WorldWideScience

Sample records for model receives fuel

  1. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. License application, amendment 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    Amendment No. 4 of the application for licensing the Barnwell Fuel Processing Plant is presented. Information is included on: the quantity and characteristics of nuclear fuel assemblies which can be received and stored; specifications limiting the outside washdown of contaminated casks received for unloading; and definition of environmental monitoring program. (U.S.)

  2. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  3. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. License application, amendment 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    Amendment No. 7 to Allied-General Nuclear Services application for licensing of the Fuel Receiving and Storage Station consists of revised pages for: Amendment No. 7 to AG-L 105, ''Technical Description in Support of Application for FRSS Operation''; Amendment No. 1 to AG-L 105A, ''Early Operation of the Service Concentrator''; and Amendment No. 2 to AG-L 110, ''FRSS Summary Preoperational Report.''

  4. 27 CFR 19.990 - Redistillation of spirits or fuel alcohol received on the plant premises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or fuel alcohol received on the plant premises. 19.990 Section 19.990 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Distilled Spirits For Fuel Use Redistillation § 19.990 Redistillation of spirits or fuel alcohol received on the plant premises. (a) Receipts for redistillation. Proprietors of alcohol fuel plants may...

  5. Mathematical modeling of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ruy; Gonzalez, Ernesto R.

    Fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane have been receiving more and more attention. Modeling plays an important role in the development of fuel cells. In this paper, the state-of-the-art regarding modeling of fuel cells with a polymer electrolyte membrane is reviewed. Modeling has allowed detailed studies concerning the development of these cells, e.g. in discussing the electrocatalysis of the reactions and the design of water-management schemes to cope with membrane dehydration. Two-dimensional models have been used to represent reality, but three-dimensional models can cope with some important additional aspects. Consideration of two-phase transport in the air cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell seems to be very appropriate. Most fuel cells use hydrogen as a fuel. Besides safety concerns, there are problems associated with production, storage and distribution of this fuel. Methanol, as a liquid fuel, can be the solution to these problems and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are attractive for several applications. Mass transport is a factor that may limit the performance of the cell. Adsorption steps may be coupled to Tafel kinetics to describe methanol oxidation and methanol crossover must also be taken into account. Extending the two-phase approach to the DMFC modeling is a recent, important point.

  6. Modelling Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is a three-year project to perform research on two accident tolerant concepts. The final outcome of the ATF HIP will be an in-depth report to the DOE Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) giving a recommendation on whether either of the two concepts should be included in their lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The two ATF concepts under investigation in the HIP are uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory), a comprehensive multiscale approach to modeling is being used that includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. Model development and fuel performance analysis are critical since a full suite of experimental studies will not be complete before AFC must prioritize concepts for focused development. In this paper, we present simulations of the two proposed accident tolerance fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ Dakota software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). We also outline the multiscale modelling approach being employed. Considerable additional work is required prior to preparing the recommendation report for the Advanced

  7. FUEL3-D: A Spatially Explicit Fractal Fuel Distribution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell A. Parsons

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of fuels treatments are hampered by inconsistencies between the spatial scale at which fuel treatments are implemented and the spatial scale, and detail, with which we model fire and fuel interactions. Central to this scale inconsistency is the resolution at which variability within the fuel bed is considered. Crown...

  8. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected

  9. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shedrow, C.B.

    1999-11-29

    The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

  10. Multiphysics modeling of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serincan, Mustafa Fazil

    Fuel cells are expected to resist permanent changes in performance over time, to tolerate unexpected changes in the ambient conditions for a stable operation, and to sustain a structural integrity under different operating conditions. However, during the operation, both solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) are prone to many hazards that may cause degradation of the performance even to the extent of complete failure of these devices. In this study performance and degradation of SOFCs and PEFCs is studied. A computational modeling framework has been established to investigate the transport phenomena and the electrochemical performance as well as the mechanical behavior of SOFCs and PEFCs. The electrochemical performance of the SOFC is investigated both in steady-state and transient operations while elucidating the transport phenomena related to the fuel cell operation. The proposed computational framework for the SOFC comprises two separate models for the test furnace and the single cell in order to more accurately model the actual test system while decreasing the computational cost. The fuel cell performance in transient operation is also studied. The performance of the SOFC is investigated in case of a failure in the fuel supply system. Mechanical behavior of the SOFC is also considered to help assessing the durability of the cells. The same modeling framework is utilized for the PEFCs to investigate electrochemical and mechanical degradation during the fuel cell operation. To assess the performance degradation as a result of gas contamination, a cation transport model is presented. It is found that the effect of fuel side contamination of cationic species is much more significant than the air side contamination while there still is a significant performance degradation associated with the latter. Further, the stresses induced during the PEFC operation due to the swelling and shrinkage of the membrane with hydration changes are

  11. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  12. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, J.E.; Shallo, F.A.; Musselwhite, E.L.; Wiedemann, G.F.; Young, M.

    1979-09-01

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model

  13. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, Jim E.; Shallo, Frank A.; Musselwhite, E Larry; Wiedemann, George F.; Young, Moylen

    1979-09-01

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model.

  14. Helicopter fuel burn modeling in AEDT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report documents work done to enhance helicopter fuel consumption modeling in the Federal Aviation : Administrations Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). Fuel consumption and flight performance data : were collected from helicopter flig...

  15. Fuel burn modeling of turboprop aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This report documents work done to enhance turbo-propeller aircraft fuel consumption modeling in the Federal Aviation Administrations Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). Fuel consumption and flight performance data were collected from aircr...

  16. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogaji, S.O.T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M. [Power Propulsion and Aerospace Engineering Department, Centre for Diagnostics and Life Cycle Costs, Cranfield University (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-09

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed. (author)

  17. Modelling fuel cell performance using artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaji, S. O. T.; Singh, R.; Pilidis, P.; Diacakis, M.

    Over the last few years, fuel cell technology has been increasing promisingly its share in the generation of stationary power. Numerous pilot projects are operating worldwide, continuously increasing the amount of operating hours either as stand-alone devices or as part of gas turbine combined cycles. An essential tool for the adequate and dynamic analysis of such systems is a software model that enables the user to assess a large number of alternative options in the least possible time. On the other hand, the sphere of application of artificial neural networks has widened covering such endeavours of life such as medicine, finance and unsurprisingly engineering (diagnostics of faults in machines). Artificial neural networks have been described as diagrammatic representation of a mathematical equation that receives values (inputs) and gives out results (outputs). Artificial neural networks systems have the capacity to recognise and associate patterns and because of their inherent design features, they can be applied to linear and non-linear problem domains. In this paper, the performance of the fuel cell is modelled using artificial neural networks. The inputs to the network are variables that are critical to the performance of the fuel cell while the outputs are the result of changes in any one or all of the fuel cell design variables, on its performance. Critical parameters for the cell include the geometrical configuration as well as the operating conditions. For the neural network, various network design parameters such as the network size, training algorithm, activation functions and their causes on the effectiveness of the performance modelling are discussed. Results from the analysis as well as the limitations of the approach are presented and discussed.

  18. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  19. VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

  20. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  1. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  2. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  3. Model Year 2017 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  4. Model Year 2018 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-12-07

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  5. Bearing support for receiving used fuel elements of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, F.

    1979-01-01

    A bearing support for receiving used fuel elements of nuclear power stations includes a plurality of chambers which have square cross-sections and each include inner and outer spaced apart walls with screening plates therebetween for screening the radiating fuel elements. Each chamber is detachably secured at its underside to a common foot plate and is held in position at its upper side by spacer elements. The outer wall comprises two equal-sided angle sheets and the inner wall comprises a closed square tube. The thickness of the outer wall is smaller than that of the inner wall and the outer walls are held in spaced relationship to each other at their upper sides by detachable bar grates

  6. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    A draft of the environmental impact statement for the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station is presented. This facility is being constructed on a 1700 acre site about six miles west of the city of Barnwell in Barnwell County, South Carolina. The following topics are discussed: the site, the station, environmental effects of site preparation and station construction, environmental effects of station operation, effluent and environmental monitoring programs, environmental effects of accidents , need for the station, benefit-cost analysis of alternatives, and conclusions. (U.S.)

  7. Modeling of hybrid vehicle fuel economy and fuel engine efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    "Near-CV" (i.e., near-conventional vehicle) hybrid vehicles, with an internal combustion engine, and a supplementary storage with low-weight, low-energy but high-power capacity, are analyzed. This design avoids the shortcoming of the "near-EV" and the "dual-mode" hybrid vehicles that need a large energy storage system (in terms of energy capacity and weight). The small storage is used to optimize engine energy management and can provide power when needed. The energy advantage of the "near-CV" design is to reduce reliance on the engine at low power, to enable regenerative braking, and to provide good performance with a small engine. The fuel consumption of internal combustion engines, which might be applied to hybrid vehicles, is analyzed by building simple analytical models that reflect the engines' energy loss characteristics. Both diesel and gasoline engines are modeled. The simple analytical models describe engine fuel consumption at any speed and load point by describing the engine's indicated efficiency and friction. The engine's indicated efficiency and heat loss are described in terms of several easy-to-obtain engine parameters, e.g., compression ratio, displacement, bore and stroke. Engine friction is described in terms of parameters obtained by fitting available fuel measurements on several diesel and spark-ignition engines. The engine models developed are shown to conform closely to experimental fuel consumption and motored friction data. A model of the energy use of "near-CV" hybrid vehicles with different storage mechanism is created, based on simple algebraic description of the components. With powertrain downsizing and hybridization, a "near-CV" hybrid vehicle can obtain a factor of approximately two in overall fuel efficiency (mpg) improvement, without considering reductions in the vehicle load.

  8. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  9. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  10. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  11. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  12. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  13. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  14. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  15. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  16. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  17. Modeling Fuel Efficiency: MPG or GPHM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkovich, Kevin G.

    2013-01-01

    The standard for measuring fuel efficiency in the U.S. has been miles per gallon (mpg). However, the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) switch in rating fuel efficiency from miles per gallon to gallons per hundred miles with the 2013 model-year cars leads to interesting and relevant mathematics with real-world connections. By modeling…

  18. Sensitivity of fire behavior simulations to fuel model variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy A. Salazar

    1985-01-01

    Stylized fuel models, or numerical descriptions of fuel arrays, are used as inputs to fire behavior simulation models. These fuel models are often chosen on the basis of generalized fuel descriptions, which are related to field observations. Site-specific observations of fuels or fire behavior in the field are not readily available or necessary for most fire management...

  19. Behaviour of defective CANDU fuel: fuel oxidation kinetic and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgs, J.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of operating CANDU fuel under defect conditions is affected by the ingress of heavy water into the fuel element. A mechanistic model has been developed to predict the extent of fuel oxidation in defective fuel and its affect on fuel thermal performance. A thermodynamic treatment of such oxidized fuel has been performed as a basis for the boundary conditions in the kinetic model. Both the kinetic and thermodynamic models have been benchmarked against recent experimental work. (author)

  20. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  1. Hydraulic modelling of the CARA Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O.; Juanico, Luis; Giorgi, M.; Ghiselli, Alberto M.; Zampach, Ruben; Fiori, Jose M.; Yedros, Pablo A.

    2004-01-01

    The CARA fuel element is been developing by the National Atomic Energy Commission for both Argentinean PHWRs. In order to keep the hydraulic restriction in their fuel channels, one of CARA's goals is to keep its similarity with both present fuel elements. In this paper is presented pressure drop test performed at a low-pressure facility (Reynolds numbers between 5x10 4 and 1,5x10 5 ) and rational base models for their spacer grid and rod assembly. Using these models, we could estimate the CARA hydraulic performance in reactor conditions that have shown to be satisfactory. (author) [es

  2. Standard fire behavior fuel models: a comprehensive set for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe H. Scott; Robert E. Burgan

    2005-01-01

    This report describes a new set of standard fire behavior fuel models for use with Rothermel's surface fire spread model and the relationship of the new set to the original set of 13 fire behavior fuel models. To assist with transition to using the new fuel models, a fuel model selection guide, fuel model crosswalk, and set of fuel model photos are provided.

  3. Nuclear fuel: modelling the advanced plutonium assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaoua, Th.; Lenain, R.

    2004-01-01

    The benefits of modeling in the nuclear sector are illustrated by the example of the design study for a new plutonium fuel assembly, APA, capable of ensuring maximum consumption of this fuel in pressurized-water reactors. Beyond the physical design of the assembly and its integration into the reactor, this serves for the working out of a complete materials flow and assists in modeling production from the entire inventory of nuclear power stations. (authors)

  4. MARMOT update for oxide fuel modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Chao [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Aagesen, Larry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ahmed, Karim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, Wen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Tonks, Michael [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Millett, Paul [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale research and development progresses in FY16 at Idaho National Laboratory in developing mechanistic materials models for oxide fuels, in parallel to the development of the MARMOT code which will be summarized in a separate report. This effort is a critical component of the microstructure based fuel performance modeling approach, supported by the Fuels Product Line in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. The progresses can be classified into three categories: 1) development of materials models to be used in engineering scale fuel performance modeling regarding the effect of lattice defects on thermal conductivity, 2) development of modeling capabilities for mesoscale fuel behaviors including stage-3 gas release, grain growth, high burn-up structure, fracture and creep, and 3) improved understanding in material science by calculating the anisotropic grain boundary energies in UO$_2$ and obtaining thermodynamic data for solid fission products. Many of these topics are still under active development. They are updated in the report with proper amount of details. For some topics, separate reports are generated in parallel and so stated in the text. The accomplishments have led to better understanding of fuel behaviors and enhance capability of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT toolkit.

  5. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  6. Analysis on fuel thermal conductivity model of the computer code for performance prediction of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hai; Huang Chen; Du Aibing; Xu Baoyu

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity is one of the most important parameters in the computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods. Several fuel thermal conductivity models used in foreign computer code, including thermal conductivity models for MOX fuel and UO 2 fuel were introduced in this paper. Thermal conductivities were calculated by using these models, and the results were compared and analyzed. Finally, the thermal conductivity model for the native computer code for performance prediction for fuel rods in fast reactor was recommended. (authors)

  7. Mathematical modeling of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi; Maloney, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    Development of predictive techniques, with regard to cell behavior, under various operating conditions is needed to improve cell performance, increase energy density, reduce manufacturing cost, and to broaden utilization of various fuels. Such technology would be especially beneficial for the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) at it early demonstration stage. The development of computer models to calculate the temperature, CD, reactant distributions in the tubular and monolithic SOFCs. Results indicate that problems of nonuniform heat generation and fuel gas depletion in the tubular cell module, and of size limitions in the monolithic (MOD 0) design may be encountered during FC operation.

  8. Fuel swelling importance in PCI mechanistic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimescu, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    Under certain conditions, fuel pellet swelling is the most important factor in determining the intensity of the pellet-to-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). This is especially true during power ramps, which lead to a temperature increase to a higher terminal plateau that is maintained for hours. The time-dependent gaseous swelling is proportional to temperature and is also enhanced by the increased gas atom migration to the grain boundary during the power ramp. On the other hand, gaseous swelling is inhibited by a compressive hydrostatic stress in the pellet. Therefore, PCMI is the net result of combining gaseous swelling and pellet thermal expansion with the opposing feedback from the cladding mechanical reaction. The coupling of the thermal and mechanical processes, mentioned above, with various feedback loops is best simulated by a mechanistic fuel code. This paper discusses a mechanistic swelling model that is coupled with a fission gas release model as well as a mechanical model of the fuel pellet. The role of fuel swelling is demonstrated for typical power ramps at different burn-ups. Also, fuel swelling plays a significant role in avoiding the thermal instability for larger gap fuel rods, by limiting the potentially exponentially increasing gap due to the positive feedback loop effect of increasing fission gas release and the associated over-pressure inside the cladding. (author)

  9. Advances in HTGR fuel performance models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stansfield, O.M.; Goodin, D.T.; Hanson, D.L.; Turner, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in HTGR fuel performance models have improved the agreement between observed and predicted performance and contributed to an enhanced position of the HTGR with regard to investment risk and passive safety. Heavy metal contamination is the source of about 55% of the circulating activity in the HTGR during normal operation, and the remainder comes primarily from particles which failed because of defective or missing buffer coatings. These failed particles make up about 5 x 10 -4 fraction of the total core inventory. In addition to prediction of fuel performance during normal operation, the models are used to determine fuel failure and fission product release during core heat-up accident conditions. The mechanistic nature of the models, which incorporate all important failure modes, permits the prediction of performance from the relatively modest accident temperatures of a passively safe HTGR to the much more severe accident conditions of the larger 2240-MW/t HTGR. (author)

  10. Underwater sounds near a fuel receiving facility in western Hong Kong: relevance to dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würsig, B; Greene, C R

    2002-08-01

    Western Hong Kong is home to two species of marine mammals: Indo-Pacific humpbacked dolphins (Sousa chinensis) and finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides). Both are threatened in many parts of their range in southeast Asia [for example, International Biological Research Institute Reports 9 (1997), 41; Asian Marine Biology 14 (1997) 111]. In 1998, when the new Hong Kong International Airport opened in western Hong Kong, small tankers (about 100 m long, cargo capacity about 6300 metric tons) began delivering fuel to the Aviation Fuel Receiving Facility (AFRF) just off Sha Chau Island, north of the airport. Calibrated sound recordings were taken over a 4-day period from a quiet, anchored boat at distances 80-2000 m from aviation fuel delivery activities at the AFRF. From the recordings, 143 sections were selected for analysis. Narrowband spectral densities on the sound pressures were computed, and one-third octave band levels were derived for center frequencies from 10 to 16,000 Hz. Broadband levels, viz. 10-20,000 Hz. were also computed. The results showed that the Sha Chau area is normally noisy underwater, with the lowest broadband levels measured corresponding to those expected during a storm at sea (sea state 6). This background noise is believed to come largely from heavy vessel traffic in the Urmston Road to the north and east of Sha Chau and from vessels in the Pearl River Estuary to the West. The sound levels from the AFRF tankers are comparable to the levels measured from similar- and smaller-sized supply vessels supporting offshore oil exploration. The strongest sounds recorded were from a tanker leaving the AFRF at distance 100 m from the hydrophone, for which the one-third octave band level at 100 Hz was 141 dB re 1 microPa (spectrum level 127 dB re 1 microPa2/Hz) and the 10-20,000 Hz broadband level was 146 dB. At distances of 100 m or more and frequencies above 300 Hz, the one-third octave band levels were less than 130 dB (spectrum level 111 dB re

  11. Thermal Model of a Dish Stirling Cavity-Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thermal model for a dish Stirling cavity based on the finite differences method. This model is a theoretical tool to optimize the cavity in terms of thermal efficiency. One of the main outcomes of this work is the evaluation of radiative exchange using the radiosity method; for that purpose, the view factors of all surfaces involved have been accurately calculated. Moreover, this model enables the variation of the cavity and receiver dimensions and the materials to determine the optimal cavity design. The tool has been used to study the cavity optimization regarding geometry parameters and material properties. Receiver absorptivity has been identified as the most influential property of the materials. The optimal aperture height depends on the minimum focal space.

  12. The effectiveness and limitations of fuel modeling using the fire and fuels extension to the Forest Vegetation Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin K. Noonan-Wright; Nicole M. Vaillant; Alicia L. Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Fuel treatment effectiveness is often evaluated with fire behavior modeling systems that use fuel models to generate fire behavior outputs. How surface fuels are assigned, either using one of the 53 stylized fuel models or developing custom fuel models, can affect predicted fire behavior. We collected surface and canopy fuels data before and 1, 2, 5, and 8 years after...

  13. Final environmental statement related to the operation of the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (Docket No. 70-1729)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The proposed action is to issue a materials license, pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30, 40 and 70 of the Commission's regulations, authorizing Allied-General Nuclear Services to receive and handle fuel casks containing spent reactor fuel elements and to store spent reactor fuel at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), in the Barnwell Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BFRSS). The BFRSS is a part of, and contiguous to, the BNFP-Separations Facility which is being constructed on a small portion of a 1700 acre site about six miles west of the city of Barnwell in Barnwell County, South Carolina. Construction of the BFRSS facility has been completed and the BNFP Separations Facility is more than 90% complete. A uranium Hexafluoride Facility is being constructed on the same site, and a Plutonium Product Facility is proposed to be constructed adjacent to the Separations Facility. The license that is the subject of this action will, if issued, allow lthe use of the BFRSS separate4 from the operation of the Separations Facility. Impacts resulting from the construction of the BFRSS have already occurred and mitigating measures have been and are being implemented to offset any adverse impacts. Operation of the BFRSS will not interfere with water sources, and should cause no noticeable damage to the terrestrial or aquatic environments. Operating experience at other fuel receiving and storage facilities has shown that radioactive concentrations discharged to the environs (the more significant process effluents) have been well below applicabhle state and federal limits. The small quantities to be released during operation of the BFRSS will result in negligible environmental impact. 20 figs

  14. Fuel safety criteria in NEA member countries - Compilation of responses received from member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    In 2001 the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) issued a report on Fuel Safety Criteria Technical Review. The objective was to review the present fuel safety criteria and judge to which extent they are affected by the 'new' design elements, such as different cladding materials, higher burnup, the use of MOX fuels, etc. The report stated that the current framework of fuel safety criteria remains generally applicable, being largely unaffected by the 'new' or modern design elements. The levels (numbers) in the individual safety criteria may, however, change in accordance with the particular fuel and core design features. Some of these levels have already been - or are continuously being - adjusted. The level adjustments of several other criteria (RIA, LOCA) also appears to be needed, on the basis of experimental data and the analysis thereof. As a follow-up, among its first tasks, the CSNI Special Expert Group on Fuel Safety Margins (SEG FSM) initiated the collection of information on the present fuel safety criteria used in NEA member states with the objective to solicit national practices in the use of fuel safety criteria, in particular to get information on their specific national levels/values, including their recent adjustments, and to identify the differences and commonalties between the different countries. Two sources of information were used to produce this report: a compilation of responses to a questionnaire prepared for the June 2000 CNRA meeting, and individual responses from the SEGFSM members to the new revised questionnaire issued by the task Force preparing this report. In accordance with the latter, the fuel safety criteria discussed in this report were divided into three categories: (A) safety criteria - criteria imposed by the regulator; (B) operational criteria - specific to the fuel design and provided by the fuel vendor as part of the licensing basis; (C) design criteria - limits employed by vendors and/or utilities for fuel

  15. Modeling bark beetles and fuels on landscapes: A demonstration of ArcFuels and a discussion of possible model enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. McMahan; Alan A. Ager; Helen Maffei; Jane L. Hayes; Eric L. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The Westwide Pine Beetle Model and the Fire and Fuels Extension were used to simulate a mountain pine beetle outbreak under different fuel treatment scenarios on a 173,000 acre landscape on the Deschutes National Forest. The goal was to use these models within ArcFuels to analyze the interacting impacts of bark beetles and management activities on landscape fuel...

  16. Modelling the effect of oxide fuel fracturing on the mechanical behaviour of fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, T.; Garcia, P.; Ricaud, J.M.; Plancq, D.; Sidoroff, F.; Bernard, L.

    2005-01-01

    Computing stress and strain fields in fuel pellets is essential to modelling the in-pile behaviour of PWR fuel rods, especially under pellet-cladding interaction conditions. Fuel cracking occurs immediately after reactor start-up and is effective in relaxing stresses in the pellet. It is therefore important that the brittle behaviour of oxide fuels be modelled. A first attempt to take into account fuel cracking involved describing radial and axial fuel cracks in the pellet through a phenomenological modification of Hooke's law. A description of the model is given along with its two-dimensional extension applied to axisymmetrical fuel pellet simulations. The first results pertaining to this model are discussed. Another approach to modelling the damage to pellets induced by cracking involves the use of so-called cohesive models. These models describe the progressive loss of cohesion of the material in the damaged area ahead of the crack tip. A short review of these models is presented. (authors)

  17. MMSNF 2005. Materials models and simulations for nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyss, M.; Durinck, J.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, P.; Garcia, P.; Ripert, M.; Blanpain, P.; Lippens, M.; Schut, H.; Federov, A.V.; Bakker, K.; Osaka, M.; Miwa, S.; Sato, I.; Tanaka, K.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.; Hou, M.; Lemehov, S.E.; Terentyev, D.; Govers, K.; Kotomin, E.A.; Ashley, N.J.; Grimes, R.W.; Van Uffelen, P.; Mastrikov, Y.; Zhukovskii, Y.; Rondinella, V.V.; Kurosaki, K.; Uno, M.; Yamanaka, S.; Minato, K.; Phillpot, S.; Watanabe, T.; Shukla, P.; Sinnott, S.; Nino, J.; Grimes, R.; Staicu, D.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Wiss, T.; Rondinella, V.V.; Ronchi, C.; Yakub, E.; Kaye, M.H.; Morrison, C.; Higgs, J.D.; Akbari, F.; Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Gueneau, C.; Gosse, S.; Chatain, S.; Dumas, J.C.; Sundman, B.; Dupin, N.; Konings, R.; Noel, H.; Veshchunov, M.; Dubourg, R.; Ozrin, C.V.; Veshchunov, M.S.; Welland, M.T.; Blanc, V.; Michel, B.; Ricaud, J.M.; Calabrese, R.; Vettraino, F.; Tverberg, T.; Kissane, M.; Tulenko, J.; Stan, M.; Ramirez, J.C.; Cristea, P.; Rachid, J.; Kotomin, E.; Ciriello, A.; Rondinella, V.V.; Staicu, D.; Wiss, T.; Konings, R.; Somers, J.; Killeen, J

    2006-07-01

    The MMSNF Workshop series aims at stimulating research and discussions on models and simulations of nuclear fuels and coupling the results into fuel performance codes.This edition was focused on materials science and engineering for fuel performance codes. The presentations were grouped in three technical sessions: fundamental modelling of fuel properties; integral fuel performance codes and their validation; collaborations and integration of activities. (A.L.B.)

  18. Modelling the effects of transport policy levers on fuel efficiency and national fuel consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, H.R.; Hutton, B.; McQuaid, R.W.; Napier Univ., Edinburgh; Raeside, R.; Napier Univ., Edinburgh; Zhang, Xiayoan; Napier Univ., Edinburgh

    2000-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the main features of a Vehicle Market Model (VMM) which estimates changes to vehicle stock/kilometrage, fuel consumed and CO 2 emitted. It is disaggregated into four basic vehicle types. The model includes: the trends in fuel consumption of new cars, including the role of fuel price: a sub-model to estimate the fuel consumption of vehicles on roads characterised by user-defined driving cycle regimes; procedures that reflect distribution of traffic across different area/road types; and the ability to vary the speed (or driving cycle) from one year to another, or as a result of traffic growth. The most significant variable influencing fuel consumption of vehicles was consumption in the previous year, followed by dummy variables related to engine size. the time trend (a proxy for technological improvements), and then fuel price. Indeed the effect of fuel price on car fuel efficiency was observed to be insignificant (at the 95% level) in two of the three versions of the model, and the size of fuel price term was also the smallest. This suggests that the effectiveness of using fuel prices as a direct policy tool to reduce fuel consumption may he limited. Fuel prices may have significant indirect impacts (such as influencing people to purchase more fuel efficient cars and vehicle manufacturers to invest in developing fuel efficient technology) as may other factors such as the threat of legislation. (Author)

  19. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system--FUEL subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Burgan; Richard C. Rothermel

    1984-01-01

    This manual documents the fuel modeling procedures of BEHAVE--a state-of-the-art wildland fire behavior prediction system. Described are procedures for collecting fuel data, using the data with the program, and testing and adjusting the fuel model.

  20. Fuel consumption models for pine flatwoods fuel types in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Modeling fire effects, including terrestrial and atmospheric carbon fluxes and pollutant emissions during wildland fires, requires accurate predictions of fuel consumption. Empirical models were developed for predicting fuel consumption from fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires in pine flatwoods ecosystems in the southeastern...

  1. Nuclear Fuel Leasing, Recycling and proliferation: Modeling a Global View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crozat, M P; Choi, J; Reis, V H; Hill, R

    2004-01-01

    On February 11, 2004, U.S. President George W. Bush, in a speech to the National Defense University stated: ''The world must create a safe, orderly system to field civilian nuclear plants without adding to the danger of weapons proliferation. The world's leading nuclear exporters should ensure that states have reliable access at reasonable cost to fuel for civilian reactors, so long as those states renounce enrichment and reprocessing. Enrichment and reprocessing are not necessary for nations seeking to harness nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.'' This concept would require nations to choose one of two paths for civilian nuclear development: those that only have reactors and those that contain one or more elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, including recycling. ''Fuel cycle'' states would enrich uranium, manufacture and lease fuel to ''reactor'' states and receive the reactor states' spent fuel. All parties would accede to stringent security and safeguard standards, embedded within a newly invigorated international regime. Reactor states would be relieved of the financial, environmental (and political) burden of enriching and manufacturing fuel and dealing with spent fuel. Fuel cycle states would potentially earn money on leasing the fuel and perhaps on sales of reactors to the reactor states. Such a leasing concept is especially interesting in scenarios which envision growth in nuclear power, and an important consideration for such a nuclear growth regime is the role of recycling of civilian spent fuel. Recycling holds promise for improved management of spent fuel and efficient utilization of resources, but continues to raise the specter of a world with uncontrolled nuclear weapons proliferation. If done effectively, a fuel-leasing concept could help create a political and economic foundation for significant growth of clean, carbon-free nuclear power while providing a mechanism for significant international cooperation to reduce proliferation concern. This

  2. Power Consumption Models for Decimation FIR Filters in Multistandard Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Grati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Decimation filters are widely used in communication-embedded systems. In fact, decimation filters are useful for implementing channel filtering or selection with low-computation complexity requirements. Many multistandard receiver designs that are required in ubiquitous embedded systems are based on a cascade of decimation filter processing. Filter number and implementation architectures have a significant impact on system performances, such as computation complexity, area, throughput, and power consumption. In this work, we present filter power consumption estimation models for FIR filters. Power consumption models were obtained from a large number of FIR filter syntheses using a direct form. Several curves that estimate power consumption were extracted from these synthesis results. Then, we have evaluated the impact of polyphase decomposition on power consumption of FIR filter and compared it with the direct form results. Some tips regarding power consumption were deduced for the polyphase implementation form. The aim of this work is to help a system designer to select an efficient implementation for FIR in terms of power consumption without having to implement and synthesize the different possible solutions. The proposed method is applied for STMicroelectronics libraries 90 nm and 65 nm low power then validated with a use case of multistandard receiver designing.

  3. Modeling fuels and fire effects in 3D: Model description and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois Pimont; Russell Parsons; Eric Rigolot; Francois de Coligny; Jean-Luc Dupuy; Philippe Dreyfus; Rodman R. Linn

    2016-01-01

    Scientists and managers critically need ways to assess how fuel treatments alter fire behavior, yet few tools currently exist for this purpose.We present a spatially-explicit-fuel-modeling system, FuelManager, which models fuels, vegetation growth, fire behavior (using a physics-based model, FIRETEC), and fire effects. FuelManager's flexible approach facilitates...

  4. Steady-state fuel behavior modeling of nitride fuels in FRAPCON-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2012-08-01

    Fuel material properties and mechanistic fission gas models in FRAPCON-EP were updated to model the steady-state behavior of high-porosity nitride fuel operating at temperatures below half of the melting point. The fuel thermal conductivity and fuel thermal expansion models were updated with correlations for UN and (U,Pu)N fuels. Hot-pressing of the as-fabricated porosity was modeled as a function of the hydrostatic pressure and creep rate. The solid fission product swelling was assumed to increase linearly with burnup. Fission gas swelling constitutive models were updated to appropriately capture the intragranular gas bubble evolution in nitride fuel. Intergranular gas swelling was neglected due to the assumed high porosity of the fuel. The fission gas release behavior was modeled by fitting the fission gas diffusion coefficient in UN to FRAPCON's default fission gas release model. This fitted gas diffusion coefficient reflects the effects of porosity, burnup, operating temperature, fission rate, and bubble sink strength. Fission gas release and fuel swelling benchmarks against irradiation data were performed. The updated code was applied to UN fuel in typical PWR geometry and operating conditions, with an extended cycle length of 24 months. The results show that swelling of the nitride fuel up to 60 MWd/kg burnup did not lead to excessive straining of the cladding. Furthermore, this study showed that a porous (>15% porosity) nitride fuel pellet could achieve a much higher margin to failure from the cladding collapse and grid-to-rod fretting.

  5. A transient fuel cell model to simulate HTPEM fuel cell impedance spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jakob Rabjerg; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved transient fuel cell model applied to the simulation of high temperature PEM fuel cell impedance spectra. The model is developed using a 2D finite volume method approach. The model is resolved along the channel and across the membrane. The model considers...

  6. Models for predicting fuel consumption in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton S. Wright

    2013-01-01

    Fuel consumption predictions are necessary to accurately estimate or model fire effects, including pollutant emissions during wildland fires. Fuel and environmental measurements on a series of operational prescribed fires were used to develop empirical models for predicting fuel consumption in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentate Nutt.) ecosystems....

  7. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  8. Forest fuel - economy and models for cost analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Anders.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop guidelines for the R and D work within Skogskraft with the aim of improving the efficiency of the investigatory work. The report mainly concerns logging waste. The contents are as follows; Terminology - definitions: This section includes a brief description of wood fuels with regard to terminology, definitions, production and marketing. Units of measurement: Different units of measurement are descrived and their relationship to forestry, sawmills and consumers of wood fuels. An account is also given of effective thermal values and formulas for calculations of the energy content for different wood fuels. Calculation models, analyses: This section discusses different models and standards for calculating machine and manual costs. In addition, views are given on cost analysis and certain guidelines with regard to overhead costs. Actors and systems: There is a risk that technical problems receive a far too dominant role in relation to problems which concern organisation and structure. Consequently, it is important to define the actors and to illustrate the different driving forces and tensions that may occur. Seven different actors/interested parties have been described and analysed with regard to primary and secondary interests in ecological, technical and economic questions. Preparation of reports: Certain recommendations have been given with regard to formal requirements and quality requirements

  9. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The following items are covered: the site, the station, environmental effects of site preparation and station construction, environmental effects of station operation, effluent and environmental monitoring programs, environmental effects of accidents, need for BFRSS, benefit-cost analysis of alternatives, generic environmental impact statements, and discussion of and response to comments received on the draft environmental statement

  10. Modeling closed nuclear fuel cycles processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmidt, O.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials, Rogova, 5a street, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Makeeva, I.R. [Zababakhin All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics, Vasiliev street 13, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456770 (Russian Federation); Liventsov, S.N. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Lenin Avenue, 30, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Computer models of processes are necessary for determination of optimal operating conditions for closed nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) processes. Computer models can be quickly changed in accordance with new and fresh data from experimental research. 3 kinds of process simulation are necessary. First, the VIZART software package is a balance model development used for calculating the material flow in technological processes. VIZART involves taking into account of equipment capacity, transport lines and storage volumes. Secondly, it is necessary to simulate the physico-chemical processes that are involved in the closure of NFC. The third kind of simulation is the development of software that allows the optimization, diagnostics and control of the processes which implies real-time simulation of product flows on the whole plant or on separate lines of the plant. (A.C.)

  11. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  12. Some properties for modeling of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    Two areas key to the materials modeling of fuel element behavior are discussed. The relative importance of atomic diffusion vs. bubble migration is first surveyed and the interplay of bubble mobility and re-solution parameter is highlighted. It is concluded that biased bubble migration at higher temperatures is required to explain available gas-release data, especially during transients. At intermediate temperatures, random bubble migration is required to explain both gas-release rates and the observation of large (approx. 700A) intragranular bubbles following in-pile and post-irradiation transients. Different fuel models employ different values of re-solution parameter, both below and above an experimentally determined value. Bubble mobilities are deduced to approach theoretical, surface diffusion-controlled values during transients, but they may be somewhat less mobile during steady-state operation. Next, the present understanding of radiation-induced hardening and creep is discussed, highlighting the interplay of these two phenomena. An overall constitutive scheme is presented and predictions of failure limits are deduced therefrom employing instability analysis

  13. Modelling strategic responses to car and fuel taxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, P.; Kooreman, P.

    We develop a model to analyse the interactions between actors involved in car and fuel taxation: consumers, car producers, fuel producers and the government. Heterogeneous consumers choose between two versions of a car that differ in engine type (diesel or gasoline). Car manufacturers and fuel

  14. Receiving more than data - a signal model, theory and implementation of a cognitive IEEE 802.15.4 receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Esemann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Standard medium access schemes sense the channel immediately prior transmission, but are blind during the transmission. Therefore, standard transceivers have limited cognitive capabilities which are important for operation in heterogeneous radio environments. Specifically, mobile interferers move gradually into the reception range before actually causing collisions. These gradual interferences cannot yet be detected, and upcoming collisions cannot be predicted. We present a theoretical analysis of the received and demodulated signal. This analysis and the derived signal model verifies that the received signal contains more than transmitted data exclusively. Enhanced signal processing extracts signal components of an interference at the receiver and enables advanced interference detection to provide information about approaching mobile interferers. Our theoretical analysis is evaluated by simulations and experiments with an IEEE 802.15.4 transmitter and an extended cognitive receiver.

  15. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  16. Fuel analysis code FAIR and its high burnup modelling capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.S.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Mahajan, S.C.; Kakodkar, A.

    1995-01-01

    A computer code FAIR has been developed for analysing performance of water cooled reactor fuel pins. It is capable of analysing high burnup fuels. This code has recently been used for analysing ten high burnup fuel rods irradiated at Halden reactor. In the present paper, the code FAIR and its various high burnup models are described. The performance of code FAIR in analysing high burnup fuels and its other applications are highlighted. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs

  17. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    OpenAIRE

    Klimko Marek

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  18. Mathematical Model of the Jet Engine Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimko, Marek

    2015-05-01

    The paper discusses the design of a simplified mathematical model of the jet (turbo-compressor) engine fuel system. The solution will be based on the regulation law, where the control parameter is a fuel mass flow rate and the regulated parameter is the rotational speed. A differential equation of the jet engine and also differential equations of other fuel system components (fuel pump, throttle valve, pressure regulator) will be described, with respect to advanced predetermined simplifications.

  19. Fuel behavior modeling using the MARS computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faya, S.C.S.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The fuel behaviour modeling code MARS against experimental data, was evaluated. Two cases were selected: an early comercial PWR rod (Maine Yankee rod) and an experimental rod from the Canadian BWR program (Canadian rod). The MARS predictions are compared with experimental data and predictions made by other fuel modeling codes. Improvements are suggested for some fuel behaviour models. Mars results are satisfactory based on the data available. (Author) [pt

  20. Recent Advances in Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ivanov

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic fuel cells convert the chemical energy of biofuels into electrical energy. Unlike traditional fuel cell types, which are mainly based on metal catalysts, the enzymatic fuel cells employ enzymes as catalysts. This fuel cell type can be used as an implantable power source for a variety of medical devices used in modern medicine to administer drugs, treat ailments and monitor bodily functions. Some advantages in comparison to conventional fuel cells include a simple fuel cell design and lower cost of the main fuel cell components, however they suffer from severe kinetic limitations mainly due to inefficiency in electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. In this review article, the major research activities concerned with the enzymatic fuel cells (anode and cathode development, system design, modeling by highlighting the current problems (low cell voltage, low current density, stability will be presented.

  1. Fuel cycle optimization using the nonlinear reactivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, Z.; Cecen, Y.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2002-01-01

    Fuel cycle optimization is one of the key subjects of reactor operation. In this study, fuel cycles of Spectral Shift PWR and Pebble Bed HTGR are optimized by using nonlinear reactivity model. The Spectral Shift concept is based on the adjustments of fuel to moderator ratio as a function of burnup. For n-batch fuel cycle, where n is equal to 3 and 4, the fuel to moderator ratio is determined as a function of burnup to maximize discharge burnup, Bd. Results show that it is possible to increase discharge burnup up to 25 percent compared to typical commercial PWR designs. Another problem arises in the design of PB-HTGR's fuel pebbles and mixing ratio. The optimization of the composition of fuel pebbles and mixing ratio for direct and n-pass fuel cycles are analyzed to maximize discharge burnup. We compared our results with the current design parameters of HTR-10 and PBMR.(author)

  2. Atomic scale simulations for improved CRUD and fuel performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    A more mechanistic description of fuel performance codes can be achieved by deriving models and parameters from atomistic scale simulations rather than fitting models empirically to experimental data. The same argument applies to modeling deposition of corrosion products on fuel rods (CRUD). Here are some results from publications in 2016 carried out using the CASL allocation at LANL.

  3. Model of U3Si2 Fuel System using BISON Fuel Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. E. Metzger; T. W. Knight; R. L. Williamson

    2014-04-01

    This research considers the proposed advanced fuel system: U3Si2 combined with an advanced cladding. U3Si2 has a number of advantageous thermophysical properties, which motivate its use as an accident tolerant fuel. This preliminary model evaluates the behavior of U3Si2 using available thermophysical data to predict the cladding-fuel pellet temperature and stress using the fuel performance code: BISON. The preliminary results obtained from the U3Si2 fuel model describe the mechanism of Pellet-Clad Mechanical Interaction for this system while more extensive testing including creep testing of U3Si2 is planned for improved understanding of thermophysical properties for predicting fuel performance.

