in the isolated nervous system. The leech nervous system is particularly amenable to such studies because of its distributed nature; sensory processing and generation of behavior occur to a large degree in iterated segmental ganglia that each contain only ∼400 neurons. Furthermore, the neurons are relatively large and are arranged with stereotyped topography on the surface of the ganglion, which greatly facilitates their identification and accessibility. This Commentary provides an overview of recent work on the leech nervous system, with particular focus on circuits that underlie leech behavior. Studies that combine the unique features of the leech with modern optical and genetic techniques are also discussed. Thus, this Commentary aims to explain the continued appeal of the leech as an experimental animal in the 21st century.

  17. The potential of antiviral agents to control classical swine fever: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Jantien A; Vrancken, Robert; Neyts, Johan; Goris, Nesya

    2013-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) represents a continuous threat to pig populations that are free of disease without vaccination. When CSF virus is introduced, the minimal control strategy imposed by the EU is often insufficient to mitigate the epidemic. Additional measures such as preemptive culling encounter ethical objections, whereas emergency vaccination leads to prolonged export restrictions. Antiviral agents, however, provide instantaneous protection without inducing an antibody response. The use of antiviral agents to contain CSF epidemics is studied with a model describing within- and between-herd virus transmission. Epidemics are simulated in a densely populated livestock area in The Netherlands, with farms of varying sizes and pig types (finishers, piglets and sows). Our results show that vaccination and/or antiviral treatment in a 2 km radius around an infected herd is more effective than preemptive culling in a 1 km radius. However, the instantaneous but temporary protection provided by antiviral treatment is slightly less effective than the delayed but long-lasting protection offered by vaccination. Therefore, the most effective control strategy is to vaccinate animals when allowed (finishers and piglets) and to treat with antiviral agents when vaccination is prohibited (sows). As independent control measure, antiviral treatment in a 1 km radius presents an elevated risk of epidemics running out of control. A 2 km control radius largely eliminates this risk.

  18. Classical toy models for the monopole shift and the quadrupole shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Katrin; Cottenier, Stefaan

    2012-08-28

    The penetration of s- and p(1/2)-electrons into the atomic nucleus leads to a variety of observable effects. The presence of s-electrons inside the nucleus gives rise to the isotope shift in atomic spectroscopy, and to the isomer shift in Mössbauer spectroscopy. Both well-known phenomena are manifestations of the more general monopole shift. In a recent paper (Koch et al., Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 032507), we discussed the existence of the formally analogous quadrupole shift: a tensor correction to the electric quadrupole interaction due to the penetration of relativistic p(1/2)-electrons into the nucleus. The quadrupole shift is predicted to be observable by high-accuracy molecular spectroscopy on a set of 4 molecules (the quadrupole anomaly). The simple physics behind all these related phenomena is easily obscured by an elaborate mathematical formalism that is required for their derivation: a multipole expansion in combination with perturbation theory, invoking quantum physics and ideally relativity. In the present paper, we take a totally different approach. We consider three classical 'toy models' that can be solved by elementary calculus, and that nevertheless contain all essential physics of the monopole and quadrupole shifts. We hope that this intuitive (yet exact) analysis will increase the understanding about multipole shift phenomena in a broader community.

  19. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  20. A Unified Derivation of Classical Subjective Expected Utility Models through Cardinal Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zank, H.; Wakker, P.P.

    1999-01-01

    Classical foundations of expected utility were provided by Ramsey, de Finetti, von Neumann & Morgenstern, Anscombe & Aumann, and others. These foundations describe preference conditions to capture the empirical content of expected utility. The assumed preference conditions, however, vary among the m

  1. Global Existence of Classical Solutions for Some Oldroyd-B Model via the Incompressible Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen LEI

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we prove local and global existence of classical solutions for a system of equations concerning an incompressible viscoelastic fluid of Oldroyd-B type via the incompressible limit when the initial data are sufficiently small.

  2. Classical statistical mechanics of a few-body interacting spin model

    CERN Document Server

    Borgonovi, F

    1999-01-01

    We study the emergence of Boltzmann's law for the "single particle energy distribution" in a closed system of interacting classical spins. It is shown that for a large number of particles Boltzmann's law may occur, even if the interaction is very strong. Specific attention is paid to classical analogs of the average shape of quantum eigenstates and "local density of states", which are very important in quantum chaology. Analytical predictions are then compared with numerical data.

  3. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J; Berry, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3-7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain-computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  4. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Parkinson, William; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-12-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG), showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT) greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK) or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless) genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) co-receptor and Wnt ligand levels

  5. Activated complement classical pathway in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying; Tao; Shi-Jie; Zheng; Bo; Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the complement system is involved in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy(OIR).METHODS: Forty C57BL/6J newborn mice were divided randomly into OIR group and control group. OIR was induced by exposing mice to 75% ±2% oxygen from postnatal 7d(P7) to P12 and then recovered in room air.For the control group, the litters were raised in room air.At the postnatal 17d(P17), gene expressions of the complement components of the classical pathway(CP),the mannose-binding lectin(MBL) pathway and the alternative pathway(AP) in the retina were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Retinal protein expressions of the key components in the CP were examined by Western blotting.· RESULTS: Whole mounted retina in the OIR mice showed area of central hypoperfusion in both superficial and deep layers and neovascular tufts in the periphery.The expressions of C1 qb and C4 b genes in the OIR retina were significantly higher than those of the controls. The expression of retinal complement factor B(CFB) gene in OIR mice was significantly lower than those of the controls. However, the expressions of C3 and complement factor H(CFH) genes were higher. The protein synthesis of the key components involved in the CP(C1q, C4 and C3) were also significantly higher in OIR mouse retina. Although MBL-associated serine protease 1(MASP1) and MASP2 were detected in both the OIR and the control groups, the expressions were weak and the difference between the two groups was not significant.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the complement system CP is activated during the pathogenesis of murine model of OIR.

  6. Overelaborated synaptic architecture and reduced synaptomatrix glycosylation in a Drosophila classic galactosemia disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Jumbo-Lucioni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic galactosemia (CG is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from loss of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT, which catalyzes conversion of galactose-1-phosphate and uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucose to glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-galactose, immediately upstream of UDP–N-acetylgalactosamine and UDP–N-acetylglucosamine synthesis. These four UDP-sugars are essential donors for driving the synthesis of glycoproteins and glycolipids, which heavily decorate cell surfaces and extracellular spaces. In addition to acute, potentially lethal neonatal symptoms, maturing individuals with CG develop striking neurodevelopmental, motor and cognitive impairments. Previous studies suggest that neurological symptoms are associated with glycosylation defects, with CG recently being described as a congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG, showing defects in both N- and O-linked glycans. Here, we characterize behavioral traits, synaptic development and glycosylated synaptomatrix formation in a GALT-deficient Drosophila disease model. Loss of Drosophila GALT (dGALT greatly impairs coordinated movement and results in structural overelaboration and architectural abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Dietary galactose and mutation of galactokinase (dGALK or UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (sugarless genes are identified, respectively, as critical environmental and genetic modifiers of behavioral and cellular defects. Assaying the NMJ extracellular synaptomatrix with a broad panel of lectin probes reveals profound alterations in dGALT mutants, including depletion of galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosamine and fucosylated horseradish peroxidase (HRP moieties, which are differentially corrected by dGALK co-removal and sugarless overexpression. Synaptogenesis relies on trans-synaptic signals modulated by this synaptomatrix carbohydrate environment, and dGALT-null NMJs display striking changes in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG co-receptor and Wnt

  7. Global Existence of Classical Solutions to a Three-Species Predator-Prey Model with Two Prey-Taxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenglin Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are concerned with three-species predator-prey model including two prey-taxes and Holling type II functional response under no flux boundary condition. By applying the contraction mapping principle, the parabolic Schauder estimates, and parabolic Lp estimates, we prove that there exists a unique global classical solution of this system.

  8. Killing scalar of non-linear σ-model on G/H realizing the classical exchange algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Shogo, E-mail: spsaoya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2014-10-07

    The Poisson brackets for non-linear σ-models on G/H are set up on the light-like plane. A quantity which transforms irreducibly by the Killing vectors, called Killing scalar, is constructed in an arbitrary representation of G. It is shown to satisfy the classical exchange algebra.

  9. Davidson and classical pragmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rossi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I wish to trace some connections between Donald Davidson's work (1917-2003 and two major representatives of the classical pragmatist movement: Charles S. Peirce (1839-1914 and William James (1842-1910. I will start with a basic characterization of classical pragmatism; then, I shall examine certain conceptions in Peirce's and James' pragmatism, in order to establish affinities with Davidson´s thought. Finally, and bearing in mind the previous con-nections, I will reflect briefly on the relevance –often unrecognized- of classical pragmatist ideas in the context of contemporary philosophi-cal discussions.

  10. Combining the Many-Body GW Formalism with Classical Polarizable Models: Insights on the Electronic Structure of Molecular Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; D'Avino, Gabriele; Duchemin, Ivan; Beljonne, David; Blase, Xavier

    2016-07-21

    We present an original hybrid QM/MM scheme merging the many-body Green's function GW formalism with classical discrete polarizable models and its application to the paradigmatic case of a pentacene crystal. Our calculated transport gap is found to be in excellent agreement with reference periodic bulk GW calculations, together with properly parametrized classical microelectrostatic calculations, and with photoionization measurements at crystal surfaces. More importantly, we prove that the gap is insensitive to the partitioning of pentacene molecules in QM and MM subsystems, as a result of the mutual compensation of quantum and classical polarizabilities, clarifying the relation between polarization energy and delocalization. The proposed hybrid method offers a computationally attractive strategy to compute the full spectrum of charged excitations in complex molecular environments, accounting for both QM and MM contributions to the polarization energy, a crucial requirement in the limit of large QM subsystems.

  11. Evaluation of control and surveillance strategies for classical swine fever using a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, S; Zu Dohna, H; Di Labio, E; Carpenter, T E; Doherr, M G

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) outbreaks can cause enormous losses in naïve pig populations. How to best minimize the economic damage and number of culled animals caused by CSF is therefore an important research area. The baseline CSF control strategy in the European Union and Switzerland consists of culling all animals in infected herds, movement restrictions for animals, material and people within a given distance to the infected herd and epidemiological tracing of transmission contacts. Additional disease control measures such as pre-emptive culling or vaccination have been recommended based on the results from several simulation models; however, these models were parameterized for areas with high animal densities. The objective of this study was to explore whether pre-emptive culling and emergency vaccination should also be recommended in low- to moderate-density areas such as Switzerland. Additionally, we studied the influence of initial outbreak conditions on outbreak severity to improve the efficiency of disease prevention and surveillance. A spatial, stochastic, individual-animal-based simulation model using all registered Swiss pig premises in 2009 (n=9770) was implemented to quantify these relationships. The model simulates within-herd and between-herd transmission (direct and indirect contacts and local area spread). By varying the four parameters (a) control measures, (b) index herd type (breeding, fattening, weaning or mixed herd), (c) detection delay for secondary cases during an outbreak and (d) contact tracing probability, 112 distinct scenarios were simulated. To assess the impact of scenarios on outbreak severity, daily transmission rates were compared between scenarios. Compared with the baseline strategy (stamping out and movement restrictions) vaccination and pre-emptive culling neither reduced outbreak size nor duration. Outbreaks starting in a herd with weaning piglets or fattening pigs caused higher losses regarding to the number of culled

  12. Modeling and verifying the polarizing reflectance of real-world metallic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kai; Weidlich, Andrea; Wilkie, Alexander; Magnor, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Using measurements of real-world samples of metals, the proposed approach verifies predictions of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. It employs ellipsometry to verify both the actual polarizing effect and the overall reflectance behavior of the metallic surfaces.

  13. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Calculating Electron Capture Cross Sections and Sample Application for ENA Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate estimates of electron-capture cross sections at energies relevant to ENA modeling (approx. few MeV per nucleon) and for multi-electron ions must rely on detailed, but computationally expensive, quantummechanical description of the collision process. Kuang's semi-classical approach is an elegant and efficient way to arrive at these estimates. Motivated by ENA modeling efforts, we shall briefly present this approach along with sample applications and report on current progress.

  14. Using a reflection model for modeling the dynamic feedback path of digital hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Guilin; Gran, Fredrik; Jacobsen, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    Feedback whistling is one of the severe problems with hearing aids, especially in dynamic situations when the users hug, pick up a telephone, etc. This paper investigates the properties of the dynamic feedback paths of digital hearing aids and proposes a model based on a reflection assumption...... gain. The method is also extended to dual-microphone hearing aids to assess the possibility of relating the two dynamic feedback paths through the reflection model. However, it is found that in a complicated acoustic environment, the relation between the two feedback paths can be very intricate...

  15. A Monte Carlo reflectance model for soil surfaces with three-dimensional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K. D.; Smith, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A Monte Carlo soil reflectance model has been developed to study the effect of macroscopic surface irregularities larger than the wavelength of incident flux. The model treats incoherent multiple scattering from Lambertian facets distributed on a periodic surface. Resulting bidirectional reflectance distribution functions are non-Lambertian and compare well with experimental trends reported in the literature. Examples showing the coupling of the Monte Carlo soil model to an adding bidirectional canopy of reflectance model are also given.

  16. Innovation Leadership in Innovation Projects: The Application of the Reflective Practitioner Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.; Gaspersz, J.; Vuuren, T. van; Dhondt, S.

    2016-01-01

    In 1983 Donald Schön wrote the Reflective Practitioner which implicitly but never explicitly contains a model of steps what it is to act as a reflective practitioner in real life. In this paper we apply that model and try to make this latent (tacit) model into a manifest (explicit) model. Project le

  17. Innovation Leadership in Innovation Projects: The Application of the Reflective Practitioner Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    In 1982 Donald Schön wrote the Reflective Practitioner which implicitly but never explicitly contains a model of steps what it is to act as a reflective practitioner in real life. In this paper we apply that model and try to make this latent (tacit) model into a manifest (explicit) model. Project le

  18. Innovation Leadership in Innovation Projects: The Application of the Reflective Practitioner Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    In 1982 Donald Schön wrote the Reflective Practitioner which implicitly but never explicitly contains a model of steps what it is to act as a reflective practitioner in real life. In this paper we apply that model and try to make this latent (tacit) model into a manifest (explicit) model. Project

  19. Three-stage classical molecular dynamics model for simulation of heavy-ion fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godre Subodh S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-stage Classical Molecular Dynamics (3S-CMD approach for heavy-ion fusion is developed. In this approach the Classical Rigid-Body Dynamics simulation for heavy-ion collision involving light deformed nucleus is initiated on their Rutherford trajectories at very large initial separation. Collision simulation is then followed by relaxation of the rigid-body constrains for one or both the colliding nuclei at distances close to the barrier when the trajectories of all the nucleons are obtained in a Classical Molecular Dynamics approach. This 3S-CMD approach explicitly takes into account not only the long range Coulomb reorientation of the deformed collision partner but also the internal vibrational excitations of one or both the nuclei at distances close to the barrier. The results of the dynamical simulation for 24Mg+208Pb collision show significant modification of the fusion barrier and calculated fusion cross sections due to internal excitations.

  20. Quantum reading of a classical digital memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2011-03-04

    We consider a basic model of digital memory where each cell is composed of a reflecting medium with two possible reflectivities. By fixing the mean number of photons irradiated over each memory cell, we show that a nonclassical source of light can retrieve more information than any classical source. This improvement is shown in the regime of few photons and high reflectivities, where the gain of information can be surprising. As a result, the use of quantum light can have nontrivial applications in the technology of digital memories, such as optical disks and barcodes.

