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Sample records for model reduction technique

  1. Model order reduction techniques with applications in finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Zu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Despite the continued rapid advance in computing speed and memory the increase in the complexity of models used by engineers persists in outpacing them. Even where there is access to the latest hardware, simulations are often extremely computationally intensive and time-consuming when full-blown models are under consideration. The need to reduce the computational cost involved when dealing with high-order/many-degree-of-freedom models can be offset by adroit computation. In this light, model-reduction methods have become a major goal of simulation and modeling research. Model reduction can also ameliorate problems in the correlation of widely used finite-element analyses and test analysis models produced by excessive system complexity. Model Order Reduction Techniques explains and compares such methods focusing mainly on recent work in dynamic condensation techniques: - Compares the effectiveness of static, exact, dynamic, SEREP and iterative-dynamic condensation techniques in producing valid reduced-order mo...

  2. Application of nonliner reduction techniques in chemical process modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhaimin, Z; Aziz, N.; Abd Shukor, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Model reduction techniques have been used widely in engineering fields for electrical, mechanical as well as chemical engineering. The basic idea of reduction technique is to replace the original system by an approximating system with much smaller state-space dimension. A reduced order model is more beneficial to process and industrial field in terms of control purposes. This paper is to provide a review on application of nonlinear reduction techniques in chemical processes. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique reviewed are also highlighted

  3. Reduction of thermal models of buildings: improvement of techniques using meteorological influence models; Reduction de modeles thermiques de batiments: amelioration des techniques par modelisation des sollicitations meteorologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dautin, S.

    1997-04-01

    This work concerns the modeling of thermal phenomena inside buildings for the evaluation of energy exploitation costs of thermal installations and for the modeling of thermal and aeraulic transient phenomena. This thesis comprises 7 chapters dealing with: (1) the thermal phenomena inside buildings and the CLIM2000 calculation code, (2) the ETNA and GENEC experimental cells and their modeling, (3) the techniques of model reduction tested (Marshall`s truncature, Michailesco aggregation method and Moore truncature) with their algorithms and their encoding in the MATRED software, (4) the application of model reduction methods to the GENEC and ETNA cells and to a medium size dual-zone building, (5) the modeling of meteorological influences classically applied to buildings (external temperature and solar flux), (6) the analytical expression of these modeled meteorological influences. The last chapter presents the results of these improved methods on the GENEC and ETNA cells and on a lower inertia building. These new methods are compared to classical methods. (J.S.) 69 refs.

  4. System Response Analysis and Model Order Reduction, Using Conventional Method, Bond Graph Technique and Genetic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Moin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper basically explores and compares the different modeling and analysis techniques and than it also explores the model order reduction approach and significance. The traditional modeling and simulation techniques for dynamic systems are generally adequate for single-domain systems only, but the Bond Graph technique provides new strategies for reliable solutions of multi-domain system. They are also used for analyzing linear and non linear dynamic production system, artificial intelligence, image processing, robotics and industrial automation. This paper describes a unique technique of generating the Genetic design from the tree structured transfer function obtained from Bond Graph. This research work combines bond graphs for model representation with Genetic programming for exploring different ideas on design space tree structured transfer function result from replacing typical bond graph element with their impedance equivalent specifying impedance lows for Bond Graph multiport. This tree structured form thus obtained from Bond Graph is applied for generating the Genetic Tree. Application studies will identify key issues and importance for advancing this approach towards becoming on effective and efficient design tool for synthesizing design for Electrical system. In the first phase, the system is modeled using Bond Graph technique. Its system response and transfer function with conventional and Bond Graph method is analyzed and then a approach towards model order reduction is observed. The suggested algorithm and other known modern model order reduction techniques are applied to a 11th order high pass filter [1], with different approach. The model order reduction technique developed in this paper has least reduction errors and secondly the final model retains structural information. The system response and the stability analysis of the system transfer function taken by conventional and by Bond Graph method is compared and

  5. Dynamic model reduction: An overview of available techniques with application to power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Savo D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises the model reduction techniques used for the reduction of large-scale linear and nonlinear dynamic models, described by the differential and algebraic equations that are commonly used in control theory. The groups of methods discussed in this paper for reduction of the linear dynamic model are based on singular perturbation analysis, modal analysis, singular value decomposition, moment matching and methods based on a combination of singular value decomposition and moment matching. Among the nonlinear dynamic model reduction methods, proper orthogonal decomposition, the trajectory piecewise linear method, balancing-based methods, reduction by optimising system matrices and projection from a linearised model, are described. Part of the paper is devoted to the techniques commonly used for reduction (equivalencing of large-scale power systems, which are based on coherency, synchrony, singular perturbation analysis, modal analysis and identification. Two (most interesting of the described techniques are applied to the reduction of the commonly used New England 10-generator, 39-bus test power system.

  6. The need for novel model order reduction techniques in the electronics industry (Chapter 1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilders, W.H.A.; Benner, P.; Hinze, M.; Maten, ter E.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the present and future needs of the electronics industry with regard to model order reduction. The industry has always been one of the main motivating fields for the development of MOR techniques, and continues to play this role. We discuss the search for provably passive

  7. New model reduction technique for a class of parabolic partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vajta, Miklos

    1991-01-01

    A model reduction (or lumping) technique for a class of parabolic-type partial differential equations is given, and its application is discussed. The frequency response of the temperature distribution in any multilayer solid is developed and given by a matrix expression. The distributed transfer

  8. Accuracy Enhanced Stability and Structure Preserving Model Reduction Technique for Dynamical Systems with Second Order Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    A method for model reduction of dynamical systems with the second order structure is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique preserves the second order structure of the system, and also preserves the stability of the original systems. The method uses the controllability and observability...... gramians within the time interval to build the appropriate Petrov-Galerkin projection for dynamical systems within the time interval of interest. The bound on approximation error is also derived. The numerical results are compared with the counterparts from other techniques. The results confirm...

  9. HIGHLY-ACCURATE MODEL ORDER REDUCTION TECHNIQUE ON A DISCRETE DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Ribeiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this work, we present a highly-accurate technique of model order reduction applied to staged processes. The proposed method reduces the dimension of the original system based on null values of moment-weighted sums of heat and mass balance residuals on real stages. To compute these sums of weighted residuals, a discrete form of Gauss-Lobatto quadrature was developed, allowing a high degree of accuracy in these calculations. The locations where the residuals are cancelled vary with time and operating conditions, characterizing a desirable adaptive nature of this technique. Balances related to upstream and downstream devices (such as condenser, reboiler, and feed tray of a distillation column are considered as boundary conditions of the corresponding difference-differential equations system. The chosen number of moments is the dimension of the reduced model being much lower than the dimension of the complete model and does not depend on the size of the original model. Scaling of the discrete independent variable related with the stages was crucial for the computational implementation of the proposed method, avoiding accumulation of round-off errors present even in low-degree polynomial approximations in the original discrete variable. Dynamical simulations of distillation columns were carried out to check the performance of the proposed model order reduction technique. The obtained results show the superiority of the proposed procedure in comparison with the orthogonal collocation method.

  10. Trimming a hazard logic tree with a new model-order-reduction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Keith; Field, Edward; Milner, Kevin R

    2017-01-01

    The size of the logic tree within the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast Version 3, Time-Dependent (UCERF3-TD) model can challenge risk analyses of large portfolios. An insurer or catastrophe risk modeler concerned with losses to a California portfolio might have to evaluate a portfolio 57,600 times to estimate risk in light of the hazard possibility space. Which branches of the logic tree matter most, and which can one ignore? We employed two model-order-reduction techniques to simplify the model. We sought a subset of parameters that must vary, and the specific fixed values for the remaining parameters, to produce approximately the same loss distribution as the original model. The techniques are (1) a tornado-diagram approach we employed previously for UCERF2, and (2) an apparently novel probabilistic sensitivity approach that seems better suited to functions of nominal random variables. The new approach produces a reduced-order model with only 60 of the original 57,600 leaves. One can use the results to reduce computational effort in loss analyses by orders of magnitude.

  11. A parametric model order reduction technique for poroelastic finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappano, Ettore; Polanz, Markus; Desmet, Wim; Mundo, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    This research presents a parametric model order reduction approach for vibro-acoustic problems in the frequency domain of systems containing poroelastic materials (PEM). The method is applied to the Finite Element (FE) discretization of the weak u-p integral formulation based on the Biot-Allard theory and makes use of reduced basis (RB) methods typically employed for parametric problems. The parametric reduction is obtained rewriting the Biot-Allard FE equations for poroelastic materials using an affine representation of the frequency (therefore allowing for RB methods) and projecting the frequency-dependent PEM system on a global reduced order basis generated with the proper orthogonal decomposition instead of standard modal approaches. This has proven to be better suited to describe the nonlinear frequency dependence and the strong coupling introduced by damping. The methodology presented is tested on two three-dimensional systems: in the first experiment, the surface impedance of a PEM layer sample is calculated and compared with results of the literature; in the second, the reduced order model of a multilayer system coupled to an air cavity is assessed and the results are compared to those of the reference FE model.

  12. Dose Reduction Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program

  13. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  14. Mixed Models and Reduction Techniques for Large-Rotation, Nonlinear Analysis of Shells of Revolution with Application to Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.; Tanner, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    An effective computational strategy is presented for the large-rotation, nonlinear axisymmetric analysis of shells of revolution. The three key elements of the computational strategy are: (1) use of mixed finite-element models with discontinuous stress resultants at the element interfaces; (2) substantial reduction in the total number of degrees of freedom through the use of a multiple-parameter reduction technique; and (3) reduction in the size of the analysis model through the decomposition of asymmetric loads into symmetric and antisymmetric components coupled with the use of the multiple-parameter reduction technique. The potential of the proposed computational strategy is discussed. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy of the mixed models developed and to show the potential of using the proposed computational strategy for the analysis of tires.

  15. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  16. Adaptive parametric model order reduction technique for optimization of vibro-acoustic models: Application to hearing aid design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creixell-Mediante, Ester; Jensen, Jakob S.; Naets, Frank; Brunskog, Jonas; Larsen, Martin

    2018-06-01

    Finite Element (FE) models of complex structural-acoustic coupled systems can require a large number of degrees of freedom in order to capture their physical behaviour. This is the case in the hearing aid field, where acoustic-mechanical feedback paths are a key factor in the overall system performance and modelling them accurately requires a precise description of the strong interaction between the light-weight parts and the internal and surrounding air over a wide frequency range. Parametric optimization of the FE model can be used to reduce the vibroacoustic feedback in a device during the design phase; however, it requires solving the model iteratively for multiple frequencies at different parameter values, which becomes highly time consuming when the system is large. Parametric Model Order Reduction (pMOR) techniques aim at reducing the computational cost associated with each analysis by projecting the full system into a reduced space. A drawback of most of the existing techniques is that the vector basis of the reduced space is built at an offline phase where the full system must be solved for a large sample of parameter values, which can also become highly time consuming. In this work, we present an adaptive pMOR technique where the construction of the projection basis is embedded in the optimization process and requires fewer full system analyses, while the accuracy of the reduced system is monitored by a cheap error indicator. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated for a 4-parameter optimization of a frequency response for a hearing aid model, evaluated at 300 frequencies, where the objective function evaluations become more than one order of magnitude faster than for the full system.

  17. A Robust Computational Technique for Model Order Reduction of Two-Time-Scale Discrete Systems via Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman M. K. Alsmadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A robust computational technique for model order reduction (MOR of multi-time-scale discrete systems (single input single output (SISO and multi-input multioutput (MIMO is presented in this paper. This work is motivated by the singular perturbation of multi-time-scale systems where some specific dynamics may not have significant influence on the overall system behavior. The new approach is proposed using genetic algorithms (GA with the advantage of obtaining a reduced order model, maintaining the exact dominant dynamics in the reduced order, and minimizing the steady state error. The reduction process is performed by obtaining an upper triangular transformed matrix of the system state matrix defined in state space representation along with the elements of B, C, and D matrices. The GA computational procedure is based on maximizing the fitness function corresponding to the response deviation between the full and reduced order models. The proposed computational intelligence MOR method is compared to recently published work on MOR techniques where simulation results show the potential and advantages of the new approach.

  18. Application of aggregation techniques for model order reduction of nuclear plants for operator guidance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, G.C.

    1980-12-01

    After a short description of a disturbance analysis system for nuclear plant based on real time dynamic modelling and simulation, a scheme for generating aggregated reduced models of high order systems is presented. This method allows the choice of dominant dynamic modes and its efficiency is illustrated for the case of a 29th order nuclear plant model

  19. Variance Reduction Techniques in Monte Carlo Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Ridder, A.A.N.; Rubinstein, R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are simulation algorithms to estimate a numerical quantity in a statistical model of a real system. These algorithms are executed by computer programs. Variance reduction techniques (VRT) are needed, even though computer speed has been increasing dramatically, ever since the

  20. A Multi-Model Reduction Technique for Optimization of Coupled Structural-Acoustic Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Finite Element models of structural-acoustic coupled systems can become very large for complex structures with multiple connected parts. Optimization of the performance of the structure based on harmonic analysis of the system requires solving the coupled problem iteratively and for several frequ....... Several methods are compared in terms of accuracy and size of the reduced systems for optimization of simple models....

  1. Improvement of Bragg peak shift estimation using dimensionality reduction techniques and predictive linear modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yafei; Macq, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    With the emergence of clinical prototypes and first patient acquisitions for proton therapy, the research on prompt gamma imaging is aiming at making most use of the prompt gamma data for in vivo estimation of any shift from expected Bragg peak (BP). The simple problem of matching the measured prompt gamma profile of each pencil beam with a reference simulation from the treatment plan is actually made complex by uncertainties which can translate into distortions during treatment. We will illustrate this challenge and demonstrate the robustness of a predictive linear model we proposed for BP shift estimation based on principal component analysis (PCA) method. It considered the first clinical knife-edge slit camera design in use with anthropomorphic phantom CT data. Particularly, 4115 error scenarios were simulated for the learning model. PCA was applied to the training input randomly chosen from 500 scenarios for eliminating data collinearities. A total variance of 99.95% was used for representing the testing input from 3615 scenarios. This model improved the BP shift estimation by an average of 63+/-19% in a range between -2.5% and 86%, comparing to our previous profile shift (PS) method. The robustness of our method was demonstrated by a comparative study conducted by applying 1000 times Poisson noise to each profile. 67% cases obtained by the learning model had lower prediction errors than those obtained by PS method. The estimation accuracy ranged between 0.31 +/- 0.22 mm and 1.84 +/- 8.98 mm for the learning model, while for PS method it ranged between 0.3 +/- 0.25 mm and 20.71 +/- 8.38 mm.

  2. Simulation model of harmonics reduction technique using shunt active filter by cascade multilevel inverter method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreh, Angga Muhamad; Subiyanto, Sunardiyo, Said

    2017-01-01

    Development of non-linear loading in the application of industry and distribution system and also harmonic compensation becomes important. Harmonic pollution is an urgent problem in increasing power quality. The main contribution of the study is the modeling approach used to design a shunt active filter and the application of the cascade multilevel inverter topology to improve the power quality of electrical energy. In this study, shunt active filter was aimed to eliminate dominant harmonic component by injecting opposite currents with the harmonic component system. The active filter was designed by shunt configuration with cascaded multilevel inverter method controlled by PID controller and SPWM. With this shunt active filter, the harmonic current can be reduced so that the current wave pattern of the source is approximately sinusoidal. Design and simulation were conducted by using Power Simulator (PSIM) software. Shunt active filter performance experiment was conducted on the IEEE four bus test system. The result of shunt active filter installation on the system (IEEE four bus) could reduce THD current from 28.68% to 3.09%. With this result, the active filter can be applied as an effective method to reduce harmonics.

  3. Adaptive parametric model order reduction technique for optimization of vibro-acoustic models: Application to hearing aid design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Naets, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Finite Element (FE) models of complex structural-acoustic coupled systems can require a large number of degrees of freedom in order to capture their physical behaviour. This is the case in the hearing aid field, where acoustic-mechanical feedback paths are a key factor in the overall system...... by projecting the full system into a reduced space. A drawback of most of the existing techniques is that the vector basis of the reduced space is built at an offline phase where the full system must be solved for a large sample of parameter values, which can also become highly time consuming. In this work, we...

  4. Principal Components as a Data Reduction and Noise Reduction Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, M. L.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of principal components as a pipeline data reduction technique for thematic mapper data was assessed and principal components analysis and its transformation as a noise reduction technique was examined. Two primary factors were considered: (1) how might data reduction and noise reduction using the principal components transformation affect the extraction of accurate spectral classifications; and (2) what are the real savings in terms of computer processing and storage costs of using reduced data over the full 7-band TM complement. An area in central Pennsylvania was chosen for a study area. The image data for the project were collected using the Earth Resources Laboratory's thematic mapper simulator (TMS) instrument.

  5. Speckle reduction techniques in digital holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, David; Kelly, Damien; Hennelly, Bryan [Department of Computer Science, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Javidi, Bahram, E-mail: bryanh@cs.nuim.i [University of Connecticut Electrical and Computer Engineering Department 371 Fairfield Road, Unit 2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We have studied several speckle reduction techniques, applicable to digital holography. These include the use of optical diffusers, wavelet filtering, simulating temporal incoherence and filtering in the Fourier domain. The Digital Holograms (DHs) used in this study are captured using a Phase Shift Interferometric (PSI) in-line setup and subsequently reconstructed numerically.

  6. Model reduction for circuit simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hinze, Michael; Maten, E Jan W Ter

    2011-01-01

    Simulation based on mathematical models plays a major role in computer aided design of integrated circuits (ICs). Decreasing structure sizes, increasing packing densities and driving frequencies require the use of refined mathematical models, and to take into account secondary, parasitic effects. This leads to very high dimensional problems which nowadays require simulation times too large for the short time-to-market demands in industry. Modern Model Order Reduction (MOR) techniques present a way out of this dilemma in providing surrogate models which keep the main characteristics of the devi

  7. LDRD report nonlinear model reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segalman, D.; Heinstein, M.

    1997-09-01

    The very general problem of model reduction of nonlinear systems was made tractable by focusing on the very large subclass consisting of linear subsystems connected by nonlinear interfaces. Such problems constitute a large part of the nonlinear structural problems encountered in addressing the Sandia missions. A synthesis approach to this class of problems was developed consisting of: detailed modeling of the interface mechanics; collapsing the interface simulation results into simple nonlinear interface models; constructing system models by assembling model approximations of the linear subsystems and the nonlinear interface models. These system models, though nonlinear, would have very few degrees of freedom. A paradigm problem, that of machine tool vibration, was selected for application of the reduction approach outlined above. Research results achieved along the way as well as the overall modeling of a specific machine tool have been very encouraging. In order to confirm the interface models resulting from simulation, it was necessary to develop techniques to deduce interface mechanics from experimental data collected from the overall nonlinear structure. A program to develop such techniques was also pursued with good success.

  8. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 ± 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 ± 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 ± 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  9. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 {+-} 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 {+-} 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 {+-} 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  10. Model Reduction in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan

    mechanical parameters from experimental results. However, in real biological world, these homogeneous and isotropic assumptions are usually invalidate. Thus, instead of using hypothesized model, a specific continuum model at mesoscopic scale can be introduced based upon data reduction of the results from molecular simulations at atomistic level. Once a continuum model is established, it can provide details on the distribution of stresses and strains induced within the biomolecular system which is useful in determining the distribution and transmission of these forces to the cytoskeletal and sub-cellular components, and help us gain a better understanding in cell mechanics. A data-driven model reduction approach to the problem of microtubule mechanics as an application is present, a beam element is constructed for microtubules based upon data reduction of the results from molecular simulation of the carbon backbone chain of alphabeta-tubulin dimers. The data base of mechanical responses to various types of loads from molecular simulation is reduced to dominant modes. The dominant modes are subsequently used to construct the stiffness matrix of a beam element that captures the anisotropic behavior and deformation mode coupling that arises from a microtubule's spiral structure. In contrast to standard Euler-Bernoulli or Timoshenko beam elements, the link between forces and node displacements results not from hypothesized deformation behavior, but directly from the data obtained by molecular scale simulation. Differences between the resulting microtubule data-driven beam model (MTDDBM) and standard beam elements are presented, with a focus on coupling of bending, stretch, shear deformations. The MTDDBM is just as economical to use as a standard beam element, and allows accurate reconstruction of the mechanical behavior of structures within a cell as exemplified in a simple model of a component element of the mitotic spindle.

  11. A quantitative comparison of noise reduction across five commercial (hybrid and model-based) iterative reconstruction techniques: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Fuentes, Jorge M; Hayano, Koichi; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Uyeda, Jennifer W; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to compare the performance of three hybrid iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) (ASiR, iDose4, SAFIRE) and their respective strengths for image noise reduction on low-dose CT examinations using filtered back projection (FBP) as the standard reference. Also, we compared the performance of these three hybrid IRTs with two model-based IRTs (Veo and IMR) for image noise reduction on low-dose examinations. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An anthropomorphic abdomen phantom was scanned at 100 and 120 kVp and different tube current-exposure time products (25-100 mAs) on three CT systems (for ASiR and Veo, Discovery CT750 HD; for iDose4 and IMR, Brilliance iCT; and for SAFIRE, Somatom Definition Flash). Images were reconstructed using FBP and using IRTs at various strengths. Nine noise measurements (mean ROI size, 423 mm(2)) on extracolonic fat for the different strengths of IRTs were recorded and compared with FBP using ANOVA. Radiation dose, which was measured as the volume CT dose index and dose-length product, was also compared. RESULTS. There were no significant differences in radiation dose and image noise among the scanners when FBP was used (p > 0.05). Gradual image noise reduction was observed with each increasing increment of hybrid IRT strength, with a maximum noise suppression of approximately 50% (48.2-53.9%). Similar noise reduction was achieved on the scanners by applying specific hybrid IRT strengths. Maximum noise reduction was higher on model-based IRTs (68.3-81.1%) than hybrid IRTs (48.2-53.9%) (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION. When constant scanning parameters are used, radiation dose and image noise on FBP are similar for CT scanners made by different manufacturers. Significant image noise reduction is achieved on low-dose CT examinations rendered with IRTs. The image noise on various scanners can be matched by applying specific hybrid IRT strengths. Model-based IRTs attain substantially higher noise reduction than hybrid

  12. Experience with Kicker Beam Coupling Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaxiola, Enrique; Caspers, Friedhelm; Ducimetière, Laurent; Kroyer, Tom

    2005-01-01

    SPS beam impedance is still one of the worries for operation with nominal LHC beam over longer periods, once the final configuration will be installed in 2006. Several CERN SPS kickers suffer from significant beam induced ferrite heating. In specific cases, for instance beam scrubbing, the temperature of certain ferrite yokes went beyond the Curie point. Several retrofit impedance reduction techniques have been investigated theoretically and with practical tests. We report on experience gained during the 2004 SPS operation with resistively coated ceramic inserts in terms of kicker heating, pulse rise time, operating voltage, and vacuum behaviour. For another technique using interleaved metallic stripes we observed significant improvements in bench measurements. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods and potential combinations of them are discussed and simulation as well as measured data are shown. Prospects for further improvements beyond 2006 are briefly outlined.

  13. Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Model Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2011-01-01

    A new relative error model reduction technique for linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. Both continuous and discrete time systems can be reduced within this framework. The proposed model reduction method is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced truncation and a recently...

  14. Efficiency of radon reduction techniques and strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Ph.; Monchecourt, D.

    2000-01-01

    Radon is a lung carcinogen recognized by the World Health Organisation and it is present in dwellings. In France, the first actions to measure the exposition of the population were made in 1982, and the first national recommendation was published in 1999. In parallel, information booklets on radon and possible actions to lower its concentration in house were made available to the public. The aim of this study was to test the economic feasibility of different methods to reduce radon level in housing. The first step was to identify the cost and the radon reduction rate of different methods, all based on insulation or ventilation of the buildings. Using the data of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), we selected six measures and combined them to obtain a total of twenty potential solutions. We also used the 'duration' model of the Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation committee (BEIR VI) to determine the probability of dying from a cancer associated to a fixed exposure to radon. Knowing this information, it was possible to make cost-efficiency analysis on our data and thus keep six interesting methods. Combining these results with the value of human life of the human capital approach we could find what was the most interesting method to apply for a known level of radon and a specific duration of exposure in a house. In given house, for each level of initial exposure, a cost benefit approach allowed to determine if one, or several techniques, or none, is worthwhile to apply. In favorable cases (i.e : easily remediable houses), and with a figure for the price of human life of about 0,9 MEuro, actions should be undertaken at levels as low as 80 Bq.m -3 . As we know the radon distribution in France, the second step was to see what would be the effects on this distribution if all inhabitants used the optimal approach against their radon exposure defined by our function. Thus, overall costs and overall risks could be computed. However, in public health issues, the

  15. First principle leakage current reduction technique for CMOS devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tsague, HD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive study of leakage reduction techniques applicable to CMOS based devices. In the process, mathematical equations that model the power-performance trade-offs in CMOS logic circuits are presented. From those equations...

  16. Nonlinear Model Reduction for RTCVD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newman, Andrew J; Krishnaprasad, P. S

    1998-01-01

    ...) for semiconductor manufacturing. They focus on model reduction for the ordinary differential equation model describing heat transfer to, from, and within a semiconductor wafer in the RTCVD chamber...

  17. Reduction technique of drop voltage and power losses to improve power quality using ETAP Power Station simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satrio, Reza Indra; Subiyanto

    2018-03-01

    The effect of electric loads growth emerged direct impact in power systems distribution. Drop voltage and power losses one of the important things in power systems distribution. This paper presents modelling approach used to restructrure electrical network configuration, reduce drop voltage, reduce power losses and add new distribution transformer to enhance reliability of power systems distribution. Restructrure electrical network was aimed to analyse and investigate electric loads of a distribution transformer. Measurement of real voltage and real current were finished two times for each consumer, that were morning period and night period or when peak load. Design and simulation were conduct by using ETAP Power Station Software. Based on result of simulation and real measurement precentage of drop voltage and total power losses were mismatch with SPLN (Standard PLN) 72:1987. After added a new distribution transformer and restructrured electricity network configuration, the result of simulation could reduce drop voltage from 1.3 % - 31.3 % to 8.1 % - 9.6 % and power losses from 646.7 watt to 233.29 watt. Result showed, restructrure electricity network configuration and added new distribution transformer can be applied as an effective method to reduce drop voltage and reduce power losses.

  18. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  19. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Justin R. [Cornell University; Hencey, Brondon M. [Cornell University

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  20. On combination of strict Bayesian principles with model reduction technique or how stochastic model calibration can become feasible for large-scale applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladyshkin, S.; Schroeder, P.; Class, H.; Nowak, W.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage represents a challenging problem in a complex dynamic system. Due to lacking information about reservoir parameters, quantification of uncertainties may become the dominant question in risk assessment. Calibration on past observed data from pilot-scale test injection can improve the predictive power of the involved geological, flow, and transport models. The current work performs history matching to pressure time series from a pilot storage site operated in Europe, maintained during an injection period. Simulation of compressible two-phase flow and transport (CO2/brine) in the considered site is computationally very demanding, requiring about 12 days of CPU time for an individual model run. For that reason, brute-force approaches for calibration are not feasible. In the current work, we explore an advanced framework for history matching based on the arbitrary polynomial chaos expansion (aPC) and strict Bayesian principles. The aPC [1] offers a drastic but accurate stochastic model reduction. Unlike many previous chaos expansions, it can handle arbitrary probability distribution shapes of uncertain parameters, and can therefore handle directly the statistical information appearing during the matching procedure. We capture the dependence of model output on these multipliers with the expansion-based reduced model. In our study we keep the spatial heterogeneity suggested by geophysical methods, but consider uncertainty in the magnitude of permeability trough zone-wise permeability multipliers. Next combined the aPC with Bootstrap filtering (a brute-force but fully accurate Bayesian updating mechanism) in order to perform the matching. In comparison to (Ensemble) Kalman Filters, our method accounts for higher-order statistical moments and for the non-linearity of both the forward model and the inversion, and thus allows a rigorous quantification of calibrated model uncertainty. The usually high computational costs of

  1. Error reduction techniques for Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, J.H.W.

    1981-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods have been widely applied to problems in nuclear physics, mathematical reliability, communication theory, and other areas. The work in this thesis is developed mainly with neutron transport applications in mind. For nuclear reactor and many other applications, random walk processes have been used to estimate multi-dimensional integrals and obtain information about the solution of integral equations. When the analysis is statistically based such calculations are often costly, and the development of efficient estimation techniques plays a critical role in these applications. All of the error reduction techniques developed in this work are applied to model problems. It is found that the nearly optimal parameters selected by the analytic method for use with GWAN estimator are nearly identical to parameters selected by the multistage method. Modified path length estimation (based on the path length importance measure) leads to excellent error reduction in all model problems examined. Finally, it should be pointed out that techniques used for neutron transport problems may be transferred easily to other application areas which are based on random walk processes. The transport problems studied in this dissertation provide exceptionally severe tests of the error reduction potential of any sampling procedure. It is therefore expected that the methods of this dissertation will prove useful in many other application areas

  2. Microblowing Technique for Drag Reduction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA seeks to develop technologies for aircraft drag reduction which contribute to improved aerodynamic efficiency in support of national goals for reducing fuel...

  3. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib; Galassi, R. Malpica; Valorani, M.

    2016-01-01

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  4. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Habib

    2016-01-05

    We outline a strategy for chemical kinetic model reduction under uncertainty. We present highlights of our existing deterministic model reduction strategy, and describe the extension of the formulation to include parametric uncertainty in the detailed mechanism. We discuss the utility of this construction, as applied to hydrocarbon fuel-air kinetics, and the associated use of uncertainty-aware measures of error between predictions from detailed and simplified models.

  5. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo; Valorani, Mauro; Najm, Habib N.; Safta, Cosmin; Khalil, Mohammad; Ciottoli, Pietro P.

    2017-01-01

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis

  6. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  7. Volume reduction techniques for solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report gives an account of some of the techniques in current use in the UK for the treatment of solid radioactive wastes to reduce their volume prior to storage or disposal. Reference is also made to current research and development projects. It is based on a report presented at a recent International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee when this subject was the main theme. An IAEA Technical Series report covering techniques in use in all parts of the world should be published within the next two years. (author)

  8. Post-placement temperature reduction techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    With technology scaled to deep submicron era, temperature and temperature gradient have emerged as important design criteria. We propose two post-placement techniques to reduce peak temperature by intelligently allocating whitespace in the hotspots. Both methods are fully compliant with commercial...

  9. Model reduction of parametrized systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Patera, Anthony; Rozza, Gianluigi; Urban, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The special volume offers a global guide to new concepts and approaches concerning the following topics: reduced basis methods, proper orthogonal decomposition, proper generalized decomposition, approximation theory related to model reduction, learning theory and compressed sensing, stochastic and high-dimensional problems, system-theoretic methods, nonlinear model reduction, reduction of coupled problems/multiphysics, optimization and optimal control, state estimation and control, reduced order models and domain decomposition methods, Krylov-subspace and interpolatory methods, and applications to real industrial and complex problems. The book represents the state of the art in the development of reduced order methods. It contains contributions from internationally respected experts, guaranteeing a wide range of expertise and topics. Further, it reflects an important effor t, carried out over the last 12 years, to build a growing research community in this field. Though not a textbook, some of the chapters ca...

  10. Quasi-monte carlo simulation and variance reduction techniques substantially reduce computational requirements of patient-level simulation models: An application to a discrete event simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, M.; Postma, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-level simulation models provide increased flexibility to overcome the limitations of cohort-based approaches in health-economic analysis. However, computational requirements of reaching convergence is a notorious barrier. The objective was to assess the impact of using

  11. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P. [AWE PLC, Aldermaston Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  12. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  13. Model Checking Markov Chains: Techniques and Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zapreev, I.S.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation deals with four important aspects of model checking Markov chains: the development of efficient model-checking tools, the improvement of model-checking algorithms, the efficiency of the state-space reduction techniques, and the development of simulation-based model-checking

  14. Cohomological reduction of sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candu, Constantin; Mitev, Vladimir; Schomerus, Volker [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Creutzig, Thomas [North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2010-01-15

    This article studies some features of quantum field theories with internal supersymmetry, focusing mainly on 2-dimensional non-linear sigma models which take values in a coset superspace. It is discussed how BRST operators from the target space super- symmetry algebra can be used to identify subsectors which are often simpler than the original model and may allow for an explicit computation of correlation functions. After an extensive discussion of the general reduction scheme, we present a number of interesting examples, including symmetric superspaces G/G{sup Z{sub 2}} and coset superspaces of the form G/G{sup Z{sub 4}}. (orig.)

  15. Data-Driven Model Order Reduction for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Tiangang; Youssef, Marzouk; Willcox, Karen

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in using MCMC for the solution of inverse problems is the repeated evaluation of computationally expensive numerical models. We develop a data-driven projection- based model order reduction technique to reduce

  16. Chemical model reduction under uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malpica Galassi, Riccardo

    2017-03-06

    A general strategy for analysis and reduction of uncertain chemical kinetic models is presented, and its utility is illustrated in the context of ignition of hydrocarbon fuel–air mixtures. The strategy is based on a deterministic analysis and reduction method which employs computational singular perturbation analysis to generate simplified kinetic mechanisms, starting from a detailed reference mechanism. We model uncertain quantities in the reference mechanism, namely the Arrhenius rate parameters, as random variables with prescribed uncertainty factors. We propagate this uncertainty to obtain the probability of inclusion of each reaction in the simplified mechanism. We propose probabilistic error measures to compare predictions from the uncertain reference and simplified models, based on the comparison of the uncertain dynamics of the state variables, where the mixture entropy is chosen as progress variable. We employ the construction for the simplification of an uncertain mechanism in an n-butane–air mixture homogeneous ignition case, where a 176-species, 1111-reactions detailed kinetic model for the oxidation of n-butane is used with uncertainty factors assigned to each Arrhenius rate pre-exponential coefficient. This illustration is employed to highlight the utility of the construction, and the performance of a family of simplified models produced depending on chosen thresholds on importance and marginal probabilities of the reactions.

  17. Exact model reduction of combinatorial reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fey Dirk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Receptors and scaffold proteins usually possess a high number of distinct binding domains inducing the formation of large multiprotein signaling complexes. Due to combinatorial reasons the number of distinguishable species grows exponentially with the number of binding domains and can easily reach several millions. Even by including only a limited number of components and binding domains the resulting models are very large and hardly manageable. A novel model reduction technique allows the significant reduction and modularization of these models. Results We introduce methods that extend and complete the already introduced approach. For instance, we provide techniques to handle the formation of multi-scaffold complexes as well as receptor dimerization. Furthermore, we discuss a new modeling approach that allows the direct generation of exactly reduced model structures. The developed methods are used to reduce a model of EGF and insulin receptor crosstalk comprising 5,182 ordinary differential equations (ODEs to a model with 87 ODEs. Conclusion The methods, presented in this contribution, significantly enhance the available methods to exactly reduce models of combinatorial reaction networks.

  18. Development and evaluation of thermal model reduction algorithms for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiml, Michael; Suderland, Martin; Reiss, Philipp; Czupalla, Markus

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the topic of the reduction of thermal models of spacecraft. The work presented here has been conducted in cooperation with the company OHB AG, formerly Kayser-Threde GmbH, and the Institute of Astronautics at Technische Universität München with the goal to shorten and automatize the time-consuming and manual process of thermal model reduction. The reduction of thermal models can be divided into the simplification of the geometry model for calculation of external heat flows and radiative couplings and into the reduction of the underlying mathematical model. For simplification a method has been developed which approximates the reduced geometry model with the help of an optimization algorithm. Different linear and nonlinear model reduction techniques have been evaluated for their applicability in reduction of the mathematical model. Thereby the compatibility with the thermal analysis tool ESATAN-TMS is of major concern, which restricts the useful application of these methods. Additional model reduction methods have been developed, which account to these constraints. The Matrix Reduction method allows the approximation of the differential equation to reference values exactly expect for numerical errors. The summation method enables a useful, applicable reduction of thermal models that can be used in industry. In this work a framework for model reduction of thermal models has been created, which can be used together with a newly developed graphical user interface for the reduction of thermal models in industry.

  19. Ultra-low dose abdominal MDCT: Using a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction technique for substantial dose reduction in a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Blake, Michael; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Choy, Gary; Karosmangulu, Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho; Brown, Kevin; Thompson, Richard; Morton, Thomas; Raihani, Nilgoun; Koehler, Thomas; Kalra, Mannudeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Limited abdominal CT indications can be performed at a size specific dose estimate of (SSDE) 1.5 mGy (∼0.9 mSv) in smaller patients (BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 ) using a knowledge based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) technique. • Evaluation of liver tumors and pathologies is unacceptable at this reduced dose with IMR technique especially in patients with a BMI greater than 25 kg/m 2 . • IMR body soft tissue and routine settings perform substantially better than IMR sharp plus setting in reduced dose CT images. • At SSDE of 1.5 mGy, objective image noise in reduced dose IMR images is 8–56% less than compared to standard dose FBP images, with lowest image noise in IMR body-soft tissue images. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and image quality parameters of a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) in reduced dose (RD) abdominal CT examinations. Materials and methods: This IRB-approved prospective study included 82 abdominal CT examinations performed for 41 consecutive patients (mean age, 62 ± 12 years; F:M 28:13) who underwent a RD CT (SSDE, 1.5 mGy ± 0.4 [∼0.9 mSv] at 120 kV with 17–20 mAs/slice) immediately after their standard dose (SD) CT exam (10 mGy ± 3 [∼6 mSv] at 120 kV with automatic exposure control) on 256 MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). SD data were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP). RD data were reconstructed with FBP and IMR. Four radiologists used a five-point scale (1 = image quality better than SD CT to 5 = image quality unacceptable) to assess both subjective image quality and artifacts. Lesions were first detected on RD FBP images. RD IMR and RD FBP images were then compared side-by-side to SD-FBP images in an independent, randomized and blinded fashion. Friedman's test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Objective measurements included image noise and attenuation as well as noise spectral density (NSD) curves to

  20. Ultra-low dose abdominal MDCT: Using a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction technique for substantial dose reduction in a prospective clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali, E-mail: rkhawaja@mgh.harvard.edu [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Singh, Sarabjeet; Blake, Michael; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Choy, Gary; Karosmangulu, Ali; Padole, Atul; Do, Synho [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brown, Kevin; Thompson, Richard; Morton, Thomas; Raihani, Nilgoun [CT Research and Advanced Development, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH (United States); Koehler, Thomas [Philips Technologie GmbH, Innovative Technologies, Hamburg (Germany); Kalra, Mannudeep K. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Limited abdominal CT indications can be performed at a size specific dose estimate of (SSDE) 1.5 mGy (∼0.9 mSv) in smaller patients (BMI less than or equal to 25 kg/m{sup 2}) using a knowledge based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) technique. • Evaluation of liver tumors and pathologies is unacceptable at this reduced dose with IMR technique especially in patients with a BMI greater than 25 kg/m{sup 2}. • IMR body soft tissue and routine settings perform substantially better than IMR sharp plus setting in reduced dose CT images. • At SSDE of 1.5 mGy, objective image noise in reduced dose IMR images is 8–56% less than compared to standard dose FBP images, with lowest image noise in IMR body-soft tissue images. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess lesion detection and image quality parameters of a knowledge-based Iterative Model Reconstruction (IMR) in reduced dose (RD) abdominal CT examinations. Materials and methods: This IRB-approved prospective study included 82 abdominal CT examinations performed for 41 consecutive patients (mean age, 62 ± 12 years; F:M 28:13) who underwent a RD CT (SSDE, 1.5 mGy ± 0.4 [∼0.9 mSv] at 120 kV with 17–20 mAs/slice) immediately after their standard dose (SD) CT exam (10 mGy ± 3 [∼6 mSv] at 120 kV with automatic exposure control) on 256 MDCT (iCT, Philips Healthcare). SD data were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP). RD data were reconstructed with FBP and IMR. Four radiologists used a five-point scale (1 = image quality better than SD CT to 5 = image quality unacceptable) to assess both subjective image quality and artifacts. Lesions were first detected on RD FBP images. RD IMR and RD FBP images were then compared side-by-side to SD-FBP images in an independent, randomized and blinded fashion. Friedman's test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Objective measurements included image noise and attenuation as well as noise spectral density (NSD) curves

  1. Fast Multiscale Reservoir Simulations using POD-DEIM Model Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Ghasemi, Mohammadreza; Yang, Yanfang; Gildin, Eduardo; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    snapshots are inexpensively computed using local model reduction techniques based on Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) which provides (1) a hierarchical approximation of snapshot vectors (2) adaptive computations by using coarse grids (3

  2. Relativistic model for statevector reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearle, P.

    1991-04-01

    A relativistic quantum field model describing statevector reduction for fermion states is presented. The time evolution of the states is governed by a Schroedinger equation with a Hamiltonian that has a Hermitian and a non-Hermitian part. In addition to the fermions, the Hermitian part describes positive and negative energy mesons of equal mass, analogous to the longitudinal and timelike photons of electromagnetism. The meson-field-sum is coupled to the fermion field. This ''dresses'' each fermion so that, in the extreme nonrelativistic limit (non-moving fermions), a fermion in a position eigenstate is also in an eigenstate of the meson-field-difference with the Yukawa-potential as eigenvalue. However, the fermions do not interact: this is a theory of free dressed fermions. It is possible to obtain a stationary normalized ''vacuum'' state which satisfies two conditions analogous to the gauge conditions of electromagnetism (i.e., that the meson-field-difference, as well as its time derivative, give zero when applied to the vacuum state), to any desired degree of accuracy. The non-Hermitian part of the Hamiltonian contains the coupling of the meson-field-difference to an externally imposed c-number fluctuating white noise field, of the CSL (Continuous Spontaneous Localization) form. This causes statevector reduction, as is shown in the extreme nonrelativistic limit. For example, a superposition of spatially separated wavepackets of a fermion will eventually be reduced to a single wavepacket: the meson-field-difference discriminates among the Yukawa-potential ''handles'' attached to each wavepacket, thereby selecting one wavepacket to survive by the CSL mechanism. Analysis beyond that given in this paper is required to see what happens when the fermions are allowed to move. (It is possible that the ''vacuum'' state becomes involved in the dynamics so that the ''gauge'' conditions can no longer be maintained.) It is shown how to incorporate these ideas into quantum

  3. Code development for analysis of MHD pressure drop reduction in a liquid metal blanket using insulation technique based on a fully developed flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Morley, Neil; Abdou, Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents details of a new numerical code for analysis of a fully developed MHD flow in a channel of a liquid metal blanket using various insulation techniques. The code has specially been designed for channels with a 'sandwich' structure of several materials with different physical properties. The code includes a finite-volume formulation, automatically generated Hartmann number sensitive meshes, and effective convergence acceleration technique. Tests performed at Ha ∼ 10 4 have showed very good accuracy. As an illustration, two blanket flows have been considered: Pb-17Li flow in a channel with a silicon carbide flow channel insert, and Li flow in a channel with insulating coating

  4. Mathematical modelling techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Aris, Rutherford

    1995-01-01

    ""Engaging, elegantly written."" - Applied Mathematical ModellingMathematical modelling is a highly useful methodology designed to enable mathematicians, physicists and other scientists to formulate equations from a given nonmathematical situation. In this elegantly written volume, a distinguished theoretical chemist and engineer sets down helpful rules not only for setting up models but also for solving the mathematical problems they pose and for evaluating models.The author begins with a discussion of the term ""model,"" followed by clearly presented examples of the different types of mode

  5. Slot technique - an alternative method of scatter reduction in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzer, W.; Widenmann, L.

    1983-01-01

    The most common method of scatter reduction in radiography is the use of an antiscatter grid. Its disadvantage is the absorption of a certain percentage of primary radiation in the lead strips of the grid and the fact that due to the limited thickness of the lead strips their scatter absorption is also limited. A possibility for avoiding this disadvantage is offered by the so-called slot technique, ie, the successive exposure of the subject with a narrow fan beam provided by slots in rather thick lead plates. The results of a comparison between grid and slot technique regarding dose to the patient, scatter reduction, image quality and the effect of automatic exposure control are reported. (author)

  6. Combining Breast Reduction Techniques to Treat Gigantomastia in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody F. Scheefer, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. In this presentation of 2 consecutive cases of symptomatic juvenile breast hypertrophy in Ghana, we review the patient presentation, workup, and discuss outcomes following a combined technique of inferior pedicle stump with free nipple graft reduction mammoplasty. Surgical goals for treatment of gigantomastia were 2-fold: to resect adequate tissue to obtain symptomatic relief with improved quality of life, while avoiding a flat, boxy-appearing breast shape.

  7. Nipple Reduction With the Chullo-Hat Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hyung-Bo; Sun, Sang-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    Although various techniques of nipple reduction have been described in the literature, many are difficult to design or have unreliable outcomes. For men, as well as women who do not plan to breastfeed, it is not necessary to apply a complicated technique that protects the lactiferous ducts. The authors introduce a simple technique for nipple reduction that has achieved consistent, reproducible results. The desired nipple length is marked, and a chullo-hat excision pattern is drawn. After infiltration of a local anesthetic solution around the nipple, excision of the excess nipple tissue is performed, comprising 2 triangular flaps. The remaining 2 pillars are approximated with 5-0 Nylon simple interrupted sutures. However, the wound is not completely closed in the central area of the nipple, which promotes the drainage of discharge. Fifty-three women (106 nipples) underwent this surgery between December 2009 and December 2013. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years (mean, 10 months). No major complications occurred, and the scars were very inconspicuous. The postoperative appearance of nipples was consistently similar in size and shape. This simple technique was safe and effective in nipples of different sizes. The results were reliable and consistent with expectations. Although this study included only women, the authors believe that outcomes would be successful in men as well. 4 Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Boundary representation modelling techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Provides the most complete presentation of boundary representation solid modelling yet publishedOffers basic reference information for software developers, application developers and users Includes a historical perspective as well as giving a background for modern research.

  9. Error reduction techniques for measuring long synchrotron mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irick, S.

    1998-07-01

    Many instruments and techniques are used for measuring long mirror surfaces. A Fizeau interferometer may be used to measure mirrors much longer than the interferometer aperture size by using grazing incidence at the mirror surface and analyzing the light reflected from a flat end mirror. Advantages of this technique are data acquisition speed and use of a common instrument. Disadvantages are reduced sampling interval, uncertainty of tangential position, and sagittal/tangential aspect ratio other than unity. Also, deep aspheric surfaces cannot be measured on a Fizeau interferometer without a specially made fringe nulling holographic plate. Other scanning instruments have been developed for measuring height, slope, or curvature profiles of the surface, but lack accuracy for very long scans required for X-ray synchrotron mirrors. The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) was developed specifically for long x-ray mirror measurement, and still outperforms other instruments, especially for aspheres. Thus, this paper focuses on error reduction techniques for the LTP

  10. Reduction of radiation biases by incorporating the missing cloud variability by means of downscaling techniques: a study using the 3-D MoCaRT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gimeno García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Handling complexity to the smallest detail in atmospheric radiative transfer models is unfeasible in practice. On the one hand, the properties of the interacting medium, i.e., the atmosphere and the surface, are only available at a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, the computational cost of accurate radiation models accounting for three-dimensional heterogeneous media are prohibitive for some applications, especially for climate modelling and operational remote-sensing algorithms. Hence, it is still common practice to use simplified models for atmospheric radiation applications.

    Three-dimensional radiation models can deal with complex scenarios providing an accurate solution to the radiative transfer. In contrast, one-dimensional models are computationally more efficient, but introduce biases to the radiation results.

    With the help of stochastic models that consider the multi-fractal nature of clouds, it is possible to scale cloud properties given at a coarse spatial resolution down to a higher resolution. Performing the radiative transfer within the cloud fields at higher spatial resolution noticeably helps to improve the radiation results.

    We present a new Monte Carlo model, MoCaRT, that computes the radiative transfer in three-dimensional inhomogeneous atmospheres. The MoCaRT model is validated by comparison with the consensus results of the Intercomparison of Three-Dimensional Radiation Codes (I3RC project.

    In the framework of this paper, we aim at characterising cloud heterogeneity effects on radiances and broadband fluxes, namely: the errors due to unresolved variability (the so-called plane parallel homogeneous, PPH, bias and the errors due to the neglect of transversal photon displacements (independent pixel approximation, IPA, bias. First, we study the effect of the missing cloud variability on reflectivities. We will show that the generation of subscale variability by means of stochastic

  11. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  12. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  13. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables

  15. Technique for Reduction of Environmental Pollution from Construction Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaeva, N. V.; Klimenko, M. Y.

    2017-11-01

    The results of the research on the negative impact construction wastes have on the urban environment and construction ecological safety are described. The research results are based on the statistical data and indicators calculated with the use of environmental pollution assessment in the restoration system of urban buildings technical conditions. The technique for the reduction of environmental pollution from construction wastes is scientifically based on the analytic summary of scientific and practical results for ecological safety ensuring at major overhaul and current repairs (reconstruction) of the buildings and structures. It is also based on the practical application of the probability theory method, system analysis and disperse system theory. It is necessary to execute some stages implementing the developed technique to reduce environmental pollution from construction wastes. The stages include various steps starting from information collection to the system formation with optimum performance characteristics which are more resource saving and energy efficient for the accumulation of construction wastes from urban construction units. The following tasks are solved under certain studies: basic data collection about construction wastes accumulation; definition and comparison of technological combinations at each system functional stage intended for the reduction of construction wastes discharge into the environment; assessment criteria calculation of resource saving and energy efficiency; optimum working parameters of each implementation stage are created. The urban construction technique implementation shows that the resource saving criteria are from 55.22% to 88.84%; potential of construction wastes recycling is 450 million tons of construction damaged elements (parts).

  16. State Space Reduction for Model Checking Agent Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.-S.T.Q. Jongmans (Sung-Shik); K.V. Hindriks; M.B. van Riemsdijk; L. Dennis; O. Boissier; R.H. Bordini (Rafael)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractState space reduction techniques have been developed to increase the efficiency of model checking in the context of imperative programming languages. Unfortunately, these techniques cannot straightforwardly be applied to agents: the nature of states in the two programming paradigms

  17. Model order reduction for complex high-tech systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutowska, A.; Hochstenbach, M.E.; Schilders, W.H.A.; Michielsen, B.; Poirier, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a computationally efficient model order reduction (MOR) technique for interconnected systems. This MOR technique preserves block structures and zero blocks and exploits separate MOR approximations for the individual sub-systems in combination with low rank approximations for the

  18. Volume reduction of ion exchange resin by a pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, M.; Funabashi, K.; Uchida, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Volume reduction techniques, such as incineration and acid digestion, of spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants are being developed with a view toward reducing radioactive waste volume and also making the final waste form more stable. The authors chose pyrolysis as a technique that can be done at low operating temperatures and low gas flow rates in a reactor vessel. Fundamental experiments were performed to clarify the resin pyrolysis characteristics, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature was determined. Consequently, a pilot plant with a treatment capacity of approx. 50 kg/batch was constructed based on the results. Using the pilot plant, the authors are now performing pyrolysis of the resins and solidification of their residues. This report will give the results of fundamental experiments and pilot plant tests

  19. Relative Error Model Reduction via Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Singular Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model reduction of linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. This order reduction technique is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced stochastic model reduction method and singular perturbation model reduction technique. Compared...... by using the concept and properties of the reciprocal systems. The results are further illustrated by two practical numerical examples: a model of CD player and a model of the atmospheric storm track....

  20. New techniques for subdivision modelling

    OpenAIRE

    BEETS, Koen

    2006-01-01

    In this dissertation, several tools and techniques for modelling with subdivision surfaces are presented. Based on the huge amount of theoretical knowledge about subdivision surfaces, we present techniques to facilitate practical 3D modelling which make subdivision surfaces even more useful. Subdivision surfaces have reclaimed attention several years ago after their application in full-featured 3D animation movies, such as Toy Story. Since then and due to their attractive properties an ever i...

  1. Survey of semantic modeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.L.

    1975-07-01

    The analysis of the semantics of programing languages was attempted with numerous modeling techniques. By providing a brief survey of these techniques together with an analysis of their applicability for answering semantic issues, this report attempts to illuminate the state-of-the-art in this area. The intent is to be illustrative rather than thorough in the coverage of semantic models. A bibliography is included for the reader who is interested in pursuing this area of research in more detail.

  2. Cogging Torque Reduction Techniques for Spoke-type IPMSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrim, F. S.; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.; Jusoh, L. I.