  4. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component......- and system models match experimental data from the literature. However, limited data were available for verification so further work is necessary to confirm detailed aspects of the models. It is nonetheless expected that the developed models will be useful for system modeling and optimization of PEM fuel...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  5. Supply chain modeling of forest fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, Helene; Lundgren, Jan T.; Roennqvist, Mikael

    2001-04-01

    We study the problem of deciding when and where forest residues are to be converted into forest fuel, and how the residues are to be transported and stored in order to satisfy demand at heating plants. Decisions also include whether or not additional harvest areas and saw-mills are to be contracted. In addition, we consider the flow of products from saw-mills and import harbors, and address the question about which terminals to use. The planning horizon is one year and monthly time periods are considered. The supply chain problem is formulated as a large mixed integer linear programming model. In order to obtain solutions within reasonable time we have developed a heuristic solution approach. Computational results from a large Swedish supplying entrepreneur are reported

  6. WWER reactor fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, S.; Chantoin, P.; Kolev, I.

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of 36 papers presented at the International Seminar on WWER Reactor Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support, organised by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (BG), in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Seminar was attended by 76 participants from 16 countries, including representatives of all major Russian plants and institutions responsible for WWER reactor fuel manufacturing, design and research. The reports are grouped in four chapters: 1) WWER Fuel Performance and Economics: Status and Improvement Prospects: 2) WWER Fuel Behaviour Modelling and Experimental Support; 3) Licensing of WWER Fuel and Fuel Analysis Codes; 4) Spent Fuel of WWER Plants. The reports from the corresponding four panel discussion sessions are also included. All individual papers are recorded in INIS as separate items

  7. Thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Akbari, F.; Thompson, D.M.; Thurgood, C.; Higgs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment has been developed to predict the fuel oxidation behaviour in operating defective nuclear fuel elements. The equilibrium stoichiometry deviation in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel has been derived from thermodynamic considerations using a self-consistent set of thermodynamic properties for the U-O system, which emphasizes replication of solubilities and three-phase invariant conditions displayed in the U-O binary phase diagram. The kinetics model accounts for multi-phase transport including interstitial oxygen diffusion in the solid and gas-phase transport of hydrogen and steam in the fuel cracks. The fuel oxidation model is further coupled to a heat conduction model to account for the feedback effect of a reduced thermal conductivity in the hyper-stoichiometric fuel. A numerical solution has been developed using a finite-element technique with the FEMLAB software package. The model has been compared to available data from several in-reactor X-2 loop experiments with defective fuel conducted at the Chalk River Laboratories. The model has also been benchmarked against an O/U profile measurement for a spent defective fuel element discharged from a commercial reactor

  8. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  9. Modeling of constituent redistribution in U Pu Zr metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hayes, S. L.; Hofman, G. L.; Yacout, A. M.

    2006-12-01

    A computer model was developed to analyze constituent redistribution in U-Pu-Zr metallic nuclear fuels. Diffusion and thermochemical properties were parametrically determined to fit the postirradiation data from a fuel test performed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The computer model was used to estimate redistribution profiles of fuels proposed for the conceptual designs of small modular fast reactors. The model results showed that the level of redistribution of the fuel constituents of the designs was similar to the measured data from EBR-II.

  10. Modeling the Thermal Rocket Fuel Preparation Processes in the Launch Complex Fueling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zolin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to carry out fuel temperature preparation for space launch vehicles using hydrocarbon propellant components. A required temperature is reached with cooling or heating hydrocarbon fuel in ground facilities fuel storages. Fuel temperature preparing processes are among the most energy-intensive and lengthy processes that require the optimal technologies and regimes of cooling (heating fuel, which can be defined using the simulation of heat exchange processes for preparing the rocket fuel.The issues of research of different technologies and simulation of cooling processes of rocket fuel with liquid nitrogen are given in [1-10]. Diagrams of temperature preparation of hydrocarbon fuel, mathematical models and characteristics of cooling fuel with its direct contact with liquid nitrogen dispersed are considered, using the numerical solution of a system of heat transfer equations, in publications [3,9].Analytical models, allowing to determine the necessary flow rate and the mass of liquid nitrogen and the cooling (heating time fuel in specific conditions and requirements, are preferred for determining design and operational characteristics of the hydrocarbon fuel cooling system.A mathematical model of the temperature preparation processes is developed. Considered characteristics of these processes are based on the analytical solutions of the equations of heat transfer and allow to define operating parameters of temperature preparation of hydrocarbon fuel in the design and operation of the filling system of launch vehicles.The paper considers a technological system to fill the launch vehicles providing the temperature preparation of hydrocarbon gases at the launch site. In this system cooling the fuel in the storage tank before filling the launch vehicle is provided by hydrocarbon fuel bubbling with liquid nitrogen. Hydrocarbon fuel is heated with a pumping station, which provides fuel circulation through the heat exchanger-heater, with

  11. Modelling of spray evaporation and penetration for alternative fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Azami, M. H.; Savill, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this work is on the modelling of evaporation and spray penetration for alternative fuels. The extension model approach is presented and validated for alternative fuels, namely, Kerosene (KE), Ethanol (ETH), Methanol (MTH), Microalgae biofuel (MA), Jatropha biofuel (JA), and Camelina biofuel (CA). The results for atomization and spray penetration are shown in a time variant condition. Comparisons have been made to visualize the transient behaviour of these fuels. The vapour pressu...

  12. Performance of fire behavior fuel models developed for the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Ziel; W. Matt Jolly

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 40 new fire behavior fuel models were published for use with the Rothermel Surface Fire Spread Model. These new models are intended to augment the original 13 developed in 1972 and 1976. As a compiled set of quantitative fuel descriptions that serve as input to the Rothermel model, the selected fire behavior fuel model has always been critical to the resulting...

  13. Combustion Characterization and Model Fuel Development for Micro-tubular Flame-assisted Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcarek, Ryan J; Garrett, Michael J; Baskaran, Amrish; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-10-02

    Combustion based power generation has been accomplished for many years through a number of heat engine systems. Recently, a move towards small scale power generation and micro combustion as well as development in fuel cell research has created new means of power generation that combine solid oxide fuel cells with open flames and combustion exhaust. Instead of relying upon the heat of combustion, these solid oxide fuel cell systems rely on reforming of the fuel via combustion to generate syngas for electrochemical power generation. Procedures were developed to assess the combustion by-products under a wide range of conditions. While theoretical and computational procedures have been developed for assessing fuel-rich combustion exhaust in these applications, experimental techniques have also emerged. The experimental procedures often rely upon a gas chromatograph or mass spectrometer analysis of the flame and exhaust to assess the combustion process as a fuel reformer and means of heat generation. The experimental techniques developed in these areas have been applied anew for the development of the micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cell. The protocol discussed in this work builds on past techniques to specify a procedure for characterizing fuel-rich combustion exhaust and developing a model fuel-rich combustion exhaust for use in flame-assisted fuel cell testing. The development of the procedure and its applications and limitations are discussed.

  14. Static and dynamic modeling of a diesel fuel processing unit for polymer electrolyte fuel cell supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrenko, D.; Pera, M.C.; Hissel, D. [FCLAB, Femto-ST, UMR 6174, University of Franche-Comte, Techn' hom, Rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort (France); Coulie, J.; Lecoq, S. [N-GHY, Site Industriel Saint Antoine - ZI Montplaisir, 51 rue Isaac Newton, 81000 Albi (France)

    2009-02-15

    This article introduces the energetic macroscopic representation (EMR) as approach for the dynamic modeling of a diesel fuel processing unit. The EMR is the first step toward model-based control structure development. The autothermal fuel processing system containing: heat exchanger, reformer, desulfurization, water gas shift, preferential oxidation and condensation is divided into a multitude simple subblocks. Each subblock describes an elementary step of the fuel conversion, several of these blocks may occur in a single module. Calculations are carried out using two basic principles: mass and energy balances. For model-based control development, it is imperative that the model represents dynamic behavior, therefore temperature and pressure dynamics are taken into account in the model. It is shown that the model is capable to predict the stationary behavior of the entire fuel processing unit correctly by comparison with given data. Predictions regarding reformer heat up, temperature and pressure dynamics are also provided. (author)

  15. Fuel modelling and its economical competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.; Savino, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to reasons of economical competitiveness, there is at present a strong need in the nuclear industry to improve fuel performance under more demanding operating conditions, such as those resulting from an extended burnup. This requires a good understanding of the properties of fuel rod materials and their in-service performance. As it can be easily foreseen, thermal, mechanical and microstructural irradiation effects are strongly interrelated while the fuel is at reactor operating conditions. (author). 7 refs., 16 figs

  16. PEM fuel cell geometry optimisation using mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Carcadea

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been extensive efforts devoted to proton exchangemembrane (PEM fuel cell modeling and simulations to study fuel cellperformance. Although fuel cells have been successfully demonstrated inboth automotive and stationary power applications, there are numeroustechnical and logistic issues that still have to be solved, such asperformance, cost, and system issues. A model based on steady,isothermal, electrochemical, three-dimensional computational fluiddynamics using the FLUENT CFD software package has been developedto predict the fluid flow pattern within a PEMFC. Three types of flow field areinvestigated with serpentine, parallel or spiral channels in order todetermine the best configuration for the fuel cell performance. In thiscontext, the paper presents the results that we have obtained and, as aconclusion of the simulations, we have achieved the best configurationregarding the performance for the fuel cell with serpentine channels. Weconsider the mathematical and computational modeling as an importantalternative for fuel cell optimization and for the exploitation/experimentationin cost reduction.

  17. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  18. Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies

  19. Development of 3D Oxide Fuel Mechanics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Casagranda, A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pitts, S. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jiang, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-27

    This report documents recent work to improve the accuracy and robustness of the mechanical constitutive models used in the BISON fuel performance code. These developments include migration of the fuel mechanics models to be based on the MOOSE Tensor Mechanics module, improving the robustness of the smeared cracking model, implementing a capability to limit the time step size based on material model response, and improving the robustness of the return mapping iterations used in creep and plasticity models.

  20. Modeling chemistry in PWR fuel crud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PWR fuel crud arises from deposition of corrosion products in the coolant on clad surfaces in the core. These deposits form a porous layer through which water must pass to provide effective heat transfer from the clad surface. The usual heat transfer mechanism is by wick boiling in which water passing through the porous crud is converted to steam that escapes through steam chimneys in the deposit. This conversion of water into steam within the deposit means that dilute solutions in the bulk coolant become concentrated in the crud and this can lead to precipitation of species such as lithium borates, ZnO and Zn-silicates. Such precipitation processes may lead to problems such as crud induced power shifts (CIPS), formally known as axial off-set anomaly (AOA), or crud induced localised corrosion (CILC) of the clad, that has led to cladding failures. These precipitation processes also hinder heat transfer and can lead to hot spots on the clad surfaces that are potentially damaging. Questions such as what should be the plant limits on Zn, Si, B and Li to prevent such problems, and how should these be controlled during the cycle, are not easy to answer. With several new designs of PWR proposing high power density cores and therefore greater subcooled nucleate boiling, and with existing plants still up-rating their cores, these questions are likely to become more important in the future. It is therefore important to understand the relationship between coolant chemistry (Zn, Si, Li, B levels) and the chemistry within fuel crud. The bulk and crud chemistry are coupled along with the bulk and local heat transfer processes. This coupling of chemistry and heat transfer makes this a particularly difficult problem to investigate theoretically although the authors have previously achieved this using a number of one dimensional heat and mass transfer models. This paper discusses a new approach to this problem using finite element methods to solve the relevant coupled chemistry and

  1. Modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Quite some studies have been conducted in order to implement oxy-fuel combustion with flue gas recycle in conventional utility boilers as an effective effort of carbon capture and storage. However, combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is significantly different from conventional air-fuel firing......, among which radiative heat transfer under oxy-fuel conditions is one of the fundamental issues. This paper demonstrates the nongray-gas effects in modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes. Oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas in a 609MW utility boiler is numerically studied, in which...... calculation of the oxy-fuel WSGGM remarkably over-predicts the radiative heat transfer to the furnace walls and under-predicts the gas temperature at the furnace exit plane, which also result in a higher incomplete combustion in the gray calculation. Moreover, the gray and non-gray calculations of the same...

  2. Receiver Prejudice and Model Ethnicity: Impact on Advertising Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsiu-Chen Sandra; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assesses the effect of model ethnicity on prejudiced respondents, and thus on advertising effectiveness. Finds that, for the most part, use of Asian models does not cause prejudiced respondents to evaluate a product or advertisement more negatively than when White models are used. (SR)

  3. Evaluation model for PWR irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, I.C.

    1983-01-01

    The individual economic value of the plutonium isotopes for the recycle of the PWR reactor is investigated, assuming the existence of an market for this element. Two distinct market situations for the stages of the fuel cycle are analysed: one for the 1972 costs and the other for costs of 1982. Comparisons are made for each of the two market situations concerning enrichment of the U-235 in the uranium fuel that gives the minimum cost in the fuel cycle. The method adopted to establish the individual value of the plutonium isotopes consists on the economical analyses of the plutonium fuel cycle for four different isotopes mixtures refering to the uranium fuel cycle. (Author) [pt

  4. Fuel assembly bow: analytical modeling and resulting design improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabel, J.; Huebsch, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The bowing of fuel assemblies may result in a contact between neighbouring fuel assemblies and in connection with a vibration to a resulting wear or even perforation at the corners of the spacer grids of neighbouring assemblies. Such events allowed reinsertion of a few fuel assemblies in Germany only after spacer repair. In order to identify the most sensitive parameters causing the observed bowing of fuel assemblies a new computer model was develop which takes into a account the highly nonlinear behaviour of the interaction between fuel rods and spacers. As a result of the studies performed with this model, design improvements such as a more rigid connection between guide thimbles and spacer grids, could be defined. First experiences with this improved design show significantly better fuel behaviour. (author). 5 figs., 1 tabs

  5. Fuel fragmentation model advances using TEXAS-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Nilsuwankowsit, S.; Tang, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Because an energetic fuel-coolant interaction may be a safety hazard, experiments are being conducted to investigate the fuel-coolant mixing/quenching process (FARO) as well as the energetics of vapor explosion propagation for high temperature fuel melt simulants (KROTOS, WFCI, ZrEX). In both types of experiments, the dynamic breakup of the fuel is one of the key aspects that must be fundamentally understood to better estimate the magnitude of the mixing/quenching process or the explosion energetics. To aid our understanding the TEXAS fuel-coolant interaction computer model has been developed and is being used to analyze these experiments. Recently, the models for dynamic fuel fragmentation during the mixing and explosion phases of the FCI have been improved by further insights into these processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe these enhancements and to demonstrate their improvements by analysis of particular JRC FCI data. (author)

  6. Modeling of terminal-area airplane fuel consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Accurate modeling of airplane fuel consumption is necessary for air transportation policy-makers to properly : adjudicate trades between competing environmental and economic demands. Existing public models used for : computing terminal-area airplane ...

  7. Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

    2009-08-06

    We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and

  8. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, Levi D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huber, Tanja K. [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Breitkreutz, Harald [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  9. Modelling of fuel rod hydriding failures in water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, E.Yu.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Khoruzhij, O.V.; Likhanskij, V.V.; Sorokin, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanistic models which were developed to describe primary hydriding phenomena in claddings of initially intact rods with residual moisture are described. The models include the following key processes: fuel rod thermal behavior, UO 2 fuel oxidation in steam-hydrogen atmosphere under irradiation, hydrogen diffusion in zirconium and in the hydride, growth of the hydride phase. Fuel rod thermomechanical behavior is calculated by using RTOP integral fuel code. An oxidation model represents the effects of temperature dynamics and temperature profile along fuel axis and radius on fuel oxidation as well as on hydrogen accumulation inside the fuel rod. Along with ordinary thermal dissociation of water molecules, the oxidation model also addresses radiolysis of the steam-hydrogen mixture due to fission fragments. The present radiolysis model takes into account the effects of the gas mixture composition, temperature and pressure. A new model of cladding hydriding is proposed in which calculation of the massive hydride growth is performed in 2-D geometry. Hydrogen transport in zirconium cladding is modeled with account for thermodiffusion. The RTOP code comprising the models developed allows us to calculate different scenarios of hydriding rod failures under given operation conditions. Test calculations were carried out and compared to available data. It is shown that there are threshold values of initial steam content inside the intact fuel rod which lead to the possibility of through-cladding hydride growth and formation of the primary defect. The threshold values depend on the oxidation state of the cladding inner surface, linear power profile in the fuel rod, fuel rod geometry, cladding temperature conditions and hydrogen diffusivities in zirconium and zirconium hydride

  10. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Device and Materials Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells is a specialized text that compiles the mathematical details and results of both device and materials modeling in a single volume. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will likely have an impact on our way of life similar to the integrated circuit. The potential applications range from the micron scale to large scale industrial production. Successful integration of PEM fuel cells into the mass market will require new materials and a deeper understanding of the balance required to maintain various operational states. This book contains articles from scientists who contribute to fuel cell models from both the materials and device perspectives. Topics such as catalyst layer performance and operation, reactor dynamics, macroscopic transport, and analytical models are covered under device modeling. Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, an...

  11. Analytic models for fuel pin transient performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, F.E.; Fox, G.L.; Washburn, D.F.; Hanson, J.E.

    1976-09-01

    HEDL's ability to analyze various mechanisms that operate within a fuel pin has progressed substantially through development of codes such as PECTCLAD, which solves cladding response, and DSTRESS, which solves fuel response. The PECTCLAD results show good correlation with a variety of mechanical tests on cladding material and also demonstrate the significance of cladding strength when applying the life fraction rule. The DSTRESS results have shown that fuel deforms sufficiently during overpower transient tests that available volumes are filled, whether in the form of a central cavity or start-up cracks

  12. Tritium fuel cycle modeling and tritium breeding analysis for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hongli; Pan, Lei; Lv, Zhongliang; Li, Wei; Zeng, Qin, E-mail: zengqin@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems was developed. • The mean residence time method applied to tritium fuel cycle calculation was updated. • Tritium fuel cycle analysis for CFETR was carried out. - Abstract: Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is a critical goal for fusion reactor operated on the D–T fuel cycle. The tritium fuel cycle models were developed to describe the characteristic parameters of the various elements of the tritium cycle as a tool for evaluating the tritium breeding requirements. In this paper, a modified tritium fuel cycle model with more detailed subsystems and an updated mean residence time calculation method was developed based on ITER tritium model. The tritium inventory in fueling system and in plasma, supposed to be important for part of the initial startup tritium inventory, was considered in the updated mean residence time method. Based on the model, the tritium fuel cycle analysis of CFETR (Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor) was carried out. The most important two parameters, the minimum initial startup tritium inventory (I{sub m}) and the minimum tritium breeding ratio (TBR{sub req}) were calculated. The tritium inventories in steady state and tritium release of subsystems were obtained.

  13. Preliminary Modeling of Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts under Accident Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle A.; Hales, Jason D.

    2016-12-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. Thus, the United States Department of Energy through its NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is funded for a three-year period. The purpose of the HIP is to perform research into two potential accident tolerant concepts and provide an in-depth report to the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) describing the behavior of the concepts, both of which are being considered for inclusion in a lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The initial focus of the HIP is on uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (INL, LANL, and ANL) a comprehensive mulitscale approach to modeling is being used including atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. In this paper, we present simulations of two proposed accident tolerant fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. The simulations investigate the fuel performance response of the proposed ATF systems under Loss of Coolant and Station Blackout conditions using the BISON code. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ DAKOTA software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). Early results indicate that each concept has significant advantages as well as areas of concern. Further work is required prior to formulating the proposition report for the Advanced Fuels Campaign.

  14. Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Shropshire, David E.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Yacout, A.M.; Schweitzer, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

  15. RA3: Application of a calculation model for fuel management with SEFE (Slightly Enriched Fuel Elements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estryk, G.; Higa, M.

    1993-01-01

    The RA-3 (5 MW, MTR) reactor is mainly utilized to produce radioisotopes (Mo-99, I-131, etc.). It started operating with Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) in 1990, and spends around 12 fuels per year. Although this consumption is small compared to a nuclear power station. It is important to do a good management of them. The present report describes: - A reactor model to perform the Fuel Shuffling. - Results of fuel management simulations for 2 and a half years of operation. Some features of the calculations can be summarized as follows: 1) A 3D calculation model is used with the code PUMA. It does not have experimental adjustments, except for some approximations in the reflector representation and predicts: power, flux distributions and reactivity of the core in an acceptable way. 2) Comparisons have been made with the measurements done in the commissioning with LEU fuels, and it has also been compared with the empirical method (the previous one) which had been used in the former times of operation with LEU fuel. 3) The number of points of the model is approximately 13500, an it can be run in 80386 personal computer. The present method has been verified as a good tool to perform the simulations for the fuel management of RA-3 reactor. It is expected to produce some economic advantages in: - Achieving a better utilization of the fuels. - Leaving more time of operation for radioisotopes production. The activation measurements through the whole core required by the previous method can be significantly reduced. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the NETL Workshop on Fuel Cell Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Gemmen; J. R. Selman

    2000-04-18

    This workshop was the first U.S. DOE sponsored meeting devoted to fuel cell modeling. The workshop was attended by over 45 people from industry, universities, and the government. The goals of the meeting were to assess the status of fuel cell modeling, and determine how new developments in fuel cell modeling can improve cell design, stack design, and power system design. The primary focus was on cell and stack modeling. Following a review of DOE/NETL fuel cell related programs and activities, Professor Robert Selman (Illinois Institute of Technology) kicked off the technical portion of the workshop by presenting an overview of fuel cell phenomena and the status of fuel cell modeling. This overview provided the necessary background for establishing a common framework for discussing fuel cell modeling. A distinction was made between micro modeling, electrode modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and system modeling. It was proposed that all modeling levels be supported for further development. In addition, due to significant advances being made outside the U.S., it was proposed that dialog/exchange with other international researchers be established. Following the Overview Session, eight leading researchers in modeling gave individual presentations. These presentations provided additional information on the status and present direction of model developments. All these presentations can be found in Attachment A. Before the workshop, a survey was sent out requesting comments from the attendees. Results from this survey can be found in Attachment B. This survey was then used as initial talking points at the individual breakout sessions on the afternoon of the workshop. Breakouts were organized by microfundamental modeling, cell modeling, stack modeling, and systems modeling.

  17. Modeling of Flow in Nuclear Reactor Fuel Cell Outlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František URBAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Safe and effective load of nuclear reactor fuel cells demands qualitative and quantitative analysis of relations between coolant temperature in fuel cell outlet temperature measured by thermocouple and middle temperature of coolant in thermocouple plane position. In laboratory at Insitute of thermal power engineering of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava was installed an experimental physical fuel cell model of VVER 440 nuclear power plant with V 213 nuclear reactors. Objective of measurements on physical model was temperature and velocity profiles analysis in the fuel cell outlet. In this paper the measured temperature and velocity profiles are compared with the results of CFD simulation of fuel cell physical model coolant flow.

  18. Lumped-parameter fuel rod model for rapid thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, K.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

    1975-07-01

    The thermal behavior of fuel rods during simulated accident conditions is extremely sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient which is, in turn, very sensitive to the cladding surface temperature and the fluid conditions. The development of a semianalytical, lumped-parameter fuel rod model which is intended to provide accurate calculations, in a minimum amount of computer time, of the thermal response of fuel rods during a simulated loss-of-coolant accident is described. The results show good agreement with calculations from a comprehensive fuel-rod code (FRAP-T) currently in use at Aerojet Nuclear Company

  19. Fuel cycle assessment: A compendium of models, methodologies, and approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to profile analytical tools and methods which could be used in a total fuel cycle analysis. The information in this document provides a significant step towards: (1) Characterizing the stages of the fuel cycle. (2) Identifying relevant impacts which can feasibly be evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively. (3) Identifying and reviewing other activities that have been conducted to perform a fuel cycle assessment or some component thereof. (4) Reviewing the successes/deficiencies and opportunities/constraints of previous activities. (5) Identifying methods and modeling techniques/tools that are available, tested and could be used for a fuel cycle assessment.

  20. Model support for an out-reactor-instrumented-defected-fuel-experiment to validate the RMC fuel oxidation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quastel, A.D.; Corcoran, E.C.; Lewis, B.J. [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Dept., Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Thiriet, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Hadaller, G. [Stern Laboratories Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    An out-reactor fuel oxidation experiment with controlled parameters is being planned to provide data for validation of the Royal Military College (RMC) mechanistic fuel oxidation model. In support of this work, fuel oxidation 2D r-θ and 3D models are presented. The 2D r-θ model with radial cracks provides the radial temperature distribution in the test fuel element and also provides heating power information. The 3D model with radial cracks and a pellet-pellet gap under a defected sheath indicate that an oxygen stoichiometry deviation of 0.057 could result within one week of heating a defected UO{sub 2} fuel element with a 5-mm{sup 2} sheath defect. (author)

  1. Dynamic Model of High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2007-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system consists of a prototype...... parts, where also the temperatures are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures, when heating the stack with external heating elements for start-up, heat...... the stack at a high stoichiometric air flow. This is possible because of the PBI fuel cell membranes used, and the very low pressure drop in the stack. The model consists of a discrete thermal model dividing the stack into three parts: inlet, middle and end and predicting the temperatures in these three...

  2. Nonlinear time-domain modeling of balanced-armature receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Joe; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Harte, James

    2011-01-01

    of the loudspeaker diaphragm inevitably changes the magnetic and electrical characteristics of the loudspeaker. A numerical time-domain model capable of describing these nonlinearities is presented. By simulation it is demonstrated how the output distortion could potentially be reduced significantly through careful...

  3. A Stochastic Programming Model for Fuel Treatment Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohannad Kabli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work considers a two-stage stochastic integer programming (SIP approach for optimizing fuel treatment planning under uncertainty in weather and fire occurrence for rural forests. Given a set of areas for potentially performing fuel treatment, the problem is to decide the best treatment option for each area under uncertainty in future weather and fire occurrence. A two-stage SIP model is devised whose objective is to minimize the here-and-now cost of fuel treatment in the first-stage, plus the expected future costs due to uncertain impact from potential fires in the second-stage calculated as ecosystem services losses. The model considers four fuel treatment options: no treatment, mechanical thinning, prescribed fire, and grazing. Several constraints such as budgetary and labor constraints are included in the model and a standard fire behavior model is used to estimate some of the parameters of the model such as fuel levels at the beginning of the fire season. The SIP model was applied to data for a study area in East Texas with 15 treatment areas under different weather scenarios. The results of the study show, for example, that unless the expected ecosystem services values for an area outweigh fuel treatment costs, no treatment is the best choice for the area. Thus the valuation of the area together with the probability of fire occurrence and behavior strongly drive fuel treatment choices.

  4. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel rod behavior modelling and current trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, Ue.

    2001-01-01

    Safety assessment of nuclear reactors is carried out by simulating the events to taking place in nuclear reactors by realistic computer codes. Such codes are developed in a way that each event is represented by differential equations derived based on physical laws. Nuclear fuel is an important barrier against radioactive fission gas release. The release of radioactivity to environment is the main concern and this can be avoided by preserving the integrity of fuel rod. Therefore, safety analyses should cover an assessment of fuel rod behavior with certain extent. In this study, common approaches for fuel behavior modeling are discussed. Methods utilized by widely accepted computer codes are reviewed. Shortcomings of these methods are explained. Current research topics to improve code reliability and problems encountered in fuel rod behavior modeling are presented

  6. Exploiting the steady state, continuous fueling reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Cunningham, G.W.; Fowler, T.B.

    1979-01-01

    A continuously fueled reactor presents an analysis challenge, especially so when the neutron accounting is sensitive to the core design and the fuel handling. A scheme was implemented to solve the steady state, continuous fueling problem. This problem is an accurate model of the reactor for assessing performance at a point in its operating history. Available capability in a modular code system developed to treat fixed fuel reactors was extended in this effort. Parametric studies have been made with this capability to assess the performance of a pebble bed power plant reactor over a wide range of fueling possibilities. The model and the calculational methods are discussed. A global iteration scheme is used to effect a solution for the critical reactor state. The schemes used to accelerate the rate of convergence of one- and two-dimensional problems are described and the interactive behavior is shown for representative problems

  7. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...... the present fundamental understanding of direct methanol fuel cell operation by developing a three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component, non-isotherm mathematical model including detailed non-ideal thermodynamics, non-equilibrium phase change and non-equilibrium sorption-desorption of methanol and water...

  8. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Benjamin A. Baker; Joseph Grimm

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating “what if” scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., “reactor types” not individual reactors and “separation types” not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several

  9. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  10. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Piet, Steven J.; Baker, Benjamin A.; Grimm, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R and D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft

  11. Solar optical codes evaluation for modeling and analyzing complex solar receiver geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowhair, Julius; Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2014-09-01

    Solar optical modeling tools are valuable for modeling and predicting the performance of solar technology systems. Four optical modeling tools were evaluated using the National Solar Thermal Test Facility heliostat field combined with flat plate receiver geometry as a benchmark. The four optical modeling tools evaluated were DELSOL, HELIOS, SolTrace, and Tonatiuh. All are available for free from their respective developers. DELSOL and HELIOS both use a convolution of the sunshape and optical errors for rapid calculation of the incident irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces. SolTrace and Tonatiuh use ray-tracing methods to intersect the reflected solar rays with the receiver surfaces and construct irradiance profiles. We found the ray-tracing tools, although slower in computation speed, to be more flexible for modeling complex receiver geometries, whereas DELSOL and HELIOS were limited to standard receiver geometries such as flat plate, cylinder, and cavity receivers. We also list the strengths and deficiencies of the tools to show tool preference depending on the modeling and design needs. We provide an example of using SolTrace for modeling nonconventional receiver geometries. The goal is to transfer the irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces calculated in an optical code to a computational fluid dynamics code such as ANSYS Fluent. This approach eliminates the need for using discrete ordinance or discrete radiation transfer models, which are computationally intensive, within the CFD code. The irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces then allows for thermal and fluid analysis on the receiver.

  12. Conceptual design for a receiving station for the nondestructive assay of PuO2 at the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, T.E.; Speir, L.G.; Ensslin, N.; Hsue, S.T.; Johnson, S.S.; Bourret, S.; Parker, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    We propose a conceptual design for a receiving station for input accountability measurements on PuO 2 received at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. Nondestructive assay techniques are proposed, including neutron coincidence counting, calorimetry, and isotopic determination by gamma-ray spectroscopy, in a versatile data acquisition system to perform input accountability measurements with precisions better than 1% at throughputs of up to 2 M.T./yr of PuO 2

  13. A nuclear fuel cycle system dynamic model for spent fuel storage options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinton, Samuel; Kazimi, Mujid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Used nuclear fuel management requires a dynamic system analysis study due to its socio-technical complexity. • Economic comparison of local, regional, and national storage options is limited due to the public financial information. • Local and regional options of used nuclear fuel management are found to be the most economic means of storage. - Abstract: The options for used nuclear fuel storage location and affected parameters such as economic liabilities are currently a focus of several high level studies. A variety of nuclear fuel cycle system analysis models are available for such a task. The application of nuclear fuel cycle system dynamics models for waste management options is important to life-cycle impact assessment. The recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Committee on America’s Nuclear Future led to increased focus on long periods of spent fuel storage [1]. This motivated further investigation of the location dependency of used nuclear fuel in the parameters of economics, environmental impact, and proliferation risk. Through a review of available literature and interactions with each of the programs available, comparisons of post-reactor fuel storage and handling options will be evaluated based on the aforementioned parameters and a consensus of preferred system metrics and boundary conditions will be provided. Specifically, three options of local, regional, and national storage were studied. The preliminary product of this research is the creation of a system dynamics tool known as the Waste Management Module (WMM) which provides an easy to use interface for education on fuel cycle waste management economic impacts. Initial results of baseline cases point to positive benefits of regional storage locations with local regional storage options continuing to offer the lowest cost

  14. Simulating the market for automotive fuel efficiency: The SHRSIM model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, D.L.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes a computer model for simulating the effects of uncertainty about future fuel prices and competitors' behavior on the market shares of an automobile manufacturer who is considering introducing technology to increase fuel efficiency. Starting with an initial sales distribution, a pivot-point multinomial logit technique is used to adjust market shares based on changes in the present value of the added fuel efficiency. These shifts are random because the model generates random fuel price projections using parameters supplied by the user. The user also controls the timing of introduction and obsolescence of technology. While the model was designed with automobiles in mind, it has more general applicability to energy using durable goods. The model is written in IBM BASIC for an IBM PC and compiled using the Microsoft QuickBASIC (trademark of the Microsoft corporation) compiler.

  15. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberman, Ben [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Martinez-Baca, Carlos [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States); Rush, Greg [LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc., North Canton, OH (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  16. PEM fuel cell modeling and simulation using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Although, the basic concept of a fuel cell is quite simple, creating new designs and optimizing their performance takes serious work and a mastery of several technical areas. PEM Fuel Cell Modeling and Simulation Using Matlab, provides design engineers and researchers with a valuable tool for understanding and overcoming barriers to designing and building the next generation of PEM Fuel Cells. With this book, engineers can test components and verify designs in the development phase, saving both time and money.Easy to read and understand, this book provides design and modelling tips for

  17. The Model of Temperature Dynamics of Pulsed Fuel Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarchenko, E A; Popov, A K

    2002-01-01

    Heat exchange process differential equations are considered for a subcritical fuel assembly with an injector. The equations are obtained by means of the use of the Hermit polynomial. The model is created for modelling of temperature transitional processes. The parameters and dynamics are estimated for hypothetical fuel assembly consisting of real mountings: the powerful proton accelerator and the reactor IBR-2 core at its subcritica l state.

  18. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0296 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Gregory Faris SRI INTERNATIONAL MENLO PARK CA Final... Faris , Gregory P. Smith 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SRI International...International Final Technical Report • September 14, 2015 RESEARCH IN SUPERCRITICAL FUEL PROPERTIES AND COMBUSTION MODELING Prepared by: Gregory W. Faris

  19. Communication received on 12 September 2006 from the Permanent Mission of Japan to the Agency concerning arrangements for the assurance of nuclear fuel supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Secretariat has received on 12 September 2006 a communication from the Permanent Mission of Japan attaching a document entitled 'Japan's Proposal: IAEA Standby Arrangements System for the Assurance of Nuclear Fuel Supply'. As requested by the Permanent Mission, the text of the attachment is herewith reproduced for the information of Member States

  20. Communication received from the Resident Representative of Germany to the IAEA with regard to the German proposal on the multilateralization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Agency has received a communication dated 26 April 2007 from the Resident Representative of Germany, attaching the German proposal on the Multilateralization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. As requested in that communication, the proposal is herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  1. Communication received from the Federal Minister for European and International Affairs of Austria with regard to the Austrian proposal on the multilateralization of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Agency has received a communication dated 10 May 2007 from the Federal Minister for European and International Affairs of the Republic of Austria, attaching a paper on the Multilateralization of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. As requested in that communication, the paper is herewith circulated for the information of Member States

  2. Communication dated 18 May 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan to the Agency enclosing a position paper regarding the establishment of IAEA nuclear fuel banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 18 May 2009 from the Permanent Mission of Kazakhstan, transmitting a position paper of Kazakhstan regarding the establishment of IAEA nuclear fuel banks. As requested in that communication, the attached position paper is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  3. On direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles modelling and demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Kristina

    2005-03-01

    In this thesis, direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems in vehicles are investigated through modelling, field tests and public acceptance surveys. A computer model of a 50 kW PEM fuel cell system was developed. The fuel cell system efficiency is approximately 50% between 10 and 45% of the rated power. The fuel cell auxiliary system, e.g. compressor and pumps, was shown to clearly affect the overall fuel cell system electrical efficiency. Two hydrogen on-board storage options, compressed and cryogenic hydrogen, were modelled for the above-mentioned system. Results show that the release of compressed gaseous hydrogen needs approximately 1 kW of heat, which can be managed internally with heat from the fuel cell stack. In the case of cryogenic hydrogen, the estimated heat demand of 13 kW requires an extra heat source. A phase change based (PCM) thermal management solution to keep a 50 kW PEM fuel cell stack warm during dormancy in a cold climate (-20 deg C) was investigated through simulation and experiments. It was shown that a combination of PCM (salt hydrate or paraffin wax) and vacuum insulation materials was able to keep a fuel cell stack from freezing for about three days. This is a simple and potentially inexpensive solution, although development on issues such as weight, volume and encapsulation materials is needed. Two different vehicle platforms, fuel cell vehicles and fuel cell hybrid vehicles, were used to study the fuel consumption and the air, water and heat management of the fuel cell system under varying operating conditions, e.g. duty cycles and ambient conditions. For a compact vehicle, with a 50 kW fuel cell system, the fuel consumption was significantly reduced, {approx}50 %, compared to a gasoline-fuelled vehicle of similar size. A bus with 200 kW fuel cell system was studied and compared to a diesel bus of comparable size. The fuel consumption of the fuel cell bus displayed a reduction of 33-37 %. The performance of a fuel

  4. Modeling of the repository behavior of TRISO fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E. E.; Bauer, T. H.

    2006-01-31

    This report satisfies Milestone 4295 for Work Package A0403K11. The long-term behavior of TRISO nuclear reactor fuel in a geologic repository is examined in terms of its durability and thermal impact. The TRISO fuel concept, under development at General Atomics[1] involves embedding fissile uranium and/or actinides in a carbonaceous material as shown in Fig. 1. In the concept, fuel kernels containing fissile material are surrounded with a porous carbon buffer and coated with inner and outer pyrocarbon layers separated with a SiC layer. The fuel particles are then imbedded in a graphite compact and the compacts placed in fuel channels drilled in fuel assembly blocks as shown in the lower right-hand corner of the figure. Dimensions are listed in Table 1. Available data on the degradation of the carbonaceous materials in an aqueous environment is reviewed. A model accounting for waste package failure and the resulting degradation of the waste forms is used to evaluate the potential for the long-term sequestration of radionuclides from spent TRISO fuel in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Finally, thermal analyses of decay heat assess the potential benefits in repository space utilization from recycling actinides from PWR spent fuel as very high burnup TRISO fuel. Experimental data on the aqueous dissolution of carbonaceous materials is relatively sparse and in some cases is based on measurements carried out at temperatures much higher than would be expected in the repository. In addition, the degree to which the aqueous solutions used in the measurements are representative of Yucca Mountain groundwater is uncertain. However, the available dissolution rate data are generally two or more orders of magnitude lower than the Yucca Mountain Project's dissolution model for borosilicate glass. Model calculations show that if the observed rates are applicable to the Yucca Mountain environment, directly disposed TRISO fuel has the potential to prevent significant release of

  5. Modeling of MOX Fuel Pellet-Clad Interaction Using ABAQUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosek, Richard G.; Pedersen, Robert C.; Maple, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) has indicated an increase in the outer diameter of fuel pins being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for the MOX irradiation program. The diameter increase is the largest in the region between fuel pellets. The fuel pellet was modeled using PATRAN and the model was evaluated using ABAQUS, version 6.2. The results from the analysis indicate the non-uniform clad diameter is caused by interaction between the fuel pellet and the clad. The results also demonstrate that the interaction is not uniform over the pellet axial length, with the largest interaction occurring in the region of the pellet-pellet interface. Results were obtained for an axisymmetric model and for a 1/8 pie shaped segment, using the coupled temperature-displacement solution technique. (authors)

  6. Multivariable control system for dynamic PEM fuel cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanislav, Vasile; Carcadea, Elena; Capris, Catalin; Culcer, Mihai; Raceanu, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The main objective of this work was to develop a multivariable control system of robust type for a PEM fuel cells assembly. The system will be used in static and mobile applications for different values of power, generated by a fuel cell assembly of up to 10 kW. Intermediate steps were accomplished: a study of a multivariable control strategy for a PEM fuel cell assembly; a mathematic modeling of mass and heat transfer inside of fuel cell assembly, defining the response function to hydrogen and oxygen/air mass flow and inlet pressure changes; a testing stand for fuel cell assembly; experimental determinations of transient response for PEM fuel cell assembly, and more others. To define the multivariable control system for a PEM fuel cell assembly the parameters describing the system were established. Also, there were defined the generic mass and energy balance equations as functions of derivative of m i , in and m i , out , representing the mass going into and out from the fuel cell, while Q in is the enthalpy and Q out is the enthalpy of the unused reactant gases and heat produced by the product, Q dis is the heat dissipated to the surroundings, Q c is the heat taken away from the stack by active cooling and W el is the electricity generated. (authors)

  7. PEM fuel cell model suitable for energy optimization purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caux, S.; Hankache, W.; Fadel, M.; Hissel, D.

    2010-01-01

    Many fuel cell stack models or fuel cell system models exist. A model must be built with a main objective, sometimes for accurate electro-chemical behavior description, sometimes for optimization procedure at a system level. In this paper, based on the fundamental reactions present in a fuel cell stack, an accurate model and identification procedure is presented for future energy management in a Hybrid Electrical Vehicle (HEV). The proposed approach extracts all important state variables in such a system and based on the control of the fuel cell's gas flows and temperature, simplification arises to a simple electrical model. Assumptions verified due to the control of the stack allow simplifying the relationships within keeping accuracy in the description of a global fuel cell stack behavior from current demand to voltage. Modeled voltage and current dynamic behaviors are compared with actual measurements. The obtained accuracy is sufficient and less time-consuming (versus other previously published system-oriented models) leading to a suitable model for optimization iterative off-line algorithms.

  8. System level modeling and component level control of fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xingjian

    This dissertation investigates the fuel cell systems and the related technologies in three aspects: (1) system-level dynamic modeling of both PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); (2) condition monitoring scheme development of PEM fuel cell system using model-based statistical method; and (3) strategy and algorithm development of precision control with potential application in energy systems. The dissertation first presents a system level dynamic modeling strategy for PEM fuel cells. It is well known that water plays a critical role in PEM fuel cell operations. It makes the membrane function appropriately and improves the durability. The low temperature operating conditions, however, impose modeling difficulties in characterizing the liquid-vapor two phase change phenomenon, which becomes even more complex under dynamic operating conditions. This dissertation proposes an innovative method to characterize this phenomenon, and builds a comprehensive model for PEM fuel cell at the system level. The model features the complete characterization of multi-physics dynamic coupling effects with the inclusion of dynamic phase change. The model is validated using Ballard stack experimental result from open literature. The system behavior and the internal coupling effects are also investigated using this model under various operating conditions. Anode-supported tubular SOFC is also investigated in the dissertation. While the Nernst potential plays a central role in characterizing the electrochemical performance, the traditional Nernst equation may lead to incorrect analysis results under dynamic operating conditions due to the current reverse flow phenomenon. This dissertation presents a systematic study in this regard to incorporate a modified Nernst potential expression and the heat/mass transfer into the analysis. The model is used to investigate the limitations and optimal results of various operating conditions; it can also be utilized to perform the

  9. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  10. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 x 10 -5 and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 x 10 -3 . Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible

  11. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-08

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohr, M.; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, G.

    1996-01-01

    From intro.: The direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell uses aqueous solutions of methanol as fuel and oxygen or air as the oxidant and uses an ionically conducting polymer membrane such as Nafion(sup r)117 and the electrolyte. This type of direct oxidation cell is fuel versatile and offers significant advantages in terms of simplicity of design and operation...The present study focuses on the results of a phenomenological model based on current understanding of the various processed operating in these cells.

  13. A Computer Model for Direct Carbonate Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, J.; Patel, P.S.; Farooque, M.; Maru, H.C.

