WorldWideScience

Sample records for model reactor vessel

  1. Reactor vessel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and

  2. Modeling irradiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 10, numerical modeling of irradiation embrittlement in reactor vessel steels are introduced. Physically-based models are developed and their role in advancing the state-of-the-art of predicting irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels is stressed

  3. Rupture tests with reactor pressure vessel head models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Keinaenen, H.; Hosio, E.; Pankakoski, P.H.; Rahka, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the LISSAC project (LImit Strains in Severe ACcidents), partly funded by the EC Nuclear Fission and Safety Programme within the 5th Framework programme, an extensive experimental and computational research programme is conducted to study the stress state and size dependence of ultimate failure strains. The results are aimed especially to make the assessment of severe accident cases more realistic. For the experiments in the LISSAC project a block of material of the German Biblis C reactor pressure vessel was available. As part of the project, eight reactor pressure vessel head models from this material (22 NiMoCr 3 7) were tested up to rupture at VTT. The specimens were provided by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK). These tests were performed under quasistatic pressure load at room temperature. Two specimens sizes were tested and in half of the tests the specimens contain holes describing the control rod penetrations of an actual reactor pressure vessel head. These specimens were equipped with an aluminium liner. All six tests with the smaller specimen size were conducted successfully. In the test with the large specimen with holes, the behaviour of the aluminium liner material proved to differ from those of the smaller ones. As a consequence the experiment ended at the failure of the liner. The specimen without holes yielded results that were in very good agreement with those from the small specimens. (author)

  4. Crystal Plasticity Model of Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement in GRIZZLY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, Suleyman Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin Whiting [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is of utmost importance to ensure safe operation of nuclear reactors under extended lifetime. Microstructure-scale models at various length and time scales, coupled concurrently or through homogenization methods, can play a crucial role in understanding and quantifying irradiation-induced defect production, growth and their influence on mechanical behavior of RPV steels. A multi-scale approach, involving atomistic, meso- and engineering-scale models, is currently being pursued within the GRIZZLY project to understand and quantify irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Within this framework, a dislocation-density based crystal plasticity model has been developed in GRIZZLY that captures the effect of irradiation-induced defects on the flow stress behavior and is presented in this report. The present formulation accounts for the interaction between self-interstitial loops and matrix dislocations. The model predictions have been validated with experiments and dislocation dynamics simulation.

  5. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  6. Prestressed concrete reactor vessel thermal cylinder model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, J.P.; Canonico, D.A.; Richardson, M.; Corum, J.M.; Dodge, W.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal cylinder experiment was designed both to provide information for evaluating the capability of analytical methods to predict the time-dependent stress-strain behavior of a 1 / 6 -scale model of the barrel section of a single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel and to demonstrate the structural behavior under design and off-design thermal conditions. The model was a thick-walled cylinder having a height of 1.22 m, a thickness of 0.46 m, and an outer diameter of 2.06 m. It was prestressed both axially and circumferentially and subjected to 4.83 MPa internal pressure together with a thermal crossfall imposed by heating the inner surface to 338.8 K and cooling the outer surface to 297.1 K. The initial 460 days of testing were divided into time periods that simulated prestressing, heatup, reactor operation, and shutdown. At the conclusion of the simulated operating period, the model was repressurized and subjected to localized heating at 505.4 K for 84 days to produce an off-design hot-spot condition. Comparisons of experimental data with calculated values obtained using the SAFE-CRACK finite-element computer program showed that the program was capable of predicting time-dependent behavior in a vessel subjected to normal operating conditions, but that it was unable to accurately predict the behavior during off-design hot-spot heating. Readings made using a neutron and gamma-ray backscattering moisture probe showed little, if any, migration of moisture in the concrete cross section. Destructive examination indicated that the model maintained its basic structural integrity during localized hot-spot heating

  7. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  8. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  9. Analyses and testing of model prestressed concrete reactor vessels with built-in planes of weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.; Paton, A.A.; Fleischer, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, analyses and testing of two small scale, single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models, one without planes of weakness and one with planes of weakness immediately behind the cavity liner. This work was carried out to extend a previous study which had suggested the likely feasibility of constructing regions of prestressed concrete reactor vessels and biological shields, which become activated, using easily removable blocks, separated by a suitable membrane. The paper describes the results obtained and concludes that the planes of weakness concept could offer a means of facilitating the dismantling of activated regions of prestressed concrete reactor vessels, biological shields and similar types of structure. (author)

  10. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  11. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, B.N.

    1976-01-01

    In nuclear power reactor systems which have a reactor core inside a pressure vessel, the feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle usually require separate pressure vessel penetrations. This requirement involves a great deal of expensive high quality special machining, welding and weld joint testing. The invention overcomes most of these problems by nestling the feedwater inlet pipe inside the steam discharge nozzle. At the same time the individual heat exchanger modules are supported from the pressure vessel at the same location as the nested feedwater inlet pipe and steam discharge nozzle combination, thus eliminating the need to accomodate troublesome differential thermal expansion problems through special structures within the pressure vessel

  12. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction

  13. Reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. Chapter 3 offers a detailed treatment of the selection criteria and properties of reactor pressure vessel materials. The main attention is directed towards steel and ingot making and the subsequent material processing

  14. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  15. Analytical model for shear strength of end slabs of prestressed concrete nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulrahman, H.O.; Sozen, M.A.; Schnobrich, W.C.

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of the behavior and strength of flat end slabs of cylindrical prestressed concrete nuclear reactor vessels. The investigation included tests of ten small-scale pressure vessels and development of a nonlinear finite-element model to simulate the deformation response and strength of the end slabs. Because earlier experimental studies had shown that the flexural strength of the end slab could be calculated using intelligible procedures, the emphasis of this investigation was on shear strength

  16. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  17. Reactor vessel stud tensioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malandra, L.J.; Beer, R.W.; Salton, R.B.; Spiegelman, S.R.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner, for facilitating the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud, has gripper jaws which when the tensioner is lowered into engagement with the upper end of the stud are moved inwards to grip the upper end and which when the tensioner is lifted move outward to release the upper end. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshimi; Fukuda, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the strength and reliability by moderating thermal stresses produced to the furnace walls of a reactor vessel by the thermal shocks upon reactor shutdown and tripping and reducing the generation of developing thermal ratchet strains produced upon repeating thermal shocks. Constitution: Upon occurrence of reactor shutdown or tripping, the temperature is detected and the pressure of the cover gas is controlled such that the axial temperature slope is decreased to displace the liquid surface in an annular vessel. Then, for attaining the stress reducing temperature, control is so conducted that the temperature of the lower portion is not higher than the upper portion in the axial temperature distribution of the reactor vessel. By controlling the pressure of the cover gas in the annular vessel in this way, the liquid level can be raised to a cover gas portion remaining at a high temperature state. Further, the temperature of the furnace wall can always be decreased to a temperature of the high temperature plenum thereby enabling to moderate the thermal stresses. (Yoshihara, H.)

  19. Dynamic analysis of the PEC fast reactor vessel: on-site tests and mathematical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zola, Maurizio; Martelli, Alessandro; Maresca, Giuseppe; Masoni, Paolo; Scandola, Giani; Descleves, Pierre

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the main features and results of the on-site dynamic tests and the related numerical analysis carried out for the PEC reactor vessel. The purpose is to provide an example of on-site testing of large components, stressing the problems encountered during the experiments, as well as in the processing phase of the test results and for the comparisons between calculations and measurements. Tests, performed by ISMES on behalf of ENEA, allowed the dynamic response of the empty vessel to be measured, thus providing data for the verification of the numerical models of the vessel supporting structure adopted in the PEC reactor-block seismic analysis. An axisymmetric model of the vessel, implemented in the vessel, implemented in the NOVAK code, had been developed in the framework of the detailed numerical studies performed by NOVATOME (again on behalf of ENEA), to check the beam schematization with fluid added mass model adopted by ANSALDO in SAP-IV and ANSYS for the reactor-block design calculations. Furthermore, a numerical model, describing vessel supporting structure in detail, was also developed by ANSALDO and implemented in the SAP-IV code. The test conditions were analysed by use of these and the design models. Comparisons between calculations and measurements showed particularly good agreement with regard to first natural frequency of the vessel and rocking stiffness of the vessel supporting structure, i.e. those parameters on which vessel seismic amplification mainly depends: this demonstrated the adequacy of the design analysis to correctly calculate the seismic motion at the PEC core diagrid. (author)

  20. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  1. Modeling of heat transfers inside the bottom of a PWR reactor vessel during a serious accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeoni, A.; Tarabelli, D.; Ratel, G.; Spindler, B.; Tourniaire, B.; Guillard, G.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of its studies on serious reactor accidents, the French atomic energy commission (CEA) is developing models describing the thermal behaviour of the corium (magma made of the molten core with structure materials) at the bottom of the pressure vessel, using results coming from the most recent experimental programs. This knowledge is capitalized with the scenario code ASTEC developed by IRSN and GRS. The article presents the models entered in ASTEC to calculate the heat transfers inside the corium bath and the results in terms of heat flux exchanged with the vessel. (J.S.)

  2. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  3. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  4. Reactor pressure vessel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challberg, Roy C.; Upton, Hubert A.

    1994-01-01

    A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough.

  5. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  6. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs

  7. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the Safety of WWER-440/230 NPPs, a list of safety issues requiring broad studies of generic interest have been agreed upon by an Advisory Group who met in Vienna in September 1990. The list was later revised in the light of the programme findings. The information on the status of the issues, and on the amount of work already completed and under way in the various countries, needs to be compiled. Moreover, an evaluation of what further work is required to resolve each one of the issues is also necessary. In view of this, the IAEA has started the preparation of a series of status reports on the various issues. This report on the generic safety issue ''Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement'' presents a comprehensive survey of technical information available in the field and identifies those aspects which require further investigation. 39 refs, 21 figs, 4 tabs

  8. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun

    1999-02-01

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10 10 neutrons/cm 2 . sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV

  9. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  10. Nanostructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels: Revised Object kinetic Monte Carlo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Messina, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Olsson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, SE-114 21 Stockholm (Sweden); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2017-02-15

    This work presents a revised set of parameters to be used in an Object kinetic Monte Carlo model to simulate the microstructure evolution under neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels at the operational temperature of light water reactors (∼300 °C). Within a “grey-alloy” approach, a more physical description than in a previous work is used to translate the effect of Mn and Ni solute atoms on the defect cluster diffusivity reduction. The slowing down of self-interstitial clusters, due to the interaction between solutes and crowdions in Fe is now parameterized using binding energies from the latest DFT calculations and the solute concentration in the matrix from atom-probe experiments. The mobility of vacancy clusters in the presence of Mn and Ni solute atoms was also modified on the basis of recent DFT results, thereby removing some previous approximations. The same set of parameters was seen to predict the correct microstructure evolution for two different types of alloys, under very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy, neutron irradiated at a relatively high flux, and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel from the Swedish Ringhals reactor surveillance program. In both cases, the predicted self-interstitial loop density matches the experimental solute cluster density, further corroborating the surmise that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures form by solute enrichment of immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope.

  11. SURROGATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION FOR RELIABILITY ANALYSIS OF REACTOR PRESSURE VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, William M.; Riley, Matthew E.; Spencer, Benjamin W.

    2016-07-01

    In nuclear light water reactors (LWRs), the reactor coolant, core and shroud are contained within a massive, thick walled steel vessel known as a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Given the tremendous size of these structures, RPVs typically contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced in the manufacturing process. After many years of operation, irradiation-induced embrittlement makes these vessels increasingly susceptible to fracture initiation at the locations of the pre-existing flaws. Because of the uncertainty in the loading conditions, flaw characteristics and material properties, probabilistic methods are widely accepted and used in assessing RPV integrity. The Fracture Analysis of Vessels – Oak Ridge (FAVOR) computer program developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used for this purpose. This program can be used in order to perform deterministic and probabilistic risk-informed analyses of the structural integrity of an RPV subjected to a range of thermal-hydraulic events. FAVOR uses a one-dimensional representation of the global response of the RPV, which is appropriate for the beltline region, which experiences the most embrittlement, and employs an influence coefficient technique to rapidly compute stress intensity factors for axis-aligned surface-breaking flaws. The Grizzly code is currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to be used as a general multiphysics simulation tool to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled RPVs. Grizzly can be used to model the thermo-mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local 3D models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in

  12. Pressure vessel, in particular reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The task to design the pre-stressing facility for a pressure vessel, especially for nuclear reactors, wiht pre-stressed jacket and pre-stressing facility, the latter one showing circumferential steel tendons supported polygonally on the outer side of the jacket by means of supporting shoes, in such a way that simply defined tensions can be generated and re-tensioning of the tendons can be carried out easily is solved according to the invention by keeping the circumference of the steel tendons fixed and by designing the supporting shoes as stressing shoes. The defined tensions are applied through the stressing shoes. (ORU) [de

  13. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention applies to a pressure vessel for nuclear reactors whose shell, made of cast metal segments, has a steel liner. This liner must be constructed to withstand all operational stresses and to be easily repairable. The invention solves this problem by installing the liner at a certain distance from the inner wall of the pressure vessel shell and by filling this clearance with supporting concrete. Both the concrete and the steel liner must have a lower prestress than the pressure vessel shell. In order to avoid damage to the liner when prestressing the pressure vessel shell, special connecting elements are provided which consist of welded-on fastening elements projecting into recesses in the cast metal segments of the pressure vessel. Their design is described in detail. (TK) [de

  14. Reactor primary containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Tasuku

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To insure safety by preventing the radioactivity release to outside environments in the event of an unforeseen accident when the gas temperature in the reactor container is high. Constitution: In the event of any unforeseen accident, a high-temperature gas in the reactor container will be discharged from a discharge port into the pool water through a suction piping system and a discharge piping system, and after being cooled with the pool water, the gas will be discharged into the reactor building. Thereafter, the cooled gas will be drawn into an emergency gas processing device through the suction piping system and removed of radioactivity, finally being discharged out into the external environment. Soluble radioactive maters will be absorbed and removed into the pool water while they are in contact with the gas in the pool water. This, therefore, can contribute much more toward the control of discharge of the radioactivity. Where it is required to improve solubility, a methyl iodine solution can be used as the pool water. A fuel storage pool may be used as the pool. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  16. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  17. Application of micromechanical models of ductile fracture initiation to reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Walle, E. van; Fabry, A.; Velde, J. van de; Meester, P. de

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the current study is the application of local micromechanical models to predict crack initiation in ductile materials. Two reactor pressure vessel materials have been selected for this study: JRQ IAEA monitor base metal (A533B Cl.1) and Doel-IV weld material. Charpy impact tests have been performed in both un-irradiated and irradiated conditions. In addition to standard tensile tests, notched tensile specimens have been tested. The upper shelf energy of the weld material remains almost un-affected by irradiation, whereas a decrease of 20% is detected for the base metal. Accordingly, the tensile properties of the weld material do not reveal a clear irradiation effect on the yield and ultimate stresses, this in contrast to the base material flow properties. The tensile tests have been analyzed in terms of micromechanical models. A good correlation is found between the standard tests and the micromechanical models, that are able to predict the ductile damage evolution in these materials. Additional information on the ductility behavior of these materials is revealed by this micromechanical analysis

  18. Modeling the Ductile Brittle Fracture Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels using a Cohesive Zone Model based approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behavior is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behavior, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behavior, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modeling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical.