    2017-08-01

    A spoke-type interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) is extending its tentacles in industrial arena due to good flux-weakening capability and high power density. In many of the application, high strength of permanent magnet causes the undesirable effects of high cogging torque that can aggravate performance of the motor. High cogging torque is significantly produced by IPMSM due to the similar length and the effectiveness of the magnetic air-gap. The address of this study is to analyze and compare the cogging torque effect and performance of four common techniques for cogging torque reduction such as skewing, notching, pole pairing and rotor pole pairing. With the aid of 3-D finite element analysis (FEA) by JMAG software, a 6S-4P Spoke-type IPMSM with various rotor-PM configurations has been designed. As a result, the cogging torque effect reduced up to 69.5% for skewing technique, followed by 31.96%, 29.6%, and 17.53% by pole pairing, axial pole pairing and notching techniques respectively.

  3. Data-Driven Model Order Reduction for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Tiangang

    2014-01-06

    One of the major challenges in using MCMC for the solution of inverse problems is the repeated evaluation of computationally expensive numerical models. We develop a data-driven projection- based model order reduction technique to reduce the computational cost of numerical PDE evaluations in this context.

  4. Computational reduction techniques for numerical vibro-acoustic analysis of hearing aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell Mediante, Ester

    . In this thesis, several challenges encountered in the process of modelling and optimizing hearing aids are addressed. Firstly, a strategy for modelling the contacts between plastic parts for harmonic analysis is developed. Irregularities in the contact surfaces, inherent to the manufacturing process of the parts....... Secondly, the applicability of Model Order Reduction (MOR) techniques to lower the computational complexity of hearing aid vibro-acoustic models is studied. For fine frequency response calculation and optimization, which require solving the numerical model repeatedly, a computational challenge...... is encountered due to the large number of Degrees of Freedom (DOFs) needed to represent the complexity of the hearing aid system accurately. In this context, several MOR techniques are discussed, and an adaptive reduction method for vibro-acoustic optimization problems is developed as a main contribution. Lastly...

  5. Computerized data reduction techniques for nadir viewing remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gormsen, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Computer resources have been developed for the analysis and reduction of MAPS experimental data from the OSTA-1 payload. The MAPS Research Project is concerned with the measurement of the global distribution of mid-tropospheric carbon monoxide. The measurement technique for the MAPS instrument is based on non-dispersive gas filter radiometer operating in the nadir viewing mode. The MAPS experiment has two passive remote sensing instruments, the prototype instrument which is used to measure tropospheric air pollution from aircraft platforms and the third generation (OSTA) instrument which is used to measure carbon monoxide in the mid and upper troposphere from space platforms. Extensive effort was also expended in support of the MAPS/OSTA-3 shuttle flight. Specific capabilities and resources developed are discussed.

  6. Energy Reduction Multipath Routing Protocol for MANET Using Recoil Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Sahu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In Mobile Ad-hoc networks (MANET, power conservation and utilization is an acute problem and has received significant attention from academics and industry in recent years. Nodes in MANET function on battery power, which is a rare and limited energy resource. Hence, its conservation and utilization should be done judiciously for the effective functioning of the network. In this paper, a novel protocol namely Energy Reduction Multipath Routing Protocol for MANET using Recoil Technique (AOMDV-ER is proposed, which conserves the energy along with optimal network lifetime, routing overhead, packet delivery ratio and throughput. It performs better than any other AODV based algorithms, as in AOMDV-ER the nodes transmit packets to their destination smartly by using a varying recoil off time technique based on their geographical location. This concept reduces the number of transmissions, which results in the improvement of network lifetime. In addition, the local level route maintenance reduces the additional routing overhead. Lastly, the prediction based link lifetime of each node is estimated which helps in reducing the packet loss in the network. This protocol has three subparts: an optimal route discovery algorithm amalgamation with the residual energy and distance mechanism; a coordinated recoiled nodes algorithm which eliminates the number of transmissions in order to reduces the data redundancy, traffic redundant, routing overhead, end to end delay and enhance the network lifetime; and a last link reckoning and route maintenance algorithm to improve the packet delivery ratio and link stability in the network. The experimental results show that the AOMDV-ER protocol save at least 16% energy consumption, 12% reduction in routing overhead, significant achievement in network lifetime and packet delivery ratio than Ad hoc on demand multipath distance vector routing protocol (AOMDV, Ad hoc on demand multipath distance vector routing protocol life

  7. Model Reduction of Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Hamid Reza

    gramians. Generalized gramians are the solutions to the observability and controllability Lyapunov inequalities. In the first framework the projection matrices are found based on the common generalized gramians. This framework preserves the stability of the original switched system for all switching...... is guaranteed to be preserved for arbitrary switching signal. To compute the common generalized gramians linear matrix inequalities (LMI’s) need to be solved. These LMI’s are not always feasible. In order to solve the problem of conservatism, the second framework is presented. In this method the projection......High-Technological solutions of today are characterized by complex dynamical models. A lot of these models have inherent hybrid/switching structure. Hybrid/switched systems are powerful models for distributed embedded systems design where discrete controls are applied to continuous processes...

  8. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  9. Behavior change techniques in popular alcohol reduction apps: content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, David; Garnett, Claire; Brown, James; West, Robert; Michie, Susan

    2015-05-14

    Mobile phone apps have the potential to reduce excessive alcohol consumption cost-effectively. Although hundreds of alcohol-related apps are available, there is little information about the behavior change techniques (BCTs) they contain, or the extent to which they are based on evidence or theory and how this relates to their popularity and user ratings. Our aim was to assess the proportion of popular alcohol-related apps available in the United Kingdom that focus on alcohol reduction, identify the BCTs they contain, and explore whether BCTs or the mention of theory or evidence is associated with app popularity and user ratings. We searched the iTunes and Google Play stores with the terms "alcohol" and "drink", and the first 800 results were classified into alcohol reduction, entertainment, or blood alcohol content measurement. Of those classified as alcohol reduction, all free apps and the top 10 paid apps were coded for BCTs and for reference to evidence or theory. Measures of popularity and user ratings were extracted. Of the 800 apps identified, 662 were unique. Of these, 13.7% (91/662) were classified as alcohol reduction (95% CI 11.3-16.6), 53.9% (357/662) entertainment (95% CI 50.1-57.7), 18.9% (125/662) blood alcohol content measurement (95% CI 16.1-22.0) and 13.4% (89/662) other (95% CI 11.1-16.3). The 51 free alcohol reduction apps and the top 10 paid apps contained a mean of 3.6 BCTs (SD 3.4), with approximately 12% (7/61) not including any BCTs. The BCTs used most often were "facilitate self-recording" (54%, 33/61), "provide information on consequences of excessive alcohol use and drinking cessation" (43%, 26/61), "provide feedback on performance" (41%, 25/61), "give options for additional and later support" (25%, 15/61) and "offer/direct towards appropriate written materials" (23%, 14/61). These apps also rarely included any of the 22 BCTs frequently used in other health behavior change interventions (mean 2.46, SD 2.06). Evidence was mentioned by 16

  10. Versions of the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief chronology of changes made to EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM), organized by WARM version number. The page includes brief summaries of changes and updates since the previous version.

  11. Documentation for the Waste Reduction Model (WARM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes the WARM documentation files and provides links to all documentation files associated with EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM). The page includes a brief summary of the chapters documenting the greenhouse gas emission and energy factors.

  12. Comparisons of receive array interference reduction techniques under erroneous generalized transmit beamforming

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha Mahmoud

    2014-02-01

    This paper studies generalized single-stream transmit beamforming employing receive array co-channel interference reduction algorithms under slow and flat fading multiuser wireless systems. The impact of imperfect prediction of channel state information for the desired user spatially uncorrelated transmit channels on the effectiveness of transmit beamforming for different interference reduction techniques is investigated. The case of over-loaded receive array with closely-spaced elements is considered, wherein it can be configured to specified interfering sources. Both dominant interference reduction and adaptive interference reduction techniques for statistically ordered and unordered interferers powers, respectively, are thoroughly studied. The effect of outdated statistical ordering of the interferers powers on the efficiency of dominant interference reduction is studied and then compared against the adaptive interference reduction. For the system models described above, new analytical formulations for the statistics of combined signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio are presented, from which results for conventional maximum ratio transmission and single-antenna best transmit selection can be directly deduced as limiting cases. These results are then utilized to obtain quantitative measures for various performance metrics. They are also used to compare the achieved performance of various configuration models under consideration. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  13. An Optimization Mechanism Intended for Static Power Reduction Using Dual-thTechnique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo P. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Power consumption reduction is a challenge nowadays. Techniques for dynamic and static power minimization have been proposed, but most of them are very time consuming. This work proposes an algorithm for reducing static power, which can be perfectly inserted in the conventional design flow for integrated systems considering an open source environment (open access infrastructure. The proposed approach, based on a Dual-Threshold technique, replaces part of the cells of the circuit by cells with a higher threshold voltage without resulting in timing violations in the circuit. The decision to replace a cell is based on timing estimates of the circuit modeling with the cell replacement, before it is actually replaced. The fact that only some cells are replaced every iteration results in a reduction of the runtime of the algorithm. Additionally, results showed a reduction in static power up to 39.28%, when applying the proposed approach in the ISCAS85 benchmark circuits.

  14. Advanced Atmospheric Ensemble Modeling Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Chiswell, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kurzeja, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Maze, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Viner, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    Ensemble modeling (EM), the creation of multiple atmospheric simulations for a given time period, has become an essential tool for characterizing uncertainties in model predictions. We explore two novel ensemble modeling techniques: (1) perturbation of model parameters (Adaptive Programming, AP), and (2) data assimilation (Ensemble Kalman Filter, EnKF). The current research is an extension to work from last year and examines transport on a small spatial scale (<100 km) in complex terrain, for more rigorous testing of the ensemble technique. Two different release cases were studied, a coastal release (SF6) and an inland release (Freon) which consisted of two release times. Observations of tracer concentration and meteorology are used to judge the ensemble results. In addition, adaptive grid techniques have been developed to reduce required computing resources for transport calculations. Using a 20- member ensemble, the standard approach generated downwind transport that was quantitatively good for both releases; however, the EnKF method produced additional improvement for the coastal release where the spatial and temporal differences due to interior valley heating lead to the inland movement of the plume. The AP technique showed improvements for both release cases, with more improvement shown in the inland release. This research demonstrated that transport accuracy can be improved when models are adapted to a particular location/time or when important local data is assimilated into the simulation and enhances SRNL’s capability in atmospheric transport modeling in support of its current customer base and local site missions, as well as our ability to attract new customers within the intelligence community.

  15. COGNITIVE RESTRUCTURING: ALTERNATIVE COUNSELING TECHNIQUES TO REDUCTION ACADEMIC PROCRASTINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Sofiana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Procrastination is often experienced by almost everyone, including students who often delay to resolve any responsibility in the academic process that would decrease the individual academic achievement. cognitive restructuring is one of the cognitive techniques used in counseling in addition to cognitive behavioral techniques (behavioral and didaktif techniques. This technique has several procedures by focusing on identifying an effort and changing dysfunctional thoughts or negative self-statements into a new belief that is more rational and adaptive, which will affect more rational behavior anyway. Cognitive restructuring techniques assessed to be an alternative counseling techniques in reducing academic procrastination.

  16. Reduced order methods for modeling and computational reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rozza, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    This monograph addresses the state of the art of reduced order methods for modeling and computational reduction of complex parametrized systems, governed by ordinary and/or partial differential equations, with a special emphasis on real time computing techniques and applications in computational mechanics, bioengineering and computer graphics.  Several topics are covered, including: design, optimization, and control theory in real-time with applications in engineering; data assimilation, geometry registration, and parameter estimation with special attention to real-time computing in biomedical engineering and computational physics; real-time visualization of physics-based simulations in computer science; the treatment of high-dimensional problems in state space, physical space, or parameter space; the interactions between different model reduction and dimensionality reduction approaches; the development of general error estimation frameworks which take into account both model and discretization effects. This...

  17. Relativistic dynamical reduction models and nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Grassi, R.

    1990-09-01

    We discuss some features of continuous dynamical models yielding state vector reduction and we briefly sketch some recent attempts to get a relativistic generalization of them. Within the relativistic context we analyze in detail the local an nonlocal features of the reduction mechanism and we investigate critically the possibility of attributing objective properties to individual systems in the micro and macroscopic cases. At the nonrelativistic level, two physically equivalent versions of continuous reduction mechanisms have been presented. However, only one of them can be taken as a starting point for the above considered relativistic generalization. By resorting to counterfactual arguments we show that the reason for this lies in the fact that the stochasticity involved in the two approaches has different conceptual implications. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs

  18. Model reduction in integrated controls-structures design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Peiman G.

    1993-01-01

    It is the objective of this paper to present a model reduction technique developed for the integrated controls-structures design of flexible structures. Integrated controls-structures design problems are typically posed as nonlinear mathematical programming problems, where the design variables consist of both structural and control parameters. In the solution process, both structural and control design variables are constantly changing; therefore, the dynamic characteristics of the structure are also changing. This presents a problem in obtaining a reduced-order model for active control design and analysis which will be valid for all design points within the design space. In other words, the frequency and number of the significant modes of the structure (modes that should be included) may vary considerably throughout the design process. This is also true as the locations and/or masses of the sensors and actuators change. Moreover, since the number of design evaluations in the integrated design process could easily run into thousands, any feasible order-reduction method should not require model reduction analysis at every design iteration. In this paper a novel and efficient technique for model reduction in the integrated controls-structures design process, which addresses these issues, is presented.

  19. A Comparative of business process modelling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkawarow, I. R. H. T.; Waworuntu, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this era, there is a lot of business process modeling techniques. This article is the research about differences of business process modeling techniques. For each technique will explain about the definition and the structure. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some popular business process modelling techniques. The comparative framework is based on 2 criteria: notation and how it works when implemented in Somerleyton Animal Park. Each technique will end with the advantages and disadvantages. The final conclusion will give recommend of business process modeling techniques that easy to use and serve the basis for evaluating further modelling techniques.

  20. Air pollution emission reduction techniques in combustion plants; Technique de reduction des emissions de polluants atmospheriques dans les installations de combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouscaren, R. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    Separating techniques offer a large choice between various procedures for air pollution reduction in combustion plants: mechanical, electrical, filtering, hydraulic, chemical, physical, catalytic, thermal and biological processes. Many environment-friendly equipment use such separating techniques, particularly for dust cleaning and fume desulfurizing and more recently for the abatement of volatile organic pollutants or dioxins and furans. These processes are briefly described

  1. Modeling the economics of LLW volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, M.H.; Witzig, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Generators of low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) are under pressure to implement volume reduction (VR) programs for political and economic reasons. Political reasons include the appearance of generating less waste or meeting quotas. Economic reasons include avoiding high disposal costs and associated surcharges. Volume reduction results in less total volume over which fixed disposal costs are allocated and therefore higher unit costs for disposal. As numerous small compacts are developed, this often overlooked effect becomes more pronounced. The described model presents two unique significant features. First, a feedback loop considers the impact of VR on disposal rates, and second, it appeals to logic without extensive knowledge of VR technology or computer modeling. The latter feature is especially useful in conveying information to students and nontechnical decision makers, demonstrating the impact of each of a complicated set of variables with reproducible results

  2. Model Reduction using Vorobyev Moment Problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strakoš, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2009), s. 363-379 ISSN 1017-1398 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100300802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : matching moments * model reduction * Krylov subspace methods * conjugate gradient method * Lanczos method * Arnoldi method * Gauss-Christoffel quadrature * scattering amplitude Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2009

  3. Application of nonisothermal kinetic techniques on the reduction of three commercial iron ore agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedolla, E.; Leon, C.A.; Aguilar, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of reduction of iron ore agglomerates by both isothermal and nonisothermal TG studies was investigated, and the work was complemented with the structural characterization of the total and partially reacted samples. Three different commercial hematite pellets were studied. The mechanisms of reduction were obtained under isothermal conditions, resulting in a fitting to chemical reaction models. Nonisothermal reduction was carried out using a TGA system (CAHN TG-171) from 600 to 1,000 degree centigree maintaining a lineal heating rate of 4,7 and 10 degree centigree/min, and the reducing atmospheres used were H 2 (100%) and H 2 -CO(95:5). The kinetic parameters were evaluated by Coats and Redfern, Dixit and Ray and Prakash and Ray techniques. It was found that the lower the heating rate, the higher the reduction degree and the higher activation energy. The activation energy for reduction with the mixture H 2 -CO was always higher than that obtained with pure H 2 . (Author)

  4. Liposuction-assisted four pedicle-based breast reduction (LAFPBR): A new safer technique of breast reduction for elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Padula, Simone; Hersant, Barbara; Noel, Warren; Meningaud, Jean Paul

    2018-05-01

    As older people increasingly care for their body image and remain active longer, the demand for reduction mammaplasty is increasing in this population. Only a few studies of reduction mammaplasty have specifically focussed on the outcomes in elderly women. We developed a new breast reduction technique: the Liposuction-Assisted Four Pedicle-Based Breast Reduction (LAFPBR) that is especially indicated for elderly patients. The aim of this paper was to describe the LAFPBR technique and to determine whether it could be considered a safer option for elderly patients compared to the superomedial pedicle (SMP) technique. A retrospective study included sixty-two women aged 60 years and over who underwent bilateral breast reduction mammaplasty. Thirty-one patients underwent LAFPBR and 31 patients were operated using the SMP technique. Complications and patient satisfaction in both groups were analysed. Patient satisfaction was measured using a validated questionnaire: the client satisfaction questionnaire 8 (CSQ-8). The LAFPBR technique required less operating time, and avoided significant blood loss. Six minor complications were observed in SMP patients. No LAFPBR women developed a procedure-related complication. Patient satisfaction was high with a mean score of 29.65 in LAFPBR patients and 28.68 in SMP patients. The LAFPBR is an easy procedure that appears safer than SMP and results in a high satisfaction rate in elderly women. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Model Order Reduction for Non Linear Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Pinillo, Rubén

    2017-01-01

    Context: Automotive industry is moving towards a new generation of cars. Main idea: Cars are furnished with radars, cameras, sensors, etc… providing useful information about the environment surrounding the car. Goals: Provide an efficient model for the radar input/output. Reducing computational costs by means of big data techniques.

  6. Planar and SPECT Monte Carlo acceleration using a variance reduction technique in I131imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosravi, H. R.; Sarkar, S.; Takavar, A.; Saghari, M.; Shahriari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Various variance reduction techniques such as forced detection (FD) have been implemented in Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of nuclear medicine in an effort to decrease the simulation time while keeping accuracy. However most of these techniques still result in very long MC simulation times for being implemented into routine use. Materials and Methods: Convolution-based forced detection (CFD) method as a variance reduction technique was implemented into the well known SlMlND MC photon simulation software. A variety of simulations including point and extended sources in uniform and non-uniform attenuation media, were performed to compare differences between FD and CFD versions of SlMlND modeling for I 131 radionuclide and camera configurations. Experimental measurement of system response function was compared to FD and CFD simulation data. Results: Different simulations using the CFD method agree very well with experimental measurements as well as FD version. CFD simulations of system response function and larger sources in uniform and non-uniform attenuated phantoms also agree well with FD version of SIMIND. Conclusion: CFD has been modeled into the SlMlND MC program and validated. With the current implementation of CFD, simulation times were approximately 10-15 times shorter with similar accuracy and image quality compared with FD MC

  7. Application of chaotic noise reduction techniques to chaotic data ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    Deco & Schurmann (1994) have considered recurrent networks that were able to capture the dynamic and metric invariants ... The two techniques we consider are Hammel's method and the local projective method. We compare the ..... where C is the mXm covariance matrix of the vectors zn within the neighbourhood Un,.

  8. A Retrofit Technique for Kicker Beam-Coupling Impedance Reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Kurennoy, S

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of the impedance of operational ferrite kicker structures may be desirable in order to avoid rebuilding such a device. Often resistively coated ceramic plates or tubes are installed for this purpose but at the expense of available aperture. Ceramic U-shaped profiles with a resistive coating fitting between the ellipse of the beam and the rectangular kicker aperture have been used to significantly reduce the impedance of the magnet, while having a limited effect on the available physical aperture. Details of this method, constraints, measurements and simulation results as well as practical aspects are presented and discussed.

  9. Securing safe and informative thoracic CT examinations—Progress of radiation dose reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Takeshi, E-mail: tkubo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Seo, Joon Beom [Department of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yamashiro, Tsuneo [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishinara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Kalender, Willi A. [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Henkestr. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Lee, Chang Hyun [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lynch, David A. [Department of Radiology, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson St, A330 Denver, Colorado 80206 (United States); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatabu, Hiroto, E-mail: hhatabu@partners.org [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Various techniques have led to substantial radiation dose reduction of chest CT. • Automatic modulation of tube current has been shown to reduce radiation dose. • Iterative reconstruction makes significant radiation dose reduction possible. • Processing time is a limitation for full iterative reconstruction, currently. • Validation of diagnostic accuracy is desirable for routine use of low dose protocols. - Abstract: The increase in the radiation exposure from CT examinations prompted the investigation on the various dose-reduction techniques. Significant dose reduction has been achieved and the level of radiation exposure of thoracic CT is expected to reach the level equivalent to several chest X-ray examinations. With more scanners with advanced dose reduction capability deployed, knowledge on the radiation dose reduction methods has become essential to clinical practice as well as academic research. This article reviews the history of dose reduction techniques, ongoing changes brought by newer technologies and areas of further investigation.

  10. Evolution of surgical techniques for a progressive risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Bruno; Santoro, Mario; Izzo, Raffaele; Servillo, Giuseppe; Compagna, Rita; Di Domenico, Lorenza; Di Nardo, Veronica; Giugliano, Giuseppe

    2017-07-18

    Advanced age is a strong predictor of high perioperative mortality in surgical patients and patients aged 75 years and older have an elevated surgical risk, much higher than that of younger patients. Progressive advances in surgical techniques now make it possible to treat high-risk surgical patients with minimally invasive procedures. Endovascular techniques have revolutionized the treatment of several vascular diseases, in particular carotid stenosis, aortic pathologies, and severely incapacitating intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia. The main advantages of the endovascular approach are the low complication rate, high rate of technical success and a good clinical outcome. Biliary stenting has improved the clinical status of severely ill patients with bile duct stricture before major surgery, and represents a good palliative therapy in the case of malignant biliary obstruction.

  11. Model reduction using a posteriori analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Whiteley, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models in biology and physiology are often represented by large systems of non-linear ordinary differential equations. In many cases, an observed behaviour may be written as a linear functional of the solution of this system of equations. A technique is presented in this study for automatically identifying key terms in the system of equations that are responsible for a given linear functional of the solution. This technique is underpinned by ideas drawn from a posteriori error analysis. This concept has been used in finite element analysis to identify regions of the computational domain and components of the solution where a fine computational mesh should be used to ensure accuracy of the numerical solution. We use this concept to identify regions of the computational domain and components of the solution where accurate representation of the mathematical model is required for accuracy of the functional of interest. The technique presented is demonstrated by application to a model problem, and then to automatically deduce known results from a cell-level cardiac electrophysiology model. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Model reduction using a posteriori analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Whiteley, Jonathan P.

    2010-05-01

    Mathematical models in biology and physiology are often represented by large systems of non-linear ordinary differential equations. In many cases, an observed behaviour may be written as a linear functional of the solution of this system of equations. A technique is presented in this study for automatically identifying key terms in the system of equations that are responsible for a given linear functional of the solution. This technique is underpinned by ideas drawn from a posteriori error analysis. This concept has been used in finite element analysis to identify regions of the computational domain and components of the solution where a fine computational mesh should be used to ensure accuracy of the numerical solution. We use this concept to identify regions of the computational domain and components of the solution where accurate representation of the mathematical model is required for accuracy of the functional of interest. The technique presented is demonstrated by application to a model problem, and then to automatically deduce known results from a cell-level cardiac electrophysiology model. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  13. Model Reduction of Fuzzy Logic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhandong Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the problem of ℒ2-ℒ∞ model reduction for continuous-time nonlinear uncertain systems. The approach of the construction of a reduced-order model is presented for high-order nonlinear uncertain systems described by the T-S fuzzy systems, which not only approximates the original high-order system well with an ℒ2-ℒ∞ error performance level γ but also translates it into a linear lower-dimensional system. Then, the model approximation is converted into a convex optimization problem by using a linearization procedure. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Fast Multiscale Reservoir Simulations using POD-DEIM Model Reduction

    KAUST Repository

    Ghasemi, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, we present a global-local model reduction for fast multiscale reservoir simulations in highly heterogeneous porous media with applications to optimization and history matching. Our proposed approach identifies a low dimensional structure of the solution space. We introduce an auxiliary variable (the velocity field) in our model reduction that allows achieving a high degree of model reduction. The latter is due to the fact that the velocity field is conservative for any low-order reduced model in our framework. Because a typical global model reduction based on POD is a Galerkin finite element method, and thus it can not guarantee local mass conservation. This can be observed in numerical simulations that use finite volume based approaches. Discrete Empirical Interpolation Method (DEIM) is used to approximate the nonlinear functions of fine-grid functions in Newton iterations. This approach allows achieving the computational cost that is independent of the fine grid dimension. POD snapshots are inexpensively computed using local model reduction techniques based on Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) which provides (1) a hierarchical approximation of snapshot vectors (2) adaptive computations by using coarse grids (3) inexpensive global POD operations in a small dimensional spaces on a coarse grid. By balancing the errors of the global and local reduced-order models, our new methodology can provide an error bound in simulations. Our numerical results, utilizing a two-phase immiscible flow, show a substantial speed-up and we compare our results to the standard POD-DEIM in finite volume setup.

  15. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Carlos Haya' , Avda. Carlos Haya, s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: garciapareja@gmail.com; Vilches, M. [Servicio de Fisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Virgen de las Nieves' , Avda. de las Fuerzas Armadas, 2, E-18014 Granada (Spain); Lallena, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    The ant colony method is used to control the application of variance reduction techniques to the simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy. In particular, splitting and Russian roulette, two standard variance reduction methods, are considered. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits, in addition, to investigate the 'hot' regions of the accelerator, an information which is basic to develop a source model for this therapy tool.

  16. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Vilches, M.; Lallena, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The ant colony method is used to control the application of variance reduction techniques to the simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy. In particular, splitting and Russian roulette, two standard variance reduction methods, are considered. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits, in addition, to investigate the 'hot' regions of the accelerator, an information which is basic to develop a source model for this therapy tool

  17. Reduction of radioactive waste volumes by using supercompaction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, John Wagner A.; Lima, Sandro Leonardo N. de

    2007-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Program from ELETRONUCLEAR comprises the use of techniques and technologies to reduce the volumes of processed radwaste, which aims to improve the storage capacity and also assure the protection for the environment, as part of ELETRONUCLEAR's business strategy. The Angra site stores radwaste in temporary storage facilities, named Store number 1 and Store number 2, which are routinely managed and surveyed periodically by the ELETRONUCLEAR's Radiological Protection Division and submitted to frequent CNEN inspections. Medium level and low level radwastes are stored on those storage facilities. In January 2005, ELETRONUCLEAR decided to realize the Supercompaction of drums with compacted radwaste, mostly from Angra 1 and a little from Angra 2. By that time, the Store 1 was near to achieve its nominal capacity; this situation demanded a prompt response, and the chosen option was to proceed the supercompaction by using a mobile supercompactor unit. In April, 2006, two thousand and twenty seven drums of 200 liters were supercompacted at the plant site, and as a result, the initial storage area became sufficient to store drums for about five more years of operation. The supercompaction process is achieved by using a hydraulic press with extra high force. The pellets (crashed drums) were placed inside a special metallic box with 2500 liters of capacity (the overpack). This operation produced 128 full boxes, varying from 12 to 19 pellets inside each box, and the boxes were stored inside the Store 1. (author)

  18. Galerkin v. discrete-optimal projection in nonlinear model reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barone, Matthew Franklin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Antil, Harbir [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Discrete-optimal model-reduction techniques such as the Gauss{Newton with Approximated Tensors (GNAT) method have shown promise, as they have generated stable, accurate solutions for large-scale turbulent, compressible ow problems where standard Galerkin techniques have failed. However, there has been limited comparative analysis of the two approaches. This is due in part to difficulties arising from the fact that Galerkin techniques perform projection at the time-continuous level, while discrete-optimal techniques do so at the time-discrete level. This work provides a detailed theoretical and experimental comparison of the two techniques for two common classes of time integrators: linear multistep schemes and Runge{Kutta schemes. We present a number of new ndings, including conditions under which the discrete-optimal ROM has a time-continuous representation, conditions under which the two techniques are equivalent, and time-discrete error bounds for the two approaches. Perhaps most surprisingly, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that decreasing the time step does not necessarily decrease the error for the discrete-optimal ROM; instead, the time step should be `matched' to the spectral content of the reduced basis. In numerical experiments carried out on a turbulent compressible- ow problem with over one million unknowns, we show that increasing the time step to an intermediate value decreases both the error and the simulation time of the discrete-optimal reduced-order model by an order of magnitude.

  19. Performability Modelling Tools, Evaluation Techniques and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis deals with three aspects of quantitative evaluation of fault-tolerant and distributed computer and communication systems: performability evaluation techniques, performability modelling tools, and performability modelling applications. Performability modelling is a relatively new

  20. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report

  1. Comparisons of receive array interference reduction techniques under erroneous generalized transmit beamforming

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha Mahmoud; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    information for the desired user spatially uncorrelated transmit channels on the effectiveness of transmit beamforming for different interference reduction techniques is investigated. The case of over-loaded receive array with closely-spaced elements

  2. The Analysis of Dimensionality Reduction Techniques in Cryptographic Object Code Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason L. Wright; Milos Manic

    2010-05-01

    This paper compares the application of three different dimension reduction techniques to the problem of locating cryptography in compiled object code. A simple classi?er is used to compare dimension reduction via sorted covariance, principal component analysis, and correlation-based feature subset selection. The analysis concentrates on the classi?cation accuracy as the number of dimensions is increased.

  3. Dynamical reduction models with general gaussian noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2002-02-01

    We consider the effect of replacing in stochastic differential equations leading to the dynamical collapse of the statevector, white noise stochastic processes with non white ones. We prove that such a modification can be consistently performed without altering the most interesting features of the previous models. One of the reasons to discuss this matter derives from the desire of being allowed to deal with physical stochastic fields, such as the gravitational one, which cannot give rise to white noises. From our point of view the most relevant motivation for the approach we propose here derives from the fact that in relativistic models the occurrence of white noises is the main responsible for the appearance of untractable divergences. Therefore, one can hope that resorting to non white noises one can overcome such a difficulty. We investigate stochastic equations with non white noises, we discuss their reduction properties and their physical implications. Our analysis has a precise interest not only for the above mentioned subject but also for the general study of dissipative systems and decoherence. (author)

  4. Dynamical reduction models with general Gaussian noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, Angelo; Ghirardi, GianCarlo

    2002-01-01

    We consider the effect of replacing in stochastic differential equations leading to the dynamical collapse of the state vector, white-noise stochastic processes with nonwhite ones. We prove that such a modification can be consistently performed without altering the most interesting features of the previous models. One of the reasons to discuss this matter derives from the desire of being allowed to deal with physical stochastic fields, such as the gravitational one, which cannot give rise to white noises. From our point of view, the most relevant motivation for the approach we propose here derives from the fact that in relativistic models intractable divergences appear as a consequence of the white nature of the noises. Therefore, one can hope that resorting to nonwhite noises, one can overcome such a difficulty. We investigate stochastic equations with nonwhite noises, we discuss their reduction properties and their physical implications. Our analysis has a precise interest not only for the above-mentioned subject but also for the general study of dissipative systems and decoherence

  5. PD/PID controller tuning based on model approximations: Model reduction of some unstable and higher order nonlinear models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Dalen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A model reduction technique based on optimization theory is presented, where a possible higher order system/model is approximated with an unstable DIPTD model by using only step response data. The DIPTD model is used to tune PD/PID controllers for the underlying possible higher order system. Numerous examples are used to illustrate the theory, i.e. both linear and nonlinear models. The Pareto Optimal controller is used as a reference controller.

  6. Optimisation of 12 MeV electron beam simulation using variance reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayamani, J; Aziz, M Z Abdul; Termizi, N A S Mohd; Kamarulzaman, F N Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for electron beam radiotherapy consumes a long computation time. An algorithm called variance reduction technique (VRT) in MC was implemented to speed up this duration. This work focused on optimisation of VRT parameter which refers to electron range rejection and particle history. EGSnrc MC source code was used to simulate (BEAMnrc code) and validate (DOSXYZnrc code) the Siemens Primus linear accelerator model with the non-VRT parameter. The validated MC model simulation was repeated by applying VRT parameter (electron range rejection) that controlled by global electron cut-off energy 1,2 and 5 MeV using 20 × 10 7 particle history. 5 MeV range rejection generated the fastest MC simulation with 50% reduction in computation time compared to non-VRT simulation. Thus, 5 MeV electron range rejection utilized in particle history analysis ranged from 7.5 × 10 7 to 20 × 10 7 . In this study, 5 MeV electron cut-off with 10 × 10 7 particle history, the simulation was four times faster than non-VRT calculation with 1% deviation. Proper understanding and use of VRT can significantly reduce MC electron beam calculation duration at the same time preserving its accuracy. (paper)

  7. Elimination of maintenance outage and cost reduction by development of outage-free maintenance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakabe, Hideo; Maruyama, Yoshinaga

    1996-01-01

    The development program of KEPCO on outage-free maintenance techniques for distribution line work since 1984 is overviewed. It has succeeded in eliminating maintenance outages since 1989. The original aim was to improve customer satisfaction. However, in all, four benefits were realised through the development. These are cost reduction, securing of worker safety, improvement of customer service, and advancement of distribution techniques and morale in KEPCO. The introduction of robotic techniques for maintenance work and manipulator techniques for repair work is planned for further modernization. These new techniques are helping in both work safety and work efficiency improvement. Cost reduction and advancement of distribution line work techniques is also considered. (R.P.)

  8. Research and development of treatment techniques for LLW from decommissioning: Decontamination and volume reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, T.; Kameo, Y.; Nakashio, N.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of reducing the amount and/or volume of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) arising from decommissioning of nuclear reactor, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing four decontamination techniques. They are: (a) Gas-carrying abrasive method, (b) In-situ remote electropolishing method for pipe system before dismantling, (c) Bead reaction - thermal shock method, and (d) Laser induced chemical method for components after dismantling. JAERI in developing techniques are also carrying out melting tests of metal and non-metal. Melting was confirmed to be effective in reducing the volume, homogenizing, and furthermore stabilizing non-metallic wastes. (author)

  9. A reliable ground bounce noise reduction technique for nanoscale CMOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Pattanaik, Manisha

    2015-11-01

    Power gating is the most effective method to reduce the standby leakage power by adding header/footer high-VTH sleep transistors between actual and virtual power/ground rails. When a power gating circuit transitions from sleep mode to active mode, a large instantaneous charge current flows through the sleep transistors. Ground bounce noise (GBN) is the high voltage fluctuation on real ground rail during sleep mode to active mode transitions of power gating circuits. GBN disturbs the logic states of internal nodes of circuits. A novel and reliable power gating structure is proposed in this article to reduce the problem of GBN. The proposed structure contains low-VTH transistors in place of high-VTH footer. The proposed power gating structure not only reduces the GBN but also improves other performance metrics. A large mitigation of leakage power in both modes eliminates the need of high-VTH transistors. A comprehensive and comparative evaluation of proposed technique is presented in this article for a chain of 5-CMOS inverters. The simulation results are compared to other well-known GBN reduction circuit techniques at 22 nm predictive technology model (PTM) bulk CMOS model using HSPICE tool. Robustness against process, voltage and temperature (PVT) variations is estimated through Monte-Carlo simulations.

  10. Probabilistic evaluation of process model matching techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuss, Elena; Leopold, Henrik; van der Aa, Han; Stuckenschmidt, Heiner; Reijers, Hajo A.

    2016-01-01

    Process model matching refers to the automatic identification of corresponding activities between two process models. It represents the basis for many advanced process model analysis techniques such as the identification of similar process parts or process model search. A central problem is how to

  11. Technique for systematic bone reduction for fixed implant-supported prosthesis in the edentulous maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2015-06-01

    Bone reduction for maxillary fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment is often necessary to either gain prosthetic space or to conceal the prosthesis-tissue junction in patients with excessive gingival display (gummy smile). Inadequate bone reduction is often a cause of prosthetic failure due to material fractures, poor esthetics, or inability to perform oral hygiene procedures due to unfavorable ridge lap prosthetic contours. Various instruments and techniques are available for bone reduction. It would be helpful to have an accurate and efficient method for bone reduction at the time of surgery and subsequently create a smooth bony platform. This article presents a straightforward technique for systematic bone reduction by transferring the patient's maximum smile line, recorded clinically, to a clear radiographic smile guide for treatment planning using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The patient's smile line and the amount of required bone reduction are transferred clinically by marking bone with a sterile stationery graphite wood pencil at the time of surgery. This technique can help clinicians to accurately achieve the desired bone reduction during surgery, and provide confidence that the diagnostic and treatment planning goals have been achieved. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Balloon osteoplasty as reduction technique in the treatment of tibial head fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freude, T; Kraus, T M; Sandmann, G H

    2015-10-01

    Tibial plateau fractures requiring surgery are severe injuries of the lower extremities. Depending on the fracture pattern, the age of the patient, the range of activity and the bone quality there is a broad variation in adequate treatment.  This article reports on an innovative treatment concept to address split depression fractures (Schatzker type II) and depression fractures (Schatzker type III) of the tibial head using the balloon osteoplasty technique for fracture reduction. Using the balloon technique achieves a precise and safe fracture reduction. This internal osteoplasty combines a minimal invasive percutaneous approach with a gently rise of the depressed area and the associated protection of the stratum regenerativum below the articular cartilage surface. This article lights up the surgical procedure using the balloon technique in tibia depression fractures. Using the balloon technique a precise and safe fracture reduction can be achieved. This internal osteoplasty combines a minimally invasive percutaneous approach with a gentle raising of the depressed area and the associated protection of the regenerative layer below the articular cartilage surface. Fracture reduction by use of a tamper results in high peak forces over small areas, whereas by using the balloon the forces are distributed over a larger area causing less secondary stress to the cartilage tissue. This less invasive approach might help to achieve a better long-term outcome with decreased secondary osteoarthritis due to the precise and chondroprotective reduction technique.

  13. Experimental investigation on emission reduction in neem oil biodiesel using selective catalytic reduction and catalytic converter techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Karthickeyan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, non-edible seed oil namely raw neem oil was converted into biodiesel using transesterification process. In the experimentation, two biodiesel blends were prepared namely B25 (25% neem oil methyl ester with 75% of diesel) and B50 (50% neem oil methyl ester with 50% diesel). Urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technique with catalytic converter (CC) was fixed in the exhaust tail pipe of the engine for the reduction of engine exhaust emissions. Initially, the engine was operated with diesel as a working fluid and followed by refilling of biodiesel blends B25 and B50 to obtain the baseline readings without SCR and CC. Then, the same procedure was repeated with SCR and CC technique for emission reduction measurement in diesel, B25 and B50 sample. The experimental results revealed that the B25 blend showed higher break thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) with lower break-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) than B50 blend at all loads. On comparing with biodiesel blends, diesel experiences increased BTE of 31.9% with reduced BSFC of 0.29 kg/kWh at full load. A notable emission reduction was noticed for all test fuels in SCR and CC setup. At full load, B25 showed lower carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.09% volume, hydrocarbon (HC) of 24 ppm, and smoke of 14 HSU and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) of 735 ppm than diesel and B50 in SCR and CC setup. On the whole, the engine with SCR and CC setup showed better performance and emission characteristics than standard engine operation.

  14. Temporal rainfall estimation using input data reduction and model inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A. J.; Vrugt, J. A.; Walker, J. P.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2016-12-01

    demonstration of equifinality. The use of a likelihood function that considers both rainfall and streamflow error combined with the use of the DWT as a model data reduction technique allows the joint inference of hydrologic model parameters along with rainfall.

  15. Advanced structural equation modeling issues and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Marcoulides, George A

    2013-01-01

    By focusing primarily on the application of structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques in example cases and situations, this book provides an understanding and working knowledge of advanced SEM techniques with a minimum of mathematical derivations. The book was written for a broad audience crossing many disciplines, assumes an understanding of graduate level multivariate statistics, including an introduction to SEM.

  16. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  17. A Strategy Modelling Technique for Financial Services

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Bernd; Winter, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Strategy planning processes often suffer from a lack of conceptual models that can be used to represent business strategies in a structured and standardized form. If natural language is replaced by an at least semi-formal model, the completeness, consistency, and clarity of strategy descriptions can be drastically improved. A strategy modelling technique is proposed that is based on an analysis of modelling requirements, a discussion of related work and a critical analysis of generic approach...

  18. Relativistic formulations with Blankenbecler-Sugar reduction technique for the three-particle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, S.; Afnan, I.R.

    1980-05-01

    A critical comparison for two-types of three-dimensional covariant equations for the three-particle system obtained by the Blankenbecler-Sugar reduction technique with the Whitghtman-Garding momenta and the usual Jacobi variables is presented. The relations between the relativistic and non-relativistic equations in the low energy limit are discussed

  19. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  20. 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    reduction in reacting flow . Registration DateRegistration TypeFirst Name Middle NameLast Name Affiliation US State /Canadian ProvinceState/Province/R gion...Report: 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the...Agreement Number: W911NF-17-1-0121 Organization: Princeton University Title: 6th International Workshop on Model Reduction in Reactive Flow Report Term

  1. Interpolation-Based Condensation Model Reduction Part 1: Frequency Window Reduction Method Application to Structural Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ingel, R

    1999-01-01

    .... Projection operators are employed for the model reduction or condensation process. Interpolation is then introduced over a user defined frequency window, which can have real and imaginary boundaries and be quite large. Hermitian...

  2. ON THE PAPR REDUCTION IN OFDM SYSTEMS: A NOVEL ZCT PRECODING BASED SLM TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VARUN JEOTI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available High Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR reduction is still an important challenge in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM systems. In this paper, we propose a novel Zadoff-Chu matrix Transform (ZCT precoding based Selected Mapping (SLM technique for PAPR reduction in OFDM systems. This technique is based on precoding the constellation symbols with ZCT precoder after the multiplication of phase rotation factor and before the Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT in the SLM based OFDM (SLM-OFDM Systems. Computer simulation results show that, the proposed technique can reduce PAPR up to 5.2 dB for N=64 (System subcarriers and V=16 (Dissimilar phase sequences, at clip rate of 10-3. Additionally, ZCT based SLM-OFDM (ZCT-SLM-OFDM systems also take advantage of frequency variations of the communication channel and can also offer substantial performance gain in fading multipath channels.

  3. Model reduction methods for vector autoregressive processes

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggemann, Ralf

    2004-01-01

    1. 1 Objective of the Study Vector autoregressive (VAR) models have become one of the dominant research tools in the analysis of macroeconomic time series during the last two decades. The great success of this modeling class started with Sims' (1980) critique of the traditional simultaneous equation models (SEM). Sims criticized the use of 'too many incredible restrictions' based on 'supposed a priori knowledge' in large scale macroeconometric models which were popular at that time. Therefore, he advo­ cated largely unrestricted reduced form multivariate time series models, unrestricted VAR models in particular. Ever since his influential paper these models have been employed extensively to characterize the underlying dynamics in systems of time series. In particular, tools to summarize the dynamic interaction between the system variables, such as impulse response analysis or forecast error variance decompo­ sitions, have been developed over the years. The econometrics of VAR models and related quantities i...

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Techniques for PAPR Reduction of OFDM Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the problem of high Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR in Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM signals is studied. Besides describing three techniques for PAPR reduction, SeLective Mapping (SLM, Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS and Interleaving, a detailed analysis of the performances of these techniques for various values of relevant parameters (number of phase sequences, number of interleavers, number of phase factors, number of subblocks depending on applied technique, is carried out. Simulation of these techniques is run in Matlab software. Results are presented in the form of Complementary Cumulative Distribution Function (CCDF curves for PAPR of 30000 randomly generated OFDM symbols. Simulations are performed for OFDM signals with 32 and 256 subcarriers, oversampled by a factor of 4. A detailed comparison of these techniques is made based on Matlab simulation results.

  5. PEAK-TO-AVERAGE POWER RATIO REDUCTION USING CODING AND HYBRID TECHNIQUES FOR OFDM SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahubali K. Shiragapur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the research work investigated is based on an error correction coding techniques are used to reduce the undesirable Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR quantity. The Golay Code (24, 12, Reed-Muller code (16, 11, Hamming code (7, 4 and Hybrid technique (Combination of Signal Scrambling and Signal Distortion proposed by us are used as proposed coding techniques, the simulation results shows that performance of Hybrid technique, reduces PAPR significantly as compared to Conventional and Modified Selective mapping techniques. The simulation results are validated through statistical properties, for proposed technique’s autocorrelation value is maximum shows reduction in PAPR. The symbol preference is the key idea to reduce PAPR based on Hamming distance. The simulation results are discussed in detail, in this article.

  6. Effect of process parameters and injector position on the efficiency of NOx reduction by selective non catalytic reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, A.; Mehmood, M.A.; Irfan, N.; Javed, M.T.; Waheed, K.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to study the effect of atomizer pressure dilution of the reducing reagent and the injector position on the efficiency or the NOx reduction by a selective non-catalytic reduction technique using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a flow reactor in which flue gas was generated by the combustion of methane in air at stoichiometric amount of oxygen and the desired levels of initial NOx (400-450 ppm) were achieved by doping the flame with ammonia. The work was directed to investigate the effect of atomizer pressure, dilution of urea reagent and the injector position. The atomizer pressure was varied from 1 to 3bar and 20-25% increase in efficiency was observed by decreasing the pressure. Effect of dilution of urea solution was investigated by varying the strength of the solution from the 8 to 32% and 40-45% increase in the efficiency was observed. Effects of injector position was investigated by injecting the urea solution both in co current and counter current direction of the flue gases and 20-25% increase in the efficiency was observed in counter current direction. (author)

  7. Efficient Symmetry Reduction and the Use of State Symmetries for Symbolic Model Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Appold

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available One technique to reduce the state-space explosion problem in temporal logic model checking is symmetry reduction. The combination of symmetry reduction and symbolic model checking by using BDDs suffered a long time from the prohibitively large BDD for the orbit relation. Dynamic symmetry reduction calculates representatives of equivalence classes of states dynamically and thus avoids the construction of the orbit relation. In this paper, we present a new efficient model checking algorithm based on dynamic symmetry reduction. Our experiments show that the algorithm is very fast and allows the verification of larger systems. We additionally implemented the use of state symmetries for symbolic symmetry reduction. To our knowledge we are the first who investigated state symmetries in combination with BDD based symbolic model checking.

  8. Technical Note: On the efficiency of variance reduction techniques for Monte Carlo estimates of imaging noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Diksha; Sempau, Josep; Badano, Aldo

    2018-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations require large number of histories to obtain reliable estimates of the quantity of interest and its associated statistical uncertainty. Numerous variance reduction techniques (VRTs) have been employed to increase computational efficiency by reducing the statistical uncertainty. We investigate the effect of two VRTs for optical transport methods on accuracy and computing time for the estimation of variance (noise) in x-ray imaging detectors. We describe two VRTs. In the first, we preferentially alter the direction of the optical photons to increase detection probability. In the second, we follow only a fraction of the total optical photons generated. In both techniques, the statistical weight of photons is altered to maintain the signal mean. We use fastdetect2, an open-source, freely available optical transport routine from the hybridmantis package. We simulate VRTs for a variety of detector models and energy sources. The imaging data from the VRT simulations are then compared to the analog case (no VRT) using pulse height spectra, Swank factor, and the variance of the Swank estimate. We analyze the effect of VRTs on the statistical uncertainty associated with Swank factors. VRTs increased the relative efficiency by as much as a factor of 9. We demonstrate that we can achieve the same variance of the Swank factor with less computing time. With this approach, the simulations can be stopped when the variance of the variance estimates reaches the desired level of uncertainty. We implemented analytic estimates of the variance of Swank factor and demonstrated the effect of VRTs on image quality calculations. Our findings indicate that the Swank factor is dominated by the x-ray interaction profile as compared to the additional uncertainty introduced in the optical transport by the use of VRTs. For simulation experiments that aim at reducing the uncertainty in the Swank factor estimate, any of the proposed VRT can be used for increasing the relative

  9. Variance reduction techniques for 14 MeV neutron streaming problem in rectangular annular bent duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueki, Kotaro [Ship Research Inst., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    Monte Carlo method is the powerful technique for solving wide range of radiation transport problems. Its features are that it can solve the Boltzmann`s transport equation almost without approximation, and that the complexity of the systems to be treated rarely becomes a problem. However, the Monte Carlo calculation is always accompanied by statistical errors called variance. In shielding calculation, standard deviation or fractional standard deviation (FSD) is used frequently. The expression of the FSD is shown. Radiation shielding problems are roughly divided into transmission through deep layer and streaming problem. In the streaming problem, the large difference in the weight depending on the history of particles makes the FSD of Monte Carlo calculation worse. The streaming experiment in the 14 MeV neutron rectangular annular bent duct, which is the typical streaming bench mark experiment carried out of the OKTAVIAN of Osaka University, was analyzed by MCNP 4B, and the reduction of variance or FSD was attempted. The experimental system is shown. The analysis model by MCNP 4B, the input data and the results of analysis are reported, and the comparison with the experimental results was examined. (K.I.)

  10. Analysis and interpretation of dynamic FDG PET oncological studies using data reduction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Andres

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic positron emission tomography studies produce a large amount of image data, from which clinically useful parametric information can be extracted using tracer kinetic methods. Data reduction methods can facilitate the initial interpretation and visual analysis of these large image sequences and at the same time can preserve important information and allow for basic feature characterization. Methods We have applied principal component analysis to provide high-contrast parametric image sets of lower dimensions than the original data set separating structures based on their kinetic characteristics. Our method has the potential to constitute an alternative quantification method, independent of any kinetic model, and is particularly useful when the retrieval of the arterial input function is complicated. In independent component analysis images, structures that have different kinetic characteristics are assigned opposite values, and are readily discriminated. Furthermore, novel similarity mapping techniques are proposed, which can summarize in a single image the temporal properties of the entire image sequence according to a reference region. Results Using our new cubed sum coefficient similarity measure, we have shown that structures with similar time activity curves can be identified, thus facilitating the detection of lesions that are not easily discriminated using the conventional method employing standardized uptake values.

  11. Model techniques for testing heated concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental techniques are described which may be used in the laboratory to measure strains of model concrete structures representing to scale actual structures of any shape or geometry, operating at elevated temperatures, for which time-dependent creep and shrinkage strains are dominant. These strains could be used to assess the distribution of stress in the scaled structure and hence to predict the actual behaviour of concrete structures used in nuclear power stations. Similar techniques have been employed in an investigation to measure elastic, thermal, creep and shrinkage strains in heated concrete models representing to scale parts of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Clipping Based Iterative PAPR Reduction Techniques for FBMC Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kollár

    2014-01-01

    to conventional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM technique. The low ACLR of the transmitted FBMC signal makes it especially favorable in cognitive radio applications, where strict requirements are posed on out-of-band radiation. Large dynamic range resulting in high peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR is characteristic of all sorts of multicarrier signals. The advantageous spectral properties of the high-PAPR FBMC signal are significantly degraded if nonlinearities are present in the transceiver chain. Spectral regrowth may appear, causing harmful interference in the neighboring frequency bands. This paper presents novel clipping based PAPR reduction techniques, evaluated and compared by simulations and measurements, with an emphasis on spectral aspects. The paper gives an overall comparison of PAPR reduction techniques, focusing on the reduction of the dynamic range of FBMC signals without increasing out-of-band radiation. An overview is presented on transmitter oriented techniques employing baseband clipping, which can maintain the system performance with a desired bit error rate (BER.