    1997-04-01

    A 3-D computer model, describing fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, and chemical and electrochemical reaction processes, has been developed for guiding the direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) stack design. This model is able to analyze the direct internal reforming (DIR) as well as the integrated IIR (indirect internal reforming)-DIR designs. Reasonable agreements between computed and fuel cell tested results, such as flow variations, temperature distributions, cell potentials, and exhaust gas compositions as well as methane conversions, were obtained. Details of the model and comparisons of the modeling results with experimental DFC stack data are presented in the paper.

  14. The FIT Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Meliisa C Teague; Gregory M Teske; Kurt G Vedros

    2010-09-01

    All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010] are an initial step by the FCR&D program toward a global analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. The question originally posed to the “system losses study” was the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, waste management, etc. versus the separation efficiency. In other words, are the costs associated with marginal reductions in separations losses (or improvements in product recovery) justified by the gains in the performance of other systems? We have learned that that is the wrong question. The right question is: how does one adjust the compositions and quantities of all mass streams, given uncertain product criteria, to balance competing objectives including cost? FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles using common bases to determine how chemical performance changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say used fuel cooling times or separation efficiencies) affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT estimates impurities in fuel and waste via a rough estimate of physics and mass balance for a set of technologies. If feasibility is an issue for a set, as it is for “minimum fuel treatment” approaches such as melt refining and AIROX, it can help to make an estimate of how performances would have to change to achieve feasibility.

  15. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  16. System modeling of spent fuel transfers at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The unloading of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for interim storage and subsequent processing in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is a multi-stage process, involving complex operations at a minimum of four different facilities at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site. Each stage typically has complicated handling and/or cooling equipment that must be periodically maintained, leading to both planned and unplanned downtime. A program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. Routine operation of the reactor for fuels performance and materials testing occurred simultaneously in FY 1994 with the blanket unloading. In the summer of 1994, Congress dictated the October 1, 1994 shutdown of EBR-2. Consequently, all blanket S/As and fueled drivers will be removed from the reactor tank and replaced with stainless steel assemblies (which are needed to maintain a precise configuration within the grid so that the under sodium fuel handling equipment can function). A system modeling effort was conducted to determine the means to achieve the objective for the blanket and fuel unloading program, which under the current plan requires complete unloading of the primary tank of all fueled assemblies in 2 1/2 years. A simulation model of the fuel handling system at ANL-W was developed and used to analyze different unloading scenarios; the model has provided valuable information about required resources and modifications to equipment and procedures. This paper reports the results of this modeling effort

  17. Modeling moisture content of fine dead wildland fuels: Input to the BEHAVE fire prediction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Rothermel; Ralph A. Wilson; Glen A. Morris; Stephen S. Sackett

    1986-01-01

    Describes a model for predicting moisture content of fine fuels for use with the BEHAVE fire behavior and fuel modeling system. The model is intended to meet the need for more accurate predictions of fine fuel moisture, particularly in northern conifer stands and on days following rain. The model is based on the Canadian Fine Fuel Moisture Code (FFMC), modified to...

  18. CANDU fuel bundle deformation modelling with COMSOL multiphysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.S.; Lewis, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The deformation behaviour of a CANDU fuel bundle was modelled. ► The model has been developed on a commercial finite-element platform. ► Pellet/sheath interaction and end-plate restraint effects were considered. ► The model was benchmarked against the BOW code and a variable-load experiment. - Abstract: A model to describe deformation behaviour of a CANDU 37-element bundle has been developed under the COMSOL Multiphysics finite-element platform. Beam elements were applied to the fuel elements (composed of fuel sheaths and pellets) and endplates in order to calculate the bowing behaviour of the fuel elements. This model is important to help assess bundle-deformation phenomena, which may lead to more restrictive coolant flow through the sub-channels of the horizontally oriented bundle. The bundle model was compared to the BOW code for the occurrence of a dry-out patch, and benchmarked against an out-reactor experiment with a variable load on an outer fuel element.

  19. Software Platform Evaluation - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. J. Jacobson; D. E. Shropshire; W. B. West

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Software Platform Evaluation (SPE) is to document the top-level evaluation of potential software platforms on which to construct a simulation model that satisfies the requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). See the Software Requirements Specification for Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model (INEEL/EXT-05-02643, Rev. 0) for a discussion of the objective and scope of the VISION model. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies. This document will serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate software platform for VISION. This is a ''living document'' that will be modified over the course of the execution of this work

  20. Simulation modelling for new gas turbine fuel controller creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendland, L. E.; Pribylov, V. G.; Borisov, Yu A.; Arzamastsev, M. A.; Kosoy, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    State of the art gas turbine fuel flow control systems are based on throttle principle. Major disadvantage of such systems is that they require high pressure fuel intake. Different approach to fuel flow control is to use regulating compressor. And for this approach because of controller and gas turbine interaction a specific regulating compressor is required. Difficulties emerge as early as the requirement definition stage. To define requirements for new object, his properties must be known. Simulation modelling helps to overcome these difficulties. At the requirement definition stage the most simplified mathematical model is used. Mathematical models will get more complex and detailed as we advance in planned work. If future adjusting of regulating compressor physical model to work with virtual gas turbine and physical control system is planned.

  1. Study of fuel control strategy based on an fuel behavior model for starting conditions; Nenryo kyodo model ni motozuita shidoji no nenryo hosei hosho ni tsuite no kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Y.; Uchida, M.; Iwano, H.; Oba, H. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We have applied a fuel behavior model to a fuel injection system which we call SOFIS (Sophisticated and Optimized Fuel Injection System) so that we get air/fuel ratio control accuracy and good driveability. However the fuel behavior under starting conditions is still not clear. To meet low emission rules and to get better driveability under starting conditions, better air/fuel ratio control is necessary. Now we have understood the ignition timing, injection timing, and injection pulse width required in such conditions. In former days, we analyzed the state of the air/fuel mixture under cold conditions and made a new fuel behavior model which considered fuel loss such as hydrocarbons and dissolution into oil and so on. Al this time, we have applied this idea to starting. We confirm this new model offers improved air/fuel ratio control. 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Modelling of fuel spray and combustion in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, M.T.; Kaario, O.T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel spray and air motion characteristics and combustion in direct injection (DI) diesel engines was studied using computational models of the commercial CFD-code FIRE. Physical subprocesses modelled included Lagrangian spray droplet movement and behaviour (atomisation, evaporation and interaction of spray droplets) and combustion of evaporated liquid spray in the gas phase. Fuel vapour combustion rate was described by the model of Magnussen and Hjertager. The standard k,{epsilon}-model was used for turbulence. In order to be able to predict combustion accurately, the fuel spray penetration should be predicted with reasonable accuracy. In this study, the standard drag coefficient had to be reduced in order to match the computed penetration to the measured one. In addition, the constants in the submodel describing droplet breakup also needed to be adjusted for closer agreement with the measurements. The characteristic time scale of fuel consumption rate k/C{sub R} {epsilon} strongly influenced the heat release and in-cylinder pressure. With a value around 2.0 to 5.0 for C{sub R}, the computed in-cylinder pressure during the compression stroke agreed quite well with the measurements. On the other hand, the in-cylinder pressure was underpredicted during the expansion stroke. This is partly due to the fact that hydrocarbon fuel combustion was modelled as a one-step reaction reading to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and inadequate description of the mixing of reactants and combustion products. (author) 16 refs.

  3. Model for the determination of the nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, J.B.L. de.

    1979-09-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cost Determination Model, MDCN, is a computer program written in FORTRAN IV, meant to calculate the nuclear fuel cost employed in nuclear power plants for heat or electrical energy generation. The economic principles employed are: capital recovery proportional to the energy generation, present worth method for the equivalence of costs and levelized fuel cost calculation. This model presents some inovations in comparasion with other models already in use, since it takes into account refueling and maintenance outages and it does not fix the fuel cycle steps (industrial processes and services). The first inovation leads to a more realistic cost determination and permits the model to be employed together with hydrothermal power system simulators; the second permits a more flexible use of the model, like economical comparison of fuel cycles. Complementing the main body of the work, where the theoretical fundamentals and methodology necessary to the calculation developments are discussed, annexes are included treating in greater detail some specific itens; the more important ones refer to the FORTRAN program, input data preparation and example. (Author) [pt

  4. 3D Reflection Map Modeling for Optical Emitter-receiver Pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Vie

    2004-01-01

    A model for a model-based 3D-position determination system for a passive object is presented. Infrared emitter/receiver pairs are proposed as sensing part to acquire information on a ball shaped object's position. A 3D reflection map model is derived trough geometrical considerations. The model...

  5. Modeling fuel cells in integrated multi-energy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriellissx, Paolo; Gazzani, Matteo; Mazzotti, Marco

    2017-01-01

    This contribution investigates how different technology modeling methodologies affect the design of decentralized multi-energy systems, especially when fuel cell and energy storage are considered. First, thermoelectric models based on a first-principle approach are implemented to determine the

  6. Standard model for safety analysis report of fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    A standard model for a safety analysis report of fuel reprocessing plants is established. This model shows the presentation format, the origin, and the details of the minimal information required by CNEN (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear) aiming to evaluate the requests of construction permits and operation licenses made according to the legislation in force. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Standard model for safety analysis report of fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    A standard model for a safety analysis report of fuel fabrication plants is established. This model shows the presentation format, the origin, and the details of the minimal information required by CNEN (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear) aiming to evaluate the requests of construction permits and operation licenses made according to the legislation in force. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Fuel consumption modeling in support of ATM environmental decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The FAA has recently updated the airport terminal : area fuel consumption methods used in its environmental models. : These methods are based on fitting manufacturers fuel : consumption data to empirical equations. The new fuel : consumption metho...

  9. Modeling of Pem Fuel Cell Systems Including Controls and Reforming Effects for Hybrid Automotive Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boettner, Daisie

    2001-01-01

    .... This study develops models for a stand-alone Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, a direct-hydrogen fuel cell system including auxiliaries, and a methanol reforming fuel cell system for integration into a vehicle performance simulator...

  10. Investigation of Burnup Credit Modeling Issues Associated with BWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2000-10-12

    /or decreasing the neutron absorber concentration. However, regulations associated with permanent disposal require consideration of scenarios and/or package conditions that are not relevant or credible for storage or transportation, and as a result, necessitate credit for burnup in BWR fuel to maintain capacity objectives. Burnup credit relies on depletion calculations to provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents and subsequent criticality calculations to assess the value of k{sub eff} for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of postulated conditions. Therefore, validation is necessary to quantify biases and uncertainties between analytic predictions and measured isotopics. However, the design and operational aspects of BWRs result in a more heterogeneous and time-varying reactor configuration than those of PWRs. Thus, BWR spent fuel analyses and validation efforts are significantly more complicated than those of their PWR counterparts. BWR spent fuel assemblies are manufactured with variable enrichments, both radially and axially, are exposed to time- and spatially-varying void distributions, contain integral burnable absorber rods, and are subject to partial control-blade insertion during operation. The latter is especially true in older fuel assemblies. Away-from-reactor depletion tools used for characterization of spent fuel have typically been developed and validated for more homogeneous PWR fuel assemblies without integral burnable absorber rods, and thus must be reassessed for BWR configurations to determine a conservative methodology for estimating the isotopic content of spent BWR fuel. This report examines the use of SAS2H8 for calculating spent BWR fuel isotopics for burnup-credit criticality safety analyses and assesses the adequacy of SAS2H for this task. The effects of SAS2H modeling assumptions on calculated spent BWR fuel isotopics and the effects of depletion assumptions on calculated k{sub inf} values are investigated. Detailed

  11. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  12. ENVI Model Development for Korean Nuclear Spent Fuel Options Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sunyoung; Jeong, Yon Hong; Han, Jae-Jun; Lee, Aeri; Hwang, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The disposal facility of the spent nuclear fuel will be operated from 2051. This paper presents the ENVI code developed by GoldSim Software to simulate options for managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in South Korea. The ENVI is a simulator to allow decision-makers to assist to evaluate the performance for spent nuclear fuel management. The multiple options for managing the spent nuclear fuel including the storage and transportation are investigated into interim storage, permanent disposal in geological repositories and overseas and domestic reprocessing. The ENVI code uses the GoldSim software to simulate the logistics of the associated activities. The result by the ENVI model not only produces the total cost to compare among the multiple options but also predict the sizes and timings of different facilities required. In order to decide the policy for spent nuclear management this purpose of this paper is to draw the optimum management plan to solve the nuclear spent fuel issue in the economical aspects. This paper is focused on the development of the ENVI's logic and calculations to simulate four options(No Reprocessing, Overseas Reprocessing, Domestic Reprocessing, and Overseas and Domestic Reprocessing) for managing the spent nuclear fuel in South Korea. The time history of the spent nuclear fuel produced from both the existing and future NPP's can be predicted, based on the Goldsim software made available very user friendly model. The simulation result will be used to suggest the strategic plans for the spent nuclear fuel management

  13. ENVI Model Development for Korean Nuclear Spent Fuel Options Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sunyoung; Jeong, Yon Hong; Han, Jae-Jun; Lee, Aeri; Hwang, Yong-Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The disposal facility of the spent nuclear fuel will be operated from 2051. This paper presents the ENVI code developed by GoldSim Software to simulate options for managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in South Korea. The ENVI is a simulator to allow decision-makers to assist to evaluate the performance for spent nuclear fuel management. The multiple options for managing the spent nuclear fuel including the storage and transportation are investigated into interim storage, permanent disposal in geological repositories and overseas and domestic reprocessing. The ENVI code uses the GoldSim software to simulate the logistics of the associated activities. The result by the ENVI model not only produces the total cost to compare among the multiple options but also predict the sizes and timings of different facilities required. In order to decide the policy for spent nuclear management this purpose of this paper is to draw the optimum management plan to solve the nuclear spent fuel issue in the economical aspects. This paper is focused on the development of the ENVI's logic and calculations to simulate four options(No Reprocessing, Overseas Reprocessing, Domestic Reprocessing, and Overseas and Domestic Reprocessing) for managing the spent nuclear fuel in South Korea. The time history of the spent nuclear fuel produced from both the existing and future NPP's can be predicted, based on the Goldsim software made available very user friendly model. The simulation result will be used to suggest the strategic plans for the spent nuclear fuel management.

  14. Review of Phenomenological Models for the Initial Phase HCDA Analysis in a Metal-Fueled Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Min; Lee, Ki Rim; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chang, Won Pyo; Suk, Soo Dong

    2009-03-01

    The safety aspects of the KALIMER design results from the advanced safety performance characteristics of its ternary alloy metallic fuel. The superior thermal, mechanical, and neutronic performance of the metal-fueled core assures inherent safety response to unprotected and multiple fault accidents which are HCDA initiating events. HCDA has received great attentions because of its significant consequence, leading to substantial core disruption, although its probability of occurrence is very low. The SAS4A code provides an integrated quantitative framework for examining the phenomenological behaviors under HCDA conditions. Various phenomenological models such as prefailure characterization, transient pin response, margins to cladding failure, axial in-pin fuel relocation prior to cladding breach, and molten fuel relocation after cladding breach are required for the HCDA analysis. The important mechanisms which introduce negative reactivity during HCDA are fuel extrusion and in-pin fuel relocation, and structural feedback through thermal-mechanical neutronic effects. This report describes the safety performance characteristics of the metal fuel as observed in ex-pile and in-pile tests, and describes associated theoretical models employed into the SAS4A HCDA analysis code. Most of such tests and experiments, and development of theoretical models have been performed for the IFR program by ANL. This report provides a phenomenological basis for gaining an understanding of the metal fuel performance characteristics that obtained from expile experiments and in-pile tests. This report will provide insight and direction for planning HCDA experiments and developing theoretical models in Korea later

  15. Communication dated 26 May 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of Austria to the Agency enclosing a working paper regarding Multilateralisation of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 26 May 2009 from the Permanent Mission of Austria, transmitting a working paper entitled 'Multilateralisation of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Increasing Transparency and Sustainable Security'. The working paper is based on a food-for-thought paper previously submitted by Austria on 10 May 2007, and issued as INFCIRC/706. As requested in that communication, the working paper is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  16. Modeling two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun; Basu, Suman; Wang, Chao-Yang [Electrochemical Engine Center (ECEC), and Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the simultaneous flow of liquid water and gaseous reactants in mini-channels of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Envisaging the mini-channels as structured and ordered porous media, we develop a continuum model of two-phase channel flow based on two-phase Darcy's law and the M{sup 2} formalism, which allow estimate of the parameters key to fuel cell operation such as overall pressure drop and liquid saturation profiles along the axial flow direction. Analytical solutions of liquid water saturation and species concentrations along the channel are derived to explore the dependences of these physical variables vital to cell performance on operating parameters such as flow stoichiometric ratio and relative humility. The two-phase channel model is further implemented for three-dimensional numerical simulations of two-phase, multi-component transport in a single fuel-cell channel. Three issues critical to optimizing channel design and mitigating channel flooding in PEM fuel cells are fully discussed: liquid water buildup towards the fuel cell outlet, saturation spike in the vicinity of flow cross-sectional heterogeneity, and two-phase pressure drop. Both the two-phase model and analytical solutions presented in this paper may be applicable to more general two-phase flow phenomena through mini- and micro-channels. (author)

  17. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  18. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, Th.

    2006-03-01

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  19. BISON and MARMOT Development for Modeling Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Williamson, Richard L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medvedev, Pavel G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    BISON and MARMOT are two codes under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for engineering scale and lower length scale fuel performance modeling. It is desired to add capabilities for fast reactor applications to these codes. The fast reactor fuel types under consideration are metal (U-Pu-Zr) and oxide (MOX). The cladding types of interest include 316SS, D9, and HT9. The purpose of this report is to outline the proposed plans for code development and provide an overview of the models added to the BISON and MARMOT codes for fast reactor fuel behavior. A brief overview of preliminary discussions on the formation of a bilateral agreement between the Idaho National Laboratory and the National Nuclear Laboratory in the United Kingdom is presented.

  20. Heat Transfer Analysis and Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Receiver Implemented in Engineering Equation Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forristall, R.

    2003-10-01

    This report describes the development, validation, and use of a heat transfer model implemented in Engineering Equation Solver. The model determines the performance of a parabolic trough solar collector's linear receiver, also called a heat collector element. All heat transfer and thermodynamic equations, optical properties, and parameters used in the model are discussed. The modeling assumptions and limitations are also discussed, along with recommendations for model improvement.

  1. Thermal modeling of a pressurized air cavity receiver for solar dish Stirling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chongzhe; Zhang, Yanping; Falcoz, Quentin; Neveu, Pierre; Li, Jianlan; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-06-01

    A solar cavity receiver model for the dish collector system is designed in response to growing demand of renewable energy. In the present research field, no investigations into the geometric parameters of a cavity receiver have been performed. The cylindrical receiver in this study is composed of an enclosed bottom at the back, an aperture at the front, a helical pipe inside the cavity and an insulation layer on the external surface of the cavity. The influence of several critical receiver parameters on the thermal efficiency is analyzed in this paper: cavity inner diameter and cavity length. The thermal model in this paper is solved considering the cavity dimensions as variables. Implementing the model into EES, each parameter influence is separately investigated, and a preliminary optimization method is proposed.

  2. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  3. Spent fuel reprocessing system security engineering capability maturity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yachun; Zou Shuliang; Yang Xiaohua; Ouyang Zigen; Dai Jianyong

    2011-01-01

    In the field of nuclear safety, traditional work places extra emphasis on risk assessment related to technical skills, production operations, accident consequences through deterministic or probabilistic analysis, and on the basis of which risk management and control are implemented. However, high quality of product does not necessarily mean good safety quality, which implies a predictable degree of uniformity and dependability suited to the specific security needs. In this paper, we make use of the system security engineering - capability maturity model (SSE-CMM) in the field of spent fuel reprocessing, establish a spent fuel reprocessing systems security engineering capability maturity model (SFR-SSE-CMM). The base practices in the model are collected from the materials of the practice of the nuclear safety engineering, which represent the best security implementation activities, reflect the regular and basic work of the implementation of the security engineering in the spent fuel reprocessing plant, the general practices reveal the management, measurement and institutional characteristics of all process activities. The basic principles that should be followed in the course of implementation of safety engineering activities are indicated from 'what' and 'how' aspects. The model provides a standardized framework and evaluation system for the safety engineering of the spent fuel reprocessing system. As a supplement to traditional methods, this new assessment technique with property of repeatability and predictability with respect to cost, procedure and quality control, can make or improve the activities of security engineering to become a serial of mature, measurable and standard activities. (author)

  4. Impedance Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Søgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A 1-dimensional impedance model for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode is formulated and applied to a cathode consisting of 50/50 wt% strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite and gadolinia doped ceria. A total of 42 impedance spectra were recorded in the temperature range: 555-852°C and in the oxygen...

  5. Modeling Thermal and Stress Behavior of the Fuel-clad Interface in Monolithic Fuel Mini-plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Burkes, Douglas E.; Wachs, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, a fuel development and qualification program is in process with the objective of qualifying very high density low enriched uranium fuel that will enable the conversion of high performance research reactors with operational requirements beyond those supported with currently available low enriched uranium fuels. The high density of the fuel is achieved by replacing the fuel meat with a single monolithic low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel foil. Doing so creates differences in the mechanical and structural characteristics of the fuel plate because of the planar interface created by the fuel foil and cladding. Furthermore, the monolithic fuel meat will dominate the structural properties of the fuel plate rather than the aluminum matrix, which is characteristic of dispersion fuel types. Understanding the integrity and behavior of the fuel-clad interface during irradiation is of great importance for qualification of the new fuel, but can be somewhat challenging to determine with a single technique. Efforts aimed at addressing this problem are underway within the fuel development and qualification program, comprised of modeling, as-fabricated plate characterization, and post-irradiation examination. An initial finite element analysis model has been developed to investigate worst-case scenarios for the basic monolithic fuel plate structure, using typical mini-plate irradiation conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor. Initial analysis shows that the stress normal to the fuel-clad interface dominates during irradiation, and that the presence of small, rounded delaminations at the interface is not of great concern. However, larger and/or fuel-clad delaminations with sharp corners can create areas of concern, as maximum principal cladding stress, strain, displacement, and peak fuel temperature are all significantly increased. Furthermore, stresses resulting from temperature gradients that cause the plate to bow or buckle in

  6. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  7. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  8. MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

    2005-04-01

    The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of

  9. Multi-physicochemical modeling of direct methane fueled solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Ding, Hanping; Xue, Xingjian

    2013-11-01

    Both H2-H2O and CO-CO2 electro-oxidation processes are considered in direct methane fueled SOFC model and incorporated into the comprehensive couplings between multi bulk transport processes, diffusion processes, surface chemical processes and the cell polarization performance. The model is validated using the experimental data of polarization performance at 600 °C, 650 °C and 700 °C respectively. Upon the model validation, extensive simulations are carried out to elucidate the complicated interaction mechanisms with emphasis on surface reaction processes and surface adsorbates under SOFC operating conditions. Results show that the surface reactions of methane are strongly dependent on the cell operating conditions and increase with increasing the operating temperature and cell current. The bulk gas species and surface adsorbates show different degree of sensitivities to cell operating conditions. Surface carbon deposition can be mitigated through increasing the operating temperature, the cell operating current, and the exchange current of electrodes as well as suitable increasing H2O content in the fuel. Surface carbon deposition may also be mitigated through suitable reducing the content of CH4, CO, and/or CO2 in the fuel.

  10. Integrated multi-scale modelling and simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, C.; Bertolus, M.; Masson, R.; Malerba, L.; Rachid, J.; Besmann, T.; Phillpot, S.; Stan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims at discussing the objectives, implementation and integration of multi-scale modelling approaches applied to nuclear fuel materials. We will first show why the multi-scale modelling approach is required, due to the nature of the materials and by the phenomena involved under irradiation. We will then present the multiple facets of multi-scale modelling approach, while giving some recommendations with regard to its application. We will also show that multi-scale modelling must be coupled with appropriate multi-scale experiments and characterisation. Finally, we will demonstrate how multi-scale modelling can contribute to solving technology issues. (authors)

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) spent fuel transportation and handling facility models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, W.B.; Bower, J.C.; Burnett, R.A.; Engel, R.L.; Rolland, C.W.

    1979-09-01

    A spent fuel logistics study was conducted in support of the US DOE program to develop facilities for preparing spent unreprocessed fuel from commercial LWRs for geological storage. Two computerized logistics models were developed. The first one was the site evaluation model. Two studies of spent fuel handling facility and spent fuel disposal facility siting were completed; the first postulates a single spent fuel handling facility located at any of six DOE laboratory sites, while the second study examined siting strategies with the spent fuel repository relative to the spent fuel handling facility. A second model to conduct storage/handling facility simulations was developed

  12. Performance Analysis of Receive Diversity in Wireless Sensor Networks over GBSBE Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-hoon Kim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks have attracted a lot of attention recently. In this paper, we develop a channel model based on the elliptical model for multipath components involving randomly placed scatterers in the scattering region with sensors deployed on a field. We verify that in a sensor network, the use of receive diversity techniques improves the performance of the system. Extensive performance analysis of the system is carried out for both single and multiple antennas with the applied receive diversity techniques. Performance analyses based on variations in receiver height, maximum multipath delay and transmit power have been performed considering different numbers of antenna elements present in the receiver array, Our results show that increasing the number of antenna elements for a wireless sensor network does indeed improve the BER rates that can be obtained.

  13. Shortcut model for water-balanced operation in fuel processor fuel cell systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Kramer, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    In a fuel processor, a hydrocarbon or oxygenate fuel is catalytically converted into a mixture rich in hydrogen which can be fed to a fuel cell to generate electricity. In these fuel processor fuel cell systems (FPFCs), water is recovered from the exhaust gases and recycled back into the system. We

  14. Heavy truck modeling for fuel consumption. Simulations and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandberg, T.

    2001-12-01

    Fuel consumption for heavy trucks depends on many factors like roads, weather, and driver behavior that are hard for a manufacturer to influence. However, one design possibility is the power train configuration. Here a new simulation program for heavy trucks is created to find the configuration of the power train that gives the lowest fuel consumption for each transport task. For efficient simulations the model uses production code for speed and gear control, and it uses exchangeable data sets to allow simulation of the whole production range of engine types, on recorded road profiles from all over the world. Combined with a graphical user interface this application is called STARS (Scania Truck And Road Simulation). The forces of rolling resistance and air resistance in the model are validated through an experiment where the propeller shaft torque of a heavy truck is measured. It is found that the coefficient of rolling resistance is strongly dependent on tire temperature, not only on vehicle speed as expected. This led to the development of a new model for rolling resistance. The model includes the dynamic behavior of the tires and relates rolling resistance to tire temperature and vehicle speed. In another experiment the fuel consumption of a test truck in highway driving is measured. The altitude of the road is recorded with a barometer and used in the corresponding simulations. Despite of the limited accuracy of this equipment the simulation program manage to predict a level of fuel consumption only 2% lower than the real measurements. It is concluded that STARS is a good tool for predicting fuel consumption for trucks in highway driving and for comparing different power train configurations.

  15. Model for Estimation of Fuel Consumption of Cruise Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Simonsen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a model to estimate the energy use and fuel consumption of cruise ships that sail Norwegian waters. Automatic identification system (AIS data and technical information about cruise ships provided input to the model, including service speed, total power, and number of engines. The model was tested against real-world data obtained from a small cruise vessel and both a medium and large cruise ship. It is sensitive to speed and the corresponding engine load profile of the ship. A crucial determinate for total fuel consumption is also associated with hotel functions, which can make a large contribution to the overall energy use of cruise ships. Real-world data fits the model best when ship speed is 70–75% of service speed. With decreased or increased speed, the model tends to diverge from real-world observations. The model gives a proxy for calculation of fuel consumption associated with cruise ships that sail to Norwegian waters and can be used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions and to evaluate energy reduction strategies for cruise ships.

  16. Logistics models for the transportation of radioactive waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Holcomb, B.D.

    1978-03-01

    Mathematical modeling of the logistics of waste shipment is an effective way to provide input to program planning and long-range waste management. Several logistics models have been developed for use in parametric studies, contingency planning, and management of transportation networks. These models allow the determination of shipping schedules, optimal routes, probable transportation modes, minimal costs, minimal personnel exposure, minimal transportation equipment, etc. Such information will permit OWI to specify waste-receiving rates at various repositories in order to balance work loads, evaluate surge capacity requirements, and estimate projected shipping cask fleets. The programs are tailored to utilize information on the types of wastes being received, location of repositories and waste-generating facilities, shipping distances, time required for a given shipment, availability of equipment, above-ground storage capabilities and locations, projected waste throughput rates, etc. Two basic models have been developed. The Low-Level Waste Model evaluates the optimal transportation policy for shipping waste directly from the source to a final destination without any intermediate stops. The Spent Fuel Logistics Model evaluates the optimal transportation policy for shipping unreprocessed spent fuel from nuclear power plants (1) indirectly, that is, to an Away-From-Reactor (AFR) storage facility, with subsequent transhipment to a repository, or (2) directly to a repository

  17. TRISO-Fuel Element Performance Modeling for the Hybrid LIFE Engine with Pu Fuel Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, M; Caro, A

    2010-02-18

    A TRISO-coated fuel thermo-mechanical performance study is performed for the hybrid LIFE engine to test the viability of TRISO particles to achieve ultra-high burnup of a weapons-grade Pu blanket. Our methodology includes full elastic anisotropy, time and temperature varying material properties for all TRISO layers, and a procedure to remap the elastic solutions in order to achieve fast fluences up to 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2} (E > 0.18 MeV). In order to model fast fluences in the range of {approx} 7 {approx} 30 x 10{sup 25} n {center_dot} m{sup -2}, for which no data exist, careful scalings and extrapolations of the known TRISO material properties are carried out under a number of potential scenarios. A number of findings can be extracted from our study. First, failure of the internal pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer occurs within the first two months of operation. Then, the particles behave as BISO-coated particles, with the internal pressure being withstood directly by the SiC layer. Later, after 1.6 years, the remaining PyC crumbles due to void swelling and the fuel particle becomes a single-SiC-layer particle. Unrestrained by the PyC layers, and at the temperatures and fluences in the LIFE engine, the SiC layer maintains reasonably-low tensile stresses until the end-of-life. Second, the PyC creep constant, K, has a striking influence on the fuel performance of TRISO-coated particles, whose stresses scale almost inversely proportional to K. Obtaining more reliable measurements, especially at higher fluences, is an imperative for the fidelity of our models. Finally, varying the geometry of the TRISO-coated fuel particles results in little differences in the scope of fuel performance. The mechanical integrity of 2-cm graphite pebbles that act as fuel matrix has also been studied and it is concluded that they can reliable serve the entire LIFE burnup cycle without failure.

  18. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  19. Modelling of LOCA Tests with the BISON Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based, multidimensional nuclear fuel performance code that is under development at Idaho National Laboratory (USA). Recent advances of BISON include the extension of the code to the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviour during loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). In this work, BISON models for the phenomena relevant to LWR cladding behaviour during LOCAs are described, followed by presentation of code results for the simulation of LOCA tests. Analysed experiments include separate effects tests of cladding ballooning and burst, as well as the Halden IFA-650.2 fuel rod test. Two-dimensional modelling of the experiments is performed, and calculations are compared to available experimental data. Comparisons include cladding burst pressure and temperature in separate effects tests, as well as the evolution of fuel rod inner pressure during ballooning and time to cladding burst. Furthermore, BISON three-dimensional simulations of separate effects tests are performed, which demonstrate the capability to reproduce the effect of azimuthal temperature variations in the cladding. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project, and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project FUMAC.

  20. Surface science studies of model fuel cell electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss progress in the understanding of electrocatalytic reactions through the study of model systems with surface spectroscopies. Pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys have been used quite successfully as models for real (commercial) electrocatalysts. Given the sheer volume of all work in electrocatalysis that is on fuel cell reactions, we will focus on electrocatalysts for fuel cells. Since Pt is the model fuel cell electrocatalyst, we will focus entirely on studies of pure Pt and Pt bimetallic alloys. The electrode reactions discussed include hydrogen oxidation/evolution, oxygen reduction, and the electrooxidation of carbon monoxide, formic acid, and methanol. Surface spectroscopies emphasized are FTIR, STM/AFM and surface X-ray scattering (SXS). The discussion focuses on the relation between the energetics of adsorption of intermediates and the reaction pathway and kinetics, and how the energetics and kinetics relate to the extrinsic properties of the model system, e.g. surface structure and/or composition. Finally, we conclude by discussing the limitations that are reached by using pure metal single crystals and well-characterized bulk alloys as models for real catalysts, and suggest some directions for developing more realistic systems.

  1. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  2. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Xu, Hui [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Brawn, Shelly [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This project’s aim was to develop fuel cell components (i.e. membranes, gas-diffusion media (GDM), bipolar plates and flow fields) that possess specific properties (i.e. water transport and conductivity). A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to elucidate the effect of certain parameters on these specific properties. Ultimately, the model will be used to determine sensitivity of fuel cell performance to component properties to determine limiting components and to guide research. We have successfully reached our objectives and achieved most of the milestones of this project. We have designed and synthesized a variety of hydrocarbon block polymer membranes with lower equivalent weight, structure, chemistry, phase separation and process conditions. These membranes provide a broad selection with optimized water transport properties. We have also designed and constructed a variety of devices that are capable of accurately measuring the water transport properties (water uptake, water diffusivity and electro-osmatic drag) of these membranes. These transport properties are correlated to the membranes’ structures derived from X-ray and microscopy techniques to determine the structure-property relationship. We successfully integrated hydrocarbon membrane MEAs with a current distribution board (CBD) to study the impact of hydrocarbon membrane on water transport in fuel cells. We have designed and fabricated various GDM with varying substrate, diffusivity and micro-porous layers (MPL) and characterized their pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity. We have derived a universal chart (MacMullin number as function of wet proofing and porosity) that can be used to characterize various GDM. The abovementioned GDMs have been evaluated in operating fuel cells; their performance is correlated to various pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity of the GDM. Unfortunately, determining a universal relationship between the MacMullin number and these properties

  3. Modeling and Control of Fuel Distribution in a Dual-Fuel Internal Combustion Engine Leveraging Late Intake Valve Closings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassa, Mateos; Hall, Carrie; Ickes, Andrew; Wallner, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Advanced internal combustion engines, although generally more efficient than conventional combustion engines, often encounter limitations in multi-cylinder applications due to variations in the combustion process encountered across cylinders and between cycles. This study leverages experimental data from an inline 6-cylinder heavy-duty dual fuel engine equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), a variable geometry turbocharger, and a fully-flexible variable intake valve actuation system to study cylinder-to-cylinder variations in power production and the underlying uneven fuel distribution that causes these variations. The engine is operated with late intake valve closure timings in a dual-fuel combustion mode in which a high reactivity fuel is directly injected into the cylinders and a low reactivity fuel is port injected into the cylinders. Both dual fuel implementation and late intake valve closing (IVC) timings have been shown to improve thermal efficiency. However, experimental data from this study reveal that when late IVC timings are used on a multi-cylinder dual fuel engine a significant variation in IMEP across cylinders results and as such, leads to efficiency losses. The difference in IMEP between the different cylinders ranges from 9% at an IVC of 570°ATDC to 38% at an IVC of 610°ATDC and indicates an increasingly uneven fuel distribution. These experimental observations along with engine simulation models developed using GT-Power have been used to better understand the distribution of the port injected fuel across cylinders under various operating conditions on such dual fuel engines. This study revealed that the fuel distribution across cylinders in this dual fuel application is significantly affected by changes in the effective compression ratio as determined by the intake valve close timing as well as the design of the intake system (specifically the length of the intake runners). Late intake valve closures allow a portion of the trapped air

  4. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  5. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  7. Numerical modeling of hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.L.; Amsden, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    The planned use of hydrogen as the energy carrier of the future introduces new challenges and opportunities, especially to the engine design community. Hydrogen is a bio-friendly fuel that can be produced from renewable resources and has no carbon dioxide combustion products; and in a properly designed ICE, almost zero NO{sub x} and hydrocarbon emissions can be achieved. Because of the unique properties of hydrogen combustion - in particular the highly wrinkled nature of the laminar flame front due to the preferential diffusion instability - modeling approaches for hydrocarbon gaseous fuels are not generally applicable to hydrogen combustion. This paper reports on the current progress to develop a engine design capability based on KIVA family of codes for hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited engines in support of the National Hydrogen Program. A turbulent combustion model, based on a modified eddy-turnover model in conjunction with an intake flow valve model, is found to describe well the efficiency and NO{sub x} emissions of this engine satisfy the Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) standard established by the California Resource Board. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Development and Validation of a Mortality Prediction Model for Patients Receiving 14 Days of Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Catherine L; Caldwell, Ellen S; Cox, Christopher E; Douglas, Ivor S; Kahn, Jeremy M; White, Douglas B; Seeley, Eric J; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Angus, Derek C; Carson, Shannon S

    2015-11-01

    The existing risk prediction model for patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation is not applicable until after 21 days of mechanical ventilation. We sought to develop and validate a mortality prediction model for patients earlier in the ICU course using data from day 14 of mechanical ventilation. Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Forty medical centers across the United States. Adult patients receiving at least 14 days of mechanical ventilation. None. Predictor variables were measured on day 14 of mechanical ventilation in the development cohort and included in a logistic regression model with 1-year mortality as the outcome. Variables were sequentially eliminated to develop the ProVent 14 model. This model was then generated in the validation cohort. A simplified prognostic scoring rule (ProVent 14 Score) using categorical variables was created in the development cohort and then tested in the validation cohort. Model discrimination was assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve. Four hundred ninety-one patients and 245 patients were included in the development and validation cohorts, respectively. The most parsimonious model included age, platelet count, requirement for vasopressors, requirement for hemodialysis, and nontrauma admission. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for the ProVent 14 model using continuous variables was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.76-0.83) in the development cohort and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.72-0.83) in the validation cohort. The ProVent 14 Score categorized age at 50 and 65 years old and platelet count at 100×10(9)/L and had similar discrimination as the ProVent 14 model in both cohorts. Using clinical variables available on day 14 of mechanical ventilation, the ProVent 14 model can identify patients receiving prolonged mechanical ventilation with a high risk of mortality within 1 year.

  9. Motor fuel demand analysis - applied modelling in the European union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorazewiez, S.

    1998-01-01

    Motor fuel demand in Europe amounts to almost half of petroleum products consumption and to thirty percent of total final energy consumption. This study considers, Firstly, the energy policies of different European countries and the ways in which the consumption of motor gasoline and automotive gas oil has developed. Secondly it provides an abstract of demand models in the energy sector, illustrating their specific characteristics. Then it proposes an economic model of automotive fuel consumption, showing motor gasoline and automotive gas oil separately over a period of thirty years (1960-1993) for five main countries in the European Union. Finally, forecasts of consumption of gasoline and diesel up to the year 2020 are given for different scenarios. (author)

  10. Model-based fault diagnosis in PEM fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobet, T.; de Lira, S.; Puig, V.; Quevedo, J. [Automatic Control Department (ESAII), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Rambla Sant Nebridi 10, 08222 Terrassa (Spain); Feroldi, D.; Riera, J.; Serra, M. [Institut de Robotica i Informatica Industrial (IRI), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) Parc Tecnologic de Barcelona, Edifici U, Carrer Llorens i Artigas, 4-6, Planta 2, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this work, a model-based fault diagnosis methodology for PEM fuel cell systems is presented. The methodology is based on computing residuals, indicators that are obtained comparing measured inputs and outputs with analytical relationships, which are obtained by system modelling. The innovation of this methodology is based on the characterization of the relative residual fault sensitivity. To illustrate the results, a non-linear fuel cell simulator proposed in the literature is used, with modifications, to include a set of fault scenarios proposed in this work. Finally, it is presented the diagnosis results corresponding to these fault scenarios. It is remarkable that with this methodology it is possible to diagnose and isolate all the faults in the proposed set in contrast with other well known methodologies which use the binary signature matrix of analytical residuals and faults. (author)

  11. Testing woody fuel consumption models for application in Australian southern eucalypt forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.J. Hollis; S. Matthews; Roger Ottmar; S.J. Prichard; S. Slijepcevic; N.D. Burrows; B. Ward; K.G. Tolhurst; W.R. Anderson; J S. Gould

    2010-01-01

    Five models for the consumption of coarse woody debris or woody fuels with a diameter larger than 0.6 cm were assessed for application in Australian southern eucalypt forest fires including: CONSUME models for (1) activity fuels, (2) natural western woody and (3) natural southern woody fuels, (4) the BURNUP model and (5) the recommendation by the Australian National...

  12. 40 CFR 600.207-93 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Values § 600.207-93 Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type. (a) Fuel economy values for a... update sales projections at the time any model type value is calculated for a label value. (iii) The... those intended for sale in other states, he will calculate fuel economy values for each model type for...

  13. 40 CFR 600.207-86 - Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Values § 600.207-86 Calculation of fuel economy values for a model type. (a) Fuel economy values for a... update sales projections at the time any model type value is calculated for a label value. (iii) The... the projected sales and fuel economy values for each base level within the model type. (1) If the...

  14. Fuel cycle model and the cost of a recycling thorium in the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Park, Chang Je

    2005-01-01

    The dry process fuel technology has a high proliferation-resistance, which allows applications not only to the existing but also to the future nuclear fuel cycle systems. In this study, the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 recycling fuel cycle in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was assessed for a fuel cycle cost evaluation. A series of parametric calculations were performed for the uranium fraction, enrichment of the initial uranium fuel, and the fission product removal rated of the recycled fuel. The fuel cycle cost was estimated by the levelized lifetime cost model provided by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency. Though it is feasible to recycle the homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in the CANDU reactor from the viewpoint of a mass balance, the recycling fuel cycle cost is much higher than the conventional natural uranium fuel cycle cost for most cases due to the high fuel fabrication cost. (author)

  15. Contrasting two models of academic self-efficacy--domain-specific versus cross-domain--in children receiving and not receiving special instruction in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungert, Tomas; Hesser, Hugo; Träff, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    In social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is domain-specific. An alternative model, the cross-domain influence model, would predict that self-efficacy beliefs in one domain might influence performance in other domains. Research has also found that children who receive special instruction are not good at estimating their performance. The aim was to test two models of how self-efficacy beliefs influence achievement, and to contrast children receiving special instruction in mathematics with normally-achieving children. The participants were 73 fifth-grade children who receive special instruction and 70 children who do not receive any special instruction. In year four and five, the children's skills in mathematics and reading were assessed by national curriculum tests, and in their fifth year, self-efficacy in mathematics and reading were measured. Structural equation modeling showed that in domains where children do not receive special instruction in mathematics, self-efficacy is a mediating variable between earlier and later achievement in the same domain. Achievement in mathematics was not mediated by self-efficacy in mathematics for children who receive special instruction. For normal achieving children, earlier achievement in the language domain had an influence on later self-efficacy in the mathematics domain, and self-efficacy beliefs in different domains were correlated. Self-efficacy is mostly domain specific, but may play a different role in academic performance depending on whether children receive special instruction. The results of the present study provided some support of the Cross-Domain Influence Model for normal achieving children. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments

  17. Modeling a Change in Flowrate through Detention or Additional Pavement on the Receiving Stream : Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The addition or removal of flow from a stream affects the water surface downstream and possibly upstream. The extent of such effects is generally determined by modeling the receiving stream. Guidance that concisely describes how far up/downstream a h...