  19. Modelling the ductile brittle fracture transition in reactor pressure vessel steels using a cohesive zone model based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Bulent Biner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fracture properties of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels show large variations with changes in temperature and irradiation levels. Brittle behaviour is observed at lower temperatures and/or higher irradiation levels whereas ductile mode of failure is predominant at higher temperatures and/or lower irradiation levels. In addition to such temperature and radiation dependent fracture behaviour, significant scatter in fracture toughness has also been observed. As a consequence of such variability in fracture behaviour, accurate estimates of fracture properties of RPV steels are of utmost importance for safe and reliable operation of reactor pressure vessels. A cohesive zone based approach is being pursued in the present study where an attempt is made to obtain a unified law capturing both stable crack growth (ductile fracture) and unstable failure (cleavage fracture). The parameters of the constitutive model are dependent on both temperature and failure probability. The effect of irradiation has not been considered in the present study. The use of such a cohesive zone based approach would allow the modelling of explicit crack growth at both stable and unstable regimes of fracture. Also it would provide the possibility to incorporate more physical lower length scale models to predict DBT. Such a multi-scale approach would significantly improve the predictive capabilities of the model, which is still largely empirical. (authors)

  20. Study on applicability of PIV measurement to natural convection in a scaled reactor vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Koga, Tomonari; Eguchi, Yuzuru; Watanabe, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to natural convection in the plenum of a scaled water test model of the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is studied in the paper. PIV measurement of such a buoyancy-driven flow in a geometrically complicated vessel is difficult in general, because the detection rate of tracer particles tends to decrease, and the noisy optical reflection to increase. In our measurements, tracer particles are adequately seeded in the hot plenum and particle images are captured by using a double-pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a high-speed camera. Then, image-processing techniques are employed to eliminate unphysical velocity vectors and unnecessary background images. The PIV results have shown that clear flow pattern can be extracted by time-averaging 300 sets of instantaneous PIV data in spite of highly fluctuating features of velocity in space and time. Moreover, the evaluation of the statistical quantities such as variance, skewness, and kurtosis has revealed the characteristic of the non-stationary spouting flows at the heater outlet. (author)

  1. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, A.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a pressure vessel which can be used for nuclear reactors and for chemical processing technologies. A grid of walls welded to each other, which is installed in the interior of the pressure vessel, is so attached to an outer jacket at several edges, that these edges exert a force on the wall of the vessel directed towards the interior. Only the out jacket resists the differential between the inner and outer pressures; the welded walls in the interior do not have to sustain any differential pressure. They create a larger number of inner spaces (or tubes) which can be individually accessible and each of which has a terminal element. (UWI) [de

  2. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  3. Stabilizer for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Masataka.

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of flush springs and sleeves are disposed to a rod to be screw-coupled to a yoke disposed between gusset side walls. A vibration energy dissipation mechanism due to resiliently plastic deformation of metal is disposed between the gusset side wall and the sleeve of the rod. When earthquakes should occur and the distance between the gusset side wall and the sleeve is changed undergoing seismic input, the vibration energy is dissipated by the resilient plastic deformation of the vibration energy dissipation mechanism. The seismic response of the pressure vessel system is thus decreased to improve seismic resistivity. The reactor safety and reliability can be ensured. It is not necessary to strengthen supports for pipeline systems, and increase of the cost, including design and manufacture, can be avoided while giving no effects on the layout for the upper portion of reactor shielding walls. (N.H.)

  4. Radiation embrittlement predictions for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Marston, T.U.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of a surveillance program in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel is to provide an accurate measure of the changes in properties necessary to assess the structural integrity of the beltline region of the vessel as it is subjected to neutron irradiation damage. To understand problems surrounding a surveillance program, it is necessary to look at the concept of a structural integrity analysis. The structural integrity analysis can, of course, be only as accurate as the input data allows. Any errors in materials properties due to either errors in test technique to obtain these properties or to test specimens being exposed to environments different than actual operating condition will be reflected as errors in the actual structural integrity analysis. In a surveillance program, we must then be sure that we are measuring the proper material property to input to the fracture mechanics model as well as insure that the irradiation environment to which we subject the specimens will not cause an error in the prediction of the actual integrity margin of the pressure vessel beltline. The following text will question the appropriateness of using irradiated materials property data derived from high flux experiment, either in test reactors or advanced surveillance positions, to predict the actual material condition at the reactor vessel wall. Additionally, data will be presented showing several new correlation methods for deriving fracture toughness data from Charpy specimens, thus giving the proper input to the fracture mechanics model of a structural integrity analysis

  5. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  6. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  7. Underwater robot system for reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    It is dangerous to work inside reactor vessel because of high radioactivity. So robot system is necessary to work inside reactor vessel instead of workers. And robot also has advantage of mobility over conventional equipment which has limitation of the range of accessibility. In this paper, we describe design consideration and criteria of robot system for reactor vessel, and component of developed system. Reliability, usability and convenience of robot system were considered to design and fabrication.

  8. Underwater robot system for reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2012-01-01

    It is dangerous to work inside reactor vessel because of high radioactivity. So robot system is necessary to work inside reactor vessel instead of workers. And robot also has advantage of mobility over conventional equipment which has limitation of the range of accessibility. In this paper, we describe design consideration and criteria of robot system for reactor vessel, and component of developed system. Reliability, usability and convenience of robot system were considered to design and fabrication

  9. Integrity of the reactor vessel support system for a postulated reactor vessel closure head drop event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Wan; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Dae Hee; Kim, Kang Soo

    1996-01-01

    The integrity of reactor vessel support system of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) is investigated for a postulated reactor vessel closure head drop event. The closure head is disassembled from the reactor vessel during refueling process or general inspection of reactor vessel and internal structures, and carried to proposed location by the head lift rig. A postulated closure head drop event could be anticipated during closure head handling process. The drop event may cause an impact load on the reactor vessel and supporting system. The integrity of the supporting system is directly relevant to that of reactor vessel and reactor internals including fuels. Results derived by elastic impact analysis, linear and non-linear buckling analysis and elasto-plastic stress analysis of the supporting system implied that the integrity of the reactor vessel supporting system is intact for a postulated reactor closure head drop event. 9 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  10. Inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doh, Euisoon

    2002-01-01

    This paper is for the inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor vessel. KPS performed Korean standard Reactor vessel inspection for a part of Yonggwang unit 5 and full inspection of Yonggwang unit 6 on November in 2001. Korean standard Reactor vessel is different from Westinghouse and Framatome plants in design and material. Understanding design, structure and material is very important to prepare and to perform Reactor vessel inspection. Korean standard Reactor vessel has 6 Stabilizer lugs, 6 Core stop lugs and one Flow Baffle around Lower head to Bottom head weld(G4). They make very difficult to perform scanning of G4 by transducers and to install Lower Platform of robot system. Korean standard Reactor vessel has 2 Outlet Nozzles, 4 Inlet Nozzles and small curvature of Inner Radius regions. That small curvature's Inner Radius region needs a special technology to perform the area more than 90% of whole examination volume. The most significant difference of Korean standard Reactor vessel is that it does not have Safe End region because both of Reactor vessel and main reactor coolant system piping are carbon steel. Therefore, the technology for this nozzle to piping weld is very unique to be compared with other Westinghouse or Framatome plants. Described above, the inspection technology of Korean standard Reactor Vessel is very different from other Reactor Vessel due to different internal structure and material. The company which performs this 10 years ISI in future will need much investigation of structure and material to succeed in Reactor vessel inspection of Korean standard plant

  11. Applied model of through-wall crack of coolant vessels of WWER-type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosyan, V.; Hovakimyan, T.; Vardanyan, M.; Khachatryan, A.; Minasyan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We propose an applied-model of Through-Wall Crack (TWC) for WWER-type units primary vessels. The model allows to simulate the main morphological parameters of real TWC, i.e. length, area of inlet and outlet openings, channel depth and small and large size unevenness of the crack surface. The model can be used for developing and improving the coolant-leak detectors for the primary circuit vessels of WWER-units. Also, it can be used for research of the coolant two-phase leakage phenomenon through narrow cracks/channels and thermo-physical processes in heat-insulation layer of the Main Coolant Piping (MCP) during the leak

  12. Reactor vessel supported by flexure member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.D.; Pankow, B.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a reactor pressure vessel which is provided with vertical support means in the form of circumferentially spaced columns upon which the vessel is mounted. The columns are adapted to undergo flexure in order to accommodate the thermally induced displacements experienced by the vessel during operational transients

  13. Vent structures in nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekawa, Yasumasa.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable degassing from the top of a reactor vessel with no operator's exposure. Constitution: Degassing for the radioactive gases are conducted through the route of: reactor vessel vent line - main steam connection line - main steam line during reactor running and deaeration for water covering to the reactor vessel during shut down of the reactor is conducted through the route of: vent line - drain line. In this case, one end of the main steam connection line, whose the other end is connected to the main steam line, is connected with the vent line above the highest level of the water covering position in the reactor vessel. The above constitution can save the mounting of a manual switching valve or a remote control valve to the main steam connection line to thereby protect operators against radioactive exposure. (Furukawa, Y.)

  14. A comparison of elastic-plastic and variable modulus-cracking constitutive models for prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.A.; Smith, P.D.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical prediction of the behavior of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs) under static, dynamic and long term loadings is complicated by the currently ill-defined behavior of concrete under stress and the three-dimensional nature of PCRVs. Which constitutive model most closely approximates the behavior of concrete in PCRVs under load has not yet been decided. Many equations for accurately modeling the three-dimensional behavior of PCRVs tax the capability of a most up-to-date computing system. The main purpose of this paper is to compare the characteristics of two constitutive models which have been proposed for concrete, variable modulus cracking model and elastic-plastic model. Moreover, the behavior of typical concrete structures was compared, the materials of which obey these constitutive laws. The response to internal pressure of PCRV structure, the constitutive models for concrete, the test problems using a thick-walled concrete ring and a rectangular concrete plate, and the analysis of an axisymmetric concrete pressure vessel PV-26 using the variable modulus cracking model of the ADINA code are explained. The variable modulus cracking model can predict the behavior of reinforced concrete structures well into the range of nonlinear behavior. (Kako, I.)

  15. Experimental analysis of a nuclear reactor prestressed concrete pressure vessels model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallin, C.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensible analysis was made of the performance of each set of sensors used to measure the strain and displacement of a 1/20 scale Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel (PCPV) model tested at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). Among the three Kinds of sensors used (strain gage, displacement transducers and load cells) the displacement transducers showed the best behavior. The displacemente transducers data was statistically analysed and a linear behavior of the model was observed during the first pressurizations tests. By means of a linear statistical correlation between experimental and expected theoretical data it was found that the model looses the linearity at a pressure between 110-125 atm. (Author) [pt

  16. How to replace a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, R.

    1996-01-01

    A potential life extending procedure for a nuclear reactor after, say, 40 years of service life, might in some circumstances be the replacement of the reactor pressure vessel. Neutron induced degradation of the vessel might make replacement by one of a different material composition desirable, for example. Although the replacement of heavy components, such as steam generators, has been possible for many years, the pressure vessel presents a much more demanding task if only because it is highly irradiated. Some preliminary feasibility studies by Siemens are reported for the two removal strategies that might be considered. These are removal of the entire pressure vessel in one piece and dismantling it into sections. (UK)

  17. Reactor Vessel External Cooling for Corium Retention SULTAN Experimental Program and Modelling with CATHARE Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, S.; Dor, I.; Geffraye, G.

    1999-01-01

    In case of severe accident, a molten pool may form at the bottom of the lower head, and some pessimistic scenarios estimate that heat fluxes up to 1.5 MW/m 2 should be transferred through the vessel wall. An efficient, though completely passive, removal of heat flux during a long time is necessary to prevent total wall ablation, and a possible solution is to flood the cavity with water and establish boiling in natural convection. High heat exchanges are expected, especially if the system design (deflector along the vessel, riser...) emphasize water natural circulation, but are unfortunately limited by the critical heat flux phenomena (CHF). CHF data are very scarce in the adequate range of hydraulic and geometric parameters and are clearly dependent of the system effect in natural convection. The system effect can both modify flow velocity and two phase flow regimes, counter-current phenomena and flow static or dynamic instabilities. The SULTAN experimental program purpose was of two kinds, increasing CHF data for realistic situations, and improving the modeling of large 3D two phase flow circuits in natural convection. The CATHARE thermal-hydraulic code is used for interpreting the data and for extrapolation to real geometry. As a first step, a one-dimensional model is used. It is shown that some closure laws have to be improved. Reasonable predictions may be obtained but, for some test conditions, multi-dimensional effects such as recirculation appear to be dominant. Therefore the 3-dimensional module of CATHARE is also used to investigate these effects. This model well predicts qualitatively the existence and the development of a 2-phase layer along the heated wall as well as the existence of a recirculation zone. But modelling problems still require further development as part of a long term program for a better prediction of multi-dimensional two-phase flows

  18. Results of reactor pressure vessels ISI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, S.

    1994-01-01

    To find out the possible influence of the annealing process to reactor pressure vessel integrity, a large in-service inspection programme has been implemented as an associated activity to reactor pressure vessel annealing. In this paper the approach to the RPV in-service inspection is shown. Also, the main results and conclusions following in-service inspection are presented. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig

  19. Segmentation and packaging reactor vessels internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text follows: With more than 25 years of experience in the development of reactor vessel internals and reactor vessel segmentation and packaging technology, Westinghouse has accumulated significant know-how in the reactor dismantling market. The primary challenges of a segmentation and packaging project are to separate the highly activated materials from the less-activated materials and package them into appropriate containers for disposal. Since disposal cost is a key factor, it is important to plan and optimize waste segmentation and packaging. The choice of the optimum cutting technology is also important for a successful project implementation and depends on some specific constraints. Detailed 3-D modeling is the basis for tooling design and provides invaluable support in determining the optimum strategy for component cutting and disposal in waste containers, taking account of the radiological and packaging constraints. The usual method is to start at the end of the process, by evaluating handling of the containers, the waste disposal requirements, what type and size of containers are available for the different disposal options, and working backwards to select a cutting method and finally the cut geometry required. The 3-D models can include intelligent data such as weight, center of gravity, curie content, etc, for each segmented piece, which is very useful when comparing various cutting, handling and packaging options. The detailed 3-D analyses and thorough characterization assessment can draw the attention to material potentially subject to clearance, either directly or after certain period of decay, to allow recycling and further disposal cost reduction. Westinghouse has developed a variety of special cutting and handling tools, support fixtures, service bridges, water filtration systems, video-monitoring systems and customized rigging, all of which are required for a successful reactor vessel internals

  20. Model tests for prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, R.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations with models of reactor pressure vessels are used to check results of three dimensional calculation methods and to predict the behaviour of the prototype. Model tests with 1:50 elastic pressure vessel models and with a 1:5 prestressed concrete pressure vessel are described and experimental results are presented. (orig.) [de

  1. Simulation and tests to individual and coupled models of the reactor vessel simulator and the recirculation system for the SUN-RAH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez S, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The present project, is continuation of the project presented in the congress SNM-2003. In this new phase of the project, they were carried out adaptive changes to the modeling and implementation of the module of the full superior of the core of the reactor, they were carried out those modeling of the generation of heat as well as of the energy transfer in the one fuel. These models present the main characteristics of the vessel of the one reactor and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that they intervene in the physical processes, in the previous version the simulation in real time it required of an extremely quick computer and without executing collateral processes. The tests are presented carried out to the different models belonging to the Simulator of the Reactor Vessel and the Recirculation system for the SUN-RAH (University Simulator of Nucleo electric with Boiling Water Reactor), as well as the results hurtled by this tests. In each section the executions of the tests and the corresponding analyses of results are shown for each pattern. Besides the above mentioned, the advantages presented by the Simulator of the reactor vessel and the recirculation system are pointed. (Author)

  2. Analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Augusto, O.B.

    1985-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of high diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem, and the results are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. (Author) [pt

  3. Integrity of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, P.E.J.; Williams, G.H.; Wright, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The background to the safety assessment of the steel reactor pressure vessels for Magnox power stations is reviewed. The evolved philosophy adopted for the 1991 safety cases prepared for the continued operation of four Magnox power stations operated by Nuclear Electric plc is described together with different aspects of the multielement integrity argument. The main revisions to the mechanical property data are addressed together with the assessment methodology adopted and their implications for the overall integrity argument formulated for the continued safe operation of these reactor pressure vessels are discussed. (author)

  4. Integrity of Magnox reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flewitt, P.E.J.; Williams, G.H.; Wright, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The background to the safety assessment of the steel reactor pressure vessels for Magnox power stations is reviewed. The evolved philosophy adopted for the 1991 safety cases prepared for the continued operation of four Magnox power stations operated by Nuclear Electric plc is described, together with different aspects of the multi-legged integrity argument. The main revisions to the materials mechanical property data are addressed together with the assessment methodology adopted and their implications for the overall integrity argument formulated for the continued safe operation of these reactor pressure vessels. (author)

  5. Seal analysis technology for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Zhang Liping; Yang Yu; Zang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    There is the coolant with radiation, high temperature and high pressure in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is closely correlated to RPV sealing capability whether the whole nuclear system work well or not. The aim of this paper is to study the seal analysis method and technology, such as the pre-tensioning of the bolt, elastoplastic contact and coupled technology of thermal and structure. The 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method really and generally consider the loads and model the contact problem with friction between the contact plates. This method is easier than the specialized seal program and used widely. And it is more really than the 2 D seal analysis method. This 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method has been successfully used in the design and analysis of RPV. (authors)