  1. Role of spatial variability of rainfall intensity: improve- ment of Eagleson's classical model to explain the rela- tionship between the coefficient of variation of annual maximum discharge and catchment size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuha, Yasuhisa; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Tomosugi, Kunio; Kishii, Tokuo; Komatsu, Yosuke

    2006-04-01

    Eagleson's classical regional flood frequency model is investigated. Our intention was not to improve the model, but to reveal previously unidentified important and dominant hydrological processes in it. The change of the coefficient of variation (CV) of annual maximum discharge with catchment area can be viewed as representing the spatial variance of floods in a homogeneous region. Several researchers have reported that the CV decreases as the catchment area increases, at least for large areas. On the other hand, Eagleson's classical studies have been known as pioneer efforts that combine the concept of similarity analysis (scaling) with the derived flood frequency approach. As we have shown, the classical model can reproduce the empirical relationship between the mean annual maximum discharge and catchment area, but it cannot reproduce the empirical decreasing CV-catchment area curve. Therefore, we postulate that previously unidentified hydrological processes would be revealed if the classical model were improved to reproduce the decreasing of CV with catchment area. First, we attempted to improve the classical model by introducing a channel network, but this was ineffective. However, the classical model was improved by introducing a two-parameter gamma distribution for rainfall intensity. What is important is not the gamma distribution itself, but those characteristics of spatial variability of rainfall intensity whose CV decreases with increasing catchment area. Introducing the variability of rainfall intensity into the hydrological simulations explains how the CV of rainfall intensity decreases with increasing catchment area. It is difficult to reflect the rainfall-runoff processes in the model while neglecting the characteristics of rainfall intensity from the viewpoint of annual flood discharge variances.

  2. 对古典文学教学中人文关怀的思考%Reflection on the Humane Care in Classical Literature Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明珠

    2012-01-01

    人文关怀是大学教育应该关注的一个重要问题。古典文学本身具有人文关怀的特点,应充分利用古典文学的思想文化资源,培养学生的人文素养。实现"人文关怀"这一教学目标,需要认真研究古典文学"如何教"和引导学生的"怎样学"问题。%Humane care should be an important concern of university education.Classical literature itself has the characteristics of humane care.We should take full advantage of the ideological and cultural resources of classical literature.We should cultivate students' consciousness of humanities.To achieve the teaching goal of Humane care,we need to seriously study classical literature and to teach and guide students "how to learn".

  3. Classics Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  4. Modeling visible and near-infrared snow surface reflectance-simulation and validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyi Wu; Ling Tong

    2011-01-01

    Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing.Hence,this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models,including the Ross-Li,Roujean,Walthall,modified Rahman and Staylor models,in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica.The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions.Moreover,with the exception of the Staylor model,all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02,indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well.The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others,indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.The bidirectional reflectance distribution flmction (BRDF) characterizes the angular distribution of surface reflection[1,2].It plays an important role in performing atmospheric correction,detecting land cover types,and calculating other biophysical parameters[3].Howcver,the retrieval of snow BRDF/albedo is always a difficult issue in the application of remotely sensed information.%Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing. Hence, this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models, including the Ross-Li, Roujean, Walthall, modified Rahman and Staylor models, in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica. The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions. Moreover, with the exception of the Staylor model, all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02, indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well. The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others, indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.

  5. Relating renormalizability of D-dimensional higher-order electromagnetic and gravitational models to the classical potential at the origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accioly, Antonio; Correia, Gilson; de Brito, Gustavo P.; de Almeida, José; Herdy, Wallace

    2017-03-01

    Simple prescriptions for computing the D-dimensional classical potential related to electromagnetic and gravitational models, based on the functional generator, are built out. These recipes are employed afterward as a support for probing the premise that renormalizable higher-order systems have a finite classical potential at the origin. It is also shown that the opposite of the conjecture above is not true. In other words, if a higher-order model is renormalizable, it is necessarily endowed with a finite classical potential at the origin, but the reverse of this statement is untrue. The systems used to check the conjecture were D-dimensional fourth-order Lee-Wick electrodynamics, and the D-dimensional fourth- and sixth-order gravity models. A special attention is devoted to New Massive Gravity (NMG) since it was the analysis of this model that inspired our surmise. In particular, we made use of our premise to resolve trivially the issue of the renormalizability of NMG, which was initially considered to be renormalizable, but it was shown some years later to be non-renormalizable. We remark that our analysis is restricted to local models in which the propagator has simple and real poles.

  6. Relationships among Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory Frameworks via Factor Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nidhi; Koran, Jennifer; Henn, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    There are well-defined theoretical differences between the classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT) frameworks. It is understood that in the CTT framework, person and item statistics are test- and sample-dependent. This is not the perception with IRT. For this reason, the IRT framework is considered to be theoretically superior…

  7. An Instructional Model for Guiding Reflection and Research in the Classroom: The Educational Situation Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Betoret, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present an instructional model entitled the "Modelo de Calidad de Situacion Educativa" (MCSE) and how teachers can use it to reflect and investigate in a formal educational setting. It is a theoretical framework which treat to explain the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the…

  8. An Instructional Model for Guiding Reflection and Research in the Classroom: The Educational Situation Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Betoret, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present an instructional model entitled the "Modelo de Calidad de Situacion Educativa" (MCSE) and how teachers can use it to reflect and investigate in a formal educational setting. It is a theoretical framework which treat to explain the functioning of an educational setting by organizing and relating the…

  9. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  10. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of marr-albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F; Porrill, John; Yeo, Christopher H; Dean, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  11. Large-N Limit as a Classical Limit: Baryon in Two-Dimensional QCD and Multi-Matrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnaswami, G S

    2004-01-01

    This thesis concerns the large-N limit, a classical limit where fluctuations in gauge-invariant variables vanish. The large dimension limit for rotation-invariant variables in atoms is given as an example of a classical limit other than hbar vanishing. Part I concerns the baryon in Rajeev's reformulation of 2d QCD in the large-N limit: a non-linear classical theory of color-singlet quark bilinears. 't Hooft's meson equation is the linearization around the vacuum on the curved grassmannian phase space. The baryon is a topological soliton. Its form factor is found variationally on a succession of increasing rank submanifolds of the phase space. These reduced systems are interacting parton models: a derivation of parton model from the soliton picture. A rank-1 ansatz leads to a Hartree approximation: a relativistic 2d realization of Witten's proposal. The baryon form factor is used to model x_B dependence of deep inelastic structure functions. In Part II, euclidean large-N multi-matrix models are reformulated as...

  12. Efforts to Increase Students Reading Interest on Educational Reference Through Classical Guidance and Counseling Experiential Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatik Sutarti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is improving students’ reading interest on educational references through classical guidance and counseling experiential learning model. The research was carried out at STKIP Pacitan on the second semester in 2016/2017 academic year. The subject of the research was 20 fourth semester students of STKIP Pacitan. The method of the research was Classroom Action Research (CAR. The data was collected through 3 (three stages namely: data reduction, data presentation, and data conclusion or verification. The research resulted that the use of classical guidance and counseling experiential learning model gave opportunity for students to deliver their ideas related with the problems in reading interest, and then, being solved together through critical thinking.

  13. Quasi-classical model of dynamic molecular structure and non-destructive wavepacket manipulation by ultrashort laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bryan, W A; King, R B; Nemeth, G R A J; Greenwood, J B; Williams, I D; Newell, W R

    2010-01-01

    A quasi-classical model (QCM) of molecular dynamics in intense femtosecond laser fields has been developed, and applied to a study of the effect of an ultrashort `control' pulse on the vibrational motion of a deuterium molecular ion in its ground electronic state. A nonadiabatic treatment accounts for the initial ionization-induced vibrational population caused by an ultrashort `pump' pulse. In the QCM, the nuclei move classically on the molecular potential as it is distorted by the laser-induced Stark shift and transition dipole. The nuclei then adjust to the modified potential, non-destructively shifting the vibrational population and relative phase. This shift has been studied as a function of control pulse parameters. Excellent agreement is observed with predictions of time-dependent quantum simulations, lending confidence to the validity of the model and permitting new observations to be made. The applicability of the QCM to more complex multi-potential energy surface molecules (where a quantum treatment...

  14. Developing a New Integrated Model to improve the using of Classical Approach in Designing Management Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad M M Abu Omar; Khairul Anuar Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Management information system (MIS) is used to solve management problems in the practical life, the designing and building of the management information systems is done by using one of the systems development methodologies. Classical approach is one of these methodologies which still suffer from some critical problems when it is used in designing and building the management information systems, it consumes more time and cost during its life cycle. This paper develops a new integrated model to...

  15. High precision single-cluster Monte Carlo measurement of the critical exponents of the classical 3D Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C

    1992-01-01

    We report measurements of the critical exponents of the classical three-dimensional Heisenberg model on simple cubic lattices of size $L^3$ with $L$ = 12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40, and 48. The data was obtained from a few long single-cluster Monte Carlo simulations near the phase transition. We compute high precision estimates of the critical coupling $K_c$, Binder's parameter $U^* and the critical exponents $\

  16. The Reflective Teacher Leader: An Action Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Leena; Anderson, Dawnette

    2012-01-01

    This study presents four teacher reflections from action research projects ranging from kindergarten to adult school improvements. A teacher leadership matrix guided participants to connect teaching and learning theory to best practices by exploring uncharted territory within an iterative cycle of research and action. Teachers developed the…

  17. Transport of particles by surface waves: a modification of the classical bouncer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragulskis, M [Department of Mathematical Research in Systems, Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50-222, 51638 Kaunas (Lithuania); Sanjuan, M A F [Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Group, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: minvydas.ragulskis@ktu.lt, E-mail: miguel.sanjuan@urjc.es

    2008-08-15

    We consider a ball under the influence of gravity on a platform. A propagating surface wave travels on the surface of the platform, while the platform remains motionless. This is a modification of the classical bouncing ball problem and describes the transport of particles by surface waves. Phase and velocity maps cannot be expressed in an explicit form owing to implicit formulations, and no formal analytical analysis is possible. Numerical analysis shows that the transition to chaos is produced via a period doubling route, which is a common property for classical bouncers. The bouncing process can be sensitive to the initial conditions, which can build the ground for control techniques that can dramatically increase the effectiveness of particle transport in practical applications.

  18. Thinking and writing at Masters level: a reflective passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John

    This article identifies key characteristics of Masters level writing and the underpinning relationship of these characteristics to reflective thought. Classical models of reflective writing are reviewed and their focus on reflection as a progressive process is debated. A linear model of reflection is proposed and its application to reflective writing for Masters level assessments is examined. The classical authors tend to present reflection as a process in which the outcomes of reflection becomes deeper at advanced levels. While this is an appropriate application of the concept of reflection for the traditional academic essay, it might not always be so appropriate for other more applied aspects of thinking and writing particularly in the development of advanced nursing practice. A linear model of reflective writing which offers a more pragmatic perspective on reflection is developed.

  19. A psycho-educational model to enhance the self-development and mental health of classical dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staden, Antoinette; Myburgh, Chris P H; Poggenpoel, Marie

    2009-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that some classical dancers have difficulty with their personal lives and with their lives as performers. Specifically, a consistent emphasis on performance-orientation has been linked to the development of potentially maladaptive dispositions. A pilot study was conducted to explore the life-world of the classical professional dancer through semi-structured interviews with nine dancers from two professional ballet companies in South Africa. The results indicated that the profession had strongly influenced their sense of self, relationships with others, and future-orientation. The findings of the pilot study are important for what they suggest about the tendency of classical dance to stimulate the setting of externalized goals that may lead to self-destructive behaviors such as eating disorders, depression, maladaptive perfectionism, and problems with career transitions. These findings were used to develop a model that aims at preparing pre-professional dancers to deal with such problems by promoting their sense of empowerment, self-development, and self-actualization as individuals and as artistic performers. What remains is for the model to be tested in practice, procedures and protocols established for training the personnel who will actualize it, and appropriate criteria identified for the assessment of self-development. Then the model can be disseminated for general use.

  20. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  1. Classical running and symmetry breaking in models with two extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Papineau, C

    2007-01-01

    We consider a codimension two scalar theory with brane-localised Higgs type potential. The six-dimensional field has Dirichlet boundary condition on the bounds of the transverse compact space. The regularisation of the brane singularity yields renormalisation group evolution for the localised couplings at the classical level. In particular, a tachyonic mass term grows at large distances and hits a Landau pole. We exhibit a peculiar value of the bare coupling such that the running mass parameter becomes large precisely at the compactification scale, and the effective four-dimensional zero mode is massless. Above the critical coupling, spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs and there is a very light state.

  2. Modelling radiation emission in the transition from the classical to the quantum regime

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, J L; Grismayer, T; Vieira, J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    An emissivity formula is derived using the generalised Fermi-Weizacker-Williams method of virtual photons which accounts for the recoil the charged particle experiences as it emits radiation. It is found that through this derivation the formula obtained by Sokolov et al using QED perturbation theory is recovered. The corrected emissivity formula is applied to nonlinear Thomson scattering scenarios in the transition from the classical to the quantum regime, for small values of the nonlinear quantum parameter \\chi. Good agreement is found between this method and a QED probabilistic approach for scenarios where both are valid. In addition, signatures of the quantum corrections are identified and explored.

  3. MODELING AN IMPROVED METHOD FOR DOUBLE MODULATION PHOTO REFLECTANCE EXPERIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hernández

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an improved method to be used in double modulation photo reflectance experiments, inorder to reduce the influence of parasitic effects in the useful signal. The method uses the inner and outer sectionsof a single chopper disk to modulate the monochromator and the laser beam, eliminating the need of complexelectronic filters, and two additional PIN photodiodes for scattered light compensation. The method has beennumerically simulated using LabVIEW in order to investigate the influence of the modulator finite switching timeand the finite resolution of the digital acquisition system. Results show that a relative error less than 1% can beachieved.

  4. Correspondence Between Continuous and Discrete 2 Flux Models for Reflectance and Transmittance of Diffusing Layers

    OpenAIRE

    Hébert, M.; Becker, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical connection between two different mathematical models dedicated to the reflectance and the transmittance of diffusing layers. The Kubelka–Munk model proposes a continuous description of scattering and absorption for two opposite diffuse fluxes in a homogeneous layer (continuous two-flux model). On the other hand, Kubelka's layering model describes the multiple reflections and transmissions of light taking place between various superposed diffusing layers (disc...

  5. An analysis of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2014-07-28

    The nonadiabatic dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions is investigated for the first time using a surface-hopping algorithm based on the solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE). This method provides a rigorous treatment of quantum coherence/decoherence effects in the dynamics of mixed quantum-classical systems, which is lacking in the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions surface-hopping approach commonly used for simulating PCET reactions. Within this approach, the protonic and electronic coordinates are treated quantum mechanically and the solvent coordinate evolves classically on both single adiabatic surfaces and on coherently coupled pairs of adiabatic surfaces. Both concerted and sequential PCET reactions are studied in detail under various subsystem-bath coupling conditions and insights into the dynamical principles underlying PCET reactions are gained. Notably, an examination of the trajectories reveals that the system spends the majority of its time on the average of two coherently coupled adiabatic surfaces, during which a phase enters into the calculation of an observable. In general, the results of this paper demonstrate the applicability of QCLE-based surface-hopping dynamics to the study of PCET and emphasize the importance of mean surface evolution and decoherence effects in the calculation of PCET rate constants.