  18. Sustainable multilateral nuclear fuel cycle framework. (2) Models for multilateral nuclear fuel cycle approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, T; Tanaka, S; Tazaki, M; Akiba, M; Takashima, R; Kuno, Y

    2011-01-01

    To construct suitable models for a reliable and sustainable international/regional framework in the fields of nuclear fuel cycle, it is essential to reflect recent political situations including such that 1) a certain number of emerging countries especially in south-east Asia want to introduce and develop nuclear power in the long-terms despite the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP, and 2) exposition of nuclear proliferation threats provided by North Korea and Iran. It is also to be considered that Japan is an unique country having enrichment and reprocessing facilities on commercial base among non-nuclear weapon countries. Although many models presented for the internationalization have not been realized yet, studies at the University of Tokyo aim at multilateral nuclear approach (MNA) in Asian-Pacific countries balancing between nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear fuel supply/service and presenting specific examples such as prerequisites for participating countries, scope of cooperative activities, ownership of facilities and type of agreements/frameworks. We will present a model basic agreement and several bilateral and multi-lateral agreements for the combinations of industry or government led consortia including Japan and its neighboring countries and made a preliminary evaluation for the combination of processes/facilities based on the INFCIRC/640 report for MNA. (author)

  19. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    OpenAIRE

    Yeom, Jong-Min; Seo, You-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE) digital elevation model (DEM) for the actual amount of...

  20. Fuel models and results from the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS TMI-2 accident calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, E.C.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description of several fuel models used in the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS analysis of the TMI-2 accident is presented, and some of the significant fuel-rod behavior results from this analysis are given. Peak fuel-rod temperatures, oxidation heat production, and embrittlement and failure behavior calculated for the TMI-2 accident are discussed. Other aspects of fuel behavior, such as cladding ballooning and fuel-cladding eutectic formation, were found not to significantly affect the accident progression

  1. Molten carbonate fuel cell: dynamic numerical modeling and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Elisangela Martins [National Institute for Space Research, Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil). Combustion and Propulsion Lab.], e-mail: elisangela@lcp.inpe.br; Jabbari, Faryar [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.], e-mail: fjabbari@uci.edu; Brouwer, Jacob [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States). National Fuel Cell Research Center], e-mail: jb@nfcrc.uci.edu

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, a detailed model incorporating simplified geometric resolution of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with detailed and dynamic simulation of all physical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in the stream-wise direction is presented. The model was developed using mass and momentum conservation, electrochemical and chemical reaction mechanisms, and heat transfer. Results from the model are compared with data from an experimental MCFC unit. Furthermore, the model was applied to predict dynamic variations of voltage, current and temperature in an MCFC as it responds to varying load demands. The voltage was evaluated by applying a model developed by Yu h and Selman (1991a, 1991b). The results show that the model can be used to predict voltage and dynamic response characteristics of an MCFC accurately and consistently for a variety of temperatures and pressures. (author)

  2. Modeling and Circumventing the Effect of Sediments and Water Column on Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, P.

    2017-12-01

    Teleseismic P-wave receiver functions are routinely used to resolve crust and mantle structure in various geologic settings. Receiver functions are approximations to the Earth's Green's functions and are composed of various scattered phase arrivals, depending on the complexity of the underlying Earth structure. For simple structure, the dominant arrivals (converted and back-scattered P-to-S phases) are well separated in time and can be reliably used in estimating crustal velocity structure. In the presence of sedimentary layers, strong reverberations typically produce high-amplitude oscillations that contaminate the early part of the wave train and receiver functions can be difficult to interpret in terms of underlying structure. The effect of a water column also limits the interpretability of under-water receiver functions due to the additional acoustic wave propagating within the water column that can contaminate structural arrivals. We perform numerical modeling of teleseismic Green's functions and receiver functions using a reflectivity technique for a range of Earth models that include thin sedimentary layers and overlying water column. These modeling results indicate that, as expected, receiver functions are difficult to interpret in the presence of sediments, but the contaminating effect of the water column is dependent on the thickness of the water layer. To circumvent these effects and recover source-side structure, we propose using an approach based on transfer function modeling that bypasses receiver functions altogether and estimates crustal properties directly from the waveforms (Frederiksen and Delayney, 2015). Using this approach, reasonable assumptions about the properties of the sedimentary layer can be included in forward calculations of the Green's functions that are convolved with radial waveforms to predict vertical waveforms. Exploration of model space using Monte Carlo-style search and least-square waveform misfits can be performed to

  3. The linearity response of the Planck-LFI flight model receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M; Villa, F; Terenzi, L; Cuttaia, F; Butler, R C; Battaglia, P; Franceschet, C; Lapolla, P M; D'Arcangelo, O; Artal, E; Davis, R; Kettle, D; Frailis, M; Galeotta, S; Gregorio, A; Hughes, N; Jukkala, P; Kilpiae, V-H; Laaninen, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the linearity response of the Planck-LFI receivers, with particular reference to signal compression measured on the 30 and 44 GHz channels. In the article we discuss the various sources of compression and present a model that accurately describes data measured during tests performed with individual radiomeric chains. After discussing test results we present the best parameter set representing the receiver response and discuss the impact of non linearity on in-flight calibration, which is shown to be negligible.

  4. Temperature calculations and the effect of modelling the fuel mechanical behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Struzik, C.; Veyrier, N.

    1998-01-01

    Some of the aspects are overviewed pertaining to the thermal modelling included in the METEOR/TRANSURANUS fuel behaviour code. A summary of the basic modelling options of the code is given. Experiments for which the fuel centerline temperature is monitored in-pile are interpreted and used to illustrate the range of operating conditions and fuel types which the modelling covers. These include high burn-ups, MOX and gadolinium doped fuels. Although the expressions used for both the fuel thermal conductivity and the gap conductance are of major importance in accurately predicting the thermal response of a fuel rod, the effect of the fuel and cladding mechanical behaviour is also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Its influence is mainly felt through the fuel-cladding gap size and in cases where the gap is closed, through the fuel cladding contact pressure. (author)

  5. Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

    2009-03-30

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  6. The graphic model of the spent fuel rod extracting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jee Sup; Kim, Sung Hyun

    1997-01-01

    The spent fuel rod extracting system is being developed in KAERI to deal with problems associated with utilization of storage pools at nuclear power plants. This system consists of an equipment system for extracting rods from spent fuel assemblies, a machine controller, and a supervisory controller. The performance of extraction system has been investigated through a series of experiments. Even though the system is designed to automatically perform sequential procedures, several problems have been found such as the gripper stucking to fuel rod caused by misaligned positioning and the socket jamming of impact wrench into the nut, etc. Up to this end the graphical model of the rod extracting system has been made so that possible sequences of operations including error detection and recovery actions are verified by using a graphic simulation before real operations. For the implementation, IGRIP is being used as a multifunctional tool for developing the rod extraction system. IGRIP is not only an excellent visualization tool, but it also highlights modeling virtual machine. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  7. Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Chao-Yang

    Proper water management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting physicochemical phenomena. Among these, the liquid saturation in the cathode side is believed to have a very strong effect on water crossover through the membrane, a key parameter to determine water balance between the anode and cathode. In this paper, based on an interfacial liquid coverage model implemented in a three-dimensional (3D) two-phase DMFC model, the liquid saturation variations in the cathode are examined in detail and their effects on the net water transport coefficient through the membrane discussed.

  8. Comparison of fuel spill fate models in soil and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinberry, B.E.; Regan, R.W. Sr.

    1991-01-01

    It has been estimated that 96 percent of the 1.4 million underground storage tanks in the U.S. contain petroleum products such as gasoline and fuel oil. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) further estimates that 84 percent of the existing underground storage tanks (UST's) are bare-steel, single-wall tanks with no corrosion protection, leak-prevention or leak-detention devices. As many as 40 percent of these tanks could be leaking now or in the near future due to corrosion, installation mistakes, or piping failures. This paper discusses the potential sources of fuel oil leaks or spills, describes the physical and chemical fate of the hydrocarbon contaminants, and reviews current literature reports which model the fate of petroleum contaminants in the subsurface environment

  9. Aspect Ratio of Receiver Node Geometry based Indoor WLAN Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Udaykumar; Bapat, Vishram N.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents validation of indoor wireless local area network (WLAN) propagation model for varying rectangular receiver node geometry. The rectangular client node configuration is a standard node arrangement in computer laboratories of academic institutes and research organizations. The model assists to install network nodes for the better signal coverage. The proposed model is backed by wide ranging real time received signal strength measurements at 2.4 GHz. The shadow fading component of signal propagation under realistic indoor environment is modelled with the dependency on varying aspect ratio of the client node geometry. The developed new model is useful in predicting indoor path loss for IEEE 802.11b/g WLAN. The new model provides better performance in comparison to well known International Telecommunication Union and free space propagation models. It is shown that the proposed model is simple and can be a useful tool for indoor WLAN node deployment planning and quick method for the best utilisation of the office space.

  10. Multiscale Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estep, Donald [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); El-Azab, Anter [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Pernice, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, John W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Polyakov, Peter [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Tavener, Simon [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Xiu, Dongbin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2017-03-23

    In this project, we will address the challenges associated with constructing high fidelity multiscale models of nuclear fuel performance. We (*) propose a novel approach for coupling mesoscale and macroscale models, (*) devise efficient numerical methods for simulating the coupled system, and (*) devise and analyze effective numerical approaches for error and uncertainty quantification for the coupled multiscale system. As an integral part of the project, we will carry out analysis of the effects of upscaling and downscaling, investigate efficient methods for stochastic sensitivity analysis of the individual macroscale and mesoscale models, and carry out a posteriori error analysis for computed results. We will pursue development and implementation of solutions in software used at Idaho National Laboratories on models of interest to the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program.

  11. Dosimetry Modeling for Predicting Radiolytic Production at the Spent Fuel - Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William H.; Kline, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2006-04-30

    Modeling of the alpha, beta, and gamma dose from spent fuel as a function of particle size and fuel to water ratio was examined. These doses will be combined with modeling of G values and interactions to determine the concentration of various species formed at the fuel water interface and their affect on dissolution rates.

  12. Atomic scale modelling of materials of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.

    2011-10-01

    This document written to obtain the French accreditation to supervise research presents the research I conducted at CEA Cadarache since 1999 on the atomic scale modelling of non-metallic materials involved in the nuclear fuel cycle: host materials for radionuclides from nuclear waste (apatites), fuel (in particular uranium dioxide) and ceramic cladding materials (silicon carbide). These are complex materials at the frontier of modelling capabilities since they contain heavy elements (rare earths or actinides), exhibit complex structures or chemical compositions and/or are subjected to irradiation effects: creation of point defects and fission products, amorphization. The objective of my studies is to bring further insight into the physics and chemistry of the elementary processes involved using atomic scale modelling and its coupling with higher scale models and experimental studies. This work is organised in two parts: on the one hand the development, adaptation and implementation of atomic scale modelling methods and validation of the approximations used; on the other hand the application of these methods to the investigation of nuclear materials under irradiation. This document contains a synthesis of the studies performed, orientations for future research, a detailed resume and a list of publications and communications. (author)

  13. Models for Microbial Fuel Cells: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chengshuo; Zhang, Daxing; Pedrycz, Witold; Zhu, Yingmin; Guo, Yongxian

    2018-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been widely viewed as one of the most promising alternative sources of renewable energy. A recognition of needs of efficient development methods based on multidisciplinary research becomes crucial for the optimization of MFCs. Modeling of MFCs is an effective way for not only gaining a thorough understanding of the effects of operation conditions on the performance of power generation but also becomes of essential interest to the successful implementation of MFCs. The MFC models encompass the underlying reaction process and limiting factors of the MFC. The models come in various forms, such as the mathematical equations or the equivalent circuits. Different modeling focuses and approaches of the MFC have emerged. In this study, we present a state of the art of MFCs modeling; the past modeling methods are reviewed as well. Models and modeling methods are elaborated on based on the classification provided by Mechanism-based models and Application-based models. Mechanisms, advantages, drawbacks, and application fields of different models are illustrated as well. We exhibit a complete and comprehensive exposition of the different models for MFCs and offer further guidance to promote the performance of MFCs.

  14. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Dag, Kaya O; Moriarty, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine and receiver. To take these phenomena into account, a consistent numerical technique that models the sound propagation from the source to receiver is developed. Large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique is employed for the flow modelling and the corresponding flow fields are used to simulate sound generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise propagation of a 5 MW wind turbine is investigated. Sound pressure level time series evaluated at the source time are studied for varying wind speeds, surface roughness, and ground impedances within a 2000 m radius from the turbine.

  15. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations. Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuel (Supplement 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P M

    1983-09-01

    Analysis of the Savannah River Plant RBOF and RRF included an evaluation of the reliability of process equipment and controls, administrative controls, and engineered safety features. The evaluation also identified potential scenarios and radiological consequences. Risks were calculated in terms of 50-year population dose commitment per year (man-rem/year) to the onsite and offsite population within an 80 Km radius of RBOF and RRF, and to an individual at the plant boundary. The total 50-year onsite and offsite population radiological risks of operating the RBOF and RRF were estimated to be 1.0 man-rem/year. These risks are significantly less than the population dose of 54,000 man/rem/yr for natural background radiation in a 50-mile radius. The 50-year maximum offsite individual risk from operating the facility was estimated to be 2.1 {times} 10{sup 5} rem/yr. These risks are significantly lower than 93 mrem/yr an individual is expected to receive from natural background radiation in this area. The analysis shows. that the RBOF and RRF can be operated without undue risk to onsite personnel or to the general public.

  16. A model for gap conductance in nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Computation of nuclear reactor fuel behavior under normal and off-normal conditions is influenced by gap conductance models. These models should provide accurate results for heat transfer for arbitrary gap widths and gas mixtures and should be based on considerations of the kinetic theory of gases. There has been considerable progress in the study of heat transfer in a simple gas for arbitrary Knudsen numbers (Kn = l/similar to d, where l is a meanfree-path and similar d is the gap width) in recent years. Using these recent results, a simple expression for heat transfer in a gas mixture (enclosed between parallel plates) for an arbitrary Knudsen number has been constructed, and a new model for gap conductance has been proposed. The latter reproduces the free molecular (small gap, Kn >> 1) and the jump limits (large gaps, Kn << 1) correctly, and it provides fairly accurate results for arbitrary gap widths. The new model is suitable for use in large fuel behavior computer programs

  17. CFD modeling of secondary flows in fuel rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baglietto, Emilio; Ninokata, Hisashi

    2004-01-01

    An optimized non-linear eddy viscosity model is introduced, for calculations of detailed coolant velocity distribution in a tight lattice fuel bundle. The low Reynolds formulation has been optimized based on DNS data for channel flow. The non-linear stress-strain relationship has been modified in the coefficients to model the flow anisotropy, which causes the formation of turbulence driven secondary flows inside the bundle subchannels. Predictions of the model are first compared to experimental measurements of secondary flows in a triangularly arrayed rod bundle with p/d=1.3. Subsequently wall shear stress and velocity predictions are compared with different experimental data for a rod bundle with p/d=1.17. The model shows to be able to correctly reproduce the scale of the secondary motion, and to accurately reproduce both wall shear stress and velocity distributions inside the rod bundle subchannels. (author)

  18. 3-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Using Different Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    major types of fuel cells in practice are listed below: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell ( PEMFC ) Alkaline Fuel cell (AFC) Phosphoric Acid...Material Operating Temperature (oC) Efficiency (%) PEMFC H2, Methanol, Formic Acid Hydrated Organic Polymer < 90 40-50 AFC Pure H2 Aqueous

  19. A general formulation for a mathematical PEM fuel cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschuk, J. J.; Li, Xianguo

    A general formulation for a comprehensive fuel cell model, based on the conservation principle is presented. The model formulation includes the electro-chemical reactions, proton migration, and the mass transport of the gaseous reactants and liquid water. Additionally, the model formulation can be applied to all regions of the PEM fuel cell: the bipolar plates, gas flow channels, electrode backing, catalyst, and polymer electrolyte layers. The model considers the PEM fuel cell to be composed of three phases: reactant gas, liquid water, and solid. These three phases can co-exist within the gas flow channels, electrode backing, catalyst, and polymer electrolyte layers. The conservation of mass, momentum, species, and energy are applied to each phase, with the technique of volume averaging being used to incorporate the interactions between the phases as interfacial source terms. In order to avoid problems arising from phase discontinuities, the gas and liquid phases are considered as a mixture. The momentum interactions between the fluid and solid phases are modeled by the Darcy-Forchheimer term. The electro-oxidation of H and CO, the reduction of O, and the heterogeneous oxidation of H and CO are considered in the catalyst layers. Due to the small pore size of the polymer electrolyte layer, the generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations, with the polymer considered as a diffusing species, are used to describe species transport. One consequence of considering the gas and liquid phases as a mixture is that expressions for the velocity of the individual phases relative to the mixture must be developed. In the gas flow channels, the flow is assumed homogeneous, while the Darcy and Schlögl equations are used to describe liquid water transport in the electrode backing and polymer electrolyte layers. Thus, two sets of equations, one for the mixture and another for the solid phase, can be developed to describe the processes occurring within a PEM fuel cell. These equations are in

  20. Model documentation Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analaytical approach and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1996 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described.

  1. Impact of different individual GNSS receiver antenna calibration models on geodetic positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baire, Q.; Pottiaux, E.; Bruyninx, C.; Defraigne, P.; Aerts, W.; Legrand, J.; Bergeot, N.; Chevalier, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    Since April 2011, the igs08.atx antenna calibration model is used in the routine IGS (International GNSS Service) data analysis. The model includes mean robot calibrations to correct for the offset and phase center variations of the GNSS receiver antennas. These so-called "type" calibrations are means of the individual calibrations available for a specific antenna/radome combination. The GNSS data analysis performed within the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) aims at being as consistent as possible with the IGS analysis. This also applies to the receiver antenna calibrations. However, when available, individual antenna calibrations are used within the EPN analysis instead of the "type" calibration. When these individual calibrations are unavailable, then the EPN analysis falls back to (type) calibrations identical as the ones used within the IGS (igs08.atx). The aim of this study is to evaluate the significance of the offset caused by using different receiver antenna calibration models on the station position. Using the PPP (Precise Point Positioning) technique, we first investigate the differences in positioning obtained when switching between individual antenna calibrations and type calibrations. We analyze the observations of the 43 EPN stations equipped with receiver antenna individually calibrated over the period covering from 2003 to 2010 and we show that these differences can reach up to 4 mm in horizontal and 10 mm in vertical. Secondly, we study the accuracy of the individual calibrations models and we evaluate the effect of different sets of individual calibrations on the positioning. For that purpose, we use the data from 6 GNSS stations equipped with an antenna which has been individually calibrated at two calibration facilities recognized by the IGS: GEO++ and Bonn institute.

  2. Multi-pulse fuel injection controller design using quadratic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Donkers, M.C.F.; Jager, A.G. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-pulse fuel injection in diesel engines enables a large flexibility in controlling the fueling profile, such that the engine performance can be maintained subject to disturbances, i.e., ambient condition changes and fuel injection deviations. Based on linearized systems, current fuel injection

  3. Development of smart controller model for dual fuel generator systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of dual fuel powered electric generators such as one of diesel and biogas has gained popularity locally both as emergency power supply units and in distributed power systems. Dual fuel generators use two fuel types simultaneously in their operations. This is however faced with challenges in control and fuel ...

  4. Developing Custom Fire Behavior Fuel Models for Mediterranean Wildland-Urban Interfaces in Southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Mario; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Lovreglio, Raffaella; Sanesi, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The dramatic increase of fire hazard in wildland-urban interfaces (WUIs) has required more detailed fuel management programs to preserve ecosystem functions and human settlements. Designing effective fuel treatment strategies allows to achieve goals such as resilient landscapes, fire-adapted communities, and ecosystem response. Therefore, obtaining background information on forest fuel parameters and fuel accumulation patterns has become an important first step in planning fuel management interventions. Site-specific fuel inventory data enhance the accuracy of fuel management planning and help forest managers in fuel management decision-making. We have customized four fuel models for WUIs in southern Italy, starting from forest classes of land-cover use and adopting a hierarchical clustering approach. Furthermore, we provide a prediction of the potential fire behavior of our customized fuel models using FlamMap 5 under different weather conditions. The results suggest that fuel model IIIP (Mediterranean maquis) has the most severe fire potential for the 95th percentile weather conditions and the least severe potential fire behavior for the 85th percentile weather conditions. This study shows that it is possible to create customized fuel models directly from fuel inventory data. This achievement has broad implications for land managers, particularly forest managers of the Mediterranean landscape, an ecosystem that is susceptible not only to wildfires but also to the increasing human population and man-made infrastructures.

  5. Modeling spray drift and runoff-related inputs of pesticides to receiving water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuyang; Luo, Yuzhou; Goh, Kean S

    2018-03-01

    Pesticides move to surface water via various pathways including surface runoff, spray drift and subsurface flow. Little is known about the relative contributions of surface runoff and spray drift in agricultural watersheds. This study develops a modeling framework to address the contribution of spray drift to the total loadings of pesticides in receiving water bodies. The modeling framework consists of a GIS module for identifying drift potential, the AgDRIFT model for simulating spray drift, and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for simulating various hydrological and landscape processes including surface runoff and transport of pesticides. The modeling framework was applied on the Orestimba Creek Watershed, California. Monitoring data collected from daily samples were used for model evaluation. Pesticide mass deposition on the Orestimba Creek ranged from 0.08 to 6.09% of applied mass. Monitoring data suggests that surface runoff was the major pathway for pesticide entering water bodies, accounting for 76% of the annual loading; the rest 24% from spray drift. The results from the modeling framework showed 81 and 19%, respectively, for runoff and spray drift. Spray drift contributed over half of the mass loading during summer months. The slightly lower spray drift contribution as predicted by the modeling framework was mainly due to SWAT's under-prediction of pesticide mass loading during summer and over-prediction of the loading during winter. Although model simulations were associated with various sources of uncertainties, the overall performance of the modeling framework was satisfactory as evaluated by multiple statistics: for simulation of daily flow, the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency Coefficient (NSE) ranged from 0.61 to 0.74 and the percent bias (PBIAS) modeling framework will be useful for assessing the relative exposure from pesticides related to spray drift and runoff in receiving waters and the design of management practices for mitigating pesticide

  6. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  7. Physical modeling of spent-nuclear-fuel container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Liping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new physical simulation model was developed to simulate the casting process of the ductile iron heavy section spent-nuclear-fuel container. In this physical simulation model, a heating unit with DR24 Fe-Cr-Al heating wires was used to compensate the heat loss across the non-natural surfaces of the sample, and a precise and reliable casting temperature controlling/monitoring system was employed to ensure the thermal behavior of the simulated casting to be similar to the actual casting. Also, a mould system was designed, in which changeable mould materials can be used for both the outside and inside moulds for different applications. The casting test was carried out with the designed mould and the cooling curves of central and edge points at different isothermal planes of the casting were obtained. Results show that for most isothermal planes, the temperature control system can keep the temperature differences within 6 ℃ between the edge points and the corresponding center points, indicating that this new physical simulation model has high simulation accuracy, and the mould developed can be used for optimization of casting parameters of spent-nuclear-fuel container, such as composition of ductile iron, the pouring temperature, the selection of mould material and design of cooling system. In addition, to maintain the spheroidalization of the ductile iron, the force-chilling should be used for the current physical simulation to ensure the solidification of casting in less than 2 h.

  8. Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ryan; Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alternative Liquid Fuels Simulation Model (AltSim) is a high-level dynamic simulation model which calculates and compares the production and end use costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy balances of several alternative liquid transportation fuels. These fuels include: corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol from various feedstocks (switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees), biodiesel, and diesels derived from natural gas (gas to liquid, or GTL), coal (coal to liquid, or CTL), and coal with biomass (CBTL). AltSim allows for comprehensive sensitivity analyses on capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, renewable and fossil fuel feedstock costs, feedstock conversion ratio, financial assumptions, tax credits, CO{sub 2} taxes, and plant capacity factor. This paper summarizes the structure and methodology of AltSim, presents results, and provides a detailed sensitivity analysis. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 sets a goal for the increased use of biofuels in the U.S., ultimately reaching 36 billion gallons by 2022. AltSim's base case assumes EPA projected feedstock costs in 2022 (EPA, 2009). For the base case assumptions, AltSim estimates per gallon production costs for the five ethanol feedstocks (corn, switchgrass, corn stover, forest residue, and farmed trees) of $1.86, $2.32, $2.45, $1.52, and $1.91, respectively. The projected production cost of biodiesel is $1.81/gallon. The estimates for CTL without biomass range from $1.36 to $2.22. With biomass, the estimated costs increase, ranging from $2.19 per gallon for the CTL option with 8% biomass to $2.79 per gallon for the CTL option with 30% biomass and carbon capture and sequestration. AltSim compares the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) associated with both the production and consumption of the various fuels. EISA allows fuels emitting 20% less greenhouse gases (GHG) than conventional gasoline and diesels to qualify as renewable fuels. This allows several of the

  9. Analysis and modelling of the fuels european market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, V.

    1999-04-01

    The research focus on the European fuel market prices referring to the Rotterdam and Genoa spot markets as well the German, Italian and French domestic markets. The thesis try to explain the impact of the London IPE future market on spot prices too. The mainstream research has demonstrated that co-integration seems to be the best theoretical approach to investigate the long run equilibrium relations. A particular attention will be devoted to the structural change in the econometric modelling on these equilibriums. A deep analysis of the main European petroleum products markets permit a better model specification concerning each of these markets. Further, we will test if any evidence of relations between spot and domestic prices could be confirmed. Finally, alternative scenarios will be depicted to forecast prices in the petroleum products markets. The objective is to observe the model reaction to changes crude oil prices. (author)

  10. A model for radial cesium transport in a fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Shosuke

    1989-01-01

    In order to explain the radial redistribution of cesium in an irradiated pellet, a two-step release model is proposed. The first step involves the migration of cesium by atomic diffusion to some channels, such as grain boundaries and cracks, and the second step assumes a thermomigration down along the temperature gradient. Distribution profiles of cesium are obtained by numerical calculation with the present model assuming a constant and spatially uniform birth rate of cesium in the pellet. The result agrees well with the profile observed by micro-gamma scanning for the LWR fuel in the outer region of the pellet but diverges from it at the inner region. Discussion is made on the steady-state model hitherto generally utilized. (orig.)

  11. Modelling of fission gas swelling in the high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Chan Bock; Bang, Je Gun; Jung, Yeon Ho

    1999-06-01

    Discharge burnup of the fuel in LWR has been increased to improve the fuel economy, and currently the high burnup fuel of over 70 MWd/kg U-rod avg. is being developed by the fuel vendors worldwide. At high burnup, thermal / mechanical properties of the fuel is known to change and new phenomenon could arise. This report describes the model development on fission gas swelling in high burnup UO 2 fuel. For the low burnup fuel, swelling only by the solid fission products has been considered in the fuel performance analysis. However, at high burnup fuel, swelling by fission gas bubbles can not be neglected anymore. Therefore, fission gas swelling model which can predict bubble swelling of the high burnup UO 2 fuel during the steady-state and the transient conditions in LWR was developed. Based on the bubble growth model, the empirical fission gas swelling model was developed as function of burnup, time and temperature. The model showed that fuel bubble swelling would be proportional to the burnup by the power of 1.157 and to the time by the power of 0.157. Comparison of the model prediction with the measured fission gas swelling data under the various burnup and temperature conditions showed that the model would predict the measured data reasonably well. (author). 20 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs

  12. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-08-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions.

  13. Three-dimensional combustion modelling of a biomass fired pulverized fuel boiler

    OpenAIRE

    Stastny, M.;Ahnert, F.;Spliethoff, H.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was applied for a 200 MW pulverised fuel boiler. Peat, demolition wood and wood residuals were used as fuel. The computer code FLUENT was used for the modelling of the combustion process inside the boiler. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model together with wall functions was adapted for characterization of the flue gas behaviour. Reaction between fuel and oxidizer was modelled using the mixture-fraction/PDF approach. The CFD calculations were compared w...

  14. New high burnup fuel models for NRC's licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data

  15. Characterization Report on Fuels for NEAMS Model Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Nearly 20% of the world’s electricity today is generated by nuclear energy from uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel. The thermal conductivity of UO2 governs the conversion of heat produced from fission events into electricity and it is an important parameter in reactor design and safety. While nuclear fuel operates at high to very high temperatures, thermal conductivity and other materials properties lack sensitivity to temperature variations and to material variations at reactor temperatures. As a result, both the uncertainties in laboratory measurements at high temperatures and the small differences in properties of different materials inevitably lead to large uncertainties in models and little predictive power. Conversely, properties measured at low to moderate temperatures have more sensitivity, less uncertainty, and have larger differences in properties for different materials. These variations need to be characterized as they will afford the highest predictive capability in modeling and offer best assurances for validation and verification at all temperatures. This is well emphasized in the temperature variation of the thermal conductivity of UO2.

  16. LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 modelling with MCNP4A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.R.M.; Bonin, H.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fueled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at Royal Military College,excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. Given the advance in computer technology, the use of Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A appeared possible for the simulation of the LEU-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core, and this work demonstrates that this is indeed the case. MCNP 4A is a full three dimensional program allowing the user to enter a large amount of complexity. The limit on the geometry complexity is the computing time required to achieve a reasonable standard deviation. To this point several models of the SLOWPOKE-2 have been developed giving some insight on the sensitivity of the code. MCNP4A can use various cross section libraries. The aim of this work is to calculate accurately the reactivity of the core and reproduce The temperature trend of the reactivity. The model preserved as much as possible the details of the core and facility in order to allow further study in the flux mapping

  17. Modelling of pellet-cladding interaction for PWRs reactors fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The pellet-cladding interaction that can occur in a PWR fuel rod design is modelled with the computer codes FRAPCON-1 and ANSYS. The fuel performance code FRAPCON-1 analyzes the fuel rod irradiation behavior and generates the initial conditions for the localized fuel rod thermal and mechanical modelling in two and three-dimensional finite elements with ANSYS. In the mechanical modelling, a pellet fragment is placed in the fuel rod gap. Two types of fuel rod cladding materials are considered: Zircaloy and austenitic stainless steel. Linear and non-linear material behaviors are allowed. Elastic, plastic and creep behaviors are considered for the cladding materials. The modelling is applied to Angra-II fuel rod design. The results are analyzed and compared. (author)

  18. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dual fuel engines are being used these days to overcome shortage of fossil fuels and fulfill stringent exhaust gas emission regulations. They have several advantages over conventional diesel engines. In this context, this paper makes use of experimental results obtained from a dual fuel engine for developing models to ...

  19. Thermochemical data and its use in modeling chemical behavior in mixed-oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibby, R.L.; Woodley, R.E.; Adamson, M.G.; Johnson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The status of US activities to obtain fuel chemistry data is reviewed. Analytical expressions addressing basic needs of all fuel chemistry models are presented. Fission product concentrations during irradiation, oxygen-to-metal (O/M) at beginning-of-life and at burnup, and the potential in fuel-cladding gap at burnup are described

  20. Integrating fire behavior models and geospatial analysis for wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Nicole M. Vaillant; Mark A. Finney

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire risk assessment and fuel management planning on federal lands in the US are complex problems that require state-of-the-art fire behavior modeling and intensive geospatial analyses. Fuel management is a particularly complicated process where the benefits and potential impacts of fuel treatments must be demonstrated in the context of land management goals...

  1. Multi-zone modeling of Diesel engine fuel spray development with vegetable oil, bio-diesel or Diesel fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Antonopoulos, K.A.; Rakopoulos, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a model of fuel sprays development in the cylinders of Diesel engines that is two-dimensional, multi-zone, with the issuing jet (from the nozzle) divided into several discrete volumes, called 'zones', formed along the direction of the fuel injection as well as across it. The model follows each zone, with its own time history, as the spray penetrates into the swirling air environment of the combustion chamber before and after wall impingement. After the jet break up time, a group of droplets is generated in each zone, with the model following their motion during heating, evaporation and mixing with the in-cylinder air. The model is applied for the interesting case of using vegetable oils or their derived bio-diesels as fuels, which recently are considered as promising alternatives to petroleum distillates since they are derived from biological sources. Although there are numerous experimental studies that show curtailment of the emitted smoke with possible increase of the emitted NO x against the use of Diesel fuel, there is an apparent scarcity of theoretical models scrutinizing the formation mechanisms of combustion generated emissions when using these biologically derived fuels. Thus, in the present work, a theoretical detailed model of spray formation is developed that is limited to the related investigation of the physical processes by decoupling it from the chemical effects after combustion initiation. The analysis results show how the widely differing physical properties of these fuels, against the normal Diesel fuel, affect greatly the spray formation and consequently the combustion mechanism and the related emissions

  2. Modeling and experimental diagnostics in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, T. E.; Wilson, M. S.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents a fit between model and experiments for well-humidified polymer electrolyte fuel cells operated to maximum current density with a range of cathode gas compositions. The model considers, in detail, losses caused by: (1) interfacial kinetics at the Pt/ionomer interface; (2) gas-transport and ionic-conductivity limitations in the catalyst layer; and (3) gas-transport limitations in the cathode backing. Our experimental data were collected with cells that utilized thin-film catalyst layers bonded directly to the membrane, and a separate catalyst-free hydrophobic backing layer. This structure allows a clearer resolution of the processes taking place in each of these distinguishable parts of the cathode. In our final comparison of model predictions with the experimental data, we stress the simultaneous fit of a family of complete polarization curves obtained for gas compositions ranging from 5 atoms O2 to a mixture of 5% O2 in N2, employing in each case the same model parameters for interracial kinetics, catalyst-layer transport, and backing-layer transport. This approach allowed us to evaluate losses in the cathode backing and in the cathode catalyst layer, and thus identify the improvements required to enhance the performance of air cathodes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Finally, we show that effects of graded depletion in oxygen along the gas flow channel can be accurately modeled using a uniform effective oxygen concentration in the flow channel, equal to the average of inlet and exit concentrations. This approach has enabled simplified and accurate consideration of oxygen utilization effects.

  3. The modeling experience of fuel element units operation under MSC.MARC and MENTAT 2008R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakov, G.; Kashirin, B.; Kosaurov, A.; Konovalov, Y.; Kuznetsov, A.; Medvedev, A.; Novikov, V.; Vatulin, A.

    2009-01-01

    MSC Software is leading developer of CAE-software in the world, so behaviour of fuel elements modeling with MSC.MARC use is of great practical importance. Behaviour of fuel elements usually is modeled in the elastic-viscous-plastic statement with account on fuel swelling during irradiation. For container type fuel elements contact interaction between fuel pellets and cladding or other parts of fuel element in top and bottom plugs must be in account. Results of simulated behaviour of various type fuel elements - container type fuel elements for PWR and RBMK reactors, dispersion type fuel elements for research reactors are presented. (authors)

  4. Simulator for candu600 fuel handling system. the experimental model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, N.; Predescu, D.; Valeca, S.

    2013-01-01

    A main way to increase the nuclear plant safety is related to selection and continuous training of the operation staff. In this order, the computer programs for training, testing and evaluation of the knowledge get, or training simulators including the advanced analytical models of the technological systems are using. The Institute for Nuclear Research from Pitesti, Romania intend to design and build an Fuel Handling Simulator at his F/M Head Test Rig facility, that will be used for training of operating personnel. This paper presents simulated system, advantages to use the simulator, and the experimental model of simulator, that has been built to allows setting of the requirements and fabrication details, especially for the software kit that will be designed and implement on main simulator. (authors)

  5. The effective and dust free receiving station and handling for the low calorific value solid fuels; Tehokas ja poelytoen seospolttoaineiden vastaanottoasema sekae kaesittely- ja kuljetinjaerjestelmae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojonen, O. [Finntech Oy, Espoo (Finland); Jaervinen, T. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Energy Use

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the project was to get higher automatization level and improve dust preventing in solid fuel receiving stations. There are two general types of receiving stations in the Finnish power plants: large unloading stations for the side tipping devices of trucks and small ones for the rear tipping devices of trucks. In the first ones the trucks empty their load (approx. 100 m{sup 3} loose bulk density) divided by hauling unit and trailer within few (5-10) minutes into a rectangular box, which depth is approx. 3 m. The discharging causes a strong counter current air and dust flow (20-40 m{sup 3}/s) upwards and the dust will easily spread out all over the station. In the second ones the discharging takes place from the rear of truck and trailer using loadspace conveyor of the vehicle within 20 minutes. The material falls on a (belt) conveyor, which is on the floor level. The problems in side tipping system are connected with dust and surplus time, which is needed for the preparation and completion of unloading and sampling. For the fine dust control has also been tested water spray (fog) nozzles and tried to utilise a settling chamber for the dust stream. Also the using the settling chamber equipped with air suction connections and cyclone separation may be effective. In the rear tipping system are also applied bag filters because of smaller air quantities. The rapid truck positioning and control in the receiving station is one of the presupposition for the fast and accurate unloading. This can be done using ultrasonic sensing methods. Also the ensuring of accurate discharging can be based on the modern technology. One of the basic things is the enlarging of video control (CCD -cameras)

  6. A Model for Molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction during Melt Slumping in a Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, Manohar Singh; Siefken, Larry James

    1999-10-01

    This paper describes a simple fuel melt slumping model to replace the current parametric model in SCDAP/RELAP5. Specifically, a fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) model is developed to analyze the slumping molten fuel, molten fuel breakup, heat transfer to coolant, relocation of the molten droplets, size of a partially solidified particles that settle to the bottom of the lower plenum, and melt-plenum interaction, if any. Considering our objectives, the molten fuel jet breakup model, and fuel droplets Lagrangian model as included in a code TEXAS-V with Eulerian thermal hydraulics for water and steam from SCDAP/RELAP5 were used. The model was assessed with experimental data from MAGICO-2000 tests performed at University of California at Santa Barbara, and FARO Test L-08 performed at Joint Research Center, Ispra, Italy. The comparison was found satisfactory.

  7. [The Structural Equation Model on Resilience of Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong Ha; Kim, Ok Soo

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and test a structural equation model on resilience of breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Participants were 204 patients with breast cancer who received chemotherapy treatment. They participated in a structured interview, which included social support, depression, symptom experience, self-efficacy, hope, resilience, and infection prevention behaviors. Data were analyzed using SPSS/WIN 20.0 and AMOS 18.0. Lower depression (γ=-.33, p=.020) and symptom experience (γ=-.31, p=.012) and higher self-efficacy (γ=.32, p=.005) and hope (γ=.48, p=.016) were influenced by higher social support. Greater resilience was influenced by lower symptom experience (β=-.18, p=.016), higher self-efficacy (β=.49, p=.023), and higher hope (β=.46, p=.012), and these predictors explained 66.7% of variance in resilience. Greater resilience (β=.54, p=.009) made an impact on greater infection prevention behaviors. Resilience mediated the relations of symptom experience (β=-.10 p=.013), self-efficacy (β=.27, p=.006) and hope (β=.25, p=.009) with infection prevention behaviors. These predictors explained 24.9% of variance in infection prevention behaviors. The findings of the study suggest that breast cancer patientsw ith greater resilience who are receiving chemotherapy participate in increased infection prevention behaviors. Further research should be conducted to seek intervention strategies that improve breast cancer patients' resilience.

  8. EIA model documentation: Electricity market module - electricity fuel dispatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM) as it was used for EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 1997. It replaces previous documentation dated March 1994 and subsequent yearly update revisions. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves four purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the model for reviewers and potential users of the EFD including energy experts at the Energy Information Administration (EIA), other Federal agencies, state energy agencies, private firms such as utilities and consulting firms, and non-profit groups such as consumer and environmental groups. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation which details model enhancements that were undertaken for AE097 and since the previous documentation. Last, because the major use of the EFD is to develop forecasts, this documentation explains the calculations, major inputs and assumptions which were used to generate the AE097

  9. EIA model documentation: Electricity market module - electricity fuel dispatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM) as it was used for EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1997. It replaces previous documentation dated March 1994 and subsequent yearly update revisions. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This document serves four purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the model for reviewers and potential users of the EFD including energy experts at the Energy Information Administration (EIA), other Federal agencies, state energy agencies, private firms such as utilities and consulting firms, and non-profit groups such as consumer and environmental groups. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation which details model enhancements that were undertaken for AE097 and since the previous documentation. Last, because the major use of the EFD is to develop forecasts, this documentation explains the calculations, major inputs and assumptions which were used to generate the AE097.

  10. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard R. Parresol; Joe H. Scott; Anne Andreu; Susan Prichard; Laurie Kurth

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or...

  11. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  12. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Modeling fuel consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    Fuel consumption specifies the amount of vegetative biomass consumed during wildland fire. It is a two-stage process of pyrolysis and combustion that occurs simultaneously and at different rates depending on the characteristics and condition of the fuel, weather, topography, and in the case of prescribed fire, ignition rate and pattern. Fuel consumption is the basic...

  13. Modeling efficiency and water balance in PEM fuel cell systems with liquid fuel processing and hydrogen membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Joshua B.; Bhargav, Atul; Shields, Eric B.; Jackson, Gregory S.; Hearn, Patrick L.