  6. Examination of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Markulin, K.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand of a higher level of safety in the operation of the nuclear power plants requires the utilisation of more precise automated equipment to perform in-service inspections. That has been achieved by technological advances in computer technology, in robotics, in examination probe technology with the development of the advanced inspection technique and has also been due to the considerable and varied experience gained in the performance of such inspections. In-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel, especially Russian-designed WWER-1000 presents one of the most important and extensive examination of nuclear power plants primary circuit components. Such examination demand high standards of inspection technology, quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing advanced technology. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the base metal of vessel and reactor welds, whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual testing is used for examination of the vessel interior. The movement of inspection probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with inspection systems. The successful performance of reactor pressure vessel is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen non-destructive techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state-of-the-art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. This paper presents advanced approach in the reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and it is especially developed for WWER-1000 nuclear power plants.(author)

  7. Safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.

    1994-01-01

    The failure of several types of geometrically similar cylindrical and spherical steel and glass fibers vessels filled with water or air was investigated when an explosive charge of TNT was detonated in the center. Vessels had radius 50-1000 mm, thickness of walls 2-20%. The detonation on TNT imitated energy release. The parameter: K = M/mf is a measure of the strength of the vessel where M is the mass of the vessel, and mf is the mass of TNT for which the vessel fails. This demanded 2-4 destroyed and nondestroyed shots. It may be showed that: K=A/σ f where σ f is the fracture stress of the material vessel, and A = const = F(energy TNT, characteristic of elasticity of vessel material). The chief results are the following: (1) A similar increase in the geometrical dimensions of steel vessels by a factor of 10 leads to the increase of parameter K in about 5 times and to decrease of failure deformation in 7 times (scale effect). (2) For glass fibers, scale effect is absent. (3) This problem is solved in terms of theory energetic scale effect. (4) The concept of TNT equivalent explosive makes it possible to use these investigations to evaluate the response of safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

  8. An object kinetic Monte Carlo model for the microstructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Luca; Olsson, Paer [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Chiapetto, Monica [SCK - CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Becquart, Charlotte S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Malerba, Lorenzo [SCK - CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    This work presents a full object kinetic Monte Carlo framework for the simulation of the microstructure evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The model pursues a ''gray-alloy'' approach, where the effect of solute atoms is seen exclusively as a reduction of the mobility of defect clusters. The same set of parameters yields a satisfactory evolution for two different types of alloys, in very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy (high flux) and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel (low flux). A satisfactory match with the experimental characterizations is obtained only if assuming a substantial immobilization of vacancy clusters due to solute atoms, which is here verified by means of independent atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The microstructure evolution of the two alloys is strongly affected by the dose rate; a predominance of single defects and small defect clusters is observed at low dose rates, whereas larger defect clusters appear at high dose rates. In both cases, the predicted density of interstitial loops matches the experimental solute-cluster density, suggesting that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures might form as a consequence of solute enrichment on immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  10. Reactor vessel supported by flexure member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.D.; Pankow, B.

    1977-01-01

    According to the present invention there is provided an improved arrangement for supporting a reactor vessel within a containment structure against static and dynamic vertical loadings capable of being imposed as a result of a serious accident as well as during periods of normal plant operation. The support arrangement of the invention is, at the same time, capable of accommodating radial displacements that normally occur between the reactor vessel and the containment structure due to operational transients. The arrangement comprises a plurality of vertical columns connected between the reactor vessel and a support base within the containment structure. The columns are designed to accommodate relative displacements between the vessel and the containment structure by flexing. This eliminates the need for relative sliding movements and thus enables the columns to be securely fixed to the vessel. This elimination of a provision for relative sliding movements avoids the spaces or gaps between the retention members and the retained elements as occurred in prior art arrangements and, concomitantly, the danger of establishing impact forces on the retention members in the event of an accident is reduced. (author)

  11. Experimental investigations on reactor pressure vessel penetration integrity under external vessel cooling in the Korean next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Cho, Young Ro; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik; Lee, Ki Young; Park, Jong Kyun

    2001-06-01

    An experimental study on the penetration integrity of the reactor vessel has been performed under external vessel cooling in the Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR). The experiments were carried out using only one penetration and 40 kg of Al2O3 melt as a corium simulant. The test section is a cylindrical shape with flat plate bottom. The thickness and material properties of the lower head vessel and the penetration including welding material are a coincident with those of the KNGR. In this study, the effect of coolant in the annulus between the ICI nozzle and the thimble tube on the integrity of the penetration has been estimated combined with the analytical study using the Modified Bulk Freezing(MBF) model. And also the experiments were performed for evaluating the effect of the external vessel cooling on the integrity of the penetration and the lower head vessel. The experimental results have shown that penetration is more damaged in the case of no external vessel cooling compared with the case of external vessel cooling. It could be inferred from the temperature histories of the lower head vessel and water in the tests with external vessel cooling that the outer surface of the vessel was effectively cooled down through the nucleate boiling in spite of the local heat up characterized by the film boiling beyond the Leidenfrost temperature. Synthesized the experimental results on the post-examination of the cross-sectional view and the thermal behavior of the test section, it is preliminarily concluded that the external vessel cooling is very effective measure for the improvement of the penetration integrity. Also it is confirmed from the experimental and calculated results that the coolant in the annulus reduces the melt penetration distance through the annulus and enhance the integrity of the reactor vessel penetration in the end.

  12. Nanostructure evolution under irradiation of Fe(C)MnNi model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapetto, M., E-mail: mchiapet@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unité Matériaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Université de Lille 1, ENSCL, F-59600 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Domain, C. [EDF R& D, Département Matériaux et Mécanique des Composants, Les Renardières, F-77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modélisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Matériaux (EM2VM) (France); Malerba, L. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-06-01

    Radiation-induced embrittlement of bainitic steels is one of the most important lifetime limiting factors of existing nuclear light water reactor pressure vessels. The primary mechanism of embrittlement is the obstruction of dislocation motion produced by nanometric defect structures that develop in the bulk of the material due to irradiation. The development of models that describe, based on physical mechanisms, the nanostructural changes in these types of materials due to neutron irradiation are expected to help to better understand which features are mainly responsible for embrittlement. The chemical elements that are thought to influence most the response under irradiation of low-Cu RPV steels, especially at high fluence, are Ni and Mn, hence there is an interest in modelling the nanostructure evolution in irradiated FeMnNi alloys. As a first step in this direction, we developed sets of parameters for object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) simulations that allow this to be done, under simplifying assumptions, using a “grey alloy” approach that extends the already existing OKMC model for neutron irradiated Fe–C binary alloys [1]. Our model proved to be able to describe the trend in the buildup of irradiation defect populations at the operational temperature of LWR (∼300 °C), in terms of both density and size distribution of the defect cluster populations, in FeMnNi model alloys as compared to Fe–C. In particular, the reduction of the mobility of point-defect clusters as a consequence of the presence of solutes proves to be key to explain the experimentally observed disappearance of detectable point-defect clusters with increasing solute content.

  13. Earthquake-proof supporting structure in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akio; Sekine, Katsuhisa; Madokoro, Manabu; Katoono, Shin-ichi; Konno, Mutsuo; Suzuki, Takuro.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional earthquake-proof structure comprises a vessel vibration stopper integrated to a reactor vessel, powder for restricting the horizontal displacements, a safety vessel surrounds the outer periphery of the reactor vessel and a safety vessel vibration stopper integrated therewith, which are fixed to buildings. However, there was a problem that a great amount of stresses are generated in the base of the reactor vessel vibration stopper due to reaction of the powders which restrict thermal expansion. In order to remarkably reduce the reaction of the powers, powders are charged into a spaces formed between each of the reactor vessel vibration stopper, the safety vessel vibration stopper and the flexible member disposed between them. According to this constitution, the reactor vessel vibration stopper does not undergo a great reaction of the powers upon thermal expansion of the reactor vessel to moderate the generated stresses, maintain the strength and provide earthquake-proof supporting function. (N.H.)

  14. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  15. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Kugeler, K.; Kugeler, M.; Petersen, K.; Decken, C.B. von der.

    1983-01-01

    This construction of a container, which is pressure-relieved by axial-central tensioning cables or reinforcing cables distributed over the circumference, makes a reduction of the wall thickness for the floor and roof, which was previously 2.5 metres by about 40% possible, and thus reduce manufacturing and cost problems. This is achieved by an appreciable increase of the prestressing exerted by the tensioning cables as this is taken up, not by the elasticity of the roof and floor, but instead by an intermediate part of pressure-resisting material. Such a container consists of a vertical cylindrical jacket of, for example, 20 metres diameter and 18 metres height, of a roof and floor of, for example, 1.50 metres thickness each and the intermediate part, which keeps the spacing of floor and roof as a central piece. This intermediate part which is taken through seals through the container can be imagined as a double tube of outside tube diameter of, for example, 4 metres and inside tube diameter of 2 metres with both tubes having thick walls. 4 tensioning cables displaced vertically by 900 run in the cylindrical annulus between the outer and inner tubes which are brought to the required pretension, e.g. 80,000 tonnes by nuts situated on the outside. The inner tube projects through the floor and roof. Its openings act as manholes and for the introduction of pipelines. These can, for example, carry a cooling medium for a reactor core via further ducts into the inside of the container. Container wall, floor and roof and the intermediate part in the form of a double tube are made up of cast steel segments or sectors in several layers. (RW)

  16. Reactor pressure vessel aging and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, C.

    1987-01-01

    The considerable aging effect on reactor pressure vessels is the effect of irradiation on material properties in the core beltline region. Modern LWRs in the Federal Republic of Germany are designed such that irradiation effects are very low. Countermeasures applicable separately or in combination for plants with higher than normally expected irradiation effects are described in three steps: first, examinations and calculations to extend the formal reactor lifetime by reducing over-conservative margins; second, changes in core design to reduce future irradiation effects; third, a procedure to recover irradiation effect on material properties already sustained. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Modeling of Late Blooming Phases and Precipitation Kinetics in Aging Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2013-09-01

    The principle work at the atomic scale is to develop a predictive quantitative model for the microstructure evolution of RPV steels under thermal aging and neutron radiation. We have developed an AKMC method for the precipitation kinetics in bcc-Fe, with Cu, Ni, Mn and Si being the alloying elements. In addition, we used MD simulations to provide input parameters (if not available in literature). MMC simulations were also carried out to explore the possible segregation/precipitation morphologies at the lattice defects. First we briefly describe each of the simulation algorithms, then will present our results.

  18. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  19. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities

  20. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  1. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  2. Stud bolt handling equipment for reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyan, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    Reactor vessel stud bolt handling equipment includes means for transferring a stud bolt to a carrier from a parking station, or vice versa. Preferably a number of stud bolts are handled simultaneously. The transfer means may include cross arms rotatable about extendable columns, and the equipment is mounted on a mobile base for movement into and out of position. Each carrier comprises a tubular socket and an expandable sleeve to grip a stud bolt. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepelak, George R.

    1978-01-01

    A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

  4. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  5. Method for temporary shielding of reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, N.P.; Sejvar, J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for shielding stored internals for reactor vessel annealing. It comprises removing nuclear fuel from the reactor vessel containment building; removing and storing upper and lower core internals under water in a refueling canal storage area; assembling a support structure in the refueling canal between the reactor vessel and the stored internals; introducing vertical shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each into the support structure; introducing horizontal shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each above the stored internals and vertical tanks; draining water from the refueling canal to the level of a flange of the reactor vessel; placing an annealing apparatus in the reactor vessel; pumping the remaining water from the reactor vessel; and annealing the reactor vessel

  6. Stresses in transition region of VVER-1000 reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namgung, I.; Nguye, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the western PWR reactor's bottom head is hemi-spherical shape, however for Russian designed VVER family of reactor it is ellipsoidal shape. The transition region from shell side to ellipsoidal head and transition top flange to cylindrical shell develop higher stress concentration than western PWR reactor vessel. This region can be modeled as conical shell with varying thickness. The theoretical derivation of stress in the thick-walled conical cylinder with varying thickness was developed and shown in detail. The results is applied to VVER-1000 reactor vessel of which shell to bottom ellipsoidal shell and shell to upper flange were investigated for stress field. The theoretical calculations were also compared with FEM solutions. An axisymmetric 3D model of VVER-1000 reactor vessel (without closure head) FEM model was created and internal hydrostatic pressure boundary condition was applied. The stress results from FEM and theoretical calculation were compared, and the discrepancies and accuracies of the theoretical results were discussed. (author)

  7. Reactor vessel water level estimation during severe accidents using cascaded fuzzy neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Yeong; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Choi, Geon Pil; Back, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Global concern and interest in the safety of nuclear power plants have increased considerably since the Fukushima accident. In the event of a severe accident, the reactor vessel water level cannot be measured. The reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on confirming the safety of reactor core cooling. However, in the event of a severe accident, it may be possible to estimate the reactor vessel water level by employing other information. The cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN) model can be used to estimate the reactor vessel water level through the process of repeatedly adding fuzzy neural networks. The developed CFNN model was found to be sufficiently accurate for estimating the reactor vessel water level when the sensor performance had deteriorated. Therefore, the developed CFNN model can help provide effective information to operators in the event of a severe accident.

  8. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  9. VISA-2, Reactor Vessel Failure Probability Under Thermal Shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, F.; Johnson, K.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: VISA2 (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) was developed to estimate the failure probability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock conditions. The deterministic portion of the code performs heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations for a vessel subjected to a user-specified temperature and pressure transient. The probabilistic analysis performs a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the probability of vessel failure. Parameters such as initial crack size and position, copper and nickel content, fluence, and the fracture toughness values for crack initiation and arrest are treated as random variables. Linear elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to model crack initiation and growth. This includes cladding effects in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations. The simulation procedure treats an entire vessel and recognizes that more than one flaw can exist in a given vessel. The flaw model allows random positioning of the flaw within the vessel wall thickness, and the user can specify either flaw length or length-to-depth aspect ratio for crack initiation and arrest predictions. The flaw size distribution can be adjust on the basis of different inservice inspection techniques and inspection conditions. The toughness simulation model includes a menu of alternative equations for predicting the shift in the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition. 2 - Method of solution: The solution method uses closed form equations for temperatures, stresses, and stress intensity factors. A polynomial fitting procedure approximates the specified pressure and temperature transient. Failure probabilities are calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 30 welds. VISA2 models only the belt-line (cylindrical) region of a reactor vessel. The stresses are a function of the radial (through-wall) coordinate only

  10. Reactor vessel closure head replacements in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome-Jeumont Industrie consortium have completed in 1997 28 reactor vessel (RV) closure head replacements, including five on 1300 MWe class PWR units. Framatome manages the operations and handles removal and reinstallation of equipment (not including the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM)) and the requalification tests, while JI, which manufactures the CRDMs, is involved in the CRDM cutting, re-machining and welding operations, using tools of original design, in order to optimize the RV closure head operation in terms of costs, schedule and dosage

  11. Reliability analysis of reactor pressure vessel intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Lu Yongbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper performs the reliability analysis of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) with ANSYS. The analysis method include direct Monte Carlo Simulation method, Latin Hypercube Sampling, central composite design and Box-Behnken Matrix design. The RPV integrity reliability under given input condition is proposed. The result shows that the effects on the RPV base material reliability are internal press, allowable basic stress and elasticity modulus of base material in descending order, and the effects on the bolt reliability are allowable basic stress of bolt material, preload of bolt and internal press in descending order. (authors)

  12. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue

  13. Liquid metal systems development: reactor vessel support structure evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an evaluation of support structures for the reactor vessel are reported. The U ring, box ring, integral ring, tee ring and tangential beam supports were investigated. The U ring is the recommended vessel support structure configuration

  14. Nonlinear analysis of end slabs in prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulrahman, H.O.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure for the nonlinear analysis of end slabs is prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs), based on the finite element method, is presented. The applicability of the procedure to the ultimate load analysis of small-scale models of the primary containment of nuclear reactors is shown. Material nonlinearity only is considered. The procedure utilizes the four-node linear quadrilateral isoparametric element with the choice of incorporating the nonconforming modes. This element is used for modeling the vessel as an axisymmetric solid. Concrete is assumed to be an isotropic material in the elastic range. The compressive stresses are judged according to a special form of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion. The nonlinear problem was solved using a generalized Newton-Raphson procedure. A detailed example problem of a pressure vessel with penetrations is presented. This is followed by a summary of the other cases studied. The solutions obtained match very closely the measured response of the test vessels under increasing internal pressure up to failure. The procedure is thus adequate for the assessment of the ultimate load behavior and failure of actual pressure vessels with a moderate demand on human and computational resources

  15. High Fluency Low Flux Embrittlement Models of LWR Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement and a Supporting Database from the UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G. Robert [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement may limit the lifetime of light water reactors (LWR). Embrittlement is primarily caused by formation of nano-scale precipitates, which cause hardening and a subsequent increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the steel. While the effect of Cu has historically been the largest research focus of RPV embrittlement, there is increasing evidence that Mn, Ni and Si are likely to have a large effect at higher fluence, where Mn-Ni-Si precipitates can form, even in the absence of Cu. Therefore, extending RPV lifetimes will require a thorough understanding of both precipitation and embrittlement at higher fluences than have ever been observed in a power reactor. To address this issue, test reactors that irradiate materials at higher neutron fluxes than power reactors are used. These experiments at high neutron flux can reach extended life neutron fluences in only months or several years. The drawback of these test irradiations is that they add additional complexity to interpreting the data, as the irradiation flux also plays a role into both precipitate formation and irradiation hardening and embrittlement. This report focuses on developing a database of both microstructure and mechanical property data to better understand the effect of flux. In addition, a previously developed model that enables the comparison of data taken over a range of neutron flux is discussed.