  6. Sensory prediction or motor control? Application of Marr-Albus type models of cerebellar function to classical conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan F Lepora

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Marr-Albus adaptive filter models of the cerebellum have been applied successfully to a range of sensory and motor control problems. Here we analyze their properties when applied to classical conditioning of the nictitating membrane response in rabbits. We consider a system-level model of eyeblink conditioning based on the anatomy of the eyeblink circuitry, comprising an adaptive filter model of the cerebellum, a comparator model of the inferior olive and a linear dynamic model of the nictitating membrane plant. To our knowledge, this is the first model that explicitly includes all these principal components, in particular the motor plant that is vital for shaping and timing the behavioral response. Model assumptions and parameters were systematically investigated to disambiguate basic computational capacities of the model from features requiring tuning of properties and parameter values. Without such tuning, the model robustly reproduced a range of behaviors related to sensory prediction, by displaying appropriate trial-level associative learning effects for both single and multiple stimuli, including blocking and conditioned inhibition. In contrast, successful reproduction of the real-time motor behavior depended on appropriate specification of the plant, cerebellum and comparator models. Although some of these properties appear consistent with the system biology, fundamental questions remain about how the biological parameters are chosen if the cerebellar microcircuit applies a common computation to many distinct behavioral tasks. It is possible that the response profiles in classical conditioning of the eyeblink depend upon operant contingencies that have previously prevailed, for example in naturally occurring avoidance movements.

  7. Model of Reflection Spectra of Rock Surface in 2π Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hongying; ZHAO Hu; YAN Lei; ZHAO Yunsheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with reflection spectra and polarized reflection spectra of 20 sorts of rock in 2π space, and then creates a model of reflection spectra of rock surface in 2π space. We measured the change of reflection and polarized reflection spectra as altering the incidence angle, vertex angle, azimuth angle, band and polarization. The results show that influence of the incidence angle on spectral curves is very strong. And when the vertex angle is constant, the horizontal azimuth polarizes rock spectra, and distorts the circular spectrum to become elliptic. The polarization influences the reflection intensity of rock spectra, but has no evident influence on the characteristics of wave forms of rock in 2π space. Therefore, we can describe the whole reflection spectral characteristics, including polarization,of rock surface in 2π space by measuring and calculating the e and p values in several key directions.

  8. Ethical issues in engineering models: an operations researcher's reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J

    2011-09-01

    This article starts with an overview of the author's personal involvement--as an Operations Research consultant--in several engineering case-studies that may raise ethical questions; e.g., case-studies on nuclear waste, water management, sustainable ecology, military tactics, and animal welfare. All these case studies employ computer simulation models. In general, models are meant to solve practical problems, which may have ethical implications for the various stakeholders; namely, the modelers, the clients, and the public at large. The article further presents an overview of codes of ethics in a variety of disciples. It discusses the role of mathematical models, focusing on the validation of these models' assumptions. Documentation of these model assumptions needs special attention. Some ethical norms and values may be quantified through the model's multiple performance measures, which might be optimized. The uncertainty about the validity of the model leads to risk or uncertainty analysis and to a search for robust models. Ethical questions may be pressing in military models, including war games. However, computer games and the related experimental economics may also provide a special tool to study ethical issues. Finally, the article briefly discusses whistleblowing. Its many references to publications and websites enable further study of ethical issues in modeling.

  9. Classical Particle in Presence of Magnetic Field, Hyperbolic Lobachevsky and Spherical Riemann Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kudryashov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion of a classical particle in 3-dimensional Lobachevsky and Riemann spaces is studied in the presence of an external magnetic field which is analogous to a constant uniform magnetic field in Euclidean space. In both cases three integrals of motions are constructed and equations of motion are solved exactly in the special cylindrical coordinates on the base of the method of separation of variables. In Lobachevsky space there exist trajectories of two types, finite and infinite in radial variable, in Riemann space all motions are finite and periodical. The invariance of the uniform magnetic field in tensor description and gauge invariance of corresponding 4-potential description is demonstrated explicitly. The role of the symmetry is clarified in classification of all possible solutions, based on the geometric symmetry group, SO(3,1 and SO(4 respectively.

  10. Particle creation, classicality and related issues in quantum field theory: I. Formalism and toy models

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, Gaurang

    2007-01-01

    The quantum theory of a harmonic oscillator with a time dependent frequency arises in several important physical problems, especially in the study of quantum field theory in an external background. While the mathematics of this system is straightforward, several conceptual issues arise in such a study. We present a general formalism to address some of the conceptual issues like the emergence of classicality, definition of particle content, back reaction etc. In particular, we parametrize the wave function in terms of a complex number (which we call excitation parameter) and express all physically relevant quantities in terms it. Many of the notions -- like those of particle number density, effective Lagrangian etc., which are usually defined using asymptotic in-out states -- are generalized as time-dependent concepts and we show that these generalized definitions lead to useful and reasonable results. Having developed the general formalism we apply it to several examples. Exact analytic expressions are found ...

  11. Survival of classical models in Bartolomeo Facio's description of battles. Some considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Abbamonte

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Facio's work, entitled Rerum gestarum Alphonsi regis libri decem, mainly describes the conquest of the Kingdom of Naples by the Aragonese king Alphonso the Magnanimous. However, the historical events are not only narrated on the basis of contemporary documents, but they are also shaped according to the various patterns provided by classical authors. Thus, in Alphonso's speech to the troops we can find a direct quotation of Cicero, or in Facio's preface there is a blend of arguments taken from Livy's praefatio and Cicero's well-known opinion on Caesar's style. Finally, in the episode on the siege of Gerba and the return of the fleet to Trapani, Facio depicts Alphonso's Tunisian enemies as if they were old Carthaginians, whilst the forced stop of the Aragonese fleet in Trapani allows the historian to establish a wisely disguised comparison with Aeneas' stop at Trapani/Drepanum in the 5th book of the Aeneid.

  12. The truncated polynomial expansion Monte Carlo method for fermion systems coupled to classical fields: a model independent implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, G.; Şen, C.; Furukawa, N.; Motome, Y.; Dagotto, E.

    2005-05-01

    A software library is presented for the polynomial expansion method (PEM) of the density of states (DOS) introduced in [Y. Motome, N. Furukawa, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 68 (1999) 3853; N. Furukawa, Y. Motome, H. Nakata, Comput. Phys. Comm. 142 (2001) 410]. The library provides all necessary functions for the use of the PEM and its truncated version (TPEM) in a model independent way. The PEM/TPEM replaces the exact diagonalization of the one electron sector in models for fermions coupled to classical fields. The computational cost of the algorithm is O(N)—with N the number of lattice sites—for the TPEM [N. Furukawa, Y. Motome, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 73 (2004) 1482] which should be contrasted with the computational cost of the diagonalization technique that scales as O(N). The method is applied for the first time to a double exchange model with finite Hund coupling and also to diluted spin-fermion models. Program summaryTitle of library:TPEM Catalogue identifier: ADVK Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVK Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1707 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 644 Distribution format:tar.gz Operating system:Linux, UNIX Number of files:4 plus 1 test program Programming language used:C Computer:PC Nature of the physical problem:The study of correlated electrons coupled to classical fields appears in the treatment of many materials of much current interest in condensed matter theory, e.g., manganites, diluted magnetic semiconductors and high temperature superconductors among others. Method of solution: Typically an exact diagonalization of the electronic sector is performed in this type of models for each configuration of classical fields, which are integrated using a classical Monte Carlo algorithm. A polynomial expansion of the density of states is able to replace the exact

  13. Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    This is the English version of a friendly graduate course on Classical Mechanics, containing about 80% of the material I covered during the January-June 1999 semester at IFUG in the Mexican city of Leon. For the Spanish version, see physics/9906066

  14. A novel trauma leadership model reflective of changing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼHuyvetter, Cecile; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    As a result of generational changes in the health care workforce, we sought to evaluate our current Trauma Medical Director Leadership model. We assessed the responsibilities, accountability, time requirements, cost, and provider satisfaction with the current leadership model. Three new providers who had recently completed fellowship training were hired, each with unique professional desires, skill sets, and experience. Our goal was to establish a comprehensive, cost-effective, accountable leadership model that enabled provider satisfaction and equalized leadership responsibilities. A 3-pronged team model was established with a Medical Director title and responsibilities rotating per the American College of Surgeons verification cycle to develop leadership skills and lessen hierarchical differences.

  15. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for ionization of the uracil molecule by impact of heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, L.

    2016-09-01

    The ionization of the uracil molecule induced by heavy-ion impact has been investigated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. Assuming the validity of the independent-particle model approximation, the collision problem is solved by considering the three-body dynamics of the projectile, an active electron and the molecule core. The interaction of the molecule core with the other two particles is described by a multi-center potential built from screened atomic potentials. The cross section differential with respect to the energy and angle of the electrons ejected in the ionization process has been calculated for an impact of 3.5 MeV u-1 {{{C}}}6+ ions. Total electron emission cross sections (TCS) are presented for {{{C}}}q+ (q=0-6) and {{{O}}}6+ projectiles as a function of the impact energy in the range from 10 keV u-1 to 10 MeV u-1. The dependence of the TCS on the charge state of the projectile has been investigated for 2.5 MeV u-1 {{{O}}}q+ (q=4-8) and {{{F}}}q+ (q=5-9) ions. The results of the calculations are compared with available experimental data and the predictions of other theoretical models: the first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1), the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state approach (CDW-EIS), and the combined classical-trajectory Monte Carlo-classical over-the-barrier model (CTMC-COB).

  16. Reflections on Improvement of Utility Model System in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Even since 1985 when the Patent Law was launched in China, the utility model patent has been playing a very important role. Over the two decades, the utility model system has played an active part in encouraging invention-creations, and promoting the progress and development of science and technology.

  17. REFLECTIONS ON THE INOPERABILITY INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Miller, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    We argue that the inoperability input-output model is a straightforward - albeit potentially very relevant - application of the standard input-output model. In addition, we propose two less standard input-output approaches as alternatives to take into consideration when analyzing the effects of disa

  18. Classical solutions for the Lorentz-violating and CPT-even term of the Standard Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; Santos, C E H

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we calculate the classical solutions for the electrodynamics stemming from the Lorentz-violating (LV) and CPT-even term of the Standard Model Extension. The solutions for point-like and extended charges are obtained from the wave equations by means of the Green method. A dipolar expansion is written for the field strengths. It is explicitly shown that charge and current generate first order effects for the magnetic and electric fields, respectively. Using the magnetic field generated by a macroscopic 1C charged sphere, we establish a stringent bound for the LV parameter:$\\kappa \\leq 10^{-16}.$

  19. Classical solutions for the Lorentz-violating and CPT-even term of the standard model extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M., Jr.; Santos, Carlos E. H.

    2008-11-01

    In this work, we calculate the classical solutions for the electrodynamics stemming from the Lorentz-violating (LV) and CPT-even term of the standard model extension. Static and stationary solutions for pointlike and extended charges are obtained from the wave equations by means of the Green method. A dipolar expansion is written for the field strengths. It is explicitly shown that charge and current generate LV first order effects for the magnetic and electric fields, respectively. Using the magnetic field generated by a macroscopic 1C charged sphere, we establish a stringent bound for the LV parameter: κ≤10-16.

  20. Probabilistic modeling of caprock leakage from seismic reflection data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zunino, Andrea; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Bergjofd-Kitterød, Ingjerd

    within the storage complexes. The geological models are built on top of geophysical data such as seismic surveys, geological information and well logs from the reservoir or nearby regions. The risk assessment of CO2 storage requires a careful analysis which accounts for all sources of uncertainty...... is a realization of a geostatistical model generated with the help of geological expert knowledge and available prototype models. Employing a Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we generate many realizations of the geostatistical model consistent with our a priori knowledge (in the form of prototype images, well logs....... However, at present, no well-defined and consistent method for mapping the true uncertainty related to the geophysical data and how that uncertainty affects the overall risk assessment for the potential storage site is available. To properly quantify the uncertainties and to avoid unrealistic...

  1. Doppler shift estimation for GNSS reflectometry using a land topography adapted reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Peraza, Luis; Falck, Carsten; Gerland, Sebastian; Wickert, Jens

    2016-04-01

    A GNSS setup with a receiver capable for reflectometry is operated by GFZ at Kongsfjorden (Spitsbergen), 78°54'14''N, 11°52'37''E, 512 m above ellipsoid (WGS-84). This permanent station at the Zeppelin mountain outpost, operated by the Norwegian Polar Institute (NPI), accumulates data since Summer 2013 observing reflections over the fjord and the adjacent land surface. Especially the presence of sea ice over the fjord and snow cover over land are of interest for reflectometry to investigate altimetry and remote sensing applications. The setup contains a GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) two-frontend receiver, which is based on commercial JAVAD hardware. The receiver is connected to one up-looking and one horizon-looking patch antenna with right-handed and left-handed circular polarization, respectively. Both antennas are installed on the same mount approximately 475 m above the fjord mean sea level. Reflections are observed at low transmitter elevation angles (between 10 and 2°). For these geometries the relative Doppler shift (sea surface reflected relative to direct signal) is almost constant 0.5 to 0.6 Hz and can be calculated with an established reflection model. Rather easily, sea surface reflections are identified in the data and the corresponding reflection points are located. About 55 daily recurring reflection events over the fjord are observed. They form a fan-shaped swath with 3 to 13 km distance around the receiver, corresponding to elevations of 10° to 2°. Also signatures of potential land reflections are found in the data. About 13 daily recurring events extend mainly over land. The potential land signatures have a rather variable Doppler shift between 0.2 to 1Hz. The significant topography of the mountainous surrounding, which varies between sea level and 900 m altitude, prevents the use of established reflection models. A topography adapted reflection model, which considers sloped surface facets, is developed. It incorporates

  2. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  3. A partnership model for a reflective narrative for researcher and participant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gill; Peters, Kath; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2016-09-01

    Background Conceptual frameworks are important to ensure a clear underpinning research philosophy. Further, the use of conceptual frameworks can support structured research processes. Aim To present a partnership model for a reflective narrative for researcher and participant. Discussion This paper positions the underpinning philosophical framework of the model in social constructionism (the idea that jointly constructed understandings form the basis for shared assumptions) and narrative enquiry. The model has five stages - study design, invitation to share a research space and partnership, a metaphorical research space, building a community story, and reading the community story to others. Core principles of the partnership model are continual reflection by the researcher, potential reflections by participants, reciprocal sharing, and partnership in research. Conclusion A 'trajectory of self' for both participants and researchers can be enhanced within reflective partnerships. Implications for practice This model can be applied to studies that use narrative enquiry and are seeking a humanistic approach with participant engagement.

  4. Classical Exchange Algebra of the Nonlinear Sigma Model on a Supercoset Target with Z2n Grading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE San-Min; LI Xin-Ying; WANG Chun; YUE Rui-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints. This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution. When n = 2, our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS5 × S5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted).%The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints.This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution.When n =2,our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS5 × S5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted).Bena,Polchinski and Roiban[1] found an infinite number of non-local classically conserved charges for the Grecn-Schwarz superstring in AdS5 × S5 background.[2] Similar results were obtained for some other strings[3-9] that propagate in AdS space-time,as discussed in Refs.[7 9].Vallilo[10] showed that such charges also exist in the pure-spinor formalism of the superstring in AdS5 × S5.Bianchi and Klǔson[11] gave the current algebra of the pure-spinor superstring.Berkovits[12] proved that the nonlocal charges in the string theory are BRST-invariant and physical.

  5. Classical and quantum solutions to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model from a time-dependent toroidal compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Sesma, L Toledo; Loaiza, O

    2015-01-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type I model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Under this approach, we present an isotropization mechanism for the Bianchi I cosmological model through the analysis of the ratio between the anisotropic parameters and the volume of the Universe which in general keeps constant or runs into zero for late times. Finally, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology.