  13. Testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in eastern Pennsylvania: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, D.B.; Scott, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    EPA has installed radon reduction measures in 38 houses in the Reading Prong region of eastern Pennsylvania. All were basement houses with hollow block or poured concrete foundation walls. The reduction approaches tested in most houses involved active soil ventilation, including: suction on the footing drain tile system; suction underneath the concrete slabs, using pipes inserted through the slabs from inside the house; and ventilation of the void network inside hollow block foundation walls. Heat recovery ventilators (HRVs) were tested in three houses. The current results confirm that, for the houses tested here, drain tile suction appears consistently able to provide high radon reductions when a complete loop of drain tile exists, often reducing high-radon houses to 4 pCi/l (148 B1/m 3 ) and less. Sub-slab suction (with pipes through the slab) can also provide high reductions if a sufficient number of suction pipes are located properly. Placement of one or more sub-slab suction pipes near each perimeter wall appears in this testing to aid in treating the major soil gas entry routes, although fewer pipes can sometimes give high reductions if conditions are favorable. For effective radon reduction using any active soil ventilation technique, it is important that major wall and slab openings be closed, and that a fan be employed that is capable of developing adequate static pressure

  14. Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anees, Mohd Talha; Abdullah, K.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik; Piah, Abd. Rahni Mt.; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Syakir, M. I.; Mohd. Omar, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Topographic and climatic changes are the main causes of abrupt flooding in tropical areas. It is the need to find out exact causes and effects of these changes. Numerical modeling techniques plays a vital role for such studies due to their use of hydrological parameters which are strongly linked with topographic changes. In this review, some of the widely used models utilizing hydrological and river modeling parameters and their estimation in data sparse region are discussed. Shortcomings of 1D and 2D numerical models and the possible improvements over these models through 3D modeling are also discussed. It is found that the HEC-RAS and FLO 2D model are best in terms of economical and accurate flood analysis for river and floodplain modeling respectively. Limitations of FLO 2D in floodplain modeling mainly such as floodplain elevation differences and its vertical roughness in grids were found which can be improve through 3D model. Therefore, 3D model was found to be more suitable than 1D and 2D models in terms of vertical accuracy in grid cells. It was also found that 3D models for open channel flows already developed recently but not for floodplain. Hence, it was suggested that a 3D model for floodplain should be developed by considering all hydrological and high resolution topographic parameter's models, discussed in this review, to enhance the findings of causes and effects of flooding.

  15. Power system coherency and model reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Joe H

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment for understanding interarea modes in large power systems and obtaining reduced-order models using the coherency concept and selective modal analysis method.

  16. Specification, construction, and exact reduction of state transition system models of biochemical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugenhagen, Scott M; Beard, Daniel A

    2012-10-21

    Biochemical reaction systems may be viewed as discrete event processes characterized by a number of states and state transitions. These systems may be modeled as state transition systems with transitions representing individual reaction events. Since they often involve a large number of interactions, it can be difficult to construct such a model for a system, and since the resulting state-level model can involve a huge number of states, model analysis can be difficult or impossible. Here, we describe methods for the high-level specification of a system using hypergraphs, for the automated generation of a state-level model from a high-level model, and for the exact reduction of a state-level model using information from the high-level model. Exact reduction is achieved through the automated application to the high-level model of the symmetry reduction technique and reduction by decomposition by independent subsystems, allowing potentially significant reductions without the need to generate a full model. The application of the method to biochemical reaction systems is illustrated by models describing a hypothetical ion-channel at several levels of complexity. The method allows for the reduction of the otherwise intractable example models to a manageable size.

  17. A Suboptimal PTS Algorithm Based on Particle Swarm Optimization Technique for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Lung Hung

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A suboptimal partial transmit sequence (PTS based on particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is presented for the low computation complexity and the reduction of the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM system. In general, PTS technique can improve the PAPR statistics of an OFDM system. However, it will come with an exhaustive search over all combinations of allowed phase weighting factors and the search complexity increasing exponentially with the number of subblocks. In this paper, we work around potentially computational intractability; the proposed PSO scheme exploits heuristics to search the optimal combination of phase factors with low complexity. Simulation results show that the new technique can effectively reduce the computation complexity and PAPR reduction.

  18. A Suboptimal PTS Algorithm Based on Particle Swarm Optimization Technique for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Shu-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A suboptimal partial transmit sequence (PTS based on particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm is presented for the low computation complexity and the reduction of the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM system. In general, PTS technique can improve the PAPR statistics of an OFDM system. However, it will come with an exhaustive search over all combinations of allowed phase weighting factors and the search complexity increasing exponentially with the number of subblocks. In this paper, we work around potentially computational intractability; the proposed PSO scheme exploits heuristics to search the optimal combination of phase factors with low complexity. Simulation results show that the new technique can effectively reduce the computation complexity and PAPR reduction.

  19. Use experiences of MCNP in nuclear energy study. 2. Review of variance reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; eds.

    1998-03-01

    `MCNP Use Experience` Working Group was established in 1996 under the Special Committee on Nuclear Code Evaluation. This year`s main activity of the working group has been focused on the review of variance reduction techniques of Monte Carlo calculations. This working group dealt with the variance reduction techniques of (1) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of fusion reactor system, (2) concept design of nuclear transmutation system using accelerator, (3) JMTR core calculation, (4) calculation of prompt neutron decay constant, (5) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation for exposure evaluation, (6) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of shielding system, etc. Furthermore, this working group started an activity to compile `Guideline of Monte Carlo Calculation` which will be a standard in the future. The appendices of this report include this `Guideline`, the use experience of MCNP 4B and examples of Monte Carlo calculations of high energy charged particles. The 11 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Use experiences of MCNP in nuclear energy study. 2. Review of variance reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    1998-03-01

    ''MCNP Use Experience'' Working Group was established in 1996 under the Special Committee on Nuclear Code Evaluation. This year''s main activity of the working group has been focused on the review of variance reduction techniques of Monte Carlo calculations. This working group dealt with the variance reduction techniques of (1) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of fusion reactor system, (2) concept design of nuclear transmutation system using accelerator, (3) JMTR core calculation, (4) calculation of prompt neutron decay constant, (5) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation for exposure evaluation, (6) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of shielding system, etc. Furthermore, this working group started an activity to compile ''Guideline of Monte Carlo Calculation'' which will be a standard in the future. The appendices of this report include this ''Guideline'', the use experience of MCNP 4B and examples of Monte Carlo calculations of high energy charged particles. The 11 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Multiscale model reduction for shale gas transport in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Akkutlu, I. Y.

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale model reduction technique that describes shale gas transport in fractured media. Due to the pore-scale heterogeneities and processes, we use upscaled models to describe the matrix. We follow our previous work (Akkutlu et al. Transp. Porous Media 107(1), 235–260, 2015), where we derived an upscaled model in the form of generalized nonlinear diffusion model to describe the effects of kerogen. To model the interaction between the matrix and the fractures, we use Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (Efendiev et al. J. Comput. Phys. 251, 116–135, 2013, 2015). In this approach, the matrix and the fracture interaction is modeled via local multiscale basis functions. In Efendiev et al. (2015), we developed the GMsFEM and applied for linear flows with horizontal or vertical fracture orientations aligned with a Cartesian fine grid. The approach in Efendiev et al. (2015) does not allow handling arbitrary fracture distributions. In this paper, we (1) consider arbitrary fracture distributions on an unstructured grid; (2) develop GMsFEM for nonlinear flows; and (3) develop online basis function strategies to adaptively improve the convergence. The number of multiscale basis functions in each coarse region represents the degrees of freedom needed to achieve a certain error threshold. Our approach is adaptive in a sense that the multiscale basis functions can be added in the regions of interest. Numerical results for two-dimensional problem are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of proposed approach. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  2. A Size Reduction Technique for Mobile Phone PIFA Antennas Using Lumped Inductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    A size reduction technique for the planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is presented. An 18 nH lumped inductor is used in addition to a small 0.3 cm3 PIFA. The PIFA is located on dielectric foam, 5 mm above a 40 mm × 100 mm ground plane. It is possible to reduce the center frequency (|S11|min) by 33 ...

  3. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    models may be created by assembling models of floor and wall structures into large models of complete buildings. When assembling the floor and wall models, the number of degrees of freedom quickly increases to exceed the limits of computer capacity, at least in a reasonable amount of computational time...... Hz. Three different methods of model reduction were investigated; Guyan reduction, component mode synthesis and a third approach where a new finite element model was created with structural elements. Eigenvalue and steady-state analyses were performed in order to compare the errors...

  4. A HYBRID TECHNIQUE FOR PAPR REDUCTION OF OFDM USING DHT PRECODING WITH PIECEWISE LINEAR COMPANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thammana Ajay

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM is a fascinating approach for wireless communication applications which require huge amount of data rates. However, OFDM signal suffers from its large Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR, which results in significant distortion while passing through a nonlinear device, such as a transmitter high power amplifier (HPA. Due to this high PAPR, the complexity of HPA as well as DAC also increases. For the reduction of PAPR in OFDM many techniques are available. Among them companding is an attractive low complexity technique for the OFDM signal’s PAPR reduction. Recently, a piecewise linear companding technique is recommended aiming at minimizing companding distortion. In this paper, a collective piecewise linear companding approach with Discrete Hartley Transform (DHT method is expected to reduce peak-to-average of OFDM to a great extent. Simulation results shows that this new proposed method obtains significant PAPR reduction while maintaining improved performance in the Bit Error Rate (BER and Power Spectral Density (PSD compared to piecewise linear companding method.

  5. Innovative Technique for Noise Reduction in Spacecraft Doppler Tracking for Planetary Interior Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaro, V.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Di Ruscio, A.; Iess, L.; Mariani, M., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Precise measurements of spacecraft range rate, enabled by two-way microwave links, are used in radio science experiments for planetary geodesy including the determination of planetary gravitational fields for the purpose of modeling the interior structure. The final accuracies in the estimated gravity harmonic coefficients depend almost linearly on the Doppler noise in the link. We ran simulations to evaluate the accuracy improvement attainable in the estimation of the gravity harmonic coefficients of Venus (with a representative orbiter) and Mercury (with the BepiColombo spacecraft), using our proposed innovative noise-cancellation technique. We showed how the use of an additional, smaller and stiffer, receiving-only antenna could reduce the leading noise sources in a Ka-band two-way link such as tropospheric and antenna mechanical noises. This is achieved through a suitable linear combination (LC) of Doppler observables collected at the two antennas at different times. In our simulations, we considered a two-way link either from NASA's DSS 25 antenna in California or from ESA's DSA-3 antenna in Malargüe (Argentina). Moreover, we selected the 12-m Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) in Chile as the three-way antenna and developed its tropospheric noise model using available atmospheric data and mechanical stability specifications. For an 8-hour Venus orbiter tracking pass in Chajnantor's winter/night conditions, the accuracy of the simulated LC Doppler observable at 10-s integration time is 6 mm/s, to be compared to 23 mm/s for the two-way link. For BepiColombo, we obtained 16.5 mm/s and 35 mm/s, respectively for the LC and two-way links. The benefits are even larger at longer time scales. Numerical simulations indicate that such noise reduction would provide significant improvements in the determination of Venus's and Mercury's gravity field coefficients. If implemented, this noise-reducing technique will be valuable for planetary geodesy missions, where the

  6. Model reduction of systems with localized nonlinearities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2006-03-01

    An LDRD funded approach to development of reduced order models for systems with local nonlinearities is presented. This method is particularly useful for problems of structural dynamics, but has potential application in other fields. The key elements of this approach are (1) employment of eigen modes of a reference linear system, (2) incorporation of basis functions with an appropriate discontinuity at the location of the nonlinearity. Galerkin solution using the above combination of basis functions appears to capture the dynamics of the system with a small basis set. For problems involving small amplitude dynamics, the addition of discontinuous (joint) modes appears to capture the nonlinear mechanics correctly while preserving the modal form of the predictions. For problems involving large amplitude dynamics of realistic joint models (macro-slip), the use of appropriate joint modes along with sufficient basis eigen modes to capture the frequencies of the system greatly enhances convergence, though the modal nature the result is lost. Also observed is that when joint modes are used in conjunction with a small number of elastic eigen modes in problems of macro-slip of realistic joint models, the resulting predictions are very similar to those of the full solution when seen through a low pass filter. This has significance both in terms of greatly reducing the number of degrees of freedom of the problem and in terms of facilitating the use of much larger time steps.

  7. Structural Modeling Using "Scanning and Mapping" Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Courtney L.; Dash, Gerald S.; Shen, J. Y.; Ferguson, Frederick; Noga, Donald F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Supported by NASA Glenn Center, we are in the process developing a structural damage diagnostic and monitoring system for rocket engines, which consists of five modules: Structural Modeling, Measurement Data Pre-Processor, Structural System Identification, Damage Detection Criterion, and Computer Visualization. The function of the system is to detect damage as it is incurred by the engine structures. The scientific principle to identify damage is to utilize the changes in the vibrational properties between the pre-damaged and post-damaged structures. The vibrational properties of the pre-damaged structure can be obtained based on an analytic computer model of the structure. Thus, as the first stage of the whole research plan, we currently focus on the first module - Structural Modeling. Three computer software packages are selected, and will be integrated for this purpose. They are PhotoModeler-Pro, AutoCAD-R14, and MSC/NASTRAN. AutoCAD is the most popular PC-CAD system currently available in the market. For our purpose, it plays like an interface to generate structural models of any particular engine parts or assembly, which is then passed to MSC/NASTRAN for extracting structural dynamic properties. Although AutoCAD is a powerful structural modeling tool, the complexity of engine components requires a further improvement in structural modeling techniques. We are working on a so-called "scanning and mapping" technique, which is a relatively new technique. The basic idea is to producing a full and accurate 3D structural model by tracing on multiple overlapping photographs taken from different angles. There is no need to input point positions, angles, distances or axes. Photographs can be taken by any types of cameras with different lenses. With the integration of such a modeling technique, the capability of structural modeling will be enhanced. The prototypes of any complex structural components will be produced by PhotoModeler first based on existing similar

  8. Modelling the Reduction of Project Making Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleinik Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article points out why earlier patterns of investment process were ineffective in developing the construction projects and shows sources for reducing of its total duration. It describes the procedure of statistical modeling and obtaining medium-term time parameters required for modern pattern of project-making; offers design formulas for assessment of total time required for project-making as well as for its main stages; reveals advantage of modern system of project-making against traditional one by comparing indicators of their duration.

  9. Model Order Reduction for Electronic Circuits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Shontz, Suzanne

    Electronic circuits are ubiquitous; they are used in numerous industries including: the semiconductor, communication, robotics, auto, and music industries (among many others). As products become more and more complicated, their electronic circuits also grow in size and complexity. This increased...... in the semiconductor industry. Circuit simulation proceeds by using Maxwell’s equations to create a mathematical model of the circuit. The boundary element method is then used to discretize the equations, and the variational form of the equations are then solved on the graph network....

  10. Biological reduction of chlorinated solvents: Batch-scale geochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsova, Irina; Mao, Xiaomin; Robinson, Clare; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, Jason I.; McCarty, Perry L.

    2010-09-01

    Simulation of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones requires a model that accounts for the complexity of processes involved and that is consistent with available laboratory studies. This paper describes such a comprehensive modeling framework that includes microbially mediated degradation processes, microbial population growth and decay, geochemical reactions, as well as interphase mass transfer processes such as DNAPL dissolution, gas formation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. All these processes can be in equilibrium or kinetically controlled. A batch modeling example was presented where the degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and its byproducts and concomitant reactions (e.g., electron donor fermentation, sulfate reduction, pH buffering by calcite dissolution) were simulated. Local and global sensitivity analysis techniques were applied to delineate the dominant model parameters and processes. Sensitivity analysis indicated that accurate values for parameters related to dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) degradation (i.e., DCE and VC maximum utilization rates, yield due to DCE utilization, decay rate for DCE/VC dechlorinators) are important for prediction of the overall dechlorination time. These parameters influence the maximum growth rate of the DCE and VC dechlorinating microorganisms and, thus, the time required for a small initial population to reach a sufficient concentration to significantly affect the overall rate of dechlorination. Self-inhibition of chlorinated ethenes at high concentrations and natural buffering provided by the sediment were also shown to significantly influence the dechlorination time. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that the rates of the competing, nonchlorinated electron-accepting processes relative to the dechlorination kinetics also affect the overall dechlorination time. Results demonstrated that the model developed is a flexible research tool that is

  11. Variance-reduction technique for Coulomb-nuclear thermalization of energetic fusion products in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    A variance-reduction technique involving use of exponential transform and angular-biasing methods has been developed. Its purpose is to minimize the variance and computer time involved in estimating the mean fusion product (fp) energy deposited in a hot, multi-region plasma under the influence of small-energy transfer Coulomb collisions and large-energy transfer nuclear elastic scattering (NES) events. This technique is applicable to high-temperature D- 3 He, Cat. D and D-T plasmas which have highly energetic fps capable of undergoing NES. A first application of this technique is made to a D- 3 He Field Reversed Mirror (FRM) where the Larmor radius of the 14.7 MeV protons are typically comparable to the plasma radius (plasma radius approx. 2 fp gyroradii) and the optimistic fp confinement (approx. 45% of 14.7 MeV protons) previously predicted is vulnerable to large orbit perturbations induced by NES. In the FRM problem, this variance reduction technique is used to estimate the fractional difference in the average fp energy deposited in the closed-field region, E/sub cf/, with and without NES collisions

  12. Model reduction by weighted Component Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae H.; Skelton, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Component Cost Analysis considers any given system driven by a white noise process as an interconnection of different components, and assigns a metric called 'component cost' to each component. These component costs measure the contribution of each component to a predefined quadratic cost function. A reduced-order model of the given system may be obtained by deleting those components that have the smallest component costs. The theory of Component Cost Analysis is extended to include finite-bandwidth colored noises. The results also apply when actuators have dynamics of their own. Closed-form analytical expressions of component costs are also derived for a mechanical system described by its modal data. This is very useful to compute the modal costs of very high order systems. A numerical example for MINIMAST system is presented.

  13. Size Reduction Techniques for Large Scale Permanent Magnet Generators in Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazdozian, Helena; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Increased wind penetration is necessary to reduce U.S. dependence on fossil fuels, combat climate change and increase national energy security. The U.S Department of Energy has recommended large scale and offshore wind turbines to achieve 20% wind electricity generation by 2030. Currently, geared doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) are typically employed in the drivetrain for conversion of mechanical to electrical energy. Yet, gearboxes account for the greatest downtime of wind turbines, decreasing reliability and contributing to loss of profit. Direct drive permanent magnet generators (PMGs) offer a reliable alternative to DFIGs by eliminating the gearbox. However, PMGs scale up in size and weight much more rapidly than DFIGs as rated power is increased, presenting significant challenges for large scale wind turbine application. Thus, size reduction techniques are needed for viability of PMGs in large scale wind turbines. Two size reduction techniques are presented. It is demonstrated that 25% size reduction of a 10MW PMG is possible with a high remanence theoretical permanent magnet. Additionally, the use of a Halbach cylinder in an outer rotor PMG is investigated to focus magnetic flux over the rotor surface in order to increase torque. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1069283 and a Barbara and James Palmer Endowment at Iowa State University.

  14. Incentives for subcontractors to adopt CO2 emission reporting and reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholtens, Bert; Kleinsmann, Renske

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the incentives for subcontractors (couriers) of a transport and logistics company to report about their CO 2 emissions and to implement CO 2 reducing technologies. Furthermore, we try to find out whether these incentives differ between British and Dutch couriers. We find that several incentives play a significant role. Subcontractors in the Netherlands predominantly are extrinsically motivated to engage in CO 2 reporting and reduction techniques. This is because they are mainly driven by regulatory compliance, energy costs and implementation costs. In contrast, British subcontractors are much more intrinsically motivated to comply. They are predominantly driven by energy costs, environmental awareness, relationship building and reputation building. The contractor will have to account for these differences in making its policies work. - Research highlights: → We investigate incentives for couriers to report CO 2 emissions and to implement CO 2 reduction techniques. → We compare couriers in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. → Several incentives are significant for the adoption of CO 2 reporting and reduction measures. → There are significant differences in the sensitivity for incentives in the Netherlands and the UK.

  15. Subbrow Approach as a Minimally Invasive Reduction Technique in the Management of Frontal Sinus Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yewon Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFrontal sinus fractures, particularly anterior sinus fractures, are relatively common facial fractures. Many agree on the general principles of frontal fracture management; however, the optimal methods of reduction are still controversial. In this article, we suggest a simple reduction method using a subbrow incision as a treatment for isolated anterior sinus fractures.MethodsBetween March 2011 and March 2014, 13 patients with isolated frontal sinus fractures were treated by open reduction and internal fixation through a subbrow incision. The subbrow incision line was designed to be precisely at the lower margin of the brow in order to obtain an inconspicuous scar. A periosteal incision was made at 3 mm above the superior orbital rim. The fracture site of the frontal bone was reduced, and bone fixation was performed using an absorbable plate and screws.ResultsContour deformities were completely restored in all patients, and all patients were satisfied with the results. Scars were barely visible in the long-term follow-up. No complications related to the procedure, such as infection, uncontrolled sinus bleeding, hematoma, paresthesia, mucocele, or posterior wall and brain injury were observed.ConclusionsThe subbrow approach allowed for an accurate reduction and internal fixation of the fractures in the anterior table of the frontal sinus by providing a direct visualization of the fracture. Considering the surgical success of the reduction and the rigid fixation, patient satisfaction, and aesthetic problems, this transcutaneous approach through a subbrow incision is concluded to be superior to the other reduction techniques used in the case of an anterior table frontal sinus fracture.

  16. H∞ /H2 model reduction through dilated linear matrix inequalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents sufficient dilated linear matrix inequalities (LMI) conditions to the $H_{infty}$ and $H_{2}$ model reduction problem. A special structure of the auxiliary (slack) variables allows the original model of order $n$ to be reduced to an order $r=n/s$ where $n,r,s in field{N}$. Arb......This paper presents sufficient dilated linear matrix inequalities (LMI) conditions to the $H_{infty}$ and $H_{2}$ model reduction problem. A special structure of the auxiliary (slack) variables allows the original model of order $n$ to be reduced to an order $r=n/s$ where $n,r,s in field...

  17. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirauschek, Christian [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technische Universität München, D-80333 Munich (Germany); Kubis, Tillmann [Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue University, 207 S Martin Jischke Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  18. Modeling techniques for quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirauschek, Christian; Kubis, Tillmann

    2014-03-01

    Quantum cascade lasers are unipolar semiconductor lasers covering a wide range of the infrared and terahertz spectrum. Lasing action is achieved by using optical intersubband transitions between quantized states in specifically designed multiple-quantum-well heterostructures. A systematic improvement of quantum cascade lasers with respect to operating temperature, efficiency, and spectral range requires detailed modeling of the underlying physical processes in these structures. Moreover, the quantum cascade laser constitutes a versatile model device for the development and improvement of simulation techniques in nano- and optoelectronics. This review provides a comprehensive survey and discussion of the modeling techniques used for the simulation of quantum cascade lasers. The main focus is on the modeling of carrier transport in the nanostructured gain medium, while the simulation of the optical cavity is covered at a more basic level. Specifically, the transfer matrix and finite difference methods for solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and Schrödinger-Poisson system are discussed, providing the quantized states in the multiple-quantum-well active region. The modeling of the optical cavity is covered with a focus on basic waveguide resonator structures. Furthermore, various carrier transport simulation methods are discussed, ranging from basic empirical approaches to advanced self-consistent techniques. The methods include empirical rate equation and related Maxwell-Bloch equation approaches, self-consistent rate equation and ensemble Monte Carlo methods, as well as quantum transport approaches, in particular the density matrix and non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The derived scattering rates and self-energies are generally valid for n-type devices based on one-dimensional quantum confinement, such as quantum well structures.

  19. Development of volume reduction treatment techniques for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabatame, Yasuzi

    1984-01-01

    The solid wastes packed in drums are preserved in the stores of nuclear establishments in Japan, and the quantity of preservation has already reached about 60 % of the capacity. It has become an important subject to reduce the quantity of generation of radioactive wastes and how to reduce the volume of generated wastes. As the result of the research aiming at the development of the solidified bodies which are excellent in the effect of volume reduction and physical properties, it was confirmed that the plastic solidified bodies using thermosetting resin were superior to conventional cement or asphalt solidification. The plastic solidifying system can treat various radioactive wastes. After radioactive wastes are dried and powdered, they are solidified with plastics, therefore, the effect of volume reduction is excellent. The specific gravity, strength and the resistance to water, fire and radiation were confirmed to be satisfacotory. The plastic solidifying system comprises three subsystems, that is, drying system, powder storing and supplying system and plastic solidifying system. Also the granulation technique after drying and powdering, acid decomposition technique, the microwave melting and solidifying technique for incineration ash, plasma melting process and electrolytic polishing decontamination are described. (Kako, I.)

  20. Dose-reduction techniques for high-dose worker groups in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a study of the extent of radiation dose received by special work groups in the nuclear power industry. Work groups which chronically get large doses were investigated, using information provided by the industry. The tasks that give high doses to these work groups were examined and techniques described that were found to be particularly successful in reducing dose. Quantitative information on the extent of radiation doses to various work groups shows that significant numbers of workers in several critical groups receive doses greater than 1 and even 2 rem per year, particularly contract personnel and workers at BWR-type plants. The number of radiation workers whose lifetime dose is greater than their age is much less. Although the techniques presented would go some way in reducing dose, it is likely that a sizeable reduction to the high-dose work groups may require development of new dose-reduction techniques as well as major changes in procedures. 10 refs., 26 tabs

  1. Lower-Order Compensation Chain Threshold-Reduction Technique for Multi-Stage Voltage Multipliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dell’ Anna

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel threshold-compensation technique for multi-stage voltage multipliers employed in low power applications such as passive and autonomous wireless sensing nodes (WSNs powered by energy harvesters. The proposed threshold-reduction technique enables a topological design methodology which, through an optimum control of the trade-off among transistor conductivity and leakage losses, is aimed at maximizing the voltage conversion efficiency (VCE for a given ac input signal and physical chip area occupation. The conducted simulations positively assert the validity of the proposed design methodology, emphasizing the exploitable design space yielded by the transistor connection scheme in the voltage multiplier chain. An experimental validation and comparison of threshold-compensation techniques was performed, adopting 2N5247 N-channel junction field effect transistors (JFETs for the realization of the voltage multiplier prototypes. The attained measurements clearly support the effectiveness of the proposed threshold-reduction approach, which can significantly reduce the chip area occupation for a given target output performance and ac input signal.

  2. Lower-Order Compensation Chain Threshold-Reduction Technique for Multi-Stage Voltage Multipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell' Anna, Francesco; Dong, Tao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Azadmehr, Mehdi; Casu, Mario; Berg, Yngvar

    2018-04-17

    This paper presents a novel threshold-compensation technique for multi-stage voltage multipliers employed in low power applications such as passive and autonomous wireless sensing nodes (WSNs) powered by energy harvesters. The proposed threshold-reduction technique enables a topological design methodology which, through an optimum control of the trade-off among transistor conductivity and leakage losses, is aimed at maximizing the voltage conversion efficiency (VCE) for a given ac input signal and physical chip area occupation. The conducted simulations positively assert the validity of the proposed design methodology, emphasizing the exploitable design space yielded by the transistor connection scheme in the voltage multiplier chain. An experimental validation and comparison of threshold-compensation techniques was performed, adopting 2N5247 N-channel junction field effect transistors (JFETs) for the realization of the voltage multiplier prototypes. The attained measurements clearly support the effectiveness of the proposed threshold-reduction approach, which can significantly reduce the chip area occupation for a given target output performance and ac input signal.

  3. Shortening treatment time in robotic radiosurgery using a novel node reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Steven van de; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The fraction duration of robotic radiosurgery treatments can be reduced by generating more time-efficient treatment plans with a reduced number of node positions, beams, and monitor units (MUs). Node positions are preprogramed locations where the robot can position the focal spot of the x-ray beam. As the time needed for the robot to travel between node positions takes up a large part of the treatment time, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a node reduction technique in order to reduce the treatment time per fraction for robotic radiosurgery. Methods: Node reduction was integrated into the inverse planning algorithm, developed in-house for the robotic radiosurgery modality. It involved repeated inverse optimization, each iteration excluding low-contribution node positions from the planning and resampling new candidate beams from the remaining node positions. Node reduction was performed until the exclusion of a single node position caused a constraint violation, after which the shortest treatment plan was selected retrospectively. Treatment plans were generated with and without node reduction for two lung cases of different complexity, one oropharyngeal case and one prostate case. Plan quality was assessed using the number of node positions, beams and MUs, and the estimated treatment time per fraction. All treatment plans had to fulfill all clinical dose constraints. Extra constraints were added to maintain the low-dose conformality and restrict skin doses during node reduction. Results: Node reduction resulted in 12 residual node positions, on average (reduction by 77%), at the cost of an increase in the number of beams and total MUs of 28% and 9%, respectively. Overall fraction durations (excluding patient setup) were shortened by 25% (range of 18%-40%), on average. Dose distributions changed only little and dose in low-dose regions was effectively restricted by the additional constraints. Conclusions: The fraction duration of robotic

  4. Shortening treatment time in robotic radiosurgery using a novel node reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, Steven van de; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The fraction duration of robotic radiosurgery treatments can be reduced by generating more time-efficient treatment plans with a reduced number of node positions, beams, and monitor units (MUs). Node positions are preprogramed locations where the robot can position the focal spot of the x-ray beam. As the time needed for the robot to travel between node positions takes up a large part of the treatment time, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a node reduction technique in order to reduce the treatment time per fraction for robotic radiosurgery. Methods: Node reduction was integrated into the inverse planning algorithm, developed in-house for the robotic radiosurgery modality. It involved repeated inverse optimization, each iteration excluding low-contribution node positions from the planning and resampling new candidate beams from the remaining node positions. Node reduction was performed until the exclusion of a single node position caused a constraint violation, after which the shortest treatment plan was selected retrospectively. Treatment plans were generated with and without node reduction for two lung cases of different complexity, one oropharyngeal case and one prostate case. Plan quality was assessed using the number of node positions, beams and MUs, and the estimated treatment time per fraction. All treatment plans had to fulfill all clinical dose constraints. Extra constraints were added to maintain the low-dose conformality and restrict skin doses during node reduction. Results: Node reduction resulted in 12 residual node positions, on average (reduction by 77%), at the cost of an increase in the number of beams and total MUs of 28% and 9%, respectively. Overall fraction durations (excluding patient setup) were shortened by 25% (range of 18%-40%), on average. Dose distributions changed only little and dose in low-dose regions was effectively restricted by the additional constraints. Conclusions: The fraction duration of robotic

  5. Quantitative comparison of commercial and non-commercial metal artifact reduction techniques in computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Wagenaar

    Full Text Available Typical streak artifacts known as metal artifacts occur in the presence of strongly attenuating materials in computed tomography (CT. Recently, vendors have started offering metal artifact reduction (MAR techniques. In addition, a MAR technique called the metal deletion technique (MDT is freely available and able to reduce metal artifacts using reconstructed images. Although a comparison of the MDT to other MAR techniques exists, a comparison of commercially available MAR techniques is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to quantify the difference in effectiveness of the currently available MAR techniques of different scanners and the MDT technique.Three vendors were asked to use their preferential CT scanner for applying their MAR techniques. The scans were performed on a Philips Brilliance ICT 256 (S1, a GE Discovery CT 750 HD (S2 and a Siemens Somatom Definition AS Open (S3. The scans were made using an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan. Three amalgam dental implants were constructed and inserted between the phantom's teeth. The average absolute error (AAE was calculated for all reconstructions in the proximity of the amalgam implants.The commercial techniques reduced the AAE by 22.0±1.6%, 16.2±2.6% and 3.3±0.7% for S1 to S3 respectively. After applying the MDT to uncorrected scans of each scanner the AAE was reduced by 26.1±2.3%, 27.9±1.0% and 28.8±0.5% respectively. The difference in efficiency between the commercial techniques and the MDT was statistically significant for S2 (p=0.004 and S3 (p<0.001, but not for S1 (p=0.63.The effectiveness of MAR differs between vendors. S1 performed slightly better than S2 and both performed better than S3. Furthermore, for our phantom and outcome measure the MDT was more effective than the commercial MAR technique on all scanners.

  6. Iterative methods used in overlap astrometric reduction techniques do not always converge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, M.; Ducourant, C.; Colin, J.; Le Campion, J. F.

    1993-04-01

    In this paper we prove that the classical Gauss-Seidel type iterative methods used for the solution of the reduced normal equations occurring in overlapping reduction methods of astrometry do not always converge. We exhibit examples of divergence. We then analyze an alternative algorithm proposed by Wang (1985). We prove the consistency of this algorithm and verify that it can be convergent while the Gauss-Seidel method is divergent. We conjecture the convergence of Wang method for the solution of astrometric problems using overlap techniques.

  7. Noise reduction techniques used on the high power klystron modulators at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The modulators used in the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have been redesigned with an emphasis on electrical noise reduction. Since the modulators are 100 MW modulators with <700 ns rise time, electrical noise can be coupled very easily to other electronic equipment in the area. This paper will detail the efforts made to reduce noise coupled to surrounding equipment. Shielding and sound grounding techniques accomplished the goal of drastically reducing the noise induced in surrounding equipment. The approach used in grounding and shielding will be discussed, and data will be presented comparing earlier designs to the improved design

  8. Application of a CADIS-like variance reduction technique to electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.; Haghighat, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the use of approximate deterministic importance functions to calculate the lower-weight bounds of the MCNP5 weight-window variance reduction technique when applied to electron transport simulations. This approach follows the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) methodology developed for neutral particles shielding calculations. The importance functions are calculated using the one-dimensional CEPXS/ONELD code package. Considering a simple 1-D problem, this paper shows that our methodology can produce speedups up to ∼82 using an approximate electron importance function distributions computed in ∼8 seconds. (author)

  9. Rabbit tissue model (RTM) harvesting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Marelyn

    2002-01-01

    A method for creating a tissue model using a female rabbit for laparoscopic simulation exercises is described. The specimen is called a Rabbit Tissue Model (RTM). Dissection techniques are described for transforming the rabbit carcass into a small, compact unit that can be used for multiple training sessions. Preservation is accomplished by using saline and refrigeration. Only the animal trunk is used, with the rest of the animal carcass being discarded. Practice exercises are provided for using the preserved organs. Basic surgical skills, such as dissection, suturing, and knot tying, can be practiced on this model. In addition, the RTM can be used with any pelvic trainer that permits placement of larger practice specimens within its confines.

  10. Model reduction of nonlinear systems subject to input disturbances

    KAUST Repository

    Ndoye, Ibrahima

    2017-07-10

    The method of convex optimization is used as a tool for model reduction of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of disturbances. It is shown that under some conditions the nonlinear disturbed system can be approximated by a reduced order nonlinear system with similar disturbance-output properties to the original plant. The proposed model reduction strategy preserves the nonlinearity and the input disturbance nature of the model. It guarantees a sufficiently small error between the outputs of the original and the reduced-order systems, and also maintains the properties of input-to-state stability. The matrices of the reduced order system are given in terms of a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). The paper concludes with a demonstration of the proposed approach on model reduction of a nonlinear electronic circuit with additive disturbances.

  11. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  12. Application of variance reduction techniques of Monte-Carlo method to deep penetration shielding problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, K.K.; Subbaiah, K.V.

    1996-01-01

    General purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP is being widely employed for solving deep penetration problems by applying variance reduction techniques. These techniques depend on the nature and type of the problem being solved. Application of geometry splitting and implicit capture method are examined to study the deep penetration problems of neutron, gamma and coupled neutron-gamma in thick shielding materials. The typical problems chosen are: i) point isotropic monoenergetic gamma ray source of 1 MeV energy in nearly infinite water medium, ii) 252 Cf spontaneous source at the centre of 140 cm thick water and concrete and iii) 14 MeV fast neutrons incident on the axis of 100 cm thick concrete disk. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs

  13. PV O&M Cost Model and Cost Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Andy

    2017-03-15

    This is a presentation on PV O&M cost model and cost reduction for the annual Photovoltaic Reliability Workshop (2017), covering estimating PV O&M costs, polynomial expansion, and implementation of Net Present Value (NPV) and reserve account in cost models.

  14. Model reduction of port-Hamiltonian systems as structured systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyuga, R.V.; Schaft, van der A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to demonstrate that a specific projection-based model reduction method, which provides an H2 error bound, turns out to be applicable to port-Hamiltonian systems, preserving the port-Hamiltonian structure for the reduced order model, and, as a consequence, passivity.

  15. Partial-Order Reduction for GPU Model Checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, T.; Wijs, A.; Bosnacki, D.; van de Pol, Jan Cornelis; Artho, C; Legay, A.; Peled, D.

    2016-01-01

    Model checking using GPUs has seen increased popularity over the last years. Because GPUs have a limited amount of memory, only small to medium-sized systems can be verified. For on-the-fly explicit-state model checking, we improve memory efficiency by applying partial-order reduction. We propose

  16. Partial-order reduction for GPU model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, T.S.; Wijs, A.J.; Bošnački, D.; van de Pol, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Model checking using GPUs has seen increased popularity over the last years. Because GPUs have a limited amount of memory, only small to medium-sized systems can be verified. For on-the-fly explicitstate model checking, we improve memory efficiency by applying partialorder reduction. We propose

  17. Metal Artifacts Reduction of Pedicle Screws on Spine Computed Tomography Images Using Variable Thresholding Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaewlek, T.; Koolpiruck, D.; Thongvigitmanee, S.; Mongkolsuk, M.; Chiewvit, P.; Thammakittiphan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Metal artifacts are one of significant problems in computed tomography (CT). The streak lines and air gaps arise from metal implants of orthopedic patients, such as prosthesis, dental bucket, and pedicle screws that cause incorrect diagnosis and local treatment planning. A common technique to suppressed artifacts is by adjusting windows, but those artifacts still remain on the images. To improve the detail of spine CT images, the variable thresholding technique is proposed in this paper. Three medical cases of spine CT images categorized by the severity of artifacts (screws head, one full screw, and two full screws) were investigated. Metal regions were segmented by k-mean clustering, then transformed into a sinogram domain. The metal sinogram was identified by the variable thresholding method, and then replaced the new estimated values by linear interpolation. The modified sinogram was reconstructed by the filtered back- projection algorithm, and added the metal region back to the modified reconstructed image in order to reproduce the final image. The image quality of the proposed technique, the automatic thresholding (Kalender) technique, and window adjustment technique was compared in term of noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR). The propose method can reduce metal artifacts between pedicle screws. After processing by our proposed technique, noise in the modified images is reduced (screws head 121.15 to73.83, one full screw 160.88 to 94.04, and two full screws 199.73 to 110.05 from the initial image) and SNR is increased (screws head 0.87 to 1.88, one full screw 1.54 to 2.82, and two full screws 0.32 to 0.41 from the initial image). The variable thresholding technique can identify the suitable boundary for restoring the missing data. The efficiency of the metal artifacts reduction is indicated on the case of partial and full pedicle screws. Our technique can improve the detail of spine CT images better than automatic thresholding (Kalender) technique, and

  18. A LATIN-based model reduction approach for the simulation of cycling damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mainak; Fau, Amelie; Nackenhorst, Udo; Néron, David; Ladevèze, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce a new method including model order reduction for the life prediction of structures subjected to cycling damage. Contrary to classical incremental schemes for damage computation, a non-incremental technique, the LATIN method, is used herein as a solution framework. This approach allows to introduce a PGD model reduction technique which leads to a drastic reduction of the computational cost. The proposed framework is exemplified for structures subjected to cyclic loading, where damage is considered to be isotropic and micro-defect closure effects are taken into account. A difficulty herein for the use of the LATIN method comes from the state laws which can not be transformed into linear relations through an internal variable transformation. A specific treatment of this issue is introduced in this work.

  19. Reduction in energy consumption and operating cost in a dried corn warehouse using logistics techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korrakot Y. Tippayawong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Corn is one of the major economic crops in Thailand. Corn postharvest operation involves various practices that consume a large amount of energy. Different energy conservation measures have been implemented but logistics consideration is not normally employed. In this work, attempt has been made to demonstrate that logistics techniques can offer a significant reduction in energy and cost. The main objective of this work is to identify and demonstrate possible approaches to improving energy efficiency and reducing operating cost for a dried corn warehouse operator. Three main problems are identified: (i relatively high fuel consumption for internal transfer process, (ii low quality of dried corn, and (iii excess expenditure on outbound transportation. Solutions are proposed and implemented using logistics operations. Improvement is achieved using plant layout and shortest path techniques, resulting in a reduction of almost 50% in energy consumption for the internal transfer process. Installation of an air distributor in the grain storage unit results in a decrease in loss due to poor-quality dried corn from 17% to 10%. Excess expenditure on dried corn distribution is reduced by 6% with application of a global positioning system.

  20. Use of Hydraulic Model for Water Loss Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Mindaugas Rimeika; Anželika Jurkienė

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic modeling is the modern way to apply world water engineering experience in every day practice. Hydraulic model is an effective tool in order to perform analysis of water supply system, optimization of its operation, assessment of system efficiency potential, evaluation of water network development, fire flow capabilities, energy saving opportunities and water loss reduction and ect. Hydraulic model shall include all possible engineering elements and devices allocated in a real water ...

  1. A Background Noise Reduction Technique Using Adaptive Noise Cancellation for Microphone Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalt, Taylor B.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Background noise in wind tunnel environments poses a challenge to acoustic measurements due to possible low or negative Signal to Noise Ratios (SNRs) present in the testing environment. This paper overviews the application of time domain Adaptive Noise Cancellation (ANC) to microphone array signals with an intended application of background noise reduction in wind tunnels. An experiment was conducted to simulate background noise from a wind tunnel circuit measured by an out-of-flow microphone array in the tunnel test section. A reference microphone was used to acquire a background noise signal which interfered with the desired primary noise source signal at the array. The technique s efficacy was investigated using frequency spectra from the array microphones, array beamforming of the point source region, and subsequent deconvolution using the Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) algorithm. Comparisons were made with the conventional techniques for improving SNR of spectral and Cross-Spectral Matrix subtraction. The method was seen to recover the primary signal level in SNRs as low as -29 dB and outperform the conventional methods. A second processing approach using the center array microphone as the noise reference was investigated for more general applicability of the ANC technique. It outperformed the conventional methods at the -29 dB SNR but yielded less accurate results when coherence over the array dropped. This approach could possibly improve conventional testing methodology but must be investigated further under more realistic testing conditions.

  2. State vector reduction - 2: Elements of physical reality, nonlocality and stochasticity in relativistic dynamical reduction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Pearle, P.

    1991-02-01

    The problem of getting a relativistic generalization of the CSL dynamical reduction model, which has been presented in part I, is discussed. In so doing we have the opportunity to introduce the idea of a stochastically invariant theory. The theoretical model we present, that satisfies this kind of invariance requirement, offers us the possibility to reconsider, from a new point of view, some conceptually relevant issues such as nonlocality, the legitimacy of attributing elements of physical reality to physical systems and the problem of establishing causal relations between physical events. (author). Refs, 3 figs

  3. [An improved reduction technique for depression fractures of lateral tibial plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchuan; Lou, Hua; Liu, Kai; Jiang, Junwei

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the improved reduction technique for depression fractures of the lateral tibial plateau and its effectiveness. Between January 2008 and December 2010; 48 patients (48 knees) with depression fractures of the lateral tibial plateau (Schatzker II or III fractures) were treated. There were 32 males and 16 females with an average age of 45.8 years (range, 16-79 years). All fractures were fresh closed fractures, which were caused by traffic accident in 27 cases, by falling from height in 5 cases, by crushing in 8 cases, and by sustained falls in 8 cases. According to Schatzker classification, 29 cases were classified as type II and 19 cases as type III. The lateral cortex was cut off to expose the depression and compacted cancellous bone was elevated to reset the articular surface. After reduction, autologous iliac bone graft and locking plate internal fixation were used. Healing of incision by first intention was achieved in all patients, and no complication occurred. All patients were followed up 1.7 years on average (range, 1-3 years). At last follow-up, the knee extension was (-0.5 +/- 0.3) degrees, and the knee flexion was (136.9 +/- 8.8) degrees. X-ray films showed that the fracture healing time was 52 weeks and no breakage of internal fixation occurred. According to Rasmussen clinical score, the results were excellent in 35 cases, good in 10 cases, and fair in 3 cases. According to Rasmussen radiographical score, the results were excellent in 41 cases, good in 7 cases; there were 41 excellent scores and 7 good scores of articular reduction; all gained good recovery of coronal and sagittal alignment and condylar width. The articular surface collapse was (1.0 +/- 0.7) mm at immediate postoperatively and (1.2 +/- 0.7) mm at last follow-up, showing no significant difference (t = -1.42, P = 0.20), but significant differences were found when compared with that at preoperation [(12.2 +/- 8.0) mm, P fracture reduction and can avoid loss of reduction. The

  4. On the problem of model reduction in the gap metric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaers, M.E.C.; Weiland, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the model reduction problem where, for a given linear time-invariant dynamical system of complexity n, a simpler system of complexity r

  5. Waste Reduction Model (WARM) Resources for Small Businesses and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides a brief overview of how EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) can be used by small businesses and organizations. The page includes a brief summary of uses of WARM for the audience and links to other resources.

  6. Structure preserving port-Hamiltonian model reduction of electrical circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyuga, R.; Schaft, van der A.J.; Benner, P.; Hinze, M.; Maten, ter E.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses model reduction of electrical circuits based on a port-Hamiltonian representation. It is shown that by the use of the Kalman decomposition an uncontrollable and/or unobservable port-Hamiltonian system is reduced to a controllable/observable system that inherits the

  7. Model reduction of nonlinear systems subject to input disturbances

    KAUST Repository

    Ndoye, Ibrahima; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-01

    The method of convex optimization is used as a tool for model reduction of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of disturbances. It is shown that under some conditions the nonlinear disturbed system can be approximated by a reduced order

  8. Twisted spin Sutherland models from quantum Hamiltonian reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, L; Pusztai, B G

    2008-01-01

    Recent general results on Hamiltonian reductions under polar group actions are applied to study some reductions of the free particle governed by the Laplace-Beltrami operator of a compact, connected, simple Lie group. The reduced systems associated with arbitrary finite-dimensional irreducible representations of the group by using the symmetry induced by twisted conjugations are described in detail. These systems generically yield integrable Sutherland-type many-body models with spin, which are called twisted spin Sutherland models if the underlying twisted conjugations are built on non-trivial Dynkin diagram automorphisms. The spectra of these models can be calculated, in principle, by solving certain Clebsch-Gordan problems, and the result is presented for the models associated with the symmetric tensorial powers of the defining representation of SU(N)

  9. One-loop dimensional reduction of the linear σ model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Silva-Neto, M.B.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1997-05-01

    We perform the dimensional reduction of the linear σ model at one-loop level. The effective of the reduced theory obtained from the integration over the nonzero Matsubara frequencies is exhibited. Thermal mass and coupling constant renormalization constants are given, as well as the thermal renormalization group which controls the dependence of the counterterms on the temperature. We also recover, for the reduced theory, the vacuum instability of the model for large N. (author)

  10. Coping with Complexity Model Reduction and Data Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Alexander N

    2011-01-01

    This volume contains the extended version of selected talks given at the international research workshop 'Coping with Complexity: Model Reduction and Data Analysis', Ambleside, UK, August 31 - September 4, 2009. This book is deliberately broad in scope and aims at promoting new ideas and methodological perspectives. The topics of the chapters range from theoretical analysis of complex and multiscale mathematical models to applications in e.g., fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics.

  11. Skin reduction technique for correction of lateral deviation of the erect straight penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaeer, Osama

    2014-07-01

    Lateral deviation of the erect straight penis (LDESP) refers to a penis that despite being straight in the erect state, points laterally, yet can be directed forward manually without the use of force. While LDESP should not impose a negative impact on sexual function, it may have a negative cosmetic impact. This work describes skin reduction technique (SRT) for correction of LDESP. Counseling was offered to males with LDESP after excluding other abnormalities. Surgery was performed in case of failed counseling. In the erect state, the degree and direction of LDESP were noted. Skin on the base of the penis on the contralateral side of LDESP was excised from the base of the penis and the edges approximated to correct LDESP. Further excision was repeated if needed. The incision was closed in two layers. Long-term efficacy of SRT was the main outcome measure. Out of 183 males with LDESP, 66.7% were not sexually active. Counseling relieved 91.8% of cases. Fifteen patients insisted on surgery, mostly from among the sexually active where the complaint was mutual from the patient and partner. SRT resulted in full correction of the angle of erection in 12 cases out of 15. Two had minimal recurrence, and one had major recurrence indicating re-SRT. LDESP is more common a complaint among those who have not experienced coital relationship, and is mostly relieved by counseling. However, sexually active males with this complaint are more difficult to relieve by counseling. A minority of patients may opt for surgical correction. SRT achieves a forward erection in such patients, is minimally invasive, and relatively safe, provided the angle of erection can be corrected manually without force. Shaeer O. Skin reduction technique for correction of lateral deviation of the erect straight penis. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  12. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fagan, J.R. Jr. [Allison Engine Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  13. Validation of variance reduction techniques in Mediso (SPIRIT DH-V) SPECT system by Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Marrero, J. P.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gomez Facenda, A.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of nuclear medical imaging systems is a widely used method for reproducing their operation in a real clinical environment, There are several Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) systems in Cuba. For this reason it is clearly necessary to introduce a reliable and fast simulation platform in order to obtain consistent image data. This data will reproduce the original measurements conditions. In order to fulfill these requirements Monte Carlo platform GAMOS (Geant4 Medicine Oriented Architecture for Applications) have been used. Due to the very size and complex configuration of parallel hole collimators in real clinical SPECT systems, Monte Carlo simulation usually consumes excessively high time and computing resources. main goal of the present work is to optimize the efficiency of calculation by means of new GAMOS functionality. There were developed and validated two GAMOS variance reduction techniques to speed up calculations. These procedures focus and limit transport of gamma quanta inside the collimator. The obtained results were asses experimentally in Mediso (SPIRIT DH-V) SPECT system. Main quality control parameters, such as sensitivity and spatial resolution were determined. Differences of 4.6% sensitivity and 8.7% spatial resolution were reported against manufacturer values. Simulation time was decreased up to 650 times. Using these techniques it was possible to perform several studies in almost 8 hours each. (Author)

  14. Green and blue water footprint reduction in irrigated agriculture: effect of irrigation techniques, irrigation strategies and mulching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukalla, A. D.; Krol, M. S.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Consumptive water footprint (WF) reduction in irrigated crop production is essential given the increasing competition for freshwater. This study explores the effect of three management practices on the soil water balance and plant growth, specifically on evapotranspiration (ET) and yield (Y) and thus the consumptive WF of crops (ET / Y). The management practices are four irrigation techniques (furrow, sprinkler, drip and subsurface drip (SSD)), four irrigation strategies (full (FI), deficit (DI), supplementary (SI) and no irrigation), and three mulching practices (no mulching, organic (OML) and synthetic (SML) mulching). Various cases were considered: arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid environments in Israel, Spain, Italy and the UK, respectively; wet, normal and dry years; three soil types (sand, sandy loam and silty clay loam); and three crops (maize, potato and tomato). The AquaCrop model and the global WF accounting standard were used to relate the management practices to effects on ET, Y and WF. For each management practice, the associated green, blue and total consumptive WF were compared to the reference case (furrow irrigation, full irrigation, no mulching). The average reduction in the consumptive WF is 8-10 % if we change from the reference to drip or SSD, 13 % when changing to OML, 17-18 % when moving to drip or SSD in combination with OML, and 28 % for drip or SSD in combination with SML. All before-mentioned reductions increase by one or a few per cent when moving from full to deficit irrigation. Reduction in overall consumptive WF always goes together with an increasing ratio of green to blue WF. The WF of growing a crop for a particular environment is smallest under DI, followed by FI, SI and rain-fed. Growing crops with sprinkler irrigation has the largest consumptive WF, followed by furrow, drip and SSD. Furrow irrigation has a smaller consumptive WF compared with sprinkler, even though the classical measure of "irrigation efficiency" for furrow

  15. Data-Driven Model Reduction and Transfer Operator Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, Stefan; Nüske, Feliks; Koltai, Péter; Wu, Hao; Kevrekidis, Ioannis; Schütte, Christof; Noé, Frank

    2018-06-01

    In this review paper, we will present different data-driven dimension reduction techniques for dynamical systems that are based on transfer operator theory as well as methods to approximate transfer operators and their eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and eigenmodes. The goal is to point out similarities and differences between methods developed independently by the dynamical systems, fluid dynamics, and molecular dynamics communities such as time-lagged independent component analysis, dynamic mode decomposition, and their respective generalizations. As a result, extensions and best practices developed for one particular method can be carried over to other related methods.