  16. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  17. Computing radiation dose to reactor pressure vessel and internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Within the next twenty years many of the nuclear reactors currently in service will reach their design lifetime. One of the key factors affecting decisions on license extensions will be the ability to confidently predict the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and core structural components which have been subjected to many years of cumulative radiation exposure. This report gives an overview of the most recent scientific literature and current methodologies for computational dosimetry in the OECD/NEA Member countries. Discussion is extended to consider some related issues of materials science, such as the metals, and limitations of the models in current use. Proposals are made for further work. (author)

  18. Re-examining reactor vessel embrittlement at Chooz A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilleret, J.-C.

    1988-01-01

    The Chooz A PWR experienced an extended shutdown in 1987/88 following indications that the reactor vessel was embrittling more rapidly than expected. Discrepancies between the expected rate and estimates of the actual rate were not easily explained. The huge body of work done since then to establish safety margins and support restart of the plant should provide a model for the owners of other older PWRs grappling with the embrittlement issue. (author)

  19. Systems aspects of reactor pressure vessel integrity: Executive report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.K.; Beck, R.K.; Wallace, I.W.; Grigsby, J.M.; Sloane, B.D.; Bishop, B.A.

    1993-11-01

    Reactor vessel integrity is affected by the following key issues: Operational heatup and cooldown pressure-temperature limit curves and the associated occurrence of low temperature over pressurization (LTOP); pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events that could lead to crack initiation in the vessel, and irradiation effects, including low upper shelf fracture toughness. Electric Power Research Institute's Embrittlement Management Program is underway to develop methods in assessing reactor vessel integrity issues due to radiation embrittlement. Reactor vessel integrity may be impacted by different aspects including some degradation mechanisms. One of those aspects are the plant system changes associated with the reactor vessel. This report uses the results from various probabilistic analyses performed by Westinghouse and other organizations, to identify those plant systems which are most important to the reactor vessel embrittlement issues

  20. Vessel core seismic interaction for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Maresca, G.

    1984-01-01

    This report deals with the analysis carried out in collaboration between ENEA and NIRA for optimizing the iterative procedure applied for the evaluation of the effects of the vessel core dynamic interaction for a fast reactor in the case of a earthquake. In fact, as shown in a previous report the convergence of such procedure was very slow for the design solution adopted for the PEC reactor, i.e. with a core restraint plate located close to the top of the core elements. This study, although performed making use of preliminary data (the same of the cited previous report) demonstrates that the convergence is fast if a suitable linear core model is applied in the first iteration linear calculations carried out by NIRA, with an intermediate stiffness with respect to those corresponding to the two limit models previously assumed and increased damping coefficients. Thus, the optimized iterative procedures is now applied in the PEC reactor block seismic verification analysis

  1. Reactor pressure vessel stud management automation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biach, W.L.; Hill, R.; Hung, K.

    1992-01-01

    The adoption of hydraulic tensioner technology as the standard for bolting and unbolting the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) head 35 yr ago represented an incredible commitment to new technology, but the existing technology was so primitive as to be clearly unacceptable. Today, a variety of approaches for improvement make the decision more difficult. Automation in existing installations must meet complex physical, logistic, and financial parameters while addressing the demands of reduced exposure, reduced critical path, and extended plant life. There are two generic approaches to providing automated RPV stud engagement and disengagement: the multiple stud tensioner and automated individual tools. A variation of the latter would include the handling system. Each has its benefits and liabilities

  2. Zircaloy welding in OPAL reactor reflector vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, L.; Martinez, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: This paper describes the development of the Zircaloy 4 welding processes applied in the fabrication of the Reflector Vessel for the OPAL reactor. As an introduction, a brief description is made of the geometric design of the Reflector Vessel, which is very complex, as it has many irradiation positions, beams tubes, channels, outer connections, and reinforcements. The complexity of this component demanded different welded joints and a careful manufacturing sequence, which comprised welding, machining, heat treatments, and quality control operations. Design and fabrication of different ad-hoc devices was also required, some of which are described in the present paper. For the purposes of issuing reliable welding procedures, the joints were previously set up through tests using samples and mock-ups. Procedures and welders were qualified in accordance with the ASME Code, Section IX. The welding methods used in the fabrication were GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) and PAW (Plasma Arc Welding), processes deemed adequate to weld these alloys, as they do not contaminate the material, for they are carried out within an inert gas atmosphere. Contrary to other welding methods commonly used for other materials, no welding fluxes or chemically-active gases are applied in these two processes. The advantages of both methods used are discussed. The welds were carried out in manual, orbital, or mechanized mode depending on the type of joint

  3. Feedwater control device for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuma, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the generation of thermal stresses at the junction between a clean-up water pipe and a feedwater pipe. Constitution: Hot water containing impurities in a pressure vessel is caused to flow by a recycling pump through a heat exchanger, a cooler and a clean-up desalter and again by way of the heat exchanger into the feedwater pipe at the junction with the clean-up water pipe, where it is mixed with the feedwater passed by way of a feedwater heater and supplied to the pressure vessel. The feedwater temperature for the feedwater pipe and the set temperature for the clean-up water are compared with each other by using temperature sensors disposed to the feedwater pipe between the junction and the feedwater heater at the upstream of the junction. If the temperature difference is increased, for instance, upon transient state where the operation of the feedwater heater is not yet stabilized, the recycling pump is controlled to stop the supply of the clean-up water to the junction while flowing only the feedwater. This makes the temperature distribution uniform and prevents the generation of the thermal stresses at the junction, by which reactor safety can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT NDT ) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties

  5. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs

  6. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle

  7. Calculation of reactor pressure vessel fluence using TORT code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chul Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1998-01-01

    TORT is employed for fast neutron fluence calculation at the reactor pressure vessel. KORI Unit 1 reactor at cycle 1 is modeled for this calculation. Three-dimensional cycle averaged assembly power distributions for KORI Unit 1 at cycle 1 are calculated by using the core physics code, NESTLE 5.0. The root mean square error is within 4.3% compared with NDR (Nuclear Design Report) for all burnup steps. The C/E (Calculated/Experimental) values for the in-vessel dosimeters distribute between 0.98 and 1.36. The most updated cross-section library, BUGLE-96 based on ENDF/B-VI is used for the neutron fluence calculation. The maximum fast neutron fluence calculated on reactor pressure vessel for KORI Unit 1 operated for 411.41 effective full power days is 1.784x10 18 n/cm 2 . The position of the maximum neutron fluence in RPV wall 1/4 T is nearby 60 cm below the midplane at zero degree

  8. Simulation of In-Vessel Corium Retention through External Reactor Vessel Cooling for SMART using SIMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin-Sung; Son, Donggun; Park, Rae-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel is necessary to evaluate the effect of the IVR-ERVC during a severe accident for SMART. A computational code called SIMPLE (Sever Invessel Melt Progression in Lower plenum Environment) has been developed for analyze transient behavior of molten corium in the lower plenum, interaction between corium and coolant, and heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. In this study, heat load analysis of the reactor vessel for SMART has been conducted using the SIMPLE. Transient behavior of the molten corium in the lower plenum and IVR-ERVC for SMART has been simulated using SIMPLE. Heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is concentrated in metallic layer by the focusing effect. As a result, metallic layer shows higher temperature than the oxidic layer. Also, vessel wall of metallic layer has been ablated by the high in-vessel temperature. Ex-vessel temperature of the metallic layer was maintained 390 K and vessel thickness was maintained 14 cm. It means that the reactor vessel integrity is maintained by the IVR-ERVC.

  9. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  10. Certifying the decommissioned Shippingport reactor vessel for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towell, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The decommissioned Shippingport reactor pressure vessel with its concentric neutron shield tank was shipped to Hanford, WA as part of the effort to restore the Shippingport Station to its original condition. The metal walls of the reactor vessel had become radioactive from neutron bombardment while the reactor was operating so it had to be shipped under the regulations for transporting radioactive material. Because of the large amount of radioactivity in the walls, 16,467 Curies, and because the potentially dispersible corrosion layer on the inner walls of both tanks was also radioactive, the Shippingport reactor vessel was transported under the most stringent of the regulations, those for a type B package. Compliance with the packaging regulations was confirmed via independent analysis by the staff of the Department of Energy certifying official and the Shippingport reactor vessel was shipped under DOE Certificate of Compliance USA/9515/B(U)

  11. Influence of Modelling Options in RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 Computer Codes on Core Melt Progression and Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Šadek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and MAAP4 are two widely used severe accident computer codes for the integral analysis of the core and the reactor pressure vessel behaviour following the core degradation. The objective of the paper is the comparison of code results obtained by application of different modelling options and the evaluation of influence of thermal hydraulic behaviour of the plant on core damage progression. The analysed transient was postulated station blackout in NPP Krško with a leakage from reactor coolant pump seals. Two groups of calculations were performed where each group had a different break area and, thus, a different leakage rate. Analyses have shown that MAAP4 results were more sensitive to varying thermal hydraulic conditions in the primary system. User-defined parameters had to be carefully selected when the MAAP4 model was developed, in contrast to the RELAP5/SCDAPSIM model where those parameters did not have any significant impact on final results.

  12. Influence of fuel loading on neutron field in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacho, M.; Slugen, V.; Farkas, G.; Sojak, S. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2010-07-01

    One of the limiting factors in terms of nuclear power plant lifetime is reactor pressure vessel neutron load. Neutron embrittlement as the most important ageing effect on the reactor pressure vessel is mainly caused by fast neutron spectra. The work is focused on mapping of neutron fields in the reactor pressure vessel of WWER-440/V-213 reactor using MCNP5 transport code. The calculation of neutron fields was performed using detailed full-core MCNP model of WWER-440 reactor developed at our department. Analysis of fuel loading pattern and burn-up influence on neutron flux density distribution in the reactor pressure vessel was realized. The fuel composition corresponds to fuel cycles of Bohunice and Mochovce nuclear power plants. The goal of this work was to improve the assessment of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel radiation degradation and following evaluation possibility of its lifetime extension and comparison of neutron flux and neutron spectra in the most loaded place of reactor pressure vessel and surveillance specimen area. (authors)

  13. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  14. Research progress and recommendations on reactor pressure vessel integrity under hypothetical core melt down accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yangui; Ning Dong; Wu Zhiwei; Cao Ming; Xie Yongcheng; He Yinbiao; Yao Weida

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is very important to ensure the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. The high-temperature creep failure is the main failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. Purpose: This paper is to present an overview of research status and progress on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario. Methods: Emphasis is placed on accomplished achievements in creep tests, scale model experiments and numerical simulation, and the domestic newly research productions on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel structure integrity. Conclusions: This paper also discusses the limitations of existing researches and indicates future research directions, such as multi-axis tensile tests, analysis of three-dimensional coupling temperature field, scaled model tests, and so on. (authors)

  15. The long-life design analysis of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ping

    2014-01-01

    Based on the fast neutron irradiation and thermal fatigue on reactor vessel ageing, the long-life design methods of reactor pressure vessel in EPR, AP1000, and CPR1000 are introduced. It is considered that adopting heavy reflector, increasing the downcomer of water gap, in-out refueling and increasing the toughness of the material are the methods to achieve the long-life running of RPV. (author)

  16. In-vessel maintenance concepts for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Yount, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts for rail-mounted and guided in-vessel handling machines (IVM) for remote maintenance inside tokamak fusion reactors are described. The IVM designs are based on concepts for tethered remotely operated vehicles and feature the use of multiple manipulator arms for remote handling and remote-controlled TV cameras for remote viewing. The concepts include IVMs for both single or dual rail systems located in the top or bottom of the reactor vessel

  17. Construction of reactor vessel bottom of prestressed reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitnikov, M.I.; Metel'skij, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    Methods are described for building reactor vessel bottoms of prestressed reinforced concrete during NPPs construction in Great Britain, France, Germany (F.R.) and the USA. Schematic of operations performed in succession is presented. Considered are different versions of one of the methods for concreting a space under a facing by forcing concrete through a hole in the facing. The method provides tight sticking of the facing to the reactor vessel bottom concrete

  18. Design for the WWR-M reactor vessel removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, Yu.N.; Toth, G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The current status of the decommissioning planning for the WWR-M reactor is outlined. ► The general dismantling strategy consists of the dismantling and removal of the separate bulky elements as whole pieces without preliminary segmentation. ► The design for the reactor vessel extraction was selected and developed. -- Abstract: The final decommissioning planning for the Kiev's research reactor WWR-M is in progress now. The general dismantling strategy consists of the dismantling and removal of the separate bulky elements as whole pieces without preliminary segmentation. The reactor vessel removal is considered as the key element in the sequence of dismantling works; a separate design for the reactor vessel extraction was developed. The extensive analysis focused on the optimization of this technical task has been performed. The outline of the design is presented in this paper

  19. Cooling device for upper lid of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Kazuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    An upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel in a BWR type reactor has one or more annular cooling elements on the surface. The outer side thereof is covered by a temperature keeping frame. The cooling elements have an annular hollow shape, and cooling water is supplied to the hollow portion. As the cooling water supplied to the cooling elements, cooling water of a reactor auxiliary cooling system as a cooling water system incorporated in the reactor container or cooling water of a dehumidification system of the reactor container is used. A plurality of temperature sensors are disposed to various portions of the upper lid of the pressure vessel. A control device determines scattering of the temperature for the entire upper lid of the pressure vessel by temperature signals sent from the temperature sensors. Then, the amount of cooling water to be flown to each of the cooling elements is controlled so as to eliminate the scattering. (I.N.)

  20. A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, O.

    1976-01-01

    A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel comprising a pump mounted in the reactor vessel and driven by a water-cooled electric motor mounted in a housing outside the reactor vessel, the shaft of the pump passing through the reactor-vessel bottom and being coupled to the motor shaft in a member mechanically connected to the bottom of the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the motor housing, the pump shaft being surrounded by a resilient sealing ring, the reactor vessel communicating with the cooling channels of the pump, when the latter is operating, via a slot surrounding the pump hollow cylindrical shaft, characterized in that the slot inner end is used for/forming a circular space surrounding the pump shaft and surrounded by the motorhousing, in which is coaxially mounted a separating cylindral wall, the upper edge of which is tightly applied against the inner wall of the motor-housing to which it is fastened vertically, the inner surface of said wall being turned towards the outer surface of a circular packing-box, the outer surface of said separating wall constituting a separating radical inner surface for a circular chamber through which flow the motor cooling water. (author)

  1. Keeping control when cutting through a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    UK Robotics' Advanced Teleoperation Controller (ATC) is a key component of one of the most extensive remote handling operations currently being undertaken - the removal of 165 mm diameter, 90 mm thick samples of carbon-manganese steel from the base of the Trawsfyndd reactor pressure vessel. These will then be used to assess the material properties of the vessel welds. (author)

  2. Dismantling method for reactor pressure vessel and system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Enomoto, Kunio; Kurosawa, Koichi; Saito, Hideyo.