  6. Reflection and transmission of elastic waves in non-local band-gap metamaterials: A comprehensive study via the relaxed micromorphic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Angela; Neff, Patrizio; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel; Rosi, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we derive, by means of a suitable least action principle, the duality jump conditions to be imposed at surfaces of discontinuity of the material properties in non-dissipative, linear-elastic, isotropic, Mindlin's and relaxed micromorphic media, respectively. The introduced theoretical framework allows the transparent set-up of different types of micro-macro connections which are intrinsically compatible with the governing bulk equations. To illustrate the interest of the many introduced jump conditions, we focus on the case of an interface between a classical Cauchy continuum on one side and a relaxed micromorphic one on the other side. As expected, we find a complete reflection in the frequency intervals for which band-gaps are known to occur in the relaxed micromorphic continuum and precise microstructure-related reflective patterns are identified. We repeat a similar study for analogous connections between a classical Cauchy continuum and a Mindlin's micromorphic one and we show that the reflective properties of the considered interfaces are drastically modified due to the fact that band-gaps are not allowed in standard Mindlin's micromorphic media. The present work opens the way towards the possibility of conceiving complex metastructures in which band-gap metamaterials and classical materials are coupled together to produce structures with completely new and unorthodox properties with respect to wave propagation, transmission and reflection. Last, but not least, indirect measurements of the material coefficients of the relaxed micromorphic model based upon real experiments of reflection and transmission in band-gap metamaterials are uncovered by the present work which makes them finally realizable in the short term.

  7. Modeling lower critical solution temperature behavior of associating polymer brushes with classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-07

    We study the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of associating polymer brushes (i.e., poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) using classical density functional theory. Without using any empirical or temperature-dependent parameters, we find the phase transition of polymer brushes from extended to collapsed structure with increasing temperature, indicating the LCST behavior of polymer brushes. The LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes is attributed to the interplay of hydrogen bonding interactions and Lennard-Jones attractions in the system. The effect of grafting density and molecular weight on the phase behavior of associating polymer brushes has been also investigated. We find no LCST behavior at low grafting density or molecular weight. Moreover, increasing grafting density decreases the LCST and swelling ratio of polymer brushes. Similarly, increasing molecular weight decreases the LCST but increases the swelling ratio. At very high grafting density, a partial collapsed structure appears near the LCST. Qualitatively consistent with experiments, our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes.

  8. Thermal quantum and classical correlations in two qubit XX model in a nonuniform external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Hassan, Ali Saif M; Joag, Pramod S

    2010-01-01

    We investigate how thermal quantum discord $(QD)$ and classical correlations $(CC)$ of a two qubit one-dimensional XX Heisenberg chain in thermal equilibrium depend on temperature of the bath as well as on nonuniform external magnetic fields applied to two qubits and varied separately. We show that the behaviour of $QD$ differs in many unexpected ways from thermal entanglement $(EN)$. For the nonuniform case, $(B_1= - B_2)$ we find that $QD$ and $CC$ are equal for all values of $(B_1=-B_2)$ and for different temperatures. We show that, in this case, the thermal states of the system belong to a class of mixed states and satisfy certain conditions under which $QD$ and $CC$ are equal. The specification of this class and the corresponding conditions is completely general and apply to any quantum system in a state in this class and satisfying these conditions. We further find the relative contributions of $QD$ and $CC$ can be controlled easily by changing the relative magnitudes of $B_1$ and $B_2$.

  9. 亚里斯多德美学思想在欧洲古典园林中的体现%Reflection of Aristotle aesthetic ideology in European classical garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋一菁

    2011-01-01

    This thesis briefly introduces Aristotle's aesthetic ideology,summarizes the development history and gardening style of European classical garden,and analyzes the reflection of Aristotle's aesthetic ideology at each aspect and its impacts on European classical gardening technology,so as to guide people to deeply understand the extensive and profound content of Aristotle's aesthetic ideology.%简要介绍了亚里斯多德的美学思想,总结了欧洲古典园林的发展历程与造园风格,并分析了亚里斯多德美学思想的各个层面在欧洲古典园林中的体现及其对欧洲古典园林艺术的影响,以期引导人们深刻领会亚里斯多德美学思想的博大精深。

  10. A Study of the Townspeople's Psychology Reflected in Classical Chinese Fictions of Song Dynasty%宋代文言小说反映的市人心态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余丹

    2011-01-01

    宋代城市生活繁荣,商品经济发达,市人阶层和市民文艺兴起,文言小说在这一特定的时代背景中产生了通俗化的倾向,其中不仅出现了大量的市井题材,而且在意识、情趣方面也走向世俗,市人阶层对金钱的热切渴求,对艳情的浓厚兴趣,以及猎奇的审美心理,都得到了充分的反映。%The city life in Song dynasty was flourished with rapid economic development.The civic class arose with its popular culture,thus the classical Chinese fictions of Song dynasty showed popularization trend under this background.Not only theme and subject but also sense and taste of the classical Chinese fictions turned to popularization.Townspeople's psychology of that time was fully reflected in these fictions,including money-worship,the interest in romantic love,and the aesthetic psychology of hunting for novelty,etc.

  11. Disesteem and Classics-Reflect on the process of acceptence about opera carmen%“冷遇”与“经典”:歌剧《卡门》的审美接受

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王博

    2012-01-01

    《卡门》在今天被人们奉为歌剧中的经典,但是它在诞生之初却曾经遭到如潮的批评,它独特的接受过程也从一个方面反映了西方音乐审美中的一个现象。通过对《卡门》接受过程的分析,进而对西方音乐发展中存在的"欣赏滞后"进行理性思考。%Nowadays,"Carmen" is regarded as a classic in the opera.However,at the beginning of the birth,it had been criticized a lot.There was a unique,distinctive process of acceptance which reflected a phenomenon in the western music aesthetics.This article based on the "Carmen" acceptance process will analyse the phenomenon,to ponder over the "sluggish classic" during the evolution of western music history.

  12. Predicting absorption and dispersion in acoustics by direct simulation Monte Carlo: Quantum and classical models for molecular relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, Amanda D; O'Connor, Patrick D; Anderson, James B; Long, Lyle N

    2008-06-01

    In the current study, real gas effects in the propagation of sound waves are simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for a wide range of frequencies. This particle method allows for treatment of acoustic phenomena at high Knudsen numbers, corresponding to low densities and a high ratio of the molecular mean free path to wavelength. Different methods to model the internal degrees of freedom of diatomic molecules and the exchange of translational, rotational and vibrational energies in collisions are employed in the current simulations of a diatomic gas. One of these methods is the fully classical rigid-rotor/harmonic-oscillator model for rotation and vibration. A second method takes into account the discrete quantum energy levels for vibration with the closely spaced rotational levels classically treated. This method gives a more realistic representation of the internal structure of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Applications of these methods are investigated in diatomic nitrogen gas in order to study the propagation of sound and its attenuation and dispersion along with their dependence on temperature. With the direct simulation method, significant deviations from continuum predictions are also observed for high Knudsen number flows.

  13. A partial least squares model for non-volatile residue quantification using diffuse reflectance infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amylynn; Moision, Robert M.

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, quantification of non-volatile residue (NVR) on surfaces relevant to space systems has been performed using solvent wipes for NVR removal followed by gravimetric analysis. In this approach the detectable levels of NVR are ultimately determined by the mass sensitivity of the analytical balance employed. Unfortunately, for routine samples, gravimetric measurement requires large sampling areas, on the order of a square foot, in order to clearly distinguish sample and background levels. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) is one possible alternative to gravimetric analysis for NVR measurement. DRIFTS is an analytical technique used for the identification and quantification of organic compounds that has two primary advantages relative to gravimetric based methods: increased sensitivity and the ability to identify classes of organic species present. However, the use of DRIFTS is not without drawbacks, most notably repeatability of sample preparation and the additive quantification uncertainty arising from overlapping infrared signatures. This can result in traditional calibration methods greatly overestimating the concentration of species in mixtures. In this work, a partial least squares (PLS) regression model is shown to be an effective method for removing the over prediction error of a three component mixture of common contaminant species.

  14. Critically Reflective Pedagogical Model: a Pragmatic Blueprint for Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Construction Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available University lecturers who aspire to provide an improved learning experience for their students continually, and be recognised for high quality teaching should embrace a critically reflective practice. Nonetheless, developing as a reflective lecturer is challenging, although there are pedagogical literatures as general guidelines. This study introduces a new pedagogical model of critically reflective practice to simplify the efforts for lecturers and to shorten their journey to becoming effective teachers. A two-phased action research strategy was adopted for the development and validation of the new model. The first phase operationalised the Brookfield’s four-lens framework to create a reflective teaching practice model, which was then validated with a case study in the second phase. The model offers a pragmatic blueprint for lecturers to build a career with sustained quality of teaching, which in turn translates into improved learning experiences for students.

  15. Algebraic Bethe Ansatz for the Osp(1|2) Model with Reflecting Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Rui-Hong; XIONG Chuan-Hua

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of graded quantum inverse scattering method, we obtain the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the Osp(l|2) model with reflecting boundary conditions in FBF background. The corresponding Bathe ansatz equations are obtained.

  16. Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, P.J.M., Paas, F. & van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2008). Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 34, 1-8.

  17. Modelling and simulation in the pharmaceutical industry--some reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Carl-Fredrik; Wiklund, Stig Johan

    2011-01-01

    Modelling and simulation (M&S) is increasingly being applied in (clinical) drug development. It provides an opportune area for the community of pharmaceutical statisticians to pursue. In this article, we highlight useful principles behind the application of M&S. We claim that M&S should be focussed on decisions, tailored to its purpose and based in applied sciences, not relying entirely on data-driven statistical analysis. Further, M&S should be a continuous process making use of diverse information sources and applying Bayesian and frequentist methodology, as appropriate. In addition to forming a basis for analysing decision options, M&S provides a framework that can facilitate communication between stakeholders. Besides the discussion on modelling philosophy, we also describe how standard simulation practice can be ineffective and how simulation efficiency can often be greatly improved.

  18. A model for facilitation of critical reflective practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TR Mavundla

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The impressive growth in the extent and range of psychiatric services provided by general hospitals in South Africa creates stress among nurses employed in these settings who are not psychiatric trained. This manifests itself in negative attitudes displayed towards mentally ill people. The aim of this paper is to discuss the process followed in the development of the model of facilitative communication. A theory generative design was used. The research methods were dealt with in four steps of theory generation as set out below. . Step 1 entailed concept analysis. This step was dealt with in two phases, namely concept identification and concept definition. During concept identification, a qualitative research strategy that is explorative, descriptive and contextual was used. This was achieved through field research conducted in an urban general hospital. A sample of twelve professional nurses was selected from a population of 800 professional nurses employed in a general hospital using the purposive sampling technique. This sample size was determined by saturation of data in themes. Both semi-structured individual phenomenological interviews and observations were used as methods of data collection. Giorgi’s method of descriptive data analysis (1985 was used. Four themes emerged from the results of the study. The main concepts of the model were identified and classified using a survey list of Dickoff et al. (1968. Step 2 dealt with the creation of interrelationship statements between concepts identified in Step 1, while Step 3 dealt with the description of the model using strategies proposed by Chinn and Kramer (1991. In Step 4, the description of guidelines for operationalising in practice was ensured. To ensure valid results, a model for trustworthiness proposed by Guba (Lincoln & Guba, 1985 was used. The following criteria for trustworthiness were applied in all the steps of theory generation: truth value, applicability, consistency and

  19. Current situation for cultivating reflective thinking in English reading instruction--The influence of teaching models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Qinglan

    2013-01-01

    Reflective thinking plays an essential role in cultivating students’creative ability. It’s essential to cultivate this ability in the process of reading instruction,while the present traditional English teaching models hinder its development. This paper tries to analyze the current situation in cultivating students’reflective thinking in English reading instruction from the traditional teaching models,in the hope of refreshing the teachers’consciousness on their teaching methods.

  20. Integral formula for elliptic SOS models with domain walls and a reflecting end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Jules

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we extend previous work of Galleas and the author to elliptic SOS models. We demonstrate that the dynamical reflection algebra can be exploited to obtain a functional equation characterizing the partition function of an elliptic SOS model with domain-wall boundaries and one reflecting end. Special attention is paid to the structure of the functional equation. Through this approach we find a novel multiple-integral formula for that partition function.

  1. Ideals, activities, dissonance, and processing: a conceptual model to guide educators' efforts to stimulate student reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Britta M; Teal, Cayla R; Rogers, John C; Paterniti, Debora A; Haidet, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Medical schools are increasingly incorporating opportunities for reflection into their curricula. However, little is known about the cognitive and/or emotional processes that occur when learners participate in activities designed to promote reflection. The purpose of this study was to identify and elucidate those processes. In 2008, the authors analyzed qualitative data from focus groups that were originally conducted to evaluate an educational activity designed to promote reflection. These data afforded the opportunity to explore the processes of reflection in detail. Transcripts (94 pages, single-spaced) from four focus groups were analyzed using a narrative framework. The authors spent approximately 40 hours in group and 240 hours in individual coding activities. The authors developed a conceptual model of five major elements in students' reflective processes: the educational activity, the presence or absence of cognitive or emotional dissonance, and two methods of processing dissonance (preservation or reconciliation). The model also incorporates the relationship between the student's internal ideal of what a doctor is or does and the student's perception of the teacher's ideal of what a doctor is or does. The model further identifies points at which educators may be able to influence the processes of reflection and the development of professional ideals. Students' cognitive and emotional processes have important effects on the success of educational activities intended to stimulate reflection. Although additional research is needed, this model-which incorporates ideals, activities, dissonance, and processing-can guide educators as they plan and implement such activities.

  2. Self-consistent Gaussian approximation study of classical J1-J2 Heisenberg model in honeycomb and diamond lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rahimipour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The classical J1-J2 Heisenberg model on bipartite lattice exhibits "Neel" order. However if the AF interactions between the next nearest neighbor(nnn are increased with respect to the nearest neighbor(nn, the frustration effect arises. In such situations, new phases such as ordered phases with coplanar or spiral ordering and disordered phases such as spin liquids can arise. In this paper we use the self-consistent Gaussian approximation to study the J1-J2 Heisenberg model in honeycomb and diamond lattices. We find the spin liquid phases such as ring-liquid and pancake-liquid in honeycomb lattice.Also for diamond lattice we show that the degeneracy of ground state can be lifted by thermal fluctuations through the order by disorder mechanism.

  3. Classical-to-quantum crossover in the critical behavior of the transverse-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin glass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Rajak, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-10-01

    We study the critical behavior of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model in transverse field (at finite temperature) using Monte Carlo simulation and exact diagonalization (at zero temperature). We determine the phase diagram of the model by estimating the Binder cumulant. We also determine the correlation length exponent from the collapse of the scaled data. Our numerical studies here indicate that critical Binder cumulant (indicating the universality class of the transition behavior) and the correlation length exponent cross over from their "classical" to "quantum" values at a finite temperature (unlike the cases of pure systems, where such crossovers occur at zero temperature). We propose a qualitative argument supporting such an observation, employing a simple tunneling picture.

  4. Numerical study of the classical 2D discrete frustrated phi(4) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savkin, V.; Rubtsov, A.N.; Janssen, T.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional discrete frustrated phi(4) model is studied by Monte Carlo simulations for two sets of the parameters of the model. Two phase transitions and a floating-incommensurate phase are observed for the case of stronger frustration. The phase transition from the floating-fluid phase to t

  5. Handbook of nature-inspired and innovative computing integrating classical models with emerging technologies

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    As computing devices proliferate, demand increases for an understanding of emerging computing paradigms and models based on natural phenomena. This handbook explores the connection between nature-inspired and traditional computational paradigms. It presents computing paradigms and models based on natural phenomena.