  16. Fast model updating coupling Bayesian inference and PGD model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Paul-Baptiste; Louf, François; Chamoin, Ludovic

    2018-04-01

    The paper focuses on a coupled Bayesian-Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD) approach for the real-time identification and updating of numerical models. The purpose is to use the most general case of Bayesian inference theory in order to address inverse problems and to deal with different sources of uncertainties (measurement and model errors, stochastic parameters). In order to do so with a reasonable CPU cost, the idea is to replace the direct model called for Monte-Carlo sampling by a PGD reduced model, and in some cases directly compute the probability density functions from the obtained analytical formulation. This procedure is first applied to a welding control example with the updating of a deterministic parameter. In the second application, the identification of a stochastic parameter is studied through a glued assembly example.

  17. Mechanism of nitric acid reduction and kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicsic, David; Balbaud-Celerier, Fanny; Tribollet, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In France, the recycling of nuclear waste fuels involves the use of hot concentrated nitric acid. The understanding and prediction of the behaviour of the structural materials (mainly austenitic stainless steels) requires the determination and modelling of the nitric acid reduction process. Nitric acid is indirectly reduced by an autocatalytic mechanism depending on the cathodic overpotential and acid concentration. This mechanism has been widely studied. All the authors agree on its autocatalytic nature, characterized by the predominant role of the reduction products. It is also generally admitted that neither nitric acid nor the nitrate ion is the electro-active species. However, the nature of the electro-active species, the place where the catalytic species regenerates and the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviour of the reaction intermediates remain uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these uncertainties by performing an electrochemical investigation of the reduction of 4 M nitric acid at 40 C at an inert electrode (platinum or gold). An inert electrode was chosen as the working electrode in a first step to avoid its oxidation and focus the research on the reduction mechanism. This experimental work enabled us to suggest a coherent sequence of electrochemical and chemical reactions. Kinetic modelling of this sequence was then carried out for a gold rotating disk electrode. A thermodynamic study at 25 C allowed the composition of the liquid and gaseous phases of nitric acid solutions in the concentration range 0.5-22 M to be evaluated. The kinetics of the reduction of 4 M nitric acid was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chrono-amperometry at an inert electrode at 40 C. The coupling of chrono-amperometry and FTIR spectroscopy in the gaseous phase led to the identification of the gaseous reduction products as a function of the cathodic overpotential. The results showed that the reduction process is autocatalytic for potentials between 0

  18. Efficient Model Order Reduction for the Dynamics of Nonlinear Multilayer Sheet Structures with Trial Vector Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Witteveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of multilayer sheet structures, such as leaf springs or car bodies, is largely determined by the nonlinear contact and friction forces between the sheets involved. Conventional computational approaches based on classical reduction techniques or the direct finite element approach have an inefficient balance between computational time and accuracy. In the present contribution, the method of trial vector derivatives is applied and extended in order to obtain a-priori trial vectors for the model reduction which are suitable for determining the nonlinearities in the joints of the reduced system. Findings show that the result quality in terms of displacements and contact forces is comparable to the direct finite element method but the computational effort is extremely low due to the model order reduction. Two numerical studies are presented to underline the method’s accuracy and efficiency. In conclusion, this approach is discussed with respect to the existing body of literature.

  19. Dynamical reduction models: present status and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassi, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita degli Studi di Trieste, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Mathematisches Institut der Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet, Theresienstr. 39, 80333 Munich (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    We review the major achievements of the dynamical reduction program, showing why and how it provides a unified, consistent description of physical phenomena, from the microscopic quantum domain to the macroscopic classical one. We discuss the difficulties in generalizing the existing models in order to comprise also relativistic quantum field theories. We point out possible future lines of research, ranging from mathematical physics to phenomenology.

  20. The Global Earthquake Model and Disaster Risk Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced, reliable and transparent tools and data to assess earthquake risk are inaccessible to most, especially in less developed regions of the world while few, if any, globally accepted standards currently allow a meaningful comparison of risk between places. The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) is a collaborative effort that aims to provide models, datasets and state-of-the-art tools for transparent assessment of earthquake hazard and risk. As part of this goal, GEM and its global network of collaborators have developed the OpenQuake engine (an open-source software for hazard and risk calculations), the OpenQuake platform (a web-based portal making GEM's resources and datasets freely available to all potential users), and a suite of tools to support modelers and other experts in the development of hazard, exposure and vulnerability models. These resources are being used extensively across the world in hazard and risk assessment, from individual practitioners to local and national institutions, and in regional projects to inform disaster risk reduction. Practical examples for how GEM is bridging the gap between science and disaster risk reduction are: - Several countries including Switzerland, Turkey, Italy, Ecuador, Papua-New Guinea and Taiwan (with more to follow) are computing national seismic hazard using the OpenQuake-engine. In some cases these results are used for the definition of actions in building codes. - Technical support, tools and data for the development of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk models for regional projects in South America and Sub-Saharan Africa. - Going beyond physical risk, GEM's scorecard approach evaluates local resilience by bringing together neighborhood/community leaders and the risk reduction community as a basis for designing risk reduction programs at various levels of geography. Actual case studies are Lalitpur in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal and Quito/Ecuador. In agreement with GEM's collaborative approach, all

  1. Architectural and compiler techniques for energy reduction in high-performance microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Nikolaos

    1999-11-01

    The microprocessor industry has started viewing power, along with area and performance, as a decisive design factor in today's microprocessors. The increasing cost of packaging and cooling systems poses stringent requirements on the maximum allowable power dissipation. Most of the research in recent years has focused on the circuit, gate, and register-transfer (RT) levels of the design. In this research, we focus on the software running on a microprocessor and we view the program as a power consumer. Our work concentrates on the role of the compiler in the construction of "power-efficient" code, and especially its interaction with the hardware so that unnecessary processor activity is saved. We propose techniques that use extra hardware features and compiler-driven code transformations that specifically target activity reduction in certain parts of the CPU which are known to be large power and energy consumers. Design for low power/energy at this level of abstraction entails larger energy gains than in the lower stages of the design hierarchy in which the design team has already made the most important design commitments. The role of the compiler in generating code which exploits the processor organization is also fundamental in energy minimization. Hence, we propose a hardware/software co-design paradigm, and we show what code transformations are necessary by the compiler so that "wasted" power in a modern microprocessor can be trimmed. More specifically, we propose a technique that uses an additional mini cache located between the instruction cache (I-Cache) and the CPU core; the mini cache buffers instructions that are nested within loops and are continuously fetched from the I-Cache. This mechanism can create very substantial energy savings, since the I-Cache unit is one of the main power consumers in most of today's high-performance microprocessors. Results are reported for the SPEC95 benchmarks in the R-4400 processor which implements the MIPS2 instruction

  2. Health gain by salt reduction in europe: a modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke A H Hendriksen

    Full Text Available Excessive salt intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt intake exceeds the World Health Organization population nutrition goal of 5 grams per day in the European region. We assessed the health impact of salt reduction in nine European countries (Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom. Through literature research we obtained current salt intake and systolic blood pressure levels of the nine countries. The population health modeling tool DYNAMO-HIA including country-specific disease data was used to predict the changes in prevalence of ischemic heart disease and stroke for each country estimating the effect of salt reduction through its effect on blood pressure levels. A 30% salt reduction would reduce the prevalence of stroke by 6.4% in Finland to 13.5% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would be decreased by 4.1% in Finland to 8.9% in Poland. When salt intake is reduced to the WHO population nutrient goal, it would reduce the prevalence of stroke from 10.1% in Finland to 23.1% in Poland. Ischemic heart disease would decrease by 6.6% in Finland to 15.5% in Poland. The number of postponed deaths would be 102,100 (0.9% in France, and 191,300 (2.3% in Poland. A reduction of salt intake to 5 grams per day is expected to substantially reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality in several European countries.

  3. Spontaneous high piezoelectricity in poly(vinylidene fluoride) nanoribbons produced by iterative thermal size reduction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Mehmet; Aktas, Ozan; Sen, Huseyin Sener; Durgun, Engin; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-09-23

    We produced kilometer-long, endlessly parallel, spontaneously piezoelectric and thermally stable poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) micro- and nanoribbons using iterative size reduction technique based on thermal fiber drawing. Because of high stress and temperature used in thermal drawing process, we obtained spontaneously polar γ phase PVDF micro- and nanoribbons without electrical poling process. On the basis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, we observed that PVDF micro- and nanoribbons are thermally stable and conserve the polar γ phase even after being exposed to heat treatment above the melting point of PVDF. Phase transition mechanism is investigated and explained using ab initio calculations. We measured an average effective piezoelectric constant as -58.5 pm/V from a single PVDF nanoribbon using a piezo evaluation system along with an atomic force microscope. PVDF nanoribbons are promising structures for constructing devices such as highly efficient energy generators, large area pressure sensors, artificial muscle and skin, due to the unique geometry and extended lengths, high polar phase content, high thermal stability and high piezoelectric coefficient. We demonstrated two proof of principle devices for energy harvesting and sensing applications with a 60 V open circuit peak voltage and 10 μA peak short-circuit current output.

  4. MCNP Variance Reduction technique application for the Development Of the Citrusdal Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makgae, R.

    2008-01-01

    A private company, Citrus Research International (CIR) is intending to construct an insect irradiation facility for the irradiation of insect for pest management in south western region of South Africa. The facility will employ a Co-60 cylindrical source in the chamber. An adequate thickness for the concrete shielding walls and the ability of the labyrinth leading to the irradiation chamber, to attenuate radiation to dose rates that are acceptably low, were determined. Two methods of MCNP variance reduction techniques were applied to accommodate the two pathways of deep penetration to evaluate the radiological impact outside the 150 cm concrete walls and steaming of gamma photons through the labyrinth. The point-kernel based MicroShield software was used in the deep penetration calculations for the walls around the source room to test its accuracy and the results obtained are in good agreement with about 15-20% difference. The dose rate mapping due to radiation Streaming along the labyrinth to the facility entrance is also to be validated with the Attila code, which is a deterministic code that solves the Discrete Ordinates approximation. This file provides a template for writing papers for the conference. (authors)

  5. MCNP Variance Reduction technique application for the Development Of the Citrusdal Irradiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makgae, R. [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), P.O. Box 9396, Centurion (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    A private company, Citrus Research International (CIR) is intending to construct an insect irradiation facility for the irradiation of insect for pest management in south western region of South Africa. The facility will employ a Co-60 cylindrical source in the chamber. An adequate thickness for the concrete shielding walls and the ability of the labyrinth leading to the irradiation chamber, to attenuate radiation to dose rates that are acceptably low, were determined. Two methods of MCNP variance reduction techniques were applied to accommodate the two pathways of deep penetration to evaluate the radiological impact outside the 150 cm concrete walls and steaming of gamma photons through the labyrinth. The point-kernel based MicroShield software was used in the deep penetration calculations for the walls around the source room to test its accuracy and the results obtained are in good agreement with about 15-20% difference. The dose rate mapping due to radiation Streaming along the labyrinth to the facility entrance is also to be validated with the Attila code, which is a deterministic code that solves the Discrete Ordinates approximation. This file provides a template for writing papers for the conference. (authors)

  6. Compression and Combining Based on Channel Shortening and Rank Reduction Technique for Cooperative Wireless Sensor Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Qasim Zeeshan

    2013-12-18

    This paper investigates and compares the performance of wireless sensor networks where sensors operate on the principles of cooperative communications. We consider a scenario where the source transmits signals to the destination with the help of L sensors. As the destination has the capacity of processing only U out of these L signals, the strongest U signals are selected while the remaining (L?U) signals are suppressed. A preprocessing block similar to channel-shortening is proposed in this contribution. However, this preprocessing block employs a rank-reduction technique instead of channel-shortening. By employing this preprocessing, we are able to decrease the computational complexity of the system without affecting the bit error rate (BER) performance. From our simulations, it can be shown that these schemes outperform the channel-shortening schemes in terms of computational complexity. In addition, the proposed schemes have a superior BER performance as compared to channel-shortening schemes when sensors employ fixed gain amplification. However, for sensors which employ variable gain amplification, a tradeoff exists in terms of BER performance between the channel-shortening and these schemes. These schemes outperform channel-shortening scheme for lower signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Evaluation of efficacy of metal artefact reduction technique using contrast media in Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusob, Diana; Zukhi, Jihan; Aziz Tajuddin, Abd; Zainon, Rafidah

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of metal artefact reduction using contrasts media in Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. A water-based abdomen phantom of diameter 32 cm (adult body size) was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. Three different contrast agents (iodine, barium and gadolinium) were filled in small PMMA tubes and placed inside a water-based PMMA adult abdomen phantom. The orthopedic metal screw was placed in each small PMMA tube separately. These two types of orthopedic metal screw (stainless steel and titanium alloy) were scanned separately. The orthopedic metal crews were scanned with single-energy CT at 120 kV and dual-energy CT at fast kV-switching between 80 kV and 140 kV. The scan modes were set automatically using the current modulation care4Dose setting and the scans were set at different pitch and slice thickness. The use of the contrast media technique on orthopedic metal screws were optimised by using pitch = 0.60 mm, and slice thickness = 5.0 mm. The use contrast media can reduce the metal streaking artefacts on CT image, enhance the CT images surrounding the implants, and it has potential use in improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artefacts. These results are valuable for imaging protocol optimisation in clinical applications.

  8. Radon reduction techniques for suspended timber floors and pressure field extension assessment of hardcore specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, T.J.; Stephen, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper comprises two case studies. The first describes a series of mitigation measures carried out in a small primary school fitted with a suspended timber floor. Radon levels had been successfully reduced but the floor subsequently collapsed due to an outbreak of dry-rot. The floor was replaced with a ground-bearing concrete slab fitted with a typical example of one of 200 or so sump-and-fan systems fitted by Cornwall County Council (CCC). Following consultation with the Building Research Establishment (BRE) a network of small bore pipes was fitted below the floor during construction to record variations in radon levels and pressures. The second case study describes the floor replacement at a second, similar school but with a permeable layer of material under the concrete slab and more pressure measurement points. The pressure measurements and their subsequent analysis are described and the performance of the two installations compared. Using BRE and CCC expertise, this technique is now being applied to a number of other replacement floors in order to assess pressure field extension in a variety of hardcore and blinding materials. It is hoped that by careful selection of hardcore and blinding specifications the increased pressure field extension obtained could result in a new-build properties requiring fewer underfloor suction points and/or a reduction in fan power consumption with a greater degree of confidence of success than at present. The selection and design of suction systems to date has been on a very pragmatic basis. (author)

  9. Technique for electronic measurement of semi-reduction layer using bipolar transistor of junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luiz A.P.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Marcus A.P.; Monte, David S.; Santos, Jose A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the World Health Organization (WHO) and also of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggest equipment for X-rays diagnosis are checked for conformance to their parameters, such as Layer Semi-Reduction (CSR). The importance of verification of diagnostic radiology in parameters is because of have records that forces patients undergoing radiation doses in some clinics, up to 300% the reference values suggested by international agencies which doses are considered unnecessary, and even harmful, either because of physical or variable greatness of being out of control nominal specification, or the fact of having to repeat the radiographs. In this context, the purpose of this study was an innovative methodology that is the use of bipolar transistor junction (TBJ) to measure the aluminum CSR in diagnostic X-ray equipment beams. Although the TBJ be a device invented in the last century, only in recent years have explored their potential as X-ray sensor applied to diagnosis. The study indicates that the tested device can operating the detection of X-rays is properly polarized with electrical signals that can detect interference of the interaction of X-ray photons with the PN junction formed by the base and emitter terminals. The result of the developed technique was compared to CSR measurements obtained with detection systems standards and it was found that the BJT provides values for aluminum CSR relative errors less than 5%

  10. Application of variance reduction technique to nuclear transmutation system driven by accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In Japan, it is the basic policy to dispose the high level radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel in stable deep strata after glass solidification. If the useful elements in the waste can be separated and utilized, resources are effectively used, and it can be expected to guarantee high economical efficiency and safety in the disposal in strata. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposed the hybrid type transmutation system, in which high intensity proton accelerator and subcritical fast core are combined, or the nuclear reactor which is optimized for the exclusive use for transmutation. The tungsten target, minor actinide nitride fuel transmutation system and the melted minor actinide chloride salt target fuel transmutation system are outlined. The conceptual figures of both systems are shown. As the method of analysis, Version 2.70 of Lahet Code System which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA was adopted. In case of carrying out the analysis of accelerator-driven subcritical core in the energy range below 20 MeV, variance reduction technique must be applied. (K.I.)

  11. Modeling of oxide reduction in repeated-batch pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Im, Hun Suk; Park, Geun Il

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation. • Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model. • Simulation showed that could be accomplished. • The dynamic material flow helps us understand the process operation. • We showed that complex material flow could be simulated in terms of mass balance. - Abstract: Pyroprocessing is a complicated batch-type operation, involving a highly complex material flow logic with a huge number of unit processes. Discrete event system modeling was used to create an integrated operation model for which simulation showed that dynamic material flow could be accomplished to provide considerable insight into the process operation. In the model simulation, the amount of material transported upstream and downstream in the process satisfies a mass balance equation while considering the hold-up incurred by every batch operation. This study also simulated, in detail, an oxide reduction group process embracing electrolytic reduction, cathode processing, and salt purification. Based on the default operation scenario, it showed that complex material flows could be precisely simulated in terms of the mass balance. Specifically, the amount of high-heat elements remaining in the molten salt bath is analyzed to evaluate the operation scenario.

  12. Discrete Event System Based Pyroprocessing Modeling and Simulation: Oxide Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Ko, W. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Kim, S. K.; Hur, J. M.; Choi, E. Y.; Im, H. S.; Park, K. I.; Kim, I. T.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes according to the batch operation cannot be predicted in an equilibrium material flow. This study began to build a dynamic material balance model based on the previously developed pyroprocessing flowsheet. As a mid- and long-term research, an integrated pyroprocessing simulator is being developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to cope with a review on the technical feasibility, safeguards assessment, conceptual design of facility, and economic feasibility evaluation. The most fundamental thing in such a simulator development is to establish the dynamic material flow framework. This study focused on the operation modeling of pyroprocessing to implement a dynamic material flow. As a case study, oxide reduction was investigated in terms of a dynamic material flow. DES based modeling was applied to build a pyroprocessing operation model. A dynamic material flow as the basic framework for an integrated pyroprocessing was successfully implemented through ExtendSim's internal database and item blocks. Complex operation logic behavior was verified, for example, an oxide reduction process in terms of dynamic material flow. Compared to the equilibrium material flow, a model-based dynamic material flow provides such detailed information that a careful analysis of every batch is necessary to confirm the dynamic material balance results. With the default scenario of oxide reduction, the batch mass balance was verified in comparison with a one-year equilibrium mass balance. This study is still under progress with a mid-and long-term goal, the development of a multi-purpose pyroprocessing simulator that is able to cope with safeguards assessment, economic feasibility, technical evaluation, conceptual design, and support of licensing for a future pyroprocessing facility

  13. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  14. Comparison of dimensionality reduction techniques for the fault diagnosis of mono block centrifugal pump using vibration signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Sakthivel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bearing fault, Impeller fault, seal fault and cavitation are the main causes of breakdown in a mono block centrifugal pump and hence, the detection and diagnosis of these mechanical faults in a mono block centrifugal pump is very crucial for its reliable operation. Based on a continuous acquisition of signals with a data acquisition system, it is possible to classify the faults. This is achieved by the extraction of features from the measured data and employing data mining approaches to explore the structural information hidden in the signals acquired. In the present study, statistical features derived from the vibration data are used as the features. In order to increase the robustness of the classifier and to reduce the data processing load, dimensionality reduction is necessary. In this paper dimensionality reduction is performed using traditional dimensionality reduction techniques and nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques. The effectiveness of each dimensionality reduction technique is also verified using visual analysis. The reduced feature set is then classified using a decision tree. The results obtained are compared with those generated by classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Bayes Net and kNN. The effort is to bring out the better dimensionality reduction technique–classifier combination.

  15. Verification and Uncertainty Reduction of Amchitka Underground Nuclear Testing Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed Hassan; Jenny Chapman

    2006-02-01

    zero. The current results of no-breakthrough match this lower bound. (8) Significant uncertainty reduction is achieved for model input parameters (recharge, conductivity, and recharge-conductivity ratio) with the R/K ratio experiencing a very dramatic reduction. (9) Uncertainty in groundwater fluxes is also reduced due to the reduction of R/K uncertainty. (10) Groundwater velocities based on new data are orders of magnitude slower than the velocities produced by the 2002 model due to the higher porosity obtained from the analysis of the MT data. (11) Uncertainty reduction in radionuclide mass flux could not be assessed as the velocities are too small to produce radionuclide breakthrough within the model timeframe of 2,000 years.

  16. Comparative analysis of nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques for breast MRI segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacobs, Michael A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States) and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Visualization of anatomical structures using radiological imaging methods is an important tool in medicine to differentiate normal from pathological tissue and can generate large amounts of data for a radiologist to read. Integrating these large data sets is difficult and time-consuming. A new approach uses both supervised and unsupervised advanced machine learning techniques to visualize and segment radiological data. This study describes the application of a novel hybrid scheme, based on combining wavelet transform and nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods, to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using three well-established NLDR techniques, namely, ISOMAP, local linear embedding (LLE), and diffusion maps (DfM), to perform a comparative performance analysis. Methods: Twenty-five breast lesion subjects were scanned using a 3T scanner. MRI sequences used were T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging. The hybrid scheme consisted of two steps: preprocessing and postprocessing of the data. The preprocessing step was applied for B{sub 1} inhomogeneity correction, image registration, and wavelet-based image compression to match and denoise the data. In the postprocessing step, MRI parameters were considered data dimensions and the NLDR-based hybrid approach was applied to integrate the MRI parameters into a single image, termed the embedded image. This was achieved by mapping all pixel intensities from the higher dimension to a lower dimensional (embedded) space. For validation, the authors compared the hybrid NLDR with linear methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) using synthetic data. For the clinical application, the authors used breast MRI data, comparison was performed using the postcontrast DCE MRI image and evaluating the congruence of the segmented lesions. Results: The NLDR-based hybrid approach was able to define and segment

  17. Comparative analysis of nonlinear dimensionality reduction techniques for breast MRI segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacobs, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Visualization of anatomical structures using radiological imaging methods is an important tool in medicine to differentiate normal from pathological tissue and can generate large amounts of data for a radiologist to read. Integrating these large data sets is difficult and time-consuming. A new approach uses both supervised and unsupervised advanced machine learning techniques to visualize and segment radiological data. This study describes the application of a novel hybrid scheme, based on combining wavelet transform and nonlinear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods, to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using three well-established NLDR techniques, namely, ISOMAP, local linear embedding (LLE), and diffusion maps (DfM), to perform a comparative performance analysis. Methods: Twenty-five breast lesion subjects were scanned using a 3T scanner. MRI sequences used were T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging. The hybrid scheme consisted of two steps: preprocessing and postprocessing of the data. The preprocessing step was applied for B 1 inhomogeneity correction, image registration, and wavelet-based image compression to match and denoise the data. In the postprocessing step, MRI parameters were considered data dimensions and the NLDR-based hybrid approach was applied to integrate the MRI parameters into a single image, termed the embedded image. This was achieved by mapping all pixel intensities from the higher dimension to a lower dimensional (embedded) space. For validation, the authors compared the hybrid NLDR with linear methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) using synthetic data. For the clinical application, the authors used breast MRI data, comparison was performed using the postcontrast DCE MRI image and evaluating the congruence of the segmented lesions. Results: The NLDR-based hybrid approach was able to define and segment both

  18. Dimensional Reduction for the General Markov Model on Phylogenetic Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jeremy G

    2017-03-01

    We present a method of dimensional reduction for the general Markov model of sequence evolution on a phylogenetic tree. We show that taking certain linear combinations of the associated random variables (site pattern counts) reduces the dimensionality of the model from exponential in the number of extant taxa, to quadratic in the number of taxa, while retaining the ability to statistically identify phylogenetic divergence events. A key feature is the identification of an invariant subspace which depends only bilinearly on the model parameters, in contrast to the usual multi-linear dependence in the full space. We discuss potential applications including the computation of split (edge) weights on phylogenetic trees from observed sequence data.

  19. Second-Order Harmonic Reduction Technique for Photovoltaic Power Conditioning Systems Using a Proportional-Resonant Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Gwang Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a second-order harmonic reduction technique using a proportional-resonant (PR controller for a photovoltaic (PV power conditioning system (PCS. In a grid-connected single-phase system, inverters create a second-order harmonic at twice the fundamental frequency. A ripple component unsettles the operating points of the PV array and deteriorates the operation of the maximum power point tracking (MPPT technique. The second-order harmonic component in PV PCS is analyzed using an equivalent circuit of the DC/DC converter and the DC/AC inverter. A new feed-forward compensation technique using a PR controller for ripple reduction is proposed. The proposed algorithm is advantageous in that additional devices are not required and complex calculations are unnecessary. Therefore, this method is cost-effective and simple to implement. The proposed feed-forward compensation technique is verified by simulation and experimental results.

  20. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-11-15

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2-65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  1. Breast Cancer-Related Arm Lymphedema: Incidence Rates, Diagnostic Techniques, Optimal Management and Risk Reduction Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Chirag; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    As more women survive breast cancer, long-term toxicities affecting their quality of life, such as lymphedema (LE) of the arm, gain importance. Although numerous studies have attempted to determine incidence rates, identify optimal diagnostic tests, enumerate efficacious treatment strategies and outline risk reduction guidelines for breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL), few groups have consistently agreed on any of these issues. As a result, standardized recommendations are still lacking. This review will summarize the latest data addressing all of these concerns in order to provide patients and health care providers with optimal, contemporary recommendations. Published incidence rates for BCRL vary substantially with a range of 2–65% based on surgical technique, axillary sampling method, radiation therapy fields treated, and the use of chemotherapy. Newer clinical assessment tools can potentially identify BCRL in patients with subclinical disease with prospective data suggesting that early diagnosis and management with noninvasive therapy can lead to excellent outcomes. Multiple therapies exist with treatments defined by the severity of BCRL present. Currently, the standard of care for BCRL in patients with significant LE is complex decongestive physiotherapy (CDP). Contemporary data also suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to the management of BCRL should begin prior to definitive treatment for breast cancer employing patient-specific surgical, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy paradigms that limit risks. Further, prospective clinical assessments before and after treatment should be employed to diagnose subclinical disease. In those patients who require aggressive locoregional management, prophylactic therapies and the use of CDP can help reduce the long-term sequelae of BCRL.

  2. Reduction in radiation dose with reconstruction technique in the brain perfusion CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. J.; Lee, H. K.; Song, H.; Ju, M. S.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, M. S.; Cho, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The principal objective of this study was to verify the utility of the reconstruction imaging technique in the brain perfusion computed tomography (PCT) scan by assessing reductions in the radiation dose and analyzing the generated images. The setting used for image acquisition had a detector coverage of 40 mm, a helical thickness of 0.625 mm, a helical shuttle mode scan type and a rotation time of 0.5 s as the image parameters used for the brain PCT scan. Additionally, a phantom experiment and an animal experiment were carried out. In the phantom and animal experiments, noise was measured in the scanning with the tube voltage fixed at 80 kVp (kilovolt peak) and the level of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) was changed from 0% to 100% at 10% intervals. The standard deviation of the CT coefficient was measured three times to calculate the mean value. In the phantom and animal experiments, the absorbed dose was measured 10 times under the same conditions as the ones for noise measurement before the mean value was calculated. In the animal experiment, pencil-type and CT-dedicated ionization chambers were inserted into the central portion of pig heads for measurement. In the phantom study, as the level of the ASIR changed from 0% to 100% under identical scanning conditions, the noise value and dose were proportionally reduced. In our animal experiment, the noise value was lowest when the ASIR level was 50%, unlike in the phantom study. The dose was reduced as in the phantom study.

  3. Power flow prediction in vibrating systems via model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianhui

    This dissertation focuses on power flow prediction in vibrating systems. Reduced order models (ROMs) are built based on rational Krylov model reduction which preserve power flow information in the original systems over a specified frequency band. Stiffness and mass matrices of the ROMs are obtained by projecting the original system matrices onto the subspaces spanned by forced responses. A matrix-free algorithm is designed to construct ROMs directly from the power quantities at selected interpolation frequencies. Strategies for parallel implementation of the algorithm via message passing interface are proposed. The quality of ROMs is iteratively refined according to the error estimate based on residual norms. Band capacity is proposed to provide a priori estimate of the sizes of good quality ROMs. Frequency averaging is recast as ensemble averaging and Cauchy distribution is used to simplify the computation. Besides model reduction for deterministic systems, details of constructing ROMs for parametric and nonparametric random systems are also presented. Case studies have been conducted on testbeds from Harwell-Boeing collections. Input and coupling power flow are computed for the original systems and the ROMs. Good agreement is observed in all cases.

  4. Reduction of collisional-radiative models for transient, atomic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Richard June; Karagozian, Ann; Bilyeu, David; Le, Hai

    2017-10-01

    Interactions between plasmas and any radiation field, whether by lasers or plasma emissions, introduce many computational challenges. One of these computational challenges involves resolving the atomic physics, which can influence other physical phenomena in the radiated system. In this work, a collisional-radiative (CR) model with reduction capabilities is developed to capture the atomic physics at a reduced computational cost. Although the model is made with any element in mind, the model is currently supplemented by LANL's argon database, which includes the relevant collisional and radiative processes for all of the ionic stages. Using the detailed data set as the true solution, reduction mechanisms in the form of Boltzmann grouping, uniform grouping, and quasi-steady-state (QSS), are implemented to compare against the true solution. Effects on the transient plasma stemming from the grouping methods are compared. Distribution A: Approved for public release; unlimited distribution, PA (Public Affairs) Clearance Number 17449. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), Grant Number 17RQCOR463 (Dr. Jason Marshall).

  5. Genetic Algorithm-Based Model Order Reduction of Aeroservoelastic Systems with Consistant States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jin; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil; Suh, Peter M.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model order reduction framework to construct linear parameter-varying reduced-order models of flexible aircraft for aeroservoelasticity analysis and control synthesis in broad two-dimensional flight parameter space. Genetic algorithms are used to automatically determine physical states for reduction and to generate reduced-order models at grid points within parameter space while minimizing the trial-and-error process. In addition, balanced truncation for unstable systems is used in conjunction with the congruence transformation technique to achieve locally optimal realization and weak fulfillment of state consistency across the entire parameter space. Therefore, aeroservoelasticity reduced-order models at any flight condition can be obtained simply through model interpolation. The methodology is applied to the pitch-plant model of the X-56A Multi-Use Technology Testbed currently being tested at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center for flutter suppression and gust load alleviation. The present studies indicate that the reduced-order model with more than 12× reduction in the number of states relative to the original model is able to accurately predict system response among all input-output channels. The genetic-algorithm-guided approach exceeds manual and empirical state selection in terms of efficiency and accuracy. The interpolated aeroservoelasticity reduced order models exhibit smooth pole transition and continuously varying gains along a set of prescribed flight conditions, which verifies consistent state representation obtained by congruence transformation. The present model order reduction framework can be used by control engineers for robust aeroservoelasticity controller synthesis and novel vehicle design.

  6. Multiple models guide strategies for agricultural nutrient reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavia, Donald; Kalcic, Margaret; Muenich, Rebecca Logsdon; Read, Jennifer; Aloysius, Noel; Bertani, Isabella; Boles, Chelsie; Confesor, Remegio; DePinto, Joseph; Gildow, Marie; Martin, Jay; Redder, Todd; Robertson, Dale M.; Sowa, Scott P.; Wang, Yu-Chen; Yen, Haw

    2017-01-01

    In response to degraded water quality, federal policy makers in the US and Canada called for a 40% reduction in phosphorus (P) loads to Lake Erie, and state and provincial policy makers in the Great Lakes region set a load-reduction target for the year 2025. Here, we configured five separate SWAT (US Department of Agriculture's Soil and Water Assessment Tool) models to assess load reduction strategies for the agriculturally dominated Maumee River watershed, the largest P source contributing to toxic algal blooms in Lake Erie. Although several potential pathways may achieve the target loads, our results show that any successful pathway will require large-scale implementation of multiple practices. For example, one successful pathway involved targeting 50% of row cropland that has the highest P loss in the watershed with a combination of three practices: subsurface application of P fertilizers, planting cereal rye as a winter cover crop, and installing buffer strips. Achieving these levels of implementation will require local, state/provincial, and federal agencies to collaborate with the private sector to set shared implementation goals and to demand innovation and honest assessments of water quality-related programs, policies, and partnerships.

  7. Dose reduction in chest CT: Comparison of the adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D, adaptive iterative dose reduction, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takahiro, E-mail: hosokawa@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Tanami, Yutaka, E-mail: tanami@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Sugiura, Hiroaki, E-mail: hsugiura@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: tabe@z5.keio.jp [Center for Clinical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio, E-mail: skuribay@a5.keio.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) and AIDR 3D in improving the image quality in low-dose chest CT (LDCT). Materials and methods: Fifty patients underwent standard-dose chest CT (SDCT) and LDCT simultaneously, performed under automatic exposure control with noise index of 19 and 38 (for a 2-mm slice thickness), respectively. The SDCT images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (SDCT-FBP images), and the LDCT images with FBP, AIDR and AIDR 3D (LDCT-FBP, LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-AIDR 3D images, respectively). On all the 200 lung and 200 mediastinal image series, objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured in several regions, and two blinded radiologists independently assessed the subjective image quality. Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test with Bonferroni's correction was used for the statistical analyses. Results: The mean dose reduction in LDCT was 64.2% as compared with the dose in SDCT. LDCT-AIDR 3D images showed significantly reduced objective noise and significantly increased SNR in all regions as compared to the SDCT-FBP, LDCT-FBP and LDCT-AIDR images (all, P ≤ 0.003). In all assessments of the image quality, LDCT-AIDR 3D images were superior to LDCT-AIDR and LDCT-FBP images. The overall diagnostic acceptability of both the lung and mediastinal LDCT-AIDR 3D images was comparable to that of the lung and mediastinal SDCT-FBP images. Conclusions: AIDR 3D is superior to AIDR. Intra-individual comparisons between SDCT and LDCT suggest that AIDR 3D allows a 64.2% reduction of the radiation dose as compared to SDCT, by substantially reducing the objective image noise and increasing the SNR, while maintaining the overall diagnostic acceptability.

  8. BIOMEHANICAL MODEL OF THE GOLF SWING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čoh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Golf is an extremely complex game which depends on a number of interconnected factors. One of the most important elements is undoubtedly the golf swing technique. High performance of the golf swing technique is generated by: the level of motor abilities, high degree of movement control, the level of movement structure stabilisation, morphological characteristics, inter- and intro-muscular coordination, motivation, and concentration. The golf swing technique was investigated using the biomechanical analysis method. Kinematic parameters were registered using two synchronised high-speed cameras at a frequency of 2,000 Hz. The sample of subjects consisted of three professional golf players. The study results showed a relatively high variability of the swing technique. The maximum velocity of the ball after a wood swing ranged from 233 to 227 km/h. The velocity of the ball after an iron swing was lower by 10 km/h on average. The elevation angle of the ball ranged from 11.7 to 15.3 degrees. In the final phase of the golf swing, i.e. downswing, the trunk rotators play the key role.

  9. Disc volume reduction with percutaneous nucleoplasty in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kasch

    Full Text Available STUDY DESIGN: We assessed volume following nucleoplasty disc decompression in lower lumbar spines from cadaveric pigs using 7.1Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. PURPOSE: To investigate coblation-induced volume reductions as a possible mechanism underlying nucleoplasty. METHODS: We assessed volume following nucleoplastic disc decompression in pig spines using 7.1-Tesla MRI. Volumetry was performed in lumbar discs of 21 postmortem pigs. A preoperative image data set was obtained, volume was determined, and either disc decompression or placebo therapy was performed in a randomized manner. Group 1 (nucleoplasty group was treated according to the usual nucleoplasty protocol with coblation current applied to 6 channels for 10 seconds each in an application field of 360°; in group 2 (placebo group the same procedure was performed but without coblation current. After the procedure, a second data set was generated and volumes calculated and matched with the preoperative measurements in a blinded manner. To analyze the effectiveness of nucleoplasty, volumes between treatment and placebo groups were compared. RESULTS: The average preoperative nucleus volume was 0.994 ml (SD: 0.298 ml. In the nucleoplasty group (n = 21 volume was reduced by an average of 0.087 ml (SD: 0.110 ml or 7.14%. In the placebo group (n = 21 volume was increased by an average of 0.075 ml (SD: 0.075 ml or 8.94%. The average nucleoplasty-induced volume reduction was 0.162 ml (SD: 0.124 ml or 16.08%. Volume reduction in lumbar discs was significant in favor of the nucleoplasty group (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that nucleoplasty has a volume-reducing effect on the lumbar nucleus pulposus in an animal model. Furthermore, we show the volume reduction to be a coblation effect of nucleoplasty in porcine discs.

  10. Respirometry techniques and activated sludge models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, O.; Spanjers, H.; Holba, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper aims to explain results of respirometry experiments using Activated Sludge Model No. 1. In cases of insufficient fit of ASM No. 1, further modifications to the model were carried out and the so-called "Enzymatic model" was developed. The best-fit method was used to determine the effect of

  11. A partitioned model order reduction approach to rationalise computational expenses in nonlinear fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfriden, P.; Goury, O.; Rabczuk, T.; Bordas, S.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose in this paper a reduced order modelling technique based on domain partitioning for parametric problems of fracture. We show that coupling domain decomposition and projection-based model order reduction permits to focus the numerical effort where it is most needed: around the zones where damage propagates. No a priori knowledge of the damage pattern is required, the extraction of the corresponding spatial regions being based solely on algebra. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated numerically with an example relevant to engineering fracture. PMID:23750055

  12. Treatment of unilateral giant fibroadenoma by breast reduction skin incision: the inverted "T" technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achebe, J U; Njeze, G E; Okwesili, O R

    2014-01-01

    Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) has been defined as fibroadenoma greater than 5 cm in it's the widest diameter and/or weighing more than 500 g. A benign lesion, its size also raises the possibility of malignancy requiring differentiation from a malignant breast disease. When unilateral GFA presents with a severe breast asymmetry, due to its size, it is not correctable by simple enucleation alone. Postoperative asymmetry from volume and ptosis disparity results, which needs to be addressed at the primary surgery. The inverted "T" technique, which is effective in volume reduction and ptosis correction in breast hypertrophy, can be applied in the treatment of unilateral GFA. This is a retrospective review of all GFA treated by inverted "T" method. A retrospective review was carried out on all patients with GFA treated by inverted "T" skin pattern method over a period of 20 years (January 1988 to December 2007). The procedures were carried out at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital and the National Orthopedic Hospital, Enugu. Information, which included patients' demographics, pre-operative assessment, operative findings and outcome of surgery were obtained from the case files of the patients. The degree of ptosis was recorded for each patient. Diagnosis of GFA was made after clinical evaluation and pre-operative tissue biopsy. Immediate results of treatment were based on the patients' satisfaction, visual assessment of symmetry of size of breasts, correction of ptosis and position of nipple areola complex (NAC). A total of 27 patients underwent inverted "T" technique for excision of GFA in their breasts. Their average age was 17.5 years (range 12-25 years) delay in presentation ranged from 2 months to 15 months. In 16 patients (59.2%), the left breast was involved in GFA whilst the tumor occurred on the right breast in 11 (40.7%). The tumor weighed on the average 1500 g (range 655-2200 g). Average diameter of the tumor was 15 cm (range 12-20 cm). All quadrants of the

  13. Breaking Computational Barriers: Real-time Analysis and Optimization with Large-scale Nonlinear Models via Model Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Quantitative Modeling and Analysis; Drohmann, Martin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Quantitative Modeling and Analysis; Tuminaro, Raymond S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Computational Mathematics; Boggs, Paul T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Quantitative Modeling and Analysis; Ray, Jaideep [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Quantitative Modeling and Analysis; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Optimization and Uncertainty Estimation

    2014-10-01

    Model reduction for dynamical systems is a promising approach for reducing the computational cost of large-scale physics-based simulations to enable high-fidelity models to be used in many- query (e.g., Bayesian inference) and near-real-time (e.g., fast-turnaround simulation) contexts. While model reduction works well for specialized problems such as linear time-invariant systems, it is much more difficult to obtain accurate, stable, and efficient reduced-order models (ROMs) for systems with general nonlinearities. This report describes several advances that enable nonlinear reduced-order models (ROMs) to be deployed in a variety of time-critical settings. First, we present an error bound for the Gauss-Newton with Approximated Tensors (GNAT) nonlinear model reduction technique. This bound allows the state-space error for the GNAT method to be quantified when applied with the backward Euler time-integration scheme. Second, we present a methodology for preserving classical Lagrangian structure in nonlinear model reduction. This technique guarantees that important properties--such as energy conservation and symplectic time-evolution maps--are preserved when performing model reduction for models described by a Lagrangian formalism (e.g., molecular dynamics, structural dynamics). Third, we present a novel technique for decreasing the temporal complexity --defined as the number of Newton-like iterations performed over the course of the simulation--by exploiting time-domain data. Fourth, we describe a novel method for refining projection-based reduced-order models a posteriori using a goal-oriented framework similar to mesh-adaptive h -refinement in finite elements. The technique allows the ROM to generate arbitrarily accurate solutions, thereby providing the ROM with a 'failsafe' mechanism in the event of insufficient training data. Finally, we present the reduced-order model error surrogate (ROMES) method for statistically quantifying reduced- order-model

  14. Optimal design of minimum mean-square error noise reduction algorithms using the simulated annealing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hur, Kur-Nan

    2009-02-01

    The performance of the minimum mean-square error noise reduction (MMSE-NR) algorithm in conjunction with time-recursive averaging (TRA) for noise estimation is found to be very sensitive to the choice of two recursion parameters. To address this problem in a more systematic manner, this paper proposes an optimization method to efficiently search the optimal parameters of the MMSE-TRA-NR algorithms. The objective function is based on a regression model, whereas the optimization process is carried out with the simulated annealing algorithm that is well suited for problems with many local optima. Another NR algorithm proposed in the paper employs linear prediction coding as a preprocessor for extracting the correlated portion of human speech. Objective and subjective tests were undertaken to compare the optimized MMSE-TRA-NR algorithm with several conventional NR algorithms. The results of subjective tests were processed by using analysis of variance to justify the statistic significance. A post hoc test, Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference, was conducted to further assess the pairwise difference between the NR algorithms.

  15. UAV State Estimation Modeling Techniques in AHRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Shikin; Zhahir, Amzari

    2017-11-01

    Autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system is depending on state estimation feedback to control flight operation. Estimation on the correct state improves navigation accuracy and achieves flight mission safely. One of the sensors configuration used in UAV state is Attitude Heading and Reference System (AHRS) with application of Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) or feedback controller. The results of these two different techniques in estimating UAV states in AHRS configuration are displayed through position and attitude graphs.

  16. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2017-01-01

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  17. Navier slip model of drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers

    KAUST Repository

    Berry, Joseph D.

    2017-10-17

    Recent experiments found that a hot solid sphere that is able to sustain a stable Leidenfrost vapor layer in a liquid exhibits significant drag reduction during free fall. The variation of the drag coefficient with Reynolds number deviates substantially from the characteristic drag crisis behavior at high Reynolds numbers. Measurements based on liquids of different viscosities show that the onset of the drag crisis depends on the viscosity ratio of the vapor to the liquid. Here we attempt to characterize the complexity of the Leidenfrost vapor layer with respect to its variable thickness and possible vapor circulation within, in terms of the Navier slip model that is defined by a slip length. Such a model can facilitate tangential flow and thereby alter the behavior of the boundary layer. Direct numerical and large eddy simulations of flow past a sphere at moderate to high Reynolds numbers (102≤Re≤4×104) are employed to quantify comparisons with experimental results, including the drag coefficient and the form of the downstream wake on the sphere. This provides a simple one parameter characterization of the drag reduction phenomenon due to a stable vapor layer that envelops a solid body.

  18. Model Reduction and Coarse-Graining Approaches for Multiscale Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Gorban, Alexander N; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2006-01-01

    Model reduction and coarse-graining are important in many areas of science and engineering. How does a system with many degrees of freedom become one with fewer? How can a reversible micro-description be adapted to the dissipative macroscopic model? These crucial questions, as well as many other related problems, are discussed in this book. Specific areas of study include dynamical systems, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, hydrodynamics and mechanics of continuous media, (bio)chemical kinetics, nonlinear dynamics, nonlinear control, nonlinear estimation, and particulate systems from various branches of engineering. The generic nature and the power of the pertinent conceptual, analytical and computational frameworks helps eliminate some of the traditional language barriers, which often unnecessarily impede scientific progress and the interaction of researchers between disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology, applied mathematics and engineering. All contributions are authored by ex...

  19. PEAK-TO-AVERAGE POWER RATIO REDUCTION USING CODING AND HYBRID TECHNIQUES FOR OFDM SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Bahubali K. Shiragapur; Uday Wali

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the research work investigated is based on an error correction coding techniques are used to reduce the undesirable Peak-to-Average Power Ratio (PAPR) quantity. The Golay Code (24, 12), Reed-Muller code (16, 11), Hamming code (7, 4) and Hybrid technique (Combination of Signal Scrambling and Signal Distortion) proposed by us are used as proposed coding techniques, the simulation results shows that performance of Hybrid technique, reduces PAPR significantly as compared to Conve...

  20. Galerkin v. least-squares Petrov–Galerkin projection in nonlinear model reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Barone, Matthew F.; Antil, Harbir

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares Petrov–Galerkin (LSPG) model-reduction techniques such as the Gauss–Newton with Approximated Tensors (GNAT) method have shown promise, as they have generated stable, accurate solutions for large-scale turbulent, compressible flow problems where standard Galerkin techniques have failed. Furthermore, there has been limited comparative analysis of the two approaches. This is due in part to difficulties arising from the fact that Galerkin techniques perform optimal projection associated with residual minimization at the time-continuous level, while LSPG techniques do so at the time-discrete level. This work provides a detailed theoretical and computational comparison of the two techniques for two common classes of time integrators: linear multistep schemes and Runge–Kutta schemes. We present a number of new findings, including conditions under which the LSPG ROM has a time-continuous representation, conditions under which the two techniques are equivalent, and time-discrete error bounds for the two approaches. Perhaps most surprisingly, we demonstrate both theoretically and computationally that decreasing the time step does not necessarily decrease the error for the LSPG ROM; instead, the time step should be ‘matched’ to the spectral content of the reduced basis. In numerical experiments carried out on a turbulent compressible-flow problem with over one million unknowns, we show that increasing the time step to an intermediate value decreases both the error and the simulation time of the LSPG reduced-order model by an order of magnitude.

  1. A cooperative reduction model for regional air pollution control in China that considers adverse health effects and pollutant reduction costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yujing; Zhao, Laijun; Xue, Jian; Hu, Qingmi; Xu, Xiang; Wang, Hongbo

    2016-12-15

    How to effectively control severe regional air pollution has become a focus of global concern recently. The non-cooperative reduction model (NCRM) is still the main air pollution control pattern in China, but it is both ineffective and costly, because each province must independently fight air pollution. Thus, we proposed a cooperative reduction model (CRM), with the goal of maximizing the reduction in adverse health effects (AHEs) at the lowest cost by encouraging neighboring areas to jointly control air pollution. CRM has two parts: a model of optimal pollutant removal rates using two optimization objectives (maximizing the reduction in AHEs and minimizing pollutant reduction cost) while meeting the regional pollution control targets set by the central government, and a model that allocates the cooperation benefits (i.e., health improvement and cost reduction) among the participants according to their contributions using the Shapley value method. We applied CRM to the case of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) reduction in Yangtze River Delta region. Based on data from 2003 to 2013, and using mortality due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases as the health endpoints, CRM saves 437 more lives than NCRM, amounting to 12.1% of the reduction under NCRM. CRM also reduced costs by US $65.8×10 6 compared with NCRM, which is 5.2% of the total cost of NCRM. Thus, CRM performs significantly better than NCRM. Each province obtains significant benefits from cooperation, which can motivate them to actively cooperate in the long term. A sensitivity analysis was performed to quantify the effects of parameter values on the cooperation benefits. Results shown that the CRM is not sensitive to the changes in each province's pollutant carrying capacity and the minimum pollutant removal capacity, but sensitive to the maximum pollutant reduction capacity. Moreover, higher cooperation benefits will be generated when a province's maximum pollutant reduction capacity increases. Copyright

  2. Investigation of Reduction of the Uncertainty of Monte Carlo Dose Calculations in Oncor® Clinical Linear Accelerator Simulation Using the DBS Variance Reduction Technique in Monte Carlo Code BEAMnrc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Asadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the benefits of Directional Bremsstrahlung Splitting (DBS dose variance reduction technique in BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC code for Oncor® linac at 6MV and 18MV energies. Materials and Method: A MC model of Oncor® linac was built using BEAMnrc MC Code and verified by the measured data for 6MV and 18MV energies of various field sizes. Then Oncor® machine was modeled running DBS technique, and the efficiency of total fluence and spatial fluence for electron and photon, the efficiency of dose variance reduction of MC calculations for PDD on the central beam axis and lateral dose profile across the nominal field was measured and compared. Result: With applying DBS technique, the total fluence of electron and photon increased in turn 626.8 (6MV and 983.4 (6MV, and 285.6 (18MV and 737.8 (18MV, the spatial fluence of electron and photon improved in turn 308.6±1.35% (6MV and 480.38±0.43% (6MV, and 153±0.9% (18MV and 462.6±0.27% (18MV. Moreover, by running DBS technique, the efficiency of dose variance reduction for PDD MC dose calculations before maximum dose point and after dose maximum point enhanced 187.8±0.68% (6MV and 184.6±0.65% (6MV, 156±0.43% (18MV and 153±0.37% (18MV, respectively, and the efficiency of MC calculations for lateral dose profile remarkably on the central beam axis and across the treatment field raised in turn 197±0.66% (6MV and 214.6±0.73% (6MV, 175±0.36% (18MV and 181.4±0.45% (18MV. Conclusion: Applying dose variance reduction technique of DBS for modeling Oncor® linac with using BEAMnrc MC Code surprisingly improved the fluence of electron and photon, and it therefore enhanced the efficiency of dose variance reduction for MC calculations. As a result, running DBS in different kinds of MC simulation Codes might be beneficent in reducing the uncertainty of MC calculations. 

  3. Moving objects management models, techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jiajie

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the topics of moving objects modeling and location tracking, indexing and querying, clustering, location uncertainty, traffic aware navigation and privacy issues as well as the application to intelligent transportation systems.

  4. Materials and techniques for model construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    The problems confronting the designer of models for cryogenic wind tunnel models are discussed with particular reference to the difficulties in obtaining appropriate data on the mechanical and physical properties of candidate materials and their fabrication technologies. The relationship between strength and toughness of alloys is discussed in the context of maximizing both and avoiding the problem of dimensional and microstructural instability. All major classes of materials used in model construction are considered in some detail and in the Appendix selected numerical data is given for the most relevant materials. The stepped-specimen program to investigate stress-induced dimensional changes in alloys is discussed in detail together with interpretation of the initial results. The methods used to bond model components are considered with particular reference to the selection of filler alloys and temperature cycles to avoid microstructural degradation and loss of mechanical properties.