    1994-01-01

    Upon dismantling of a reactor pressure vessel, a containment building made of concretes is disposed underground and a spent pressure vessel is contained therein, and incore structures are contained in the spent pressure vessel. Further, a plasma-welder and a pressing machine are disposed to a pool for provisionally placing reactor equipments in the reactor building for devoluming the incore structures by welding and compression. An overhead-running crane and rails therefor are disposed on the roof and the outer side of the reactor building for transporting the pressure vessel from the reactor building to the containment building. They may be contained in the containment building after incorporation of the incore structures into the pressure vessel at the outside of the reactor building. For the devoluming treatment, a combination of cutting, welding, pressing and the like are optically conducted. A nuclear power plant can be installed by using a newly manufactured nuclear reactor, with no requirement for a new site and it is unnecessary to provide a new radioactive waste containing facility. (N.H.)

  3. Nuclear reactor having an inflatable vessel closure seal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved type of closure head seal for the rotatable plugs of the reactor vessel of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor is described. The seal prevents the release of radioactive particles while allowing the plug to be rotated without major manipulation of the seal structure. (UK)

  4. System for cooling the containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Didier.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a post-accidental cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. This system includes in series a turbine fed by the moist air contained in the vessel, a condenser in which the air is dried and cooled, a compressor actuated by the turbine and a cooling exchanger. The cold water flowing through the condenser and in the exchanger is taken from a tank outside the vessel and injected by a pump actuated by the turbine. The application is for nuclear reactors under pressure [fr

  5. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Loeseth, S.; Holand, I.

    1977-01-01

    A computational model for circular symmetric reinforced concrete shell problems is described. The model is based on the Finite Element Method. Non-linear stress-strain constitutive relations are used for the concrete, the reinforcement and for the liner. The reinforcement layers may be of different steel qualities. Each layer may be given a specified prestressing. This can be done at the beginning of the computations or the specific reinforcement layer can be considered inactive until a specified level of loading is reached. Thus, the prestressing procedure may also be analyzed in detail. Bond-slip effects are not accounted for. However, no bond may be assumed for prestressing cables by inserting special reinforcement elements. Several models of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels which have been tested up to rupture have been analysed. Analytical (numerical) models for reinforced concrete are also discussed on a more general basis. (Auth.)

  6. Motor-driven screwing and transporting tool for pressure vessels, especially pressure vessels for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, M.

    1976-01-01

    A screwing and transporting device for tensioning and loosening the reactor pressure vessel head is described. The advantage of the tool is its ability to unscrew the stud bolts from the lower part of the pressure vessel, too, and therefore make them accessible for in-service inspection. (TK) [de

  7. Design Procedure on Stud Bolt for Reactor Vessel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Wook; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Jeoung, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-01

    The reactor pressure vessel flange is welded to the upper part of reactor pressure vessel, and there are stud holes to mount the closure head with stud bolts. The surface mating the closure head is compressed with O-ring, which acts as a sealing gasket to prevent coolant leakage. Bolted flange connections perform a very important structural role in the design of a reactor pressure vessel. Their importance stems from two important functions: (a) maintenance of the structural integrity of the connection itself, and (b) prevention of leakage through the O-ring preloaded by stud bolts. In the present study, an evaluation procedure for the design of stud bolt is developed to meet ASME code requirements. The developed design procedure could provide typical references in the development of advanced reactor design in the future

  8. Elements of thought on corium containment strategy in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    As accidents with core fusion are taken into account for the design of third-generation nuclear reactors, this brief document presents the corium containment strategy for a reactor vessel, its limitations, as well as research programs undertaken by the IRSN in this field. The report describes the controlled management of a severe accident, the major objective being to minimise releases in the environment, that which requires to maintain the reactor containment enclosure tightness. Practical actions are briefly indicated. Key points indicating the feasibility of a strategy of containment in vessel are discussed. The impact of reactor power on the robustness of an approach with containment in vessel is also discussed. An overview of technological evolutions and contributions of researches made by the IRSN is finally proposed

  9. Materials surveillance program for C-E NSSS reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziol, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation surveillance programs for light water NSSS reactor vessels provide the means by which the utility can assess the extent of neutron-induced changes in the reactor vessel materials. These programs are conducted to verify, by direct measurement, the conservatism in the predicted radiation-induced changes and hence the operational parameters (i.e., heat-up, cooldown, and pressurization rates). In addition, such programs provide assurance that the scheduled adjustments in the operational parameters are made with ample margin for safe operation of the plant. During the past 3 years, several documents have been promulgated establishing the criteria for determining both the initial properties of the reactor vessel materials as well as measurement of changes in these initial properties as a result of irradiation. These documents, ASTM E-185-73, ''Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels,'' and Appendix H to 10 CFR 50, ''Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements,'' are complementary to each other. They are the result of a change in the basic philosophy regarding the design and analysis of reactor vessels. In effect, the empirical ''transition temperature approach,'' which was used for design, was replaced by the ''analytical fracture mechanics approach.'' The implementation of this technique was described in Welding Research Council Bulletin 1975 and Appendix G to ASME Code Section III. Further definition of requirements appears in Appendix G to 10 CFR 50 published in July 1973. It is the intent of this paper to describe (1) a typical materials surveillance program for the reactor vessel of a Combustion Engineering NSSS, and (2) how the results of such programs, as well as experimental programs provide feed-back for improvement of materials to enhance their radiation resistance and thereby further improve the safety and reliability of future plants. (author)

  10. Investigation of flow stabilization in a compact reactor vessel of a FBR. Flow visualization in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    In the feasibility studies of Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System, a compact reactor vessel is considered from economical improvement point of a sodium cooled loop type fast reactor. The flow field was visualized by water experiment for a reactor vessel with 'a column type UIS (Upper Internal Structure)', which has a slit for fuel handling mechanism and is useful for a compact fast reactor. In this research, the 1/20 scale test equipment using water was made to understand coolant flow through a slit of a column type UIS' and fundamental behavior of reactor upper plenum flow. In the flow visualization tests, tracer particles were added in the water, and illuminated by the slit-shaped pulse laser. The flow visualization image was taken with a CCD camera. We obtained fluid velocity vectors from the visualization image using the Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results are as follows. 1. Most of coolant flow through a slit of 'column type UIS' arrived the dip plate directly. In the opposite side of a slit, most of coolant flowed toward reactor vessel wall before it arrived the dip plate. 2. The PIV was useful to measure the flow field in the reactor vessel. The obtained velocity field was consistent with the flow visualization result. 3. The jet through the UIS slit was dependent on the UIS geometry. There is a possibility to control the jet by the UIS geometry. (author)

  11. Material problems in accident analysis of prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.

    1977-01-01

    Due to their very high energy absorption capability, as well as their inherent safety advantages, prestressed concrete reactor vessels are presently being keenly studied as the basic barrier to contain hypothetical core disruptive accidents in a fast breeder reactor. One problem investigated is the nonlinear constitutive behavior and failure criteria for concrete. Previously, a comprehensive theory, called endochronic theory, has been shown to satisfy all basic currently known features of test data. Nevertheless uncertainty still exists with regard to non-proportional loading paths, for which good test data are lacking at present. An extension of the endochronic theory which correlates best with general experimental evidence and includes fracturing terms is given, and a comparison with vertex-type hardening in plasticity is made. A second problem which must be analysed in accident situations is the high temperature shock on the concrete walls (due to liquid sodium, up to 850 0 C). Refining a previous crude formulation, a rational model for calculating moisture and heat transfer and pore pressures in concrete subjected to thermal shock is presented. In conclusion, a new design concept, in which the concrete vessel is completely dehydrated and kept hot throughout its service life in order to substantially improve its response to thermal shock as well as liquid sodium contact, is described. (Auth.)

  12. Weld residual stress predictions in reactor vessel head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suanno, Rodolfo L.M.; Ferrari, Lucio D.B. [ELETROBRAS Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Stress Analysis Department], e-mail: rsuanno@eletronuclear.gov.br; Teughels, Anne; Malekian, Christian [Tractebel Engineering, Brussels (Belgium). Reliability Nuclear Department], e-mail: anne.teughels@tractebel.com

    2009-07-01

    The penetrations in the early Pressurized Water Reactors Vessels are characterized by Alloy 600 tubes, welded by Alloy 182/82. The Alloy 600 tubes have been shown to be susceptible to PWSCC (Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking) which may lead to crack forming. The cracking mechanism is driven mainly by the welding residual stress and, in a second place, by the operational stress in the weld region. It is therefore of big interest to quantify the weld residual stress field correctly. In this paper the weld residual stress field is calculated by finite elements using a sequentially coupled approach, which is well known in literature. It includes a transient thermal analysis simulating the heating during the multipass welding, followed by a transient thermo-mechanical analysis for the determination of the stresses involved with it. The welding consists of a sequence of weld beads, each of which is deposited in its entirety, at once, instead of gradually. Central as well as eccentric sidehill nozzles on the vessel head are analyzed in the paper. For the former a 2- dimensional axisymmetrical finite element model is used, whereas for the latter a 3-dimensional model is set up. Different positions on the vessel head are compared and the influence of the sidehill effect is illustrated. In the framework of a common project for Angra 1, Tractebel Engineering (Belgium) and ELETRONUCLEAR (Nuclear Utility, Brazil) had the opportunity to compare their analysis method, which they applied to the Belgian and the Brazilian nuclear reactors, respectively. The global approach in both cases is very similar but is applied to different configurations, specific for each plant. In the article the results of both cases are compared. (author)

  13. Reactors with pressure vessel in pre-stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Christian; Lafore, Pierre

    1964-12-01

    After having proposed a general description of the evolution of the general design of reactors with a vessel in pre-stressed concrete, this report outlines the interest of this technical solution of a vessel in pre-stressed concrete with integrated exchangers, which is to replace steel vessel. This solution is presented as much safer. The authors discuss the various issues related to protection: inner and outer biological protection of the vessel, material protection (against heating, steel irradiation, Wigner effect, and moderator radiolytic corrosion). They report the application of calculation methods: calculation of vessel concrete heating, study of the intermediate zone in integrated reactors, neutron spectrum and flows in the core of a graphite pile

  14. Design and analysis of multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, D.W.; Burdette, E.G.; Callahan, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    During the past 25 years, a rather rapid evolution has taken place in the design and use of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRVs). Initially the concrete vessel served as a one-to-one replacement for its steel counterpart. This was followed by the development of the integral design which led eventually to the more recent multicavity vessel concept. Although this evolution has seen problems in construction and operation, a state-of-the-art review which was recently conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicated that the PCRV has proven to be a satisfactory and inherently safe type of vessel for containment of gas-cooled reactors from a purely functional standpoint. However, functionalism is not the only consideration in a demanding and highly competitive industry. A summary is presented of the important considerations in the design and analysis of multicavity PCRVs together with overall conclusions concerning the state of the art of these vessels

  15. Completely integrated prestressed-concrete reactor pressure vessel, type 'Star'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neunert, B.; Jueptner, G.; Kumpf, H.

    1975-01-01

    The star support vessel is suitable for the connection to all primary circuit systems consisting of a main vessel and a number of satellite vessels around and connected to it, i.e. for LWR, HTR and process reactor. It must be made clear, however, that the PWR in particular with its components does not appear to be suited for the optimum incorporation in a prestressed-concrete pressure vessel system, no matter what kind. There are clear concepts about modifications which, however, require considerable development expenditure. (orig./LH) [de

  16. Stress analysis of pierced regions for prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of prestressed concrete vessels for nuclear reactors and, in particular, the design of the perforated end-caps increasingly calls for better analytical techniques. A method is proposed by which the distribution of stress in the perforated end-caps may be defined, assuming constant elevated temperature and radial prestress. A special feature of the proposed analysis is the method by which an elastic solution can be modified to take account of the time-dependent effects such as creep and shrinkage at ambient and elevated temperatures. The technique was used to analyse slab models. It was shown that the proposed method estimates the deformational behaviour of the models with an acceptable degree of accuracy. The distribution of stress as a result of thermal creep predicted by the method also agreed well with the cracking pattern of the models. (U.K.)

  17. MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large-system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models

  18. Effect of in-core instrumentation mounting location on external reactor vessel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jungsoo; Ha, Huiun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations were conducted for the evaluation of an IVR-ERVC application. • The ULPU-V experiment was simulated for the validation of numerical method. • The effect of ICI mounting location on an IVR-ERVC application was investigated. • TM-ICI is founded to be superior to BM-ICI for successful application of IVR-ERVC. - Abstract: The effect of in-core instrumentation (ICI) mounting location on the application of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC), used to mitigate severe accidents in which the nuclear fuel inside the reactor vessel becomes molten, was investigated. Numerical simulations of the subcooled boiling flow within an advanced pressurized-water reactor (PWR) in IVR-ERVC applications were conducted for the cases of top-mounted ICI (TM-ICI) and bottom-mounted ICI (BM-ICI), using the commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS-CFX. Shear stress transport (SST) and the RPI model were used for turbulence closure and subcooled flow boiling, respectively. To validate the numerical method for IVR applications, numerical simulations of ULPU-V experiments were also conducted. The BM-ICI reactor vessel was modeled using a simplified design of an advanced PWR with BM-ICI; the TM-ICI counterpart was modeled by removing the ICI parts from the original geometry. It was found that TM-ICI was superior to BM-ICI for successful application of IVR-ERVC. For the BM-ICI case, the flow field was complicated because of the existence of ICIs and a significant temperature gradient was observed near the ICI nozzles on the lower part of the reactor vessel, where the ICIs were attached. These observations suggest that the existence of ICI below the reactor vessel hinders reactor vessel cooling.

  19. Role of radiation embrittlement in reactor vessel integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Chexal, V.K.; Wyckoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor vessel integrity calculations are complex. The effect of radiation embrittlement on vessel material properties is a very important aspect of any vessel integrity evaluation. The importance of realistic (based on surveillance capsule results) rather than conservative estimates of the material properties (based on regulatory curves) cannot be overestimated. It is also important to make realistic thermal hydraulic and system operations assumptions. In addition, use of actual flaw sizes from in-service inspections (versus hypothetical flaw size selection) will promote realism. Important research results exist that need to be incorporated into the regulatory process. The authors believe results from current research and development efforts will demonstrate that, with reasonable assumptions and best estimate calculations, the safety of even the older reactor vessels with high copper content welds can be assured over their design lifetimes without the need for major fixes. The utilities, through EPRI and the vendors, have dedicated a significant effort to solving the pressurized thermal shock problem

  20. Investigation of the failure of a reactor pressure vessel by plastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1994-01-01

    A possible consequence of a core meltdown accident in a pressurized water reactor is the failure of the reactor pressure vessel under high internal pressure. With the aid of the finite element program ABAQUS and using a material model of the thermo-plasticity for large deformation, the failure of the reactor pressure vessel due to plastic instability was examined. It was apparent from the finite element calculations that solely due to reduction in strength of the material, even for internal wall temperatures clearly below the core melt; of about 2000 C, the critical internal pressure can fall to values which are lower than the working pressure. With the aid of simplified geometry, a lower limit for the pressure at failure of the reactor pressure vessel can be calculated. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Image processing algorithm for robot tracking in reactor vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Won; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyun [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, we proposed an image processing algorithm to find the position of an underwater robot in the reactor vessel. Proposed algorithm is composed of Modified SURF(Speeded Up Robust Feature) based on Mean-Shift and CAMSHIFT(Continuously Adaptive Mean Shift Algorithm) based on color tracking algorithm. Noise filtering using luminosity blend method and color clipping are preprocessed. Initial tracking area for the CAMSHIFT is determined by using modified SURF. And then extracting the contour and corner points in the area of target tracked by CAMSHIFT method. Experiments are performed at the reactor vessel mockup and verified to use in the control of robot by visual tracking

  3. Image processing algorithm for robot tracking in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Won; Choi, Young Soo; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min; Kim, Nam Kyun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed an image processing algorithm to find the position of an underwater robot in the reactor vessel. Proposed algorithm is composed of Modified SURF(Speeded Up Robust Feature) based on Mean-Shift and CAMSHIFT(Continuously Adaptive Mean Shift Algorithm) based on color tracking algorithm. Noise filtering using luminosity blend method and color clipping are preprocessed. Initial tracking area for the CAMSHIFT is determined by using modified SURF. And then extracting the contour and corner points in the area of target tracked by CAMSHIFT method. Experiments are performed at the reactor vessel mockup and verified to use in the control of robot by visual tracking

  4. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  5. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-01-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  6. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical procedures for predicting the nonlinear behaviour of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel over its design life are discussed. The numerical models are constructed by combining three-dimensional isoparametric finite elements which simulate the concrete, thin shell elements which simulate steel liner plates and layers of reinforcement steel, and axial elements for discrete prestressing cables. Nonlinearity under compressive stress, multi-dimensional cracking, shrinkage, and stress/temperature induced creep of concrete are considered in addition to the elastic plastic behaviour of the liner and reinforcing steel. The analysis of an actual PCRV is described. Stress contours and cracking patterns in the region of cutouts corresponding to operational pressure and temperature loads are illustrated. The effects of creep, unloading,and creep recovery are then shown. Lastly, a strategy for assessing the performance over its design life is discussed. (Auth.)