  6. Classical and recent free-volume models for polymer solutions: A comparative evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radfarnia, H.R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ghotbi, C.

    2007-01-01

    to improve the performance of a recent model, the so-called Freed-FV First, we propose a modification of the Freed-FV model accounting for the anomalous free-volume behavior of aqueous systems (unlike the other solvents, water has a lower free-volume percentage than polymers). The results predicted...

  7. Numerical study of the classical 2D discrete frustrated phi(4) model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savkin, V.; Rubtsov, A.N.; Janssen, T.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional discrete frustrated phi(4) model is studied by Monte Carlo simulations for two sets of the parameters of the model. Two phase transitions and a floating-incommensurate phase are observed for the case of stronger frustration. The phase transition from the floating-fluid phase to

  8. The classical r-matrix method for nonlinear sigma-model

    OpenAIRE

    Sevostyanov, Alexey

    1995-01-01

    The canonical Poisson structure of nonlinear sigma-model is presented as a Lie-Poisson r-matrix bracket on coadjoint orbits. It is shown that the Poisson structure of this model is determined by some `hidden singularities' of the Lax matrix.

  9. Non-equilibrium phase transition in a two-species driven-diffusive model of classical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadermazi, Mohammad; Jafarpour, Farhad H.

    2016-09-01

    A two-species driven-diffusive model of classical particles is introduced on a lattice with periodic boundary condition. The model consists of a finite number of first class particles in the presence of a second class particle. While the first class particles can only hop forward, the second class particle is able to hop both forward and backward with specific rates. We have shown that the partition function of this model can be calculated exactly. The model undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition when a condensation of the first class particles occurs behind the second class particle. The phase transition point and the spatial correlations between the first class particles are calculated exactly. On the other hand, we have shown that this model can be mapped onto a two-dimensional walk model. The random walker can only move on the first quarter of a two-dimensional plane and that it takes the paths which can start at any height and end at any height upper than the height of the starting point. The initial vertex (starting point) and the final vertex (end point) of each lattice path are weighted. The weight of the outset point depends on the height of that point while the weight of the end point depends on the height of both the outset point and the end point of each path. The partition function of this walk model is calculated using a transfer matrix method.

  10. a Radiative Transfer Equation/phase Function Approach to Vegetation Canopy Reflectance Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Marion Herbert

    Vegetation canopy reflectance models currently in use differ considerably in their treatment of the radiation scattering problem, and it is this fundamental difference which stimulated this investigation of the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach. The primary objective of this thesis is the development of vegetation canopy phase functions which describe the probability of radiation scattering within a canopy in terms of its biological and physical characteristics. In this thesis a technique based upon quadrature formulae is used to numerically generate a variety of vegetation canopy phase functions. Based upon leaf inclination distribution functions, phase functions are generated for plagiophile, extremophile, erectophile, spherical, planophile, blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and soybean canopies. The vegetation canopy phase functions generated are symmetric with respect to the incident and exitant angles, and hence satisfy the principle of reciprocity. The remaining terms in the radiative transfer equation are also derived in terms of canopy geometry and optical properties to complete the development of the radiative transfer equation/phase function description for vegetation canopy reflectance modeling. In order to test the radiative transfer equation/phase function approach the iterative discrete ordinates method for solving the radiative transfer equation is implemented. In comparison with field data, the approach tends to underestimate the visible reflectance and overestimate infrared reflectance. The approach does compare well, however, with other extant canopy reflectance models; for example, it agrees to within ten to fifteen percent of the Suits model (Suits, 1972). Sensitivity analysis indicates that canopy geometry may influence reflectance as much as 100 percent for a given wavelength. Optical thickness produces little change in reflectance after a depth of 2.5 (Leaf area index of 4.0) is reached, and reflectance generally increases

  11. Forward Modeling of Azimuthal Anisotropy to the Reflected P Wave of Coal Seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-gong; DONG Shou-hua; YUE Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    Under the condition of weak anisotropy, the relation of P-wave anisotropy in direction to fractures of coal seams was researched in order to forecast the density and the direction of the fractures. Although the approximate solution by Rüger is suitable for thick reservoirs, it has some limitations for the composite reflected wave from both roofs and floors of coal seams, as well as multiple reflections. So first, the phase velocity and group velocity as well as their travel time were calculated about the reflected P-wave of the coal seam. Then, the anisotropic coefficients of both roofs and floors were calculated by Rüger formulae and last, the section versus azimuth in fixed offset can be gotten by convolution. In addition, the relation of amplitude of the composite reflected wave to azimuth angle was discussed. The forward modelling results of the coal azimuth anisotropy show these: 1) the coal seam is the strong reflecting layer, but the change of the reflectivity caused by the azimuth anisotropy is smaller; 2) if the azimuth angle is parallel to the crack strike, the reflectivity reaches up to the maximum absolute value, however, if the azimuth angle is perpendicular to the crack strike, the absolute value of the reflection coefficient is minimum; and 3)the reflection coefficient is the cosine function of the azimuth angle and the period is π.

  12. A characterization of edge reflection positive partition functions of vertex coloring models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Regts (Guus)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractSzegedy (B. Szegedy, Edge coloring models and reflection positivity, Journal of the American Mathematical Society 20, 2007, 969-988.) showed that the partition function of any vertex coloring model is equal to the partition function of a complex edge coloring model. Using some results in

  13. A characterization of edge-reflection positive partition functions of vertex-coloring models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Regts (Guus); J. Nešetřil (Jaroslav); M Pellegrini

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractSzegedy (B. Szegedy, Edge coloring models and reflection positivity, Journal of the American Mathematical Society 20, 2007, 969-988.) showed that the partition function of any vertex coloring model is equal to the partition function of a complex edge coloring model. Using some results in

  14. Multiple-reflection model of human skin and estimation of pigment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Rie; Tominaga, Shoji; Tanno, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    We describe a new method for estimating the concentrations of pigments in the human skin using surface spectral reflectance. We derive an equation that expresses the surface spectral reflectance of the human skin. First, we propose an optical model of the human skin that accounts for the stratum corneum. We also consider the difference between the scattering coefficient of the epidermis and that of the dermis. We then derive an equation by applying the Kubelka-Munk theory to an optical model of the human skin. Unlike a model developed in a recent study, the present equation considers pigments as well as multiple reflections and the thicknesses of the skin layers as factors that affect the color of the human skin. In two experiments, we estimate the pigment concentrations using the measured surface spectral reflectances. Finally, we confirm the feasibility of the concentrations estimated by the proposed method by evaluating the estimated pigment concentrations in the skin.

  15. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for the antiproton-induced ionization of atomic hydrogen at low impact energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkadi, L

    2015-01-01

    The three-body dynamics of the ionization of the atomic hydrogen by 30 keV antiproton impact has been investigated by calculation of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The results of the calculations are compared with the predictions of quantum mechanical descriptions: The semi-classical time-dependent close-coupling theory, the fully quantal, time-independent close-coupling theory, and the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state model. In the analysis particular emphasis was put on the role of the nucleus-nucleus (NN) interaction played in the ionization process. For low-energy electron ejection CTMC predicts a large NN interaction effect on FDCS, in agreement with the quantum mechanical descriptions. By examining individual particle trajectories it was found that the relative motion between the electron and the nuclei is coupled very weakly with that between the nuclei, consequently the two motions can be treated independently. A simple ...

  16. Estimating leaf area index by inversion of reflectance model for semiarid natural grasslands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The study developed an integrated reflectance model combining radiative transfer and geometric optical properties in order to inverse leaf area index(LAI) of semiarid natural grasslands.In order to better link remote sensing information with land plants,and facilitate regional and global climate change studies,the model introduced a simple but important geometrical similarity parameter related to plant crown shapes.The model revealed the influences of different plant crown shapes(such as spherical,cylindrical/cuboidal and conic crowns) on leaf/branch angle distribution frequencies,shadow ground coverage,shadowed or sunlit background fractions,canopy reflectance,and scene reflectance.The modeled reflectance data agreed with the measured ones in the three Leymus chinensis steppes with different degradation degrees,which validated the reflectance model.The lower the degradation degree was,the better the modeled data agreed with the measured data.After this reflectance model was coupled with the optimization inversion method,LAI over the entire study region was estimated once every eight days using the eight-day products of surface reflectance obtained by multi-spectral Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer(MODIS) during the growing seasons in 2002.The temporal and spatial patterns of inversed LAI for the steppes with different cover degrees,swamps,flood plains,and croplands agreed with the general laws and measurements very well.But for unused land cover types(sands,saline,and barren lands) and forestlands,totally accounting for about 10% of the study region,the reasonable LAI values were not derived by inversing,requiring further revising of the model or the development of a new model for them.

  17. The high-temperature expansion of the classical Ising model with Sz2 term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Thomaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We derive the high-temperature expansion of the Helmholtz free energy up to order β17 of the one-dimensional spin-S Ising model, with single-ion anisotropy term, in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field. We show that the values of some thermodynamical functions for the ferromagnetic models, in the presence of a weak magnetic field, are not small corrections to their values with h=0. This model with S=3 was applied by Kishine et al. [J.-i. Kishine et al., Phys. Rev. B, 2006, 74, 224419] to analyze experimental data of the single-chain magnet [Mn (saltmen]2 [Ni(pac2 (py2] (PF62 for T<40 K. We show that for T<35 K the thermodynamic functions of the large-spin limit model are poor approximations to their analogous spin-3 functions.

  18. On the current-driven model in the classical electrodynamics of continuous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Vadim A

    2010-12-01

    The current-driven model in which a continuous medium is excited by a pre-determined current which overlaps with the medium in all points in space but is not subject to constitutive relations is critically analyzed.

  19. On the geometry of classically integrable two-dimensional non-linear sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammedi, N., E-mail: nouri@lmpt.univ-tours.f [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique (CNRS - UMR 6083), Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Parc de Grandmont, F-37200 Tours (France)

    2010-11-11

    A master equation expressing the zero curvature representation of the equations of motion of a two-dimensional non-linear sigma models is found. The geometrical properties of this equation are outlined. Special attention is paid to those representations possessing a spectral parameter. Furthermore, a closer connection between integrability and T-duality transformations is emphasised. Finally, new integrable non-linear sigma models are found and all their corresponding Lax pairs depend on a spectral parameter.

  20. Comparison of a new expert elicitation model with the Classical Model, equal weights and single experts, using a cross-validation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flandoli, F. [Dip.to di Matematica Applicata, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Giorgi, E. [Dip.to di Matematica Applicata, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Pisa, via della Faggiola 32, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Aspinall, W.P. [Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, and Aspinall and Associates, Tisbury (United Kingdom); Neri, A., E-mail: neri@pi.ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Pisa, via della Faggiola 32, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The problem of ranking and weighting experts' performances when quantitative judgments are being elicited for decision support is considered. A new scoring model, the Expected Relative Frequency model, is presented, based on the closeness between central values provided by the expert and known values used for calibration. Using responses from experts in five different elicitation datasets, a cross-validation technique is used to compare this new approach with the Cooke Classical Model, the Equal Weights model, and individual experts. The analysis is performed using alternative reward schemes designed to capture proficiency either in quantifying uncertainty, or in estimating true central values. Results show that although there is only a limited probability that one approach is consistently better than another, the Cooke Classical Model is generally the most suitable for assessing uncertainties, whereas the new ERF model should be preferred if the goal is central value estimation accuracy. - Highlights: > A new expert elicitation model, named Expected Relative Frequency (ERF), is presented. > A cross-validation approach to evaluate the performance of different elicitation models is applied. > The new ERF model shows the best performance with respect to the point-wise estimates.

  1. Loop algorithm for classical Heisenberg models with spin-ice type degeneracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinaoka, Hiroshi; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2010-10-01

    In many frustrated Ising models, a single-spin flip dynamics is frozen out at low temperatures compared to the dominant interaction energy scale because of the discrete “multiple valley” structure of degenerate ground-state manifold. This makes it difficult to study low-temperature physics of these frustrated systems by using Monte Carlo simulation with the standard single-spin flip algorithm. A typical example is the so-called spin-ice model, frustrated ferromagnets on the pyrochlore lattice. The difficulty can be avoided by a global-flip algorithm, the loop algorithm, that enables to sample over the entire discrete manifold and to investigate low-temperature properties. We extend the loop algorithm to Heisenberg spin systems with strong easy-axis anisotropy in which the ground-state manifold is continuous but still retains the spin-ice type degeneracy. We examine different ways of loop flips and compare their efficiency. The extended loop algorithm is applied to two models, a Heisenberg antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy along the z axis, and a Heisenberg spin-ice model with the local ⟨111⟩ easy-axis anisotropy. For both models, we demonstrate high efficiency of our loop algorithm by revealing the low-temperature properties which were hard to access by the standard single-spin flip algorithm. For the former model, we examine the possibility of order from disorder and critically check its absence. For the latter model, we elucidate a gas-liquid-solid transition, namely, crossover or phase transition among paramagnet, spin-ice liquid, and ferromagnetically ordered ice-rule state.

  2. Controlling disease outbreaks in wildlife using limited culling: modelling classical swine fever incursions in wild pigs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowled, Brendan D; Garner, M Graeme; Negus, Katherine; Ward, Michael P

    2012-01-16

    Disease modelling is one approach for providing new insights into wildlife disease epidemiology. This paper describes a spatio-temporal, stochastic, susceptible- exposed-infected-recovered process model that simulates the potential spread of classical swine fever through a documented, large and free living wild pig population following a simulated incursion. The study area (300 000 km2) was in northern Australia. Published data on wild pig ecology from Australia, and international Classical Swine Fever data was used to parameterise the model. Sensitivity analyses revealed that herd density (best estimate 1-3 pigs km-2), daily herd movement distances (best estimate approximately 1 km), probability of infection transmission between herds (best estimate 0.75) and disease related herd mortality (best estimate 42%) were highly influential on epidemic size but that extraordinary movements of pigs and the yearly home range size of a pig herd were not. CSF generally established (98% of simulations) following a single point introduction. CSF spread at approximately 9 km2 per day with low incidence rates (wild pig area). The low incidence rate indicates that surveillance for wildlife disease epidemics caused by short lived infections will be most efficient when surveillance is based on detection and investigation of clinical events, although this may not always be practical. Epidemics could be contained and eradicated with culling (aerial shooting) or vaccination when these were adequately implemented. It was apparent that the spatial structure, ecology and behaviour of wild populations must be accounted for during disease management in wildlife. An important finding was that it may only be necessary to cull or vaccinate relatively small proportions of a population to successfully contain and eradicate some wildlife disease epidemics.

  3. The classical Starling resistor model often does not predict inspiratory airflow patterns in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Robert L; Edwards, Bradley A; Sands, Scott A; Butler, James P; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The upper airway is often modeled as a classical Starling resistor, featuring a constant inspiratory airflow, or plateau, over a range of downstream pressures. However, airflow tracings from clinical sleep studies often show an initial peak before the plateau. To conform to the Starling model, the initial peak must be of small magnitude or dismissed as a transient. We developed a method to simulate fast or slow inspirations through the human upper airway, to test the hypothesis that this initial peak is a transient. Eight subjects [4 obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 4 controls] slept in an "iron lung" and wore a nasal mask connected to a continuous/bilevel positive airway pressure machine. Downstream pressure was measured using an epiglottic catheter. During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, subjects were hyperventilated to produce a central apnea, then extrathoracic pressure was decreased slowly (∼2-4 s) or abruptly (<0.5 s) to lower downstream pressure and create inspiratory airflow. Pressure-flow curves were constructed for flow-limited breaths, and slow vs. fast reductions in downstream pressure were compared. All subjects exhibited an initial peak and then a decrease in flow with more negative pressures, demonstrating negative effort dependence (NED). The rate of change in downstream pressure did not affect the peak to plateau airflow ratio: %NED 22 ± 13% (slow) vs. 20 ± 5% (fast), P = not significant. We conclude that the initial peak in inspiratory airflow is not a transient but rather a distinct mechanical property of the upper airway. In contrast to the classical Starling resistor model, the upper airway exhibits marked NED in some subjects.