  5. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by fasted and fed human gastric fluid. II. Ex vivo gastric reduction modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirman, Christopher R., E-mail: ckirman@summittoxicology.com [Summit Toxicology, Orange Village, OH, 44022 (United States); Suh, Mina, E-mail: msuh@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Mission Viejo, CA, 92692 (United States); Hays, Sean M., E-mail: shays@summittoxicology.com [Summit Toxicology, Allenspark, CO, 8040 (United States); Gürleyük, Hakan, E-mail: hakan@brooksrand.com [Brooks Applied Labs, Bothell, WA, 98011 (United States); Gerads, Russ, E-mail: russ@brooksrand.com [Brooks Applied Labs, Bothell, WA, 98011 (United States); De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Parker, William, E-mail: william.parker@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Durham, NC, 27710 (United States); Lin, Shu, E-mail: shu.lin@duke.edu [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Durham, NC, 27710 (United States); Haws, Laurie C., E-mail: lhaws@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Katy, TX, 77494 (United States); Harris, Mark A., E-mail: mharris@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Austin, TX, 78751 (United States); Proctor, Deborah M., E-mail: dproctor@toxstrategies.com [ToxStrategies, Inc., Mission Viejo, CA, 92692 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    To extend previous models of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction by gastric fluid (GF), ex vivo experiments were conducted to address data gaps and limitations identified with respect to (1) GF dilution in the model; (2) reduction of Cr(VI) in fed human GF samples; (3) the number of Cr(VI) reduction pools present in human GF under fed, fasted, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-use conditions; and (4) an appropriate form for the pH-dependence of Cr(VI) reduction rate constants. Rates and capacities of Cr(VI) reduction were characterized in gastric contents from fed and fasted volunteers, and from fasted pre-operative patients treated with PPIs. Reduction capacities were first estimated over a 4-h reduction period. Once reduction capacity was established, a dual-spike approach was used in speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry analyses to characterize the concentration-dependence of the 2nd order reduction rate constants. These data, when combined with previously collected data, were well described by a three-pool model (pool 1 = fast reaction with low capacity; pool 2 = slow reaction with higher capacity; pool 3 = very slow reaction with higher capacity) using pH-dependent rate constants characterized by a piecewise, log-linear relationship. These data indicate that human gastric samples, like those collected from rats and mice, contain multiple pools of reducing agents, and low concentrations of Cr(VI) (< 0.7 mg/L) are reduced more rapidly than high concentrations. The data and revised modeling results herein provide improved characterization of Cr(VI) gastric reduction kinetics, critical for Cr(VI) pharmacokinetic modeling and human health risk assessment. - Highlights: • SIDMS allows for measurement of Cr(VI) reduction rate in gastric fluid ex vivo • Human gastric fluid has three reducing pools • Cr(VI) in drinking water at < 0.7 mg/L is rapidly reduced in human gastric fluid • Reduction rate is concentration- and pH-dependent • A refined PK

  6. Modeling of detective quantum efficiency considering scatter-reduction devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Woong; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The reduction of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) cannot be restored and thus has become a severe issue in digital mammography.1 Therefore, antiscatter grids are typically used in mammography. Scatter-cleanup performance of various scatter-reduction devices, such as air gaps,2 linear (1D) or cellular (2D) grids,3, 4 and slot-scanning devices,5 has been extensively investigated by many research groups. In the present time, a digital mammography system with the slotscanning geometry is also commercially available.6 In this study, we theoretically investigate the effect of scattered photons on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance of digital mammography detectors by using the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) approach. We show a simple DQE formalism describing digital mammography detector systems equipped with scatter reduction devices by regarding the scattered photons as additive noise sources. The LFD increased with increasing PMMA thickness, and the amounts of LFD indicated the corresponding SF. The estimated SFs were 0.13, 0.21, and 0.29 for PMMA thicknesses of 10, 20, and 30 mm, respectively. While the solid line describing the measured MTF for PMMA with 0 mm was the result of least-squares of regression fit using Eq. (14), the other lines were simply resulted from the multiplication of the fit result (for PMMA with 0 mm) with the (1-SF) estimated from the LFDs in the measured MTFs. Spectral noise-power densities over the entire frequency range were not much changed with increasing scatter. On the other hand, the calculation results showed that the spectral noise-power densities increased with increasing scatter. This discrepancy may be explained by that the model developed in this study does not account for the changes in x-ray interaction parameters for varying spectral shapes due to beam hardening with increasing PMMA thicknesses.

  7. Evaluating two model reduction approaches for large scale hedonic models sensitive to omitted variables and multicollinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2014-01-01

    Hedonic models in environmental valuation studies have grown in terms of number of transactions and number of explanatory variables. We focus on the practical challenge of model reduction, when aiming for reliable parsimonious models, sensitive to omitted variable bias and multicollinearity. We...

  8. Experimental study and modelling of iron ore reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to find new ways to drastically reduce the CO 2 emissions from the steel industry (ULCOS project), the reduction of iron ore by pure hydrogen in a shaft furnace was investigated. The work consisted of literature, experimental, and modelling studies. The chemical reaction and its kinetics were analysed on the basis of thermogravimetric experiments and physicochemical characterizations of partially reduced samples. A specific kinetic model was designed, which simulates the successive reactions, the different steps of mass transport, and possible iron sintering, at the particle scale. Finally, a 2-dimensional numerical model of a shaft furnace was developed. It depicts the variation of the solid and gas temperatures and compositions throughout the reactor. One original feature of the model is using the law of additive characteristic times for calculating the reaction rates. This allowed us to handle both the particle and the reactor scale, while keeping reasonable calculation time. From the simulation results, the influence of the process parameters was assessed. Optimal operating conditions were concluded, which reveal the efficiency of the hydrogen process. (author)

  9. Investigation on imperfection sensitivity of composite cylindrical shells using the nonlinearity reduction technique and the polynomial chaos method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke; Sun, Qin; Liu, Xiaoran

    2018-05-01

    The theoretical buckling load of a perfect cylinder must be reduced by a knock-down factor to account for structural imperfections. The EU project DESICOS proposed a new robust design for imperfection-sensitive composite cylindrical shells using the combination of deterministic and stochastic simulations, however the high computational complexity seriously affects its wider application in aerospace structures design. In this paper, the nonlinearity reduction technique and the polynomial chaos method are implemented into the robust design process, to significantly lower computational costs. The modified Newton-type Koiter-Newton approach which largely reduces the number of degrees of freedom in the nonlinear finite element model, serves as the nonlinear buckling solver to trace the equilibrium paths of geometrically nonlinear structures efficiently. The non-intrusive polynomial chaos method provides the buckling load with an approximate chaos response surface with respect to imperfections and uses buckling solver codes as black boxes. A fast large-sample study can be applied using the approximate chaos response surface to achieve probability characteristics of buckling loads. The performance of the method in terms of reliability, accuracy and computational effort is demonstrated with an unstiffened CFRP cylinder.

  10. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of the reduction of concentrated nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicsic, David

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis aimed at determining and quantifying the different stages of the reduction mechanism in the case of concentrated nitric acid. After having reported the results of a bibliographical study on the chemical and electrochemical behaviour of concentrated nitric media (generalities, chemical equilibriums, NOx reactivity, electrochemical reduction of nitric acid), the author reports the development and discusses the results of a thermodynamic simulation of a nitric environment at 25 C. This allowed the main species to be identified in the liquid and gaseous phases of nitric acid solutions. The author reports an experimental electrochemical investigation coupled with analytic techniques (infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy) and shows that the reduction process depends on the cathodic overvoltage, and identifies three potential areas. A kinetic modelling of the stationary state and of the impedance is then developed in order to better determine, discuss and quantify the reduction process. The application of this kinetic model to the preliminary results of an electrochemical study performed on 304 L steel is then discussed [fr

  12. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  13. Kantowski-Sachs multidimensional cosmological models and dynamical dimensional reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demianski, M.; Rome Univ.; Golda, Z.A.; Heller, M.; Szydlowski, M.

    1988-01-01

    Einstein's field equations are solved for a multidimensional spacetime (KS) x Tsup(m), where (KS) is a four-dimensional Kantowski-Sachs spacetime and Tsup(m) is an m-dimensional torus. Among all possible vacuum solutions there is a large class of spacetimes in which the macroscopic space expands and the microscopic space contracts to a finite volume. We also consider a non-vacuum case and we explicitly solve the field equations for the matter satisfying the Zel'dovich equation of state. In non-vacuum models, with matter satisfying an equation of state p = γρ, O ≤ γ < 1, at a sufficiently late stage of evolution the microspace always expands and the dynamical dimensional reduction does not occur. (author)

  14. Multidimensional Rank Reduction Estimator for Parametric MIMO Channel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pesavento

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel algebraic method for the simultaneous estimation of MIMO channel parameters from channel sounder measurements is developed. We consider a parametric multipath propagation model with P discrete paths where each path is characterized by its complex path gain, its directions of arrival and departure, time delay, and Doppler shift. This problem is treated as a special case of the multidimensional harmonic retrieval problem. While the well-known ESPRIT-type algorithms exploit shift-invariance between specific partitions of the signal matrix, the rank reduction estimator (RARE algorithm exploits their internal Vandermonde structure. A multidimensional extension of the RARE algorithm is developed, analyzed, and applied to measurement data recorded with the RUSK vector channel sounder in the 2 GHz band.

  15. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  16. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2014-06-06

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  17. Restrictions in Model Reduction for Polymer Chain Models in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Calo, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    We model high molecular weight homopolymers in semidilute concentration via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD). We show that in model reduction methodologies for polymers it is not enough to preserve system properties (i.e., density ρ, pressure p, temperature T, radial distribution function g(r)) but preserving also the characteristic shape and length scale of the polymer chain model is necessary. In this work we apply a DPD-model-reduction methodology for linear polymers recently proposed; and demonstrate why the applicability of this methodology is limited upto certain maximum polymer length, and not suitable for solvent coarse graining.

  18. Reductive dehalogenation in microbial and electrolytic model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criddle, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    This research addresses the principles or reductive dehalogenation, with a focus on microbial processes. Carbon tetrachloride (CT) was selected as a model compound for intensive investigation. Three different experimental systems were studied: pure cultures of Escherichia coli k-12, pure cultures of a denitrifying Pseudomonad isolated from aquifer solids (Pseudomonas sp. strain KC), and an electrolysis cell. The product distributions were consistent with the hypothesis that CT undergoes a rate-limiting reduction to radical species which rapidly react with constituents of the surrounding milieu. In cultures of E. coli k-12, use of oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors generally prevented CT transformation. At low oxygen levels (∼ 1%), however, transformation of 14 C-CT to 14 C-CO 2 and attachment to cell material did occur in accord with reports of CT fate in mammalian cell cultures. Under fumarate-respiring conditions, 14 C-CT was recovered as 14 C-C 2 , chloroform (CF), and in a non-volatile fraction. In contrast, fermenting conditions resulted in more CF, more cell-bound 14 C, and almost no 14 C-CO 2 . Rates were faster under fermenting conditions than under fumarate-respiring conditions. Rates also decreased over time suggesting the gradual exhaustion of transformation activity. This loss was modeled with a simple exponential decay term. Pseudomonas sp. strain KC converted 14 C-CT to 14 C-CO 2 under denitrifying conditions, without CF production. Strain KC was the only organism of several denitrifiers that transformed CT. Induction of CT transformation by strain KC depended upon the presence of trace metals. Addition of ferrous iron and cobalt inhibited CT transformation. For strain KC, CT transformation is apparently linked to its mechanism for trace metal acquisition

  19. High-grade spondylolisthesis: gradual reduction using Magerl's external fixator followed by circumferential fusion technique and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampalis, Christos; Grevitt, Michael; Shafafy, Masood; Webb, John

    2012-05-01

    To report the results of a cohort of patients treated with this technique high lighting radiological and functional outcomes, discussing also benefits arising from a gradual reduction procedure compared with other techniques. We evaluated nine patients who have undergone high-grade listhesis reduction and circumferential fusion at our institution from 1988 to 2006. Average length of follow-up was 11 years (5-19). Functional outcomes and radiological measurements were recorded and reported. Slip magnitude was reduced by an average of 2.9 grades (Meyerding classification). Slip angle improved by an average of 66% (p = 0.0001), lumbosacral angle by 47% (p = 0.0002), sacral rotation by 51% (p = 0.0068) and sacral inclination by 47% (p = 0.0055). At the latest follow-up 88.9% had achieved solid fusion. Post-operative 10-point Visual Analogue Score (VAS) for back pain had improved by 70% (p Average postoperative Oswestry Disability Index for all patients was 8% (range 0-16%) and that for Low Back Outcome Scores was 56.6 (range 44-70). All components of Short Form 36 Health Survey were greater than 80%. Overall patients' expectations were met in 100%. This is an effective and safe technique which addresses the lumbosacral kyphosis and cosmetic deformity without the neurological complications which accompany other reduction and fusion techniques for high-grade spondylolisthesis.

  20. Role of sedimentary organic matter in bacterial sulfate reduction: the G model tested

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, J.T.; Berner, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory study of the bacterial decomposition of Long Island Sound plankton in oxygenated seawater over a period of 2 years shows that the organic material undergoes decomposition via first-order kinetics and can be divided into two decomposable fractions, of considerably different reactivity, and a nonmetabolized fraction. This planktonic material, after undergoing varying degrees of oxic degradation, was added in the laboratory to anoxic sediment taken from a depth of 1 m at the NWC site of Long Island Sound and the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in the sediment measured by the 35 S radiotracer technique. The stimulated rate of sulfate reduction was in direct proportion to the amount of planktonic carbon added. This provides direct confirmation of the first-order decomposition, or G model, for marine sediments and proves that the in situ rate of sulfate reduction is organic-matter limited. Slower sulfate reduction rates resulted when oxically degraded plankton rather than fresh plankton was added, and the results confirm the presence of the same two fractions of organic matter deduced from the oxic degradation studies. Near-surface Long Island Sound sediment, which already contains abundant readily decomposable organic matter, was also subjected to anoxic decomposition by bacterial sulfate reduction. The decrease in sulfate reduction rate with time parallels decreases in the amount of organic matter, and these results also indicate the presence of two fractions of organic carbon of distinctly different reactivity. From plots of the log of reduction rate vs. time two first-order rate constants were obtained that agree well with those derived from the plankton addition experiment. Together, the two experiments confirm the use of a simple multi-first-order rate law for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments

  1. The calm mouse: an animal model of stress reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurfein, Blake T; Stamm, Andrew W; Bacchetti, Peter; Dallman, Mary F; Nadkarni, Nachiket A; Milush, Jeffrey M; Touma, Chadi; Palme, Rupert; Di Borgo, Charles Pozzo; Fromentin, Gilles; Lown-Hecht, Rachel; Konsman, Jan Pieter; Acree, Michael; Premenko-Lanier, Mary; Darcel, Nicolas; Hecht, Frederick M; Nixon, Douglas F

    2012-05-09

    Chronic stress is associated with negative health outcomes and is linked with neuroendocrine changes, deleterious effects on innate and adaptive immunity, and central nervous system neuropathology. Although stress management is commonly advocated clinically, there is insufficient mechanistic understanding of how decreasing stress affects disease pathogenesis. Therefore, we have developed a "calm mouse model" with caging enhancements designed to reduce murine stress. Male BALB/c mice were divided into four groups: control (Cntl), standard caging; calm (Calm), large caging to reduce animal density, a cardboard nest box for shelter, paper nesting material to promote innate nesting behavior, and a polycarbonate tube to mimic tunneling; control exercise (Cntl Ex), standard caging with a running wheel, known to reduce stress; and calm exercise (Calm Ex), calm caging with a running wheel. Calm, Cntl Ex and Calm Ex animals exhibited significantly less corticosterone production than Cntl animals. We also observed changes in spleen mass, and in vitro splenocyte studies demonstrated that Calm Ex animals had innate and adaptive immune responses that were more sensitive to acute handling stress than those in Cntl. Calm animals gained greater body mass than Cntl, although they had similar food intake, and we also observed changes in body composition, using magnetic resonance imaging. Together, our results suggest that the Calm mouse model represents a promising approach to studying the biological effects of stress reduction in the context of health and in conjunction with existing disease models.

  2. A comparative study of dimensionality reduction techniques to enhance trace clustering performances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, M.S.; Yang, H.; Siadat, S.H.; Pechenizkiy, M.

    2013-01-01

    Process mining techniques have been used to analyze event logs from information systems in order to derive useful patterns. However, in the big data era, real-life event logs are huge, unstructured, and complex so that traditional process mining techniques have difficulties in the analysis of big

  3. Modification of the radiological technique of Parma for reduction of irradiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfel, G.; Ionesco-Farco, F.

    1982-04-01

    A modified radiological technique to demonstrate the temporo-mandibular joint is presented. An ordinary X-ray tube put on the skin is directed 10/sup 0/ dorso-ventrally and 10/sup 0/ caudo-cranially to the temporo-mandibular joint. The irradiation skin dose applied is ten times smaller than by using the conventional contact technique.

  4. Assessment of current techniques for reduction of indoor radon concentration in existing and new houses in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, O.; Arvela, H.

    2012-03-01

    Radon control technologies aim at the reduction of indoor radon concentrations in existing buildings and in new construction through remedial and preventive measures. In recent years, rising ecological awareness and rising energy costs have stimulated the development of low energy and passive houses to save energy. This report contains the analysis and assessment of current techniques and technologies used to achieve the reduction of indoor radon concentrations in existing and new houses with regard to the reduction efficiency and potential impact on energy consumption (qualitative analysis). A questionnaire was prepared and sent to all RADPAR partners in 14 different countries in order to gather national information about the current remediation and prevention techniques. Responses with variable amounts of information were obtained. Based on the questionnaire responses, the status of radon remediation and prevention in each country was assessed, in addition to the reduction efficiency and potential impact on energy consumption of the current remediation and prevention techniques. The number of dwellings with an elevated indoor radon concentration typically ranges from tens of thousands to a million. The percentage of these houses already remediated varies from zero to 15%. Preventive measures in new construction have been taken from a small number of houses to over half a million houses. The research data on the current situation, the number of houses with preventive measures and the efficiency of these measures is currently still quite inadequate. Assessment of the techniques and also the surveys aiming at exploring the impact of remedial and preventive measures is greatly needed in order to promote the work at the national level. The most efficient remediation method is the active sub-slab depressurization (SSD) and the radon well, for which the reduction in the radon concentration is typically 70 - 95%. Other methods, such as sealing entry routes and improving

  5. Reduction of Under-Determined Linear Systems by Sparce Block Matrix Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp-Johansen, Niels Jacob; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Damkilde, Lars

    1996-01-01

    numerical stability of the aforementioned reduction. Moreover the coefficient matrix for the equilibrium equations is typically very sparse. The objective is to deal efficiently with the full pivoting reduction of sparse rectangular matrices using a dynamic storage scheme based on the block matrix concept.......Under-determined linear equation systems occur in different engineering applications. In structural engineering they typically appear when applying the force method. As an example one could mention limit load analysis based on The Lower Bound Theorem. In this application there is a set of under......-determined equilibrium equation restrictions in an LP-problem. A significant reduction of computer time spent on solving the LP-problem is achieved if the equilib rium equations are reduced before going into the optimization procedure. Experience has shown that for some structures one must apply full pivoting to ensure...

  6. A probabilistic evaluation procedure for process model matching techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuss, Elena; Leopold, Henrik; van der Aa, Han; Stuckenschmidt, Heiner; Reijers, Hajo A.

    2018-01-01

    Process model matching refers to the automatic identification of corresponding activities between two process models. It represents the basis for many advanced process model analysis techniques such as the identification of similar process parts or process model search. A central problem is how to

  7. Passive Techniques for Fan Noise Reduction in New Turbofan Engines: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Gorj-Bandpy

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the various environmental concerns, the aircraft noise item has been constantly growing in importance over the past years. Measures for its reduction at the source as well its mitigation around airports must take into account aspects of medicine and technical design as well as legal and land use planning aspects. Fan noise is one of the principal noise sources in turbofan aero-engines. In this paper a review of the main technologies employed for the reduction of fan noise turbofan engines is presented.

  8. Large-scale inverse model analyses employing fast randomized data reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; Le, Ellen B.; O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Bui-Thanh, Tan

    2017-08-01

    When the number of observations is large, it is computationally challenging to apply classical inverse modeling techniques. We have developed a new computationally efficient technique for solving inverse problems with a large number of observations (e.g., on the order of 107 or greater). Our method, which we call the randomized geostatistical approach (RGA), is built upon the principal component geostatistical approach (PCGA). We employ a data reduction technique combined with the PCGA to improve the computational efficiency and reduce the memory usage. Specifically, we employ a randomized numerical linear algebra technique based on a so-called "sketching" matrix to effectively reduce the dimension of the observations without losing the information content needed for the inverse analysis. In this way, the computational and memory costs for RGA scale with the information content rather than the size of the calibration data. Our algorithm is coded in Julia and implemented in the MADS open-source high-performance computational framework (http://mads.lanl.gov). We apply our new inverse modeling method to invert for a synthetic transmissivity field. Compared to a standard geostatistical approach (GA), our method is more efficient when the number of observations is large. Most importantly, our method is capable of solving larger inverse problems than the standard GA and PCGA approaches. Therefore, our new model inversion method is a powerful tool for solving large-scale inverse problems. The method can be applied in any field and is not limited to hydrogeological applications such as the characterization of aquifer heterogeneity.

  9. A new role for reduction in pressure drop in cyclones using computational fluid dynamics techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Noriler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a new mechanical device to improve the gas flow in cyclones by pressure drop reduction is presented and discussed. This behavior occurs due to the effects of introducing swirling breakdown phenomenon at the inlet of the vortex finder tube. The device consists of a tube with two gas inlets in an appositive spiral flux that produces a sudden reduction in the tangential velocity peak responsible for practically 80 % of the pressure drop in cyclones. In turn, peak reduction causes a decrease in pressure drop by a breakdown of the swirling, and because of this the solid particles tend to move faster toward the wall , increasing collection efficiency. As a result of this phenomenon the overall performance of cyclones is improved. Numerical simulations with 3-D, transient, asymmetric and anisotropic turbulence closure by differential Reynolds stress for Lapple and Stairmand standard geometries of 0.3 m in diameter, show a reduction in pressure drop of 20 % and a shift of the tangential velocity peak toward the wall. All numerical experiments were carried out with a commercial CFD code showing numerical stability and good convergence rates with high-order interpolation schemes, SIMPLEC pressure-velocity coupling and other numerical features.

  10. Implementation of variance-reduction techniques for Monte Carlo nuclear logging calculations with neutron sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for nuclear logging applications are considered to be highly demanding transport problems. In this paper, the implementation of weight-window variance reduction schemes in a 'manual' fashion to improve the efficiency of calculations for a neutron logging tool is presented.

  11. Vehicle Lightweighting: Mass Reduction Spectrum Analysis and Process Cost Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarin, Anthony [IBIS Associates, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States); Hannibal, Ted [IBIS Associates, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States); Raghunathan, Anand [Energetics Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Ivanic, Ziga [Energetics Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Clark, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office, Materials area commissioned a study to model and assess manufacturing economics of alternative design and production strategies for a series of lightweight vehicle concepts. In the first two phases of this effort examined combinations of strategies aimed at achieving strategic targets of 40% and a 45% mass reduction relative to a standard North American midsize passenger sedan at an effective cost of $3.42 per pound (lb) saved. These results have been reported in the Idaho National Laboratory report INL/EXT-14-33863 entitled Vehicle Lightweighting: 40% and 45% Weight Savings Analysis: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting published in March 2015. The data for these strategies were drawn from many sources, including Lotus Engineering Limited and FEV, Inc. lightweighting studies, U.S. Department of Energy-funded Vehma International of America, Inc./Ford Motor Company Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Demonstration Project, the Aluminum Association Transportation Group, many United States Council for Automotive Research’s/United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC lightweight materials programs, and IBIS Associates, Inc.’s decades of experience in automotive lightweighting and materials substitution analyses.

  12. Hybrid CMS methods with model reduction for assembly of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Charbel

    1991-01-01

    Future on-orbit structures will be designed and built in several stages, each with specific control requirements. Therefore there must be a methodology which can predict the dynamic characteristics of the assembled structure, based on the dynamic characteristics of the subassemblies and their interfaces. The methodology developed by CSC to address this issue is Hybrid Component Mode Synthesis (HCMS). HCMS distinguishes itself from standard component mode synthesis algorithms in the following features: (1) it does not require the subcomponents to have displacement compatible models, which makes it ideal for analyzing the deployment of heterogeneous flexible multibody systems, (2) it incorporates a second-level model reduction scheme at the interface, which makes it much faster than other algorithms and therefore suitable for control purposes, and (3) it does answer specific questions such as 'how does the global fundamental frequency vary if I change the physical parameters of substructure k by a specified amount?'. Because it is based on an energy principle rather than displacement compatibility, this methodology can also help the designer to define an assembly process. Current and future efforts are devoted to applying the HCMS method to design and analyze docking and berthing procedures in orbital construction.

  13. Vehicle Lightweighting: Mass Reduction Spectrum Analysis and Process Cost Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarin, Anthony; Hannibal, Ted; Raghunathan, Anand; Ivanic, Ziga; Clark, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, Materials area commissioned a study to model and assess manufacturing economics of alternative design and production strategies for a series of lightweight vehicle concepts. In the first two phases of this effort examined combinations of strategies aimed at achieving strategic targets of 40% and a 45% mass reduction relative to a standard North American midsize passenger sedan at an effective cost of $3.42 per pound (lb) saved. These results have been reported in the Idaho National Laboratory report INL/EXT-14-33863 entitled Vehicle Lightweighting: 40% and 45% Weight Savings Analysis: Technical Cost Modeling for Vehicle Lightweighting published in March 2015. The data for these strategies were drawn from many sources, including Lotus Engineering Limited and FEV, Inc. lightweighting studies, U.S. Department of Energy-funded Vehma International of America, Inc./Ford Motor Company Multi-Material Lightweight Prototype Vehicle Demonstration Project, the Aluminum Association Transportation Group, many United States Council for Automotive Research's/United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC lightweight materials programs, and IBIS Associates, Inc.'s decades of experience in automotive lightweighting and materials substitution analyses.

  14. On order reduction in hydrogen isotope distillation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarigiannis, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The design integration of the fuel processing system for the next generation fusion reactor plants (such as ITER and beyond) requires the enhancement of safety features related to the operation of the system. The current drive for inherent safety of hazardous chemical plants warrants the minimization of active toxic or radioactive inventories and the identification of process pathways with minimal risk of accidental or routine releases. New mathematical and numerical tools have been developed for the dynamic simulation and optimization of the safety characteristics related to tritium in all its forms in the fusion fuel processing system. The separation of hydrogen isotopes by cryogenic distillation is a key process therein, due to the importance of the separation performance for the quality of the fuel mixture and the on site inventory, the increased energy requirements for cryogenic operation, and the high order of mathematical complexity required for accurate models, able to predict the transient as well as the steady state behavior of the process. The modeling methodology described here is a part of a new dynamic simulation code that captures the inventory dynamics of all the species in the fusion fuel processing plant. The significant reduction of the computational effort and time required by this code will permit designers to easily explore a variety of design and technology options and assess their impact on the overall power plant safety

  15. Teaching the Basics: Development and Validation of a Distal Radius Reduction and Casting Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Mark A; Fabricant, Peter D; Lawrence, J Todd R

    2017-09-01

    Approximately one-third of reduced pediatric distal radius fractures redisplace, resulting in further treatment. Two major modifiable risk factors for loss of reduction are reduction adequacy and cast quality. Closed reduction and immobilization of distal radius fractures is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education residency milestone. Teaching and assessing competency could be improved with a life-like simulation training tool. Our goal was to develop and validate a realistic distal radius fracture reduction and casting simulator as determined by (1) a questionnaire regarding the "realism" of the model and (2) the quantitative assessments of reduction time, residual angulation, and displacement. A distal radius fracture model was created with radiopaque bony segments and articulating elbows and shoulders. Simulated periosteum and internal deforming forces required proper reduction and casting techniques to achieve and maintain reduction. The forces required were estimated through an iterative process through feedback from experienced clinicians. Embedded monofilaments allowed for quantitative assessment of residual displacement and angulation through the use of fluoroscopy. Subjects were asked to perform closed reduction and apply a long arm fiberglass cast. Primary performance variables assessed included reduction time, residual angulation, and displacement. Secondary performance variables consisted of number of fluoroscopic images, casting time, and cast index (defined as the ratio of the internal width of the forearm cast in the sagittal plane to the internal width in the coronal plane at the fracture site). Subject grading was performed by two blinded reviewers. Interrater reliability was nearly perfect across all measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.94-0.99), thus disagreements in measurements were handled by averaging the assessed values. After completion the participants answered a Likert-based questionnaire regarding the

  16. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of humeral shaft fractures: a technique to aid fracture reduction and minimize complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Sohn, Hoon-Sang; Do, Nam-Hoon

    2012-10-01

    To introduce a modified operative technique for minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) for acute displaced humeral shaft fractures and to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes. : Prospective clinical series study. University hospital. Twenty-one patients with acute displaced humeral shaft fractures were treated by MIPO with a modified fracture reduction technique. A narrow 4.5/5.0-mm locking compression plate was applied to the anterior aspect of the humerus. Fracture reduction and manipulation were performed using a plate and drill bits. The operating time, time to union, humeral alignment, and functional outcome of the shoulder and elbow joints were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles shoulder score and Mayo elbow performance score. No patient experienced a neurological complication. Bony union was obtained in 20/21 patients at a mean 17.5 weeks postoperatively. Eighteen patients had excellent and 3 patients had good results in the University of California Los Angeles score. The average Mayo elbow performance score was 97.5. Two patients were converted to an open reduction during operation due to a failure of MIPO. There was 1 nonunion and 1 malunion in this series. Although the MIPO technique for humeral shaft fractures is technically demanding, satisfactory clinical outcomes in terms of bony union and shoulder and elbow function can be obtained using the modified fracture reduction method. Potential postoperative complications, such as malreduction and nonunion, must be considered. Appropriate surgical indications, a thorough understanding of the neurovascular anatomy and skillful surgical technique, are needed to reduce potential complications.

  17. PERFORMANCE EVOLUTION OF PAPR REDUCTION IN OFDM WITH AND WITHOUT LDPC TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Punit Upmanyu*; Prof. Saurabh Gaur

    2016-01-01

    The OFDM is one of the proven multicarrier modulation techniques, which provides high spectral efficiency, low implementation complexity, less vulnerability to echoes and non-linear distortion. Apart from the above advantages presently this technique is used by almost all wireless standards and above. The one major shortcoming in the implementation of this system is the high PAPR (peak-to-average power ratio) of this system. In this paper, Irregular Low-Density-Parity Check encoder is used ef...

  18. Process techniques of charge transfer time reduction for high speed CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhongxiang; Li Quanliang; Han Ye; Qin Qi; Feng Peng; Liu Liyuan; Wu Nanjian

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes pixel process techniques to reduce the charge transfer time in high speed CMOS image sensors. These techniques increase the lateral conductivity of the photo-generated carriers in a pinned photodiode (PPD) and the voltage difference between the PPD and the floating diffusion (FD) node by controlling and optimizing the N doping concentration in the PPD and the threshold voltage of the reset transistor, respectively. The techniques shorten the charge transfer time from the PPD diode to the FD node effectively. The proposed process techniques do not need extra masks and do not cause harm to the fill factor. A sub array of 32 × 64 pixels was designed and implemented in the 0.18 μm CIS process with five implantation conditions splitting the N region in the PPD. The simulation and measured results demonstrate that the charge transfer time can be decreased by using the proposed techniques. Comparing the charge transfer time of the pixel with the different implantation conditions of the N region, the charge transfer time of 0.32 μs is achieved and 31% of image lag was reduced by using the proposed process techniques. (semiconductor devices)

  19. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong-Ho Park, Xin Zhang, Seon-Yong Hwang, Sang Hyun Jung, Semin Kang, Hyun-Beom Shin, Ho Kwan Kang, Hyung-Ho Park, Ross H Hill and Chul Ki Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL. The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm−2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  20. Simple and cost-effective fabrication of size-tunable zinc oxide architectures by multiple size reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyeong-Ho; Hwang, Seon-Yong; Jung, Sang Hyun; Kang, Semin; Shin, Hyun-Beom; Kang, Ho Kwan; Ko, Chul Ki; Zhang Xin; Hill, Ross H; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple size reduction technique for fabricating 400 nm zinc oxide (ZnO) architectures using a silicon master containing only microscale architectures. In this approach, the overall fabrication, from the master to the molds and the final ZnO architectures, features cost-effective UV photolithography, instead of electron beam lithography or deep-UV photolithography. A photosensitive Zn-containing sol–gel precursor was used to imprint architectures by direct UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL). The resulting Zn-containing architectures were then converted to ZnO architectures with reduced feature sizes by thermal annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. The imprinted and annealed ZnO architectures were also used as new masters for the size reduction technique. ZnO pillars of 400 nm diameter were obtained from a silicon master with pillars of 1000 nm diameter by simply repeating the size reduction technique. The photosensitivity and contrast of the Zn-containing precursor were measured as 6.5 J cm −2 and 16.5, respectively. Interesting complex ZnO patterns, with both microscale pillars and nanoscale holes, were demonstrated by the combination of dose-controlled UV exposure and a two-step UV-NIL.

  1. Modelling stillbirth mortality reduction with the Lives Saved Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Blencowe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The worldwide burden of stillbirths is large, with an estimated 2.6 million babies stillborn in 2015 including 1.3 million dying during labour. The Every Newborn Action Plan set a stillbirth target of ≤12 per 1000 in all countries by 2030. Planning tools will be essential as countries set policy and plan investment to scale up interventions to meet this target. This paper summarises the approach taken for modelling the impact of scaling-up health interventions on stillbirths in the Lives Saved tool (LiST, and potential future refinements. Methods The specific application to stillbirths of the general method for modelling the impact of interventions in LiST is described. The evidence for the effectiveness of potential interventions to reduce stillbirths are reviewed and the assumptions of the affected fraction of stillbirths who could potentially benefit from these interventions are presented. The current assumptions and their effects on stillbirth reduction are described and potential future improvements discussed. Results High quality evidence are not available for all parameters in the LiST stillbirth model. Cause-specific mortality data is not available for stillbirths, therefore stillbirths are modelled in LiST using an attributable fraction approach by timing of stillbirths (antepartum/ intrapartum. Of 35 potential interventions to reduce stillbirths identified, eight interventions are currently modelled in LiST. These include childbirth care, induction for prolonged pregnancy, multiple micronutrient and balanced energy supplementation, malaria prevention and detection and management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, diabetes and syphilis. For three of the interventions, childbirth care, detection and management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and diabetes the estimate of effectiveness is based on expert opinion through a Delphi process. Only for malaria is coverage information available, with coverage

  2. EXCHANGE-RATES FORECASTING: EXPONENTIAL SMOOTHING TECHNIQUES AND ARIMA MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezsi Eva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Exchange rates forecasting is, and has been a challenging task in finance. Statistical and econometrical models are widely used in analysis and forecasting of foreign exchange rates. This paper investigates the behavior of daily exchange rates of the Romanian Leu against the Euro, United States Dollar, British Pound, Japanese Yen, Chinese Renminbi and the Russian Ruble. Smoothing techniques are generated and compared with each other. These models include the Simple Exponential Smoothing technique, as the Double Exponential Smoothing technique, the Simple Holt-Winters, the Additive Holt-Winters, namely the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average model.

  3. On a Graphical Technique for Evaluating Some Rational Expectations Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren; Swensen, Anders R.

    2011-01-01

    Campbell and Shiller (1987) proposed a graphical technique for the present value model, which consists of plotting estimates of the spread and theoretical spread as calculated from the cointegrated vector autoregressive model without imposing the restrictions implied by the present value model....... In addition to getting a visual impression of the fit of the model, the purpose is to see if the two spreads are nevertheless similar as measured by correlation, variance ratio, and noise ratio. We extend these techniques to a number of rational expectation models and give a general definition of spread...

  4. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  5. Technique Based on Image Pyramid and Bayes Rule for Noise Reduction in Unsupervised Change Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-qiang; HUO hong; FANG Tao; ZHU Ju-lian; GE Wei-li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a technique based on image pyramid and Bayes rule for reducing noise effects in unsupervised change detection is proposed. By using Gaussian pyramid to process two multitemporal images respectively, two image pyramids are constructed. The difference pyramid images are obtained by point-by-point subtraction between the same level images of the two image pyramids. By resizing all difference pyramid images to the size of the original multitemporal image and then making product operator among them, a map being similar to the difference image is obtained. The difference image is generated by point-by-point subtraction between the two multitemporal images directly. At last, the Bayes rule is used to distinguish the changed pixels. Both synthetic and real data sets are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. Experimental results show that the map from the proposed technique is more robust to noise than the difference image.

  6. Modelling of catalytic oxidation of NH3 and reduction of NO on limestone during sulphur capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Bhatia, Suresh K.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    activity with respect to each species involved. An existing particle model, the Grain-Micrograin Model, which simulates sulphur capture on limestone under oxidizing conditions is considered in the modelling. Simulation results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data are obtained here......A theoretical study of the complex transient system of simultaneous sulphur capture and catalytic reactions of N-containing compounds taking place on a single limestone particle is conducted. The numerical technique developed previously by the authors (Kiil et al. 1994) based on collocation...... for the catalytic chemistry of NH3 during simultaneous sulphur capture on a Stevns Chalk particle. The reduction of NO by NH3 over CaSO4 (which is the product of the reaction between SO2, O2 and limestone) was found to be important because this reaction could explain the change in selectivity with increased solid...

  7. Efficient Analysis of Structures with Rotatable Elements Using Model Order Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fotyga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel full-wave technique which allows for a fast 3D finite element analysis of waveguide structures containing rotatable tuning elements of arbitrary shapes. Rotation of these elements changes the resonant frequencies of the structure, which can be used in the tuning process to obtain the S-characteristics desired for the device. For fast commutations of the response as the tuning elements are rotated, the 3D finite element method is supported by multilevel model-order reduction, orthogonal projection at the boundaries of macromodels and the operation called macromodels cloning. All the time-consuming steps are performed only once in the preparatory stage. In the tuning stage, only small parts of the domain are updated, by means of a special meshing technique. In effect, the tuning process is performed extremely rapidly. The results of the numerical experiments confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method.

  8. Reduction methods and uncertainty analysis: application to a Chemistry-Transport Model for modeling and simulation of impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutahar, Jaouad

    2004-01-01

    In an integrated impact assessment, one has to test several scenarios of the model inputs or/and to identify the effects of model input uncertainties on the model outputs. In both cases, a large number of simulations of the model is necessary. That of course is not feasible with comprehensive Chemistry-Transport Model, due to the need for huge CPU times. Two approaches may be used in order to circumvent these difficulties: The first approach consists in reducing the computational cost of the original model by building a reduced model. Two reduction techniques are used: the first method, POD, is related to the statistical behaviour of the system and is based on a proper orthogonal decomposition of the solutions. The second method, is an efficient representation of the input/output behaviour through look-up tables. It describes the output model as an expansion of finite hierarchical correlated function in terms of the input variables. The second approach is based on reducing the number of models runs required by the standard Monte Carlo methods. It characterizes the probabilistic response of the uncertain model output as an expansion of orthogonal polynomials according to model inputs uncertainties. Then the classical Monte Carlo simulation can easily be used to compute the probability density of the uncertain output. Another key point in an integrated impact assessment is to develop strategies for the reduction of emissions by computing Source/Receptor matrices for several years of simulations. We proposed here an efficient method to calculate these matrices by using the adjoint model and in particular by defining the 'representative chemical day'. All of these methods are applied to POLAIR3D, a Chemistry-Transport model developed in this thesis. (author) [fr

  9. Fast uncertainty reduction strategies relying on Gaussian process models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, Clement

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with sequential and batch-sequential evaluation strategies of real-valued functions under limited evaluation budget, using Gaussian process models. Optimal Stepwise Uncertainty Reduction (SUR) strategies are investigated for two different problems, motivated by real test cases in nuclear safety. First we consider the problem of identifying the excursion set above a given threshold T of a real-valued function f. Then we study the question of finding the set of 'safe controlled configurations', i.e. the set of controlled inputs where the function remains below T, whatever the value of some others non-controlled inputs. New SUR strategies are presented, together with efficient procedures and formulas to compute and use them in real world applications. The use of fast formulas to recalculate quickly the posterior mean or covariance function of a Gaussian process (referred to as the 'kriging update formulas') does not only provide substantial computational savings. It is also one of the key tools to derive closed form formulas enabling a practical use of computationally-intensive sampling strategies. A contribution in batch-sequential optimization (with the multi-points Expected Improvement) is also presented. (author)

  10. Layout-Driven Post-Placement Techniques for Temperature Reduction and Thermal Gradient Minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Calimera, Andrea; Macii, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    With the continuing scaling of CMOS technology, on-chip temperature and thermal-induced variations have become a major design concern. To effectively limit the high temperature in a chip equipped with a cost-effective cooling system, thermal specific approaches, besides low power techniques, are ...

  11. Chaparral shrub recovery after fuel reduction: a comparison of prescribed fire and mastication techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Potts; E. Marino; S. Stephens

    2010-01-01

    Fuel management techniques are commonly used in shrublands to reduce wildfire risk. However, more information about the ecological effects of these treatments is needed by managers and ecologists. In an effort to address this need, we performed a replicated (4 replicates per treatment) 48-ha experiment in northern California chaparral dominated by Adenostoma...

  12. Mesh refinement for uncertainty quantification through model reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Stinis, Panos

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel way of deciding when and where to refine a mesh in probability space in order to facilitate uncertainty quantification in the presence of discontinuities in random space. A discontinuity in random space makes the application of generalized polynomial chaos expansion techniques prohibitively expensive. The reason is that for discontinuous problems, the expansion converges very slowly. An alternative to using higher terms in the expansion is to divide the random space in smaller elements where a lower degree polynomial is adequate to describe the randomness. In general, the partition of the random space is a dynamic process since some areas of the random space, particularly around the discontinuity, need more refinement than others as time evolves. In the current work we propose a way to decide when and where to refine the random space mesh based on the use of a reduced model. The idea is that a good reduced model can monitor accurately, within a random space element, the cascade of activity to higher degree terms in the chaos expansion. In turn, this facilitates the efficient allocation of computational sources to the areas of random space where they are more needed. For the Kraichnan–Orszag system, the prototypical system to study discontinuities in random space, we present theoretical results which show why the proposed method is sound and numerical results which corroborate the theory

  13. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  14. Oxygen reduction kinetics on mixed conducting SOFC model cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, F.S.

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction at the surface of mixed conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes is one of the main limiting factors to the performance of these promising systems. For ''realistic'' porous electrodes, however, it is usually very difficult to separate the influence of different resistive processes. Therefore, a suitable, geometrically well-defined model system was used in this work to enable an unambiguous distinction of individual electrochemical processes by means of impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical measurements were performed on dense thin film microelectrodes, prepared by PLD and photolithography, of mixed conducting perovskite-type materials. The first part of the thesis consists of an extensive impedance spectroscopic investigation of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3 (LSCF) microelectrodes. An equivalent circuit was identified that describes the electrochemical properties of the model electrodes appropriately and enables an unambiguous interpretation of the measured impedance spectra. Hence, the dependencies of individual electrochemical processes such as the surface exchange reaction on a wide range of experimental parameters including temperature, dc bias and oxygen partial pressure could be studied. As a result, a comprehensive set of experimental data has been obtained, which was previously not available for a mixed conducting model system. In the course of the experiments on the dc bias dependence of the electrochemical processes a new and surprising effect was discovered: It could be shown that a short but strong dc polarisation of a LSCF microelectrode at high temperature improves its electrochemical performance with respect to the oxygen reduction reaction drastically. The electrochemical resistance associated with the oxygen surface exchange reaction, initially the dominant contribution to the total electrode resistance, can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. This &apos

  15. Cost analysis of soil-depressurization techniques for indoor radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The article discusses a parametric cost analysis to evaluate active soil depressurization (ASD) systems for indoor radon reduction in houses. The analysis determined the relative importance of 14 ASD design variables and 2 operating variables on the installation and operating costs of residential ASD systems in several types of houses. Knowledge of the most important variables would enable EPA's research and development efforts to be more effectively directed at ways to reduce ASD costs and thus to increase utilization of the technology. Parameters offering the greatest potential for reductions in installation costs included three dealing with houses with poor subslab communication: (1) reducing the number of subslab depressurization pipes; (2) eliminating excavation of large subslab pits beneath the suction pipes to improve suction field extension; and (3) improving the effectiveness of premitigation subslab communication diagnostic testing in achieving simpler, less expensive ASD system designs. In addition, determining acceptable conditions for discharging ASD exhaust at grade level would reduce installation costs. Better design guidance for crawl-space submembrane depressurization (SMD) systems could reduce installation costs, if difficult membrane sealing steps and complete coverage of the crawl-space floor by the membrane can be avoided

  16. Consistent model reduction of polymer chains in solution in dissipative particle dynamics: Model description

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno Chaparro, Nicolas

    2015-06-30

    We introduce a framework for model reduction of polymer chain models for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, where the properties governing the phase equilibria such as the characteristic size of the chain, compressibility, density, and temperature are preserved. The proposed methodology reduces the number of degrees of freedom required in traditional DPD representations to model equilibrium properties of systems with complex molecules (e.g., linear polymers). Based on geometrical considerations we explicitly account for the correlation between beads in fine-grained DPD models and consistently represent the effect of these correlations in a reduced model, in a practical and simple fashion via power laws and the consistent scaling of the simulation parameters. In order to satisfy the geometrical constraints in the reduced model we introduce bond-angle potentials that account for the changes in the chain free energy after the model reduction. Following this coarse-graining process we represent high molecular weight DPD chains (i.e., ≥200≥200 beads per chain) with a significant reduction in the number of particles required (i.e., ≥20≥20 times the original system). We show that our methodology has potential applications modeling systems of high molecular weight molecules at large scales, such as diblock copolymer and DNA.

  17. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction Technique for the Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K; Kuo, H; Ritter, J; Shen, J; Basavatia, A; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S; Tome, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a metal artifact reduction technique in depleting metal artifact and its application in improving dose calculation in External Radiation Therapy Planning. Methods: CIRS electron density phantom was scanned with and without steel drill bits placed in some plug holes. Meta artifact reduction software with Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) was used to remove metal artifacts for scanned image with metal. Hounsfield units of electron density plugs from artifact free reference image and MDT processed images were compared. To test the dose calculation improvement after the MDT processed images, clinically approved head and neck plan with manual dental artifact correction was tested. Patient images were exported and processed with MDT and plan was recalculated with new MDT image without manual correction. Dose profiles near the metal artifacts were compared. Results: The MDT used in this study effectively reduced the metal artifact caused by beam hardening and scatter. The windmill around the metal drill was greatly improved with smooth rounded view. Difference of the mean HU in each density plug between reference and MDT images were less than 10 HU in most of the plugs. Dose difference between original plan and MDT images were minimal. Conclusion: Most metal artifact reduction methods were developed for diagnostic improvement purpose. Hence Hounsfield unit accuracy was not rigorously tested before. In our test, MDT effectively eliminated metal artifacts with good HU reproduciblity. However, it can introduce new mild artifacts so the MDT images should be checked with original images

  18. Pre-concentration technique for reduction in "Analytical instrument requirement and analysis"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sangita; Singha, Mousumi; Meena, Sher Singh

    2018-04-01

    Availability of analytical instruments for a methodical detection of known and unknown effluents imposes a serious hindrance in qualification and quantification. Several analytical instruments such as Elemental analyzer, ICP-MS, ICP-AES, EDXRF, ion chromatography, Electro-analytical instruments which are not only expensive but also time consuming, required maintenance, damaged essential parts replacement which are of serious concern. Move over for field study and instant detection installation of these instruments are not convenient to each and every place. Therefore, technique such as pre-concentration of metal ions especially for lean stream elaborated and justified. Chelation/sequestration is the key of immobilization technique which is simple, user friendly, most effective, least expensive, time efficient; easy to carry (10g - 20g vial) to experimental field/site has been demonstrated.

  19. A noise reduction technique based on nonlinear kernel function for heart sound analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ashok; Saxena, Ishan; Tang, Hong; Banerjee, Poulami

    2017-02-13

    The main difficulty encountered in interpretation of cardiac sound is interference of noise. The contaminated noise obscures the relevant information which are useful for recognition of heart diseases. The unwanted signals are produced mainly by lungs and surrounding environment. In this paper, a novel heart sound de-noising technique has been introduced based on a combined framework of wavelet packet transform (WPT) and singular value decomposition (SVD). The most informative node of wavelet tree is selected on the criteria of mutual information measurement. Next, the coefficient corresponding to the selected node is processed by SVD technique to suppress noisy component from heart sound signal. To justify the efficacy of the proposed technique, several experiments have been conducted with heart sound dataset, including normal and pathological cases at different signal to noise ratios. The significance of the method is validated by statistical analysis of the results. The biological information preserved in de-noised heart sound (HS) signal is evaluated by k-means clustering algorithm and Fit Factor calculation. The overall results show that proposed method is superior than the baseline methods.

  20. Air flow measurement techniques applied to noise reduction of a centrifugal blower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laage, John W.; Armstrong, Ashli J.; Eilers, Daniel J.; Olsen, Michael G.; Mann, J. Adin

    2005-09-01

    The air flow in a centrifugal blower was studied using a variety of flow and sound measurement techniques. The flow measurement techniques employed included Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), pitot tubes, and a five hole spherical probe. PIV was used to measure instantaneous and ensemble-averaged velocity fields over large area of the outlet duct as a function of fan position, allowing for the visualization of the flow as it leave the fan blades and progressed downstream. The results from the flow measurements were reviewed along side the results of the sound measurements with the goal of identifying sources of noise and inefficiencies in flow performance. The radiated sound power was divided into broadband and tone noise and measures of the flow. The changes in the tone and broadband sound were compared to changes in flow quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress. Results for each method will be presented to demonstrate the strengths of each flow measurement technique as well as their limitations. Finally, the role that each played in identifying noise sources is described.

  1. Circuit oriented electromagnetic modeling using the PEEC techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ruehli, Albert; Jiang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    This book provides intuitive solutions to electromagnetic problems by using the Partial Eelement Eequivalent Ccircuit (PEEC) method. This book begins with an introduction to circuit analysis techniques, laws, and frequency and time domain analyses. The authors also treat Maxwell's equations, capacitance computations, and inductance computations through the lens of the PEEC method. Next, readers learn to build PEEC models in various forms: equivalent circuit models, non orthogonal PEEC models, skin-effect models, PEEC models for dielectrics, incident and radiate field models, and scattering PEEC models. The book concludes by considering issues like such as stability and passivity, and includes five appendices some with formulas for partial elements.

  2. [Intestinal lengthening techniques: an experimental model in dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibay González, Francisco; Díaz Martínez, Daniel Alberto; Valencia Flores, Alejandro; González Hernández, Miguel Angel

    2005-01-01

    To compare two intestinal lengthening procedures in an experimental dog model. Intestinal lengthening is one of the methods for gastrointestinal reconstruction used for treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modification to the Bianchi's technique is an alternative. The modified technique decreases the number of anastomoses to a single one, thus reducing the risk of leaks and strictures. To our knowledge there is not any clinical or experimental report that studied both techniques, so we realized the present report. Twelve creole dogs were operated with the Bianchi technique for intestinal lengthening (group A) and other 12 creole dogs from the same race and weight were operated by the modified technique (Group B). Both groups were compared in relation to operating time, difficulties in technique, cost, intestinal lengthening and anastomoses diameter. There were no statistical difference in the anastomoses diameter (A = 9.0 mm vs. B = 8.5 mm, p = 0.3846). Operating time (142 min vs. 63 min) cost and technique difficulties were lower in group B (p anastomoses (of Group B) and intestinal segments had good blood supply and were patent along their full length. Bianchi technique and the modified technique offer two good reliable alternatives for the treatment of short bowel syndrome. The modified technique improved operating time, cost and technical issues.

  3. Dry-plasma-free chemical etch technique for variability reduction in multi-patterning (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Subhadeep; Mohanty, Nihar; Farrell, Richard A.; Franke, Elliott; Raley, Angelique; Thibaut, Sophie; Pereira, Cheryl; Pillai, Karthik; Ko, Akiteru; Mosden, Aelan; Biolsi, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Scaling beyond the 7nm technology node demands significant control over the variability down to a few angstroms, in order to achieve reasonable yield. For example, to meet the current scaling targets it is highly desirable to achieve sub 30nm pitch line/space features at back-end of the line (BEOL) or front end of line (FEOL); uniform and precise contact/hole patterning at middle of line (MOL). One of the quintessential requirements for such precise and possibly self-aligned patterning strategies is superior etch selectivity between the target films while other masks/films are exposed. The need to achieve high etch selectivity becomes more evident for unit process development at MOL and BEOL, as a result of low density films choices (compared to FEOL film choices) due to lower temperature budget. Low etch selectivity with conventional plasma and wet chemical etch techniques, causes significant gouging (un-intended etching of etch stop layer, as shown in Fig 1), high line edge roughness (LER)/line width roughness (LWR), non-uniformity, etc. In certain circumstances this may lead to added downstream process stochastics. Furthermore, conventional plasma etches may also have the added disadvantage of plasma VUV damage and corner rounding (Fig. 1). Finally, the above mentioned factors can potentially compromise edge placement error (EPE) and/or yield. Therefore a process flow enabled with extremely high selective etches inherent to film properties and/or etch chemistries is a significant advantage. To improve this etch selectivity for certain etch steps during a process flow, we have to implement alternate highly selective, plasma free techniques in conjunction with conventional plasma etches (Fig 2.). In this article, we will present our plasma free, chemical gas phase etch technique using chemistries that have high selectivity towards a spectrum of films owing to the reaction mechanism ( as shown Fig 1). Gas phase etches also help eliminate plasma damage to the

  4. Reduction of aflatoxins in dundi-cut whole red chillies (capsicum indicum)by manual sorting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Asghar, M.A.; Ahmed, A.; Iqbal, J.; Shamsuddin, Z.A.