  7. PWR reactor vessel in-service-inspection according to RSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algarotti, Marc; Dubois, Philippe; Hernandez, Luc; Landez, Jean Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear services experience Framatome ANP (an AREVA and Siemens company) has designed and constructed 86 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) around the world including the three units lately commissioned at Ling Ao in the People's Republic of China and ANGRA 2 in Brazil; the company provided general and specialized outage services supporting numerous outages. Along with the American and German subsidiaries, Framatome ANP Inc. and Framatome ANP GmbH, Framatome ANP is among the world leading nuclear services providers, having experience of over 500 PWR outages on 4 continents, with current involvement in more than 50 PWR outages per year. Framatome ANP's experience in the examinations of reactor components began in the 1970's. Since then, each unit (American, French and German companies) developed automated NDT inspection systems and carried out pre-service and ISI (In-Service Inspections) using a large range of NDT techniques to comply with each utility expectations. These techniques have been validated by the utilities and the safety authorities of the countries where they were implemented. Notably Framatome ANP is fully qualified to provide full scope ISI services to satisfy ASME Section XI requirements, through automated NDE tasks including nozzle inspections, reactor vessel head inspections, steam generator inspections, pressurizer inspections and RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) inspections. Intercontrole (Framatome ANP subsidiary dedicated in supporting ISI) is one of the leading NDT companies in the world. Its main activity is devoted to the inspection of the reactor primary circuit in French and foreign PWR Nuclear Power Plants: the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the pressurizer, the reactor internals and reactor coolant system piping. NDT methods mastered by Intercontrole range from ultrasonic testing to eddy current and gamma ray examinations, as well as dye penetrant testing, acoustic monitoring and leak testing. To comply with the high requirements of

  8. Monitoring PWR reactor vessel liquid level with SPNDs during LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Data from in-core self-powered neutron detectors taken during two nuclear loss-of-coolant accident simulations have been correlated with core moderator density changes. The detector current attenuation has been calculated during blowdown and reflood phases of the simulation. Based on these data, it is concluded that these detectors could be used to monitor reactor vessel liquid level during loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

  9. Reactor vessel assessment and the development of a reactor vessel life extension program for Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.; Hijeck, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to provide a general assessment of the life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two reactor pressure vessels. The purpose of the study is to assess the general life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs reactor pressure vessels based upon an extension and variation of the Surry pilot plant life extension study. This assessment provided a detailed reactor vessel surveillance program for plant life extension along with a hierarchy of specific tasks necessary for attaining maximum useful life. The assessment identified a number of critical issues which may impact life attainment and extension along with potential solutions to address these issues to ensure the life extension option is not precluded

  10. PERFORM 60: Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mazouzi, A.; Alamo, A.; Lidbury, D.; Moinereau, D.; Van Dyck, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Multi-scale and multi-physics modelling are adopted by PERFORM 60 to predict irradiation damage in nuclear structural materials. → PERFORM 60 allows to Consolidate the community and improve the interaction between universities/industries and safety authorities. → Experimental validation at the relevant scale is a key for developing the multi-scale modelling methodology. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, materials undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational lifetime. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and potential degradation of certain essential structures of the power plant to ensure their safe and reliable operation. So far, the monitoring and mitigation of these degradation phenomena rely mainly on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the materials behaviour in a nuclear environment. Indeed, within the PERFECT project of the EURATOM framework program (FP6), a first step has been successfully reached through the development of a simulation platform that contains several advanced numerical tools aiming at the prediction of irradiation damage in both the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its internals using available, state-of-the-art-knowledge. These tools allow simulation of irradiation effects on the nanostructure and the constitutive behaviour of the RPV low alloy steels, as well as their fracture mechanics properties. For the more highly irradiated reactor internals, which are commonly produced using austenitic stainless steels, the first partial models were established, describing radiation effects on the nanostructure and providing a first description of the

  11. Support device in a pressure vessel, particularly a reactor pressure vessel, to support against horizontal forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Harand, E.; Scholz, M.; Scheler, R.

    1986-01-01

    In a support device on a reactor pressure vessel of a PWR, a guide leading downwards is provided in the vertical pellet cartridge on the floor side of the reactor pressure vessel, which is located in a fixed support pipe. The support pipe is supported on a concreted baseplate in the horizontal direction, and can be screwed to this. The support pipe has a plate-shaped support foot to support it on the baseplate. The reactor pressure vessel, normally resting on its main coolant duct in the plane normal to the axis, can be effectively supported against horizontal forces by this additional support, without preventing thermal movement in the longitudinal axis. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Recent experience reactor pressure vessel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignes, A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper present the Framatome's recent experience in the manufacture of 1300 MWe PWR vessels; one shows how the very high standards of quality have been obtained to meet the stringent requirements. After a description of a pressure vessel, materials and forgings properties are presented. The nature and sequence of the main fabrication operations are reviewed. This paper deals after with the quality of welds, the preheating and post-heating equipment, the submerged arc welding process and procedures, the cladding process, and the under-clad cracking problems. Ultrasonic inspection procedures of the main welds are described with a comparison of RCCM (design and construction rules for mechanical components of PWR units) and Sizewell B specifications. Support of data on the reproductibility and effectiveness of ultrasonic examination and on the reliability given by repetitive inspection are presented

  13. Radiation-induced embrittlement in light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    In operating light water reactor (LWR) commercial power plants, neutron radiation induces embrittlement of the pressure vessel (PV) and its support structures. As a consequence, LWR-PV integrity is a primary safety consideration. LWR-PV integry is a significant economic consideration because the PV and its support structures are nonreplaceable power plant components and embrittlement of these components can therefore limit the effective operating lifetime of the plant. In addition to plant life considerations, LWR-PV embrittlement creates significant cycle-to-cycle impact through the restriction of normal heat-up and cool-down reactor operations. Recent LWR-PV benchmark experiments are analyzed. On this bases, it is established that an exponential representation accurately describes the spatial dependence of neutron exposure in LWR-PV. Implications produced by simple exponental behavior are explained and trend-curve models for the predictions of PV embrittelment are derived. These derivations provide for a clearer understanding and assessment of the assumptions underlying these trend-curve models. It is demonstrated that LWR-PV embrittlement possesses significant material dependence. (orig.)

  14. Heat treatment device for extending the life of a pressure vessel, particularly a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, P.; Mueller, E.; Poerner, H.; Weber, R.

    1979-01-01

    A support body in the form of an insulating cylinder is tightly sealed by connected surfaces at its outer circumference to the inner wall of the pressure vessel. It forms an annular heating space. The heat treatment or tempering of the pressure vessel takes place with the reactor space empty and screened from the outside by ceiling bolts. Heating gas or an induction winding can be used as the means of heating. (DG) [de

  15. Design of the fast breeder reactor single wall inner vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terny, P.; Blaix, J.C.; Del Beccaro, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a fast breeder reactor single wall inner vessel. It describes first the studies that led to the optimization of the structure geometry with respect to stability behavior, and subsequently the analyses required to justify the equipment with respect to risks of fatigue, creep and progressive deformation. (orig.)

  16. Positron annihilation studies of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauer, G.; Liszkay, L.; Molnar, B.

    1988-01-01

    Several annealing studies by positron annihilation (Doppler broadening, lifetime) on neutron irradiated Cr-Mo-V reactor pressure vessel steels (Soviet type 15Kh2MFA) regarding the influences of irradiation temperature, fluence of fast neutrons as well as different impurity contents are presented and discussed. A possibility of explaining the positron annihilation data by irradiation induced carbide formation is proposed. (author)

  17. Prediction of Reactor Vessel Water Level Using Fuzzy Neural Networks in Severe Accidents due to LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soonho; Kim, Jaehawn; Na, Mangyun [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    When the initial events that may lead to the severe accident such as Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) occurs at a nuclear power plant, it is most important to check the status of the plant conditions by observing the safety-related parameters such as neutron flux, pressurizer pressure, steam generator pressure and water level. In this paper, we propose a method of predicting the water level of coolant in the reactor vessel that directly affect the important events such as the exposure of the reactor core and the damage of reactor vessel by using a Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) method. In addition, the data for verifying a proposed model was obtained by simulating the severe accident scenarios for the OPR1000 nuclear power plant using the MAAP4 code. In this paper, a prediction model was developed for predicting the reactor vessel water level using the FNN method. The proposed FNN model was verified based on the simulation data of OPR1000 by using MAAP4 code. As a result of simulation, we could see that the performance of the proposed FNN model is quite satisfactory but some large errors are observed occasionally. If the proposed FNN model is optimized by using a variety of data, it is possible to predict the reactor vessel water level exactly.

  18. Damage by radiation in structural materials of BWR reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, E.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    The structural materials which are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors undergo degradation in their mechanical properties mainly due to the damage produced by the fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. The mechanisms of neutron damage in this type of materials are experimentally studied, through the irradiation of vessel steel in experimental reactors for a quickly ageing. Alternately the neutron damage through steel irradiation with heavy ions is simulated. In this work the first results of the damage induced by irradiation of a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor are shown. The irradiation was performed with fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10 18 n/cm 2 ) in the TRIGA Mark III Salazar reactor and separately with Ni +3 ions in a Tandetrom accelerator (E= 4.8 MeV and an ion flux rank of 0.1 to 53 ions/A 2 ). (Author)

  19. Prediction of the reactor vessel water level using fuzzy neural networks in severe accident circumstance of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ho; Kim, Dae Seop; Kim, Jae Hwan; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Safety-related parameters are very important for confirming the status of a nuclear power plant. In particular, the reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on the safety fortress by confirming reactor core cooling. In this study, the reactor vessel water level under the condition of a severe accident, where the water level could not be measured, was predicted using a fuzzy neural network (FNN). The prediction model was developed using training data, and validated using independent test data. The data was generated from simulations of the optimized power reactor 1000 (OPR1000) using MAAP4 code. The informative data for training the FNN model was selected using the subtractive clustering method. The prediction performance of the reactor vessel water level was quite satisfactory, but a few large errors were occasionally observed. To check the effect of instrument errors, the prediction model was verified using data containing artificially added errors. The developed FNN model was sufficiently accurate to be used to predict the reactor vessel water level in severe accident situations where the integrity of the reactor vessel water level sensor is compromised. Furthermore, if the developed FNN model can be optimized using a variety of data, it should be possible to predict the reactor vessel water level precisely.

  20. PREDICTION OF THE REACTOR VESSEL WATER LEVEL USING FUZZY NEURAL NETWORKS IN SEVERE ACCIDENT CIRCUMSTANCES OF NPPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOON HO PARK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Safety-related parameters are very important for confirming the status of a nuclear power plant. In particular, the reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on the safety fortress by confirming reactor core cooling. In this study, the reactor vessel water level under the condition of a severe accident, where the water level could not be measured, was predicted using a fuzzy neural network (FNN. The prediction model was developed using training data, and validated using independent test data. The data was generated from simulations of the optimized power reactor 1000 (OPR1000 using MAAP4 code. The informative data for training the FNN model was selected using the subtractive clustering method. The prediction performance of the reactor vessel water level was quite satisfactory, but a few large errors were occasionally observed. To check the effect of instrument errors, the prediction model was verified using data containing artificially added errors. The developed FNN model was sufficiently accurate to be used to predict the reactor vessel water level in severe accident situations where the integrity of the reactor vessel water level sensor is compromised. Furthermore, if the developed FNN model can be optimized using a variety of data, it should be possible to predict the reactor vessel water level precisely.

  1. Seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, H.J.; Huelsermann, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel, steam boiler vessel, or any other vessel which is desirably sealed against pressure of the type including a housing and a housing closure that present opposed vertical sealing surfaces which define the sides of a channel. The seals of the present invention comprise at least one sealing member disposed in the channel, having at least one stop face, a base portion and two shank portions extending from the base portion to form a groove-like recess. The shank portions are provided with sealing surfaces arranged to mate with the opposed vertical pressure vessel sealing surfaces. A shank-spreading wedge element also disposed in the channel has at least one stop face and is engaged in the groove-like recess with the sealing member and wedge element stop face adjacent to each other

  2. Updated embrittlement trend curve for reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.; Santos, C.; Eason, E.; Wright, J.; Odette, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high energy neutrons from the core. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV belt-line materials is currently evaluated using US Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG 1.99 Rev 2), which presents methods for estimating the Charpy transition temperature shift (ΔT30) at 30 ft-lb (41 J) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). A more recent embrittlement model, based on a broader database and more recent research results, is presented in NUREG/CR-6551. The objective of this paper is to describe the most recent update to the embrittlement model in NUREG/CR-6551, based upon additional data and increased understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The updated ΔT30 and USE models include fluence, copper, nickel, phosphorous content, and product form; the ΔT30 model also includes coolant temperature, irradiation time (or flux), and a long-time term. The models were developed using multi-variable surface fitting techniques, understanding of the ΔT30 mechanisms, and engineering judgment. The updated ΔT30 model reduces scatter significantly relative to RG 1.99 Rev 2 on the currently available database for plates, forgings, and welds. This updated embrittlement trend curve will form the basis of revision 3 to Regulatory Guide 1.99. (author)

  3. Requirements for thermal insulation on prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Wistrom, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    During the past decade, extensive design, construction, and operating experience on concrete pressure vessels for gas-cooled reactor applications has accumulated. Excellent experience has been obtained to date on the structural components (concrete, prestressing systems, liners, penetrations, and closures) and the thermal insulation. Three fundamentally different types of insulation systems have been employed to ensure the satisfactory performance of this component, which is critical to the overall success of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Although general design criteria have been published, the requirements for design, materials, and construction are not rigorously addressed in any national or international code. With the more onerous design conditions being imposed by advanced reactor systems, much greater attention has been directed to advance the state of the art of insulation systems for PCRVs. This paper addresses some of the more recent developments in this field being performed by General Atomic Company and others. (author)

  4. Advanced Approach of Reactor Pressure Vessel In-service Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Pajnic, M.