    Integrating PEM fuel cells effectively with liquid hydrocarbon reforming requires careful system analysis to assess trade-offs associated with H 2 production, purification, and overall water balance. To this end, a model of a PEM fuel cell system integrated with an autothermal reformer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (modeled as C 12H 23) and with H 2 purification in a water-gas-shift/membrane reactor is developed to do iterative calculations for mass, species, and energy balances at a component and system level. The model evaluates system efficiency with parasitic loads (from compressors, pumps, and cooling fans), system water balance, and component operating temperatures/pressures. Model results for a 5-kW fuel cell generator show that with state-of-the-art PEM fuel cell polarization curves, thermal efficiencies >30% can be achieved when power densities are low enough for operating voltages >0.72 V per cell. Efficiency can be increased by operating the reformer at steam-to-carbon ratios as high as constraints related to stable reactor temperatures allow. Decreasing ambient temperature improves system water balance and increases efficiency through parasitic load reduction. The baseline configuration studied herein sustained water balance for ambient temperatures ≤35 °C at full power and ≤44 °C at half power with efficiencies approaching ∼27 and ∼30%, respectively.

  14. Multi-Fuel oxidation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells : Model anodes and system studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    With the evolution of renewable energy technologies it has become necessary that a balance is found between power production with conventional energy sources and other long term solutions. SOFCs offer an alternative for utilising conventional fossil fuels as well as sustainable biomass derived fuels

  15. A physical model of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell anode impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M.; Casalegno, A.

    2014-02-01

    In the present work a physically based model of direct methanol fuel cell anode impedance has been developed and validated at different operating current densities. The proposed model includes the two-phase mass transport of both methanol and water through diffusion and catalyst layers and the methanol oxidation reaction involving CO adsorbed intermediate. Model simulations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental observations and permit to evaluate the origin of anode impedance features. Model results confirm that the high frequency 45° linear branch is caused by proton transport limitations within the catalyst layer and that the low frequency inductive behavior is due to surface coverage by CO reaction intermediate. Moreover model predictions elucidate the contribution to the impedance of mass transport phenomena through diffusion layer, that is relevant even at low current density and increases along the channel length. In particular liquid convective fluxes are considered as a process of pressure buildup and breakthrough at diffusion layer intersecting fibers, resulting in a discontinuous phenomenon. By means of this intermittent description it is possible to correctly reproduce mass transport limitations through diffusion layers, that manifest themselves as a second arch superimposed to the first one, peculiar of kinetic losses.

  16. Fuel rod modelling during transients: The TOUTATIS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentejac, F.; Bourreau, S.; Brochard, J.; Hourdequin, N.; Lansiart, S.

    2001-01-01

    The TOUTATIS code is devoted to the PCI local phenomena simulation, in correlation with the METEOR code for the global behaviour of the fuel rod. More specifically, the TOUTATIS objective is to evaluate the mechanical constraints on the cladding during a power transient thus predicting its behaviour in term of stress corrosion cracking. Based upon the finite element computation code CASTEM 2000, TOUTATIS is a set of modules written in a macro language. The aim of this paper is to present both code modules: The axisymmetric bi-dimensional module, modeling a unique block pellet; The tri dimensional module modeling a radially fragmented pellet. Having shown the boundary conditions and the algorithms used, the application will be illustrated by: A short presentation of the bidimensional axisymmetric modeling performances as well as its limits; The enhancement due to the three dimensional modeling will be displayed by sensitivity studies to the geometry, in this case the pellet height/diameter ratio. Finally, we will show the easiness of the development inherent to the CASTEM 2000 system by depicting the process of a modeling enhancement by adding the possibility of an axial (horizontal) fissuration of the pellet. As conclusion, the future improvements planned for the code are depicted. (author)

  17. Improvement of the design model for SMART fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Kyun; Yim, Jeong Sik

    2001-04-01

    A Study on the design improvement of the TEP, BEP and Hoddown spring of a fuel assembly for SMART was performed. Cut boundary Interpolation Method was applied to get more accurate results of stress and strain distribution from the results of the coarse model calculation. The improved results were compared with that of a coarse one. The finer model predicted slightly higher stress and strain distribution than the coarse model, which meant the results of the coarse model was not converged. Considering that the test results always showed much less stress than the FEM and the location of the peak stress of the refined model, the pressure stress on the loading point seemed to contribute significantly to the stresses. Judging from the fact that the peak stress appeared only at the local area, the results of the refined model were considered enough to be a conservative prediction of the stress levels. The slot of the guide thimble screw was ignored to get how much thickness of the flow plate can be reduced in case of optimization of the thickness and also cut off the screw dent hole was included for the actual geometry. For the BEP, the leg and web were also included in the model and the results with and without the leg alignment support were compared. Finally, the holddown spring which is important during the in-reactor behavior of the FA was modeled more realistic and improved to include the effects of the friction between the leaves and the loading surface. Using this improved model, it was possible that the spring characteristics were predicted more accurate to the test results. From the analysis of the spring characteristics, the local plastic area controled the characteristics of the spring dominantly which implied that it was necessary for the design of the leaf to be optimized for the improvement of the plastic behavior of the leaf spring

  18. Application of the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System to evaluate water budgets after forest fuel management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A. M.; Micheletty, P. D.; Kinoshita, A. M.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Sagehen Experimental Forest is being used as a prototype for forest fuel management to mitigate severe wildfires and improve ecosystem function and habitat. Sagehen is located at the headwaters of Sagehen Creek and contributes to the Truckee River, which is the main water supply for Reno, Nevada. Sagehen is a snow-dominated basin that receives an average annual rainfall of 892 mm and streamflow of 392 mm. A standardized precipitation index (SPI) indicates eight wet years and three dry years occurred since 1978. The Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) is utilized to run scenarios of fuel treatments and to analyze corresponding water budget changes in Sagehen. PRMS is calibrated to observed streamflow using the systematic multi-objective, step-wise calibration software Let Us Calibrate (LUCA). The basin is divided into 128 hydrologic response units (HRUs) based on similar hydrologic and physical characteristics. Fuel management will include multiple thinning and burning treatments based on topography and ecosystem characteristics and coincides with approximately 41 percent of the defined HRUs. Three treatment scenarios were run for relevant HRUs for water years 1981-2000. Scenarios reflect a 25, 50, and 75 percent vegetation reduction by altering sensitive parameters such as summer and winter cover density, summer and winter rain-interception storage capacity, and snow-interception storage capacity. Preliminary analysis shows changes in the water budget exemplified by simulated streamflow compared to baseline simulations. Ongoing work includes investigating PRMS outputs such as evapotranspiration, snow, and recharge to fully understand the scope of proposed fuel management in Sagehen. Individual assessment of impacted HRUs will also provide insight on specific treatment types and ultimately provide insight for future regional treatments in the Sierra Nevada.

  19. Modeling and control of the output current of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a dynamic Matlab SIMULINK model of the relationship between the fuel cell current set point of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell system and the output current of the system is developed. The model contains an estimated fuel cell model, based on a polarization curve and assumed first order...... dynamics, as well as a battery model based on an equivalent circuit model and a balance of plant power consumption model. The models are tuned with experimental data and verified using a verification data set. The model is used to develop an output current controller which can control the charge current...

  20. Modeling of burnup express-estimation for UO{sub 2}-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhanskii, Vladimir V.; Tokarev, Sergey A.; Vilkhivskaya, Olga V., E-mail: vilhivskaya_olga@mail.ru

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Proposed engineering model estimates fuel burnup by {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratio. • Buildup of cesium isotopes relies on changing neutron spectrum in the core cycle. • {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratios in FAs with Gd-doped fuel rods are analyzed. • Comparison of the model calculations with the NPPs spike measurements is presented. - Abstract: The paper presents the developed engineering model of cesium isotopes production as function of UO{sub 2}-fuel burnup and an assessment of their activity ratios. The model considers the evolution of linear power of gadolinium-doped fuel rods and fuel rods surrounding them in fuel assemblies with high enrichment fuel, harder neutron spectrum, and the changes in cross-sections of neutron reactions in thermal and epithermal energy areas. Parametrical dependences in the model are based on the fuel operation data for nuclear power plants and on the detailed neutronic-physical calculations of the core. Presented are the results of the model calculations for the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs activity ratios in fuel taking into account the parameter of hardness of the neutron spectrum during the first irradiation cycle for fuel with enrichment ranging from 3.6 wt% in {sup 235}U.

  1. Receiver design for SPAD-based VLC systems under Poisson-Gaussian mixed noise model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianqi; Wang, Zhaocheng; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-23

    Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) is a promising photosensor because of its high sensitivity to optical signals in weak illuminance environment. Recently, it has drawn much attention from researchers in visible light communications (VLC). However, existing literature only deals with the simplified channel model, which only considers the effects of Poisson noise introduced by SPAD, but neglects other noise sources. Specifically, when an analog SPAD detector is applied, there exists Gaussian thermal noise generated by the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and the digital-to-analog converter (D/A). Therefore, in this paper, we propose an SPAD-based VLC system with pulse-amplitude-modulation (PAM) under Poisson-Gaussian mixed noise model, where Gaussian-distributed thermal noise at the receiver is also investigated. The closed-form conditional likelihood of received signals is derived using the Laplace transform and the saddle-point approximation method, and the corresponding quasi-maximum-likelihood (quasi-ML) detector is proposed. Furthermore, the Poisson-Gaussian-distributed signals are converted to Gaussian variables with the aid of the generalized Anscombe transform (GAT), leading to an equivalent additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, and a hard-decision-based detector is invoked. Simulation results demonstrate that, the proposed GAT-based detector can reduce the computational complexity with marginal performance loss compared with the proposed quasi-ML detector, and both detectors are capable of accurately demodulating the SPAD-based PAM signals.

  2. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk

    Fuel cells are strong candidates to become the power sources of the 21th century. Despite, being close to mass market entry for several years, fuel cells still are still only found in prototypes and very few commercial products. The reason for this is that fuel cells currently suffer from too hig...... and to be transferred into a current density measurement tool. It is the hope that the contribution of this thesis can aid in bringing fuel cells faster to the market. Fuel cells are a key technology needed to cope with the climate changes of the future....

  3. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley; Weber, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.; Balliet, Ryan; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Newman, John

    2007-09-07

    Fuel cells may become the energy-delivery devices of the 21st century with realization of a carbon-neutral energy economy. Although there are many types of fuel cells, polymerelectrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are receiving the most attention for automotive and small stationary applications. In a PEFC, hydrogen and oxygen are combined electrochemically to produce water, electricity, and waste heat. During the operation of a PEFC, many interrelated and complex phenomena occur. These processes include mass and heat transfer, electrochemical reactions, and ionic and electronic transport. Most of these processes occur in the through-plane direction in what we term the PEFC sandwich as shown in Figure 1. This sandwich comprises multiple layers including diffusion media that can be composite structures containing a macroporous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) and microporous layer (MPL), catalyst layers (CLs), flow fields or bipolar plates, and a membrane. During operation fuel is fed into the anode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and reacts electrochemically at the anode CL to form hydrogen ions and electrons. The oxidant, usually oxygen in air, is fed into the cathode flow field, moves through the diffusion medium, and is electrochemically reduced at the cathode CL by combination with the generated protons and electrons. The water, either liquid or vapor, produced by the reduction of oxygen at the cathode exits the PEFC through either the cathode or anode flow field. The electrons generated at the anode pass through an external circuit and may be used to perform work before they are consumed at the cathode. The performance of a PEFC is most often reported in the form of a polarization curve, as shown in Figure 2. Roughly speaking, the polarization curve can be broken down into various regions. First, it should be noted that the equilibrium potential differs from the open-circuit voltage due mainly to hydrogen crossover through the membrane (i.e., a mixed potential

  4. Application of the Nelson model to four timelag fuel classes using Oklahoma field observations: Model evaluation and comparison with national Fire Danger Rating System algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Carlson; Larry S. Bradshaw; Ralph M. Nelson; Randall R Bensch; Rafal Jabrzemski

    2007-01-01

    The application of a next-generation dead-fuel moisture model, the 'Nelson model', to four timelag fuel classes using an extensive 21-month dataset of dead-fuel moisture observations is described. Developed by Ralph Nelson in the 1990s, the Nelson model is a dead-fuel moisture model designed to take advantage of frequent automated weather observations....

  5. Characterization and Modeling of a Methanol Reforming Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    topologies is the Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell (RMFC) system that operates on a mix of methanol and water. The fuel is reformed with a steam reforming to a hydrogen rich gas, however with additional formation of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (HT......-PEMFC) has the benefit of being resistant to CO poisoning. The HT-PEM fuel cell operates at elevated temperatures (above 100 oC) and therefore uses phosphoric acid as a proton conductor.  Using a HT-PEMFC in a RMFC system enables the use of exhaust gas from the fuel cell in a catalytic burner which is able...... to heat up the steam reforming process. However, utilizing the excess hydrogen in the system complicates the RMFC system as the amount of hydrogen can vary depending on the fuel methanol supply, fuel cell load and the reformer gas composition. This PhD study has therefore been involved in investigating...

  6. Modeling of the filling and cooling processes of hot fuel mains in Liquid Fuel Rocket Power Plant (LFRPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisnyakov, V. F.; Pokrishkin, V. V.; Serebryansky, V. N.

    A mathematical model of heat and mass exchange processes during filling and cooling of hot fuel mains of the Liquid Fuel Rocket Power Plant (LFRPP), which allows to define a mass consumption and distribution of two-phase flow parameters by the length of pipeline. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data, taken during filling of the main with a supply of liquid oxygen from the tank into the combustion chamber. Also, the results of modeling of hydrogen main dynamic characteristics of LFRPP in the same conditions are given.

  7. Spent fuel dissolution rates: from experiments to models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, J.; Casa, I.; Clarens, F.; Rovira, M.; Pablo, J. de

    2003-01-01

    In this work we made a review on the different models and mechanisms that have been developed by different authors to explain the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel under oxic conditions. In most cases the oxidizing reagent used has been the molecular oxygen, but also some works with hydrogen peroxide or even with hypochloric acid can be found. Leaching experiments have been carried out with different types of spent nuclear fuel as well as with either chemical or natural analogues such as non irradiated uranium dioxide or natural uraninites, respectively. In oxygen and in the absence of bicarbonate ion, the data found in literature can be fitted considering the two-step oxidative dissolution mechanism developed by Torrero et al. (1998). This mechanism is able to explain the different reaction orders for pH oxygen concentration obtained depending on the experimental conditions. In the presence of bicarbonate, the data can be fitted considering the mechanism described de Pablo et al. (1999), which consists on two different steps: (1) oxidation of the surface of the solid and (2) surface co-ordination of the bicarbonate ion and dissolution of the complex formed. This model allows to explain different reaction orders for bicarbonate and oxygen concentration obtained by different authors. The development of a mechanism of UO 2 oxidation and dissolution in the presence of hydrogen peroxides is much more complied than in the case of oxygen because of the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide, which is probably catalysed by the UO 2 (s). At present, more work is being directed to the elucidation of this mechanism, including the study of the influence of some radicals such as OH on the UO 2 dissolution. (Author)

  8. Toward verifying fossil fuel CO2 emissions with the CMAQ model: motivation, model description and initial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P; Pinto, Joseph P; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A

    2014-04-01

    Motivated by the question of whether and how a state-of-the-art regional chemical transport model (CTM) can facilitate characterization of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and verify CO2 fossil-fuel emissions, we for the first time applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate CO2. This paper presents methods, input data, and initial results for CO2 simulation using CMAQ over the contiguous United States in October 2007. Modeling experiments have been performed to understand the roles of fossil-fuel emissions, biosphere-atmosphere exchange, and meteorology in regulating the spatial distribution of CO2 near the surface over the contiguous United States. Three sets of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes were used as input to assess the impact of uncertainty of NEE on CO2 concentrations simulated by CMAQ. Observational data from six tall tower sites across the country were used to evaluate model performance. In particular, at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO), a tall tower site that receives urban emissions from Denver CO, the CMAQ model using hourly varying, high-resolution CO2 fossil-fuel emissions from the Vulcan inventory and Carbon Tracker optimized NEE reproduced the observed diurnal profile of CO2 reasonably well but with a low bias in the early morning. The spatial distribution of CO2 was found to correlate with NO(x), SO2, and CO, because of their similar fossil-fuel emission sources and common transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the potential of using a regional CTM to help interpret CO2 observations and understand CO2 variability in space and time. The ability to simulate a full suite of air pollutants in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of their use as tracers for CO2 source attribution. This work serves as a proof of concept and the foundation for more comprehensive examinations of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and various uncertainties in the future. Atmospheric CO2 has long been modeled

  9. New weighted sum of gray gases model applicable to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Johansen, Lars Christian Riis; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    gases model (WSGGM) is derived, which is applicable to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion. First, a computer code is developed to evaluate the emissivity of any gas mixture at any condition by using the exponential wide band model (EWBM...

  10. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Modelling Using Moving Least Squares Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Tirnovan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cell, with low polluting emissions, is a great alternative to replace the traditional electrical power sources for automotive applications or for small stationary consumers. This paper presents a numerical method, for the fuel cell modelling, based on moving least squares (MLS. Experimental data have been used for developing an approximated model of the PEMFC function of the current density, air inlet pressure and operating temperature of the fuel cell. The method can be applied for modelling others fuel cell sub-systems, such as the compressor. The method can be used for off-line or on-line identification of the PEMFC stack.

  11. A semi empirical model of the direct methanol fuel cell. Part II. Parametric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, K.; Jackson, C.; Argyropoulos, P.

    A parametric analysis of a model equation developed to predict the cell voltage versus current density response of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell is presented. The equation is based on a semi-empirical approach in which methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics are combined with effective mass transport coefficients for the fuel cell electrodes. The model equation is applied to experimental data for a small-scale fuel cell and produces electrochemical parameters generally consistent with those expected for the individual components of the fuel cell MEA. The parameters thus determined are also used in the model to predict the performance of a DMFC with a new membrane electrode assembly.

  12. A proposed model of factors influencing hydrogen fuel cell vehicle acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanina, N. H. Noor; Kwe Lu, Tan; Fadhilah, A. R.

    2016-03-01

    Issues such as environmental problem and energy insecurity keep worsening as a result of energy use from household to huge industries including automotive industry. Recently, a new type of zero emission vehicle, hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (HFCV) has received attention. Although there are argues on the feasibility of hydrogen as the future fuel, there is another important issue, which is the acceptance of HFCV. The study of technology acceptance in the early stage is a vital key for a successful introduction and penetration of a technology. This paper proposes a model of factors influencing green vehicle acceptance, specifically HFCV. This model is built base on two technology acceptance theories and other empirical studies of vehicle acceptance. It aims to provide a base for finding the key factors influencing new sustainable energy fuelled vehicle, HFCV acceptance which is achieved by explaining intention to accept HFCV. Intention is influenced by attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control from Theory of Planned Behaviour and personal norm from Norm Activation Theory. In the framework, attitude is influenced by perceptions of benefits and risks, and social trust. Perceived behavioural control is influenced by government interventions. Personal norm is influenced by outcome efficacy and problem awareness.

  13. Bivariate modelling of the financial development-fossil fuel consumption nexus in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Yeboah Asuamah, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    The present paper modelled the relationship between financial developments and fossil fuel energy consumption in Ghana for the period 1970-2011 by applying Autoregressive Distributed Lad Model (ARDL). The findings of the paper on the cointegration test indicate significant evidence of cointegration between fossil fuel consumption and financial development. The findings seem to suggest that financial development is an explanatory variable in fossil fuel consumption management in achieving sust...

  14. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior

  15. Source-receiver two-way wave extrapolation for prestack exploding-reflector modelling and migration

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-10-08

    Most modern seismic imaging methods separate input data into parts (shot gathers). We develop a formulation that is able to incorporate all available data at once while numerically propagating the recorded multidimensional wavefield forward or backward in time. This approach has the potential for generating accurate images free of artiefacts associated with conventional approaches. We derive novel high-order partial differential equations in the source-receiver time domain. The fourth-order nature of the extrapolation in time leads to four solutions, two of which correspond to the incoming and outgoing P-waves and reduce to the zero-offset exploding-reflector solutions when the source coincides with the receiver. A challenge for implementing two-way time extrapolation is an essential singularity for horizontally travelling waves. This singularity can be avoided by limiting the range of wavenumbers treated in a spectral-based extrapolation. Using spectral methods based on the low-rank approximation of the propagation symbol, we extrapolate only the desired solutions in an accurate and efficient manner with reduced dispersion artiefacts. Applications to synthetic data demonstrate the accuracy of the new prestack modelling and migration approach.

  16. Modeling vehicle fuel consumption and emissions at signalized intersection approaches : integrating field-collected data into microscopic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Microscopic models produce emissions and fuel consumption estimates with higher temporal resolution than other scales of : models. Most emissions and fuel consumption models were developed with data from dynamometer testing which are : sufficiently a...

  17. Analytical model describes ion conduction in fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel; Tse, Steve; Witten, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Many fuel cell designs employ polyelectrolyte membranes, but little is known about how to tune the parameters (water level, morphology, etc.) to maximize ion conductivity. We came up with a simple model based on a random, discrete water distribution and ion confinement due to neighboring polymer. The results quantitatively agree with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and explain experimental observations. We find that when the ratio of water volume to polymer volume, Vw /Vp , is small, the predicted ion self-diffusion coefficient scales roughly as Dw T√{Vw /Vp } exp(- ⋯Vp /Vw) , where Dw T is the limiting value in pure water at temperature T . At high water levels the model also agrees with MD simulation, plateauing to Dw T . The model predicts a maximum conductivity at a water level higher than is typically used, and that it would be beneficial to increase water retention even at the expense of lower ion concentration. Also, membranes would conduct better if they phase-separated into water-rich and polymer-rich regions. US ARMY MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  18. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials, APPENDIX A: Energy Use and Emissions from the Lifecycle of Diesel-Like Fuels Derived From Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark; Lipman, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    An Appendix to the Report, “A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materialsâ€

  19. Dodewaard fuel supply agreement - a model for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raven, L.F.; Hubers, C.

    1980-01-01

    An Agreement between the Utility GKN and the Fuel Supplier BNFL has eliminated any Utility imposed penalty clauses for fuel failure due to operational conditions and, consequently, there are no restrictions imposed by the Fuel Supplier on the reactor operational manoeuvres. The result is that the Utility can now decide if the risk of fuel clad failure during a reactor power ramp outweighs the financial loss due to slower ramp rates. It is the Utility and not the Fuel Supplier who is in the best position to make this judgment provided adequate operational experience and computer codes are available to quantify the risk. The paper discusses the reactor operational experience, including the fuel failure rate and the confirmation of PCI failure by post irradiation examination. It establishes the practicality of the Agreement for the Dodewaard reactor and suggests such arrangements could be beneficial to other Utilities. (author)

  20. The FIT 2.0 Model - Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Gregory M Teske

    2011-06-01

    All mass streams from fuel separation and fabrication are products that must meet some set of product criteria – fuel feedstock impurity limits, waste acceptance criteria (WAC), material storage (if any), or recycle material purity requirements such as zirconium for cladding or lanthanides for industrial use. These must be considered in a systematic and comprehensive way. The FIT model and the “system losses study” team that developed it [Shropshire2009, Piet2010b] are steps by the Fuel Cycle Technology program toward an analysis that accounts for the requirements and capabilities of each fuel cycle component, as well as major material flows within an integrated fuel cycle. This will help the program identify near-term R&D needs and set longer-term goals. This report describes FIT 2, an update of the original FIT model.[Piet2010c] FIT is a method to analyze different fuel cycles; in particular, to determine how changes in one part of a fuel cycle (say, fuel burnup, cooling, or separation efficiencies) chemically affect other parts of the fuel cycle. FIT provides the following: Rough estimate of physics and mass balance feasibility of combinations of technologies. If feasibility is an issue, it provides an estimate of how performance would have to change to achieve feasibility. Estimate of impurities in fuel and impurities in waste as function of separation performance, fuel fabrication, reactor, uranium source, etc.

  1. A suitable model plant for control of the set fuel cell-DC/DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andujar, J.M.; Segura, F.; Vasallo, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, E.P.S. La Rabida, Universidad de Huelva, Ctra. Huelva - Palos de la Frontera, S/N, 21819 La Rabida - Palos de la Frontera Huelva (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    In this work a state and transfer function model of the set made up of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell and a DC/DC converter is developed. The set is modelled as a plant controlled by the converter duty cycle. In addition to allow setting the plant operating point at any point of its characteristic curve (two interesting points are maximum efficiency and maximum power points), this approach also allows the connection of the fuel cell to other energy generation and storage devices, given that, as they all usually share a single DC bus, a thorough control of the interconnected devices is required. First, the state and transfer function models of the fuel cell and the converter are obtained. Then, both models are related in order to achieve the fuel cell+DC/DC converter set (plant) model. The results of the theoretical developments are validated by simulation on a real fuel cell model. (author)

  2. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  3. Effects of homogeneous geometry models in simulating the fuel balls in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mengjen; Liang Jenqhorng; Peir Jinnjer; Chao Dersheng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the core geometry of HTR-10 was simulated using four different models including: (1) model 1 - an explicit double heterogeneous geometry, (2) model 2 - a mixing of UO 2 kernel and four layers in each TRISO particle into one, (3) model 3 - a mixing of 8,335 TRISO particles and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one, and (4) model 4 - a mixing of the outer graphite shell, 8,335 TRISO particles, and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one. The associated initial core computations were performed using the MCNP version 1.51 computer code. The experimental fuel loading height of 123 cm was employed for each model. The results revealed that the multiplication factors ranged from largest to smallest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. The neutron spectrum in the fuel region of each models varied from the hardest to the softest are model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4 while the averaged neutron spectrum in fuel ball from hardest to softest are model 4, model 3, model 2, and model 1. In addition, the CPU execution times extended from longest to shortest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. (author)

  4. Application of Thermochemical Modeling to Assessment/Evaluation of Nuclear Fuel Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, Theodore M [University of South Carolina, Columbia; McMurray, Jake W [ORNL; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The combination of new fuel compositions and higher burn-ups envisioned for the future means that representing fuel properties will be much more important, and yet more complex. Behavior within the oxide fuel rods will be difficult to model owing to the high temperatures, and the large number of elements generated and their significant concentrations that are a result of fuels taken to high burn-up. This unprecedented complexity offers an enormous challenge to the thermochemical understanding of these systems and opportunities to advance solid solution models to describe these materials. This paper attempts to model and simulate that behavior using an oxide fuels thermochemical description to compute the equilibrium phase state and oxygen potential of LWR fuel under irradiation.

  5. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Yeom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE digital elevation model (DEM for the actual amount of incident solar radiation according to solar geometry. The surface insolation mapping, by integrating a physical model with the Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS Meteorological Imager (MI image, was performed through a comparative analysis with ground-based observation data (pyranometer. Original and topographically corrected solar radiation maps were created and their characteristics analyzed. Both the original and the topographically corrected solar energy resource maps captured the temporal variations in atmospheric conditions, such as the movement of seasonal rain fronts during summer. In contrast, although the original solar radiation map had a low insolation value over mountain areas with a high rate of cloudiness, the topographically corrected solar radiation map provided a better description of the actual surface geometric characteristics.

  6. Predicting surface fuel models and fuel metrics using lidar and CIR imagery in a dense mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek K. Jakubowksi; Qinghua Guo; Brandon Collins; Scott Stephens; Maggi. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    We compared the ability of several classification and regression algorithms to predict forest stand structure metrics and standard surface fuel models. Our study area spans a dense, topographically complex Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest. We used clustering, regression trees, and support vector machine algorithms to analyze high density (average 9 pulses/m

  7. Mathematical modeling of oxygen transport in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Ann Mari

    1997-12-31

    This thesis develops mathematical models to describe the electrochemical performance of a solid oxide fuel cell cathode based on electrochemical kinetics and mass transfer. The individual effects of various coupled processes are investigated. A one-dimensional model is developed based on porous electrode theory. Two different mechanisms are investigated for the charge transfer reaction. One of these assumes that intermediately adsorbed oxygen atoms are reduced at the electrode/electrolyte interface, similar to the models proposed for metal electrodes. Simulated polarization curves exhibit limited currents due to depletion of oxygen adsorbates at high cathodic overvoltages. An empirical correlation is confirmed to exist between the limiting current an the oxygen partial pressure, however, a similar correlation often assumed to exist between the measured polarization resistance and the oxygen partial pressure could not be justified. For the other model, oxygen vacancies are assumed to be exchanged directly at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The electrochemical behaviour is improved by reducing the oxygen partial pressure, due to increased vacancy concentration of the electrode material. Simulated polarization curves exhibit Tafel-like slopes in the cathodic direction, which are due to polarization concentration, and not activation polarization in the conventional sense. Anodic limiting currents are predicted due to lack of available free sites for vacancy exchange at the cathode side. The thesis also presents a theoretical treatment of current and potential distributions in simple two-dimensional cell geometries, and a two-dimensional model for a porous electrode-electrolyte system for investigation of the effect of interfacial diffusion of adsorbates along the electrode/electrolyte interface. 172 refs., 60 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. DART model for thermal conductivity of U3Si2 aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the primary physical models that form the basis of the DART model for calculating irradiation-induced changes in the thermal conductivity of aluminium dispersion fuel. DART calculations of fuel swelling, pore closure, and thermal conductivity are compared with measured values

  9. A semi-empirical model of the direct methanol fuel cell performance. Part I. Model development and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, P.; Scott, K.; Shukla, A. K.; Jackson, C.

    A model equation is developed to predict the cell voltage versus current density response of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The equation is based on a semi-empirical approach in which methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction kinetics are combined with effective mass transport coefficients for the fuel cell electrodes. The model equation is validated against experimental data for a small-scale fuel cell and is applicable over a wide range of methanol concentration and temperatures.

  10. Ab Initio Enhanced calphad Modeling of Actinide-Rich Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong Austin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-28

    The process of fuel recycling is central to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), where plutonium and the minor actinides (MA) Am, Np, and Cm are extracted from spent fuel and fabricated into new fuel for a fast reactor. Metallic alloys of U-Pu-Zr-MA are leading candidates for fast reactor fuels and are the current basis for fast spectrum metal fuels in a fully recycled closed fuel cycle. Safe and optimal use of these fuels will require knowledge of their multicomponent phase stability and thermodynamics (Gibbs free energies). In additional to their use as nuclear fuels, U-Pu-Zr-MA contain elements and alloy phases that pose fundamental questions about electronic structure and energetics at the forefront of modern many-body electron theory. This project will validate state-of-the-art electronic structure approaches for these alloys and use the resulting energetics to model U-Pu-Zr-MA phase stability. In order to keep the work scope practical, researchers will focus on only U-Pu-Zr-{Np,Am}, leaving Cm for later study. The overall objectives of this project are to: Provide a thermodynamic model for U-Pu-Zr-MA for improving and controlling reactor fuels; and, Develop and validate an ab initio approach for predicting actinide alloy energetics for thermodynamic modeling.

  11. Static and dynamic modeling of a diesel fed fuel cell power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrenko, D.; Hissel, D.; Pera, M.C. [FCLAB, Femto-ST, UMR 6174, University of Franche-Comte, Techn' hom, Rue Thierry Mieg, 90010 Belfort (France); Lecoq, S.; Herail, E. [N-GHY, Site Industriel Saint Antoine - ZI Montplaisir, 51 rue Isaac Newton, 81000 Albi (France)

    2010-02-15

    Fuel cell supplied auxiliary power units could ease the development of fuel cell systems in transportation application if they are fed by conventional hydrocarbons like diesel. Then a fuel processor has to be used to convert the hydrocarbon in a hydrogen rich gas mixture with a low rate of contaminant. The temperatures of the fuel processor modules and the mass flows have to be controlled. The energetic macroscopic representation (EMR) is a causal, graphic modeling tool for complex multi-domain systems that can be used for the design of the control structure through the inversion of model. In this work EMR is used to model a diesel supplied low temperature fuel cell unit including the fuel processor, the fuel cell stack (HTPEM) as well as the supply system of the mass flows. The presented fuel processor and HTPEM models are validated against experimental results. The structure of the temperature and mass flow controls in the fuel processor and supply system are derived. Both the model and the control are implemented in Matlab/Simulink trademark and validated. (author)

  12. Model and algorithm for bi-fuel vehicle routing problem to reduce GHG emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Behroz; MirHassani, Seyed Ali; Hooshmand, Farnaz

    2017-09-01

    Because of the harmful effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted by petroleum-based fuels, the adoption of alternative green fuels such as biodiesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) is an inevitable trend in the transportation sector. However, the transition to alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) fleets is not easy and, particularly at the beginning of the transition period, drivers may be forced to travel long distances to reach alternative fueling stations (AFSs). In this paper, the utilization of bi-fuel vehicles is proposed as an operational approach. We present a mathematical model to address vehicle routing problem (VRP) with bi-fuel vehicles and show that the utilization of bi-fuel vehicles can lead to a significant reduction in GHG emissions. Moreover, a simulated annealing algorithm is adopted to solve large instances of this problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated on some random instances.

  13. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark J. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-14

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  14. Modeling defect and fission gas properties in U-Si fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Noordhoek, Mark [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Besmann, Theodore [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Middleburgh, Simon C. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, Vasteras (Sweden); Lahoda, E. J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Woods, PA (United States); Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Grimes, Robin W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-27

    Uranium silicides, in particular U3Si2, are being explored as an advanced nuclear fuel with increased accident tolerance as well as competitive economics compared to the baseline UO2 fuel. They benefit from high thermal conductivity (metallic) compared to UO2 fuel (insulator or semi-conductor) used in current Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The U-Si fuels also have higher fissile density. In order to perform meaningful engineering scale nuclear fuel performance simulations, the material properties of the fuel, including the response to irradiation environments, must be known. Unfortunately, the data available for USi fuels are rather limited, in particular for the temperature range where LWRs would operate. The ATF HIP is using multi-scale modeling and simulations to address this knowledge gap.

  15. Modeling and Simulation for Fuel Cell Polymer Electrolyte Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have established methods to evaluate key properties that are needed to commercialize polyelectrolyte membranes for fuel cell electric vehicles such as water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. These methods are based on coarse-graining models. For calculating water diffusion and gas permeability through the membranes, the dissipative particle dynamics–Monte Carlo approach was applied, while mechanical strength of the hydrated membrane was simulated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics. As a result of our systematic search and analysis, we can now grasp the direction necessary to improve water diffusion, gas permeability, and mechanical strength. For water diffusion, a map that reveals the relationship between many kinds of molecular structures and diffusion constants was obtained, in which the direction to enhance the diffusivity by improving membrane structure can be clearly seen. In order to achieve high mechanical strength, the molecular structure should be such that the hydrated membrane contains narrow water channels, but these might decrease the proton conductivity. Therefore, an optimal design of the polymer structure is needed, and the developed models reviewed here make it possible to optimize these molecular structures.

  16. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs

  17. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Modeling of Diffusive Convective and Electromechanical Processes in PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads

    of their impact on the operational performance of the fuel cell. In the modelling work presented, the commercial CFD package CFX4.4 is used as the foundation to generate a model of a PEM fuel cell. The CFX4.4 platform provides the framework of solving the three-dimensional transport equations for mass, momentum......In the report, the transport phenomena in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell fueled by hydrogen and air, is analyzed, and a comprehensive three dimensional computerized model of the cell is presented. The model accounts for most of the major transport processes and allow the prediction...... of the gaseous phase in the fuel cell and allows prediction of the concentration of the species present. A special feature of the approach developed is a method that allows detailed modelling and prediction of electrode kinetics. The transport of electrons in the gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer, as well...

  19. Research of power fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in industrial boiler based on numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova K.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the presented research is to perform numerical modelling of fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in once-through industrial steam boiler. Full size and scaled-down furnace model created with FIRE 3D software and was used for the research. All geometrical features were observed. The baseline information for the low-temperature vortex furnace process are velocity and temperature of low, upper and burner blast, air-fuel ratio, fuel consumption, coal dust size range. The obtained results are: temperature and velocity three dimensional fields, furnace gases and solid fuel ash particles concentration.

  20. 77 FR 13009 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ... Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Identification of Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel Pathways Under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Withdrawal... Renewable Fuel Standard program regulations. Because EPA received adverse comment, we are withdrawing the...

  1. 2.5D real waveform and real noise simulation of receiver functions in 3D models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Jacobsen, B. H.; Balling, N.

    There are several reasons why a real-data receiver function differs from the theoretical receiver function in a 1D model representing the stratification under the seismometer. Main reasons are ambient noise, spectral deficiencies in the impinging P-waveform, and wavefield propagation in laterally...

  2. A computer model to determine the primary contributors to relative radiation dose received by astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazareth, O.W.; Divadeenam, M.; Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Energy, Upton, New York (USA))

    1991-01-10

    This paper describes a computer model which was used to determine the relative radiation dose of protons of different energies. In the future, the model will be extended to calculate the dosage received by an astronaut during a specific mission to Mars, and within a spacecraft with specific materials and with a specific geometry. The framework for the calculations centered on the computer program HETC, a Monte Carlo transport code for computing the properties of high energy nucleon-meson cascades in matter. It is valid up to several hundred GeV. It was found that protons in the energy range from 50 to 200 MeV are the largest contributor to the radiation dose to a human inside an Al structure 1 cm thick. Other studies have predicted a dose-equivalent of several Sv (several hundred rem) to each crew member during the voyage. LD{sub 50} is the amount of radiation required to produce death in 50% of the organisms within 30 days. Since LD{sub 50} is 4.5 Sv (450 rem) for people, several Sv is a relatively high value.

  3. Communication of 8 June 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea concerning a non-paper 'The Republic of Korea's suggestion on possible criteria for multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 8 June 2009 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea, transmitting the text of a non-paper entitled 'The Republic of Korea's Suggestion on Possible Criteria for Multilateral Approaches to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'. As requested in that communication, the abovementioned non-paper is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  4. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt; Ebert, William

    2015-07-01

    The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO2 and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO2 and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO2 and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H2O2 and O2). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit fuel degradation to chemical dissolution, which results in radionuclide source term values that are four or five orders of magnitude lower than when oxidative dissolution processes are operative. This paper presents the scientific basis of the model, the approach for modeling used fuel in a disposal system, and preliminary

  5. Simple heat conduction model with phase change for reactor fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.; Ishii, M.; Grolmes, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple conduction model with phase change has been developed for the transient analysis of a reactor fuel pin based on average properties and lumped parameter techniques. Using the predetermined average overall heat transfer coefficient across a fuel pin in the steady-state period, the average transient fuel and clad temperatures can be formulated analytically. For loss-of-flow at constant power, the start of melting and complete melting for both the fuel and clad can be estimated with considerable accuracy. The purpose of the analysis is to provide a simple useful tool to obtain the general information about fuel and clad leading into the cooling transients. At present, the formulation is being employed for cladding motion and cladding blockage formation in the subassembly of a reactor core. The solution of the simple conduction model for the incipient melting time and the complete melting time of the clad in both R-5 and L-2 test fuel pins was compared with the numerical solution obtained from the SAS code, and the agreement between both solutions is excellent. For the R-5 test case, the analytical solution of the simple conduction model for the complete melting times for both clad and fuel was further compared with numerical solution calculated from THTB code at various axial position of the fuel pin. The comparison shows good agreement. The present lumped parameter model for a fuel pin has been developed to be used in an analysis of multichannel clad motions in a loss-of-flow accident

  6. Nonlinear Modeling and Analysis of Pressure Wave inside CEUP Fuel Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Hayat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating conditions dependent large pressure variations are one of the working characteristics of combination electronic unit pump (CEUP fuel injection system for diesel engines. We propose a precise and accurate nonlinear numerical model of pressure inside HP fuel pipeline of CEUP using wave equation (WE including both viscous and frequency dependent frictions. We have proved that developed hyperbolic approximation gives more realistic description of pressure wave as compared to classical viscous damped wave equation. Frictional effects of various frequencies on pressure wave have been averaged out across valid frequencies to represent the combined effect of all frequencies on pressure wave. Dynamic variations of key fuel properties including density, acoustic wave speed, and bulk modulus with varying pressures have also been incorporated. Based on developed model we present analysis on effect of fuel pipeline length on pressure wave propagation and variation of key fuel properties with both conventional diesel and alternate fuel rapeseed methyl ester (RME for CEUP pipeline.

  7. The Finite Element Modelling and Dynamic Characteristics Analysis about One Kind of Armoured Vehicles’ Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Ge, Zhishang; Zhai, Weihao; Tan, Shiwang; Zhang, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of fuel tank are studied for the armoured vehicle in this paper. The CATIA software is applied to build the CAD model of the armoured vehicles’ fuel tank, and the finite element model is established in ANSYS Workbench. The finite element method is carried out to analyze the static and dynamic mechanical properties of the fuel tank, and the first six orders of mode shapes and their frequencies are also computed and given in the paper, then the stress distribution diagram and the high stress areas are obtained. The results of the research provide some references to the fuel tanks’ design improvement, and give some guidance for the installation of the fuel tanks on armoured vehicles, and help to improve the properties and the service life of this kind of armoured vehicles’ fuel tanks.