    2013-01-01

    Dundi-cut whole red chillies (Capsicum indicum) are the most revenue- generating commodity of Pakistan. Accordingly, the competence and magnitude of manual hand-picked sorting of red chillies on the reduction of total aflatoxins (AFs) content were assessed during the present study. AFs contents were determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) technique. On the basis of AFs content, red chilli samples were grouped as Group A with 1 to 20 mu g/kg, Group B with 20 to 30?g/kg, Group C with 30-100?g/kg and Group D quality samples with 100 to 150g/kg. Physically identified defects including midget/dwarfed, damaged, broken, dusty and dirty were looked for and such pods were removed. A reduction of 90-100% of AFs was achieved in Group A, 65-80% in B, 65-75% in C and 70% in D quality samples. An average of 78% reduction in AFs content was achieved. Hence, the non-destructive physical hand-picked sorting of red chillies can be applied as a rapid, safe and cost effective method for the reduction of AFs content in red chillies with preserved nutritional values. (author)

  5. Installation and testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in 40 eastern Pennsylvania houses. Final report, October 1984-June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.G.; Robertson, A.; Findlay, W.O.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the installation and testing of indoor radon-reduction techniques in 40 houses in eastern Pennsylvania. Early in 1985, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (PDER) started a large radon survey in communities in the Reading Prong (a granite formation) in eastern Pennsylvania, following the discovery of a house with extremely high radon concentrations, greater than 1.2 MBq/cu m. Candidate houses for the program, with radon concentrations in excess of 750 Bq/cu m, were selected from this survey. A total of 40 houses with representative substructure types were chosen from this group, and mitigation methods were selected and installed from June 1985 to June 1987. Initial soil-ventilation installations achieved large reductions in radon concentrations at low cost, but these reductions were not always sustained in colder weather, and several systems were modified during the project to improve their performance. Major reductions in radon concentration were realized in all the houses worked on, with most houses with active soil ventilation systems achieving less than 150 Bq/cu m (4 pCi/L) on an annual average basis in the living areas

  6. Novel Power Reduction Technique for ReRAM with Automatic Avoidance Circuit for Wasteful Overwrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaya Handa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-power operations can be great advantageous for ReRAM devices. However, wasteful overwriting such as the SET operation to low-resistance state (LRS device and the RESET operation to high-resistance state (HRS device causes not only an increase in power but also the degradation of the write cycles due to repeatedly rewriting. Thus, in this paper, we proposed a novel automatic avoidance circuit for dealing with wasteful overwriting that uses a sense amplifier and estimated the energy consumption reduction rate by conducting a circuit simulation. As a result, this circuit helped to reliably avoid the wasteful overwriting operation to reduce about 99% and 97% of wasteful energy using VSRC and CSRC, respectively.

  7. Survey of Object-Based Data Reduction Techniques in Observational Astronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasik Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dealing with astronomical observations represents one of the most challenging areas of big data analytics. Besides huge variety of data types, dynamics related to continuous data flow from multiple sources, handling enormous volumes of data is essential. This paper provides an overview of methods aimed at reducing both the number of features/attributes as well as data instances. It concentrates on data mining approaches not related to instruments and observation tools instead working on processed object-based data. The main goal of this article is to describe existing datasets on which algorithms are frequently tested, to characterize and classify available data reduction algorithms and identify promising solutions capable of addressing present and future challenges in astronomy.

  8. The hematoma block: a simple, effective technique for closed reduction of ankle fracture dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Adrianne; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Management of a dislocated ankle fracture can be challenging because of instability of the ankle mortise, a compromised soft tissue envelope, and the potential neurovascular compromise. Every effort should be made to quickly and efficiently relocate the disrupted ankle joint. Within the emergency department setting, narcotics and benzodiazepines can be used to sedate the patient before attempting closed reduction. The combination of narcotics and benzodiazepines provides relief of pain and muscle guarding; however, it conveys a risk of seizure as well as respiratory arrest. An alternative to conscious sedation is the hematoma block, or an intra-articular local anesthetic injection in the ankle joint and the associated fracture hematoma. The hematoma block offers a comparable amount of analgesia to conscious sedation without the additional cardiovascular risk, hospital cost, and procedure time. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Leakage Reduction in Water Distribution Systems with Efficient Placement and Control of Pressure Reducing Valves Using Soft Computing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of leakages in a water distribution system (WDS is one of the major concerns of water industries. Leakages depend on pressure, hence installing pressure reducing valves (PRVs in the water network is a successful techniques for reducing leakages. Determining the number of valves, their locations, and optimal control setting are the challenges faced. This paper presents a new algorithm-based rule for determining the location of valves in a WDS having a variable demand pattern, which results in more favorable optimization of PRV localization than that caused by previous techniques. A multiobjective genetic algorithm (NSGA-II was used to determine the optimized control value of PRVs and to minimize the leakage rate in the WDS. Minimum required pressure was maintained at all nodes to avoid pressure deficiency at any node. Proposed methodology is applied in a benchmark WDS and after using PRVs, the average leakage rate was reduced by 6.05 l/s (20.64%, which is more favorable than the rate obtained with the existing techniques used for leakage control in the WDS. Compared with earlier studies, a lower number of PRVs was required for optimization, thus the proposed algorithm tends to provide a more cost-effective solution. In conclusion, the proposed algorithm leads to more favorable optimized localization and control of PRV with improved leakage reduction rate.

  10. Reduction of radiation doses in leg lengthening procedures by means of audit and computed tomography scanogram techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanowski, C.A.J.; Sprigg, A.; Underwood, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    Children with congenital bone dysplasias may benefit from leg lengthening procedures. Such procedures, by necessity, require frequent and regular imaging. It is necessary to minimize the total radiation dose to these patients, and particularly the dose to the gonads. In the present study, the films of 13 patients who had completed leg lengthening procedures were reviewed. The number of films was assessed together with the use of appropriate gonad shielding. In a second part of the study, thermoluminescent dosemeter measurements of radiation doses to a phantom were made for both plain radiographs (with and without gonad protection) and computed tomography (CT) scanograms. The results show that audit plays an important role in assessing radiographic practice with respect to accurate placement of gonad protection and confirm that a significant dose reduction can be accomplished by careful use of this lead shielding. Dose reduction can also be achieved by using alternative radiographic techniques such as CT scanograms. (author)

  11. Sliding mode controller gain adaptation and chattering reduction techniques for DSP-based PM DC motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal, Mehmet; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve and maintain the prospective benefits of sliding mode control (SMC) methodology, the phenomenon known as “chattering”, the main obstacle encountered in real-time applications, has to be suppressed. In this study, two promising switching control gain adaptation and chattering...... reduction techniques are investigated, and the effectiveness of chattering suppression for current regulation of PM DC drives is tested. The sampling rate was also examined to determine how it affects the amplitude of chattering. This paper concentrates on various combinations of observer-based methods...... in order to find the best solution for chattering reduction. To find a practical solution a tunable low-pass filter (LPF) was used to average the discontinuous control term. The validity of the existing conditions for the gain adaptation methods are examined and observer gain value was determined through...

  12. Mercury Concentration Reduction In Waste Water By Using Liquid Surfactant Membrane Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno; Sardjono, Joko

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this research is ti know effectiveness of liquid surfactant membrane in diminishing mercury found in waste water. This process can be regarded as transferring process of solved mercury from the external phase functioning as a moving phase to continue to the membrane internal one. The existence of the convection rotation results in the change of the surface pressure on the whole interface parts, so the solved mercury disperses on every interface part. Because of this rotation, the solved mercury will fulfil every space with particles from dispersion phase in accordance with its volume. Therefore, the change of the surface pressure on the whole interface parts can be kept stable to adsorb mercury. The mercury adsorbed in the internal phase moves to dispersed particles through molecule diffusion process. The liquid surfactant membrane technique in which the membrane phase is realized into emulsion contains os kerosene as solvent, sorbitan monoleat (span-80) 5 % (v/v) as surfactant, threbuthyl phosphate (TBP) 10 % (v/v) as extractant, and solved mercury as the internal phase. All of those things are mixed and stirred with 8000 rpm speed for 20 minutes. After the stability of emulsion is formed, the solved mercury is extracted by applying extraction process. The effective condition required to achieve mercury ion recovery utilizing this technique is obtained through extraction and re-extraction process. This process was conducted in 30 minutes with membrane and mercury in scale 1 : 1 on 100 ppm concentration. The results of the processes was 99,6 % efficiency. This high efficiency shows that the liquid surfactant membrane technique is very effective to reduce waste water contamined by mercury

  13. Stability Analysis and H∞ Model Reduction for Switched Discrete-Time Time-Delay Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Fan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of exponential stability and H∞ model reduction of a class of switched discrete-time systems with state time-varying delay. Some subsystems can be unstable. Based on the average dwell time technique and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF approach, sufficient conditions for exponential stability with H∞ performance of such systems are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. For the high-order systems, sufficient conditions for the existence of reduced-order model are derived in terms of LMIs. Moreover, the error system is guaranteed to be exponentially stable and an H∞ error performance is guaranteed. Numerical examples are also given to demonstrate the effectiveness and reduced conservatism of the obtained results.

  14. Modelling Technique for Demonstrating Gravity Collapse Structures in Jointed Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, B.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a base-friction modeling technique for studying the development of collapse structures in jointed rocks. A moving belt beneath weak material is designed to simulate gravity. A description is given of the model frame construction. (Author/SA)

  15. A pilot modeling technique for handling-qualities research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief survey of the more dominant analysis techniques used in closed-loop handling-qualities research is presented. These techniques are shown to rely on so-called classical and modern analytical models of the human pilot which have their foundation in the analysis and design principles of feedback control. The optimal control model of the human pilot is discussed in some detail and a novel approach to the a priori selection of pertinent model parameters is discussed. Frequency domain and tracking performance data from 10 pilot-in-the-loop simulation experiments involving 3 different tasks are used to demonstrate the parameter selection technique. Finally, the utility of this modeling approach in handling-qualities research is discussed.

  16. Summary on several key techniques in 3D geological modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized.

  17. Assessment of patient dose reduction when using AEC technique in toshiba 64 MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khojali, Wadah Mohamed Ali.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of research is to evaluate the efficiency of AEC (SUREDOSE) used in Toshiba CT scanner in reducing patient radiation dose. 107 patients were studied from four CT scanners. Scan factors and radiation dose received during abdominal CT scan was registered between the contract phases of abdominal CT scan, where the arterial contrast phases was done with Routine Manual Protocol i.e. fixed mA and kVp regardless patient age, weight and reason of scan, while the vinous phase done using AEC. The mA values were considerably less in vinous phase than in the arterial phase for all hospitals with exceptional to hospital 4 where the mA values had increased. There were no variations between the two phases in the other scan factors (kVp. pitch, slice thickness, scan length), which indicates that the software was mainly changing the mA values. The mA also showed wide variations during venous phase as a result of the varying mA applied by the AEC for the different patient ages and weights. The data collection has showed that, the application of SURDOSE decreases that average mA by 56.6%, 61%6 and 56.6 for hospitals 1, 2, and 3 respectively. The reduction of the average of the CTD1_vol were 54.2%. 64.1% in hospital 1.2. and 3 respectively. The average DLPs were also less by 57.1%. 62.8%. 57.5% in hospital, 2, and 3 respectively between the phases. In hospital 4 one raw of the CT detector was not functioning this has disturbed the SURDOSE software. Leading to increase of the mA values and hence the patient radiation dose mA, CTD1_vol and DLP in this hospital increased by 47.7%, 54.3% and 42.8% respectively. This highlighted the risk of not applying the AEC correctly. The non application of this software was only due to lake of knowledge how to use it and the benefits of dose reduction associated with it. Application of this software is very useful and operator should be trained to use it in all CT exams. (Author)

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments using quadric geometry and variance reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosio, Bruno; Schoonjans, Tom; Brunetti, Antonio; Oliva, Piernicola; Masala, Giovanni Luca

    2014-03-01

    Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 83617 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1038160 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Tested on several PCs and on Mac. Operating system: Linux, Mac OS X, Windows (native and cygwin). RAM: It is dependent on the input data but usually between 1 and 10 MB. Classification: 2.5, 21.1. External routines: XrayLib (https://github.com/tschoonj/xraylib/wiki) Nature of problem: Simulation of a wide range of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments using different types of sources and detectors. Solution method: XRMC is a versatile program that is useful for the simulation of a wide range of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments. It enables the simulation of monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources, with unpolarised or partially/completely polarised radiation. Single-element detectors as well as two-dimensional pixel detectors can be used in the simulations, with several acquisition options. In the current version of the program, the sample is modelled by combining convex three-dimensional objects demarcated by quadric surfaces, such as planes, ellipsoids and cylinders. The Monte Carlo approach makes XRMC able to accurately simulate X-ray photon transport and interactions with matter up to any order of interaction. The differential cross-sections and all other quantities related to the interaction processes (photoelectric absorption, fluorescence emission, elastic and inelastic scattering) are computed using the xraylib software library, which is currently the most complete and up-to-date software library for X-ray parameters. The use of variance reduction techniques makes XRMC able to reduce the simulation time by several orders of magnitude compared to other general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation programs. Running time: It is dependent on the complexity of the simulation. For the examples

  19. Polysulfobetaine films prepared by electrografting technique for reduction of biofouling on electroconductive surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stach, Marek; Kronekova, Zuzana; Kasak, Peter; Kollar, Jozef; Pentrak, Martin; Micusik, Matej; Chorvat, Dusan; Nunney, Tim S.; Lacik, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The sulfobetaine films were prepared on stainless steel and golden surfaces. In the first step, the poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) film was created by employing the electrografting polymerization technique. In the second step, this film was modified to polysulfobetaine, i.e. the polymer film bearing the zwitterionic groups. The presence of the electrografted film and its modification were determined by contact angle measurements, infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The prepared films were homogeneous with the thickness from about 5 to 26 nm as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The atomic force microscopy measurements showed the increase of surface roughness upon the surface coating. In vitro tests using adherent RAT-2 fibroblast cells and fluorescently labelled bovine serum albumin proteins showed that prepared polysulfobetaine films can be used in applications requiring the resistance against cell attachment and biofouling.

  20. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parakasamurthy, K S [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad (India); Pande, D P [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author). 7 refs.

  1. Reduction of heart sound interference from lung sound signals using empirical mode decomposition technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ashok; Bhattacharya, P S; Saha, Goutam

    2011-01-01

    During the recording time of lung sound (LS) signals from the chest wall of a subject, there is always heart sound (HS) signal interfering with it. This obscures the features of lung sound signals and creates confusion on pathological states, if any, of the lungs. A novel method based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) technique is proposed in this paper for reducing the undesired heart sound interference from the desired lung sound signals. In this, the mixed signal is split into several components. Some of these components contain larger proportions of interfering signals like heart sound, environmental noise etc. and are filtered out. Experiments have been conducted on simulated and real-time recorded mixed signals of heart sound and lung sound. The proposed method is found to be superior in terms of time domain, frequency domain, and time-frequency domain representations and also in listening test performed by pulmonologist.

  2. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parakasamurthy, K.S.; Pande, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author)

  3. Brief report on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction (1995-96)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamping, Xiao; Holappa, L [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Metallurgy

    1997-12-31

    This article summaries the research work on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction. The thermodynamic properties of FeCr slag systems were calculated with the regular solution model. The effects of CaO/MgO ratio, Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} amount as well as the slag basicity on the activities of chromium oxides and the oxidation state of chromium were examined. The calculated results were compared to the experimental data in the literature. In the kinetic modelling of the chromite reduction, the reduction possibilities and tendencies of the chromite constitutes with CO were analysed based on the thermodynamic calculation. Two reaction models, a structural grain model and a multi-layers reaction model, were constructed and applied to simulate the chromite pellet reduction and chromite lumpy ore reduction, respectively. The calculated reduction rates were compared with the experimental measurements and the reaction mechanisms were discussed. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 4 refs.

  4. Brief report on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction (1995-96)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yamping; Holappa, L. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    This article summaries the research work on thermodynamics of chromium slags and kinetic modelling of chromite reduction. The thermodynamic properties of FeCr slag systems were calculated with the regular solution model. The effects of CaO/MgO ratio, Al{sub 2}0{sub 3} amount as well as the slag basicity on the activities of chromium oxides and the oxidation state of chromium were examined. The calculated results were compared to the experimental data in the literature. In the kinetic modelling of the chromite reduction, the reduction possibilities and tendencies of the chromite constitutes with CO were analysed based on the thermodynamic calculation. Two reaction models, a structural grain model and a multi-layers reaction model, were constructed and applied to simulate the chromite pellet reduction and chromite lumpy ore reduction, respectively. The calculated reduction rates were compared with the experimental measurements and the reaction mechanisms were discussed. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 4 refs.

  5. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  6. Segmentation and Dimension Reduction: Exploratory and Model-Based Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Rosmalen (Joost)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractRepresenting the information in a data set in a concise way is an important part of data analysis. A variety of multivariate statistical techniques have been developed for this purpose, such as k-means clustering and principal components analysis. These techniques are often based on the

  7. A New ABCD Technique to Analyze Business Models & Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Aithal P. S.; Shailasri V. T.; Suresh Kumar P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Various techniques are used to analyze individual characteristics or organizational effectiveness like SWOT analysis, SWOC analysis, PEST analysis etc. These techniques provide an easy and systematic way of identifying various issues affecting a system and provides an opportunity for further development. Whereas these provide a broad-based assessment of individual institutions and systems, it suffers limitations while applying to business context. The success of any business model depends on ...

  8. Mathematical optimization techniques for managing selective catalytic reduction for a fleet of coal-fired power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis Pena, Antonio Alejandro

    Major commercial electricity generation is done by burning fossil fuels out of which coal-fired power plants produce a substantial quantity of electricity worldwide. The United States has large reserves of coal, and it is cheaply available, making it a good choice for the generation of electricity on a large scale. However, one major problem associated with using coal for combustion is that it produces a group of pollutants known as nitrogen oxides (NO x). NOx are strong oxidizers and contribute to ozone formation and respiratory illness. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates the quantity of NOx emitted to the atmosphere in the United States. One technique coal-fired power plants use to reduce NOx emissions is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). SCR uses layers of catalyst that need to be added or changed to maintain the required performance. Power plants do add or change catalyst layers during temporary shutdowns, but it is expensive. However, many companies do not have only one power plant, but instead they can have a fleet of coal-fired power plants. A fleet of power plants can use EPA cap and trade programs to have an outlet NOx emission below the allowances for the fleet. For that reason, the main aim of this research is to develop an SCR management mathematical optimization methods that, with a given set of scheduled outages for a fleet of power plants, minimizes the total cost of the entire fleet of power plants and also maintain outlet NO x below the desired target for the entire fleet. We use a multi commodity network flow problem (MCFP) that creates edges that represent all the SCR catalyst layers for each plant. This MCFP is relaxed because it does not consider average daily NOx constraint, and it is solved by a binary integer program. After that, we add the average daily NOx constraint to the model with a schedule elimination constraint (MCFPwSEC). The MCFPwSEC eliminates, one by one, the solutions that do not satisfy the average daily

  9. Modelling road dust emission abatement measures using the NORTRIP model: Vehicle speed and studded tyre reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, M.; Sundvor, I.; Denby, B. R.; Johansson, C.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Janhäll, S.

    2016-06-01

    Road dust emissions in Nordic countries still remain a significant contributor to PM10 concentrations mainly due to the use of studded tyres. A number of measures have been introduced in these countries in order to reduce road dust emissions. These include speed reductions, reductions in studded tyre use, dust binding and road cleaning. Implementation of such measures can be costly and some confidence in the impact of the measures is required to weigh the costs against the benefits. Modelling tools are thus required that can predict the impact of these measures. In this paper the NORTRIP road dust emission model is used to simulate real world abatement measures that have been carried out in Oslo and Stockholm. In Oslo both vehicle speed and studded tyre share reductions occurred over a period from 2004 to 2006 on a major arterial road, RV4. In Stockholm a studded tyre ban on Hornsgatan in 2010 saw a significant reduction in studded tyre share together with a reduction in traffic volume. The model is found to correctly simulate the impact of these measures on the PM10 concentrations when compared to available kerbside measurement data. Importantly meteorology can have a significant impact on the concentrations through both surface and dispersion conditions. The first year after the implementation of the speed reduction on RV4 was much drier than the previous year, resulting in higher mean concentrations than expected. The following year was much wetter with significant rain and snow fall leading to wet or frozen road surfaces for 83% of the four month study period. This significantly reduced the net PM10 concentrations, by 58%, compared to the expected values if meteorological conditions had been similar to the previous years. In the years following the studded tyre ban on Hornsgatan road wear production through studded tyres decreased by 72%, due to a combination of reduced traffic volume and reduced studded tyre share. However, after accounting for exhaust

  10. A Method to Test Model Calibration Techniques: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, Ron; Polly, Ben; Neymark, Joel

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a method for testing model calibration techniques. Calibration is commonly used in conjunction with energy retrofit audit models. An audit is conducted to gather information about the building needed to assemble an input file for a building energy modeling tool. A calibration technique is used to reconcile model predictions with utility data, and then the 'calibrated model' is used to predict energy savings from a variety of retrofit measures and combinations thereof. Current standards and guidelines such as BPI-2400 and ASHRAE-14 set criteria for 'goodness of fit' and assume that if the criteria are met, then the calibration technique is acceptable. While it is logical to use the actual performance data of the building to tune the model, it is not certain that a good fit will result in a model that better predicts post-retrofit energy savings. Therefore, the basic idea here is that the simulation program (intended for use with the calibration technique) is used to generate surrogate utility bill data and retrofit energy savings data against which the calibration technique can be tested. This provides three figures of merit for testing a calibration technique, 1) accuracy of the post-retrofit energy savings prediction, 2) closure on the 'true' input parameter values, and 3) goodness of fit to the utility bill data. The paper will also discuss the pros and cons of using this synthetic surrogate data approach versus trying to use real data sets of actual buildings.

  11. Modeling Techniques for a Computational Efficient Dynamic Turbofan Engine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory A. Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transient two-stream engine model has been developed. Individual component models developed exclusively in MATLAB/Simulink including the fan, high pressure compressor, combustor, high pressure turbine, low pressure turbine, plenum volumes, and exit nozzle have been combined to investigate the behavior of a turbofan two-stream engine. Special attention has been paid to the development of transient capabilities throughout the model, increasing physics model, eliminating algebraic constraints, and reducing simulation time through enabling the use of advanced numerical solvers. The lessening of computation time is paramount for conducting future aircraft system-level design trade studies and optimization. The new engine model is simulated for a fuel perturbation and a specified mission while tracking critical parameters. These results, as well as the simulation times, are presented. The new approach significantly reduces the simulation time.

  12. Gravity Reduction View: A Radiographic Technique for the Evaluation and Management of Weber B Fibula Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Ehrlichman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: While various radiographic parameters and application of manual/gravity stress have been proposed to elucidate instability for Weber B fibula fractures, the prognostic capability of these modalities remains unclear. Determination of anatomic positioning of the mortise is paramount. We propose a novel view, the Gravity Reduction View (GRV, which helps elucidate non-anatomic positioning and reducibility of the mortise.Methods: The patient is positioned lateral decubitus with the injured leg elevated on a holder with the fibula directed superiorly. The x-ray cassette is placed posterior to the heel, with the beam angled at 15˚ of internal rotation to obtain a mortise view. Our proposed treatment algorithm is based upon the measurement of the medial clear space (MCS on the GRV versus the static mortise view (and in comparison to the superior clear space (SCS and is based on reducibility of the MCS. A retrospective review of patients evaluated utilizing the GRV was performed.Results: 26 patients with Weber B fibula fractures were managed according to this treatment algorithm. Mean age was 50.57 years old (range: range:18-81, SD=19. 17 patients underwent operative treatment and 9 patients were initially treated nonoperatively. 2 patients demonstrated late displacement and were treated surgically. Using this algorithm, at a mean follow-up of 26 weeks, all patients had a final MCS that was less than the SCS (final mean MCS 2.86 mm vs. mean SCS of 3.32 indicating effectiveness of the treatment algorithm.Conclusion: The GRV is a novel radiographic view in which deltoid competency, reducibility and initial positioning of the mortise are assessed by comparing a static mortise view with the appearance of the mortise on the GRV. We have developed a treatment algorithm based on the GRV and have found it to be useful in guiding treatment and successful at achieving anatomic mortise alignment.

  13. Numerical model updating technique for structures using firefly algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Kubair, K.; Mohan, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    Numerical model updating is a technique used for updating the existing experimental models for any structures related to civil, mechanical, automobiles, marine, aerospace engineering, etc. The basic concept behind this technique is updating the numerical models to closely match with experimental data obtained from real or prototype test structures. The present work involves the development of numerical model using MATLAB as a computational tool and with mathematical equations that define the experimental model. Firefly algorithm is used as an optimization tool in this study. In this updating process a response parameter of the structure has to be chosen, which helps to correlate the numerical model developed with the experimental results obtained. The variables for the updating can be either material or geometrical properties of the model or both. In this study, to verify the proposed technique, a cantilever beam is analyzed for its tip deflection and a space frame has been analyzed for its natural frequencies. Both the models are updated with their respective response values obtained from experimental results. The numerical results after updating show that there is a close relationship that can be brought between the experimental and the numerical models.

  14. Assessment of thermal load reduction due to the application of simple passive techniques in a house office building at the south of Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanski, Roman; Azzain, Gassem

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of possible reduction of heating and cooling requirements of 300 m 2 house-office building has been presented in this paper, when simple Thermal Passive Techniques (TPT) have been applied to building's construction in Sebha city at the Libyan south. The known software for dynamic simulation (TRNSYS) has been used as an environment of digital experimentation for this study. A prototype represents the building has been constructed with the help of the available model of single thermal zone of TRNSYS (Type 19). The built-in ASHREA Transfer Function Method within this model has been used to calculate the heat flux through building's materials. Primarily, the thermal load on building's construction without TPTs has been evaluated under weather conditions of a Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) of Sebha city. Then, the building has been equipped with simple TPTs (such as the control of building materials, insulation, shading, infiltration and ventilation with windows resizing). This building was subjected to the same weather conditions and again the thermal load has been evaluated in order to report the percentage of reduction of thermal load. The simulation has been conducted successfully, where good assessment of reduction of annual heating and cooling demands in the building has been obtained. It is proved that, about (46%) of annual heating load and (48%) of annual cooling load can be reduced if suitable simple TPTs were incorporated in buildings.(Author)

  15. Radiation dose reduction on multidetector abdominal CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qifeng; Peng Yun; Duan Xiaomin; Sun Jihang; Yu Tong; Han Zhonglong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility to reduce radiation doses on pediatric multidetector abdominal CT using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique (ASIR) associated with automated tube current modulation technique (ATCM). Methods: Thirty patients underwent abdominal CT with ATCM and the follow-up scan with ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR. ATCM was used with age dependent noise index (NI) settings: NI = 9 for 0-5 year old and NI = 11 for > 5 years old for simple ATCM group, NI = 11 for 0-5 year old and NI = 15 for > 5 years old for ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR group (AISR group). Two radiologists independently evaluated images for diagnostic quality and image noise with subjectively image quality score and image noise score using a 5-point scale. Interobserver agreement was assessed by Kappa test. The volume CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) for the two groups were recorded. Statistical significance for the CTDIvol value was analyzed by pair-sample t test. Results: The average CTDIvol for the ASIR group was (1.38 ± 0.64) mGy, about 60% lower than (3.56 ± 1.23) mGy for the simple ATCM group, and the CTDIvol of two groups had statistically significant differences. (t = 33.483, P < 0.05). The subjective image quality scores for the simple ATCM group were 4.43 ± 0.57 and 4.37 ±0.61, Kappa = 0.878, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.70 ± 0.47 and 4.60 ± 0.50, Kappa = 0.783, P < 0.01), by two observers. The image noise score for the simple ATCM group were 4.03 ±0.56 and 3.83 ±0.53, Kappa = 0.572, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.20 ± 0.48 and 4.10 ± 0.48, Kappa = 0.748, P < 0.01), by two observers. All images had acceptable diagnostic image quality. Conclusion: Lower radiation dose can be achieved by elevating NI with ASIR in pediatric CT abdominal studies, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (authors)

  16. Plasticity models of material variability based on uncertainty quantification techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Reese E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Rizzi, Francesco [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Templeton, Jeremy Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Ostien, Jakob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The advent of fabrication techniques like additive manufacturing has focused attention on the considerable variability of material response due to defects and other micro-structural aspects. This variability motivates the development of an enhanced design methodology that incorporates inherent material variability to provide robust predictions of performance. In this work, we develop plasticity models capable of representing the distribution of mechanical responses observed in experiments using traditional plasticity models of the mean response and recently developed uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques. Lastly, we demonstrate that the new method provides predictive realizations that are superior to more traditional ones, and how these UQ techniques can be used in model selection and assessing the quality of calibrated physical parameters.

  17. Assessment and Reduction of Model Parametric Uncertainties: A Case Study with A Distributed Hydrological Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Y.; Liang, X. Z.; Duan, Q.; Xu, J.; Zhao, P.; Hong, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The uncertainties associated with the parameters of a hydrological model need to be quantified and reduced for it to be useful for operational hydrological forecasting and decision support. An uncertainty quantification framework is presented to facilitate practical assessment and reduction of model parametric uncertainties. A case study, using the distributed hydrological model CREST for daily streamflow simulation during the period 2008-2010 over ten watershed, was used to demonstrate the performance of this new framework. Model behaviors across watersheds were analyzed by a two-stage stepwise sensitivity analysis procedure, using LH-OAT method for screening out insensitive parameters, followed by MARS-based Sobol' sensitivity indices for quantifying each parameter's contribution to the response variance due to its first-order and higher-order effects. Pareto optimal sets of the influential parameters were then found by the adaptive surrogate-based multi-objective optimization procedure, using MARS model for approximating the parameter-response relationship and SCE-UA algorithm for searching the optimal parameter sets of the adaptively updated surrogate model. The final optimal parameter sets were validated against the daily streamflow simulation of the same watersheds during the period 2011-2012. The stepwise sensitivity analysis procedure efficiently reduced the number of parameters that need to be calibrated from twelve to seven, which helps to limit the dimensionality of calibration problem and serves to enhance the efficiency of parameter calibration. The adaptive MARS-based multi-objective calibration exercise provided satisfactory solutions to the reproduction of the observed streamflow for all watersheds. The final optimal solutions showed significant improvement when compared to the default solutions, with about 65-90% reduction in 1-NSE and 60-95% reduction in |RB|. The validation exercise indicated a large improvement in model performance with about 40

  18. Models and Techniques for Proving Data Structure Lower Bounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green

    In this dissertation, we present a number of new techniques and tools for proving lower bounds on the operational time of data structures. These techniques provide new lines of attack for proving lower bounds in both the cell probe model, the group model, the pointer machine model and the I...... bound of tutq = (lgd􀀀1 n). For ball range searching, we get a lower bound of tutq = (n1􀀀1=d). The highest previous lower bound proved in the group model does not exceed ((lg n= lg lg n)2) on the maximum of tu and tq. Finally, we present a new technique for proving lower bounds....../O-model. In all cases, we push the frontiers further by proving lower bounds higher than what could possibly be proved using previously known techniques. For the cell probe model, our results have the following consequences: The rst (lg n) query time lower bound for linear space static data structures...

  19. New-construction techniques and HVAC overpressurization for radon reduction in schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saum, D.; Witter, K.A.; Craig, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Construction of a school in Fairfax County, Virginia, is being carefully monitored since elevated indoor radon levels have been identified in many existing houses near the site. Soil gas radon concentrations measured prior to pouring of the slabs were also indicative of a potential radon problem should the soil gas enter the school; however, subslab radon measurements collected thus far are lower than anticipated. Radon-resistant features have been incorporated into construction of the school and include the placing of at least 100 mm of clean coarse aggregate under the slab and a plastic film barrier between the aggregate and the slab, the sealing of all expansion joints, the sealing or plugging of all utility penetrations where possible, and the painting of interior block walls. In addition, the school's heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system has been designed to operate continuously in overpressurization to help reduce pressure-driven entry of radon-containing soil gas into the building. Following completion, indoor radon levels in the school will be monitored to determine the effectiveness of these radon-resistant new-construction techniques and HVAC overpressurization in limiting radon entry into the school

  20. Instanton-based techniques for analysis and reduction of error floors of LDPC codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chertkov, Michael; Chilappagari, Shashi K.; Stepanov, Mikhail G.; Vasic, Bane

    2008-01-01

    We describe a family of instanton-based optimization methods developed recently for the analysis of the error floors of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Instantons are the most probable configurations of the channel noise which result in decoding failures. We show that the general idea and the respective optimization technique are applicable broadly to a variety of channels, discrete or continuous, and variety of sub-optimal decoders. Specifically, we consider: iterative belief propagation (BP) decoders, Gallager type decoders, and linear programming (LP) decoders performing over the additive white Gaussian noise channel (AWGNC) and the binary symmetric channel (BSC). The instanton analysis suggests that the underlying topological structures of the most probable instanton of the same code but different channels and decoders are related to each other. Armed with this understanding of the graphical structure of the instanton and its relation to the decoding failures, we suggest a method to construct codes whose Tanner graphs are free of these structures, and thus have less significant error floors.

  1. Manufacturing Enhancement through Reduction of Cycle Time using Different Lean Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthini Rekha, R.; Periyasamy, P.; Nallusamy, S.

    2017-08-01

    In recent manufacturing system the most important parameters in production line are work in process, TAKT time and line balancing. In this article lean tools and techniques were implemented to reduce the cycle time. The aim is to enhance the productivity of the water pump pipe by identifying the bottleneck stations and non value added activities. From the initial time study the bottleneck processes were identified and then necessary expanding processes were also identified for the bottleneck process. Subsequently the improvement actions have been established and implemented using different lean tools like value stream mapping, 5S and line balancing. The current state value stream mapping was developed to describe the existing status and to identify various problem areas. 5S was used to implement the steps to reduce the process cycle time and unnecessary movements of man and material. The improvement activities were implemented with required suggested and the future state value stream mapping was developed. From the results it was concluded that the total cycle time was reduced about 290.41 seconds and the customer demand has been increased about 760 units.

  2. Instanton-based techniques for analysis and reduction of error floor of LDPC codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chilappagari, Shashi K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stepanov, Mikhail G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vasic, Bane [SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE

    2008-01-01

    We describe a family of instanton-based optimization methods developed recently for the analysis of the error floors of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes. Instantons are the most probable configurations of the channel noise which result in decoding failures. We show that the general idea and the respective optimization technique are applicable broadly to a variety of channels, discrete or continuous, and variety of sub-optimal decoders. Specifically, we consider: iterative belief propagation (BP) decoders, Gallager type decoders, and linear programming (LP) decoders performing over the additive white Gaussian noise channel (AWGNC) and the binary symmetric channel (BSC). The instanton analysis suggests that the underlying topological structures of the most probable instanton of the same code but different channels and decoders are related to each other. Armed with this understanding of the graphical structure of the instanton and its relation to the decoding failures, we suggest a method to construct codes whose Tanner graphs are free of these structures, and thus have less significant error floors.

  3. Successful Gastric Volvulus Reduction and Gastropexy Using a Dual Endoscope Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith H. Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric volvulus is a life threatening condition characterized by an abnormal rotation of the stomach around an axis. Although the first line treatment of this disorder is surgical, we report here a case of gastric volvulus that was endoscopically managed using a novel strategy. An 83-year-old female with a history of pancreatic cancer status postpylorus-preserving Whipple procedure presented with a cecal volvulus requiring right hemicolectomy. Postoperative imaging included a CT scan and upper GI series that showed a gastric volvulus with the antrum located above the diaphragm. An upper endoscopy was advanced through the pylorus into the duodenum and left in this position to keep the stomach under the diaphragm. A second pediatric endoscope was advanced alongside and used to complete percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG placement for anterior gastropexy. The patient’s volvulus resolved and there were no complications. From our review of the literature, the dual endoscopic technique employed here has not been previously described. Patients who are poor surgical candidates or those who do not require emergent surgery can possibly benefit the most from similar minimally invasive endoscopic procedures as described here.

  4. Dietary Impact of Adding Potassium Chloride to Foods as a Sodium Reduction Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo van Buren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Potassium chloride is a leading reformulation technology for reducing sodium in food products. As, globally, sodium intake exceeds guidelines, this technology is beneficial; however, its potential impact on potassium intake is unknown. Therefore, a modeling study was conducted using Dutch National Food Survey data to examine the dietary impact of reformulation (n = 2106. Product-specific sodium criteria, to enable a maximum daily sodium chloride intake of 5 grams/day, were applied to all foods consumed in the survey. The impact of replacing 20%, 50% and 100% of sodium chloride from each product with potassium chloride was modeled. At baseline median, potassium intake was 3334 mg/day. An increase in the median intake of potassium of 453 mg/day was seen when a 20% replacement was applied, 674 mg/day with a 50% replacement scenario and 733 mg/day with a 100% replacement scenario. Reformulation had the largest impact on: bread, processed fruit and vegetables, snacks and processed meat. Replacement of sodium chloride by potassium chloride, particularly in key contributing product groups, would result in better compliance to potassium intake guidelines (3510 mg/day. Moreover, it could be considered safe for the general adult population, as intake remains compliant with EFSA guidelines. Based on current modeling potassium chloride presents as a valuable, safe replacer for sodium chloride in food products.

  5. Triangular lipodermal flaps in Wise pattern reduction mammoplasty (superomedial pedicle): A novel technique to reduce T-junction necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Haitham H; Malahias, Marco; Shetty, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Although Wise pattern reduction mammoplasty is one of the most prevalent procedures providing satisfactory cutaneous reduction, it is at the expense of inevitable lengthier scars and wound complications, especially at the inverted T junction. To describe a novel technique providing tension-free closure at the T junction through performing triangular lipodermal flaps. The aim is to alleviate skin tension, thus reducing skin necrosis, dehiscence and excessive scarring at the T junction. One hundred seventy-three consecutive procedures were performed on 137 patients between 2009 and 2013. Data collected included demographics, perioperative morbidity and resected breast tissue weight. The follow-up period ranged from three to 30 months; early and late postoperative complications and patient satisfaction were recorded. Superficial epidermolysis without T-junction dehiscence was experienced in eight (4.6%) procedures while five (2.9%) procedures developed full-thickness wound dehiscence. Ninety-four percent of patients were highly satisfied with the outcome. The technique is safe, versatile and easy to execute, providing a tension-free zone and acting as internal dermal sling, thus providing better wound healing with more favourable aesthetic outcome and maintaining breast projection.

  6. Testing of indoor radon-reduction techniques in basement houses having adjoining wings. Final report, August 1988-September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messing, M.

    1990-11-01

    The report gives results of tests of indoor radon reduction techniques in 12 existing Maryland houses, with the objective of determining when basement houses with adjoining wings require active soil depressurization (ASD) treatment of both wings, and when treatment of the basement alone is sufficient. In five basement houses with adjoining slabs on grade, ASD treatment of both wings provided an incremental additional radon reduction of 0 to 5.2 pCi/L, compared to ASD treatment of either one of the slabs alone. However, basement-only treatment reduced radon to <4 pCi/L in all five houses. In six basement houses having adjoining crawl spaces, ASD treatment of both wings (including sub-liner depressurization of the crawl space) provided little additional reduction compared to basement-only treatment, when sub-slab communication was good. When communication was not good, treatment of both wings was required to achieve <4 pCi/L. Tests of one fully slab-on-grade house showed that, when there is good aggregate under the slab, a one-pipe sub-slab depressurization system can achieve <1-2 pCi/L, even when there are forced-air supply ducts under the slab

  7. Rubin's CMS reduction method for general state-space models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, de A.; Campen, van D.H.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the Rubin CMS procedure for the reduction and successive coupling of undamped structural subsystems with symmetric system matrices will be modified for the case of general damping. The final coordinate transformation is based on the use of complex (residual) flexibility modes,

  8. Relativistic dynamical reduction models: General framework and examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Grassi, R.

    1990-04-01

    The formulation of a relativistic theory of statevector reduction is proposed and analyzed, and its conceptual consequences are elucidated. In particular, a detailed discussion of stochastic invariance and of local and nonlocal aspects at the level of individual systems is presented. (author). 35 refs, 5 figs

  9. Optimal Hankel Norm Model Reduction by Truncation of Trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, B.; Weiland, S.

    2000-01-01

    We show how optimal Hankel-norm approximations of dynamical systems allow for a straightforward interpretation in terms of system trajectories. It is shown that for discrete time single-input systems optimal reductions are obtained by cutting 'balanced trajectories', i.e., by disconnecting the past

  10. A Behavioral Weight Reduction Model for Moderately Mentally Retarded Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotatori, Anthony F.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A behavioral weight reduction treatment and maintenance program for moderately mentally retarded adolescents which involves six phases from background information collection to followup relies on stimulus control procedures to modify eating behaviors. Data from pilot studies show an average weekly weight loss of .5 to 1 pound per S. (CL)

  11. Model Reduction of Computational Aerothermodynamics for Multi-Discipline Analysis in High Speed Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Andrew Rippetoe

    This dissertation describes model reduction techniques for the computation of aerodynamic heat flux and pressure loads for multi-disciplinary analysis of hypersonic vehicles. NASA and the Department of Defense have expressed renewed interest in the development of responsive, reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles capable of sustained high-speed flight and access to space. However, an extensive set of technical challenges have obstructed the development of such vehicles. These technical challenges are partially due to both the inability to accurately test scaled vehicles in wind tunnels and to the time intensive nature of high-fidelity computational modeling, particularly for the fluid using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The aim of this dissertation is to develop efficient and accurate models for the aerodynamic heat flux and pressure loads to replace the need for computationally expensive, high-fidelity CFD during coupled analysis. Furthermore, aerodynamic heating and pressure loads are systematically evaluated for a number of different operating conditions, including: simple two-dimensional flow over flat surfaces up to three-dimensional flows over deformed surfaces with shock-shock interaction and shock-boundary layer interaction. An additional focus of this dissertation is on the implementation and computation of results using the developed aerodynamic heating and pressure models in complex fluid-thermal-structural simulations. Model reduction is achieved using a two-pronged approach. One prong focuses on developing analytical corrections to isothermal, steady-state CFD flow solutions in order to capture flow effects associated with transient spatially-varying surface temperatures and surface pressures (e.g., surface deformation, surface vibration, shock impingements, etc.). The second prong is focused on minimizing the computational expense of computing the steady-state CFD solutions by developing an efficient surrogate CFD model. The developed two

  12. Top-down constraints on global N2O emissions at optimal resolution: application of a new dimension reduction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kelley C.; Millet, Dylan B.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Henze, Daven K.; Griffis, Timothy J.; Chaliyakunnel, Sreelekha; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Saikawa, Eri; Xiang, Gao; Prinn, Ronald G.; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Weiss, Ray F.; Dutton, Geoff S.; Elkins, James W.; Krummel, Paul B.; Langenfelds, Ray; Steele, L. Paul

    2018-01-01

    We present top-down constraints on global monthly N2O emissions for 2011 from a multi-inversion approach and an ensemble of surface observations. The inversions employ the GEOS-Chem adjoint and an array of aggregation strategies to test how well current observations can constrain the spatial distribution of global N2O emissions. The strategies include (1) a standard 4D-Var inversion at native model resolution (4° × 5°), (2) an inversion for six continental and three ocean regions, and (3) a fast 4D-Var inversion based on a novel dimension reduction technique employing randomized singular value decomposition (SVD). The optimized global flux ranges from 15.9 Tg N yr-1 (SVD-based inversion) to 17.5-17.7 Tg N yr-1 (continental-scale, standard 4D-Var inversions), with the former better capturing the extratropical N2O background measured during the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) airborne campaigns. We find that the tropics provide a greater contribution to the global N2O flux than is predicted by the prior bottom-up inventories, likely due to underestimated agricultural and oceanic emissions. We infer an overestimate of natural soil emissions in the extratropics and find that predicted emissions are seasonally biased in northern midlatitudes. Here, optimized fluxes exhibit a springtime peak consistent with the timing of spring fertilizer and manure application, soil thawing, and elevated soil moisture. Finally, the inversions reveal a major emission underestimate in the US Corn Belt in the bottom-up inventory used here. We extensively test the impact of initial conditions on the analysis and recommend formally optimizing the initial N2O distribution to avoid biasing the inferred fluxes. We find that the SVD-based approach provides a powerful framework for deriving emission information from N2O observations: by defining the optimal resolution of the solution based on the information content of the inversion, it provides spatial information that is lost when

  13. Modeling with data tools and techniques for scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Klemens, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Modeling with Data fully explains how to execute computationally intensive analyses on very large data sets, showing readers how to determine the best methods for solving a variety of different problems, how to create and debug statistical models, and how to run an analysis and evaluate the results. Ben Klemens introduces a set of open and unlimited tools, and uses them to demonstrate data management, analysis, and simulation techniques essential for dealing with large data sets and computationally intensive procedures. He then demonstrates how to easily apply these tools to the many threads of statistical technique, including classical, Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and Monte Carlo methods

  14. Drag reduction of a car model by linear genetic programming control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiying; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Borée, Jacques; Harambat, Fabien

    2017-08-01

    We investigate open- and closed-loop active control for aerodynamic drag reduction of a car model. Turbulent flow around a blunt-edged Ahmed body is examined at ReH≈ 3× 105 based on body height. The actuation is performed with pulsed jets at all trailing edges (multiple inputs) combined with a Coanda deflection surface. The flow is monitored with 16 pressure sensors distributed at the rear side (multiple outputs). We apply a recently developed model-free control strategy building on genetic programming in Dracopoulos and Kent (Neural Comput Appl 6:214-228, 1997) and Gautier et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:424-441, 2015). The optimized control laws comprise periodic forcing, multi-frequency forcing and sensor-based feedback including also time-history information feedback and combinations thereof. Key enabler is linear genetic programming (LGP) as powerful regression technique for optimizing the multiple-input multiple-output control laws. The proposed LGP control can select the best open- or closed-loop control in an unsupervised manner. Approximately 33% base pressure recovery associated with 22% drag reduction is achieved in all considered classes of control laws. Intriguingly, the feedback actuation emulates periodic high-frequency forcing. In addition, the control identified automatically the only sensor which listens to high-frequency flow components with good signal to noise ratio. Our control strategy is, in principle, applicable to all multiple actuators and sensors experiments.

  15. Inverting travel times with a triplication. [spline fitting technique applied to lunar seismic data reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    A method based on the use of constrained spline fits is used to overcome the difficulties arising when body-wave data in the form of T-delta are reduced to the tau-p form in the presence of cusps. In comparison with unconstrained spline fits, the method proposed here tends to produce much smoother models which lie approximately in the middle of the bounds produced by the extremal method. The method is noniterative and, therefore, computationally efficient. The method is applied to the lunar seismic data, where at least one triplication is presumed to occur in the P-wave travel-time curve. It is shown, however, that because of an insufficient number of data points for events close to the antipode of the center of the lunar network, the present analysis is not accurate enough to resolve the problem of a possible lunar core.

  16. Plants status monitor: Modelling techniques and inherent benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeding, R.J.; Lainoff, S.M.; Rees, D.C.; Prather, W.A.; Fickiessen, K.O.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Plant Status Monitor (PSM) is designed to provide plant personnel with information on the operational status of the plant and compliance with the plant technical specifications. The PSM software evaluates system models using a 'distributed processing' technique in which detailed models of individual systems are processed rather than by evaluating a single, plant-level model. In addition, development of the system models for PSM provides inherent benefits to the plant by forcing detailed reviews of the technical specifications, system design and operating procedures, and plant documentation. (orig.)

  17. Sensitivity analysis technique for application to deterministic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigami, T.; Cazzoli, E.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Unwin, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The characterization of sever accident source terms for light water reactors should include consideration of uncertainties. An important element of any uncertainty analysis is an evaluation of the sensitivity of the output probability distributions reflecting source term uncertainties to assumptions regarding the input probability distributions. Historically, response surface methods (RSMs) were developed to replace physical models using, for example, regression techniques, with simplified models for example, regression techniques, with simplified models for extensive calculations. The purpose of this paper is to present a new method for sensitivity analysis that does not utilize RSM, but instead relies directly on the results obtained from the original computer code calculations. The merits of this approach are demonstrated by application of the proposed method to the suppression pool aerosol removal code (SPARC), and the results are compared with those obtained by sensitivity analysis with (a) the code itself, (b) a regression model, and (c) Iman's method

  18. Selection of productivity improvement techniques via mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahassan M. Khater

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new mathematical model to select an optimal combination of productivity improvement techniques. The proposed model of this paper considers four-stage cycle productivity and the productivity is assumed to be a linear function of fifty four improvement techniques. The proposed model of this paper is implemented for a real-world case study of manufacturing plant. The resulted problem is formulated as a mixed integer programming which can be solved for optimality using traditional methods. The preliminary results of the implementation of the proposed model of this paper indicate that the productivity can be improved through a change on equipments and it can be easily applied for both manufacturing and service industries.

  19. Constructing canine carotid artery stenosis model by endovascular technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Guangsen; Liu Yizhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a carotid artery stenosis model by endovascular technique suitable for neuro-interventional therapy. Methods: Twelve dogs were anesthetized, the unilateral segments of the carotid arteries' tunica media and intima were damaged by a corneous guiding wire of home made. Twenty-four carotid artery stenosis models were thus created. DSA examination was performed on postprocedural weeks 2, 4, 8, 10 to estimate the changes of those stenotic carotid arteries. Results: Twenty-four carotid artery stenosis models were successfully created in twelve dogs. Conclusions: Canine carotid artery stenosis models can be created with the endovascular method having variation of pathologic characters and hemodynamic changes similar to human being. It is useful for further research involving the new technique and new material for interventional treatment. (authors)

  20. Efficient response spectrum analysis of a reactor using Model Order Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jin Ho; Choi, Jin Bok; Ryu, Jeong Soo

    2012-01-01

    A response spectrum analysis (RSA) has been widely used to evaluate the structural integrity of various structural components in the nuclear industry. However, solving the large and complex structural systems numerically using the RSA requires a considerable amount of computational resources and time. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes the RSA based on the model order reduction (MOR) technique achieved by applying a projection from a higher order to a lower order space using Krylov subspaces generated by the Arnoldi algorithm. The dynamic characteristics of the final reduced system are almost identical with those of the full system by matching the moments of the reduced system with those of the full system up to the required nth order. It is remarkably efficient in terms of computation time and does not require a global system. Numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed method saves computational costs effectively, and provides a reduced system framework that predicts the accurate responses of a global system

  1. Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Large-Scale Communications Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Webb, Steve

    1997-01-01

    .... Tests of random number generators were also developed and applied to CECOM models. It was found that synchronization of random number strings in simulations is easy to implement and can provide significant savings for making comparative studies. If synchronization is in place, then statistical experiment design can be used to provide information on the sensitivity of the output to input parameters. The report concludes with recommendations and an implementation plan.

  2. Modeling and design techniques for RF power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Arvind; Laskar, Joy

    2008-01-01

    The book covers RF power amplifier design, from device and modeling considerations to advanced circuit design architectures and techniques. It focuses on recent developments and advanced topics in this area, including numerous practical designs to back the theoretical considerations. It presents the challenges in designing power amplifiers in silicon and helps the reader improve the efficiency of linear power amplifiers, and design more accurate compact device models, with faster extraction routines, to create cost effective and reliable circuits.

  3. Techniques for discrimination-free predictive models (Chapter 12)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamiran, F.; Calders, T.G.K.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Custers, B.H.M.; Calders, T.G.K.; Schermer, B.W.; Zarsky, T.Z.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we give an overview of the techniques developed ourselves for constructing discrimination-free classifiers. In discrimination-free classification the goal is to learn a predictive model that classifies future data objects as accurately as possible, yet the predicted labels should be

  4. Using of Structural Equation Modeling Techniques in Cognitive Levels Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalija Curkovic

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available When constructing knowledge tests, cognitive level is usually one of the dimensions comprising the test specifications with each item assigned to measure a particular level. Recently used taxonomies of the cognitive levels most often represent some modification of the original Bloom’s taxonomy. There are many concerns in current literature about existence of predefined cognitive levels. The aim of this article is to investigate can structural equation modeling techniques confirm existence of different cognitive levels. For the purpose of the research, a Croatian final high-school Mathematics exam was used (N = 9626. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural regression modeling were used to test three different models. Structural equation modeling techniques did not support existence of different cognitive levels in this case. There is more than one possible explanation for that finding. Some other techniques that take into account nonlinear behaviour of the items as well as qualitative techniques might be more useful for the purpose of the cognitive levels validation. Furthermore, it seems that cognitive levels were not efficient descriptors of the items and so improvements are needed in describing the cognitive skills measured by items.