  4. Probabilistic biomechanical finite element simulations: whole-model classical hypothesis testing based on upcrossing geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd C. Pataky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Statistical analyses of biomechanical finite element (FE simulations are frequently conducted on scalar metrics extracted from anatomically homologous regions, like maximum von Mises stresses from demarcated bone areas. The advantages of this approach are numerical tabulability and statistical simplicity, but disadvantages include region demarcation subjectivity, spatial resolution reduction, and results interpretation complexity when attempting to mentally map tabulated results to original anatomy. This study proposes a method which abandons the two aforementioned advantages to overcome these three limitations. The method is inspired by parametric random field theory (RFT, but instead uses a non-parametric analogue to RFT which permits flexible model-wide statistical analyses through non-parametrically constructed probability densities regarding volumetric upcrossing geometry. We illustrate method fundamentals using basic 1D and 2D models, then use a public model of hip cartilage compression to highlight how the concepts can extend to practical biomechanical modeling. The ultimate whole-volume results are easy to interpret, and for constant model geometry the method is simple to implement. Moreover, our analyses demonstrate that the method can yield biomechanical insights which are difficult to infer from single simulations or tabulated multi-simulation results. Generalizability to non-constant geometry including subject-specific anatomy is discussed.

  5. Information about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response in vicarious classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygge, S

    1976-06-01

    Four groups with 16 observers each participated in a differential, vicarious conditioning experiment with skin conductance responses as the dependent variable. The information available to the observer about the model's unconditioned stimulus and response was varied in a 2 X 2 factorial design. Results clearly showed that information about the model's unconditioned stimulus (a high or low dB level) was not necessary for vicarious instigation, but that information about the unconditioned response (a high or low emotional aversiveness) was necessary. Data for conditioning of responses showed almost identical patterns to those for vicarious instigation. To explain the results, a distinction between factors necessary for the development and elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was introduced, and the effectiveness of information about the model's response on the elicitation of vicariously instigated responses was considered in terms of an expansion of Bandura's social learning theory.

  6. The love equation: Computational modeling of romantic relationships in French classical drama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.; Kestemont, M.; Schöch, C.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    We report on building a computational model of romantic relationships in a corpus of historical literary texts. We frame this task as a ranking problem in which, for a given character, we try to assign the highest rank to the character with whom (s)he is most likely to be romantically involved. As d

  7. Electro-acoustic behavior of the mitotic spindle: a semi-classical coarse-grained model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Havelka

    Full Text Available The regulation of chromosome separation during mitosis is not fully understood yet. Microtubules forming mitotic spindles are targets of treatment strategies which are aimed at (i the triggering of the apoptosis or (ii the interruption of uncontrolled cell division. Despite these facts, only few physical models relating to the dynamics of mitotic spindles exist up to now. In this paper, we present the first electromechanical model which enables calculation of the electromagnetic field coupled to acoustic vibrations of the mitotic spindle. This electromagnetic field originates from the electrical polarity of microtubules which form the mitotic spindle. The model is based on the approximation of resonantly vibrating microtubules by a network of oscillating electric dipoles. Our computational results predict the existence of a rapidly changing electric field which is generated by either driven or endogenous vibrations of the mitotic spindle. For certain values of parameters, the intensity of the electric field and its gradient reach values which may exert a not-inconsiderable force on chromosomes which are aligned in the spindle midzone. Our model may describe possible mechanisms of the effects of ultra-short electrical and mechanical pulses on dividing cells--a strategy used in novel methods for cancer treatment.

  8. The classic European hyperinflations revisited : testing the Cagan model using a cointegrated VAR approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom

    1994-01-01

    I tidligere studier af de klassiske Europæiske hyperinflationer antages det at stød til pengeefterspørgslen er ikke-stationære. I artiklen vises det v.h.a. kointegrationstests at denne antagelse er fejlagtig. Med udgangspunkt i en kointegreret VAR model findes det, at der under de Europæiske...

  9. Historic Building Information Modelling - Adding intelligence to laser and image based surveys of European classical architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Maurice; McGovern, Eugene; Pavia, Sara

    2013-02-01

    Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) is a novel prototype library of parametric objects, based on historic architectural data and a system of cross platform programmes for mapping parametric objects onto point cloud and image survey data. The HBIM process begins with remote collection of survey data using a terrestrial laser scanner combined with digital photo modelling. The next stage involves the design and construction of a parametric library of objects, which are based on the manuscripts ranging from Vitruvius to 18th century architectural pattern books. In building parametric objects, the problem of file format and exchange of data has been overcome within the BIM ArchiCAD software platform by using geometric descriptive language (GDL). The plotting of parametric objects onto the laser scan surveys as building components to create or form the entire building is the final stage in the reverse engineering process. The final HBIM product is the creation of full 3D models including detail behind the object's surface concerning its methods of construction and material make-up. The resultant HBIM can automatically create cut sections, details and schedules in addition to the orthographic projections and 3D models (wire frame or textured) for both the analysis and conservation of historic objects, structures and environments.

  10. The Love Equation : Computational Modeling of Romantic Relationships in French Classical Drama

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.B.; Kestemont, Mike; Schöch, Christof; van den Bosch, Antal; Finlayson, Mark; Miller, Ben; Lieto, Antonio; Ronfard, Remi

    2015-01-01

    We report on building a computational model of romantic relationships in a corpus of historical literary texts. We frame this task as a ranking problem in which, for a given character, we try to assign the highest rank to the character with whom (s)he is most likely to be romantically involved. As d

  11. Protein folding pathways and state transitions described by classical equations of motion of an elastic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth; Toon, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    Protein topology defined by the matrix of residue contacts has proved to be a fruitful basis for the study of protein dynamics. The widely implemented coarse-grained elastic network model of backbone fluctuations has been used to describe crystallographic temperature factors, allosteric couplings, and some aspects of the folding pathway. In the present study, we develop a model of protein dynamics based on the classical equations of motion of a damped network model (DNM) that describes the folding path from a completely unfolded state to the native conformation through a single-well potential derived purely from the native conformation. The kinetic energy gained through the collapse of the protein chain is dissipated through a friction term in the equations of motion that models the water bath. This approach is completely general and sufficiently fast that it can be applied to large proteins. Folding pathways for various proteins of different classes are described and shown to correlate with experimental observations and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Allosteric transitions between alternative protein structures are also modeled within the DNM through an asymmetric double-well potential.

  12. Modeling the effects of a single reflection on binaural speech intelligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennies, Jan; Warzybok, Anna; Brand, Thomas; Kollmeier, Birger

    2014-03-01

    Recently the influence of delay and azimuth of a single speech reflection on speech reception thresholds (SRTs) was systematically investigated using frontal, diffuse, and lateral noise [Warzybok et al. (2013). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 269-282]. The experiments showed that the benefit of an early reflection was independent of its azimuth and mostly independent of noise type, but that the detrimental effect of a late reflection depended on its direction relative to the noise. This study tests if different extensions of a binaural speech intelligibility model can predict these data. The extensions differ in the order in which binaural processing and temporal integration of early reflections take place. Models employing a correction for the detrimental effects of reverberation on speech intelligibility after performing the binaural processing predict SRTs in symmetric masking conditions (frontal, diffuse), but cannot predict the measured interaction of temporal and spatial integration. In contrast, a model extension accounting for the distinction between useful and detrimental reflections before the binaural processing stage predicts the data with an overall R(2) of 0.95. This indicates that any model framework predicting speech intelligibility in rooms should incorporate an interaction between binaural and temporal integration of reflections at a comparatively early stage.

  13. Understanding EROS2 observations toward the spiral arms within a classical Galactic model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniez, M.; Sajadian, S.; Karami, M.; Rahvar, S.; Ansari, R.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: EROS (Expérience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres) has searched for microlensing toward four directions in the Galactic plane away from the Galactic center. The interpretation of the catalog optical depth is complicated by the spread of the source distance distribution. We compare the EROS microlensing observations with Galactic models (including the Besançon model), tuned to fit the EROS source catalogs, and take into account all observational data such as the microlensing optical depth, the Einstein crossing durations, and the color and magnitude distributions of the catalogued stars. Methods: We simulated EROS-like source catalogs using the HIgh-Precision PARallax COllecting Satellite (Hipparcos) database, the Galactic mass distribution, and an interstellar extinction table. Taking into account the EROS star detection efficiency, we were able to produce simulated color-magnitude diagrams that fit the observed diagrams. This allows us to estimate average microlensing optical depths and event durations that are directly comparable with the measured values. Results: Both the Besançon model and our Galactic model allow us to fully understand the EROS color-magnitude data. The average optical depths and mean event durations calculated from these models are in reasonable agreement with the observations. Varying the Galactic structure parameters through simulation, we were also able to deduce contraints on the kinematics of the disk, the disk stellar mass function (at a few kpc distance from the Sun), and the maximum contribution of a thick disk of compact objects in the Galactic plane (Mthickcompetitive constraints. Conclusions: Our simulation gives a better understanding of the lens and source spatial distributions in the microlensing events. The goodness of a global fit taking into account all the observables (from the color-magnitude diagrams and microlensing observations) shows the validity of the Galactic models. Our tests with the parameters excursions

  14. Phase diagram of the Shastry-Sutherland Kondo lattice model with classical localized spins: a variational calculation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Munir; Sengupta, Pinaki

    2017-08-01

    We study the Shastry-Sutherland Kondo lattice model with additional Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions, exploring the possible magnetic phases in its multi-dimensional parameter space. Treating the local moments as classical spins and using a variational ansatz, we identify the parameter ranges over which various common magnetic orderings are potentially stabilized. Our results reveal that the competing interactions result in a heightened susceptibility towards a wide range of spin configurations including longitudinal ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order, coplanar flux configurations and most interestingly, multiple non-coplanar configurations including a novel canted-flux state as the different Hamiltonian parameters like electron density, interaction strengths and degree of frustration are varied. The non-coplanar and non-collinear magnetic ordering of localized spins behave like emergent electromagnetic fields and drive unusual transport and electronic phenomena.

  15. A unified model for the spectrophotometric development of classical and recurrent novae: the role of asphericity of the ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the geometry, and not only the filling factors, of nova ejecta is important in the interpretation of their spectral and photometric developments. Ensembles of spectra and light curves have provided general typographies. This Letter suggests how these can be unified.The observed spread in the maximum magnitude - rate of decline (MMRD) relation is argued to result from the range of opening angles and inclination of the ejecta, and not only to their masses and velocities. The spectroscopic classes can be similarly explained and linked to the behavior of the light curves. The secondary maximum observed in some dust forming novae is a natural consequence of the asphericity. Neither secondary ejections nor winds are needed to explain the phenomenology. The spectrophotometric development of classical novae can be understood within a single phenomenological model with bipolar, although not jet-like, mass ejecta. High resolution spectropolarimetry will be an essential analytical tool.

  16. Metastable configurations of a finite-size chain of classical spins within the one-dimensional chiral XY-model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexander P., E-mail: APPopov@mephi.ru [Department of Molecular Physics, National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gloria Pini, Maria, E-mail: mariagloria.pini@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi del CNR (CNR-ISC), Unità di Firenze, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Rettori, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The metastable states of a finite-size chain of N classical spins described by the chiral XY-model on a discrete one-dimensional lattice are calculated by means of a general theoretical method recently developed by one of us. This method allows one to determine all the possible equilibrium magnetic states in an accurate and systematic way. The ground state of a chain consisting of N classical XY spins is calculated in the presence of (i) a symmetric ferromagnetic exchange interaction, favoring parallel alignment of nearest neighbor spins, (ii) a uniaxial anisotropy, favoring a given direction in the film plane, and (iii) an antisymmetric Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI), favoring perpendicular alignment of nearest neighbor spins. In addition to the ground state with a non-uniform helical spin arrangement, which originates from the energy competition in the finite-size chain with open boundary conditions, we have found a considerable number of higher-energy equilibrium states. In the investigated case of a chain with N=10 spins and a DMI much smaller than the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy, it turns out that a metastable (unstable) state of the finite chain is characterized by a configuration where none (at least one) of the inner spins is nearly parallel to the hard axis. The role of the DMI is to establish a unique rotational sense for the helical ground state. Moreover, the number of both metastable and unstable equilibrium states is doubled with respect to the case of zero DMI. This produces modifications in the Peierls–Nabarro potential encountered by a domain wall during its displacement along the discrete spin chain. - Highlights: • A finite-size chain of N classical spins within the XY-chiral model is investigated. • Using a systematic theoretical method, all equilibrium states are calculated for N=10. • The ground state has a non-uniform helical order with unique rotational sense. • Metastable states contain a domain wall whose energy

  17. Effect of magnetic field on noncollinear magnetism in classical bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasrija, Kanika; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-05-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of a bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional square lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. The study is motivated by the relevance of this simple model to the non-collinear magnetism and the consequent ferroelectric behavior in the recently discovered high-temperature multiferroic, cupric oxide (CuO). We show that an external magnetic field stabilizes a non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is characterized by a finite ferromagnetic moment along the direction of the applied magnetic field and a spiral spin texture if projected in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real-space analysis highlights a coexistence of non-collinear regions with ferromagnetic clusters. The results are also supported by simple variational calculations.

  18. A comparison of classical mechanics models and finite element simulation of elastically tailored wing boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfield, Lawrence W.; Pickings, Richard D.; Chang, Stephen; Holl, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Structural tailoring concepts were developed to create wings with elastically produced camber for the purpose of increasing lift during takeoff conditions. Simple models based upon enhancements to the thin walled composite beam theory of Rehfield were developed to investigate prospects for elastic tailoring of the chordwise deformation of wing structures. The purpose here is to provide a comparison of the theoretical results with a finite element model for the bending method of producing camber. Finite element correlation studies were completed for two cases: a bonded unstiffened structural box, and a bolted unstiffened structural box. Results from these studies show an error of less than one percent for the bonded case and less than six percent for the bolted case in predicting camber curvature for the structural box. Examination of the results shows that the theory is very accurate for the cases studied and will provide an excellent basis for conducting further tailoring studies.

  19. Effect of magnetic field on noncollinear magnetism in classical bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasrija, Kanika, E-mail: kanikapasrija@iisermohali.ac.in; Kumar, Sanjeev, E-mail: sanjeev@iisermohali.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, S. A. S. Nagar, Manauli PO 140306 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of a bilinear-biquadratic Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional square lattice in the presence of an external magnetic field. The study is motivated by the relevance of this simple model to the non-collinear magnetism and the consequent ferroelectric behavior in the recently discovered high-temperature multiferroic, cupric oxide (CuO). We show that an external magnetic field stabilizes a non-coplanar magnetic phase, which is characterized by a finite ferromagnetic moment along the direction of the applied magnetic field and a spiral spin texture if projected in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Real-space analysis highlights a coexistence of non-collinear regions with ferromagnetic clusters. The results are also supported by simple variational calculations.

  20. Classical dynamics of the Bianchi IX model: space-like and time-like singularity cases

    CERN Document Server

    Parnovsky, S L

    2016-01-01

    We present the comparison of the dynamics of the vacuum Bianchi IX model near the space-like and time-like singularities. In both cases there exist oscillatory type solutions with diverging asymptotically curvature invariants. The dynamics of the time-like singularity case includes additionally the singular solutions with diverging volume density, but vanishing curvature invariants. Our numerical results are consistent with qualitative analytical considerations underlying finding the generic singular solutions to general relativity.