  8. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  9. Modeling of WWER-440 Fuel Pin Behavior at Extended Burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Koliel, M.S.; Abou-Zaid, A.A.; El-Kafas, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, there is an ongoing effort to increase fuel discharge burn-up of all LWRs fuel including WWER's as much as possible in order to decrease power production cost. Therefore, burn-up is expected to be increased to 60 to 70 Mwd/kg U. The change in the fuel radial power distribution as a function of fuel burn up can affect the radial fuel temperature distribution as well as the fuel microstructure in the fuel pellet rim. In this paper, the radial burn-up and fissile products distributions of WWER-440 UO 2 fuel pin were evaluated using MCNP 4B and ORIGEN2 codes. The impact of the thermal conductivity on predicted fission gas release calculations is needed. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin cell well. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modeled separately. The fraction of the rim structure and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the fuel burn-up was predicted. a computer program; RIMSC-01, is developed to perform the required FGR calculations. Finally, the relevant phenomena and the corresponding models together with their validation are presented

  10. Advancements in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements and related structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billone, M.C.; Montgomery, R.O.; Rashid, Y.R.; Head, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    An important aspect of the design and analysis of nuclear reactors is the ability to predict the behavior of fuel elements in the adverse environment of a reactor system. By understanding the thermomechanical behavior of the different materials which constitute a nuclear fuel element, analysis and predictions can be made regarding the integrity and reliability of fuel element designs. The SMiRT conference series, through the division on fuel elements and the post-conference seminars on fuel element modeling, provided technical forums for the international participation in the exchange of knowledge concerning the thermomechanical modeling of fuel elements. This paper discusses the technical advances in the behavioral modeling of fuel elements presented at the SMiRT conference series since its inception in 1971. Progress in the areas of material properties and constitutive relationships, modeling methodologies, and integral modeling approaches was reviewed and is summarized in light of their impact on the thermomechanical modeling of nuclear fuel elements. 34 refs., 5 tabs

  11. Crustal Structure and Subsidence of the Williston Basin: Evidence from Receiver Function Stacking and Gravity Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.; Mickus, K. L.; Gao, S. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Williston Basin of the northcentral United States and southern Canada is a typical intracratonic sag basin, with nearly continuous subsidence from the Cambrian to the Jurassic. A number of contrasting models on the subsidence mechanism of this approximately circular basin have been proposed. While in principle 3D variations of crustal thickness, layering, and Poisson's ratio can provide essential constraints on the models, thick layers of Phanerozoic sediment with up to 4.5 km thickness prevented reliable determinations of those crustal properties using active or passive source seismic techniques. Specifically, the strong reverberations of teleseismic P-to-S converted waves (a.k.a. receiver functions or RFs) from the Moho and intracrustal interfaces in the loose sedimentary layer can severely contaminate the RFs. Here we use RFs recorded by about 200 USArray and other stations in the Williston Basin and adjacent areas to obtain spatial distributions of the crustal properties. We have found that virtually all of the RFs recorded by stations in the Basin contain strong reverberations, which are effectively removed using a recently developed deconvolution-based filter (Yu et al., 2015, DOI: 10.1002/2014JB011610). A "double Moho" structure is clearly imaged beneath the Basin. The top interface has a depth of about 40 km beneath the Basin, and shallows gradually toward the east from the depocenter. It joins with the Moho beneath the western margin of the Superior Craton, where the crust is about 30 km thick. The bottom interface has a depth of 55 km beneath the Wyoming Craton, and deepens to about 70 km beneath the depocenter. Based on preliminary results of H-k stacking and gravity modeling, we interpret the layer between the two interfaces as a high density, probably eclogized layer. Continuous eclogitization from the Cambrian to the Jurassic resulted in the previously observed rates of subsidence being nearly linear rather than exponential.

  12. Heat transfer analysis of porous media receiver with different transport and thermophysical models using mixture as feeding gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fuqiang; Tan, Jianyu; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using local thermal non-equilibrium model to solve heat transfer of porous media. • CH 4 /H 2 O mixture is adopted as feeding gas of porous media receiver. • Radiative transfer equation between porous strut is solved by Rosseland approximation. • Transport and thermophysical models not included in Fluent are programmed by UDFs. • Variations of model on thermal performance of porous media receiver are studied. - Abstract: The local thermal non-equilibrium model is adopted to solve the steady state heat and mass transfer problems of porous media solar receiver. The fluid entrance surface is subjected to concentrated solar radiation, and CH 4 /H 2 O mixture is adopted as feeding gas. The radiative heat transfer equation between porous strut is solved by Rosseland approximation. The impacts of variation in transport and thermophysical characteristics model of gas mixture on thermal performance of porous media receiver are investigated. The transport and thermophysical characteristics models which are not included in software Fluent are programmed by user defined functions (UDFs). The numerical results indicate that models of momentum source term for porous media receiver have significant impact on pressure drop and static pressure distribution, and the radiative heat transfer cannot be omitted during the thermal performance analysis of porous media receiver

  13. User Guide for VISION 3.4.7 (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Wendell D. Hintze

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters and options; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation or disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft Excel input files, a Powersim Studio core, and several Microsoft Excel output files. All must be co-located in the same folder on a PC to function. You must use Powersim Studio 8 or better. We have tested VISION with the Studio 8 Expert, Executive, and Education versions

  14. Modeling Cold Start in a Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Ryan James

    Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are electrochemical devices that create electricity by consuming hydrogen and oxygen, forming water and heat as byproducts. PEFCs have been proposed for use in applications that may require start-up in environments with temperatures below 0 degrees C. Doing so requires that the cell heat up, and when its own waste heat is used to do so, the process is referred to here as "cold start.'' However, at low temperatures the cell's product water freezes, and if the temperature does not rise fast enough, the accumulation of ice in the cathode catalyst layer (cCL) can reduce cell performance significantly, extending the time required to heat up. In addition to reducing performance during cold start, under some conditions the accumulation of ice can lead to irreversible structural degradation of the cCL. The objective of this dissertation is to construct and verify a cold-start model for a single PEFC, use it to improve understanding of cold-start behavior, and to demonstrate how this understanding can lead to better start protocols and material properties. The macrohomogeneous model that has been developed to meet the objective is two-dimensional, transient, and nonisothermal. A key differentiating feature is the inclusion of water in all four of the possible phases: ice, liquid, gas, and membrane. In order to predict water content in the ice, liquid, and gas phases that are present in the porous media, the thermodynamics of phase equilibrium are revisited, and a method for relating phase pressures to water content in each of these phases is developed. Verification of the model is performed by comparing model predictions for cell behavior during parametric studies to measured values taken from various sources. In most cases, good agreement is observed between the model and the experiments. Results from the simulations are used to explain the trends that are observed. The verified cold-start model is deployed to determine a cold

  15. State-of-the-Art Report on Multi-scale Modelling of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.J.; Dingreville, R.; Littlewood, D.; Tikare, V.; Bertolus, M.; Blanc, V.; Bouineau, V.; Carlot, G.; Desgranges, C.; Dorado, B.; Dumas, J.C.; Freyss, M.; Garcia, P.; Gatt, J.M.; Gueneau, C.; Julien, J.; Maillard, S.; Martin, G.; Masson, R.; Michel, B.; Piron, J.P.; Sabathier, C.; Skorek, R.; Toffolon, C.; Valot, C.; Van Brutzel, L.; Besmann, Theodore M.; Chernatynskiy, A.; Clarno, K.; Gorti, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, B.; Devanathan, R.; Dumont, M.; Maugis, P.; El-Azab, A.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Krack, M.; Yun, Y.; Kurata, M.; Kurosaki, K.; Largenton, R.; Lebensohn, R.A.; Malerba, L.; Oh, J.Y.; Phillpot, S.R.; Tulenko, J. S.; Rachid, J.; Stan, M.; Sundman, B.; Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Van Uffelen, P.; Welland, M.J.; Valot, Carole; Stan, Marius; Massara, Simone; Tarsi, Reka

    2015-10-01

    The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has undertaken an ambitious programme to document state-of-the-art of modelling for nuclear fuels and structural materials. The project is being performed under the Working Party on Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Material for Nuclear Systems (WPMM), which has been established to assess the scientific and engineering aspects of fuels and structural materials, describing multi-scale models and simulations as validated predictive tools for the design of nuclear systems, fuel fabrication and performance. The WPMM's objective is to promote the exchange of information on models and simulations of nuclear materials, theoretical and computational methods, experimental validation and related topics. It also provides member countries with up-to-date information, shared data, models, and expertise. The goal is also to assess needs for improvement and address them by initiating joint efforts. The WPMM reviews and evaluates multi-scale modelling and simulation techniques currently employed in the selection of materials used in nuclear systems. It serves to provide advice to the nuclear community on the developments needed to meet the requirements of modelling for the design of different nuclear systems. The original WPMM mandate had three components (Figure 1), with the first component currently completed, delivering a report on the state-of-the-art of modelling of structural materials. The work on modelling was performed by three expert groups, one each on Multi-Scale Modelling Methods (M3), Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels (M2F) and Structural Materials Modelling (SMM). WPMM is now composed of three expert groups and two task forces providing contributions on multi-scale methods, modelling of fuels and modelling of structural materials. This structure will be retained, with the addition of task forces as new topics are developed. The mandate of the Expert Group on Multi-Scale Modelling of

  16. Simplified Modeling of Tropospheric Ozone Formation Considering Alternative Fuels Using

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Aragão Ferreira da Silva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian cities have been constantly exposed to air quality episodes of high ozone concentrations (O3 . Known for not be emitted directly into the environment, O3 is a result of several chemical reactions of other pollutants emitted to atmosphere. The growth of vehicle fleet and government incentives for using alternative fuels like ethanol and Compressed Natural Gas (CNG are changing the Brazilian Metropolitan Areas in terms of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde emissions, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's present in the atmosphere and known to act on the kinetics of ozone. Driven by high concentrations of tropospheric ozone in urban/industry centers and its implications for environment and population health, the target of this work is understand the kinetics of ozone formation through the creation of a mathematical model in FORTRAN 90, describing a system of coupled ordinary differential equations able to represent a simplified mechanism of photochemical reactions in the Brazilian Metropolitan Area. Evaluating the concentration results of each pollutant were possible to observe the precursor’s influence on tropospheric ozone formation, which seasons were more conducive to this one and which are the influences of weather conditions on formation of photochemical smog.

  17. Modeling and Analysis of FCM UN TRISO Fuel Using the PARFUME Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise Collin

    2013-09-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl) modeling code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel in the frame of the design and development of Fully Ceramic Matrix (FCM) fuel. A specific modeling of a TRISO particle with UN kernel was developed with PARFUME, and its behavior was assessed in irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The calculations were used to access the dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn-up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn-up. These material properties are unknown at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, more effort is needed to determine them and positively conclude on the applicability of FCM fuel to LWRs.

  18. Progress in core and fuel modelling to calculate severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, M.; Baldi, St.; Porta, J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of CERMET type composite fuels lead to a correct use of plutonium; a good thermomechanical behaviour due to a low operating temperature thanks to a high thermo-conductivity, that favours high burn-up due to the low fission gas release. However, the increase in the metallic mass, an alloy of zircaloy in the core, as well as the composite nature of the fuel with two very different melting temperatures (∼ 1,600 deg C for the metal, and 2,300 deg C for the ceramic) lead to a behaviour very different from that of the traditional ceramic fuel in the event of an accident. (authors)

  19. Experimental irradiation of UMo fuel: Pie results and modeling of fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.; Plancq, D.; Huet, F.; Guigon, B.; Lemoine, P.; Sacristan, P.; Hofman, G.; Snelgrove, J.; Rest, J.; Hayes, S.; Meyer, M.; Vacelet, H.; Leborgne, E.; Dassel, G.

    2002-01-01

    Seven full-sized U Mo plates containing ca. 8 g/cm 3 of uranium in the fuel meat have been irradiated since the beginning of the French U Mo development program. The first three of them with 20% 235 U enrichment were irradiated at maximum surfacic power under 150 W/cm 2 in the OSIRIS reactor up to 50% burn-up and are under examination. Their global behaviour is satisfactory: no failure and a low swelling. The other four plates were irradiated in the HFR Petten at maximum surfacic power between 150 and 250 W/cm 2 with two enrichments 20 and 35%. The experiment was stopped after two cycles due to a fuel failure. The post- irradiation examinations were completed in 2001 in Petten. Examinations showed a correct behaviour of 20% enriched plates and an abnormal behaviour of the two other plates (35%-enriched) with a clad failure on the plate 4. The fuel failure appears to result from a combination of factors that led to high corrosion cladding and high fuel meat temperatures. (author)

  20. Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA's ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems

  1. Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA`s ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems.

  2. A fission gas release model for MOX fuel and its verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Y.H.; Sohn, D.S.; Strijov, P.

    2000-01-01

    A fission gas release model for MOX fuel has been developed based on a model for UO 2 fuel. Using the concept of equivalent cell, the model considers the uneven distribution of Pu within the fuel matrix and a number of Pu-rich particles that could lead to a non-uniform fission rate and fission gas distribution across the fuel pellet. The model has been incorporated into a code, COSMOS, and some parametric studies were made to analyze the effect of the size and Pu content of Pu-rich agglomerates. The model was then applied to the experimental data obtained from the FIGARO program, which consisted of the base irradiation of MOX fuels in the BEZNAU-1 PWR and the subsequent irradiation of four refabricated fuel segments in the Halden reactor. The calculated gas releases show good agreement with the measured ones. In addition, the present analysis indicates that the microstructure of the MOX fuel used in the FIGARO program is such that it has produced little difference in terms of gas release compared with UO 2 fuel. (author)

  3. Identifying the European fossil fuel plumes in the atmosphere over the Northeast Atlantic Region through isotopic observations and numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geels, C.; Christensen, J.H.; Hansen, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric transport, C-14. fossil fuel CO_2, numerical modeling, the north East Atlantic Region Udgivelsesdato: 18 August......Atmospheric transport, C-14. fossil fuel CO_2, numerical modeling, the north East Atlantic Region Udgivelsesdato: 18 August...

  4. Modelling of Water Cooled Fuel Including Design Basis and Severe Accidents. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    The demands on nuclear fuel have recently been increasing, and include transient regimes, higher discharge burnup and longer fuel cycles. This has resulted in an increase of loads on fuel and core internals. In order to satisfy these demands while ensuring compliance with safety criteria, new national and international programmes have been launched and advanced modelling codes are being developed. The Fukushima Daiichi accident has particularly demonstrated the need for adequate analysis of all aspects of fuel performance to prevent a failure and also to predict fuel behaviour were an accident to occur.This publication presents the Proceedings of the Technical Meeting on Modelling of Water Cooled Fuel Including Design Basis and Severe Accidents, which was hosted by the Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC) in Chengdu, China, following the recommendation made in 2013 at the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology. This recommendation was in agreement with IAEA mid-term initiatives, linked to the post-Fukushima IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan, as well as the forthcoming Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Fuel Modelling in Accident Conditions. At the technical meeting in Chengdu, major areas and physical phenomena, as well as types of code and experiment to be studied and used in the CRP, were discussed. The technical meeting provided a forum for international experts to review the state of the art of code development for modelling fuel performance of nuclear fuel for water cooled reactors with regard to steady state and transient conditions, and for design basis and early phases of severe accidents, including experimental support for code validation. A round table discussion focused on the needs and perspectives on fuel modelling in accident conditions. This meeting was the ninth in a series of IAEA meetings, which reflects Member States’ continuing interest in nuclear fuel issues. The previous meetings were held in 1980 (jointly with

  5. A comparative Thermal Analysis of conventional parabolic receiver tube and Cavity model tube in a Solar Parabolic Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S.; Ramakrishna, P.; Sangavi, S.

    2018-02-01

    Improvements in heating technology with solar energy is gaining focus, especially solar parabolic collectors. Solar heating in conventional parabolic collectors is done with the help of radiation concentration on receiver tubes. Conventional receiver tubes are open to atmosphere and loose heat by ambient air currents. In order to reduce the convection losses and also to improve the aperture area, we designed a tube with cavity. This study is a comparative performance behaviour of conventional tube and cavity model tube. The performance formulae were derived for the cavity model based on conventional model. Reduction in overall heat loss coefficient was observed for cavity model, though collector heat removal factor and collector efficiency were nearly same for both models. Improvement in efficiency was also observed in the cavity model’s performance. The approach towards the design of a cavity model tube as the receiver tube in solar parabolic collectors gave improved results and proved as a good consideration.

  6. Combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame; Modelisation de la combustion d`une flamme de fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flour, I.; Mechitouan, N.

    1996-10-01

    The combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame has been realised in the scope of the R and D `Combustion Turbines`. This report presents the results of the 2D simulation of a fuel oil flame (n-octane), at atmospherical pressure, without swirl, realised using the Eulerian two-phase flow software Melodif. This calculation has been defined in collaboration with IFP, using experimental data from the IFRP. The hollow cone spray of liquid fuel is injected in the middle of the combustion chamber, with a co-flowing annular air. The furnace diameter is 2 meter and its length is 6,25 meter. A large recirculation zone is induced by the air flow, and leads to take into account the whole furnace, in order to avoid some problems with the limit conditions at the outlet. This calculation deals with droplets evaporation, gaseous phase combustion and radiation heat transfer. Predictions concerning gaseous axial mean velocity and mean temperature gradient in the flame, are in good agreement with measurements. However the temperature is too low in the peripheral zone of the flow. This is probably due to the fact that heat exchanges at the wall furnace are not correctly represented, because of a lack of detailed limit conditions for the walls. The mean radial velocity is not so well predicted, but this measurement is also quite difficult in a strongly longitudinal flow. The results concerning the dispersed phase will not be compared, because no measurements on the liquid fuel were available. As it has been experimentally observed, the simulation shows that the fuel oil spray quickly evaporates as it enters the combustion chamber. This result allows to propose to use an homogeneous approach (hypothesis of no-slipping between the two phases) in an Eulerian one-phase flow code, in case of a 3D simulation of liquid fuel turbine. (authors)

  7. A model for predicting skin dose received by patients from an x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient dosimetry has raised concern on quality assurance in hospitals. Several organisations and research groups have been advocating ways of minimising radiation dose received by patients in hospitals. In this paper we have shown that it is possible to obtain in a simple way a reasonable estimate of skin dose received ...

  8. Field Measurement and Calibration of HDM-4 Fuel Consumption Model on Interstate Highway in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fuel consumptions are measured by operating passenger car and tractor-trailer on two interstate roadway sites in Florida. Each site contains flexible pavement and rigid pavement with similar pavement, traffic and environmental condition. Field test reveals that the average fuel consumption differences between vehicle operating on flexible pavement and rigid pavement at given test condition are 4.04% for tractor-trailer and 2.50% for passenger car, with a fuel saving on rigid pavement. The fuel consumption differences are found statistically significant at 95% confidence level for both vehicle types. Test data are then used to calibrate the Highway Development and Management IV (HDM-4 fuel consumption model and model coefficients are obtained for three sets of observations. Field measurement and prediction by calibrated model shows generally good agreement. Nevertheless, verification and adjustment with more experiment or data sources would be expected in future studies.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Eddy Current Probes for CANDU RTM Fuel Channel Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luloff, Mark Stephen

    Multi-frequency Eddy Current (EC) inspection with a transmit-receive probe (two horizontally offset coils) is used to monitor the Pressure Tube (PT) to Calandria Tube (CT) gap of CANDU fuel channels. Accurate gap measurements are crucial to ensure fitness of service; however, variations in probe liftoff, PT electrical resistivity, and PT wall thickness can generate systematic measurement errors. Validated mathematical models of the EC probe are very useful for data interpretation, and may improve the gap measurement under inspection conditions where these parameters vary. As a first step, exact solutions for the electromagnetic response of a transmit-receive coil pair situated above two parallel plates separated by an air gap were developed. This model was validated against experimental data with flat-plate samples. Finite element method models revealed that this geometrical approximation could not accurately match experimental data with real tubes, so analytical solutions for the probe in a double-walled pipe (the CANDU fuel channel geometry) were generated using the Second-Order Vector Potential (SOVP) formalism. All electromagnetic coupling coefficients arising from the probe, and the layered conductors were determined and substituted into Kirchhoff's circuit equations for the calculation of the pickup coil signal. The flat-plate model was used as a basis for an Inverse Algorithm (IA) to simultaneously extract the relevant experimental parameters from EC data. The IA was validated over a large range of second layer plate resistivities (1.7 to 174 plate, microO·cm) wall thickness ( 1 to 4.9 mm), probe liftoff ( 2 mm to 8 mm), and plate-to plate gap ( 0 mm to 13 mm). The IA achieved a relative error of less than 6% for the extracted FP resistivity and an accuracy of +/-0.1 mm for the LO measurement. The IA was able to achieve a plate gap measurement with an accuracy of less than +/-0.7 mm error over a 2.4 mm to 7.5 mm probe liftoff and +/-0.3 mm at nominal

  10. Fuel requirements for experimental devices in MTR reactors. A perturbation model for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation in neutron absorbing devices, requiring high fast neutron fluxes in the core or high thermal fluxes in the reflector and flux traps, lead to higher density fuel and larger core dimensions. A perturbation model of the reactor core helps to estimate the fuel requirements. (orig.)

  11. Fuel load modeling from mensuration attributes in temperate forests in northern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricela Morales-Soto; Marín Pompa-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    The study of fuels is an important factor in defining the vulnerability of ecosystems to forest fires. The aim of this study was to model a dead fuel load based on forest mensuration attributes from forest management inventories. A scatter plot analysis was performed and, from explanatory trends between the variables considered, correlation analysis was carried out...

  12. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...

  13. Generation of Comprehensive Surrogate Kinetic Models and Validation Databases for Simulating Large Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    counterflow burner, a vaporization system, flow controllers, an online Fourier transform infrared ( FTIR ) spectrometer, and a laser induced fluorescence...plane Laser sheet for LIF Air Heater Heater N2 Fuel Atomization & evaporation Temperature measurements 59 vaporizing temperature, an FTIR ...amounts of indene being formed. The model simulates the fuel decay and formation of most of the intermediates accurately for all the experimental data

  14. An approach for modelling CANDU Fuel string vibration induced by unsteady flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadaee, M.; Yu, S.D., E-mail: mofadaee@ryerson.ca, E-mail: syu@ryerson.ca [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive dynamical model is presented in this paper to handle vibration a string of 12 CANDU6 fuel bundles inside a pressure tube under operating conditions. A finite element based computer program is developed at Ryerson University in collaboration with Candu Energy Inc. to simulate fuel string vibration and vibration induced wear in the pressure tube. The focus of this paper is dynamic frictional contact among fuel elements via spacer pads, between fuel elements and the pressure tube via bearing pads, and between neighboring fuel bundles via endplates. The types of deformations are bending, torsion and axial for the fuel elements, and in-plane and out-of-plane bending for the endplates. The system equations of motion are discretized in the time-domain by means of the Bozzak-Newmark scheme; the contact problem is handled using an iterative LCP algorithm. The unsteady flow and flow induced excitations are obtained using the FLUENT-LES. (author)

  15. Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO95) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources--wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. The RFM also reads in hydroelectric facility capacities and capacity factors from a data file for use by the NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM). The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological, cost and resource size characteristics of renewable energy technologies. These characteristics are used to compute a levelized cost to be competed against other similarly derived costs from other energy sources and technologies. The competition of these energy sources over the NEMS time horizon determines the market penetration of these renewable energy technologies. The characteristics include available energy capacity, capital costs, fixed operating costs, variable operating costs, capacity factor, heat rate, construction lead time, and fuel product price.

  16. Modeling of a HTPEM fuel cell using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Sahlin, Simon Lennart

    2015-01-01

    In this work an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model of the voltage of a fuel cell is developed. The inputs of this model are the fuel cell temperature, current density and the carbon monoxide concentration of the anode supply gas. First an identification experiment which spans the...... between performance and fast model evaluation. This model has a mean absolute error of 0.70%. It is concluded that the developed ANFIS model is suitable for optimization of fuel cell systems and as the steady state component in larger dynamic system models.......In this work an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model of the voltage of a fuel cell is developed. The inputs of this model are the fuel cell temperature, current density and the carbon monoxide concentration of the anode supply gas. First an identification experiment which spans...... the expected operating range of the fuel cell is performed in a test station. The data from this experiment is then used to train ANFIS models with 2, 3, 4 and 5 membership functions. The performance of these models is then compared and it is found that using 3 membership functions provides the best compromise...

  17. Fuel Used for Off-Road Recreation: A Reassessment of the Fuel Use Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.; Hu, P.S.

    1999-07-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA required that certain tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-road recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Funds to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual States equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1993 to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-road recreation in the State level by different vehicle types. A modification of the methodology developed by ORNL has been used to apportion funds to the States since that time.

  18. Bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2013-01-01

    Because of the complexity to describe and solve thermo-chemical processes occurring in a fuel bed in grate-fired boiler, it is often necessary to simplify the process and use modeling techniques based on overall mass, energy and species conservation. A comparison between two numerical models...... to describe the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. In this work both models consider the incoming solid fuel as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed is treated as a 0D system, but the thermo...

  19. Development of an analytical model to assess fuel property effects on combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized first-order computer model has been developed in order to analytically evaluate the potential effect of alternative fuels' effects on gas turbine combustors. The model assesses the size, configuration, combustion reliability, and durability of the combustors required to meet performance and emission standards while operating on a broad range of fuels. Predictions predicated on combustor flow-field determinations by the model indicate that fuel chemistry, as defined by hydrogen content, exerts a significant influence on flame retardation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission.

  20. Development of a Model and Localization Algorithm for Received Signal Strength-Based Geolocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    power at the sth receiver from the mth transmitter. Ems = ( P0d η 0 ds(ẑm)η ) (4.21) where P0 is the transmit power, d0 is the close-in reference...distance generally taken to be one, ds(ẑm) is the distance from the estimated location of the mth transmitter to the sth receiver. Step 3 Normalize the...current estimate derived in Step 1 determine the expected RSS power at the sth receiver from the mth transmitter Ems = ( P0d η 0 ds(ẑm)η ) , (5.36) where

  1. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  2. Overall models and experimental database for UO2 and MOX fuel increasing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Blanpain, P.

    2001-01-01

    COPERNIC is an advanced fuel rod performance code developed by Framatome. It is based on the TRANSURANUS code that contains a clear and flexible architecture, and offers many modeling possibilities. The main objectives of COPERNIC are to accurately predict steady-state and transient fuel operations at high burnups and to incorporate advanced materials such as the Framatome M5-alloy cladding. An extensive development program was undertaken to benchmark the code to very high burnups and to new M5-alloy cladding data. New models were developed for the M5-alloy cladding and the COPERNIC thermal models were upgraded and improved to extend the predictions to burnups over 100 GWd/tM. Since key phenomena, like fission gas release, are strongly temperature dependent, many other models were upgraded also. The COPERNIC qualification range extends to 67, 55, 53 GWd/tM respectively for UO 2 , UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 , and MOX fuels with Zircaloy-4 claddings. The range extends to 63 GWd/tM with UO 2 fuel and the advanced M5-alloy cladding. The paper focuses on thermal and fission gas release models, and on MOX fuel modeling. The COPERNIC thermal model consists of several submodels: gap conductance, gap closure, fuel thermal conductivity, radial power profile, and fuel rim. The fuel thermal conductivity and the gap closure models, in particular, have been significantly improved. The model was benchmarked with 3400 fuel centerline temperature data from many French and international programs. There are no measured to predicted statistical biases with respect to linear heat generation rate or burnup. The overall quality of the model is state-of-the-art as the model uncertainty is below 10 %. The fission gas release takes into account athermal and thermally activated mechanisms. The model was adapted to MOX and Gadolinia fuels. For the heterogeneous MOX MIMAS fuels, an effective burnup is used for the incubation threshold. For gadolinia fuels, a scaled temperature effect is used. The

  3. 11. International conference on WWER fuel performance, modelling and experimental support. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.; Boneva, S.; Mitev, M.

    2015-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented in 11th International Conference on WWER Fuel Performance, Modeling and Experimental Support, organized by the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, supported by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), the Bulgarian Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and TVEL Fuel Company, Russia. The Conference took place in hotel Bolero, Golden Sands Resort, Bulgaria, from 26 September 2015 to 3 October 2015. It was attended by 117 participants, among them more than 100 experts and specialists from 22 countries, including representatives of 3 international organizations, 16 Russian organizations and other 36 foreign institutes, nuclear fuel plants, nuclear power plants and organizations responsible for WWER and PWR fuel design, manufacturing and research, and 3 Bulgarian organizations, working for the Bulgarian nuclear industry. 70 papers have been presented in the Conference in 6 oral and 1 poster session, covering: (1) general overview lectures; (2) fuel performance and operational experience; (3) fuel modeling and experimental support; (4) fuel safety and QA; (5) spent fuel performance and management; (6) specific issues of WWER-1000 fuel reliability. The proceedings provide Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations of the Conference, together with the full text of the presentations. IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) “Achieving zero fuel failure rates: challenges and perspectives”, 1 – 2 October 2015 was organized in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on WWER Fuel Performance, Modelling and Experimental Support. The reports presented on TM sessions are included in the Conference Proceedings too

  4. Permeability of EVOH Barrier Material Used in Automotive Applications: Metrology Development for Model Fuel Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EVOH (Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol materials are widely used in automotive applications in multi-layer fuel lines and tanks owing to their excellent barrier properties to aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These barrier materials are essential to limit environmental fuel emissions and comply with the challenging requirements of fast changing international regulations. Nevertheless, the measurement of EVOH permeability to model fuel mixtures or to their individual components is particularly difficult due to the complexity of these systems and their very low permeability, which can vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the permeating species and their relative concentrations. This paper describes the development of a new automated permeameter capable of taking up the challenge of measuring minute quantities as low as 1 mg/(m2.day for partial fluxes for model fuel mixtures containing ethanol, i-octane and toluene at 50°C. The permeability results are discussed as a function of the model fuel composition and the importance of EVOH preconditioning is emphasized for accurate permeability measurements. The last part focuses on the influence of EVOH conditioning on its mechanical properties and its microstructure, and further illustrates the specific behavior of EVOH in presence of ethanol oxygenated fuels. The new metrology developed in this work offers a new insight in the permeability properties of a leading barrier material and will help prevent the consequences of (bioethanol addition in fuels on environmental emissions through fuel lines and tanks.

  5. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Books Received. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 118-118 Books Received. Books Received · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 120-120 Books Received. Books Received.

  6. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerden, James L., E-mail: jerden@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Frey, Kurt [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ebert, William [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • This model accounts for chemistry, temperature, radiolysis, U(VI) minerals, and hydrogen effect. • The hydrogen effect dominates processes determining spent fuel dissolution rate. • The hydrogen effect protects uranium oxide spent fuel from oxidative dissolution. - Abstract: The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO{sub 2} and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO{sub 2} and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO{sub 2} and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit

  7. Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

  8. Modelling of the fuel mechanical behavior: from creep laws to internal variable models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, S.

    1998-01-01

    Creep laws such as that of Bohaboy are commonly used to simulate the fuel pellet response to the demands placed upon it during its use. These laws are sufficient for describing the base operating conditions (where only creep appears), but they require improvement for describing power ramp conditions (where hardening and relaxation appear). The aim of the present paper is to develop a framework in which it will be possible to build models that are more representative of the fuel pellet in pile conditions. The approach presented here is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and continuum mechanics. It is postulated that the material is made of a mixture of porous and 'sound' material. The evolution of porosity is deduced from experimental results in order to be consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. This implies the assumption of a threshold value for the existence of densification and swelling. (orig.)

  9. Using a prescribed fire to test custom and standard fuel models for fire behaviour prediction in a non-native, grass-invaded tropical dry shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Pierce; Sierra McDaniel; Mark Wasser; Alison Ainsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Susan Cordell; Ralf Ohlemuller

    2014-01-01

    Questions: Do fuel models developed for North American fuel types accurately represent fuel beds found in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Do standard or custom fuel models for firebehavior models with in situ or RAWS measured fuel moistures affect the accuracy of predicted fire behavior in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Location: Hawai’i Volcanoes National...

  10. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  11. A Study on the Development of Simplified Fuel Assembly SSE/LOCA Analysis Model using Optimization Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyou Seok; Jeon, Sang Youn; Kim, Hyeong Koo

    2009-01-01

    Under the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) and Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) events, the fuel assembly deflection and impact force between fuel assemblies are obtained by the dynamic transient analysis for the reactor core model. The impact behavior between fuel assemblies shows non-linear characteristics, because fuel assembly shows non-linearly dynamic characteristics and its geometry is complicated. Furthermore, since a reactor core consists of a large number of fuel assemblies, the dynamic behavior of the core under the postulated events is very difficult to analyze. Therefore, it is necessary that fuel assembly model be simplified considering dynamic non-linear characteristics in core analysis. In this study, a simplified fuel assembly finite element model for 17 Type RFA has been developed using optimization technique. To obtain the simplified model, the optimization algorithm of ANSYS was used, and the model was verified by comparison with fuel assembly mechanical test results

  12. A Study on the Development of Simplified Fuel Assembly SSE/LOCA Analysis Model using Optimization Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyou Seok; Jeon, Sang Youn; Kim, Hyeong Koo [Korea Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Under the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) and Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) events, the fuel assembly deflection and impact force between fuel assemblies are obtained by the dynamic transient analysis for the reactor core model. The impact behavior between fuel assemblies shows non-linear characteristics, because fuel assembly shows non-linearly dynamic characteristics and its geometry is complicated. Furthermore, since a reactor core consists of a large number of fuel assemblies, the dynamic behavior of the core under the postulated events is very difficult to analyze. Therefore, it is necessary that fuel assembly model be simplified considering dynamic non-linear characteristics in core analysis. In this study, a simplified fuel assembly finite element model for 17 Type RFA has been developed using optimization technique. To obtain the simplified model, the optimization algorithm of ANSYS was used, and the model was verified by comparison with fuel assembly mechanical test results.

  13. Fuel switching in power-plants: Modelling and impact on the analysis of energy projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varympopiotis, G.; Tolis, A.; Rentizelas, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The impact of fuel-switching in electricity generation is researched. • 15 Scenarios of fuel-technology combinations are compared using a computational model. • Fuel-switching results to higher yields compared to single-fuelled plants. • Plants with natural gas combined cycle and solid fuel supercritical boilers are optimal. • Fuel-switching, offers higher flexibility and security of fuel supply. - Abstract: In electricity markets, where conditions are uncertain, the choice of the best technology and the optimisation of production processes may not anymore be enough to ensure optimal investment yield of energy business plans. Providing some aspects of flexibility might enhance their financial performance; fuel switching may prove to be an alternative option, offering operational flexibility over time, as well as significant financial benefits. Traditional investment analysis methods are considered marginally useful to analyse this case. Instead, the recent tools of time-dependent investment analysis are more appropriate, since they are not inherently restricted to immediate, irreversible decisions. In the present work, a time-dependent computational model is presented and applied in the case study of the Greek Power Sector, in order to estimate the potential advantages of the fuel switching concept. Moreover, the optimal timing of switching is derived, to ensure increasing yields of an average-capacity power-plant. The results of the research indicate significant financial benefits anticipated in most scenarios from applying fuel switching, compared to single-fuelled electricity generation units. Security of fuel supply and enhanced flexibility may also be offered to the power plant since more than one technology and fuels may be engaged

  14. SAFARI 2000 Modeled Fuel Load in Southern Africa, 1999-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains global, spatially explicit (1 km2 grid cells) and temporally explicit (semi-monthly) modeled output of fuel loads over southern Africa. The...

  15. FY17 Progress in Modeling of Lanthanide Transport in Metallic Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-19

    A critical review of fuel-clad-chemical interactions along with modelling requirements is published. The mechanism of lanthanide transport is studied experimentally (NEUP collaboration) and using simulations and initial results are published in Refs.

  16. SAFARI 2000 Modeled Fuel Load in Southern Africa, 1999-2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains global, spatially explicit (1 km2 grid cells) and temporally explicit (semi-monthly) modeled output of fuel loads over southern...

  17. Finite element analysis model development and static strength analysis for CANDU-6 reactor fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Suk, Ho Chun

    2000-12-01

    A static and finite-element (FE) analysis model was developed to simulate out-reactor fuel string strength tests with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model takes into account the deflection of fuel elements and stress and displacement in end-plates subjected to hydraulic drag loads. It was adapted to the strength tests performed for CANFLEX 43-element bundles and the existing 37-element bundles. The FE model was found to be in good agreement with the experiment results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the fuel bundle strings, such as load transfer between ring elements, end-plate rib effects, hydraulic drag load incurring plastic deformation in fuel string and hydraulic flow rate effects were investigated.

  18. Current status of the FASTGRASS/PARAGRASS models for fission product release from LWR fuel during normal and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Zawadski, S.A.; Piasecka, M.

    1983-10-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS model for the prediction of the behavior of the gaseous and volatile fission products in nuclear fuels under normal and transient conditions has undergone substantial improvements. The major improvements have been in the atomistic and bubble diffusive flow models, in the models for the behavior of gas bubbles on grain surfaces, and in the models for the behavior of the volatile fission products iodine and cesium. The thoery has received extensive verification over a wide range of fuel operating conditions, and can be regarded as a state-of-the-art model based on our current level of understanding of fission product behavior. PARAGRASS is an extremely efficient, mechanistic computer code with the capability of modeling steady-state and transient fission-product behavior. The models in PARAGRASS are based on the more detailed ones in FASTGRASS. PARAGRASS updates for the FRAPCON (PNL), FRAP-T (INEL), and SCDAP (INEL) codes have recently been completed and implemented. Results from an extensive FASTGRASS verification are presented and discussed for steady-state and transient conditions. In addition, FASTGRASS predictions for fission product release rate constants are compared with those in NUREG-0772. 21 references, 13 figures

  19. Forecasting production of fossil fuel sources in Turkey using a comparative regression and ARIMA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ediger, Volkan S.; Akar, Sertac; Ugurlu, Berkin

    2006-01-01

    This study aims at forecasting the most possible curve for domestic fossil fuel production of Turkey to help policy makers to develop policy implications for rapidly growing dependency problem on imported fossil fuels. The fossil fuel dependency problem is international in scope and context and Turkey is a typical example for emerging energy markets of the developing world. We developed a decision support system for forecasting fossil fuel production by applying a regression, ARIMA and SARIMA method to the historical data from 1950 to 2003 in a comparative manner. The method integrates each model by using some decision parameters related to goodness-of-fit and confidence interval, behavior of the curve, and reserves. Different forecasting models are proposed for different fossil fuel types. The best result is obtained for oil since the reserve classifications used it is much better defined them for the others. Our findings show that the fossil fuel production peak has already been reached; indicating the total fossil fuel production of the country will diminish and theoretically will end in 2038. However, production is expected to end in 2019 for hard coal, in 2024 for natural gas, in 2029 for oil and 2031 for asphaltite. The gap between the fossil fuel consumption and production is growing enormously and it reaches in 2030 to approximately twice of what it is in 2000

  20. A model for fuel shuffling and burnable absorbers optimization in low leakage PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear model for the simultaneous optimization of fuel shuffling and burnable absorbers in PWRs is formulated using the depletion perturbation theory. The sensitivity coefficients are defined in a new way, using a macroscopic burnup model coupled with the explicit burnable absorbers depletion equation. Since first-order perturbation theory is limited to small changes in burnable absorber concentration, the associated control variable is continuous, with a constraint on maximal increment. Fuel shuffling is described by Boolean variables. Thus a special case of a mixed-integer quadratic programming problem is obtained, since the interaction of fuel and absorber optimization is considered. (author)

  1. Model for the calculation of pressure loss through heavy fuel oil transfer pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luis Laurencio-Alfonso,

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the limitations of methodologies and empirical correlations in the evaluation of simultaneous effects produced by viscous and mix strength during the transfer of fluids through pipelines, this article presents the functional relationships that describe the pressure variations for the non-Newtonian fuel oil flowrate. The experimental study was conducted based on a characterization of the rheological behavior of fuel oil and modeling for a pseudoplastic behavior. The resulting model describes temperature changes, viscous friction effects and the effects of blending flow layers; which is therefore the basis of calculation for the selection, evaluation and rationalization of transport of heavy fuel oil by pipelines.

  2. On-Road Validation of a Simplified Model for Estimating Real-World Fuel Economy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Eric; Gonder, Jeff; Jehlik, Forrest

    2017-01-01

    On-road fuel economy is known to vary significantly between individual trips in real-world driving conditions. This work introduces a methodology for rapidly simulating a specific vehicle's fuel economy over the wide range of real-world conditions experienced across the country. On-road test data collected using a highly instrumented vehicle is used to refine and validate this modeling approach. Model accuracy relative to on-road data collection is relevant to the estimation of 'off-cycle credits' that compensate for real-world fuel economy benefits that are not observed during certification testing on a chassis dynamometer.

  3. Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model (VT-CPFM: Model Validation and Calibration Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A power-based vehicle fuel consumption model, entitled the Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model (VT-CPFM that was developed in an earlier publication is validated against in-field fuel consumption measurements. The study demonstrates that the VT-CPFMs calibrated using the EPA city and highway fuel economy ratings generally provide reliable fuel consumption estimates with a coefficient of determination in the range of 0.96. More importantly, both estimates and measurements produce very similar behavioral changes depending on engine load conditions. The VT-CPFMs are demonstrated to be easily calibrated using publically available data without the need to gather in-field instantaneous data.

  4. Model for the calculation of pressure loss through heavy fuel oil transfer pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Hector Luis Laurencio-Alfonso,; José Falcón-Hernández; Yoalbys Retirado-Mediaceja; Olga Pérez-Maliuk

    2012-01-01

    Considering the limitations of methodologies and empirical correlations in the evaluation of simultaneous effects produced by viscous and mix strength during the transfer of fluids through pipelines, this article presents the functional relationships that describe the pressure variations for the non-Newtonian fuel oil flowrate. The experimental study was conducted based on a characterization of the rheological behavior of fuel oil and modeling for a pseudoplastic behavior. The resulting model...

  5. An earthquake transient method for pebble-bed reactors and a fuel temperature model for TRISO fueled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Javier

    This investigation is divided into two general topics: (1) a new method for analyzing the safe shutdown earthquake event in a pebble bed reactor core, and (2) the development of an explicit tristructural-isotropic fuel model for high temperature reactors. The safe shutdown earthquake event is one of the design basis accidents for the pebble bed reactor. The new method captures the dynamic geometric compaction of the pebble bed core. The neutronic and thermal-fluids grids are dynamically re-meshed to simulate the re-arrangement of the pebbles in the reactor during the earthquake. Results are shown for the PBMR-400 assuming it is subjected to the Idaho National Laboratory's design basis earthquake. The study concludes that the PBMR-400 can safely withstand the reactivity insertions induced by the slumping of the core and the resulting relative withdrawal of the control rods. This characteristic stems from the large negative Doppler feedback of the fuel. This Doppler feedback mechanism is a major contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors that use fuel based on TRISO particles. The correct prediction of the magnitude and time-dependence of this feedback effect is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed in this work and incorporated in the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with more complex methods, requiring multi-TRISO calculations within one control volume. The performance of the code during fast and moderately-slow transients is verified. These analyses show how explicit TRISO models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature, and consequently, of the power escalation. In addition, a brief study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap inside the TRISO particles is included

  6. Constructing COMSOL Models of a Bacteriological Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Robert; Mansell, James

    2012-01-01

    We show very initial work on a specific bioelectrochemical system (BES), a bacteriologically driven 'fuel cell' (BFS), that is intended to process waste products, such as CO2 and brine. (1) Processing is the priority, not power generation (2) Really a Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC)

  7. Modelling of radiation field around spent fuel container

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kryuchkov, EF; Opalovsky, VA; Tikhomirov, GV

    2005-01-01

    Operation of nuclear reactors leads to the production of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). There are two basic strategies of SNF management: ultimate disposal of SNF in geological formations and recycle or repeated utilisation of reprocessed SNF. In both options, there is an urgent necessity to study

  8. Modeled forest inventory data suggest climate benefits from fuels management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremy S. Fried; Theresa B. Jain; Jonathan. Sandquist

    2013-01-01

    As part of a recent synthesis addressing fuel management in dry, mixed-conifer forests we analyzed more than 5,000 Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots, a probability sample that represents 33 million acres of these forests throughout Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, and extreme northern California. We relied on the BioSum analysis framework that...