  5. NMR and modelling techniques in structural and conformation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, R J [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The use of Lanthanide Induced Shifts (L.I.S.) and modelling techniques in conformational analysis is presented. The use of Co{sup III} porphyrins as shift reagents is discussed, with examples of their use in the conformational analysis of some heterocyclic amines. (author) 13 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Air quality modelling using chemometric techniques | Azid | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents that the chemometric techniques and modelling become an excellent tool in API assessment, air pollution source identification, apportionment and can be setbacks in designing an API monitoring network for effective air pollution resources management. Keywords: air pollutant index; chemometric; ANN; ...

  7. AN OVERVIEW OF REDUCED ORDER MODELING TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandelli, D.; Alfonsi, A.; Talbot, P.; Wang, C.; Maljovec, D.; Smith, C.; Rabiti, C.; Cogliati, J.

    2016-10-01

    The RISMC project is developing new advanced simulation-based tools to perform Computational Risk Analysis (CRA) for the existing fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These tools numerically model not only the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactors primary and secondary systems, but also external event temporal evolution and component/system ageing. Thus, this is not only a multi-physics problem being addressed, but also a multi-scale problem (both spatial, µm-mm-m, and temporal, seconds-hours-years). As part of the RISMC CRA approach, a large amount of computationally-expensive simulation runs may be required. An important aspect is that even though computational power is growing, the overall computational cost of a RISMC analysis using brute-force methods may be not viable for certain cases. A solution that is being evaluated to assist the computational issue is the use of reduced order modeling techniques. During the FY2015, we investigated and applied reduced order modeling techniques to decrease the RISMC analysis computational cost by decreasing the number of simulation runs; for this analysis improvement we used surrogate models instead of the actual simulation codes. This article focuses on the use of reduced order modeling techniques that can be applied to RISMC analyses in order to generate, analyze, and visualize data. In particular, we focus on surrogate models that approximate the simulation results but in a much faster time (microseconds instead of hours/days).

  8. Chromium (VI) reduction in acetate- and molasses-amended natural media: empirical model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Dongping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Stimulating indigenous microbes to reduce heavy metals from highly toxic oxidized species to more benign reduced species is a promising groundwater remediation technique that has already seen successful field applications. Designing such a bio-remediation scheme requires a model incorporating the kinetics of nonlinear bio-geochemical interactions between multiple species. With this motivation, we performed a set of microcosm experiments in natural sediments and their indigenous pore water and microbes, generating simultaneous time series for concentrations of Cr(VI), an electron donor (both molasses and acetate were considered), and biomass. Molasses was found to undergo a rapid direct abiotic reaction which eliminated all Cr(VI) before any biomass had time to grow. This was not found in the acetate microcosms, and a distinct zero-order bio-reduction process was observed. Existing models were found inappropriate and a new set of three coupled governing equations representing these process dynamics were developed and their parameters calibrated against the time series from the acetate-amended microcosms. Cell suspension batch experiments were also performed to calibrate bio-reduction rates in the absence of electron donor and sediment. The donor used to initially grow the cells (molasses or acetate) was found not to impact the reduction rate constants in suspension, which were orders of magnitude larger than those explaining the natural media microcosm experiments. This suggests the limited utility of kinetics determined in suspension for remedial design. Scoping studies on the natural media microcosms were also performed, suggesting limited impact of foreign abiotic material and minimal effect of diffusion limitation in the vertical dimension. These analyses may be of independent value to future researchers.

  9. Radiological passports as a decision support technique for post Chernobyl dose reduction in contaminated settlements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Mansoux, H.; Yakushau, A.; Antsipov, G.; Averin, V.; Zhouchenko, Y.; Minenko, V.; Tirmarche, M.

    2004-01-01

    countermeasures recommended and was incorporated in the database developed. It addresses the above settlements and all other critical locations, assists for evaluation of radioecological conditions and ranking of contaminated settlements, files data on these settlements, recommends and evaluates protection measures, and provides decision-makers with a risk-based remedial planning and a feasibility assessment of recommended measures based on a cost-benefit analysis. To support a decision protocol, the database, in addition to informational block, contains also a simulation block comprised by the following models: (A) contaminant transfer to basic forage resources and food; (B) exposure and risk assessment and prediction; and (C) cost and efficiency analysis based on data of available countermeasures. This study is funded by FGI Programme. (author)

  10. Particle Reduction Strategies - PAREST. Traffic emission modelling. Model comparision and alternative scenarios. Sub-report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugler, Ulrike; Theloke, Jochen; Joerss, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of the reference scenario and the various reduction scenarios in PAREST was based on the Central System of Emissions (CSE) (CSE, 2007). Emissions from road traffic were calculated by using the traffic emission model TREMOD (Knoerr et al., 2005) and fed into the CSE. The version TREMOD 4.17 has been used. The resulting emission levels in PAREST reference scenario were supplemented by the emission-reducing effect of the implementation of the future Euro 5 and 6 emission standards for cars and light commercial vehicles and Euro VI for heavy commercial vehicles in combination with the truck toll extension. [de

  11. Spatial Modeling of Geometallurgical Properties: Techniques and a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, Jared L., E-mail: jdeutsch@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Canada); Palmer, Kevin [Teck Resources Limited (Canada); Deutsch, Clayton V.; Szymanski, Jozef [University of Alberta, School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Canada); Etsell, Thomas H. [University of Alberta, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    High-resolution spatial numerical models of metallurgical properties constrained by geological controls and more extensively by measured grade and geomechanical properties constitute an important part of geometallurgy. Geostatistical and other numerical techniques are adapted and developed to construct these high-resolution models accounting for all available data. Important issues that must be addressed include unequal sampling of the metallurgical properties versus grade assays, measurements at different scale, and complex nonlinear averaging of many metallurgical parameters. This paper establishes techniques to address each of these issues with the required implementation details and also demonstrates geometallurgical mineral deposit characterization for a copper–molybdenum deposit in South America. High-resolution models of grades and comminution indices are constructed, checked, and are rigorously validated. The workflow demonstrated in this case study is applicable to many other deposit types.

  12. A fermionic molecular dynamics technique to model nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vantournhout, K.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At sub-nuclear densities of about 10 14 g/cm 3 , nuclear matter arranges itself in a variety of complex shapes. This can be the case in the crust of neutron stars and in core-collapse supernovae. These slab like and rod like structures, designated as nuclear pasta, have been modelled with classical molecular dynamics techniques. We present a technique, based on fermionic molecular dynamics, to model nuclear matter at sub-nuclear densities in a semi classical framework. The dynamical evolution of an antisymmetric ground state is described making the assumption of periodic boundary conditions. Adding the concepts of antisymmetry, spin and probability distributions to classical molecular dynamics, brings the dynamical description of nuclear matter to a quantum mechanical level. Applications of this model vary from investigation of macroscopic observables and the equation of state to the study of fundamental interactions on the microscopic structure of the matter. (author)

  13. New techniques for cutting and decontamination for decommissioning of nuclear research reactors with consideration of cost reduction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, W.; Redeker, C.F.; Versemann, R.

    2003-06-01

    In decommissioning of research reactors, specific boundary conditions, such as special materials, nuclides, geometries, spatial circumstances exist. This project aims on the development and adaptation of progressive procedures for decommissioning tasks with respect to economical aspects (cost reduction). Explored are Laser Cutting techniques, especially the cutting of aluminium in atmosphere and under water, remote- and manually controlled; decontamination and removal of concrete and ceramics by a combined diodelaser / cryogenic carbon dioxide thermal shock treatment (dry ice blasting) as well as cutting with the water-abrasive-suspension-jet and the plasma beam. The project will lead to application in the decommissioning of PTB's FRMB (research reactor of Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany). (orig.) [de

  14. Colloidal silver nanoparticles prepared by UV-light induced citrate reduction technique for the quantitative detection of uric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Anupam; Panda, Sovan Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Reddish-yellow color colloid consisting of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) has been synthesized by reducing aqueous AgNO3 solution by photo-induced citrate reduction technique under UV light. As prepared colloid exhibits single and intense plasmonic absorption peak in the violet region of the visible spectra with the peak centered at 405 nm. The NPs are fine and spherical with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 nm. These colloidal NPs have been used for the quantitative detection of uric acid by UV-VIS spectroscopy. A linear red shifting of the characteristics Plasmonic absorption peak of Ag NPs is observed with uric acid concentration. Uric acid can be detected by UV-VIS spectroscopy down to 5 nM limit using the prepared colloid.

  15. Model technique for aerodynamic study of boiler furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-02-01

    The help of the Division was recently sought to improve the heat transfer and reduce the exit gas temperature in a pulverized-fuel-fired boiler at an Australian power station. One approach adopted was to construct from Perspex a 1:20 scale cold-air model of the boiler furnace and to use a flow-visualization technique to study the aerodynamic patterns established when air was introduced through the p.f. burners of the model. The work established good correlations between the behaviour of the model and of the boiler furnace.

  16. Line impedance estimation using model based identification technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciobotaru, Mihai; Agelidis, Vassilios; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of the line impedance can be used by the control of numerous grid-connected systems, such as active filters, islanding detection techniques, non-linear current controllers, detection of the on/off grid operation mode. Therefore, estimating the line impedance can add extra functions...... into the operation of the grid-connected power converters. This paper describes a quasi passive method for estimating the line impedance of the distribution electricity network. The method uses the model based identification technique to obtain the resistive and inductive parts of the line impedance. The quasi...

  17. Coronary artery plaques: Cardiac CT with model-based and adaptive-statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Schlett, Christopher L.; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Major, Gyöngi Petra; Károlyi, Mihály; Do, Synho; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare image quality of coronary artery plaque visualization at CT angiography with images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) techniques. Methods: The coronary arteries of three ex vivo human hearts were imaged by CT and reconstructed with FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Coronary cross-sectional images were co-registered between the different reconstruction techniques and assessed for qualitative and quantitative image quality parameters. Readers were blinded to the reconstruction algorithm. Results: A total of 375 triplets of coronary cross-sectional images were co-registered. Using MBIR, 26% of the images were rated as having excellent overall image quality, which was significantly better as compared to ASIR and FBP (4% and 13%, respectively, all p < 0.001). Qualitative assessment of image noise demonstrated a noise reduction by using ASIR as compared to FBP (p < 0.01) and further noise reduction by using MBIR (p < 0.001). The contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) using MBIR was better as compared to ASIR and FBP (44 ± 19, 29 ± 15, 26 ± 9, respectively; all p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MBIR improved image quality, reduced image noise and increased CNR as compared to the other available reconstruction techniques. This may further improve the visualization of coronary artery plaque and allow radiation reduction.

  18. A model-reduction approach to the micromechanical analysis of polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jean-Claude; Suquet, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    The present study is devoted to the extension to polycrystals of a model-reduction technique introduced by the authors, called the nonuniform transformation field analysis (NTFA). This new reduced model is obtained in two steps. First the local fields of internal variables are decomposed on a reduced basis of modes as in the NTFA. Second the dissipation potential of the phases is replaced by its tangent second-order (TSO) expansion. The reduced evolution equations of the model can be entirely expressed in terms of quantities which can be pre-computed once for all. Roughly speaking, these pre-computed quantities depend only on the average and fluctuations per phase of the modes and of the associated stress fields. The accuracy of the new NTFA-TSO model is assessed by comparison with full-field simulations on two specific applications, creep of polycrystalline ice and response of polycrystalline copper to a cyclic tension-compression test. The new reduced evolution equations is faster than the full-field computations by two orders of magnitude in the two examples.

  19. Balloon osteoplasty--a new technique for reduction and stabilisation of impression fractures in the tibial plateau: a cadaver study and first clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Philipp; Sandmann, Gunther; Bauer, Jan; König, Benjamin; Martetschläger, Frank; Müller, Dirk; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Neumaier, Markus; Biberthaler, Peter; Stöckle, Ulrich; Freude, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Fractures of the tibial plateau are among the most severe injuries of the knee joint and lead to advanced gonarthrosis if the reduction does not restore perfect joint congruency. Many different reduction techniques focusing on open surgical procedures have been described in the past. In this context we would like to introduce a novel technique which was first tested in a cadaver setup and has undergone its successful first clinical application. Since kyphoplasty demonstrated effective ways of anatomical correction in spine fractures, we adapted the inflatable instruments and used the balloon technique to reduce depressed fragments of the tibial plateau. The technique enabled us to restore a congruent cartilage surface and bone reduction. In this technique we see a useful new method to reduce depressed fractures of the tibial plateau with the advantages of low collateral damage as it is known from minimally invasive procedures.

  20. Model-checking techniques based on cumulative residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D Y; Wei, L J; Ying, Z

    2002-03-01

    Residuals have long been used for graphical and numerical examinations of the adequacy of regression models. Conventional residual analysis based on the plots of raw residuals or their smoothed curves is highly subjective, whereas most numerical goodness-of-fit tests provide little information about the nature of model misspecification. In this paper, we develop objective and informative model-checking techniques by taking the cumulative sums of residuals over certain coordinates (e.g., covariates or fitted values) or by considering some related aggregates of residuals, such as moving sums and moving averages. For a variety of statistical models and data structures, including generalized linear models with independent or dependent observations, the distributions of these stochastic processes tinder the assumed model can be approximated by the distributions of certain zero-mean Gaussian processes whose realizations can be easily generated by computer simulation. Each observed process can then be compared, both graphically and numerically, with a number of realizations from the Gaussian process. Such comparisons enable one to assess objectively whether a trend seen in a residual plot reflects model misspecification or natural variation. The proposed techniques are particularly useful in checking the functional form of a covariate and the link function. Illustrations with several medical studies are provided.

  1. Development of phased mission analysis program with Monte Carlo method. Improvement of the variance reduction technique with biasing towards top event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinan; Mihara, Takatsugu

    1998-12-01

    This report presents a variance reduction technique to estimate the reliability and availability of highly complex systems during phased mission time using the Monte Carlo simulation. In this study, we introduced the variance reduction technique with a concept of distance between the present system state and the cut set configurations. Using this technique, it becomes possible to bias the transition from the operating states to the failed states of components towards the closest cut set. Therefore a component failure can drive the system towards a cut set configuration more effectively. JNC developed the PHAMMON (Phased Mission Analysis Program with Monte Carlo Method) code which involved the two kinds of variance reduction techniques: (1) forced transition, and (2) failure biasing. However, these techniques did not guarantee an effective reduction in variance. For further improvement, a variance reduction technique incorporating the distance concept was introduced to the PHAMMON code and the numerical calculation was carried out for the different design cases of decay heat removal system in a large fast breeder reactor. Our results indicate that the technique addition of this incorporating distance concept is an effective means of further reducing the variance. (author)

  2. Compact state-space models for complex superconducting radio-frequency structures based on model order reduction and concatenation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flisgen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of large chains of superconducting cavities with couplers is a challenging task in computational electrical engineering. The direct numerical treatment of these structures can easily lead to problems with more than ten million degrees of freedom. Problems of this complexity are typically solved with the help of parallel programs running on supercomputing infrastructures. However, these infrastructures are expensive to purchase, to operate, and to maintain. The aim of this thesis is to introduce and to validate an approach which allows for modeling large structures on a standard workstation. The novel technique is called State-Space Concatenations and is based on the decomposition of the complete structure into individual segments. The radio-frequency properties of the generated segments are described by a set of state-space equations which either emerge from analytical considerations or from numerical discretization schemes. The model order of these equations is reduced using dedicated model order reduction techniques. In a final step, the reduced-order state-space models of the segments are concatenated in accordance with the topology of the complete structure. The concatenation is based on algebraic continuity constraints of electric and magnetic fields on the decomposition planes and results in a compact state-space system of the complete radio-frequency structure. Compared to the original problem, the number of degrees of freedom is drastically reduced, i.e. a problem with more than ten million degrees of freedom can be reduced on a standard workstation to a problem with less than one thousand degrees of freedom. The final state-space system allows for determining frequency-domain transfer functions, field distributions, resonances, and quality factors of the complete structure in a convenient manner. This thesis presents the theory of the state-space concatenation approach and discusses several validation and application examples. The examples

  3. Model Reduction via Principe Component Analysis and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, R.; Chen, J.; Hoversten, M. G.; Luo, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical and hydrogeological inverse problems often include a large number of unknown parameters, ranging from hundreds to millions, depending on parameterization and problems undertaking. This makes inverse estimation and uncertainty quantification very challenging, especially for those problems in two- or three-dimensional spatial domains. Model reduction technique has the potential of mitigating the curse of dimensionality by reducing total numbers of unknowns while describing the complex subsurface systems adequately. In this study, we explore the use of principal component analysis (PCA) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling methods for model reduction through the use of synthetic datasets. We compare the performances of three different but closely related model reduction approaches: (1) PCA methods with geometric sampling (referred to as 'Method 1'), (2) PCA methods with MCMC sampling (referred to as 'Method 2'), and (3) PCA methods with MCMC sampling and inclusion of random effects (referred to as 'Method 3'). We consider a simple convolution model with five unknown parameters as our goal is to understand and visualize the advantages and disadvantages of each method by comparing their inversion results with the corresponding analytical solutions. We generated synthetic data with noise added and invert them under two different situations: (1) the noised data and the covariance matrix for PCA analysis are consistent (referred to as the unbiased case), and (2) the noise data and the covariance matrix are inconsistent (referred to as biased case). In the unbiased case, comparison between the analytical solutions and the inversion results show that all three methods provide good estimates of the true values and Method 1 is computationally more efficient. In terms of uncertainty quantification, Method 1 performs poorly because of relatively small number of samples obtained, Method 2 performs best, and Method 3 overestimates uncertainty due to inclusion

  4. Noise Reduction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  5. Climate change air toxic co-reduction in the context of macroeconomic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Chen, Pi-Cheng; Shi, Hsiu-Ching; Chao, Chia-Wei

    2013-08-15

    This paper examines the health implications of global PM reduction accompanying greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the 180 national economies of the global macroeconomy. A human health effects module based on empirical data on GHG emissions, PM emissions, background PM concentrations, source apportionment and human health risk coefficients is used to estimate reductions in morbidity and mortality from PM exposures globally as co-reduction of GHG reductions. These results are compared against the "fuzzy bright line" that often underlies regulatory decisions for environmental toxics, and demonstrate that the risk reduction through PM reduction would usually be considered justified in traditional risk-based decisions for environmental toxics. It is shown that this risk reduction can be on the order of more than 4 × 10(-3) excess lifetime mortality risk, with global annual cost savings of slightly more than $10B, when uniform GHG reduction measures across all sectors of the economy form the basis for climate policy ($2.2B if only Annex I nations reduce). Consideration of co-reduction of PM-10 within a climate policy framework harmonized with other environmental policies can therefore be an effective driver of climate policy. An error analysis comparing results of the current model against those of significantly more spatially resolved models at city and national scales indicates errors caused by the low spatial resolution of the global model used here may be on the order of a factor of 2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Romanian energy system model and a nuclear reduction strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gota, Dan-Ioan; Lund, Henrik; Miclea, Liviu

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the Romanian energy system with the purpose of providing a tool for the analysis of future sustainable energy strategies. The model represents the total national energy system and is detailed to the level of hourly demand and production in order to be able to analyse...... the consequences of adding fluctuating renewable energy sources to the system. The model has been implemented into the EnergyPLAN tool and has been validated in order to determine if it can be used as a reference model for other simulations. In EnergyPLAN, two different future strategy scenarios for the Romanian...... energy system are compared to the actual data of Romania of year 2008. First, a comparison is made between the 2008 model and the 2013 strategy scenario corresponding to the grid of the Romanian transmission system operator (TSO) Transelectrica. Then, a comparison is made to a second strategy scenario...

  7. Speckle noise reduction technique for Lidar echo signal based on self-adaptive pulse-matching independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Jiaxing; Zhu, Daiyin; Tu, Qi

    2018-04-01

    Speckle noise has always been a particularly tricky problem in improving the ranging capability and accuracy of Lidar system especially in harsh environment. Currently, effective speckle de-noising techniques are extremely scarce and should be further developed. In this study, a speckle noise reduction technique has been proposed based on independent component analysis (ICA). Since normally few changes happen in the shape of laser pulse itself, the authors employed the laser source as a reference pulse and executed the ICA decomposition to find the optimal matching position. In order to achieve the self-adaptability of algorithm, local Mean Square Error (MSE) has been defined as an appropriate criterion for investigating the iteration results. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that the self-adaptive pulse-matching ICA (PM-ICA) method could effectively decrease the speckle noise and recover the useful Lidar echo signal component with high quality. Especially, the proposed method achieves 4 dB more improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than a traditional homomorphic wavelet method.

  8. Kinetic modeling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) reduction of titania in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tan Wei; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Rezan, Sheikh Abdul; Noor, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Izah Shoparwe, Noor; Alizadeh, Reza; Roohi, Parham

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, reduction of Titania (TiO2) by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)-hydrogen-argon gas mixture was investigated by experimental and kinetic modelling in MATLAB. The reduction experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1100-1200°C with a reduction time from 1-3 hours and 10-20 minutes of LPG flowing time. A shrinking core model (SCM) was employed for the kinetic modelling in order to determine the rate and extent of reduction. The highest experimental extent of reduction of 38% occurred at a temperature of 1200°C with 3 hours reduction time and 20 minutes of LPG flowing time. The SCM gave a predicted extent of reduction of 82.1% due to assumptions made in the model. The deviation between SCM and experimental data was attributed to porosity, thermodynamic properties and minute thermal fluctuations within the sample. In general, the reduction rates increased with increasing reduction temperature and LPG flowing time.

  9. A Third-Generation Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction Technique: Phantom Study of Image Noise, Spatial Resolution, Lesion Detectability, and Dose Reduction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, André; Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Samei, Ehsan

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess image noise, spatial resolution, lesion detectability, and the dose reduction potential of a proprietary third-generation adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR-V) technique. A phantom representing five different body sizes (12-37 cm) and a contrast-detail phantom containing lesions of five low-contrast levels (5-20 HU) and three sizes (2-6 mm) were deployed. Both phantoms were scanned on a 256-MDCT scanner at six different radiation doses (1.25-10 mGy). Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), ASIR-V with 50% blending with FBP (ASIR-V 50%), and ASIR-V without blending (ASIR-V 100%). In the first phantom, noise properties were assessed by noise power spectrum analysis. Spatial resolution properties were measured by use of task transfer functions for objects of different contrasts. Noise magnitude, noise texture, and resolution were compared between the three groups. In the second phantom, low-contrast detectability was assessed by nine human readers independently for each condition. The dose reduction potential of ASIR-V was estimated on the basis of a generalized linear statistical regression model. On average, image noise was reduced 37.3% with ASIR-V 50% and 71.5% with ASIR-V 100% compared with FBP. ASIR-V shifted the noise power spectrum toward lower frequencies compared with FBP. The spatial resolution of ASIR-V was equivalent or slightly superior to that of FBP, except for the low-contrast object, which had lower resolution. Lesion detection significantly increased with both ASIR-V levels (p = 0.001), with an estimated radiation dose reduction potential of 15% ± 5% (SD) for ASIR-V 50% and 31% ± 9% for ASIR-V 100%. ASIR-V reduced image noise and improved lesion detection compared with FBP and had potential for radiation dose reduction while preserving low-contrast detectability.

  10. Development of a kinetic model for biological sulphate reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-phase (aqueous/gas) physical, biological and chemical processes ... Additionally, the background weak acid/base chemistry for water, carbonate, ... in the UCTADM1 model, and hence the physical gas exchange for sulphide is included.

  11. Development of a kinetic model for biological sulphate reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accordingly, following the approach in the UCTADM1 model, chemical processes for these are included. .... can be applied under BSR conditions also) and that for simple ...... the authors would like to thank Kwezi V3 Engineers for afford-.

  12. Use of hydrological modelling and isotope techniques in Guvenc basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinbilek, D.

    1991-07-01

    The study covers the work performed under Project No. 335-RC-TUR-5145 entitled ''Use of Hydrologic Modelling and Isotope Techniques in Guvenc Basin'' and is an initial part of a program for estimating runoff from Central Anatolia Watersheds. The study presented herein consists of mainly three parts: 1) the acquisition of a library of rainfall excess, direct runoff and isotope data for Guvenc basin; 2) the modification of SCS model to be applied to Guvenc basin first and then to other basins of Central Anatolia for predicting the surface runoff from gaged and ungaged watersheds; and 3) the use of environmental isotope technique in order to define the basin components of streamflow of Guvenc basin. 31 refs, figs and tabs

  13. Construct canine intracranial aneurysm model by endovascular technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xiaodong; Liu Yizhi; Ni Caifang; Ding Yi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct canine bifurcation aneurysms suitable for evaluating the exploration of endovascular devices for interventional therapy by endovascular technique. Methods: The right common carotid artery of six dogs was expanded with a pliable balloon by means of endovascular technique, then embolization with detached balloon was taken at their originations DAS examination were performed on 1, 2, 3 d after the procedurse. Results: 6 aneurysm models were created in six dogs successfully with the mean width and height of the aneurysms decreasing in 3 days. Conclusions: This canine aneurysm model presents the virtue in the size and shape of human cerebral bifurcation saccular aneurysms on DSA image, suitable for developing the exploration of endovascular devices for aneurismal therapy. The procedure is quick, reliable and reproducible. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of data reduction methods for dynamic PET series based on Monte Carlo techniques and the NCAT phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thireou, Trias; Rubio Guivernau, Jose Luis; Atlamazoglou, Vassilis; Ledesma, Maria Jesus; Pavlopoulos, Sotiris; Santos, Andres; Kontaxakis, George

    2006-01-01

    A realistic dynamic positron-emission tomography (PET) thoracic study was generated, using the 4D NURBS-based (non-uniform rational B-splines) cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom and a sophisticated model of the PET imaging process, simulating two solitary pulmonary nodules. Three data reduction and blind source separation methods were applied to the simulated data: principal component analysis, independent component analysis and similarity mapping. All methods reduced the initial amount of image data to a smaller, comprehensive and easily managed set of parametric images, where structures were separated based on their different kinetic characteristics and the lesions were readily identified. The results indicate that the above-mentioned methods can provide an accurate tool for the support of both visual inspection and subsequent detailed kinetic analysis of the dynamic series via compartmental or non-compartmental models

  15. Towards Model Validation and Verification with SAT Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Gogolla, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After sketching how system development and the UML (Unified Modeling Language) and the OCL (Object Constraint Language) are related, validation and verification with the tool USE (UML-based Specification Environment) is demonstrated. As a more efficient alternative for verification tasks, two approaches using SAT-based techniques are put forward: First, a direct encoding of UML and OCL with Boolean variables and propositional formulas, and second, an encoding employing an...

  16. Metal artifact reduction algorithm based on model images and spatial information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jay [Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shih, Cheng-Ting [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, Shu-Jun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzung-Chi [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Sun, Jing-Yi [Institute of Radiological Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, No.155, Sec. 2, Linong Street, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become one of the most favorable choices for diagnosis of trauma. However, high-density metal implants can induce metal artifacts in CT images, compromising image quality. In this study, we proposed a model-based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm. First, we built a model image using the k-means clustering technique with spatial information and calculated the difference between the original image and the model image. Then, the projection data of these two images were combined using an exponential weighting function. At last, the corrected image was reconstructed using the filter back-projection algorithm. Two metal-artifact contaminated images were studied. For the cylindrical water phantom image, the metal artifact was effectively removed. The mean CT number of water was improved from -28.95{+-}97.97 to -4.76{+-}4.28. For the clinical pelvic CT image, the dark band and the metal line were removed, and the continuity and uniformity of the soft tissue were recovered as well. These results indicate that the proposed MAR algorithm is useful for reducing metal artifact and could improve the diagnostic value of metal-artifact contaminated CT images.

  17. [Preparation of simulate craniocerebral models via three dimensional printing technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Q; Chen, A L; Zhang, T; Zhu, Q; Xu, T

    2016-08-09

    Three dimensional (3D) printing technique was used to prepare the simulate craniocerebral models, which were applied to preoperative planning and surgical simulation. The image data was collected from PACS system. Image data of skull bone, brain tissue and tumors, cerebral arteries and aneurysms, and functional regions and relative neural tracts of the brain were extracted from thin slice scan (slice thickness 0.5 mm) of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, slice thickness 1mm), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, respectively. MIMICS software was applied to reconstruct colored virtual models by identifying and differentiating tissues according to their gray scales. Then the colored virtual models were submitted to 3D printer which produced life-sized craniocerebral models for surgical planning and surgical simulation. 3D printing craniocerebral models allowed neurosurgeons to perform complex procedures in specific clinical cases though detailed surgical planning. It offered great convenience for evaluating the size of spatial fissure of sellar region before surgery, which helped to optimize surgical approach planning. These 3D models also provided detailed information about the location of aneurysms and their parent arteries, which helped surgeons to choose appropriate aneurismal clips, as well as perform surgical simulation. The models further gave clear indications of depth and extent of tumors and their relationship to eloquent cortical areas and adjacent neural tracts, which were able to avoid surgical damaging of important neural structures. As a novel and promising technique, the application of 3D printing craniocerebral models could improve the surgical planning by converting virtual visualization into real life-sized models.It also contributes to functional anatomy study.

  18. Skin fluorescence model based on the Monte Carlo technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churmakov, Dmitry Y.; Meglinski, Igor V.; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Greenhalgh, Douglas A.

    2003-10-01

    The novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account spatial distribution of fluorophores following the collagen fibers packing, whereas in epidermis and stratum corneum the distribution of fluorophores assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the NIR spectral region, while fluorescence of sensor layer embedded in epidermis is localized at the adjusted depth. The model is also able to simulate the skin fluorescence spectra.

  19. System health monitoring using multiple-model adaptive estimation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifford, Stanley Ryan

    Monitoring system health for fault detection and diagnosis by tracking system parameters concurrently with state estimates is approached using a new multiple-model adaptive estimation (MMAE) method. This novel method is called GRid-based Adaptive Parameter Estimation (GRAPE). GRAPE expands existing MMAE methods by using new techniques to sample the parameter space. GRAPE expands on MMAE with the hypothesis that sample models can be applied and resampled without relying on a predefined set of models. GRAPE is initially implemented in a linear framework using Kalman filter models. A more generalized GRAPE formulation is presented using extended Kalman filter (EKF) models to represent nonlinear systems. GRAPE can handle both time invariant and time varying systems as it is designed to track parameter changes. Two techniques are presented to generate parameter samples for the parallel filter models. The first approach is called selected grid-based stratification (SGBS). SGBS divides the parameter space into equally spaced strata. The second approach uses Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) to determine the parameter locations and minimize the total number of required models. LHS is particularly useful when the parameter dimensions grow. Adding more parameters does not require the model count to increase for LHS. Each resample is independent of the prior sample set other than the location of the parameter estimate. SGBS and LHS can be used for both the initial sample and subsequent resamples. Furthermore, resamples are not required to use the same technique. Both techniques are demonstrated for both linear and nonlinear frameworks. The GRAPE framework further formalizes the parameter tracking process through a general approach for nonlinear systems. These additional methods allow GRAPE to either narrow the focus to converged values within a parameter range or expand the range in the appropriate direction to track the parameters outside the current parameter range boundary

  20. Application of object modeling technique to medical image retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Fumiaki; Abe, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the results of discussions on the object-oriented analysis methodology, which is one of the object-oriented paradigms. In particular, we considered application of the object modeling technique (OMT) to the analysis of a medical image retrieval system. The object-oriented methodology places emphasis on the construction of an abstract model from real-world entities. The effectiveness of and future improvements to OMT are discussed from the standpoint of the system's expandability. These discussions have elucidated that the methodology is sufficiently well-organized and practical to be applied to commercial products, provided that it is applied to the appropriate problem domain. (author)

  1. Light aircraft sound transmission studies - Noise reduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Heitman, Karen E.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental tests conducted on the fuselage of a single-engine Piper Cherokee light aircraft suggest that the cabin interior noise can be reduced by increasing the transmission loss of the dominant sound transmission paths and/or by increasing the cabin interior sound absorption. The validity of using a simple room equation model to predict the cabin interior sound-pressure level for different fuselage and exterior sound field conditions is also presented. The room equation model is based on the sound power flow balance for the cabin space and utilizes the measured transmitted sound intensity data. The room equation model predictions were considered good enough to be used for preliminary acoustical design studies.

  2. Approximate reduction of linear population models governed by stochastic differential equations: application to multiregional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Luis; Alonso, Juan Antonio

    2017-12-01

    In this work we develop approximate aggregation techniques in the context of slow-fast linear population models governed by stochastic differential equations and apply the results to the treatment of populations with spatial heterogeneity. Approximate aggregation techniques allow one to transform a complex system involving many coupled variables and in which there are processes with different time scales, by a simpler reduced model with a fewer number of 'global' variables, in such a way that the dynamics of the former can be approximated by that of the latter. In our model we contemplate a linear fast deterministic process together with a linear slow process in which the parameters are affected by additive noise, and give conditions for the solutions corresponding to positive initial conditions to remain positive for all times. By letting the fast process reach equilibrium we build a reduced system with a lesser number of variables, and provide results relating the asymptotic behaviour of the first- and second-order moments of the population vector for the original and the reduced system. The general technique is illustrated by analysing a multiregional stochastic system in which dispersal is deterministic and the rate growth of the populations in each patch is affected by additive noise.

  3. High precision NC lathe feeding system rigid-flexible coupling model reduction technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, He; Hua, Qingsong; Cheng, Lianjun; Zhang, Hongxin; Zhao, Qinghai; Mao, Xinkai

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes the use of dynamic substructure method of reduction of order to achieve effective reduction of feed system for high precision NC lathe feeding system rigid-flexible coupling model, namely the use of ADAMS to establish the rigid flexible coupling simulation model of high precision NC lathe, and then the vibration simulation of the period by using the FD 3D damper is very effective for feed system of bolt connection reduction of multi degree of freedom model. The vibration simulation calculation is more accurate, more quickly.

  4. Finite element calculations illustrating a method of model reduction for the dynamics of structures with localized nonlinearities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd; Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2006-10-01

    A technique published in SAND Report 2006-1789 ''Model Reduction of Systems with Localized Nonlinearities'' is illustrated in two problems of finite element structural dynamics. That technique, called here the Method of Locally Discontinuous Basis Vectors (LDBV), was devised to address the peculiar difficulties of model reduction of systems having spatially localized nonlinearities. It's illustration here is on two problems of different geometric and dynamic complexity, but each containing localized interface nonlinearities represented by constitutive models for bolted joint behavior. As illustrated on simple problems in the earlier SAND report, the LDBV Method not only affords reduction in size of the nonlinear systems of equations that must be solved, but it also facilitates the use of much larger time steps on problems of joint macro-slip than would be possible otherwise. These benefits are more dramatic for the larger problems illustrated here. The work of both the original SAND report and this one were funded by the LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. Equation-free model reduction for complex dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Maitre, O. P.; Mathelin, L.; Le Maitre, O. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a reduced model strategy for simulation of complex physical systems. A classical reduced basis is first constructed relying on proper orthogonal decomposition of the system. Then, unlike the alternative approaches, such as Galerkin projection schemes for instance, an equation-free reduced model is constructed. It consists in the determination of an explicit transformation, or mapping, for the evolution over a coarse time-step of the projection coefficients of the system state on the reduced basis. The mapping is expressed as an explicit polynomial transformation of the projection coefficients and is computed once and for all in a pre-processing stage using the detailed model equation of the system. The reduced system can then be advanced in time by successive applications of the mapping. The CPU cost of the method lies essentially in the mapping approximation which is performed offline, in a parallel fashion, and only once. Subsequent application of the mapping to perform a time-integration is carried out at a low cost thanks to its explicit character. Application of the method is considered for the 2-D flow around a circular cylinder. We investigate the effectiveness of the reduced model in rendering the dynamics for both asymptotic state and transient stages. It is shown that the method leads to a stable and accurate time-integration for only a fraction of the cost of a detailed simulation, provided that the mapping is properly approximated and the reduced basis remains relevant for the dynamics investigated. (authors)

  6. Model studies of limitation of carbon dioxide emissions reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The report consists of two papers concerning mitigation of CO 2 emissions in Sweden, ''Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions. Socio-economic effects and the importance of international coordination'', and ''Model calculations for Sweden's energy system with carbon dioxide limitations''. Separate abstracts were prepared for both of the papers

  7. Optimal Tax Reduction by Depreciation : A Stochastic Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, M.; De Waegenaere, A.M.B.; Wielhouwer, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper focuses on the choice of a depreciation method, when trying to minimize the expected value of the present value of future tax payments.In a quite general model that allows for stochastic future cash- ows and a tax structure with tax brackets, we determine the optimal choice between the

  8. Maximizing neotissue growth kinetics in a perfusion bioreactor: An in silico strategy using model reduction and Bayesian optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrian, Mohammad; Guyot, Yann; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Olofsson, Simon; Sonnaert, Maarten; Misener, Ruth; Geris, Liesbet

    2018-03-01

    In regenerative medicine, computer models describing bioreactor processes can assist in designing optimal process conditions leading to robust and economically viable products. In this study, we started from a (3D) mechanistic model describing the growth of neotissue, comprised of cells, and extracellular matrix, in a perfusion bioreactor set-up influenced by the scaffold geometry, flow-induced shear stress, and a number of metabolic factors. Subsequently, we applied model reduction by reformulating the problem from a set of partial differential equations into a set of ordinary differential equations. Comparing the reduced model results to the mechanistic model results and to dedicated experimental results assesses the reduction step quality. The obtained homogenized model is 10 5 fold faster than the 3D version, allowing the application of rigorous optimization techniques. Bayesian optimization was applied to find the medium refreshment regime in terms of frequency and percentage of medium replaced that would maximize neotissue growth kinetics during 21 days of culture. The simulation results indicated that maximum neotissue growth will occur for a high frequency and medium replacement percentage, a finding that is corroborated by reports in the literature. This study demonstrates an in silico strategy for bioprocess optimization paying particular attention to the reduction of the associated computational cost. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Level-set techniques for facies identification in reservoir modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Marco A.; McLaughlin, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the application of level-set techniques for facies identification in reservoir models. The identification of facies is a geometrical inverse ill-posed problem that we formulate in terms of shape optimization. The goal is to find a region (a geologic facies) that minimizes the misfit between predicted and measured data from an oil-water reservoir. In order to address the shape optimization problem, we present a novel application of the level-set iterative framework developed by Burger in (2002 Interfaces Free Bound. 5 301-29 2004 Inverse Problems 20 259-82) for inverse obstacle problems. The optimization is constrained by (the reservoir model) a nonlinear large-scale system of PDEs that describes the reservoir dynamics. We reformulate this reservoir model in a weak (integral) form whose shape derivative can be formally computed from standard results of shape calculus. At each iteration of the scheme, the current estimate of the shape derivative is utilized to define a velocity in the level-set equation. The proper selection of this velocity ensures that the new shape decreases the cost functional. We present results of facies identification where the velocity is computed with the gradient-based (GB) approach of Burger (2002) and the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) technique of Burger (2004). While an adjoint formulation allows the straightforward application of the GB approach, the LM technique requires the computation of the large-scale Karush-Kuhn-Tucker system that arises at each iteration of the scheme. We efficiently solve this system by means of the representer method. We present some synthetic experiments to show and compare the capabilities and limitations of the proposed implementations of level-set techniques for the identification of geologic facies.

  10. Level-set techniques for facies identification in reservoir modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Marco A; McLaughlin, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the application of level-set techniques for facies identification in reservoir models. The identification of facies is a geometrical inverse ill-posed problem that we formulate in terms of shape optimization. The goal is to find a region (a geologic facies) that minimizes the misfit between predicted and measured data from an oil–water reservoir. In order to address the shape optimization problem, we present a novel application of the level-set iterative framework developed by Burger in (2002 Interfaces Free Bound. 5 301–29; 2004 Inverse Problems 20 259–82) for inverse obstacle problems. The optimization is constrained by (the reservoir model) a nonlinear large-scale system of PDEs that describes the reservoir dynamics. We reformulate this reservoir model in a weak (integral) form whose shape derivative can be formally computed from standard results of shape calculus. At each iteration of the scheme, the current estimate of the shape derivative is utilized to define a velocity in the level-set equation. The proper selection of this velocity ensures that the new shape decreases the cost functional. We present results of facies identification where the velocity is computed with the gradient-based (GB) approach of Burger (2002) and the Levenberg–Marquardt (LM) technique of Burger (2004). While an adjoint formulation allows the straightforward application of the GB approach, the LM technique requires the computation of the large-scale Karush–Kuhn–Tucker system that arises at each iteration of the scheme. We efficiently solve this system by means of the representer method. We present some synthetic experiments to show and compare the capabilities and limitations of the proposed implementations of level-set techniques for the identification of geologic facies

  11. Validation of transport models using additive flux minimization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankin, A. Y.; Kruger, S. E. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Groebner, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Hakim, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Kritz, A. H.; Rafiq, T. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    A new additive flux minimization technique is proposed for carrying out the verification and validation (V and V) of anomalous transport models. In this approach, the plasma profiles are computed in time dependent predictive simulations in which an additional effective diffusivity is varied. The goal is to obtain an optimal match between the computed and experimental profile. This new technique has several advantages over traditional V and V methods for transport models in tokamaks and takes advantage of uncertainty quantification methods developed by the applied math community. As a demonstration of its efficiency, the technique is applied to the hypothesis that the paleoclassical density transport dominates in the plasma edge region in DIII-D tokamak discharges. A simplified version of the paleoclassical model that utilizes the Spitzer resistivity for the parallel neoclassical resistivity and neglects the trapped particle effects is tested in this paper. It is shown that a contribution to density transport, in addition to the paleoclassical density transport, is needed in order to describe the experimental profiles. It is found that more additional diffusivity is needed at the top of the H-mode pedestal, and almost no additional diffusivity is needed at the pedestal bottom. The implementation of this V and V technique uses the FACETS::Core transport solver and the DAKOTA toolkit for design optimization and uncertainty quantification. The FACETS::Core solver is used for advancing the plasma density profiles. The DAKOTA toolkit is used for the optimization of plasma profiles and the computation of the additional diffusivity that is required for the predicted density profile to match the experimental profile.

  12. Validation of transport models using additive flux minimization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankin, A. Y.; Kruger, S. E.; Groebner, R. J.; Hakim, A.; Kritz, A. H.; Rafiq, T.

    2013-01-01

    A new additive flux minimization technique is proposed for carrying out the verification and validation (V and V) of anomalous transport models. In this approach, the plasma profiles are computed in time dependent predictive simulations in which an additional effective diffusivity is varied. The goal is to obtain an optimal match between the computed and experimental profile. This new technique has several advantages over traditional V and V methods for transport models in tokamaks and takes advantage of uncertainty quantification methods developed by the applied math community. As a demonstration of its efficiency, the technique is applied to the hypothesis that the paleoclassical density transport dominates in the plasma edge region in DIII-D tokamak discharges. A simplified version of the paleoclassical model that utilizes the Spitzer resistivity for the parallel neoclassical resistivity and neglects the trapped particle effects is tested in this paper. It is shown that a contribution to density transport, in addition to the paleoclassical density transport, is needed in order to describe the experimental profiles. It is found that more additional diffusivity is needed at the top of the H-mode pedestal, and almost no additional diffusivity is needed at the pedestal bottom. The implementation of this V and V technique uses the FACETS::Core transport solver and the DAKOTA toolkit for design optimization and uncertainty quantification. The FACETS::Core solver is used for advancing the plasma density profiles. The DAKOTA toolkit is used for the optimization of plasma profiles and the computation of the additional diffusivity that is required for the predicted density profile to match the experimental profile

  13. Index-aware model order reduction : LTI DAEs in electric networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banagaaya, N.; Schilders, W.H.A.; Ali, G.; Tischendorf, C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Model order reduction (MOR) has been widely used in the electric networks but little has been done to reduce higher index differential algebraic equations (DAEs). The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Most methods first do an index reduction before reducing a

  14. Model reduction of detailed-balanced reaction networks by clustering linkage classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; van der Schaft, Abraham; Findeisen, Rolf; Bullinger, Eric; Balsa-Canto, Eva; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model reduction method that involves sequential application of clustering of linkage classes and Kron reduction. This approach is specifically useful for chemical reaction networks with each linkage class having less number of reactions. In case of detailed balanced chemical reaction

  15. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the Des Moines River, Iowa using SWAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F

    2009-10-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km(2) in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed.

  17. Improved ceramic slip casting technique. [application to aircraft model fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M. (Inventor); Vasquez, Peter (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A primary concern in modern fluid dynamics research is the experimental verification of computational aerothermodynamic codes. This research requires high precision and detail in the test model employed. Ceramic materials are used for these models because of their low heat conductivity and their survivability at high temperatures. To fabricate such models, slip casting techniques were developed to provide net-form, precision casting capability for high-purity ceramic materials in aqueous solutions. In previous slip casting techniques, block, or flask molds made of plaster-of-paris were used to draw liquid from the slip material. Upon setting, parts were removed from the flask mold and cured in a kiln at high temperatures. Casting detail was usually limited with this technique -- detailed parts were frequently damaged upon separation from the flask mold, as the molded parts are extremely delicate in the uncured state, and the flask mold is inflexible. Ceramic surfaces were also marred by 'parting lines' caused by mold separation. This adversely affected the aerodynamic surface quality of the model as well. (Parting lines are invariably necessary on or near the leading edges of wings, nosetips, and fins for mold separation. These areas are also critical for flow boundary layer control.) Parting agents used in the casting process also affected surface quality. These agents eventually soaked into the mold, the model, or flaked off when releasing the case model. Different materials were tried, such as oils, paraffin, and even an algae. The algae released best, but some of it remained on the model and imparted an uneven texture and discoloration on the model surface when cured. According to the present invention, a wax pattern for a shell mold is provided, and an aqueous mixture of a calcium sulfate-bonded investment material is applied as a coating to the wax pattern. The coated wax pattern is then dried, followed by curing to vaporize the wax pattern and leave a shell

  18. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  19. Models for universal reduction of macroscopic quantum fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diosi, L.

    1988-10-01

    If quantum mechanics is universal, then macroscopic bodies would, in principle, possess macroscopic quantum fluctuations (MQF) in their positions, orientations, densities etc. Such MQF, however, are not observed in nature. The hypothesis is adopted that the absence of MQF is due to a certain universal mechanism. Gravitational measures were applied for reducing MQF of the mass density. This model leads to classical trajectories in the macroscopic limit of translational motion. For massive objects, unwanted macroscopic superpositions of quantum states will be destroyed within short times. (R.P.) 34 refs

  20. Coset Space Dimensional Reduction approach to the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farakos, K.; Kapetanakis, D.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Zoupanos, G.

    1988-01-01

    We present a unified theory in ten dimensions based on the gauge group E 8 , which is dimensionally reduced to the Standard Mode SU 3c xSU 2 -LxU 1 , which breaks further spontaneously to SU 3L xU 1em . The model gives similar predictions for sin 2 θ w and proton decay as the minimal SU 5 G.U.T., while a natural choice of the coset space radii predicts light Higgs masses a la Coleman-Weinberg

  1. A dynamic model of optimal reduction of marine oil pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deissenberg, C. [CEFI-CNRS, Les Milles (France); Gottinger, H.W. [International Inst. for Environmental Economics and Management, Bad Waldsee (Germany); Gurman, V. [RAS, Program Systems Inst., Pereslavl-Zalessky (Russian Federation); Marinushkin, D. [Pereslavl Univ., Pereslavl-Zalessky (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposes a system of dynamic models to describe the interactive behaviour of different agents (polluters, inspectors, and a principal pollution control agency) involved in the processes of marine oil pollution and of its prevention and purification, under some realistic assumptions, In particular, short- and long-term economic responses of polluters to monitoring efforts, as well as possible collusions between polluters and inspectors, are taken into account. A numerical example is considered using the results of Deissenberg et al., (2001), which show the existence of optimal fines and inspector wage rates that minimize (along with other variables) a simple and visual 'social damage' criterion. (Author)

  2. An implicit scheme with memory reduction technique for steady state solutions of DVBE in all flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. M.; Shu, C.; Yang, W. M.; Wu, J.

    2018-04-01

    High consumption of memory and computational effort is the major barrier to prevent the widespread use of the discrete velocity method (DVM) in the simulation of flows in all flow regimes. To overcome this drawback, an implicit DVM with a memory reduction technique for solving a steady discrete velocity Boltzmann equation (DVBE) is presented in this work. In the method, the distribution functions in the whole discrete velocity space do not need to be stored, and they are calculated from the macroscopic flow variables. As a result, its memory requirement is in the same order as the conventional Euler/Navier-Stokes solver. In the meantime, it is more efficient than the explicit DVM for the simulation of various flows. To make the method efficient for solving flow problems in all flow regimes, a prediction step is introduced to estimate the local equilibrium state of the DVBE. In the prediction step, the distribution function at the cell interface is calculated by the local solution of DVBE. For the flow simulation, when the cell size is less than the mean free path, the prediction step has almost no effect on the solution. However, when the cell size is much larger than the mean free path, the prediction step dominates the solution so as to provide reasonable results in such a flow regime. In addition, to further improve the computational efficiency of the developed scheme in the continuum flow regime, the implicit technique is also introduced into the prediction step. Numerical results showed that the proposed implicit scheme can provide reasonable results in all flow regimes and increase significantly the computational efficiency in the continuum flow regime as compared with the existing DVM solvers.

  3. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Numerical and modeling techniques used in the EPIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzica, P.A.; Abramson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    EPIC models fuel and coolant motion which result from internal fuel pin pressure (from fission gas or fuel vapor) and/or from the generation of sodium vapor pressures in the coolant channel subsequent to pin failure in an LMFBR. The modeling includes the ejection of molten fuel from the pin into a coolant channel with any amount of voiding through a clad rip which may be of any length or which may expand with time. One-dimensional Eulerian hydrodynamics is used to model both the motion of fuel and fission gas inside a molten fuel cavity and the mixture of two-phase sodium and fission gas in the channel. Motion of molten fuel particles in the coolant channel is tracked with a particle-in-cell technique

  5. Soft computing techniques toward modeling the water supplies of Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliadis, L; Maris, F; Tachos, S

    2011-10-01

    This research effort aims in the application of soft computing techniques toward water resources management. More specifically, the target is the development of reliable soft computing models capable of estimating the water supply for the case of "Germasogeia" mountainous watersheds in Cyprus. Initially, ε-Regression Support Vector Machines (ε-RSVM) and fuzzy weighted ε-RSVMR models have been developed that accept five input parameters. At the same time, reliable artificial neural networks have been developed to perform the same job. The 5-fold cross validation approach has been employed in order to eliminate bad local behaviors and to produce a more representative training data set. Thus, the fuzzy weighted Support Vector Regression (SVR) combined with the fuzzy partition has been employed in an effort to enhance the quality of the results. Several rational and reliable models have been produced that can enhance the efficiency of water policy designers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Hierarchy structuring for mammography technique by interpretive structural modeling method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Nozomi; Kurowarabi, Kunio; Terashita, Takayoshi; Nishimoto, Naoki; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2009-10-20

    Participation in screening mammography is currently desired in Japan because of the increase in breast cancer morbidity. However, the pain and discomfort of mammography is recognized as a significant deterrent for women considering this examination. Thus quick procedures, sufficient experience, and advanced skills are required for radiologic technologists. The aim of this study was to make the point of imaging techniques explicit and to help understand the complicated procedure. We interviewed 3 technologists who were highly skilled in mammography, and 14 factors were retrieved by using brainstorming and the KJ method. We then applied Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM) to the factors and developed a hierarchical concept structure. The result showed a six-layer hierarchy whose top node was explanation of the entire procedure on mammography. Male technologists were related to as a negative factor. Factors concerned with explanation were at the upper node. We gave attention to X-ray techniques and considerations. The findings will help beginners improve their skills.

  7. Teaching scientific concepts through simple models and social communication techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilakaratne, K.