    2006-01-01

    The most important task of every utility operating a nuclear power plant is the continuously keeping of the desired safety and reliability level. This is achieved by the performance of numerous inspections of the components, equipment and system of the nuclear power plant in operation and in particular during the scheduled maintenance periods at re-fueling time. Periodic non-destructive in-service inspections provide most relevant criteria of the integrity of primary circuit pressure components. The task is to reliably detect defects and realistically size and characterize them. One of most important and the most extensive examination is a reactor pressure vessel in-service inspection. That inspection demand high standards of technology and quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) advanced technology as well as regarding reactor pressure vessel tool and control systems. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the defined sections (reactor welds), whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual inspection is used for examination of the vessel inner surface. The movement of probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with NDT systems. The successful performance is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen NDT techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state of the art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. The advanced approach as presented in this paper offer more flexibility of application (non-destructive tests, local grinding action as well as taking of boat samples

  5. An effective convectivity model for simulation of in-vessel core melt progression in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, C.T.; Dinh, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with development and application of a so-called Effective Convection Model (ECM), which aims to provide a detailed, mechanistic description of heat transfer processes in a BWR lower plenum. The ECM is a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-like tool which employs a simpler and more effective approach to compute heat transfer by solving only energy conservation equation instead of solving the full set of Navier-Stokes and energy equations by a CFD code. We implement the ECM in a CFD code (Fluent), with detailed description of the ECM development, implementation and validation. A dual approach is used to validate the ECM, namely validation against experimental data and against heat transfer results obtained by CFD predictions in the same geometries and conditions. Insights gained from CFD simulations are also used to improve ECM. The ECM capability as an effective tool to simulate heat transfer of an internally heated volume in 3-dimensional complex geometry is demonstrated through examples of heat transfer analysis in a BWR lower plenum being cooled by coolant flow in Control Rod Guide Tubes. Simulation results and key findings of this case are reported and discussed. (authors)

  6. Reactor vessel inspection tool availability improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepek, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Periodic inspection of nuclear plant components and systems is a practical necessity, as well as a mandatory requirement for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Accordingly, Westinghouse has established a comprehensive Nuclear Inspection Program with procedures and sophisticated state-of-the-art equipment to assist utilities in the planning, implementation, and documentation of timely, efficient, and effective inspections. Westinghouse has a broad background of inspection service experience that encompasses the full range of nondestructive examinations. These examinations are performed in accordance with the applicable edition of Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, the Plant Technical specifications, and other pertinent regulatory guidelines (such as NRC Reg. Guide 1.150). The overall objective of this program was to identify those elements of the R.V. ISI Program which had negative impact on performance and develop/implement an action plant to resolve those issues

  7. Using ultrasonic measurements and a two-phase composite model to assess radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasonic methods used in the study of radiation damage and recovery in single crystals appear to also be useful for similar studies on polycrystalline alloys. Ultrasonic methods have demonstrated a sensitivity to radiation damage as affected by neutron fluence, irradiation temperature, large changes in composition, and possibly, as well, by neutron energy spectrum. On the microstructure defect evolution, only the residual defects created through the radiation event will contribute to the final macroscopic material property change. From a microstructure point, it is generally accepted that radiation hardening and embrittlement in metals are caused by clusters of vacancies, interstitial, and solute atoms that impede the motion of slip dislocations. Although vacancy-type defects are a major contributor to the material hardening, they also indicate the presence of other interstitial defects. Thus the total volume change of vacancy-type defects before and after irradiation can serve as a direct index to the final material property changes. The volume change of the vacancy-type defects can be determined by utilizing the two -phase composite model (matrix and void-type inclusion) to interpret wave velocities of baseline and irradiated specimens that are obtained from the ultrasonic wave experiment. This is a relatively economic and straightforward procedure. The correlation of the volume change of the vacancy-type defects with the existing destructive mechanical test results may play an important role in the future for the prediction of the radiation embrittlement and remaining plant lifetime, especially for the older plants on the verge of exhausting all the available mechanical test specimens loaded in the surveillance capsules. The above hypothesis was supported by the limited irradiated data analyzed and presented in his paper. The proposed ultrasonic methodology also has a potential application to assess creep damage in fossil power plants

  8. Analysis of properties of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel semiproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horacek, L.; Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is made of selected tensile characteristics and of the chemical composition of steels 15Kh2MFA and 18Kh2MFA used for the manufacture of semifinished products of WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels with respect to the first 15 pressure vessels manufactured in Czechoslovakia. The results are analyzed with respect to the developmental trend (comparing the results of analyses of the first 5 and the first 15 pressure vessels manufactured by Skoda) and a different origin (comparing those by Skoda by the Izhorskij Zavod in the USSR). The effects of thickness of the semifinished product on tensile properties and of the chemical composition on radiation resitance of WWER-440 pressure vessels are considered in more detail. (author). 3 tabs., 3 refs

  9. An analysis of reactor pit pressurization and forces applied on reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongzhong; Li Feng

    1997-12-01

    The pressure and temperature transients with the time of the reactor pit during LOCA have been analyzed by using Catem computer code for Qinshan-2 nuclear power plant. The force and bending moment on the inlet and outlet nozzles of the reactor vessel also have been calculated by using Wformom code. Qinshan-2 NPP is a two-loop nuclear power plant. The cold water of the accumulators are directly injected into the downcomer of reactor vessel. Injection line of accumulators is located at the same level with the inlet and outlet nozzles. These geometry characteristics have been taken into account in the circumferential vessel pit nodding using five volumes around the vessel. The assumptions used in the analysis and calculation results have been presented. Many sensitive calculations have been performed for different break size and circumferential nodding

  10. Numerical simulation of hydrogen diffusion in the pressure vessel wall of a WWER-440 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, J.; Vergara, D.; Lorenzo, M.

    2017-07-01

    Materials forming the wall of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (NRPV) can undergo in-service failure due to the presence of hydrogen, which enhances the fracture process known as hydrogen embrittlement (HE). A common way of avoiding this damage phenomenon is using a cladding material at the vessel wall side exposed to the hydrogenating source. This layer acts as a barrier for hydrogen diffusion and, hence, it protects the base material. In this paper, a numerical model of hydrogen diffusion assisted by stress and strain is used to analyse the hydrogen distribution, and hence the HE, in the pressure vessel wall of a real widely spread WWER-440 reactor considering two thickness for the cladding layer. Results show how the hydrogen accumulation is delayed as the thickness of the cladding layer increases, thus delaying the HE phenomenon affecting the structural integrity of the reactor.

  11. Neutron irradiation effects in reactor pressure vessel steels and weldments. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. A separate abstract was prepared for the introduction and for each of the eleven chapters, which are: 1. Reactor Pressure Vessel Design, 2. Reactor Pressure Materials, 3. WWER Pressure Vessels, 4. Determination of Mechanical Properties, 5. Neutron Exposure, 6. Methodology of Irradiation Experiments, 7. Effect of Irradiation on Mechanical Properties, 8. Mechanisms of Irradiation Embrittlement, 9. Modelling of Irradiation Damage, 10. Annealing of Irradiation Damage, 11. Safety Assessment using Surveillance Programmes and Data Bases

  12. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1995-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 30 ft-lb (41 J) Charpy transition temperature and Charpy upper shelf energy due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is i good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between he observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes

  13. Embrittlement recovery due to annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, E.D.; Wright, J.E.; Nelson, E.E.; Odette, G.R.; Mader, E.V.

    1998-01-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV) can be reduced by thermal annealing at temperatures higher than the normal operating conditions. The objective of this work was to analyze the pertinent data and develop quantitative models for estimating the recovery in 41 J (30 ft-lb) Charpy transition temperature (TT) and Charpy upper shelf energy (USE) due to annealing. An analysis data base was developed, reviewed for completeness and accuracy, and documented as part of this work. Models were developed based on a combination of statistical techniques, including pattern recognition and transformation analysis, and the current understanding of the mechanisms governing embrittlement and recovery. The quality of models fitted in this project was evaluated by considering both the Charpy annealing data used for fitting and a surrogate hardness data base. This work demonstrates that microhardness recovery is a good surrogate for shift recovery and that there is a high level of consistency between the observed annealing trends and fundamental models of embrittlement and recovery processes. (orig.)

  14. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  15. Structural integrity evaluation of PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most important structural component of a PWR nuclear power plant. It contains the reactor core and is the main component of the primary system pressure boundary, the system responsible for removing the heat generated by the nuclear reactions. It is considered not replaceable and, therefore, its lifetime is a key element to define the plant life as a whole. Three critical issues related to the reliability of the RPV structural integrity come out by reason of the radiation damage imposed to the vessel material during operation. These issues concern the definition of pressure versus temperature limits for reactor heatup and cooldown, pressurized thermal shock evaluation and assessment of reactor vessels with low upper shelf Charpy impact energy levels. This work aims to present the major aspects related to these topics. The requirements for preventing fracture of the RPV are reviewed as well as the available technology for assessing the safety margins. For each mentioned problem, the several steps for structural integrity evaluation are described and the analysis methods are discussed. (author)

  16. Marine reactor pressure vessels dumped in the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mount, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1988, 16 marine reactors from seven Russian submarines and the icebreaker Lenin, each of which suffered some form of reactor accident, were dumped in a variety of containments, using a number of sealing methods, at five sites in the Kara Sea. All reactors were dumped at sites that varied in depth from 12 to 300 m and six contained their spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This paper examines the breakdown of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) barriers due to corrosion, with specific emphasis on those RPVs containing SNF. Included are discussions of the structural aspects of the steam generating installations and their associated RPVs, a summary of the disposal operations, assumptions on corrosion rates of structural and filler materials, and an estimate of the structural integrity of the RPVs at the present time (1996) and in the year 2015

  17. Simulation and tests to individual and coupled models of the reactor vessel simulator and the recirculation system for the SUN-RAH; Simulacion y pruebas a modelos individuales y acoplados del simulador de la vasija del reactor y el sistema de recirculacion para el SUN-RAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez S, R.A. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: rsanchez_15@yahoo.com.mx

    2004-07-01

    The present project, is continuation of the project presented in the congress SNM-2003. In this new phase of the project, they were carried out adaptive changes to the modeling and implementation of the module of the full superior of the core of the reactor, they were carried out those modeling of the generation of heat as well as of the energy transfer in the one fuel. These models present the main characteristics of the vessel of the one reactor and of the recirculation system, defined by the main phenomena that they intervene in the physical processes, in the previous version the simulation in real time it required of an extremely quick computer and without executing collateral processes. The tests are presented carried out to the different models belonging to the Simulator of the Reactor Vessel and the Recirculation system for the SUN-RAH (University Simulator of Nucleo electric with Boiling Water Reactor), as well as the results hurtled by this tests. In each section the executions of the tests and the corresponding analyses of results are shown for each pattern. Besides the above mentioned, the advantages presented by the Simulator of the reactor vessel and the recirculation system are pointed. (Author)

  18. Latest feedback from a major reactor vessel dismantling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, J.; Segerud, P.; Sanchez, M.; Garcia, R.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse performed two large segmentation projects in 2010-2013 and then 2013-2015 at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant in Spain. The power plant is located in Almonacid de Zorita, 43 miles east of Madrid, Spain and was in operation between 1968 and 2006. This paper will describe the sequential steps required to prepare, segment, separate, and package the individual component segments using under water mechanical techniques. The paper will also include experiences and lessons learned that Westinghouse has collected from the activities performed during the reactor vessel and vessel internals segmentation projects. (authors)

  19. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  1. In-Vessel Retention via External Reactor Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrata, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    In-vessel (corium) retention (IVR) via external reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cooling is considered to be an effective severe accident management strategy for corium localisation and stabilisation. The main idea of IVR strategy consists in flooding the reactor cavity and transferring the decay heat through the wall of RPV to the recirculating water and than to the atmosphere of the containment of nuclear power plant. The aim of this strategy is to localise and to stabilise the corium inside the RPV. Not using this procedure could destroy the integrity of RPV and might cause the interaction of the corium with the concrete at the bed of the reactor cavity. Several experimental facilities and computer codes (MVITA, ASTEC module DIVA and CFD codes) were applied to simulate the IVR strategy for concrete reactor designs. The necessary technical modifications concerning the implementation of IVR concept were applied at the Loviisa NPP (VVER-440/V213). This strategy is also an important part of the advanced reactor designs AP600 and AP1000. (authors)

  2. Prestressed concrete pressure vessel for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, L.

    1976-01-01

    A prestressed concrete pressure vessel is described which is to be used for a nuclear reactor. It is of integrated construction, has a fixed amount of prestressing and can be used at very high internal pressures. The re-inforcement is arranged in U shapes in the concrete and the space of the reactor core and equipment is situated between the two uprights (of the U). Their ends are anchored to the outer walls of the concrete. All ends of the cross braced re-inforcement are equally distributed over the circumference of the common concrete structure along its height. (UWI) [de

  3. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  4. Welding of the A1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.

    1975-01-01

    As concerns welding, the A-1 reactor pressure vessel represents a geometrically complex unit containing 1492 welded joints. The length of welded sections varies between 10 and 620 mm. At an operating temperature of 120 degC and a pressure of 650 N/cm 2 the welded joints in the reactor core are exposed to an integral dose of 3x10 18 n/cm 2 . The chemical composition is shown for pressure vessel steel as specified by CSN 413090.9 modified by Ni, Ti and Al additions, and for the welding electrodes used. The requirements are also shown for the mechanical properties of the base and the weld metals. The technique and conditions of welding are described. No defects were found in ultrasonic testing of welded joints. (J.B.)

  5. Vessel supporting structure for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, Armel; Jullien, Georges

    1974-01-01

    The supporting structure described is for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor, the vessel being of the type suspended to the end slab of the reactor. It includes a ring connected at one of its two ends to a single shell and at the other end to two shells. One of these three shells connected to the lower end of the ring forms the upper part of the vessel to be supported. The two other shells are embedded in two sperate parts of the slab. The ring and shell assembly is housed in an annular space provided in the end slab and separating it into two parts, namely a central part and a peripheral part [fr

  6. Annealing the reactor vessel at the Palisades Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenech, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    In the way of background, Palisades was licensed in 1967 and went commercial in 1971. Jumping to two years ago, we faced at that time three issues that challenged our ability to operate to end-of-license, which would be 2007 without any extensions. The three items were regulatory performance, economic performance, and reactor vessel embrittlement. We had not been operating the plant with the kind of conservative decisions and with the kind of safety margins that one is expected to operate a plant in the United States at this time. Our economic performance was not satisfactory in that our capacity factor was low and our costs high. In the area of reactor vessel embrittlement, our analysis showed that we would reach the NRC screening criteria for embrittlement in the year 2004. Over the last two years, we have made significant improvements in the first two areas. Our decision-making has changed. Our performance, especially over the last year and a half, has been excellent. In addition, we have gotten our capacity factors up and our costs under control. Clearly, sustained performance is what is going to carry the day but from what we can see and from where we are, we are in more of a maintenance-of-performance than in a turn-around situation. On the other hand, in the area of reactor vessel embrittlement, about a year and a half ago we had a bit of a setback. We had taken material from retired steam generators that had welds identical to the welds in our reactor vessel. When we analyzed the welds from our steam generators, we were given some surprises about the chemistry makeup. When we applied the new information to our analysis, we changed the date on which we would reach our screening criteria from 2004 to late 1999

  7. Development of ROV System for FOSAR in Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Uk; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyun [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Foreign object in the reactor vessel is susceptible to damage the fuel. Prior to reloading fuel assemblies into the core, FOSAR(Foreign Object Search And Retrieval) activities were performed on and beneath the lower core plate with conventional equipment. However, the reactor vessel is limited to humans who are susceptible to radiation exposure, and conventional equipment is hard to access because of the complexity of the structure. To improve the convenience of use and retrieval ability in the under-core plate region, we are developing a FOSAR system carried by ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). In this paper, we describe a ROV system developed. The ROV system is composed of robot vehicle and remote control unit. The vehicle has 4 thrusters, tilt, camera, light and depth sensor, etc. Considering radiation damage, processors are not equipped on the vehicle. Control signals and sensing signals are transferred through umbilical cable. Remote control unit is composed of electric driving module and two computers which one is for the control and the other is for the detection of robot position. Control computer has a joystick user input and video/signal input, and transmit motor control signal and lens control signal via CAN/RS485 communication. And the other computers transmit information of vehicle position to the control computer via serial communication. Information of vehicle position is obtained through image processing algorithm. The acquiring camera of vehicle is on the flange of reactor vessel. Simulations on the detection of vehicle position are performed at the reactor vessel mockup which scaled down by 6 and verified to use in the control of robot by visual tracking. And functional test has been performed on the air condition. In the future, performance test will be carried out real sized mockup and underwater condition

  8. TMI-2 reactor vessel and balance of plant status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    In the fall of 1988 a corporate decision was made which concentrated effort on support of reactor vessel defueling and minimized activity in balance-of-plant areas. The auxiliary and fuel handling building are in a safe/stable state but final preparations for monitored storage won't be pursued until defueling and fuel shipping are complete. In addition to dispositioning fuel, the project is actively preparing for disposal of the Accident Generated Water (2.3 million gallons) by evaporation

  9. Ver reactor pressure vessel neutron exposure evaluation and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmera, B.

    1992-01-01

    The surveillance neutron exposure monitoring system In VVER-440, V 213 series, consists of 54 Fe(n,p), 63 Cu(n,α and 93 Nb(n,n) detectors. The Fe detector is loaded for one year Cone fuel cycle) Irradiation only. The evaluation of the neutron monitor results including transformation to the critical locations of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) can be based on the direct estimations of the neutron spectra and led factors (and other important space energy indices) in the mock-up experiments carried out. in the LR-0 experimental reactor, N.R.I. Rez. Because of high acceleration factor (about 11 for neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV) the specimens are pulled out within five years of VVER-440 operation. After that the ex-vessel monitoring should be applied for RPV exposure determination. A recommended procedure (guide) for the RPV neutron exposure evaluation has been completed recently. All previous experimental data (the surveillance and ex-vessel monitors, I.R-0 mock-up measurements) have been revised arid reevaluated using the IRDF-90 (IAEA) cross section data. A brief review of this work is presented in the paper. Some comments relating to the RPV dosimetry of VVER-440, series 230, and VVER-1000 reactors are also done. (author)

  10. Reliability aspects of radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel mterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1985-01-01

    The service life estimate is a major factor in the evaluation of the operating reliability and safety of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The evaluation of the service life of the pressure vessel is based on a comparison of fracture toughness values with stress intensity factors. Notch toughness curves are used for the indirect determination of fracture toughness. The dominant degradation effect is radiation embrittlement. Factors having the greatest effect on the result are the properties of the starting material of the vessel and the impurity content, mainly the Cu and P content. The design life is affected by the evaluation of residual lifetime which is made by periodical nondestructive inspections and using surveillance samples. (M.D.)