  9. A fuel consumption model for off-road use of mobile machinery in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van linden, Veerle; Herman, Lieve

    2014-01-01

    Until 2009, the annual reporting of emissions by off-road transport in agriculture in Belgium was based on a 1994 calculation model that needed to be updated. An energy consumption model was established for plant production in Belgium as a backbone for a new emission model. The model starts from agricultural activities involving off-road fuel consumption. Effects of soil type, tractor size, field size and machine load are modelled. Twenty-seven FCIs (fuel consumption indicators) were computed for plant production. FCIs are expressed per year and are used for emission estimates on a regional level. FCIs ranged from 37 to 311 L/ha. Sensitivity analysis showed the highest impact of tractor size with a surplus fuel consumption between 10 and 41% depending on the crop type. Fuel consumption (L) can be further processed into greenhouse gas emissions. FCIs can be adopted in LCA (life cycle assessment) studies. With ∼310 L/ha, orchards are most fuel intensive, followed by field vegetables and sugar beets (∼150 L/ha). The total off-road energy consumption of field vegetables is high because second cropping is a common practice. - Highlights: • An energy consumption model is proposed that is based on farming activities. • No statistical data on fuel consumption are required for the calculation. • The published FCIs can be adopted in LCA studies directly or as an allocation key

  10. Elementary kinetic modelling applied to solid oxide fuel cell pattern anodes and a direct flame fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Marcel

    2009-05-27

    In the course of this thesis a model for the prediction of polarisation characteristics of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was developed. The model is based on an elementary kinetic description of electrochemical reactions and the fundamental conservation principles of mass and energy. The model allows to predict the current-voltage relation of an SOFC and offers ideal possibilities for model validation. The aim of this thesis is the identification of rate-limiting processes and the determination of the elementary pathway during charge transfer. The numerical simulation of experiments with model anodes allowed to identify a hydrogen transfer to be the most probable charge-transfer reaction and revealed the influence of diffusive transport. Applying the hydrogen oxidation kinetics to the direct flame fuel cell system (DFFC) showed that electrochemical oxidation of CO is possible based on the same mechanism. Based on the quantification of loss processes in the DFFC system, improvements on cell design, predicting 80% increase of efficiency, were proposed. (orig.)

  11. Mechanistic modelling of gaseous fission product behaviour in UO2 fuel by Rtop code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanukova, V.D.; Khoruzhii, O.V.; Kourtchatov, S.Y.; Likhanskii, V.V.; Matveew, L.V.

    2002-01-01

    The current status of a mechanistic modelling by the RTOP code of the fission product behaviour in polycrystalline UO 2 fuel is described. An outline of the code and implemented physical models is presented. The general approach to code validation is discussed. It is exemplified by the results of validation of the models of fuel oxidation and grain growth. The different models of intragranular and intergranular gas bubble behaviour have been tested and the sensitivity of the code in the framework of these models has been analysed. An analysis of available models of the resolution of grain face bubbles is also presented. The possibilities of the RTOP code are presented through the example of modelling behaviour of WWER fuel over the course of a comparative WWER-PWR experiment performed at Halden and by comparison with Yanagisawa experiments. (author)

  12. Models for solid oxide fuel cell systems exploitation of models hierarchy for industrial design of control and diagnosis strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Marra, Dario; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Sorrentino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book presents methodologies for optimal design of control and diagnosis strategies for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell systems. A key feature of the methodologies presented is the exploitation of modelling tools that balance accuracy and computational burden.

  13. On the mixing model for calculating the temperature fields in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhin, V.I.; Zhukov, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    One of the alternatives of the mixing model applied for calculating temperature fields in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies,including the fuel assemblies with nonequilibrium energy-release in fuel element cross section, is consistently described. The equations for both constant and variable values of coolant density and heat capacity are obtained. The mixing model is based on a set of mass, heat and longitudinal momentum balance equations. This set is closed by the ratios connecting the unknown values for gaps between fuel elements with the averaged values for neighbouring channels. The ratios to close momentum and heat balance equations, explaining, in particular, the nonequivalent heat and mass, momentum and mass transfer coefficients, are suggested. The balance equations with variable coolant density and heat capacity are reduced to the form coinciding with those of the similar equations with constant values of these parameters. Application of one of the main ratios of the mixing model relating the coolant transverse overflow in the gaps between fuel elements to the averaged coolant rates (flow rates) in the neighbouring channels is mainly limited by the coolant stabilized flow in the fuel assemblies with regular symmetrical arrangement of elements. Mass transfer coefficients for these elements are experimentally determined. The ratio in the paper is also applicable for calculation of fuel assembly temperature fields with a small relative shift of elements

  14. Modelling of the Gadolinium Fuel Test IFA-681 using the BISON Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Novascone, Stephen Rhead [Idaho National Laboratory; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory; Williamson, Richard L [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    In this work, application of Idaho National Laboratory’s fuel performance code BISON to modelling of fuel rods from the Halden IFA-681 gadolinium fuel test is presented. First, an overview is given of BISON models, focusing on UO2/UO2-Gd2O3 fuel and Zircaloy cladding. Then, BISON analyses of selected fuel rods from the IFA-681 test are performed. For the first time in a BISON application to integral fuel rod simulations, the analysis is informed by detailed neutronics calculations in order to accurately capture the radial power profile throughout the fuel, which is strongly affected by the complex evolution of absorber Gd isotopes. In particular, radial power profiles calculated at IFE–Halden Reactor Project with the HELIOS code are used. The work has been carried out in the frame of the collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory and Halden Reactor Project. Some slide have been added as an Appendix to present the newly developed PolyPole-1 algorithm for modeling of intra-granular fission gas release.

  15. Image analysis and 2D/3D modeling of the MOX fuel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudinet, Ghislain

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of the MOX fuel, made with UO 2 and PuO 2 , determines his 'in pile' behavior. The french companies CEA and COGEMA are highly interested in its description by image analysis, which is the object of the present work. The segmentation algorithms described here use pictures issued from a microprobe and a SEM, to analyse the plutonium and porosity distribution in the fuel pellets. They are innovating, automated and robust enough to be used with a small data set. They have been successfully tested on different fuels, before and after irradiation. Three-dimensional informations have been computed with a genetic algorithm. The obtained 3D object size distributions allowed the modeling of many different industrial and research fuels. 3D reconstruction is accurate and stable, and provides a basis for different studies among which the study of the MOX fuel 'in pile' behavior. (author)

  16. Integrated modeling for optimized regional transportation with compressed natural gas fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam A. Gabbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transportation represents major energy consumption where fuel is considered as a primary energy source. Recent development in the vehicle technology revealed possible economical improvements when using natural gas as a fuel source instead of traditional gasoline. There are several fuel alternatives such as electricity, which showed potential for future long-term transportation. However, the move from current situation where gasoline vehicle is dominating shows high cost compared to compressed natural gas vehicle. This paper presents modeling and simulation methodology to optimize performance of transportation based on quantitative study of the risk-based performance of regional transportation. Emission estimation method is demonstrated and used to optimize transportation strategies based on life cycle costing. Different fuel supply scenarios are synthesized and evaluated, which showed strategic use of natural gas as a fuel supply.

  17. Nonlinear modelling of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack using nonlinear cancellation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barus, R. P. P.; Tjokronegoro, H. A.; Leksono, E.; Ismunandar

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells are promising new energy conversion devices that are friendly to the environment. A set of control systems are required in order to operate a fuel cell based power plant system optimally. For the purpose of control system design, an accurate fuel cell stack model in describing the dynamics of the real system is needed. Currently, linear model are widely used for fuel cell stack control purposes, but it has limitations in narrow operation range. While nonlinear models lead to nonlinear control implemnetation whos more complex and hard computing. In this research, nonlinear cancellation technique will be used to transform a nonlinear model into a linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics. The transformation is done by replacing the input of the original model by a certain virtual input that has nonlinear relationship with the original input. Then the equality of the two models is tested by running a series of simulation. Input variation of H2, O2 and H2O as well as disturbance input I (current load) are studied by simulation. The error of comparison between the proposed model and the original nonlinear model are less than 1 %. Thus we can conclude that nonlinear cancellation technique can be used to represent fuel cell nonlinear model in a simple linear form while maintaining the nonlinear characteristics and therefore retain the wide operation range

  18. Fuel cell/back-up battery hybrid energy conversion systems: Dynamic modeling and harmonic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathabadi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel technique to completely eliminate the harmful harmonics of fuel cell system. • Presenting a novel high accurate detailed electrochemical dynamic model of fuel cells. • Back-up battery system to compensate the slow dynamic response of fuel cell system. • Exact analysis of real electrochemical reactions occurring inside fuel cells. - Abstract: In this study, a novel dynamic model of fuel cells is presented. High accurate static and dynamic responses of the proposed model are experimentally validated by comparing simulated results with real experimental data. The obtained model together with theoretical results shows that a fuel cell or a fuel cell stack has very slow dynamic response, so that, it cannot adapt itself to the fast variations in load demand. It is shown that for adapting well a fuel cell stack to the load demand, the stack should be equipped with a proposed back-up battery system which compensates the slow dynamic response of the stack by providing a bidirectional path to transmit/absorb the extra instant power. It is proved that the conventional switching waveforms used in the converters of the stacks and back-up systems produce an enormous amount of harmful harmonics. Then, a novel technique is proposed to completely eliminate main harmful harmonics. It is worthwhile to note that all the other techniques only reduce the harmful harmonics. Simulated results verify that the back-up battery system together with applying the proposed technique provide a fast dynamic response for the fuel cell/back-up battery system, and also completely eliminate the main harmful harmonics

  19. Dynamic Modeling of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell System using Empirical Data and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    an empirical approach. Fin efficiency models for the cooling effect of the air are also developed using empirical methods. A fuel cell model is also implemented based on a standard model which is adapted to fit the measured performance of the H3-350 module. All the individual parts of the model are verified...

  20. Final Report for NFE-07-00912: Development of Model Fuels Experimental Engine Data Base & Kinetic Modeling Parameter Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The automotive and engine industries are in a period of very rapid change being driven by new emission standards, new types of after treatment, new combustion strategies, the introduction of new fuels, and drive for increased fuel economy and efficiency. The rapid pace of these changes has put more pressure on the need for modeling of engine combustion and performance, in order to shorten product design and introduction cycles. New combustion strategies include homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), partial-premixed combustion compression ignition (PCCI), and dilute low temperature combustion which are being developed for lower emissions and improved fuel economy. New fuels include bio-fuels such as ethanol or bio-diesel, drop-in bio-derived fuels and those derived from new crude oil sources such as gas-to-liquids, coal-to-liquids, oil sands, oil shale, and wet natural gas. Kinetic modeling of the combustion process for these new combustion regimes and fuels is necessary in order to allow modeling and performance assessment for engine design purposes. In this research covered by this CRADA, ORNL developed and supplied experimental data related to engine performance with new fuels and new combustion strategies along with interpretation and analysis of such data and consulting to Reaction Design, Inc. (RD). RD performed additional analysis of this data in order to extract important parameters and to confirm engine and kinetic models. The data generated was generally published to make it available to the engine and automotive design communities and also to the Reaction Design Model Fuels Consortium (MFC).

  1. Nuclear fuel cycle system simulation tool based on high-fidelity component modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, David E.,

    2014-02-01

    The DOE is currently directing extensive research into developing fuel cycle technologies that will enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy. The task is formidable considering the numerous fuel cycle options, the large dynamic systems that each represent, and the necessity to accurately predict their behavior. The path to successfully develop and implement an advanced fuel cycle is highly dependent on the modeling capabilities and simulation tools available for performing useful relevant analysis to assist stakeholders in decision making. Therefore a high-fidelity fuel cycle simulation tool that performs system analysis, including uncertainty quantification and optimization was developed. The resulting simulator also includes the capability to calculate environmental impact measures for individual components and the system. An integrated system method and analysis approach that provides consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles was developed. A general approach was utilized allowing for the system to be modified in order to provide analysis for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the framework for simulating many different fuel cycle options is provided. Two example fuel cycle configurations were developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized waste inventories.

  2. A simplified model for predicting skin dose received by patients from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to present a simplified model for predicting skin doses as function of three diagnostic X-ray parameters. The model used was a modification of an existing model by Edmonds. Results obtained based on our model show a reasonable agreement (1% or less) between our modified and the previously ...

  3. GEN-IV Benchmarking of Triso Fuel Performance Models under accident conditions modeling input data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: • The modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release. • The modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments. • The comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from “Case 5” of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. “Case 5” of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to “effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model” [IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read

  4. A Model for Nitrogen Chemistry in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Pulverized Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Hansen, Stine; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a model for the nitrogen chemistry in the oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The model is a chemical reaction engineering type of model with a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry, together with a simplified description of the mixing of flows......, heating and devolatilization of particles, and gas–solid reactions. The model is validated by comparison with entrained flow reactor results from the present work and from the literature on pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 and air, covering the effects of fuel, mixing conditions, temperature......, stoichiometry, and inlet NO level. In general, the model provides a satisfactory description of NO formation in air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal, but under some conditions, it underestimates the impact on NO of replacing N2 with CO2. According to the model, differences in the NO yield between the oxy...

  5. Study on models for gap conductance between fuel and sheath for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Ohn, M.Y.; Lim, H.S.; Choi, J.H.; Hwang, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. (author)

  6. Evaluation of gap heat transfer model in ELESTRES for CANDU fuel element under normal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Moon; Ohn, Myung Ryong; Im, Hong Sik; Choi, Jong Hoh; Hwang, Soon Taek

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. 13 figs., 3 tabs., 16 refs. (Author)

  7. Thermomechanical modeling of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Patrick, W.C.

    1986-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable deep geologic storage of commercially generated spent nuclear-reactor fuel assemblies. One of the primary aspects of the test was to measure the thermomechanical response of the rock mass to the extensive heating of a large volume of rock. Instrumentation was emplaced to measure stress changes, relative motion of the rock mass, and tunnel closures during three years of heating from thermally decaying heat sources, followed by a six-month cooldown period. The calculations reported here were performed using the best available input parameters, thermal and mechanical properties, and power levels which were directly measured or inferred from measurements made during the test. This report documents the results of these calculations and compares the results with selected measurements made during heating and cooling of the SFT-C.

  8. Thermomechanical modeling of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Patrick, W.C.

    1986-02-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable deep geologic storage of commercially generated spent nuclear-reactor fuel assemblies. One of the primary aspects of the test was to measure the thermomechanical response of the rock mass to the extensive heating of a large volume of rock. Instrumentation was emplaced to measure stress changes, relative motion of the rock mass, and tunnel closures during three years of heating from thermally decaying heat sources, followed by a six-month cooldown period. The calculations reported here were performed using the best available input parameters, thermal and mechanical properties, and power levels which were directly measured or inferred from measurements made during the test. This report documents the results of these calculations and compares the results with selected measurements made during heating and cooling of the SFT-C

  9. Modelling for Fuel Optimal Control of a Variable Compression Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Ylva

    2007-01-01

    Variable compression engines are a mean to meet the demand on lower fuel consumption. A high compression ratio results in high engine efficiency, but also increases the knock tendency. On conventional engines with fixed compression ratio, knock is avoided by retarding the ignition angle. The variable compression engine offers an extra dimension in knock control, since both ignition angle and compression ratio can be adjusted. The central question is thus for what combination of compression ra...

  10. Treating asphericity in fuel particle pressure vessel modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Wadsworth, Derek C.

    1994-07-01

    The prototypical nuclear fuel of the New Production Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) consists of spherical TRISO-coated particles suspended in graphite cylinders. The coating layers surrounding the fuel kernels in these particles consist of pyrolytic carbon layers and a silicon carbide layer. These coating layers act as a pressure vessel which retains fission product gases. In the operating conditions of the NP-MHTGR, a small percentage of these particles (pressure vessels) are expected to fail due to the pressure loading. The fuel particles of the NP-MHTGR deviate to some degree from a true spherical shape, which may have some effect on the failure percentages. A method is presented that treats the asphericity of the particles in predicting failure probabilities for particle samples. It utilizes a combination of finite element analysis and Monte Carlo sampling and is based on the Weibull statistical theory. The method is used here to assess the effects of asphericity in particles of two common geometric shapes, i.e. faceted particles and ellipsoidal particles. The method presented could be used to treat particle anomalies other than asphericity.

  11. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  12. Prediction models for performance and emissions of a dual fuel CI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    use artificial intelligence modelling techniques like fuzzy logic, Artificial Neural Net- work (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), etc. This paper uses a neuro fuzzy modelling technique, Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) for developing predic- tion models for performance and emission parameter of a dual fuel engine.

  13. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 10: The Understory Response Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland; Melanie Miller

    2005-01-01

    The Understory Response Model is a species-specific computer model that qualitatively predicts change in total species biomass for grasses, forbs, and shrubs after thinning, prescribed fire, or wildfire. The model examines the effect of fuels management on plant survivorship and reproduction. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what...

  14. A microstructure-dependent model for fission product gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Hastings, I.J.

    1979-06-01

    A model for the release of fission gas from irradiated UO2 fuel is presented. It incorporates fission gas diffusion bubble and grain boundary movement,intergranular bubble formation and interlinkage. In addition, the model allows estimates of the extent of structural change and fuel swelling. In the latter, contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles are considered. When included in the ELESIM fuel performance code, the model yields predictions which are in good agreement with data from UO2 fuel elements irradiated over a range of water-cooled reactor conditions: linear power outputs between 40 and 120 kW/m, burnups between 10 and 300 MW.h/kg U and power histories including constant, high-to-low and low-to-high power periods. The predictions of the model are shown to be most sensitive to fuel power (temperature), the selection of diffusion coefficient for fission gas in UO2 and burnup. The predictions are less sensitive to variables such as fuel restraint, initial grain size and the rate of grain growth. (author)

  15. A linear reactivity model approximation to predict BWR fuel assembly burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfin L, A.; Alonso V, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [IPN, ESFM, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: adl@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    A second order nodal method was derived for the one and a half group version of neutron diffusion theory in X-Y geometry. Based on the linear reactivity model, two reactivity relations are developed to treat fresh and depleted loading batches as a way to account for the spatial variation of moderator properties due to the substantial fraction of steam void present as well as the effect of the control rod positioning. Based on these ideas a program was developed to predict fuel batch burnup in a BWR operating cycle and fuel power sharing. The method was used to test two consecutive BWR operating fuel cycles. (Author)

  16. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...... of the MEA's is 160-180oC, depending on the purity of the hydrogen used, the load pattern and the desired lifetime. The advantages of the HTPEM fuel cell technology include fast response to load changes and high tolerance to CO (1-3%)...

  17. New approaches to the modelling of multi-component fuel droplet heating and evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Sazhin, Sergei S

    2015-02-25

    The previously suggested quasi-discrete model for heating and evaporation of complex multi-component hydrocarbon fuel droplets is described. The dependence of density, viscosity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity of liquid components on carbon numbers n and temperatures is taken into account. The effects of temperature gradient and quasi-component diffusion inside droplets are taken into account. The analysis is based on the Effective Thermal Conductivity/Effective Diffusivity (ETC/ED) model. This model is applied to the analysis of Diesel and gasoline fuel droplet heating and evaporation. The components with relatively close n are replaced by quasi-components with properties calculated as average properties of the a priori defined groups of actual components. Thus the analysis of the heating and evaporation of droplets consisting of many components is replaced with the analysis of the heating and evaporation of droplets consisting of relatively few quasi-components. It is demonstrated that for Diesel and gasoline fuel droplets the predictions of the model based on five quasi-components are almost indistinguishable from the predictions of the model based on twenty quasi-components for Diesel fuel droplets and are very close to the predictions of the model based on thirteen quasi-components for gasoline fuel droplets. It is recommended that in the cases of both Diesel and gasoline spray combustion modelling, the analysis of droplet heating and evaporation is based on as little as five quasi-components.

  18. Multiple-Echo Suppression Modeling and Experimental Verification for Acoustic Transmission along Periodic Drillstring Using Dual Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the oil industry, the accompanied reverberation is a major constraint in the transmission rate and distance because the drillstring is a heterogeneous assembly. Based on the transient impulse responses in uplink and downlink channels, an improved simplified echo suppression model with two acoustic receivers is presented in consideration of position optimization of single acoustic receiver. Then the acoustic receiving characteristics of transmitted signals in a length-limited periodic drillstring channel are obtained in single- and dual-receiver modes. An additive downward white Gaussian noise is also introduced in the channel. Moreover, an experimental rig is established by using a rotatable electromagnetic vibration exciter and two piezoelectric accelerometers, which are spaced one-quarter wavelength apart along a 6.3-meter simulated periodic drillstring. The ASK-, FSK-, and PSK-modulated square-wave pulse sequences at a transmission rate of 200 bit/s are applied to the simulated drillstring at a rotation speed of 0, 80, and 140 r/min, respectively. The experimental results show that the dual-receiver mode can exhibit a significantly improved average error bit ratio, which is approximately 2.5 to 3 times lower than that of the single-receiver mode, especially under the conditions of higher rotation speeds.

  19. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mei, Zhigang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  20. Modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with variable distance gas flow in anode and cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Shahbudin Masdar; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari

    2006-01-01

    A number of fundamental studies have been directed towards increasing our understanding of PEM fuel cell and their performance. Mathematical modeling is one of the way and very essential component in the development of this fuel cell. Model validation is presented, the validated model is then used to investigate the behavior of mole fraction of gases, current density, and the performances of stack using polarization curve depending on distance gases flow in channel. The model incorporates a complete cell with both the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and the serpentine gas distributor channel. Finally, the parametric studies in single stack design are illustrated

  1. Microcomputer simulation model for facility performance assessment: a case study of nuclear spent fuel handling facility operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, A.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Otis, P.T.

    1985-10-01

    A microcomputer based simulation model was recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist in the evaluation of design alternatives for a proposed facility to receive, consolidate and store nuclear spent fuel from US commercial power plants. Previous performance assessments were limited to deterministic calculations and Gantt chart representations of the facility operations. To insure that the design of the facility will be adequate to meet the specified throughput requirements, the simulation model was used to analyze such factors as material flow, equipment capability and the interface between the MRS facility and the nuclear waste transportation system. The simulation analysis model was based on commercially available software and application programs designed to represent the MRS waste handling facility operations. The results of the evaluation were used by the design review team at PNL to identify areas where design modifications should be considered. 4 figs.

  2. A model for predicting skin dose received by patients from an x-ray ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have done this by modifying a model for predicting skin dose derived by Edmonds for a triple-phase generator. Results for 100 patients based on the triple-phase generator output show a reasonable average agreement (»1%) between our present model and the Edmonds's model. Although our earlier estimated ...

  3. Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-08-01

    The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial

  4. A model for release of fission products from a breached fuel plate under wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Seerban, R.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Silva, A.T. e; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Damy, M. de A.; Teodoro, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    MTR fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored worldwide mainly under the water of storage pools. When cladding breach is present in one or more fuel plates of such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion of nuclides of a radioactive fission product either through a postulated small cylindrical breach or directly from a large circular hole in the cladding. In each case, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a breached fuel plate. Regarding sipping tests already performed at the IEA-R1 research reactor on breached MTR fuel elements, the proposed model correlates successfully the specific activity of 137 Cs, measured as a function of time, with the evaluated size of the cladding breach. (author)

  5. A model for release of fission products from a breached fuel plate under wet storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Seerban, R.S.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Silva, A.T. e; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Damy, M. de A.; Teodoro, C.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    MTR fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored worldwide mainly under the water of storage pools. When cladding breach is present in one or more fuel plates of such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion of nuclides of a radioactive fission product either through a postulated small cylindrical breach or directly from a large circular hole in the cladding. In each case, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a breached fuel plate. Regarding sipping tests already performed at the IEA-R1 research reactor on breached MTR fuel elements, the proposed model correlates successfully the specific activity of {sup 137}Cs, measured as a function of time, with the evaluated size of the cladding breach. (author)

  6. Development of numerical models for Monte Carlo simulations of Th-Pb fuel assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oettingen Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thorium-uranium fuel cycle is a promising alternative against uranium-plutonium fuel cycle, but it demands many advanced research before starting its industrial application in commercial nuclear reactors. The paper presents the development of the thorium-lead (Th-Pb fuel assembly numerical models for the integral irradiation experiments. The Th-Pb assembly consists of a hexagonal array of ThO2 fuel rods and metallic Pb rods. The design of the assembly allows different combinations of rods for various types of irradiations and experimental measurements. The numerical model of the Th-Pb assembly was designed for the numerical simulations with the continuous energy Monte Carlo Burnup code (MCB implemented on the supercomputer Prometheus of the Academic Computer Centre Cyfronet AGH.

  7. Fuel relocation modeling in the SAS4A accident analysis code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.M.; Miles, K.J.; Kalimullah; Hill, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The SAS4A code system has been designed for the analysis of the initial phase of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDAs) up to gross melting or failure of the subassembly walls. During such postulated accident scenarios as the Loss-of-Flow (LOF) and Transient-Overpower (TOP) events, the relocation of the fuel plays a key role in determining the sequence of events and the amount of energy produced before neutronic shutdown. This paper discusses the general strategy used in modelong the various phenomena which lead to fuel relocation and presents the key fuel relocation models used in SAS4A. The implications of these models for the whole-core accident analysis as well as recent results of fuel relocation are emphasized. 12 refs

  8. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paddison, Stephen J; Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    .... Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, and molecular-level modeling...

  9. FITTING A THREE DIMENSIONAL PEM FUEL CELL MODEL TO MEASUREMENTS BY TUNING THE POROSITY AND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Mads; Odgaard, Madeleine; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2004-01-01

    the distribution of current density and further how thisaffects the polarization curve.The porosity and conductivity of the catalyst layer are some ofthe most difficult parameters to measure, estimate and especiallycontrol. Yet the proposed model shows how these two parameterscan have significant influence...... on the performance of the fuel cell.The two parameters are shown to be key elements in adjusting thethree-dimensional model to fit measured polarization curves.Results from the proposed model are compared to single cellmeasurements on a test MEA from IRD Fuel Cells.......A three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a PEM fuel cell is presented. The model consists ofstraight channels, porous gas diffusion layers, porous catalystlayers and a membrane. In this computational domain, most ofthe transport phenomena which govern the performance of the...

  10. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system....... The temperature is predicted in these three parts, where they also are measured. The heat balance of the system involves a fuel cell model to describe the heat added by the fuel cells when a current is drawn. Furthermore the model also predicts the temperatures when heating the stack with external heating...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  11. Modelling of the spent fuel heat-up in the spent fuel pools using one-dimensional system codes and CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazevicius, Audrius; Kaliatka, Algirdas [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania). Lab. of Nuclear Installation Safety

    2017-07-15

    The main functions of spent fuel pools are to remove the residual heat from spent fuel assemblies and to perform the function of biological shielding. In the case of loss of heat removal from spent fuel pool, the fuel rods and pool water temperatures would increase continuously. After the saturated temperature is reached, due to evaporation of water the pool water level would drop, eventually causing the uncover of spent fuel assemblies, fuel overheating and fuel rods failure. This paper presents an analysis of loss of heat removal accident in spent fuel pool of BWR 4 and a comparison of two different modelling approaches. The one-dimensional system thermal-hydraulic computer code RELAP5 and CFD tool ANSYS Fluent were used for the analysis. The results are similar, but the local effects cannot be simulated using a one-dimensional code. The ANSYS Fluent calculation demonstrated that this three-dimensional treatment allows to avoid the need for many one-dimensional modelling assumptions in the pool modelling and enables to reduce the uncertainties associated with natural circulation flow calculation.

  12. International experience and status of fuel element performance and modelling for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    Current knowledge concerning water reactor fuel performance and technology is reviewed (212 references). The emphasis is on aspects of in-reactor performance including behaviour in accidents. Computer models for predicting fuel behaviour during the ordinary running of the reactor and during accidents are described. These codes include COMETHE, HOTROD, SLEUTH-SEER and FRAPCON. Their agreement with experimental data is examined. (U.K.)

  13. Modeling combustion of ammonia/hydrogen fuel blends under gas turbine conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hua; Valera Medina, Agustin; Bowen, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    To utilize ammonia as an alternative fuel for future power generation, it is essential to develop combustion chemical kinetic mechanisms which can describe in some detail the reaction characteristics and combustion properties. In the present study, a detailed chemical-kinetics mechanism is developed to validate premixed combustion characteristics of ammonia and hydrogen fuel blends comprehensively. In order to obtain a useful model for gas turbine applications, the proposed kinetic mechanism ...

  14. Specialists' meeting on fuel element performance computer modelling, Preston, United Kingdom, 15-19 March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The 46 papers of the meeting concerned with computer models of Water Reactor fuel elements cover practically all aspects of behavior of fuel elements in normal operation and in accident condition. Each session of the meeting produced a critical evaluation of one of the 5 topics into which the subject area had been divided. The sessions' report summarize the papers and make recommendations for further work. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers presented at this meeting

  15. Systems Integration, Modeling, and Validation of a Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Ogburn, Michael James

    2000-01-01

    The goals of the research documented in this thesis were the design, construction, modeling, and validation of a fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle based a conversion of a five-passenger production sedan. Over 60 engineering students working together as the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Team of Virginia Tech (HEVT), integrated a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system into a series hybrid electric vehicle. This design produced an efficient and truly zero-emission vehicle. This 1997 Chevrolet Lum...

  16. Technical and economic modelling of processes for liquid fuel production in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgwater, A.V.; Double, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The project which is described had the objective of examining the full range of technologies for liquid fuel production from renewable feedstocks in a technical and economic evaluation in order to identify the most promising technologies. The technologies considered are indirect thermochemical liquefaction (i.e. via gasification) to produce methanol, fuel alcohol or hydrocarbon fuels, direct thermochemical liquefaction or pyrolysis to produce hydrocarbon fuels and fermentation to produce ethanol. Feedstocks considered were wood, refuse derived fuel, straw, wheat and sugar beet. In order to carry out the evaluation, a computer model was developed, based on a unit process approach. Each unit operation is modelled as a process step, the model calculating the mass balance, energy balance and operating cost of the unit process. The results from the process step models are then combined to generate the mass balance, energy balance, capital cost and operating cost for the total process. The results show that the lowest production cost (L7/GJ) is obtained for methanol generated from a straw feedstock, but there is a moderate level of technical uncertainty associated with this result. The lowest production cost for hydrocarbon fuel (L8.6/GJ) is given by the pyrolysis process using a wood feedstock. This process has a high level of uncertainty. Fermentation processes showed the highest production costs, ranging from L14.4/GJ for a simple wood feedstock process to L25.2/GJ for a process based on sugar beet. The important conclusions are as follows: - In every case, the product cost is above current liquid fuel prices; - In most cases the feedstock cost dominates the production cost; -The most attractive products are thermochemically produced alcohol fuels

  17. Modeled and experimental results of an omnidirectional free-space optical receiver architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Lovell, Gregory L.; Finch, Michael F.

    2017-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communications provide point-to-point connectivity while offering many advantages in size, weight, and power as compared to radio frequency. It has the potential to provide fiber-optic data rates without the need for lengthy fiber cables. Omnidirectional FSO, also known as O-FSO systems, provide a non-line-of-sight option for data communications. They are gaining popularity in short-distance networks. Most existing O-FSO links range from 1 to 100 m and present experimental/simulated data rates ranging between 5 kb/s and 1 Mb/s. A 2.5-Gb/s O-FSO system was recently reported with a range of 25 cm. This paper employs a fiber bundle as an O-FSO receiver. The energy collected by the receiver is related to the acceptance cone of each fiber. The fiber bundle integrates the optical power gathered by the individual fibers and couples it to the photodetector. Experimental data rates approaching 100 kb/s over a meter long system are presented, whereas simulated results support a data rate up to 52 Mb/s for distances approaching a kilometer. Theoretical and experimental optical power versus range is also presented for the proposed O-FSO architecture, using on-off keying.

  18. Optimisation of MSW collection routes for minimum fuel consumption using 3D GIS modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, G; Zsigraiova, Z; Semiao, V; Carvalho, M G

    2009-03-01

    Collection of municipal solid waste (MSW) may account for more than 70% of the total waste management budget, most of which is for fuel costs. It is therefore crucial to optimise the routing network used for waste collection and transportation. This paper proposes the use of geographical information systems (GIS) 3D route modelling software for waste collection and transportation, which adds one more degree of freedom to the system and allows driving routes to be optimised for minimum fuel consumption. The model takes into account the effects of road inclination and vehicle weight. It is applied to two different cases: routing waste collection vehicles in the city of Praia, the capital of Cape Verde, and routing the transport of waste from different municipalities of Santiago Island to an incineration plant. For the Praia city region, the 3D model that minimised fuel consumption yielded cost savings of 8% as compared with an approach that simply calculated the shortest 3D route. Remarkably, this was true despite the fact that the GIS-recommended fuel reduction route was actually 1.8% longer than the shortest possible travel distance. For the Santiago Island case, the difference was even more significant: a 12% fuel reduction for a similar total travel distance. These figures indicate the importance of considering both the relief of the terrain and fuel consumption in selecting a suitable cost function to optimise vehicle routing.

  19. Model development for quantitative evaluation of proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-07-01

    This study addresses the quantitative evaluation of the proliferation resistance which is important factor of the alternative nuclear fuel cycle system. In this study, model was developed to quantitatively evaluate the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycles. The proposed models were then applied to Korean environment as a sample study to provide better references for the determination of future nuclear fuel cycle system in Korea. In order to quantify the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle, the proliferation resistance index was defined in imitation of an electrical circuit with an electromotive force and various electrical resistance components. The analysis on the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles has shown that the resistance index as defined herein can be used as an international measure of the relative risk of the nuclear proliferation if the motivation index is appropriately defined. It has also shown that the proposed model can include political issues as well as technical ones relevant to the proliferation resistance, and consider all facilities and activities in a specific nuclear fuel cycle (from mining to disposal). In addition, sensitivity analyses on the sample study indicate that the direct disposal option in a country with high nuclear propensity may give rise to a high risk of the nuclear proliferation than the reprocessing option in a country with low nuclear propensity

  20. Model development for quantitative evaluation of proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Il; Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung

    2000-07-01

    This study addresses the quantitative evaluation of the proliferation resistance which is important factor of the alternative nuclear fuel cycle system. In this study, model was developed to quantitatively evaluate the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycles. The proposed models were then applied to Korean environment as a sample study to provide better references for the determination of future nuclear fuel cycle system in Korea. In order to quantify the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle, the proliferation resistance index was defined in imitation of an electrical circuit with an electromotive force and various electrical resistance components. The analysis on the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel cycles has shown that the resistance index as defined herein can be used as an international measure of the relative risk of the nuclear proliferation if the motivation index is appropriately defined. It has also shown that the proposed model can include political issues as well as technical ones relevant to the proliferation resistance, and consider all facilities and activities in a specific nuclear fuel cycle (from mining to disposal). In addition, sensitivity analyses on the sample study indicate that the direct disposal option in a country with high nuclear propensity may give rise to a high risk of the nuclear proliferation than the reprocessing option in a country with low nuclear propensity.

  1. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  2. THETRIS: A MICRO-SCALE TEMPERATURE AND GAS RELEASE MODEL FOR TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ortensi; A.M. Ougouag

    2011-12-01

    The dominating mechanism in the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the Doppler feedback effect. These reactor designs are fueled with sub-millimeter sized kernels formed into TRISO particles that are imbedded in a graphite matrix. The best spatial and temporal representation of the feedback effect is obtained from an accurate approximation of the fuel temperature. Most accident scenarios in HTRs are characterized by large time constants and slow changes in the fuel and moderator temperature fields. In these situations a meso-scale, pebble and compact scale, solution provides a good approximation of the fuel temperature. Micro-scale models are necessary in order to obtain accurate predictions in faster transients or when parameters internal to the TRISO are needed. Since these coated particles constitute one of the fundamental design barriers for the release of fission products, it becomes important to understand the transient behavior inside this containment system. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed and incorporated into the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The code includes gas release models that provide a simple predictive capability of the internal pressure during transients. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with other micro-scale fuel models, but with the added capability to analyze gas release, internal pressure buildup, and effects of a gap in the TRISO. The analyses show the instances when the micro-scale models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature and Doppler feedback. In addition, a sensitivity study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap is included. Although the formation of a gap occurs under special conditions, its consequences on the dynamic behavior of the reactor can cause unexpected responses during fast transients. Nevertheless, the strong

  3. Modeling Cold Start in a Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Balliet, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are electrochemical devices that create electricity by consuming hydrogen and oxygen, forming water and heat as byproducts. PEFCs have been proposed for use in applications that may require start-up in environments with temperatures below 0 degrees C. Doing so requires that the cell heat up, and when its own waste heat is used to do so, the process is referred to here as ``cold start.'' However, at low temperatures the cell's product water freezes, and i...

  4. Calculational advance in the modeling of fuel-coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique is applied to numerically simulate a fuel-coolant interaction. The technique is based on the ability to calculate separate space- and time-dependent velocities for each of the participating components. In the limiting case of a vapor explosion, this framework allows calculation of the pre-mixing phase of film boiling and interpenetration of the working fluid by hot liquid, which is required for extrapolating from experiments to a reactor hypothetical accident. Qualitative results are compared favorably to published experimental data where an iron-alumina mixture was poured into water. Differing results are predicted with LMFBR materials

  5. Modeling and experimental validation of water mass balance in a PEM fuel cell stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Araya, Samuel Simon; Olesen, Anders Christian

    2016-01-01

    incorporates all the essential fundamental physical and electrochemical processes occurring in the membrane electrolyte and considers the water adsorption/desorption phenomena in the membrane. The effect of diffusivity model, surface roughness and water content driving force is considered. The model...... transport when membrane absorption/ desorption is considered in the model. The model becomes useful in system modelling when studying fuel cells in dynamic conditions....

  6. Dynamic Modeling of a Reformed Methanol Fuel Cell System using Empirical Data and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Kristian Kjær; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    an empirical approach. Fin efficiency models for the cooling effect of the air are also developed using empirical methods. A fuel cell model is also implemented based on a standard model which is adapted to fit the measured performance of the H3-350 module. All the individual parts of the model are verified...... hydrogen, which is difficult and energy consuming to store and transport. The models include thermal equilibrium models of the individual components of the system. Models of the heating and cooling of the gas flows between components are also modeled and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System models...... of the reforming process are implemented. Models of the cooling flow of the blowers for the fuel cell and the burner which supplies process heat for the reformer are made. The two blowers have a common exhaust, which means that the two blowers influence each other’s output. The models take this into account using...

  7. Physics-based modeling of live wildland fuel ignition experiments in the Forced Ignition and Flame Spread Test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Anand; B. Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; S. McAllister; D. R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    A computational study was performed to improve our understanding of the ignition of live fuel in the forced ignition and flame spread test apparatus, a setup where the impact of the heating mode is investigated by subjecting the fuel to forced convection and radiation. An improvement was first made in the physics-based model WFDS where the fuel is treated as fixed...

  8. Monte Carlo modeling for realizing optimized management of failed fuel replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Nakasuji, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cladding is one of the key components in a fission reactor to keep confining radioactive materials inside a fuel tube. During reactor operation, the cladding is however sometimes breached and radioactive materials leak from the fuel ceramic pellet into the coolant water through the breach. The primary coolant water is therefore monitored so that any leak is quickly detected, where the coolant water is periodically sampled and the concentration of, for example the radioactive iodine 131 (I-131), is measured. Depending on the measured concentration, the faulty fuel assembly with leaking rod is removed from the reactor and replaced by new one immediately or at the next refueling. In the present study, an effort has been made to develop a methodology to optimize the management for replacement of failed fuels due to cladding failures using the I-131 concentration measured in the sampled coolant water. A model numerical equation is proposed to describe the time evolution of I-131 concentration due to fuel leaks, and is then solved using the Monte-Carlo method as a function of sampling rate. Our results have indicated that, in order to achieve the rationalized management of failed fuels, higher resolution to detect a small amount of I-131 is not necessarily required but more frequent sampling is favorable. (author)

  9. DOSIMETRY MODELING FOR PREDICTING RADIOLYTIC PRODUCTION AT THE SPENT FUEL - WATER INTERFACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.H. Miller

    2006-01-01

    The radiolysis of water in contact with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will produce oxidants and reductants that can affect the dissolution of the fuel in a geologic disposal site. These products are created by initial radiolytic species which are a function of the type of radiation being emitted by the SNF, i.e. alpha, beta and/or gamma, as well as the energy of this radiation, the fuel grain size (and resulting surface-to-volume ratio) and the fuel-to-water ratio. These products interact with the surface of the fuel, creating new species and ultimately affecting the dissolution rate. The objective of the work reported here is to develop a systematic dosimetry model to determine the dose to water from the SNF as a function of these variables. This dose is calculated for different radiation types as a function of decay for the average fuel composition expected at Yucca Mountain. From these dose calculations the production rate of initial radiolytic products can be estimated. This data provides the basis for subsequent determination of the resulting chemical interactions at the fuel/water interface predicted by published theoretical and experimental data

  10. DOSIMETRY MODELING FOR PREDICTING RADIOLYTIC PRODUCTION AT THE SPENT FUEL-WATER INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.H. Miller

    2006-03-03

    The radiolysis of water in contact with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will produce oxidants and reductants that can affect the dissolution of the fuel in a geologic disposal site. These products are created by initial radiolytic species which are a function of the type of radiation being emitted by the SNF, i.e. alpha, beta and/or gamma, as well as the energy of this radiation, the fuel grain size (and resulting surface-to-volume ratio) and the fuel-to-water ratio. These products interact with the surface of the fuel, creating new species and ultimately affecting the dissolution rate. The objective of the work reported here is to develop a systematic dosimetry model to determine the dose to water from the SNF as a function of these variables. This dose is calculated for different radiation types as a function of decay for the average fuel composition expected at Yucca Mountain. From these dose calculations the production rate of initial radiolytic products can be estimated. This data provides the basis for subsequent determination of the resulting chemical interactions at the fuel/water interface predicted by published theoretical and experimental data.