  1. Critical Exponents of the Classical 3D Heisenberg Model A Single-Cluster Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1993-01-01

    We have simulated the three-dimensional Heisenberg model on simple cubic lattices, using the single-cluster Monte Carlo update algorithm. The expected pronounced reduction of critical slowing down at the phase transition is verified. This allows simulations on significantly larger lattices than in previous studies and consequently a better control over systematic errors. In one set of simulations we employ the usual finite-size scaling methods to compute the critical exponents $\

  2. An Algorithm of a Virtual Quantum Computer Model on a Classical Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Kamalov, T. F.; Rybakov, Yu. P.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of virtual quantum states became possible due to the hypothesis on the nature of quantum states quant-ph/0212139. This study considers a stochastic geometrical background (stochastic gravitational background) generating correlation (or, coherency) of various quantum non-interacting objects. In the quantum state virtual model, a simple method of generating of two (or more) dichotomic signals with controlled mutual correlation factor from a single continuous stochastic process is i...

  3. Synchronisation of fertility with carrying capacity; an investigation using classical and agent based modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Crozier Murrell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalized Verhulst model subject to seasonal change in both fertility rate and carrying capacity is outlined. Numerical solutions to the Verhulst equations are employed to obtain optimal fertility rate phase shift with respect to carrying capacity. Possible natural selection for a preferred season of conception is investigated using agent based simulations. Both experiments indicate that synchronization of fertility rate to environment carrying capacity is beneficial to species survival.

  4. A Parameter Study of Classical Be Star Disk Models Constrained by Optical Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Piskunov (2003); these profiles are based on the hydrogen populations computed for the appropriate LTE, line-blanketed model atmosphere adopted from...physical conditions throughout the disk to be retained. The Stark broadening routines of Barklem & Piskunov (2003) were also used to compute the local H...as an NSERC USRA in 2006. Facilities: Hall, NPOI REFERENCES Armstrong, J. T., et al. 1998, ApJ, 496, 550 Barklem, P. S., & Piskunov , N. E. 2003, in IAU

  5. Evaluation of reflection and refraction in simulations of ultraviolet disinfection using the discrete ordinates radiation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C K

    2009-01-01

    Simulations of UV disinfection systems require accurate models of UV radiation within the reactor. Processes such as reflection and refraction at surfaces within the reactor can impact the intensity of the simulated radiation field, which in turn impacts the simulated dose and performance of the UV reactor. This paper describes a detailed discrete ordinates radiation model and comparisons to a test that recorded the UV radiation distribution around a low pressure UV lamp in a water-filled chamber with a UV transmittance of 88%. The effects of reflection and refraction at the quartz sleeve were investigated, along with the impact of wall reflection from the interior surfaces of the chamber. Results showed that the inclusion of wall reflection improved matches between predicted and measured values of incident radiation throughout the chamber. The difference between simulations with and without reflection ranged from several percent near the lamp to nearly 40% further away from the lamp. Neglecting reflection and refraction at the quartz sleeve increased the simulated radiation near the lamp and reduced the simulated radiation further away from the lamp. However, the distribution and trends in the simulated radiation field both with and without the effects of reflection and refraction at the quartz sleeve were consistent with the measured data distributions.

  6. [Mechanisms and regulation of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in filamentous fungi: classical cases and new models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Ivonne; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia; Montoya, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant renewable carbon source on earth. However, this polymer structure comprises a physical and chemical barrier for carbon access, which has limited its exploitation. In nature, only a few percentage of microorganisms may degrade this polymer by cellulase expression. Filamentous fungi are one of the most active and efficient groups among these microorganisms. This review describes similarities and differences between cellulase activity mechanisms and regulatory mechanisms controlling gene expression for 3 of the most studied cellulolytic filamentous fungi models: Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus nidulans, and the recently described model Neurospora crassa. Unlike gene expression mechanisms, it was found that enzymatic activity mechanisms are similar for all the studied models. Understanding the distinctive elements of each system is essential for the development of strategies for the improvement of cellulase production, either by providing the optimum environment (fermentation conditions) or increasing gene expression in these microorganisms by genetic engineering. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Classical defects in higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Ilham; Ramadhan, Handhika S.

    2017-09-01

    We construct solutions of higher-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to nonlinear σ -model with cosmological constant. The σ -model can be perceived as exterior configuration of a spontaneously-broken SO(D-1) global higher-codimensional "monopole". Here we allow the kinetic term of the σ -model to be noncanonical; in particular we specifically study a quadratic-power-law type. This is some possible higher-dimensional generalization of the Bariola-Vilenkin (BV) solutions with k-global monopole studied recently. The solutions can be perceived as the exterior solution of a black hole swallowing up noncanonical global defects. Even in the absence of comological constant its surrounding spacetime is asymptotically non-flat; it suffers from deficit solid angle. We discuss the corresponding horizons. For Λ >0 in 4 d there can exist three extremal conditions (the cold, ultracold, and Nariai black holes), while in higher-than-four dimensions the extremal black hole is only Nariai. For Λ <0 we only have black hole solutions with one horizon, save for the 4 d case where there can exist two horizons. We give constraints on the mass and the symmetry-breaking scale for the existence of all the extremal cases. In addition, we also obtain factorized solutions, whose topology is the direct product of two-dimensional spaces of constant curvature (M_2, dS_2, or AdS_2) with (D-2)-sphere. We study all possible factorized channels.

  8. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  9. Description of Hymenolepis microstoma (Nottingham strain: a classical tapeworm model for research in the genomic era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Peter D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hymenolepis microstoma (Dujardin, 1845 Blanchard, 1891, the mouse bile duct tapeworm, is a rodent/beetle-hosted laboratory model that has been used in research and teaching since its domestication in the 1950s. Recent characterization of its genome has prompted us to describe the specific strain that underpins these data, anchoring its identity and bringing the 150+ year-old original description up-to-date. Results Morphometric and ultrastructural analyses were carried out on laboratory-reared specimens of the 'Nottingham' strain of Hymenolepis microstoma used for genome characterization. A contemporary description of the species is provided including detailed illustration of adult anatomy and elucidation of its taxonomy and the history of the specific laboratory isolate. Conclusions Our work acts to anchor the specific strain from which the H. microstoma genome has been characterized and provides an anatomical reference for researchers needing to employ a model tapeworm system that enables easy access to all stages of the life cycle. We review its classification, life history and development, and briefly discuss the genome and other model systems being employed at the beginning of a genomic era in cestodology.

  10. Validation of the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, K. Frank; Vamal, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer model was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement near clouds. This simple model accounts for the radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and molecular layer above, the major contribution to the reflectance enhancement near clouds for short wavelengths. We use LES/SHDOM simulated 3D radiation fields to valid the two-layer model for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometer. We find: (a) The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; and (b) The magnitude of the 2-layer modeled enhancement agree reasonably well with the "truth" with some expected underestimation. We further extend our model to include cloud-surface interaction using the Poisson model for broken clouds. We found that including cloud-surface interaction improves the correction, though it can introduced some over corrections for large cloud albedo, large cloud optical depth, large cloud fraction, large cloud aspect ratio. This over correction can be reduced by excluding scenes (10 km x 10km) with large cloud fraction for which the Poisson model is not designed for. Further research is underway to account for the contribution of cloud-aerosol radiative interaction to the enhancement.

  11. Correction of terrestrial LiDAR intensity channel using Oren-Nayar reflectance model: An application to lithological differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellan, Antonio; Humair, Florian; Matasci, Battista; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based LiDAR has been traditionally used for surveying purposes via 3D point clouds. In addition to XYZ coordinates, an intensity value is also recorded by LiDAR devices. The intensity of the backscattered signal can be a significant source of information for various applications in geosciences. Previous attempts to account for the scattering of the laser signal are usually modelled using a perfect diffuse reflection. Nevertheless, experience on natural outcrops shows that rock surfaces do not behave as perfect diffuse reflectors. The geometry (or relief) of the scanned surfaces plays a major role in the recorded intensity values. Our study proposes a new terrestrial LiDAR intensity correction, which takes into consideration the range, the incidence angle and the geometry of the scanned surfaces. The proposed correction equation combines the classical radar equation for LiDAR with the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the Oren-Nayar model. It is based on the idea that the surface geometry can be modelled by a relief of multiple micro-facets. This model is constrained by only one tuning parameter: the standard deviation of the slope angle distribution (σslope) of micro-facets. Firstly, a series of tests have been carried out in laboratory conditions on a 2 m2 board covered by black/white matte paper (perfect diffuse reflector) and scanned at different ranges and incidence angles. Secondly, other tests were carried out on rock blocks of different lithologies and surface conditions. Those tests demonstrated that the non-perfect diffuse reflectance of rock surfaces can be practically handled by the proposed correction method. Finally, the intensity correction method was applied to a real case study, with two scans of the carbonate rock outcrop of the Dents-du-Midi (Swiss Alps), to improve the lithological identification for geological mapping purposes. After correction, the intensity values are proportional to the intrinsic material reflectance

  12. 从经典著作的原始语境反观法国学派的民族中心主义%Reflecting upon the Ethnocentrism of the French School in the Original Context of the Classic Works

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林满平; 王宁宁

    2012-01-01

    In the pioneering days of comparative literature, the French School, regarding influence research as the essence to rely upon, insists on paying attention to the factual relations in literature among different countries and various ethnic groups. The French School is criticized by later scholars for having fallen into the category of narrow ethnocentrism, due to the unavoidable limitation of history at the beginning, and its own defect that the theory has been divorced from the practice. The author holds that one should carefully read and reflect upon classic works of disciplines to comprehensively learn about the influence research of the French School, and grasp it as a whole in the original context of those classic works.%比较文学初创时期的法国学派,坚持以实证主义的态度,关照不同国家不同民族之间文学上的事实联系,以影响研究为自己安身立命之根本。法国学派在初创时期因为历史无可避免的局限性,以其自身理论与实践相脱节的缺陷,被后来学者指责陷入了狭隘的民族中心主义。笔者认为,对法国学派的影响研究的全面认识。应该细读和反思元典著作,立足于学科经典著作的原始语境来整体把握。

  13. Scaling of the dynamics of a homogeneous one-dimensional anisotropic classical Heisenberg model with long-range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, C. R.; Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of quasistationary states of long-range interacting systems with N particles can be described by kinetic equations such as the Balescu-Lenard and Landau equations. In the case of one-dimensional homogeneous systems, two-body contributions vanish as two-body collisions in one dimension only exchange momentum and thus cannot change the one-particle distribution. Using a Kac factor in the interparticle potential implies a scaling of the dynamics proportional to Nδ with δ =1 except for one-dimensional homogeneous systems. For the latter different values for δ were reported for a few models. Recently it was shown by Rocha Filho and collaborators [Phys. Rev. E 90, 032133 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.032133 for the Hamiltonian mean-field model that δ =2 provided that N is sufficiently large, while small N effects lead to δ ≈1.7 . More recently, Gupta and Mukamel [J. Stat. Mech. (2011) P03015, 10.1088/1742-5468/2011/03/P03015] introduced a classical spin model with an anisotropic interaction with a scaling in the dynamics proportional to N1.7 for a homogeneous state. We show here that this model reduces to a one-dimensional Hamiltonian system and that the scaling of the dynamics approaches N2 with increasing N . We also explain from theoretical consideration why usual kinetic theory fails for small N values, which ultimately is the origin of noninteger exponents in the scaling.

  14. Quantum features derived from the classical model of a bouncer-walker coupled to a zero-point field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabl, H.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Fussy, S.; Grössing, G.

    2012-05-01

    In our bouncer-walker model a quantum is a nonequilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy. Specifically, we consider a "particle" as a bouncer whose oscillations are phase-locked with those of the energy-momentum reservoir of the zero-point field (ZPF), and we combine this with the random-walk model of the walker, again driven by the ZPF. Starting with this classical toy model of the bouncer-walker we were able to derive fundamental elements of quantum theory [1]. Here this toy model is revisited with special emphasis on the mechanism of emergence. Especially the derivation of the total energy hslashωo and the coupling to the ZPF are clarified. For this we make use of a sub-quantum equipartition theorem. It can further be shown that the couplings of both bouncer and walker to the ZPF are identical. Then we follow this path in accordance with Ref. [2], expanding the view from the particle in its rest frame to a particle in motion. The basic features of ballistic diffusion are derived, especially the diffusion constant D, thus providing a missing link between the different approaches of our previous works [1, 2].

  15. Quantum features derived from the classical model of a bouncer-walker coupled to a zero-point field

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabl, Herbert; Fussy, Siegfried; Groessing, Gerhard; 10.1088/1742-6596/361/1/012021

    2012-01-01

    In our bouncer-walker model a quantum is a nonequilibrium steady-state maintained by a permanent throughput of energy. Specifically, we consider a "particle" as a bouncer whose oscillations are phase-locked with those of the energy-momentum reservoir of the zero-point field (ZPF), and we combine this with the random-walk model of the walker, again driven by the ZPF. Starting with this classical toy model of the bouncer-walker we were able to derive fundamental elements of quantum theory. Here this toy model is revisited with special emphasis on the mechanism of emergence. Especially the derivation of the total energy hbar.omega and the coupling to the ZPF are clarified. For this we make use of a sub-quantum equipartition theorem. It can further be shown that the couplings of both bouncer and walker to the ZPF are identical. Then we follow this path in accordance with previous work, expanding the view from the particle in its rest frame to a particle in motion. The basic features of ballistic diffusion are der...

  16. Testing the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, Frank; Varnai, Tamas; Levy, Rob

    2015-01-01

    A two-layer model (2LM) was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement due to cloud-molecular radiative interaction at MODIS at 0.47 micrometers. Recently, we extended the model to include cloud-surface and cloud-aerosol radiative interactions. We use the LES/SHDOM simulated 3D true radiation fields to test the 2LM for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometers. We find: The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; the cloud-molecular interaction alone accounts for 70 percent of the enhancement; the cloud-surface interaction accounts for 16 percent of the enhancement; the cloud-aerosol interaction accounts for an additional 13 percent of the enhancement. We conclude that the 2LM is simple to apply and unbiased.

  17. Parallelization of a Quantum-Classic Hybrid Model For Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The expensive reengineering of the sequential software and the difficult parallel programming are two of the many technical and economic obstacles to the wide use of HPC. We investigate the chance to improve in a rapid way the performance of a numerical serial code for the simulation of the transport of a charged carriers in a Double-Gate MOSFET. We introduce the Drift-Diffusion-Schrödinger-Poisson (DDSP) model and we study a rapid parallelization strategy of the numerical procedure on shared...

  18. Generalized classical, quantum and intermediate statistics and the Polya urn model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niven, Robert K. [School of Aerospace, Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Northcott Drive, Canberra, ACT, 2600 (Australia); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen O (Denmark)], E-mail: r.niven@adfa.edu.au; Grendar, Marian [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Bel University, Tajovskeho 40, 974 01 Banska Bystrica (Slovakia)], E-mail: marian.grendar@savba.sk

    2009-02-02

    Generalized probability distributions for Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, with unequal source ('prior') probabilities q{sub i} for each level i, are obtained by combinatorial reasoning. For equiprobable degenerate sublevels, these reduce to those given by Brillouin in 1930, more commonly given as a statistical weight for each statistic. These distributions and corresponding cross-entropy (divergence) functions are shown to be special cases of the Polya urn model, involving neither independent nor identically distributed ('ninid') sampling. The most probable Polya distribution is shown to contain the Acharya-Swamy intermediate statistic.