    2011-01-01

    For science education, it is important to demonstrate to students the relevance of scientific concepts in every-day life experiences. Although there are methods available for achieving this goal, it is more effective if cultural flavor is also added to the teaching techniques and thereby the teacher and students can easily relate the subject matter to their surroundings. Furthermore, this would bridge the gap between science and day-to-day experiences in an effective manner. It could also help students to use science as a tool to solve problems faced by them and consequently they would feel science is a part of their lives. In this paper, it has been described how simple models and cultural communication techniques can be used effectively in demonstrating important scientific concepts to the students of secondary and higher secondary levels by using two consecutive activities carried out at the Institute of Fundamental Studies (IFS), Sri Lanka. (author)

  8. Assessments of Bubble Dynamics Model and Influential Parameters in Microbubble Drag Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skudarnov, P. V; Lin, C. X

    2006-01-01

    .... The effects of mixture density variation, free stream turbulence intensity, free stream velocity, and surface roughness on the microbubble drag reduction were studied using a single phase model based...

  9. Automated Techniques for the Qualitative Analysis of Ecological Models: Continuous Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn van Coller

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The mathematics required for a detailed analysis of the behavior of a model can be formidable. In this paper, I demonstrate how various computer packages can aid qualitative analyses by implementing techniques from dynamical systems theory. Because computer software is used to obtain the results, the techniques can be used by nonmathematicians as well as mathematicians. In-depth analyses of complicated models that were previously very difficult to study can now be done. Because the paper is intended as an introduction to applying the techniques to ecological models, I have included an appendix describing some of the ideas and terminology. A second appendix shows how the techniques can be applied to a fairly simple predator-prey model and establishes the reliability of the computer software. The main body of the paper discusses a ratio-dependent model. The new techniques highlight some limitations of isocline analyses in this three-dimensional setting and show that the model is structurally unstable. Another appendix describes a larger model of a sheep-pasture-hyrax-lynx system. Dynamical systems techniques are compared with a traditional sensitivity analysis and are found to give more information. As a result, an incomplete relationship in the model is highlighted. I also discuss the resilience of these models to both parameter and population perturbations.

  10. FAM-MDR: a flexible family-based multifactor dimensionality reduction technique to detect epistasis using related individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Cattaert

    Full Text Available We propose a novel multifactor dimensionality reduction method for epistasis detection in small or extended pedigrees, FAM-MDR. It combines features of the Genome-wide Rapid Association using Mixed Model And Regression approach (GRAMMAR with Model-Based MDR (MB-MDR. We focus on continuous traits, although the method is general and can be used for outcomes of any type, including binary and censored traits. When comparing FAM-MDR with Pedigree-based Generalized MDR (PGMDR, which is a generalization of Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR to continuous traits and related individuals, FAM-MDR was found to outperform PGMDR in terms of power, in most of the considered simulated scenarios. Additional simulations revealed that PGMDR does not appropriately deal with multiple testing and consequently gives rise to overly optimistic results. FAM-MDR adequately deals with multiple testing in epistasis screens and is in contrast rather conservative, by construction. Furthermore, simulations show that correcting for lower order (main effects is of utmost importance when claiming epistasis. As Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM is a complex phenotype likely influenced by gene-gene interactions, we applied FAM-MDR to examine data on glucose area-under-the-curve (GAUC, an endophenotype of T2DM for which multiple independent genetic associations have been observed, in the Amish Family Diabetes Study (AFDS. This application reveals that FAM-MDR makes more efficient use of the available data than PGMDR and can deal with multi-generational pedigrees more easily. In conclusion, we have validated FAM-MDR and compared it to PGMDR, the current state-of-the-art MDR method for family data, using both simulations and a practical dataset. FAM-MDR is found to outperform PGMDR in that it handles the multiple testing issue more correctly, has increased power, and efficiently uses all available information.

  11. Mathematical Modeling and Dimension Reduction in Dynamical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegård, Michael

    . These systems are generically nonlinear and the studies of them often become enormously complex. The framework in which such systems are best understood is via the theory of dynamical systems, where the critical behavior is systematically analyzed by performing bifurcation theory. In that context the current...... thesis is attacking two problems. The first is concerned with the mathematical modelling and analysis of an experiment of a vibro-impacting beam. This type of dynamical system has received much attention in the recent years and they occur frequently in mechanical applications, where they induce noise...... the existence of isolas of subharmonic orbits. These were then verified in the practical experiment in the lab. The second problem that is addressed in the current thesis is a problem that has developed as a consequence of the increasing power of computers which has created the demand for analysis of ever more...

  12. Model reduction and analysis of a vibrating beam microgyroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi; Nayfeh, Ali Hasan; Choura, Slim A.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the nonlinear dynamic analysis of a vibrating beam microgyroscope composed of a rotating cantilever beam with a tip mass at its end. The rigid mass is coupled to two orthogonal electrodes in the drive and sense directions, which are attached to the rotating base. The microbeam is driven by an AC voltage in the drive direction, which induces vibrations in the orthogonal sense direction due to rotation about the microbeam axis. The electrode placed in the sense direction is used to measure the induced motions and extract the underlying angular speed. A reduced-order model of the gyroscope is developed using the method of multiple scales and used to examine its dynamic behavior. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. Model Reduction of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems Experiencing Hopf Bifurcation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelkefi, Abdessattar

    2013-06-18

    In this paper, we employ the normal form to derive a reduced - order model that reproduces nonlinear dynamical behavior of aeroelastic systems that undergo Hopf bifurcation. As an example, we consider a rigid two - dimensional airfoil that is supported by nonlinear springs in the pitch and plunge directions and subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. We apply the center manifold theorem on the governing equations to derive its normal form that constitutes a simplified representation of the aeroelastic sys tem near flutter onset (manifestation of Hopf bifurcation). Then, we use the normal form to identify a self - excited oscillator governed by a time - delay ordinary differential equation that approximates the dynamical behavior while reducing the dimension of the original system. Results obtained from this oscillator show a great capability to predict properly limit cycle oscillations that take place beyond and above flutter as compared with the original aeroelastic system.

  14. Model reduction and analysis of a vibrating beam microgyroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2012-05-08

    The present work is concerned with the nonlinear dynamic analysis of a vibrating beam microgyroscope composed of a rotating cantilever beam with a tip mass at its end. The rigid mass is coupled to two orthogonal electrodes in the drive and sense directions, which are attached to the rotating base. The microbeam is driven by an AC voltage in the drive direction, which induces vibrations in the orthogonal sense direction due to rotation about the microbeam axis. The electrode placed in the sense direction is used to measure the induced motions and extract the underlying angular speed. A reduced-order model of the gyroscope is developed using the method of multiple scales and used to examine its dynamic behavior. © The Author(s) 2012 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Indirect reduction technique using a distraction support in minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis of tibial shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Wei; Shi, Zeng-Yuan; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Mao, Hai-Jiao

    2016-12-01

    To describe an indirect reduction technique during minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) of tibial shaft fractures with the use of a distraction support. Between March 2011 and October 2014, 52 patients with a mean age of 48 years (16-72 years) sustaining tibial shaft fractures were included. All the patients underwent MIPPO for the fractures using a distraction support prior to insertion of the plate. Fracture angular deformity was assessed by goni- ometer measurement on preoperative and postoperative images. Preoperative radiographs revealed a mean of 7.6°(1.2°-28°) angulation in coronal plane and a mean of 6.8°(0.5°-19°) angulation in sagittal plane. Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral radio- graphs showed a mean of 0.8°(0°-4.0°) and 0.6°(0°-3.6°) of varus/valgus and apex anterior/posterior angulation, respectively. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were noted. This study suggests that the distraction support during MIPPO of tibial shaft fractures is an effective and safe method with no associated complications.

  16. A new cerebral vasospasm model established with endovascular puncture technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Jianfei; Liu Yizhi; Ji Jiansong; Zhao Zhongwei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the method of establishing cerebral vasospasm (CVS) models in rabbits by using endovascular puncture technique. Methods: Endovascular puncture procedure was performed in 78 New Zealand white rabbits to produce subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The survival rabbits were randomly divided into seven groups (3 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d, 3 d, 7 d and 14 d), with five rabbits in each group for both study group (SAH group) and control group. Cerebral CT scanning was carried out in all rabbits both before and after the operation. The inner diameter and the thickness of vascular wall of both posterior communicating artery (PcoA) and basilar artery (BA) were determined after the animals were sacrificed, and the results were analyzed. Results: Of 78 experimental rabbits, CVS model was successfully established in 45, including 35 of SAH group and 10 control subgroup. The technical success rate was 57.7%. Twelve hours after the procedure, the inner diameter of PcoA and BA in SAH group was decreased by 45.6% and 52.3%, respectively, when compared with these in control group. The vascular narrowing showed biphasic changes, the inner diameter markedly decreased again at the 7th day when the decrease reached its peak to 31.2% and 48.6%, respectively. Conclusion: Endovascular puncture technique is an effective method to establish CVS models in rabbits. The death rate of experimental animals can be decreased if new interventional material is used and the manipulation is carefully performed. (authors)

  17. Steady state analysis of Boolean molecular network models via model reduction and computational algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Aguilar, Boris; Hinkelmann, Franziska; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2014-06-26

    A key problem in the analysis of mathematical models of molecular networks is the determination of their steady states. The present paper addresses this problem for Boolean network models, an increasingly popular modeling paradigm for networks lacking detailed kinetic information. For small models, the problem can be solved by exhaustive enumeration of all state transitions. But for larger models this is not feasible, since the size of the phase space grows exponentially with the dimension of the network. The dimension of published models is growing to over 100, so that efficient methods for steady state determination are essential. Several methods have been proposed for large networks, some of them heuristic. While these methods represent a substantial improvement in scalability over exhaustive enumeration, the problem for large networks is still unsolved in general. This paper presents an algorithm that consists of two main parts. The first is a graph theoretic reduction of the wiring diagram of the network, while preserving all information about steady states. The second part formulates the determination of all steady states of a Boolean network as a problem of finding all solutions to a system of polynomial equations over the finite number system with two elements. This problem can be solved with existing computer algebra software. This algorithm compares favorably with several existing algorithms for steady state determination. One advantage is that it is not heuristic or reliant on sampling, but rather determines algorithmically and exactly all steady states of a Boolean network. The code for the algorithm, as well as the test suite of benchmark networks, is available upon request from the corresponding author. The algorithm presented in this paper reliably determines all steady states of sparse Boolean networks with up to 1000 nodes. The algorithm is effective at analyzing virtually all published models even those of moderate connectivity. The problem for

  18. Use of advanced modeling techniques to optimize thermal packaging designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formato, Richard M; Potami, Raffaele; Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed case study the authors demonstrate, for the first time, the capability of using advanced modeling techniques to correctly simulate the transient temperature response of a convective flow-based thermal shipper design. The objective of this case study was to demonstrate that simulation could be utilized to design a 2-inch-wall polyurethane (PUR) shipper to hold its product box temperature between 2 and 8 °C over the prescribed 96-h summer profile (product box is the portion of the shipper that is occupied by the payload). Results obtained from numerical simulation are in excellent agreement with empirical chamber data (within ±1 °C at all times), and geometrical locations of simulation maximum and minimum temperature match well with the corresponding chamber temperature measurements. Furthermore, a control simulation test case was run (results taken from identical product box locations) to compare the coupled conduction-convection model with a conduction-only model, which to date has been the state-of-the-art method. For the conduction-only simulation, all fluid elements were replaced with "solid" elements of identical size and assigned thermal properties of air. While results from the coupled thermal/fluid model closely correlated with the empirical data (±1 °C), the conduction-only model was unable to correctly capture the payload temperature trends, showing a sizeable error compared to empirical values (ΔT > 6 °C). A modeling technique capable of correctly capturing the thermal behavior of passively refrigerated shippers can be used to quickly evaluate and optimize new packaging designs. Such a capability provides a means to reduce the cost and required design time of shippers while simultaneously improving their performance. Another advantage comes from using thermal modeling (assuming a validated model is available) to predict the temperature distribution in a shipper that is exposed to ambient temperatures which were not bracketed

  19. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow

  20. Fluoroscopically guided closed reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle: prospective clinical study of the technique and results in ten dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Tomlinson, J L; Reed, A L

    1999-01-01

    To report a technique for fluoroscopically guided closed reduction with internal fixation of fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle (FLHC) and determine the long-term results in 10 clinical cases. Prospective clinical case study. Ten dogs with 11 fractures. Fractures of the lateral portion of the humeral condyle were stabilized with transcondylar screws and Kirschner wires. Closed reduction and implant placement were achieved using intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. After fracture repair, postoperative radiographs were evaluated for articular alignment and implant placement. Dogs were evaluated after surgery by means of lameness scores, elbow range of motion (ROM), radiographic assessment, and owner evaluation of function. Postoperative reduction was considered anatomic in 6 fractures with all other fractures having ROM values between affected and unaffected elbows. All of the dogs in this study regained 90-100% of full function, based on owner assessment. Fluoroscopic guidance for closed reduction and internal fixation of FLHC in dogs is an effective technique.

  1. Adaptive Autoregressive Model for Reduction of Noise in SPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reijo Takalo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents improved autoregressive modelling (AR to reduce noise in SPECT images. An AR filter was applied to prefilter projection images and postfilter ordered subset expectation maximisation (OSEM reconstruction images (AR-OSEM-AR method. The performance of this method was compared with filtered back projection (FBP preceded by Butterworth filtering (BW-FBP method and the OSEM reconstruction method followed by Butterworth filtering (OSEM-BW method. A mathematical cylinder phantom was used for the study. It consisted of hot and cold objects. The tests were performed using three simulated SPECT datasets. Image quality was assessed by means of the percentage contrast resolution (CR% and the full width at half maximum (FWHM of the line spread functions of the cylinders. The BW-FBP method showed the highest CR% values and the AR-OSEM-AR method gave the lowest CR% values for cold stacks. In the analysis of hot stacks, the BW-FBP method had higher CR% values than the OSEM-BW method. The BW-FBP method exhibited the lowest FWHM values for cold stacks and the AR-OSEM-AR method for hot stacks. In conclusion, the AR-OSEM-AR method is a feasible way to remove noise from SPECT images. It has good spatial resolution for hot objects.

  2. Monte Carlo technique for very large ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, C.; Winkelmann, V.

    1982-08-01

    Rebbi's multispin coding technique is improved and applied to the kinetic Ising model with size 600*600*600. We give the central part of our computer program (for a CDC Cyber 76), which will be helpful also in a simulation of smaller systems, and describe the other tricks necessary to go to large lattices. The magnetization M at T=1.4* T c is found to decay asymptotically as exp(-t/2.90) if t is measured in Monte Carlo steps per spin, and M( t = 0) = 1 initially.

  3. Validation techniques of agent based modelling for geospatial simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Darvishi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting aspects of modelling and simulation study is to describe the real world phenomena that have specific properties; especially those that are in large scales and have dynamic and complex behaviours. Studying these phenomena in the laboratory is costly and in most cases it is impossible. Therefore, Miniaturization of world phenomena in the framework of a model in order to simulate the real phenomena is a reasonable and scientific approach to understand the world. Agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS is a new modelling method comprising of multiple interacting agent. They have been used in the different areas; for instance, geographic information system (GIS, biology, economics, social science and computer science. The emergence of ABM toolkits in GIS software libraries (e.g. ESRI’s ArcGIS, OpenMap, GeoTools, etc for geospatial modelling is an indication of the growing interest of users to use of special capabilities of ABMS. Since ABMS is inherently similar to human cognition, therefore it could be built easily and applicable to wide range applications than a traditional simulation. But a key challenge about ABMS is difficulty in their validation and verification. Because of frequent emergence patterns, strong dynamics in the system and the complex nature of ABMS, it is hard to validate and verify ABMS by conventional validation methods. Therefore, attempt to find appropriate validation techniques for ABM seems to be necessary. In this paper, after reviewing on Principles and Concepts of ABM for and its applications, the validation techniques and challenges of ABM validation are discussed.

  4. Validation techniques of agent based modelling for geospatial simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, M.; Ahmadi, G.

    2014-10-01

    One of the most interesting aspects of modelling and simulation study is to describe the real world phenomena that have specific properties; especially those that are in large scales and have dynamic and complex behaviours. Studying these phenomena in the laboratory is costly and in most cases it is impossible. Therefore, Miniaturization of world phenomena in the framework of a model in order to simulate the real phenomena is a reasonable and scientific approach to understand the world. Agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) is a new modelling method comprising of multiple interacting agent. They have been used in the different areas; for instance, geographic information system (GIS), biology, economics, social science and computer science. The emergence of ABM toolkits in GIS software libraries (e.g. ESRI's ArcGIS, OpenMap, GeoTools, etc) for geospatial modelling is an indication of the growing interest of users to use of special capabilities of ABMS. Since ABMS is inherently similar to human cognition, therefore it could be built easily and applicable to wide range applications than a traditional simulation. But a key challenge about ABMS is difficulty in their validation and verification. Because of frequent emergence patterns, strong dynamics in the system and the complex nature of ABMS, it is hard to validate and verify ABMS by conventional validation methods. Therefore, attempt to find appropriate validation techniques for ABM seems to be necessary. In this paper, after reviewing on Principles and Concepts of ABM for and its applications, the validation techniques and challenges of ABM validation are discussed.

  5. Mathematical Model and Artificial Intelligent Techniques Applied to a Milk Industry through DSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, P. Ravi; Divya, V. P. Sree

    2011-08-01

    The resources for electrical energy are depleting and hence the gap between the supply and the demand is continuously increasing. Under such circumstances, the option left is optimal utilization of available energy resources. The main objective of this chapter is to discuss about the Peak load management and overcome the problems associated with it in processing industries such as Milk industry with the help of DSM techniques. The chapter presents a generalized mathematical model for minimizing the total operating cost of the industry subject to the constraints. The work presented in this chapter also deals with the results of application of Neural Network, Fuzzy Logic and Demand Side Management (DSM) techniques applied to a medium scale milk industrial consumer in India to achieve the improvement in load factor, reduction in Maximum Demand (MD) and also the consumer gets saving in the energy bill.

  6. Laparoscopic anterior resection: new anastomosis technique in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedirli, Abdulkadir; Yucel, Deniz; Ekim, Burcu

    2014-01-01

    Bowel anastomosis after anterior resection is one of the most difficult tasks to perform during laparoscopic colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate a new feasible and safe intracorporeal anastomosis technique after laparoscopic left-sided colon or rectum resection in a pig model. The technique was evaluated in 5 pigs. The OrVil device (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts) was inserted into the anus and advanced proximally to the rectum. A 0.5-cm incision was made in the sigmoid colon, and the 2 sutures attached to its delivery tube were cut. After the delivery tube was evacuated through the anus, the tip of the anvil was removed through the perforation. The sigmoid colon was transected just distal to the perforation with an endoscopic linear stapler. The rectosigmoid segment to be resected was removed through the anus with a grasper, and distal transection was performed. A 25-mm circular stapler was inserted and combined with the anvil, and end-to-side intracorporeal anastomosis was then performed. We performed the technique in 5 pigs. Anastomosis required an average of 12 minutes. We observed that the proximal and distal donuts were completely removed in all pigs. No anastomotic air leakage was observed in any of the animals. This study shows the efficacy and safety of intracorporeal anastomosis with the OrVil device after laparoscopic anterior resection.

  7. Nonlinear model order reduction for flexible multibody dynamics: a modal derivatives approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Long, E-mail: L.Wu-1@tudelft.nl [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering (Netherlands); Tiso, Paolo, E-mail: ptiso@ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Institute for Mechanical Systems (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    An effective reduction technique is presented for flexible multibody systems, for which the elastic deflection could not be considered small. We consider here the planar beam systems undergoing large elastic rotations, in the floating frame description. The proposed method enriches the classical linear reduction basis with modal derivatives stemming from the derivative of the eigenvalue problem. Furthermore, the Craig–Bampton method is applied to couple the different reduced components. Based on the linear projection, the configuration-dependent internal force can be expressed as cubic polynomials in the reduced coordinates. Coefficients of these polynomials can be precomputed for efficient runtime evaluation. The numerical results show that the modal derivatives are essential for the correct approximation of the nonlinear elastic deflection with respect to the body reference. The proposed reduction method constitutes a natural and effective extension of the classical linear modal reduction in the floating frame.

  8. Photochemical modelling of photo-oxidant levels over the Swiss plateau and emission reduction scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosselet, C.M.; Kerr, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    During summertime high pressure conditions, high photo-oxidant (O 3 , H 2 O 2 , PAN and others) levels are frequently observed in the planetary boundary layer in central Europe. It is well known that close to the earth's surface ozone is formed by complex reactions involving VOC, NO x , and sunlight. Substantial reductions of both precursors are needed to reduce photo-oxidant levels. In this context the reductions of the abundance of the precursors and the variation of their ratios is of great importance. Here we report model calculations from the Harwell Photochemical Trajectory Model of the levels of O 3 , H 2 O 2 and PAN along a trajectory over the Swiss Plateau from Lake Constance to Lake Geneva. These calculations are in satisfactory agreement with measurements made during the intensive observation period of the research program POLLUMET (Pollution and Meteorology in Switzerland). Sensitivity calculations of emission reduction scenarios indicate that on the Swiss Plateau the ozone production may be mainly NO x -limited; under conditions where the CO levels are closer to the upper limit within the range (120-600 ppbv). The calculated peak ozone level reduction caused by an exclusive NO x -emission reduction is about three times larger than that caused by an exclusive VOC reduction. The combined reduction of all precursor compounds is the most efficient strategy, although it is only marginally more efficient than the NO x -reduction scenario alone. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs

  9. A Continuous Dynamic Traffic Assignment Model From Plate Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivas, A.; Gallego, I.; Sanchez-Cambronero, S.; Ruiz-Ripoll, L.; Barba, R.M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the dynamic estimation of traffic flows on all links of a network from observable field data assuming the first-in-first-out (FIFO) hypothesis. The traffic flow intensities recorded at the exit of the scanned links are propagated to obtain the flow waves on unscanned links. For that, the model calculates the flow-cost functions through information registered with the plate scanning technique. The model also responds to the concern about the parameter quality of flow-cost functions to replicate the real traffic flow behaviour. It includes a new algorithm for the adjustment of the parameter values to link characteristics when its quality is questionable. For that, it is necessary the a priori study of the location of the scanning devices to identify all path flows and to measure travel times in all links. A synthetic network is used to illustrate the proposed method and to prove its usefulness and feasibility. (Author)

  10. Carbon emission reduction targeting through process integration and fuel switching with mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiew, B.J.; Shuhaimi, M.; Hashim, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CO 2 emissions reduction targeting for existing plant were categorized into three groups. ► Model for CO 2 emissions reduction targeting via combination approach was developed. ► Effect of combination approach onto HEN area efficiency was discussed. ► Proposed execution strategy can avoid HEN area efficiency deterioration. -- Abstract: Carbon emission reduction targeting is an important and effective effort for industry to contribute in controlling greenhouse gases concentration in atmosphere. Graphical approach has been proposed for CO 2 emissions reduction targeting via HEN retrofit and fuel switching. However, it involves potentially time consuming manual procedures and the quality of solutions produced greatly depends on designer’s experience and judgment. Besides, graphical approach hardly account for the cost factor during the design phase, thus potentially generate complex design. This paper introduces an MINLP model for simultaneous CO 2 emissions reduction targeting via fuel switching and HEN retrofit. A sequential model execution was proposed along with the proposed model. The application of the model on a crude preheat train case study has demonstrated its workability to generate optimal solution for targeted CO 2 emissions reduction at minimum payback period.

  11. Identifying and quantifying energy savings on fired plant using low cost modelling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Robert; Ward, John

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: → Furnace models based on the zone method for radiation calculation are described. → Validated steady-state and transient models have been developed. → We show how these simple models can identify the best options for saving energy. → High emissivity coatings predicted to give performance enhancement on a fired heater. → Optimal heat recovery strategies on a steel reheating furnace are predicted. -- Abstract: Combustion in fired heaters, boilers and furnaces often accounts for the major energy consumption on industrial processes. Small improvements in efficiency can result in large reductions in energy consumption, CO 2 emissions, and operating costs. This paper will describe some useful low cost modelling techniques based on the zone method to help identify energy saving opportunities on high temperature fuel-fired process plant. The zone method has for many decades, been successfully applied to small batch furnaces through to large steel-reheating furnaces, glass tanks, boilers and fired heaters on petrochemical plant. Zone models can simulate both steady-state furnace operation and more complex transient operation typical of a production environment. These models can be used to predict thermal efficiency and performance, and more importantly, to assist in identifying and predicting energy saving opportunities from such measures as: ·Improving air/fuel ratio and temperature controls. ·Improved insulation. ·Use of oxygen or oxygen enrichment. ·Air preheating via flue gas heat recovery. ·Modification to furnace geometry and hearth loading. There is also increasing interest in the application of refractory coatings for increasing surface radiation in fired plant. All of the techniques can yield savings ranging from a few percent upwards and can deliver rapid financial payback, but their evaluation often requires robust and reliable models in order to increase confidence in making financial investment decisions. This paper gives

  12. Modelling CEC variations versus structural iron reduction levels in dioctahedral smectites. Existing approaches, new data and model refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Jebril; Tournassat, Christophe; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Greneche, Jean Marc; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    A model was developed to describe how the 2:1 layer excess negative charge induced by the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by sodium dithionite buffered with citrate-bicarbonate is balanced and applied to nontronites. This model is based on new experimental data and extends structural interpretation introduced by a former model [36-38]. The 2:1 layer negative charge increase due to Fe(III) to Fe(II) reduction is balanced by an excess adsorption of cations in the clay interlayers and a specific sorption of H(+) from solution. Prevalence of one compensating mechanism over the other is related to the growing lattice distortion induced by structural Fe(III) reduction. At low reduction levels, cation adsorption dominates and some of the incorporated protons react with structural OH groups, leading to a dehydroxylation of the structure. Starting from a moderate reduction level, other structural changes occur, leading to a reorganisation of the octahedral and tetrahedral lattice: migration or release of cations, intense dehydroxylation and bonding of protons to undersaturated oxygen atoms. Experimental data highlight some particular properties of ferruginous smectites regarding chemical reduction. Contrary to previous assumptions, the negative layer charge of nontronites does not only increase towards a plateau value upon reduction. A peak is observed in the reduction domain. After this peak, the negative layer charge decreases upon extended reduction (>30%). The decrease is so dramatic that the layer charge of highly reduced nontronites can fall below that of its fully oxidised counterpart. Furthermore, the presence of a large amount of tetrahedral Fe seems to promote intense clay structural changes and Fe reducibility. Our newly acquired data clearly show that models currently available in the literature cannot be applied to the whole reduction range of clay structural Fe. Moreover, changes in the model normalising procedure clearly demonstrate that the investigated low

  13. Arthroscopically Assisted Coracoclavicular Fixation Using a Single Flip Button Device Technique: What Are the Main Factors Affecting the Maintenance of Reduction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Beom Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Among coracoclavicular (CC fixation techniques, the use of flip button device was demonstrated to have successful outcomes with the advantage of being able to accommodate an arthroscopic procedure. Purpose. This study was conducted to investigate the factors associated with loss of fixation after arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single flip button device for acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocations. Materials and Methods. We enrolled a total of 47 patients (35 men and 12 women. Plain radiography was performed at a mean of 24 months postoperatively to evaluate the final radiological outcome. The primary outcome measure was a long-term reduction of the AC joint for at least 24 months. Results. We found that 29 patients had a high quality reduction (61.7% and 18 patients had a low quality reduction (38.3% in initial postoperative CT findings. Our study showed that the duration (5 days from injury to treatment and the quality of initial postoperative reduction were significantly associated with the maintenance of reduction at final follow-up. Conclusion. Our study showed that maintaining stable reduction after arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single flip button device technique is difficult especially in patients who received delayed treatment or whose initial reduction quality was poor.

  14. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-01-01

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and

  15. Techniques to Access Databases and Integrate Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, Gene; Tenney, Nathan D.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Droppo, James G.; Meyer, Philip D.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2009-06-17

    This document addresses techniques to access and integrate data for defining site-specific conditions and behaviors associated with ground-water and surface-water radionuclide transport applicable to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews. Environmental models typically require input data from multiple internal and external sources that may include, but are not limited to, stream and rainfall gage data, meteorological data, hydrogeological data, habitat data, and biological data. These data may be retrieved from a variety of organizations (e.g., federal, state, and regional) and source types (e.g., HTTP, FTP, and databases). Available data sources relevant to hydrologic analyses for reactor licensing are identified and reviewed. The data sources described can be useful to define model inputs and parameters, including site features (e.g., watershed boundaries, stream locations, reservoirs, site topography), site properties (e.g., surface conditions, subsurface hydraulic properties, water quality), and site boundary conditions, input forcings, and extreme events (e.g., stream discharge, lake levels, precipitation, recharge, flood and drought characteristics). Available software tools for accessing established databases, retrieving the data, and integrating it with models were identified and reviewed. The emphasis in this review was on existing software products with minimal required modifications to enable their use with the FRAMES modeling framework. The ability of four of these tools to access and retrieve the identified data sources was reviewed. These four software tools were the Hydrologic Data Acquisition and Processing System (HDAPS), Integrated Water Resources Modeling System (IWRMS) External Data Harvester, Data for Environmental Modeling Environmental Data Download Tool (D4EM EDDT), and the FRAMES Internet Database Tools. The IWRMS External Data Harvester and the D4EM EDDT were identified as the most promising tools based on their ability to access and

  16. Comparative analysis of perinatal outcome of spontaneous pregnancy reduction and multifetal pregnancy reduction in triplet pregnancies conceived after assisted reproductive technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: With the advent of assisted reproductive treatment options, the incidence of multiple pregnancies has increased. Although the need for elective single embryo transfer is emphasized time and again, its uniform applicability in practice is yet a distant goal. In view of the fact that triplet and higher order pregnancies are associated with significant fetomaternal complications, the fetal reduction is a commonly used option in such cases. This retrospective study aims to compare the perinatal outcome in patients with triplet gestation who have undergone spontaneous fetal reduction (SFR as against those in whom multifetal pregnancy reduction (MFPR was done. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the present study, eighty patients with triplet gestation at 6 weeks were considered. The patients underwent SFR or MFPR at or before 12-13 weeks and were divided into two groups (34 and 46, respectively. RESULTS: Our study found no statistical difference in perinatal outcome between the SFR and MFPR groups in terms of average gestational age at delivery, abortion rate, preterm delivery rate, and birth weight. The study shows that the risk of aborting all fetuses after SFR is three times (odds ratio [OR] = 3.600, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2794-46.388 that of MFPR in subsequent 2 weeks. There were more chances of loss of extra fetus in SFR (23.5% group than MFPR group (8.7% (OR = 3.889, 95% CI = 1.030-14.680. As neither group offers any significant benefit from preterm delivery, multiple pregnancies continue to be responsible for preterm delivery despite fetal reduction. CONCLUSION: There appears to be some advantages of MFPR in perinatal outcome when compared to SFR, especially if the latter happens at advanced gestation. Therefore, although it is advisable to wait for SFR to occur, in patients with triplet gestation at 11-12 weeks, MFPR is a viable option to be considered.

  17. Photochemical modeling in California with two chemical mechanisms: model intercomparison and response to emission reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kelly, James T; Avise, Jeremy C; Kaduwela, Ajith P; Stockwell, William R

    2011-05-01

    An updated version of the Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC) chemical mechanism (SAPRC07C) was implemented into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.6. CMAQ simulations using SAPRC07C and the previously released version, SAPRC99, were performed and compared for an episode during July-August, 2000. Ozone (O3) predictions of the SAPRC07C simulation are generally lower than those of the SAPRC99 simulation in the key areas of central and southern California, especially in areas where modeled concentrations are greater than the federal 8-hr O3 standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) and/or when the volatile organic compound (VOC)/nitrogen oxides (NOx) ratio is less than 13. The relative changes of ozone production efficiency (OPE) against the VOC/NOx ratio at 46 sites indicate that the OPE is reduced in SAPRC07C compared with SAPRC99 at most sites by as much as approximately 22%. The SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C mechanisms respond similarly to 20% reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions. The response of the mechanisms to 20% NOx emissions reductions can be grouped into three cases. In case 1, in which both mechanisms show a decrease in daily maximum 8-hr O3 concentration with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 decrease in SAPRC07C is smaller. In case 2, in which both mechanisms show an increase in O3 with decreasing NOx emissions, the O3 increase is larger in SAPRC07C. In case 3, SAPRC07C simulates an increase in O3 in response to reduced NOx emissions whereas SAPRC99 simulates a decrease in O3 for the same region. As a result, the areas where NOx controls would be disbeneficial are spatially expanded in SAPRC07C. Although the results presented here are valuable for understanding differences in predictions and model response for SAPRC99 and SAPRC07C, the study did not evaluate the impact of mechanism differences in the context of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for using numerical models in demonstrating air quality attainment

  18. A stochastic approach for model reduction and memory function design in hydrogeophysical inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Z.; Kellogg, A.; Terry, N.

    2009-12-01

    Geophysical (e.g., seismic, electromagnetic, radar) techniques and statistical methods are essential for research related to subsurface characterization, including monitoring subsurface flow and transport processes, oil/gas reservoir identification, etc. For deep subsurface characterization such as reservoir petroleum exploration, seismic methods have been widely used. Recently, electromagnetic (EM) methods have drawn great attention in the area of reservoir characterization. However, considering the enormous computational demand corresponding to seismic and EM forward modeling, it is usually a big problem to have too many unknown parameters in the modeling domain. For shallow subsurface applications, the characterization can be very complicated considering the complexity and nonlinearity of flow and transport processes in the unsaturated zone. It is warranted to reduce the dimension of parameter space to a reasonable level. Another common concern is how to make the best use of time-lapse data with spatial-temporal correlations. This is even more critical when we try to monitor subsurface processes using geophysical data collected at different times. The normal practice is to get the inverse images individually. These images are not necessarily continuous or even reasonably related, because of the non-uniqueness of hydrogeophysical inversion. We propose to use a stochastic framework by integrating minimum-relative-entropy concept, quasi Monto Carlo sampling techniques, and statistical tests. The approach allows efficient and sufficient exploration of all possibilities of model parameters and evaluation of their significances to geophysical responses. The analyses enable us to reduce the parameter space significantly. The approach can be combined with Bayesian updating, allowing us to treat the updated ‘posterior’ pdf as a memory function, which stores all the information up to date about the distributions of soil/field attributes/properties, then consider the

  19. Improving default risk prediction using Bayesian model uncertainty techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Reza; Mosleh, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Credit risk is the potential exposure of a creditor to an obligor's failure or refusal to repay the debt in principal or interest. The potential of exposure is measured in terms of probability of default. Many models have been developed to estimate credit risk, with rating agencies dating back to the 19th century. They provide their assessment of probability of default and transition probabilities of various firms in their annual reports. Regulatory capital requirements for credit risk outlined by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision have made it essential for banks and financial institutions to develop sophisticated models in an attempt to measure credit risk with higher accuracy. The Bayesian framework proposed in this article uses the techniques developed in physical sciences and engineering for dealing with model uncertainty and expert accuracy to obtain improved estimates of credit risk and associated uncertainties. The approach uses estimates from one or more rating agencies and incorporates their historical accuracy (past performance data) in estimating future default risk and transition probabilities. Several examples demonstrate that the proposed methodology can assess default probability with accuracy exceeding the estimations of all the individual models. Moreover, the methodology accounts for potentially significant departures from "nominal predictions" due to "upsetting events" such as the 2008 global banking crisis. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  1. A low-cost, goal-oriented ‘compact proper orthogonal decomposition’ basis for model reduction of static systems

    KAUST Repository

    Carlberg, Kevin; Farhat, Charbel

    2010-01-01

    A novel model reduction technique for static systems is presented. The method is developed using a goal-oriented framework, and it extends the concept of snapshots for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to include (sensitivity) derivatives of the state with respect to system input parameters. The resulting reduced-order model generates accurate approximations due to its goal-oriented construction and the explicit 'training' of the model for parameter changes. The model is less computationally expensive to construct than typical POD approaches, since efficient multiple right-hand side solvers can be used to compute the sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on a parameterized aerospace structure problem. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A low-cost, goal-oriented ‘compact proper orthogonal decomposition’ basis for model reduction of static systems

    KAUST Repository

    Carlberg, Kevin

    2010-12-10

    A novel model reduction technique for static systems is presented. The method is developed using a goal-oriented framework, and it extends the concept of snapshots for proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to include (sensitivity) derivatives of the state with respect to system input parameters. The resulting reduced-order model generates accurate approximations due to its goal-oriented construction and the explicit \\'training\\' of the model for parameter changes. The model is less computationally expensive to construct than typical POD approaches, since efficient multiple right-hand side solvers can be used to compute the sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated on a parameterized aerospace structure problem. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Study on Apparent Kinetic Prediction Model of the Smelting Reduction Based on the Time-Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-feng Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of direct smelting reduction experiment has been carried out with high phosphorous iron ore of the different bases by thermogravimetric analyzer. The derivative thermogravimetric (DTG data have been obtained from the experiments. One-step forward local weighted linear (LWL method , one of the most suitable ways of predicting chaotic time-series methods which focus on the errors, is used to predict DTG. In the meanwhile, empirical mode decomposition-autoregressive (EMD-AR, a data mining technique in signal processing, is also used to predict DTG. The results show that (1 EMD-AR(4 is the most appropriate and its error is smaller than the former; (2 root mean square error (RMSE has decreased about two-thirds; (3 standardized root mean square error (NMSE has decreased in an order of magnitude. Finally in this paper, EMD-AR method has been improved by golden section weighting; its error would be smaller than before. Therefore, the improved EMD-AR model is a promising alternative for apparent reaction rate (DTG. The analytical results have been an important reference in the field of industrial control.

  4. Global-local nonlinear model reduction for flows in heterogeneous porous media

    KAUST Repository

    AlOtaibi, Manal; Calo, Victor M.; Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Galvis, Juan; Ghommem, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we combine discrete empirical interpolation techniques, global mode decomposition methods, and local multiscale methods, such as the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM), to reduce the computational complexity associated with nonlinear flows in highly-heterogeneous porous media. To solve the nonlinear governing equations, we employ the GMsFEM to represent the solution on a coarse grid with multiscale basis functions and apply proper orthogonal decomposition on a coarse grid. Computing the GMsFEM solution involves calculating the residual and the Jacobian on a fine grid. As such, we use local and global empirical interpolation concepts to circumvent performing these computations on the fine grid. The resulting reduced-order approach significantly reduces the flow problem size while accurately capturing the behavior of fully-resolved solutions. We consider several numerical examples of nonlinear multiscale partial differential equations that are numerically integrated using fully-implicit time marching schemes to demonstrate the capability of the proposed model reduction approach to speed up simulations of nonlinear flows in high-contrast porous media.

  5. Global-local nonlinear model reduction for flows in heterogeneous porous media

    KAUST Repository

    AlOtaibi, Manal

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we combine discrete empirical interpolation techniques, global mode decomposition methods, and local multiscale methods, such as the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM), to reduce the computational complexity associated with nonlinear flows in highly-heterogeneous porous media. To solve the nonlinear governing equations, we employ the GMsFEM to represent the solution on a coarse grid with multiscale basis functions and apply proper orthogonal decomposition on a coarse grid. Computing the GMsFEM solution involves calculating the residual and the Jacobian on a fine grid. As such, we use local and global empirical interpolation concepts to circumvent performing these computations on the fine grid. The resulting reduced-order approach significantly reduces the flow problem size while accurately capturing the behavior of fully-resolved solutions. We consider several numerical examples of nonlinear multiscale partial differential equations that are numerically integrated using fully-implicit time marching schemes to demonstrate the capability of the proposed model reduction approach to speed up simulations of nonlinear flows in high-contrast porous media.

  6. Establishment and correction of an Echelle cross-prism spectrogram reduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Bayanheshig; Li, Xiaotian; Cui, Jicheng

    2017-11-01

    The accuracy of an echelle cross-prism spectrometer depends on the matching degree between the spectrum reduction model and the actual state of the spectrometer. However, the error of adjustment can change the actual state of the spectrometer and result in a reduction model that does not match. This produces an inaccurate wavelength calibration. Therefore, the calibration of a spectrogram reduction model is important for the analysis of any echelle cross-prism spectrometer. In this study, the spectrogram reduction model of an echelle cross-prism spectrometer was established. The image position laws of a spectrometer that varies with the system parameters were simulated to the influence of the changes in prism refractive index, focal length and so on, on the calculation results. The model was divided into different wavebands. The iterative method, least squares principle and element lamps with known characteristic wavelength were used to calibrate the spectral model in different wavebands to obtain the actual values of the system parameters. After correction, the deviation of actual x- and y-coordinates and the coordinates calculated by the model are less than one pixel. The model corrected by this method thus reflects the system parameters in the current spectrometer state and can assist in accurate wavelength extraction. The instrument installation and adjustment would be guided in model-repeated correction, reducing difficulty of equipment, respectively.

  7. Characterising and modelling regolith stratigraphy using multiple geophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Cremasco, D.; Fotheringham, T.; Hatch, M. A.; Triantifillis, J.; Wilford, J.

    2013-12-01

    Regolith is the weathered, typically mineral-rich layer from fresh bedrock to land surface. It encompasses soil (A, E and B horizons) that has undergone pedogenesis. Below is the weathered C horizon that retains at least some of the original rocky fabric and structure. At the base of this is the lower regolith boundary of continuous hard bedrock (the R horizon). Regolith may be absent, e.g. at rocky outcrops, or may be many 10's of metres deep. Comparatively little is known about regolith, and critical questions remain regarding composition and characteristics - especially deeper where the challenge of collecting reliable data increases with depth. In Australia research is underway to characterise and map regolith using consistent methods at scales ranging from local (e.g. hillslope) to continental scales. These efforts are driven by many research needs, including Critical Zone modelling and simulation. Pilot research in South Australia using digitally-based environmental correlation techniques modelled the depth to bedrock to 9 m for an upland area of 128 000 ha. One finding was the inability to reliably model local scale depth variations over horizontal distances of 2 - 3 m and vertical distances of 1 - 2 m. The need to better characterise variations in regolith to strengthen models at these fine scales was discussed. Addressing this need, we describe high intensity, ground-based multi-sensor geophysical profiling of three hillslope transects in different regolith-landscape settings to characterise fine resolution (i.e. a number of frequencies; multiple frequency, multiple coil electromagnetic induction; and high resolution resistivity. These were accompanied by georeferenced, closely spaced deep cores to 9 m - or to core refusal. The intact cores were sub-sampled to standard depths and analysed for regolith properties to compile core datasets consisting of: water content; texture; electrical conductivity; and weathered state. After preprocessing (filtering, geo

  8. Modelling of slag emulsification and slag reduction in CAS-OB process

    OpenAIRE

    Sulasalmi, P. (Petri)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Composition Adjustment by Sealed argon bubbling – Oxygen Blowing (CAS-OB) process is a ladle treatment process that was developed for chemical heating and alloying of steel. The main stages of the process are heating, (possible) alloying and reduction of slag. The CAS-OB process aims for homogenization and control of the composition and temperature of steel. In this dissertation, a mathematical reaction model was developed for the slag reduction stage of the CAS-OB process. Sl...

  9. Preliminary empirical models to predict reductions in total and low flows resulting from afforestation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scott, DF

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models to predict runoff reductions due to afforestation are presented. The models are intended to aid decision-makers and planners who need to evaluate the water requirements of competing land uses at a district or regional scale. Five...

  10. A remediation performance model for enhanced metabolic reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes in fractured clay till

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Chambon, Julie C.; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2012-01-01

    A numerical model of metabolic reductive dechlorination is used to describe the performance of enhanced bioremediation in fractured clay till. The model is developed to simulate field observations of a full scale bioremediation scheme in a fractured clay till and thereby to assess remediation...

  11. Model assessment using a multi-metric ranking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, P. J.; Lau, Y.; Alaka, G.; Marks, F.

    2017-12-01

    Validation comparisons of multiple models presents challenges when skill levels are similar, especially in regimes dominated by the climatological mean. Assessing skill separation will require advanced validation metrics and identifying adeptness in extreme events, but maintain simplicity for management decisions. Flexibility for operations is also an asset. This work postulates a weighted tally and consolidation technique which ranks results by multiple types of metrics. Variables include absolute error, bias, acceptable absolute error percentages, outlier metrics, model efficiency, Pearson correlation, Kendall's Tau, reliability Index, multiplicative gross error, and root mean squared differences. Other metrics, such as root mean square difference and rank correlation were also explored, but removed when the information was discovered to be generally duplicative to other metrics. While equal weights are applied, weights could be altered depending for preferred metrics. Two examples are shown comparing ocean models' currents and tropical cyclone products, including experimental products. The importance of using magnitude and direction for tropical cyclone track forecasts instead of distance, along-track, and cross-track are discussed. Tropical cyclone intensity and structure prediction are also assessed. Vector correlations are not included in the ranking process, but found useful in an independent context, and will be briefly reported.

  12. VLF surface-impedance modelling techniques for coal exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.; Thiel, D.; O' Keefe, S. [Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). Faculty of Engineering and Physical Systems

    2000-10-01

    New and efficient computational techniques are required for geophysical investigations of coal. This will allow automated inverse analysis procedures to be used for interpretation of field data. In this paper, a number of methods of modelling electromagnetic surface impedance measurements are reviewed, particularly as applied to typical coal seam geology found in the Bowen Basin. At present, the Impedance method and the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method appear to offer viable solutions although both have problems. The Impedance method is currently slightly inaccurate, and the FDTD method has large computational demands. In this paper both methods are described and results are presented for a number of geological targets. 17 refs., 14 figs.

  13. Demand Management Based on Model Predictive Control Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser A. Davizón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Demand management (DM is the process that helps companies to sell the right product to the right customer, at the right time, and for the right price. Therefore the challenge for any company is to determine how much to sell, at what price, and to which market segment while maximizing its profits. DM also helps managers efficiently allocate undifferentiated units of capacity to the available demand with the goal of maximizing revenue. This paper introduces control system approach to demand management with dynamic pricing (DP using the model predictive control (MPC technique. In addition, we present a proper dynamical system analogy based on active suspension and a stability analysis is provided via the Lyapunov direct method.

  14. Testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in central Ohio houses: Phase 2 (Winter 1988-1989). Final report, September 1988-May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findlay, W.O.; Robertson, A.; Scott, A.G.

    1990-05-01

    The report gives results of tests of developmental indoor radon reduction techniques in nine slab-on-grade and four crawl-space houses near Dayton, Ohio. The slab-on-grade tests indicated that, when there is a good layer of aggregate under the slab, the sub-slab ventilation (SSV) mitigation technique, with only one or two suction pipes, can generally reduce indoor concentrations below 2 pCi/L (86 to 99% reduction). These reductions can be achieved even when: there are forced-air supply ducts under the slab; the slab is large (up to 2600 sq ft); and the foundation walls are hollow block. Operating the SSV system in suction always gave greater reductions than did operating in pressure. The crawl-space tests demonstrated that depressurizing under a plastic liner over the crawl-space floor was able to reduce living-area radon concentrations below 2 pCi/L (81 to 96% reduction). The performance of such sub-liner depressurization gave better reductions than did crawl-space ventilation (blowing air into, or out of, the crawl space). Completely covering the crawl-space floor with plastic sheeting was not always necessary to get adequate performance

  15. Enhancing photogrammetric 3d city models with procedural modeling techniques for urban planning support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubiger-Banz, S; Arisona, S M; Zhong, C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a workflow to increase the level of detail of reality-based 3D urban models. It combines the established workflows from photogrammetry and procedural modeling in order to exploit distinct advantages of both approaches. The combination has advantages over purely automatic acquisition in terms of visual quality, accuracy and model semantics. Compared to manual modeling, procedural techniques can be much more time effective while maintaining the qualitative properties of the modeled environment. In addition, our method includes processes for procedurally adding additional features such as road and rail networks. The resulting models meet the increasing needs in urban environments for planning, inventory, and analysis

  16. Physiological Modeling of Responses to Upper vs Lower Lobe Lung Volume Reduction in Homogeneous Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arschang eValipour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: In clinical trials, homogeneous emphysema patients have responded well to upper lobe volume reduction but not lower lobe volume reduction. Materials/Methods: To understand the physiological basis for this observation, a computer model was developed to simulate the effects of upper and lower lobe lung volume reduction on RV/TLC and lung recoil in homogeneous emphysema.Results: Patients with homogeneous emphysema received either upper or lower lobe volume reduction therapy based on findings of radionucleotide scintigraphy scanning. CT analysis of lobar volumes showed that patients undergoing upper (n=18; -265 mL/site and lower lobe treatment (n=11; -217 mL/site experienced similar reductions in lung volume. However, only upper lobe treatment improved FEV1 (+11.1±14.7% vs -4.4±15.8% and RV/TLC (-5.4± 8.1% vs -2.4±8.6%. Model simulations provided an unexpected explanation for this response. Increases in transpulmonary pressure subsequent to volume reduction increased RV/TLC in upper lobe alveoli, while caudal shifts in airway closure decreased RV/TLC in lower lobe alveoli. Upper lobe treatment, which eliminates apical alveoli with high RV/TLC values, lowers the average RV/TLC of the lung. Conversely, lower lobe treatment, which eliminates caudal alveoli with low RV/TLC values, has less effect. Conclusions: Lower lobe treatment in homogeneous emphysema is uniformly less effective than upper lobe treatment.

  17. Sodium intake status in United States and potential reduction modeling: an NHANES 2007-2010 analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, Victor L; Spence, Lisa; Samuel, Priscilla

    2015-11-01

    Limiting dietary sodium intake has been a consistent dietary recommendation. Using NHANES 2007-2010 data, we estimated current sodium intake and modeled the potential impact of a new sodium reduction technology on sodium intake. NHANES 2007-2010 data were used to assess current sodium intake. The National Cancer Institute method was used for usual intake determination. Suggested sodium reductions using SODA-LO (®) Salt Microspheres ranged from 20% to 30% in 953 foods and usual intakes were modeled by using various reduction factors and levels of market penetration. SAS 9.2, SUDAAN 11, and NHANES survey weights were used in all calculations with assessment across gender and age groups. Current (2007-2010) sodium intake (mg/day) exceeds recommendations across all age gender groups and has not changed during the last decade. However, sodium intake measured as a function of food intake (mg/g food) has decreased significantly during the last decade. Two food categories contribute about 2/3rd of total sodium intake: "Grain Products" and "Meat, Poultry, Fish & Mixtures". Sodium reduction, with 100% market penetration of the new technology, was estimated to be 230-300 mg/day or 7-9% of intake depending upon age and gender group. Sodium reduction innovations like SODA-LO (®) Salt Microspheres could contribute to meaningful reductions in sodium intake.

  18. Modeling of Chemical Reactions in Afterburning for the Reduction of N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Glarborg, Peter; Leckner, Bo

    1996-01-01

    Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions.......Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions....

  19. Geometric subspace updates with applications to online adaptive nonlinear model reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Peherstorfer, Benjamin; Willcox, Karen

    2018-01-01

    In many scientific applications, including model reduction and image processing, subspaces are used as ansatz spaces for the low-dimensional approximation and reconstruction of the state vectors of interest. We introduce a procedure for adapting an existing subspace based on information from...... Estimation (GROUSE). We establish for GROUSE a closed-form expression for the residual function along the geodesic descent direction. Specific applications of subspace adaptation are discussed in the context of image processing and model reduction of nonlinear partial differential equation systems....

  20. The phase field technique for modeling multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer-Loginova, I.; Singer, H. M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reviews methods and applications of the phase field technique, one of the fastest growing areas in computational materials science. The phase field method is used as a theory and computational tool for predictions of the evolution of arbitrarily shaped morphologies and complex microstructures in materials. In this method, the interface between two phases (e.g. solid and liquid) is treated as a region of finite width having a gradual variation of different physical quantities, i.e. it is a diffuse interface model. An auxiliary variable, the phase field or order parameter \\phi(\\vec{x}) , is introduced, which distinguishes one phase from the other. Interfaces are identified by the variation of the phase field. We begin with presenting the physical background of the phase field method and give a detailed thermodynamical derivation of the phase field equations. We demonstrate how equilibrium and non-equilibrium physical phenomena at the phase interface are incorporated into the phase field methods. Then we address in detail dendritic and directional solidification of pure and multicomponent alloys, effects of natural convection and forced flow, grain growth, nucleation, solid-solid phase transformation and highlight other applications of the phase field methods. In particular, we review the novel phase field crystal model, which combines atomistic length scales with diffusive time scales. We also discuss aspects of quantitative phase field modeling such as thin interface asymptotic analysis and coupling to thermodynamic databases. The phase field methods result in a set of partial differential equations, whose solutions require time-consuming large-scale computations and often limit the applicability of the method. Subsequently, we review numerical approaches to solve the phase field equations and present a finite difference discretization of the anisotropic Laplacian operator.