  11. Analysis and optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using modeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Valdés, Ing. Raciel de la; García Parra, MSc. Lázaro Roger; González Rodríguez, MSc. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional, non-isothermal and steady-state model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques, specifically ANSYS FLUENT 14.5. It's considered multicomponent diffusion and two-phasic flow. The model was compared with experimental published data and with another model. The operation parameters: reactants pressure and temperature, gases flow direction, gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer porosity, reactants humidification and oxygen concentration are analyzed. The model allows the fuel cell design optimization taking in consideration the channels dimensions, the channels length and the membrane thickness. Furthermore, fuel cell performance is analyzed working with SPEEK membrane, an alternative electrolyte to Nafion. In order to carry on membrane material study, it's necessary to modify the expression that describes the electrolyte ionic conductivity. It's found that the device performance has got a great sensibility to pressure, temperature, reactant humidification and oxygen concentration variations. (author)

  12. Integrated model of Korean spent fuel and high level waste disposal options - 16091

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yongsoo; Miller, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated model developed by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to simulate options for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and reprocessing products in South Korea. A companion paper (Hwang and Miller, 2009) describes a systems-level model of Korean options for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in the 21. century. The model addresses alternative design concepts for disposal of SNF of different types (Candu, PWR), high level waste, and fission products arising from a variety of alternative fuel cycle back ends. It uses the GoldSim software to simulate the engineered system, near-field and far-field geosphere, and biosphere, resulting in long-term dose predictions for a variety of receptor groups. The model's results allow direct comparison of alternative repository design concepts, and identification of key parameter uncertainties and contributors to receptor doses. (authors)

  13. A mathematical model of an automatic assembler to stack fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.G.; Joynes, R.; Bretzlaff, C.I.

    1980-11-01

    Fuel elements for CANDU reactors are assembled from stacks of cylindrical UO 2 pellets, with close tolerances on lengths and diameters. Present stacking techniques involve extensive manual operations and they can be speeded up and reduced in cost by an automated device. If gamma-active fuel is handled such a device is essential. An automatic fuel pellet assembly process was modelled mathematically. The model indicated a suitable sequence of pellet manipulations to arrive at a stack length that was always within tolerance. This sequence was used as the inital input for the design of mechanical hardware. The mechanical design and the refinement of the mathematical model proceeded simultaneously. Mechanical constraints were allowed for in the model, and its optimized sequence of operations was incorporated in a microcomputer program to control the mechanical hardware. (auth)

  14. Mechanistic modelling of a cathode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanwarangkul, R.; Croiset, E.; Pritzker, M. D.; Fowler, M. W.; Douglas, P. L.; Entchev, E.

    A two-dimensional mechanistic model of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering momentum, energy, mass and charge transport is developed. The model geometry of a single cell comprises an air-preheating tube, air channel, fuel channel, anode, cathode and electrolyte layers. The heat radiation between cell and air-preheating tube is also incorporated into the model. This allows the model to predict heat transfer between the cell and air-preheating tube accurately. The model is validated and shows good agreement with literature data. It is anticipated that this model can be used to help develop efficient fuel cell designs and set operating variables under practical conditions. The transport phenomena inside the cell, including gas flow behaviour, temperature, overpotential, current density and species concentration, are analysed and discussed in detail. Fuel and air velocities are found to vary along flow passages depending on the local temperature and species concentrations. This model demonstrates the importance of incorporating heat radiation into a tubular SOFC model. Furthermore, the model shows that the overall cell performance is limited by O 2 diffusion through the thick porous cathode and points to the development of new cathode materials and designs being important avenues to enhance cell performance.

  15. Modelling fuel demand for different socio-economic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadud, Zia; Graham, Daniel J.; Noland, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    The fuel demand literature provides a range of estimates of the long and short-run price and income elasticities of gasoline demand for different countries and states. These estimates can be very useful in predicting the overall impacts of policy approaches designed to reduce fuel consumption and to address concerns of carbon emissions or energy security. However, analysis of policy options based on elasticities that are homogenous across income groups provides no information about the relative distributional burden that may be faced by different sectors of the population. Different responses to the same change in price or income are likely to occur, dependent on both travel needs and income levels. This paper estimates gasoline demand elasticities for different income quintiles in the United States to test for heterogeneity in demand response. Group wise summary consumer expenditure data for 20 years is used to derive the elasticity estimates. The results show that the elasticities do vary across groups and follow a U-pattern from the lowest to the highest income quintile. The lowest income quintile is found to have the largest price elasticity. The lowest and the highest income quintiles appear to be statistically insensitive to any changes in income. The rebound effect also follows the U-pattern, with the highest rebound observed among the wealthiest households. Rural households appear to have lower price elasticity than households in urban areas. (author)

  16. Modelling of high burnup structure in UO2 fuel with the RTOP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Zborovskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Kanyukova, V.; Sorokin, A.

    2008-01-01

    The present work deals with self-consistent physical approach aimed to derive the criterion of fuel restructuring avoiding correlations. The approach is based on study of large over pressurized bubbles formation on dislocations, at grain boundaries and in grain volume. At first, stage of formation of bubbles non-destroyable by fission fragments is examined using consistent modelling of point defects and fission gas behavior near dislocation and in grain volume. Then, evolution of formed large non-destroyable bubbles is considered using results of the previous step as initial values. Finally, condition of dislocation loops punching by sufficiently large over pressurized bubbles is regarded as the criterion of fuel restructuring onset. In the present work consideration of large over pressurized bubbles evolution is applied to modelling of the restructuring threshold depending on temperature, burnup and grain size. Effect of grain size predicted by the model is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Restructuring threshold criterion as an analytical function of local burnup and fuel temperature is derived and compared with HBRP project data. To predict rim-layer width formation depending on fuel burnup and irradiation conditions the model is implemented into the mechanistic fuel performance code RTOP. Calculated dependencies give upper estimate for the width of restructured region. Calculations show that one needs to consider temperature distribution within pellet which depends on irradiation history in order to model rim-structure formation

  17. Accessing and constructing driving data to develop fuel consumption forecast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Rei-Jo; Yao, Hsiu-Hsen; Hung, Shih-Wei; Hackman, Acquah

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we develop a forecasting models, to estimate fuel consumption based on the driving behavior, in which vehicles and routes are known. First, the driving data are collected via telematics and OBDII. Then, the driving fuel consumption formula is used to calculate the estimate fuel consumption, and driving behavior indicators are generated for analysis. Based on statistical analysis method, the driving fuel consumption forecasting model is constructed. Some field experiment results were done in this study to generate hundreds of driving behavior indicators. Based on data mining approach, the Pearson coefficient correlation analysis is used to filter highly fuel consumption related DBIs. Only highly correlated DBI will be used in the model. These DBIs are divided into four classes: speed class, acceleration class, Left/Right/U-turn class and the other category. We then use K-means cluster analysis to group to the driver class and the route class. Finally, more than 12 aggregate models are generated by those highly correlated DBIs, using the neural network model and regression analysis. Based on Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE) to evaluate from the developed AMs. The best MAPE values among these AM is below 5%.

  18. Source‐receiver two‐way wave extrapolation for prestack exploding‐reflector modeling and migration

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2010-10-17

    While most of the modern seismic imaging methods perform imaging by separating input data into parts (shot gathers), we develop a formulation that is able to incorporate all available data at once while numerically propagating the recorded multidimensional wavefield backward in time. While computationally extensive, this approach has the potential of generating accurate images, free of artifacts associated with conventional approaches. We derive novel high‐order partial differential equations in source‐receiver‐time domain. The fourth order nature of the extrapolation in time has four solutions two of which correspond to the ingoing and outgoing P‐waves and reduces to the zero‐offset exploding‐reflector solutions when the source coincides with the receiver. Using asymptotic approximations, we develop an approach to extrapolating the full prestack wavefield forward or backward in time.

  19. Developing the Model of Fuel Injection Process Efficiency Analysis for Injector for Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, M. Yu; Kayukov, S. S.; Gorshkalev, A. A.; Belousov, A. V.; Gallyamov, R. E.; Lysenko, Yu D.

    2018-01-01

    The article proposes an assessment option for analysing the quality of fuel injection by the injector constituting the development of calculation blocks in a common injector model within LMS Imagine.Lab AMESim. The parameters of the injector model in the article correspond to the serial injector Common Rail-type with solenoid. The possibilities of this approach are demonstrated with providing the results using the example of modelling the modified injector. Following the research results, the advantages of the proposed approach to analysing assessing the fuel injection quality were detected.

  20. Modelling of Physical, Chemical, and Material Properties of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Kupecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of modelling techniques applicable for system-level studies to account for physical, chemical, and material properties of solid oxide fuel cells. Functionality of 0D to 3D models is discussed and selected examples are given. Author provides information on typical length scales in evaluation of power systems with solid oxide fuel cells. In each section, proper examples of previous studies done in the field of 0D–3D modelling are recalled and discussed.

  1. THETRIS: A micro-scale temperature and gas release model for TRISO fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, Javier, E-mail: Javier.Ortensi@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States); Boer, Brian; Ougouag, Abderrafi M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doppler feedback dominates feedback effect in high temperature reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accurate representation of the fuel temperature is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer THETRIS, a micro-scale heat transfer model has been developed to provide more accurate measure of the fuel temperatures in TRISO fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gas release models were added to the fuel temperature model to determine internal gas pressures during accident conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper includes results from a total control rod ejection accident in the PBMR-400 reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fuel temperatures rise sharply during the event but the internal TRISO pressures remain below 30 MPa. - Abstract: The dominating mechanism in the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the Doppler feedback effect. These reactor designs are fueled with submillimeter-sized kernels formed into tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particles that are imbedded in a graphite matrix. The best spatial and temporal representation of the feedback effect is obtained from an accurate approximation of the fuel temperature. Micro-scale models of TRISO particles are necessary in order to obtain accurate predictions during fast transients or when parameters internal to the TRISO are needed. Most accident scenarios in HTRs are characterized by large time constants and slow changes in the fuel and moderator temperature fields. In these situations, a meso-scale, or pebble- and compact-scale, solution provides a good approximation of the fuel temperature as the fission thermal energy transports out of the kernel and into the surrounding matrix with a much shorter time constant. Therefore, in most cases, the matrix can be assumed to be in quasi-static equilibrium with the kernels. These models, however, fail to provide accurate information on the state of the various components of the TRISO

  2. Dynamic modeling of gas turbines in integrated gasification fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclay, James Davenport

    2009-12-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid systems for use in integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems operating on coal will stretch existing fossil fuel reserves, generate power with less environmental impact, while having a cost of electricity advantage over most competing technologies. However, the dynamic performance of a SOFC-GT in IGFC applications has not been previously studied in detail. Of particular importance is how the turbo-machinery will be designed, controlled and operated in such applications; this is the focus of the current work. Perturbation and dynamic response analyses using numerical SimulinkRTM models indicate that compressor surge is the predominant concern for safe dynamic turbo-machinery operation while shaft over-speed and excessive turbine inlet temperatures are secondary concerns. Fuel cell temperature gradients and anode-cathode differential pressures were found to be the greatest concerns for safe dynamic fuel cell operation. Two control strategies were compared, that of constant gas turbine shaft speed and constant fuel cell temperature, utilizing a variable speed gas turbine. Neither control strategy could eliminate all vulnerabilities during dynamic operation. Constant fuel cell temperature control ensures safe fuel cell operation, while constant speed control does not. However, compressor surge is more likely with constant fuel cell temperature control than with constant speed control. Design strategies that provide greater surge margin while utilizing constant fuel cell temperature control include increasing turbine design mass flow and decreasing turbine design inlet pressure, increasing compressor design pressure ratio and decreasing compressor design mass flow, decreasing plenum volume, decreasing shaft moment of inertia, decreasing fuel cell pressure drop, maintaining constant compressor inlet air temperature. However, these strategies in some cases incur an efficiency penalty. A broad comparison of cycles

  3. SMAFS, Steady-state analysis Model for Advanced Fuel cycle Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEE, Kwang-Seok

    2006-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The model was developed as a part of the study, 'Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management', which was performed during 2003-2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model are represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high-level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front-end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds). 2 - Methods: In Monte Carlo simulation, it is assumed that all unit costs follow a triangular probability distribution function, i.e., the probability that the unit cost has a value increases linearly from its lower bound to the nominal value and then decreases linearly to its upper bound. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The limit for the Monte Carlo iterations is the one of an Excel worksheet, i.e. 65,536

  4. Heat exchanger modelling in central receiver solar power plant using dense particle suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Belmonte, Miguel A.; Gómez-García, Fabrisio; González-Aguilar, José; Romero, Manuel; Benoit, Hadrien; Flamant, Gilles

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a detailed thermodynamic model for a heat exchanger (HX) working with a dense particle suspension (DPS) as heat transfer fluid (HTF) in the solar loop and water-steam as working fluid is presented. HX modelling is based on fluidized bed (FB) technology and its design has been conceived to couple solar plant using DPS as HTF and storage media with Rankine cycle for power generation. Using DPS as heat transfer fluid allows extending operating temperature range what will help to reduce thermal energy storage costs favoring higher energy densities but will also allow running power cycle at higher temperature what will increase its efficiency. Besides HX modelling description, this model will be used to reproduce solar plant performance under steady state and transient conditions.

  5. VOC composition of current motor vehicle fuels and vapors, and collinearity analyses for receptor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jo-Yu; Batterman, Stuart A

    2012-03-01

    The formulation of motor vehicle fuels can alter the magnitude and composition of evaporative and exhaust emissions occurring throughout the fuel cycle. Information regarding the volatile organic compound (VOC) composition of motor fuels other than gasoline is scarce, especially for bioethanol and biodiesel blends. This study examines the liquid and vapor (headspace) composition of four contemporary and commercially available fuels: gasoline (gasoline), ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), and B20 (20% soy-biodiesel and 80% ULSD). The composition of gasoline and E85 in both neat fuel and headspace vapor was dominated by aromatics and n-heptane. Despite its low gasoline content, E85 vapor contained higher concentrations of several VOCs than those in gasoline vapor, likely due to adjustments in its formulation. Temperature changes produced greater changes in the partial pressures of 17 VOCs in E85 than in gasoline, and large shifts in the VOC composition. B20 and ULSD were dominated by C(9) to C(16)n-alkanes and low levels of the aromatics, and the two fuels had similar headspace vapor composition and concentrations. While the headspace composition predicted using vapor-liquid equilibrium theory was closely correlated to measurements, E85 vapor concentrations were underpredicted. Based on variance decomposition analyses, gasoline and diesel fuels and their vapors VOC were distinct, but B20 and ULSD fuels and vapors were highly collinear. These results can be used to estimate fuel related emissions and exposures, particularly in receptor models that apportion emission sources, and the collinearity analysis suggests that gasoline- and diesel-related emissions can be distinguished. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Uncertainties in modeling and scaling in the prediction of fuel stored energy and thermal response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state temperature distribution and the stored energy in nuclear fuel elements are computed by analytical methods and used to rank, in the order of importance, the effects on stored energy from statistical uncertainties in modeling parameters, in boundary and in operating conditions. An integral technique is used to calculate the transient fuel temperature and to estimate the uncertainties in predicting the fuel thermal response and the peak clad temperature during a large-break loss of coolant accident. The uncertainty analysis presented here is an important part of evaluating the applicability, the uncertainties and the scaling capabilities of computer codes for nuclear reactor safety analyses. The methods employed in this analysis merit general attention because of their simplicity. It is shown that the blowdown peak is dominated by fuel stored energy alone or, equivalently, by linear heating rate. Gap conductance, peaking factors and fuel thermal conductivity are the three most important fuel modeling parameters affecting peak clad temperature uncertainty. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  7. A Two-Dimensional Multiphysics Coupling Model of a Middle and Low Temperature Solar Receiver/Reactor for Methanol Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjuan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper, the endothermic methanol decomposition reaction is used to obtain syngas by transforming middle and low temperature solar energy into chemical energy. A two-dimensional multiphysics coupling model of a middle and low temperature of 150~300 °C solar receiver/reactor was developed, which couples momentum equation in porous catalyst bed, the governing mass conservation with chemical reaction, and energy conservation incorporating conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer. The complex thermochemical conversion process of the middle and low temperature solar receiver/reactor (MLTSRR system was analyzed. The numerical finite element method (FEM model was validated by comparing it with the experimental data and a good agreement was obtained, revealing that the numerical FEM model is reliable. The characteristics of chemical reaction, coupled heat transfer, the components of reaction products, and the temperature fields in the receiver/reactor were also revealed and discussed. The effects of the annulus vacuum space and the glass tube on the performance of the solar receiver/reactor were further studied. It was revealed that when the direct normal irradiation increases from 200 W/m2 to 800 W/m2, the theoretical efficiency of solar energy transformed into chemical energy can reach 0.14–0.75. When the methanol feeding rate is 13 kg/h, the solar flux increases from 500 W/m2 to 1000 W/m2, methanol conversion can fall by 6.8–8.9% with air in the annulus, and methanol conversion can decrease by 21.8–28.9% when the glass is removed from the receiver/reactor.

  8. Physical characteristics of shrub and conifer fuels for fire behavior models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan R. Gallacher; Thomas H. Fletcher; Victoria Lansinger; Sydney Hansen; Taylor Ellsworth; David R. Weise

    2017-01-01

    The physical properties and dimensions of foliage are necessary inputs for some fire spread models. Currently, almost no data exist on these plant characteristics to fill this need. In this report, we measured the physical properties and dimensions of the foliage from 10 live shrub and conifer fuels throughout a 1-year period. We developed models to predict relative...

  9. Engineering bed models for solid fuel conversion process in grate-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M.; Massarotti, N.; Indrizzi, V.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison between two numerical models describing the thermo-chemical conversion process of a solid fuel bed in a grate-fired boiler is presented. Both models consider the incoming biomass as subjected to drying, pyrolysis, gasification and combustion. In the first approach the biomass bed...

  10. A Fuel-Sensitive Reduced-Order Model (ROM) for Piston Engine Scaling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    computational fluid dynamics simulations resolving the transient 3-D spray behavior have been performed to validate the model... computational fluid dynamics , fuels 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 56...from the work of Naber and Siebers (Naber and Siebers 1996; Siebers 1999) and a full-order model (FOM) based on 3-D– computational fluid dynamics

  11. Dynamic Thermal Model And Control Of A Pem Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2013-01-01

    A lumped parameter dynamic model is developed for predicting the stack performance, temperatures of the exit reactant gases and coolant liquid outlet in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. The air compressor, humidifier and cooling heat exchanger models are integrated to study...... the performance of the thermal system, especially when investigating applications that have highly dynamic operating conditions....

  12. Modelling microbial fuel cells with suspended cells and added electron transfer mediator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picoreanu, C.; Katuri, K.P.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Head, I.M.; Scott, K.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of a mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) with suspended biomass and added electron-transfer mediator is described. The model is based on mass balances for several dissolved chemical species such as substrate, oxidized mediator and reduced mediator. Biological, chemical and

  13. BEHAVE: fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system-BURN Subsystem, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Andrews

    1986-01-01

    Describes BURN Subsystem, Part 1, the operational fire behavior prediction subsystem of the BEHAVE fire behavior prediction and fuel modeling system. The manual covers operation of the computer program, assumptions of the mathematical models used in the calculations, and application of the predictions.

  14. Kinetic models for detection of toxicity in a microbial fuel cell based biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, N.E.; Keesman, K.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Straten, van G.

    2011-01-01

    Currently available models describing microbial fuel cell (MFC) polarization curves, do not describe the effect of the presence of toxic components. A bioelectrochemical model combined with enzyme inhibition kinetics, that describes the polarization curve of an MFC-based biosensor, was modified to

  15. CORCON: a computer program for modelling molten fuel/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program modelling the interaction between molten core materials and structural concrete is being developed to provide a capability for making quantitative estimates of reactor fuel-melt accidents. The principal phenomenological models, inter-component heat transfer, concrete erosion, and melt/gas chemical reactions, are described. A code test comparison calculation is discussed

  16. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  17. Main concepts and objectives of fuel performance modelling and core development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.; O'Carroll, C.; Van de Laar, J.; Ray, I.

    1994-01-01

    The basic concepts of the fuel rod modelling was reviewed and their limitations are discussed.Three more general modelling concepts are briefly outlined: one-dimensional models versus 2-D or 3-D models; steady-state versus transient modelling; empirical versus mechanical models. The fuel rod behaviour is determined by thermal, mechanical and physical processes such as densification, swelling, gas release, irradiation damage etc. It is shown that the macroscopic behaviour of a fuel rod is to a large extent determined by the local UO 2 microstructure. Any fuel rod model must include the solution of the heat conduction equation and the principal mechanical equations i. e. equilibrium and compatibility, together with constitutive equations. The basic limitations from the different assumptions made for the solution of the governing equations are identified. It was shown that the thermal and the mechanical analysis are strongly coupled and therefore errors are propagated. The individual correlations and processes are also not error-free and in only some cases can individual errors be estimated. There is almost for all processes a good understanding of the dominating parameters but the unsolved problem is how local quantities such as pores and grain structure, stresses etc. evolve during the irradiation. Thus the wrong input data for local processes is considered as one of the main source of uncertainty. Fission gas release and swelling could not be described by the corresponding equations without introducing some free parameters. The center line predictions of two codes for FUMEX blind exercise are given. It is stated that since the D-COM exercise in 1984, fuel rod performance codes have been improved considerably and must be now considered as mature tools for further optimisation of fuel rods. 1 tab., 12 figs., 22 refs

  18. Study of visualized simulation and analysis of nuclear fuel cycle system based on multilevel flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingquan; Yoshikawa, H.; Zhou Yangping

    2005-01-01

    Complex energy and environment system, especially nuclear fuel cycle system recently raised social concerns about the issues of economic competitiveness, environmental effect and nuclear proliferation. Only under the condition that those conflicting issues are gotten a consensus between stakeholders with different knowledge background, can nuclear power industry be continuingly developed. In this paper, a new analysis platform has been developed to help stakeholders to recognize and analyze various socio-technical issues in the nuclear fuel cycle sys- tem based on the functional modeling method named Multilevel Flow Models (MFM) according to the cognition theory of human being, Its character is that MFM models define a set of mass, energy and information flow structures on multiple levels of abstraction to describe the functional structure of a process system and its graphical symbol representation and the means-end and part-whole hierarchical flow structure to make the represented process easy to be understood. Based upon this methodology, a micro-process and a macro-process of nuclear fuel cycle system were selected to be simulated and some analysis processes such as economics analysis, environmental analysis and energy balance analysis related to those flows were also integrated to help stakeholders to understand the process of decision-making with the introduction of some new functions for the improved Multilevel Flow Models Studio, and finally the simple simulation such as spent fuel management process simulation and money flow of nuclear fuel cycle and its levelised cost analysis will be represented as feasible examples. (authors)

  19. Validation of models for the analysis of the transient behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.M.; Hughes, T.H.; Gruber, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory has prompted a renewed interest in U-Pu-Zr metal alloys as a fuel for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Part of the attractiveness of the IFR concept is the improvement in reactor safety margins through inherent features of a metal-fueled LMR core. In order to demonstrate these safety margins it is necessary to have computer codes available to analyze the detailed response of metallic fuel to a wide range of accident initiators. Two of the codes that play a key role in assessing this response are the STARS fission gas behavior code and the FPIN2 fuel pin mechanics code. Verification and validation are two important components in the development of models and computer codes. Verification demonstrates through comparison of calculations with analytical solutions that the methodology and algorithms correctly solve the equations that govern the phenomena being modeled. Validation, on the other hand, demonstrates through comparison with data that the phenomena are being modeled correctly. Both components are necessary in order to have the confidence to extrapolate the calculations to reactor accident conditions. This paper presents the results of recent progress in the validation of models for the analysis of the behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel. 9 refs., 7 figs

  20. Modeling and Structural Optimization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagakos, Grigorios

    the problem in the micro-scale. Taking as starting point the homogenization method for getting an upscaled equation for the diffusion of ion vacancies in a fuel cell's cathode, we derive formulas that express the Area Specific Resistance (ASR) of the electrode as a function of geometric parameters......, such as the tortuosity and the porosity of the material, for preselected micro-structures. Furthermore, we apply optimization techniques to lead this ASR to minimization. This work has been the fruit of collaboration with Professor Sossina Haile at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and with assistant...... the compound of magnesium hydrides encapsulated in PMMA for a set of experiments aiming at the development of a mass production method through laser ablation for cheap and effective hydrogen storage. This work was done in collaboration with Dr. Athanasios Stubos at the National Center for Scientific Research...

  1. A computer model to predict temperatures and gas flows during AGR fuel handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, D.C.; Bowler, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes the development of a comprehensive computer model (HOSTAGE) that has been developed for the Heysham II/Torness AGRs to predict temperature transients for all the important components during normal and fault conditions. It models not only the charge and discharge or fuel from an on-load reactor but also follows the fuel down the rest of the fuel route until it is dismantled. The main features of the physical model of gas and heat flow are described. Experimental results are used where appropriate and an indication will be given of how the predictions by HOSTAGE correlate with operating AGR reactors. The role of HOSTAGE in the Heysham II/Torness safety case is briefly discussed. (author)

  2. Experimental validation of a fuel additive assisted regeneration model in silicon carbide diesel filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, G.A.; Pontikakis, G.N.; Stamatelos, A.M. [University of Thessaly, Volos (Greece). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, an experimental validation procedure is applied to an improved one-dimensional model of fuel additive assisted regeneration of a diesel particulate filter. Full-scale tests on an engine bench of the regeneration behaviour of a diesel filter fitted to a modern diesel engine run on catalyst-doped fuel are employed for this purpose. The main objectives of the validation procedure concern the ability of the model to predict the effects of exhaust mass flowrate, initial soot loading mass, volatile organic fraction of the soot and additive concentration in the fuel. The results of the validation procedure are intended to demonstrate the scope and extent of applicability of models of this type to real-world design and optimization studies with diesel filters. (author)

  3. A CFD numerical model for the flow distribution in a MTR fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Santos, Pedro Henrique Di Giovanni; Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de; Torres, Walmir Maximo; Umbehaun, Pedro Ernesto; Souza, Jose Antonio Batista de; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Prado, Adelk de Carvalho, E-mail: acprado@ipen.br, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br, E-mail: dpedro_digiovanni_s@hotmail.com, E-mail: fabio@ipen.br, E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br, E-mail: jasouza@ipen.br, E-mail: abelchior@ipen.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear; Angelo, Edvaldo, E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelo, Gabriel, E-mail: gangelo@fei.edu.br [Fundacao Educacional Inaciana (FEI), Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Previously, an instrumented dummy fuel element (DMPV-01), with the same geometric characteristics of a MTR fuel element, was designed and constructed for pressure drop and flow distribution measurement experiments at the IEA-R1 reactor core. This dummy element was also used to measure the flow distribution among the rectangular flow channels formed by element fuel plates. A CFD numerical model was developed to complement the studies. This work presents the proposed CFD model as well as a comparison between numerical and experimental results of flow rate distribution among the internal flow channels. Numerical results show that the model reproduces the experiments very well and can be used for the studies as a more convenient and complementary tool. (author)

  4. Model development for quantitative evaluation of nuclear fuel cycle alternatives and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il

    2000-02-01

    This study addresses the quantitative evaluation of the proliferation resistance and the economics which are important factors of the alternative nuclear fuel cycle system. In this study, model was developed to quantitatively evaluate the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycles, and a fuel cycle cost analysis model was suggested to incorporate various uncertainties in the fuel cycle cost calculation. The proposed models were then applied to Korean environment as a sample study to provide better references for the determination of future nuclear fuel cycle system in Korea. In order to quantify the proliferation resistance of the nuclear fuel cycle, the proliferation resistance index was defined in imitation of an electrical circuit with an electromotive force and various electrical resistance components. In this model, the proliferation resistance was described an a relative size of the barrier that must be overcome in order to acquire nuclear weapons. Therefore, a larger barriers means that the risk of failure is great, expenditure of resources is large and the time scales for implementation is long. The electromotive force was expressed as the political motivation of the potential proliferators, such as an unauthorized party or a national group to acquire nuclear weapons. The electrical current was then defined as a proliferation resistance index. There are two electrical circuit models used in the evaluation of the proliferation resistance: the series and the parallel circuits. In the series circuit model of the proliferation resistance, a potential proliferator has to overcome all resistance barriers to achieve the manufacturing of the nuclear weapons. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that the IAEA(International Atomic Energy Agency)'s safeguards philosophy relies on the defense-in-depth principle against nuclear proliferation at a specific facility. The parallel circuit model was also used to imitate the risk of proliferation for

  5. Modelling receiving water quality responses to brackishwater shrimp aquaculture farm effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy Chaudhury, R.K.; Ramana Murty, V.; Ravindran, M.

    1999-01-01

    The objective was to perform a waste load allocation and determine the extent of aquaculture that the creeks can sustain, by meeting the water quality criteria for both the creek ecosystem and pond culture. Based on these results, similar assessments may be performed for other sites supporting large scale aquaculture activities. This paper introduces the sampling program and modelling methodology of the study

  6. A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

    2011-12-20

    This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

  7. Simple nonlinearity evaluation and modeling of low-noise amplifiers with application to radio astronomy receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, F. J.; Pascual, J. P.; de La Fuente, M. L.; Artal, E.; Portilla, J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a comparative nonlinear analysis of low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) under different stimuli for use in astronomical applications. Wide-band Gaussian-noise input signals, together with the high values of gain required, make that figures of merit, such as the 1 dB compression (1 dBc) point of amplifiers, become crucial in the design process of radiometric receivers in order to guarantee the linearity in their nominal operation. The typical method to obtain the 1 dBc point is by using single-tone excitation signals to get the nonlinear amplitude to amplitude (AM-AM) characteristic but, as will be shown in the paper, in radiometers, the nature of the wide-band Gaussian-noise excitation signals makes the amplifiers present higher nonlinearity than when using single tone excitation signals. Therefore, in order to analyze the suitability of the LNA's nominal operation, the 1 dBc point has to be obtained, but using realistic excitation signals. In this work, an analytical study of compression effects in amplifiers due to excitation signals composed of several tones is reported. Moreover, LNA nonlinear characteristics, as AM-AM, total distortion, and power to distortion ratio, have been obtained by simulation and measurement with wide-band Gaussian-noise excitation signals. This kind of signal can be considered as a limit case of a multitone signal, when the number of tones is very high. The work is illustrated by means of the extraction of realistic nonlinear characteristics, through simulation and measurement, of a 31 GHz back-end module LNA used in the radiometer of the QUIJOTE (Q U I JOint TEnerife) CMB experiment.

  8. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-cycle fuel economy values for a model type. 600.209-08 Section 600.209-08 Protection of Environment... model type. (a) Base level. 5-cycle fuel economy values for a base level are calculated from vehicle... any model type value is calculated for a label value. (iii) The provisions of this paragraph (a)(3...

  9. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, based on modelling analyses. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, on the basis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massara, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Since the very first hours after the accident at Fukushima-Daiichi, numerical simulations by means of severe accident codes have been carried out, aiming at highlighting the key physical phenomena allowing a correct understanding of the sequence of events, and - on a long enough timeline - improving models and methods, in order to reduce the discrepancy between calculated and measured data. A last long-term objective is to support the future decommissioning phase. The presentation summarises some of the available elements on the role of the fuel/cladding-water interaction, which became available only through modelling because of the absence of measured data directly related to the cladding-steam interaction. This presentation also aims at drawing some conclusions on the status of the modelling capabilities of current tools, particularly for the purpose of the foreseen application to ATF fuels: - analyses with MELCOR, MAAP, THALES2 and RELAP5 are presented; - input data are taken from BWR Mark-I Fukushima-Daiichi Units 1, 2 and 3, completed with operational data published by TEPCO. In the case of missing or incomplete data or hypotheses, these are adjusted to reduce the calculation/measurement discrepancy. The behaviour of the accident is well understood on a qualitative level (major trends on RPV pressure and water level, dry-wet and PCV pressure are well represented), allowing a certain level of confidence in the results of the analysis of the zirconium-steam reaction - which is accessible only through numerical simulations. These show an extremely fast sequence of events (here for Unit 1): - the top of fuel is uncovered in 3 hours (after the tsunami); - the steam line breaks at 6.5 hours. Vessel dries at 10 hours, with a heat-up rate in a first moment driven by the decay heat only (∼7 K/min) and afterwards by the chemical heat from Zr-oxidation (over 30 K/min), associated with massive hydrogen production. It appears that the level of uncertainty increases with

  10. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanafi H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend. A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5 and 10% ethanol (E10 (in vol. under full load condition at variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 2750 rpm with 250 rpm increment. The model was then validated with other researcher’s experimental result. Model consists of intake and exhaust systems, cylinder, head, valves and port geometries. Performance tests were conducted for volumetric efficiency, brake engine torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure, brake specific fuel consumption, and brake thermal efficiency, while exhaust emissions were analyzed for carbon monoxide (CO and unburned hydrocarbons (HC. The results showed that blending diesel with ethanol increases the volumetric efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption and brake thermal efficiency, while it decreases brake engine torque, brake power and brake mean effective pressure. In term of emission characteristics, the CO emissions concentrations in the engine exhaust decrease significantly with ethanol as additive. But for HC emission, its concentration increase when apply in high engine speed. In conclusion, using Ethanol as fuel additive blend with Diesel operating in HCCI shows a good result in term of performance and emission in low speed but not recommended to use in high speed engine. Ethanol-diesel blends need to researched more to make it commercially useable.

  11. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    fuel cell system for studying temperature variations over fast load changes. A temperature dependent cell polarization and hydration model integrated with the compressor, humidifier and cooling system are simulated in dynamic condition. A feedback PID control was implemented for stack cooling....... A combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM...

  12. Modeling a Distributed Power Flow Controller with a PEM Fuel Cell for Power Quality Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chakravorty

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical power demand is increasing at a relatively fast rate over the last years. Because of this increasing demand the power system is becoming very complex. Both electric utilities and end users of electric power are becoming increasingly concerned about power quality. This paper presents a new concept of distributed power flow controller (DPFC, which has been implemented with a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. In this paper, a PEM fuel cell has been simulated in Simulink/MATLAB and then has been used in the proposed DPFC model. The new proposed DPFC model has been tested on a IEEE 30 bus system.

  13. New Procedure to Develop Lumped Kinetic Models for Heavy Fuel Oil Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yunqing

    2016-09-20

    A new procedure to develop accurate lumped kinetic models for complex fuels is proposed, and applied to the experimental data of the heavy fuel oil measured by thermogravimetry. The new procedure is based on the pseudocomponents representing different reaction stages, which are determined by a systematic optimization process to ensure that the separation of different reaction stages with highest accuracy. The procedure is implemented and the model prediction was compared against that from a conventional method, yielding a significantly improved agreement with the experimental data. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  14. A Model Driven Approach to domain standard specifications examplified by Finance Accounts receivable/ Accounts payable

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Bahadar

    2005-01-01

    This thesis was written as a part of a master degree at the University of Oslo. The thesis work was conducted at SINTEF. The work has been carried out in the period November 2002 and April 2005. This thesis might be interesting to anyone interested in Domain Standard Specification Language developed by using the MDA approach to software development. The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) allows to separate the system functionality specification from its implementation on any specific technolo...

  15. Subalpine Pyrenees received higher nitrogen deposition than predicted by EMEP and CHIMERE chemistry-transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Marion; Lamaze, Thierry; Couvidat, Florian; Pornon, André

    2015-08-01

    Deposition of reactive nitrogen (N) from the atmosphere is expected to be the third greatest driver of biodiversity loss by the year 2100. Chemistry-transport models are essential tools to estimate spatially explicit N deposition but the reliability of their predictions remained to be validated in mountains. We measured N deposition and air concentration over the subalpine Pyrenees. N deposition was found to range from 797 to 1,463 mg N m-2 year-1. These values were higher than expected from model predictions, especially for nitrate, which exceeded the estimations of EMEP by a factor of 2.6 and CHIMERE by 3.6. Our observations also displayed a reversed reduced-to-oxidized ratio in N deposition compared with model predictions. The results highlight that the subalpine Pyrenees are exposed to higher levels of N deposition than expected according to standard predictions and that these levels exceed currently recognized critical loads for most high-elevation habitats. Our study reveals a need to improve the evaluation of N deposition in mountains which are home to a substantial and original part of the world’s biodiversity.

  16. Diesel engine emissions and combustion predictions using advanced mixing models applicable to fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abani, Neerav; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-09-01

    An advanced mixing model was applied to study engine emissions and combustion with different injection strategies ranging from multiple injections, early injection and grouped-hole nozzle injection in light and heavy duty diesel engines. The model was implemented in the KIVA-CHEMKIN engine combustion code and simulations were conducted at different mesh resolutions. The model was compared with the standard KIVA spray model that uses the Lagrangian-Drop and Eulerian-Fluid (LDEF) approach, and a Gas Jet spray model that improves predictions of liquid sprays. A Vapor Particle Method (VPM) is introduced that accounts for sub-grid scale mixing of fuel vapor and more accurately and predicts the mixing of fuel-vapor over a range of mesh resolutions. The fuel vapor is transported as particles until a certain distance from nozzle is reached where the local jet half-width is adequately resolved by the local mesh scale. Within this distance the vapor particle is transported while releasing fuel vapor locally, as determined by a weighting factor. The VPM model more accurately predicts fuel-vapor penetrations for early cycle injections and flame lift-off lengths for late cycle injections. Engine combustion computations show that as compared to the standard KIVA and Gas Jet spray models, the VPM spray model improves predictions of in-cylinder pressure, heat released rate and engine emissions of NOx, CO and soot with coarse mesh resolutions. The VPM spray model is thus a good tool for efficiently investigating diesel engine combustion with practical mesh resolutions, thereby saving computer time.

  17. Characterizing model uncertainties in the life cycle of lignocellulose-based ethanol fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatari, Sabrina; MacLean, Heather L

    2010-11-15

    Renewable and low carbon fuel standards being developed at federal and state levels require an estimation of the life cycle carbon intensity (LCCI) of candidate fuels that can substitute for gasoline, such as second generation bioethanol. Estimating the LCCI of such fuels with a high degree of confidence requires the use of probabilistic methods to account for known sources of uncertainty. We construct life cycle models for the bioconversion of agricultural residue (corn stover) and energy crops (switchgrass) and explicitly examine uncertainty using Monte Carlo simulation. Using statistical methods to identify significant model variables from public data sets and Aspen Plus chemical process models,we estimate stochastic life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the two feedstocks combined with two promising fuel conversion technologies. The approach can be generalized to other biofuel systems. Our results show potentially high and uncertain GHG emissions for switchgrass-ethanol due to uncertain CO₂ flux from land use change and N₂O flux from N fertilizer. However, corn stover-ethanol,with its low-in-magnitude, tight-in-spread LCCI distribution, shows considerable promise for reducing life cycle GHG emissions relative to gasoline and corn-ethanol. Coproducts are important for reducing the LCCI of all ethanol fuels we examine.

  18. Pu-rich MOX agglomerate-by-agglomerate model for fuel pellet burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, G.S.

    2004-01-01

    In support of potential licensing of the mixed oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium and depleted uranium for use in United States reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The WG-MOX comprises five percent PuO 2 and 95% depleted UO 2 . Based on the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) observation, the volume fraction (VF) of MOX agglomerates in the fuel pellet is about 16.67%, and PuO 2 concentration of 30.0 = (5 / 16.67 x 100) wt% in the agglomerate. A pressurized water reactor (PWR) unit WG-MOX lattice with Agglomerate-by-Agglomerate Fuel (AbAF) modeling has been developed. The effect of the irregular agglomerate distribution can be addressed through the use of the Monte Carlo AbAF model. The AbAF-calculated cumulative ratio of Agglomerate burnup to U-MAtrix burnup (AG/MA) is 9.17 at the beginning of life, and decreases to 2.88 at 50 GWd/t. The MCNP-AbAF-calculated results can be used to adjust the parameters in the MOX fuel fission gas release modeling. (author)

  19. Effect of lattice deformation on temperature fields and heat transfer in the fuel elements of characteristic zones for a model of fast reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Matyukhin, N.M.; Sviridenko, E.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Given are the experimental results for temperature fields in the model assembly in nonribbed simulators of the BN-600-type reactor fuel elements in the course of deformation of the lattice caused by shifting of the central and peripheral (lateral, angular) fuel elements by the value of the gap between the fuel elements (the limiting case when the fuel elements touch each other along the whole length). An assembly consisting of 37 electroheated pipes arranged in a triangular lattice with a relative step of S/d=1.185 is used as a model. The experiments were carried out on the sodium stand at constant energy release along the length of the fuel element simulators and at the Pe number changing in the 14-700 range. The data obtained show considerable increase of nonuniformities of the fuel element temperatures for characteristic zones of the fuel cassette assembly models of the fast reactor at deviations of the lattice geometric sizes from the nominal ones. For the central nonribbed element the temperature nonuniformity increases approximately 7.5 times and for the lateral element approximately 6 times when the elements touch each other along the whole length. The shift the central nonribbed element by the value of the gap between the fu.el elements leads to the decrease of heat transfer in comparison with heat transfer at the nominal geometry approximately 3-7 times in the 10-450 range for the Pe numbers. It is shown that the coolant temperature distribution along the assembly radius has a complex character (with a peak between the centre and the perifery) caused by redistribution of coolant consumptions due to fuel element lattice deformation

  20. Biojet fuels and emissions mitigation in aviation: An integrated assessment modeling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Marshall; Muratori, Matteo; Kyle, Page

    2017-05-01

    Although the aviation sector is a relatively small contributor to total greenhouse gas emissions, it is a fast-growing, fossil fuel-intensive transportation mode. Because aviation is a mode for which liquid fuels currently have no practical substitute, biofuels are gaining attention as a promising cleaner alternative. In this paper, we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to develop scenarios that explore the potential impact of biojet fuels for use in aviation in the context of broader climate change mitigation. We show that a carbon price would have a significant impact on the aviation sector. In the absence of alternatives to jet fuel from petroleum, mitigation potential is limited and would be at the expense of aviation service demand growth. However, mitigation efforts through the increased use of biojet fuels show potential to reduce the carbon intensity of aviation, and may not have a significant impact on carbon mitigation and bioenergy use in the rest of the energy system. The potential of biofuel to decarbonize air transport is significantly enhanced when carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is used in the conversion process to produce jet fuels from biomass feedstock.