  19. Exchange interaction radically changes behavior of a quantum particle in a classically forbidden region: simple model

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2009-01-01

    Exchange interaction strongly influences the long-range behavior of localized electron orbitals and quantum tunneling amplitudes.In the Hartree-Fock approximation the exchange produces a power-law decay instead of the usual exponential decrease at large distances. To show that this effect is real (i.e. not a result of the approximation) we consider a simple model where different effects may be accurately analyzed. Applications include huge enhancement of inner electron ionization by a static electric field or laser field considered in Ref. M. Ya. Amusia, arxiv:0904.4395

  20. Exponentially long Equilibration times in a 1-D Collisional Model of a classical gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Benettin, G.

    1999-01-01

    separation between the time scale for the vibration and the time scale associated with a typical binary collision in the gas. We consider here a simple 1-D model, and show how, when these time scales are well separated, the collisional dynamics is constrained by a many-particle adiabatic invariant....... The effect is that the collisional energy exchanges between the translational and the vibrational degrees of freedom are slowed down by an exponential factor (as Jeans conjectured). A metastable situation thus occurs, in which the fast vibrational degrees of freedom effectivly do not contribute...

  1. Parallelization of a Quantum-Classic Hybrid Model For Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Salas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The expensive reengineering of the sequential software and the difficult parallel programming are two of the many technical and economic obstacles to the wide use of HPC. We investigate the chance to improve in a rapid way the performance of a numerical serial code for the simulation of the transport of a charged carriers in a Double-Gate MOSFET. We introduce the Drift-Diffusion-Schrödinger-Poisson (DDSP model and we study a rapid parallelization strategy of the numerical procedure on shared memory architectures.

  2. Chirally Invariant Avatar in a Model of Neutrinos with Light Cone Reflection Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Chodos, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In previous work we developed a model of neutrinos based on a new symmetry, Light Cone Reflection (LCR), that interchanges spacelike and timelike intervals. In this paper we start with the four-dimensional model, and construct a two-dimensional avatar that obeys the same equations of motion, and preserves both the light-cone reflection symmetry and the chiral symmetry of the original theory. The avatar also contains the interaction that rendered the four-dimensional model gauge invariant. In an addendum, we make some remarks about how to determine the scalar field that enters into the definition of the LCR-covariant derivative.

  3. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M.; Tsuru, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  4. Dual geometric worm algorithm for two-dimensional discrete classical lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Peter; Sørensen, Erik S.; Alet, Fabien

    2004-07-01

    We present a dual geometrical worm algorithm for two-dimensional Ising models. The existence of such dual algorithms was first pointed out by Prokof’ev and Svistunov [N. Prokof’ev and B. Svistunov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 160601 (2001)]. The algorithm is defined on the dual lattice and is formulated in terms of bond variables and can therefore be generalized to other two-dimensional models that can be formulated in terms of bond variables. We also discuss two related algorithms formulated on the direct lattice, applicable in any dimension. These latter algorithms turn out to be less efficient but of considerable intrinsic interest. We show how such algorithms quite generally can be “directed” by minimizing the probability for the worms to erase themselves. Explicit proofs of detailed balance are given for all the algorithms. In terms of computational efficiency the dual geometrical worm algorithm is comparable to well known cluster algorithms such as the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms, however, it is quite different in structure and allows for a very simple and efficient implementation. The dual algorithm also allows for a very elegant way of calculating the domain wall free energy.

  5. Parametric Models of NIR Transmission and Reflectivity Spectra for Dyed Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    parametric model Eq.(1a), and assuming background subtraction with a scale factor Co, the modeled transmission component of the dyes as a function of...and inversely proportional to the level of scattering. The experimental quantity defined by Eq.(7) is modeled parametrically by the scaled absorption...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5708--15-9629 Parametric Models of NIR Transmission and Reflectivity Spectra for Dyed

  6. Low-energy electron reflectivity from graphene: First-principles computations and approximate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feenstra, R.M., E-mail: feenstra@cmu.edu [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Widom, M. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A computational method is developed whereby the reflectivity of low-energy electrons from a surface can be obtained from a first-principles solution of the electronic structure of the system. The method is applied to multilayer graphene. Two bands of reflectivity minima are found, one at 0–8 eV and the other at 14–22 eV above the vacuum level. For a free-standing slab with n layers of graphene, each band contains n−1 zeroes in the reflectivity. Two additional image-potential type states form at the ends of the graphene slab, with energies just below the vacuum level, hence producing a total of 2n states. A tight-binding model is developed, with basis functions localized in the spaces between the graphene planes (and at the ends of the slab). The spectrum of states produced by the tight-binding model is found to be in good agreement with the zeros of reflectivity (i.e. transmission resonances) of the first-principles results. - Highlights: ► Developed method for simulation of low-energy electron reflectivity spectra. ► Reflectivity spectra of graphene are computed by a first-principles method. ► Comparison is made between results from first-principles and from a tight-binding model.

  7. META-COMMUNICATION FOR REFLECTIVE ONLINE CONVERSATIONS: Models for Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin OZARSLAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Meta Communication” is the process between message designers when they are talking about the learning process, as distinguished from their articulation of the “substantive” learning, itself. Therefore, it is important to understand how to design reflective online conversations and how to implement a diverse milieu for prospective online learners so that they are able to transfer their information, knowledge, and learning from theoretical forms to real life experiences. This book discusses meta-communication for reflective online conversations to provide digital people with models for distance education. This book brings together meta-communication, distance education, and models as well as reflective online conversations at the same time.The book is consisted of 321 pages covering 17 chapters. Topics covered in this book are divided into four sections: Meta-communicative knowledge building and online communications, dynamic models of meta-communication and reflective conversations, designing online messages for reflections, and meta-communicative assessments and reflective communication skills. The book's broader audience is anyone who is involved in e-learning.

  8. The Play Curricular Activity Reflection Discussion Model for Game-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Aroutis; Shah, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates the process of game-based learning in classrooms through the use of the Play Curricular activity Reflection Discussion (PCaRD) model. A mixed-methods study was conducted at a high school to implement three games with the PCaRD model in a year-long elective course. Data sources included interviews and observations for…

  9. A New Theory-to-Practice Model for Student Affairs: Integrating Scholarship, Context, and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.; Kimball, Ezekiel W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we synthesize existing theory-to-practice approaches within the student affairs literature to arrive at a new model that incorporates formal and informal theory, institutional context, and reflective practice. The new model arrives at a balance between the rigor necessary for scholarly theory development and the adaptability…

  10. Three-Component Model of Spottedness in the Classical RS CVn System UX Ari

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I. Yu.

    2014-09-01

    It is shown that the hypothesis of a complex (cold spots and hot flares) structure for the active regions on UX Ari reproduces well the photometric behavior of the star. According to the model the spots are colder than the quiescent atmosphere at 1300 K, while the flares are hotter than the photosphere at 750 K. These estimates are in good agreement with Doppler mapping of the star, with calculations of its photometric behavior, and with observations of OH molecular bands. The effective area of the spotted regions approaches half the total surface of the star. Our estimates show that the flares form about a third of the spotted area. The time variation in the star's brightness and in the effective area of the spots is probably cyclical with a characteristic time of 8-9 years. The switching of the active latitudes shows no obvious cyclicity.

  11. Scale genesis and gravitational wave in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Jisuke [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University,Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yamada, Masatoshi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University,Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg,Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    We assume that the origin of the electroweak (EW) scale is a gauge-invariant scalar-bilinear condensation in a strongly interacting non-abelian gauge sector, which is connected to the standard model via a Higgs portal coupling. The dynamical scale genesis appears as a phase transition at finite temperature, and it can produce a gravitational wave (GW) background in the early Universe. We find that the critical temperature of the scale phase transition lies above that of the EW phase transition and below few O(100) GeV and it is strongly first-order. We calculate the spectrum of the GW background and find the scale phase transition is strong enough that the GW background can be observed by DECIGO.

  12. Risk Forecasting of Karachi Stock Exchange: A Comparison of Classical and Bayesian GARCH Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhat Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the estimation, forecasting and evaluation of Value-at-Risk (VaR of Karachi Stock Exchange before and after the global financial crisis of 2008 using Bayesian method. The generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedastic (GARCH models under the assumption of normal and heavy-tailed errors are used to forecast one-day-ahead risk estimates. Various measures and backtesting methods are employed to evaluate VaR forecasts. The observed number of VaR violations using Bayesian method is found close to the expected number of violations. The losses are also found smaller than the competing Maximum Likelihood method. The results showed that the Bayesian method produce accurate and reliable VaR forecasts and can be preferred over other methods. 

  13. Classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model from the critical point and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Katsimiga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present two different families of solutions of the U(1-Higgs model in a (1+1 dimensional setting leading to a localization of the gauge field. First we consider a uniform background (the usual vacuum, which corresponds to the fully higgsed-superconducting phase. Then we study the case of a non-uniform background in the form of a domain wall which could be relevantly close to the critical point of the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking. For both cases we obtain approximate analytical nodeless and nodal solutions for the gauge field resulting as bound states of an effective Pöschl–Teller potential created by the scalar field. The two scenaria differ only in the scale of the characteristic localization length. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the obtained analytical solutions. Additionally we demonstrate how a kink may be used as a mediator driving the dynamics from the critical point and beyond.

  14. Classical dynamics of the Abelian Higgs model from the critical point and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimiga, G. C.; Diakonos, F. K.; Maintas, X. N.

    2015-09-01

    We present two different families of solutions of the U(1)-Higgs model in a (1 + 1) dimensional setting leading to a localization of the gauge field. First we consider a uniform background (the usual vacuum), which corresponds to the fully higgsed-superconducting phase. Then we study the case of a non-uniform background in the form of a domain wall which could be relevantly close to the critical point of the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking. For both cases we obtain approximate analytical nodeless and nodal solutions for the gauge field resulting as bound states of an effective Pöschl-Teller potential created by the scalar field. The two scenaria differ only in the scale of the characteristic localization length. Numerical simulations confirm the validity of the obtained analytical solutions. Additionally we demonstrate how a kink may be used as a mediator driving the dynamics from the critical point and beyond.

  15. General classical solutions of nonlinear $\\sigma$-model and pion charge distribution of disoriented chiral condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z; Huang, Zheng; Suzuki, Mahiko

    1996-01-01

    We obtain the general analytic solutions of the nonlinear \\sigma-model in 3+1 dimensions as the candidates for the disoriented chiral condensate (DCC). The nonuniformly isospin-orientated solutions are shown to be related to the uniformly oriented ones through the chiral (axial) rotations. We discuss the pion charge distribution arising from these solutions. The distribution dP/df=1/(2\\sqrt{f}) holds for the uniform solutions in general and the nonuniform solutions in the 1+1 boost invariant case. For the nonuniform solution in 1+1 without a boost-invariance and in higher dimensions, the distribution does not hold in the integrated form. However, it is applicable to the pions selected from a small segment in the momentum phase space. We suggest that the nonuniform DCC's may correspond to the mini-Centauro events.

  16. Spiral Galaxies - classical description of spiral arms and rotational velocity pattern - toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Lobodzinski, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    We propose an explanation of features of spiral galaxies: spiral arms and observed flat rotation curves, without the presence of an exotic form of matter. The formalism is based on Boltzmanns transport equation for the collisional matter and the very-low-velocity post-Newtonian approximation of the general relativity equations expressed in the Maxwell-like form. The Maxwell-like formulation provides the base for the explanation of the above phenomena in the language of dynamically created gravitoelectromagnetic fields by the movement of mass streams in the plane of the galaxy disc. In the model we use radical simplifications expressed as neglect of the gravitational interaction between neighbors and approximation of the incompressible mass flow. In this frame we show that if the galaxy is fuelled constantly by mass from an external gas reservoir, then the amplification of the gravitomagnetic field can be large enough to create the rotational velocity pattern and spiral arms without the necessity of introducin...

  17. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    CERN Document Server

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fern\\'andez & Reisenegger (2005) for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger (2010) for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our prediction...

  18. Scale genesis and gravitational wave in a classically scale invariant extension of the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Jisuke

    2016-01-01

    We assume that the origin of the electroweak (EW) scale is a gauge-invariant scalar-bilinear condensation in a strongly interacting non-abelian gauge sector, which is connected to the standard model via a Higgs portal coupling. The dynamical scale genesis appears as a phase transition at finite temperature, and it can produce a gravitational wave (GW) background in the early Universe. We find that the critical temperature of the scale phase transition lies above that of the EW phase transition and below few $O(100)$ GeV and it is strongly first-order. We calculate the spectrum of the GW background and find the scale phase transition is strong enough that the GW background can be observed by DECIGO.

  19. Revisiting classic water erosion models in drylands: The strong impact of biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, M.A.; Belnap, J.; Bala, Chaudhary V.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil erosion and subsequent degradation has been a contributor to societal collapse in the past and is one of the major expressions of desertification in arid regions. The revised universal soil loss equation (RUSLE) models soil lost to water erosion as a function of climate erosivity (the degree to which rainfall can result in erosion), topography, soil erodibility, and land use/management. The soil erodibility factor (K) is primarily based upon inherent soil properties (those which change slowly or not at all) such as soil texture and organic matter content, while the cover/management factor (C) is based on several parameters including biological soil crust (BSC) cover. We examined the effect of two more precise indicators of BSC development, chlorophyll a and exopolysaccharides (EPS), upon soil stability, which is closely inversely related to soil loss in an erosion event. To examine the relative influence of these elements of the C factor to the K factor, we conducted our investigation across eight strongly differing soils in the 0.8 million ha Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. We found that within every soil group, chlorophyll a was a moderate to excellent predictor of soil stability (R2 = 0.21-0.75), and consistently better than EPS. Using a simple structural equation model, we explained over half of the variance in soil stability and determined that the direct effect of chlorophyll a was 3?? more important than soil group in determining soil stability. Our results suggest that, holding the intensity of erosive forces constant, the acceleration or reduction of soil erosion in arid landscapes will primarily be an outcome of management practices. This is because the factor which is most influential to soil erosion, BSC development, is also among the most manageable, implying that water erosion in drylands has a solution. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Adapting a regularized canopy reflectance model (REGFLEC) for the retrieval challenges of dryland agricultural systems

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2016-08-20

    A regularized canopy reflectance model (REGFLEC) is applied over a dryland irrigated agricultural system in Saudi Arabia for the purpose of retrieving leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll content (Chll). To improve the robustness of the retrieved properties, REGFLEC was modified to 1) correct for aerosol and adjacency effects, 2) consider foliar dust effects on modeled canopy reflectances, 3) include spectral information in the red-edge wavelength region, and 4) exploit empirical LAI estimates in the model inversion. Using multi-spectral RapidEye imagery allowed Chll to be retrieved with a Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) of 7.9 μg cm− 2 (16%), based upon in-situ measurements conducted in fields of alfalfa, Rhodes grass and maize over the course of a growing season. LAI and Chll compensation effects on canopy reflectance were largely avoided by informing the inversion process with ancillary LAI inputs established empirically on the basis of a statistical machine learning technique. As a result, LAI was reproduced with good accuracy, with an overall MAD of 0.42 m2 m− 2 (12.5%). Results highlighted the considerable challenges associated with the translation of at-sensor radiance observations to surface bidirectional reflectances in dryland environments, where issues such as high aerosol loadings and large spatial gradients in surface reflectance from bright desert soils to dark vegetated fields are often present. Indeed, surface reflectances in the visible bands were reduced by up to 60% after correction for such adjacency effects. In addition, dust deposition on leaves required explicit modification of the reflectance sub-model to account for its influence. By implementing these model refinements, REGFLEC demonstrated its utility for within-field characterization of vegetation conditions over the challenging landscapes typical of dryland agricultural regions, offering a means through which improvements can be made in the management of these globally