  11. Experimental and numerical investigation of coolant mixing in a model of reactor pressure vessel down-comer and in cold leg inlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutli Ezddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal fatigue and pressurized thermal shock phenomena are the main problems for the reactor pressure vessel and the T-junctions both of them depend on the mixing of the coolant. The mixing process, flow and temperature distribution has been investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry, laser induced fluorescence, and simulated by CFD tools. The obtained results showed that the ratio of flow rate between the main pipe and the branch pipe has a big influence on the mixing process. The particle image velocimetry/planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements technologies proved to be suitable for the investigation of turbulent mixing in the complicated flow system: both velocity and temperature distribution are important parameters in the determination of thermal fatigue and pressurized thermal shock. Results of the applied these techniques showed that both of them can be used as a good provider for data base and to validate CFD results.

  12. Feedback from Westinghouse experience on segmentation of reactor vessel internals - 59013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Boucau, Joseph; Segerud, Per; Fallstroem, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    With more than 25 years of experience in the development of reactor vessel internals segmentation and packaging technology, Westinghouse has accumulated significant know-how in the reactor dismantling market. Building on tooling concepts and cutting methodologies developed decades ago for the successful removal of nuclear fuel from the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor (TMI-2), Westinghouse has continuously improved its approach to internals segmentation and packaging by incorporating lessons learned and best practices into each successive project. Westinghouse has developed several concepts to dismantle reactor internals based on safe and reliable techniques, including plasma arc cutting (PAC), abrasive water-jet cutting (AWJC), metal disintegration machining (MDM), or mechanical cutting. Westinghouse has applied its technology to all types of reactors covering Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR's) and sodium reactors. The primary challenges of a segmentation and packaging project are to separate the highly activated materials from the less-activated materials and package them into appropriate containers for disposal. Since space is almost always a limiting factor it is therefore important to plan and optimize the available room in the segmentation areas. The choice of the optimum cutting technology is important for a successful project implementation and depends on some specific constraints like disposal costs, project schedule, available areas or safety. Detailed 3-D modeling is the basis for tooling design and provides invaluable support in determining the optimum strategy for component cutting and disposal in waste containers, taking account of the radiological and packaging constraints. Westinghouse has also developed a variety of special handling tools, support fixtures, service bridges, water filtration systems, video-monitoring systems and customized rigging, all of which are required for a

  13. Stress analysis of blanket vessel for JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, K.; Minato, A.

    1979-01-01

    A blanket structure of JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) consists of about 2,300 blanket cells with round cornered rectangular cross sections (twelve slightly different shapes) and is placed in a vacuum vessel. Each blanket vessel is a double-walled thin-shell structure made of Type 316 stainless steel with a spherical domed surface at the plasma side. Ribs for coolant channel are provided between inner and outer walls. The blanket cell contains Li 2 O pebbles and blocks for tritium breeding and stainless steel blocks for neutron reflection. A coolant is helium gas at 10 kgf/cm 2 (0.98 MPa) and its inlet and outlet temperatures are 300 0 C and 500 0 C. The maxima of heat flux and nuclear heating rate at the first wall are 12 W/cm 2 and 2 W/cc. A design philosophy of the blanket structure is based on high tritium breeding ratio and more effective shielding performance. The thin-shell vessel with a rectangular cross section satisfies the design philosophy. We have designed the blanket structure so that the adjacent vessels are mutually supporting in order to decrease the large deformation and stress due to internal pressure in case of the thin-shell vessel. (orig.)

  14. The need to pressure test prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forgie, J.H.; Holland, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    In the period when PCRV were relatively unproven, proof pressure testing provided a useful demonstration of vessel integritiy and a confirmation of model testing and of analysis. No failures have occurred during concrete vessel tests in the UK or in the subsequent operational life of the vessels and much has been learned of their behaviour in service. The paper examines the advantages and disadvantages of proof testing PCRV in the light of the above increased knowledge of vessel performance. The paper draws attention to certain hypothetical loading cases that could be more onerous than the proof test and suggests that pressure testing could itself cause unnecessarily high loading to parts of the vessel. Always recognising the safety considerations and demonstrations of such are of prime importance, the authors suggest that a lower pressure level could be adopted without loss of original intent. In addition some ground rules are suggested as to cases where proof testing could be omitted. (orig./HP)

  15. Crack analysis of multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallix, R.; Liu, T.C.; Lu, S.C.H.

    1975-01-01

    A new method to perform the crack analysis of non-axisymmetric, multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRV's) subjected to hypothetical overpressure by using an axisymmetric two-dimensional finite element computer code is presented. Concrete, steel liner, bonded reinforcing steel and prestressing steel elements are modeled. The limiting tensile strain criterion is adopted for concrete cracking. The steel elements are assumed to be elastic/perfectly plastic. Von Mises yield criterion and Prandtl-Reuss flow equations define the behavior of the liner in the range of plastic deformations. An orthotropic stress-strain constitutive law is utilized for cracked concrete elements. To account for the presence of penetrations and secondary cavities in the PCRV, a modified finite element model based on the concept of effective moduli is adopted. The pressure in these cavities is simulated by equivalent axisymmetric pressure distributions. In the analysis, the pressure is applied incrementally. For a given pressure, the displacements, strains, and stresses are computed. The state of strains or stresses is then examined against the cracking or yield criteria. If cracking or yield is indicated, the stiffness and load matrices for the cracked and yielding elements are recomputed and a new equilibrium is sought. This procedure is repeated until the desired convergence of the solution is achieved. The validity of the adopted approach utilizing the two-dimensional finite element method for overpressure analyses of non-axisymmetric PCRV's is demonstrated through comparisons with two multicavity PCRV scale models. A reliable and conservative estimate of PCRV behavior under overpressure is obtained

  16. Stress analysis in a non axisymmetric loaded reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Levi Barcelos; Assis, Gracia Menezes V. de; Miranda, Carlos Alexandre J.; Cruz, Julio Ricardo B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1995-01-01

    In this work we intend to present the stress analysis of a PWR vessel under postulated concentrated loads. The vessel was modeled with Axisymmetric solid 4 nodes harmonic finite elements with the use of the ANSYS program, version 5.0. The bolts connecting the vessel flanges were modeled with beam elements. Some considerations were made to model the contact between the flanges. The perforated part of the vessel tori spherical head was modeled (with reduced properties due to its holes) to introduce its stiffness and loads but was not within the scope of this work. The loading consists of some usual ones, as pressure, dead weight, bolts preload, seismic load and some postulated ones as concentrated loads, over the vessel, modeled by Fourier Series. The results in the axisymmetric model are taken in terms of linearized stresses, obtained in some circumferential positions and for each position, in some sections along the vessel. Using the ASME Code (Section III, Division 1, Sub-section NB) the stresses are within the allowable limits. In order to draw some conclusions about stress linearization, the membrane plus bending stresses (Pl + Pb) are obtained and compared in some sections, using three different methods. (author)

  17. Ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds at reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, X.

    1991-01-01

    Austenitic welds play an important role in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) both of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). These pressure retaining joints still pose problems for ultrasonic examination. During the last few years some progress has been achieved in overcoming these problems. The state of the art of the practical application is described in 'The Handbook on Ultrasonic Examination of Austenitic Welds' of the International Institute of Welding which was issued in 1986. This document was prepared by an international working group. Sulzer Brothers Limited, Winterthur Switzerland as manufacturer of both BWR and PWR RPVs has a long experience with ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds. In General Electric BWR RPVs the main recirculation line, the feedwater line and additional lines are connected to nozzles of the RPV with dissimilar metal welds joining stainless steel to carbon steel. The control rod drive (CRD) housings are attached to the RPV with complex weld joints. Framatome and Westinghouse RPVs also are provided with welds between the vessel and the main coolant line. This paper presents examples of ultrasonic approaches and examination results. Aspects of fabrication, preservice and inservice inspections are also covered. Complex weld joint design both from the point of material and geometry make ultrasonic examination sometimes extremely difficult but based on case by case investigations reliable solutions can often be realized. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear reactor support and seismic restraint with in-vessel core retention cooling features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Tyler A.; Edwards, Michael J.

    2018-01-23

    A nuclear reactor including a lateral seismic restraint with a vertically oriented pin attached to the lower vessel head and a mating pin socket attached to the floor. Thermally insulating materials are disposed alongside the exterior surface of a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel including at least the lower vessel head.

  19. U.S. nuclear reactor vessel integrity considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.

    1980-01-01

    1. Radiation embrittlement is but one consideration, albeit a very important one in the analysis of reactor vessel integrity. It can only be evaluated objectively in the context of the overall vessel integrity evaluation. 2. In many cases, individual surveillance capsule results may not be useful, but when treated as a whole the surveillance data are the most meaningful. 3. The currently published embrittlement trend curves are not adequate, but several improved versions are to be soon available. 4. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art embrittlement assessment procedures are being effectively evaluated with current U.S. and foreign research. By mid-1982, the significant research will be completed, well before any significant real embrittlement problems are anticipated even with current technology. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Supplementary surveillance programme for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Novosad, P.

    1994-01-01

    Paper gives a short analysis of a standard surveillance program for WWER440/213 type reactor pressure vessels. The program suggests the surveillance specimens are located in the region of high lead factor and thus they are suitable for surveillance for only up to about 5 years. For better and effective use of the results, their re-evaluation, based on gamma scanning of irradiated specimens as well as on testing of reconstituted irradiated specimens with the goal to determine the static and dynamic fracture toughness has been opened. New, supplementary surveillance program for the vessels operated in Czech Republic was designed: archive pieces of specimens (for further reconstitution after irradiation) will be irradiated in sites with low lead factor and then tested to determine the standard (impact) and fracture toughnesses

  1. Rotating plug bearings and seals for nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear reactor vessel described includes an obturator head mounted on the vessel and supporting rotating components by means of bearings with seals located at the circumference of the rotating components, as well as a system for lubricating the seals and bearings, marked by the fact that each rotating component rests on a first annular support fixed to the rim of the rotating component and provided with a part extending vertically above the latter. This first support has an extension descending externally at a distance from this vertical part so as to form an annular space. This annular space accomodates a second annular support, whilst bearings and seals are located between the extension of the first support and the outside of the second support, in order to prevent the lubricant applied to the bearings and seals from entering the space between the first and second annular supports [fr

  2. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R ampersand D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993)

  3. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected. (author)

  4. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected

  5. 1-D Two-phase Flow Investigation for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Cheol

    2007-02-01

    During a severe accident, when a molten corium is relocated in a reactor vessel lower head, the RCF(Reactor Cavity Flooding) system for ERVC (External Reactor Vessel Cooling) is actuated and coolants are supplied into a reactor cavity to remove a decay heat from the molten corium. This severe accident mitigation strategy for maintaining a integrity of reactor vessel was adopted in the nuclear power plants of APR1400, AP600, and AP1000. Under the ERVC condition, the upward two-phase flow is driven by the amount of the decay heat from the molten corium. To achieve the ERVC strategy, the two-phase natural circulation in the annular gap between the external reactor vessel and the insulation should be formed sufficiently by designing the coolant inlet/outlet area and gap size adequately on the insulation device. Also the natural circulation flow restriction has to be minimized. In this reason, it is needed to review the fundamental structure of insulation. In the existing power plants, the insulation design is aimed at minimizing heat losses under a normal operation. Under the ERVC condition, however, the ability to form the two-phase natural circulation is uncertain. Namely, some important factors, such as the coolant inlet/outlet areas, flow restriction, and steam vent etc. in the flow channel, should be considered for ERVC design. T-HEMES 1D study is launched to estimate the natural circulation flow under the ERVC condition of APR1400. The experimental facility is one-dimensional and scaled down as the half height and 1/238 channel area of the APR1400 reactor vessel. The air injection method was used to simulate the boiling at the external reactor vessel and generate the natural circulation two-phase flow. From the experimental results, the natural circulation flow rate highly depended on inlet/outlet areas and the circulation flow rate increased as the outlet height as well as the supplied water head increased. On the other hand, the simple analysis using the drift

  6. Optimization of reactor pressure vessel internals segmentation in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Sik [Dankook Univ., Chungnam (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-11-15

    One of the most challenging tasks during plant decommissioning is the removal of highly radioactive internal components from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). For RPV internals dismantling, it is essential that all activities are thoroughly planned and discussed in the early stage of the decommissioning project. One of the key activities in the detailed planning is to prepare the segmentation and packaging plan that describes the sequential steps required to segment, separate, and package each individual component of RPV, based on an activation analysis and component characterization study.

  7. Advanced ultrasonic and eddy current examinations of the reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, M.; Zado, V.

    1996-01-01

    In order to improve safety and reliability of nuclear power plant components, the existing examination methods are permanently developed as well as the new methods of examination are implemented. For the same reason, beside referent requirements, complementary NDE methods are utilized. Some examination methods techniques are not required to be used by referent safety codes and standards but they are frequently practiced as additional prevention to the component failure. This article presents the state of the art methods and techniques currently applied for examination of the reactor vessel base material, clad and weld materials. (author)

  8. Shear strength of end slabs of prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K.C.; Gotschall, H.L.; Liu, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    Prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRV's) have been adopted for primary containments in most large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor installations. The most common configuration for PCRVs is a right-vertical cylinder with thick end slabs. In order to assess the integrity of a PCRV it is necessary to predict the ultimate strength of the end slabs. The complexity of the basic mechanism of shear failure in the PCRV end slabs has thus far prohibited the development of a completely analytical solution. However, many experimental investigations of PCRV end slabs have been conducted over the past decade. This information makes it possible to establish empirical formulae for the ultimate strength of PCRV end slabs. The basis and development of an empirical shear-flexure interaction expression is presented. (Auth.)

  9. Needs for evaluated covariance data for reactor pressure vessel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Broadhead, B.L.; Wagschal, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses new methodology for quantifying and then reducing uncertainties in the calculated pressure vessel fluences of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The technique involves combining the integral results of the calculated and measured PWR surveillance dosimetry activities with the differential data used in the calculations, along with covariances of all the quantities, into a generalized linear least-squares adjustment procedure. Based on analysis of both PWRs and test reactor benchmarks, substantial evidence now exists to support the conclusion that, of all the nuclear as well as non-nuclear differential data considered, ENDF/B-VI values of the total inelastic iron cross sections and their covariances are the most important data controlling the outcome of the adjustment procedure. Predicted adjustments in these cross sections provided the stimulus for new measurements, the results of which impacted the ENDF/B-VI evaluation of iron 56

  10. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-01-01

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation

  11. ASTM Standards for Reactor Dosimetry and Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, PATRICK J.

    1999-09-14

    The ASTM standards provide guidance and instruction on how to field and interpret reactor dosimetry. They provide a roadmap towards understanding the current ''state-of-the-art'' in reactor dosimetry, as reflected by the technical community. The consensus basis to the ASTM standards assures the user of an unbiased presentation of technical procedures and interpretations of the measurements. Some insight into the types of standards and the way in which they are organized can assist one in using them in an expeditious manner. Two example are presented to help orient new users to the breadth and interrelationship between the ASTM nuclear metrology standards. One example involves the testing of a new ''widget'' to verify the radiation hardness. The second example involves quantifying the radiation damage at a pressure vessel critical weld location through surveillance dosimetry and calculation.

  12. Mechanical probabilistic study of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, V.; Persoz, M.; Debost-Eymard; Donore, A.M.; Meister, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the probabilistic study carried out on the vessel case under assumptions of occurrence of an underclad flaw and of an accidental transient of the pressurized thermal shock type (PTS). The estimation model of the failure criterion requires finite element computations. Therefore the probabilistic analysis is based on a coupling between Code Aster, the EDF FE software for thermomechanical analysis and PROBAN, a probabilistic analysis software (Det Norske Veritas). The vessel model is first described by focusing on the thermomechanical model (pseudo-1D and 2D axisymmetrical computations are considered and compared) then on the model used in the probabilistic analysis. The second part deals with the probabilistic analyses (computations of failure probabilities during the transient) carried out on the model for different cases and the comparison of the results. Eventually, the perspectives of this work, from both the computational point of view and the application to the vessel study, are outlined. (orig./DGE)

  13. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    The reliability of nuclear power plants depends on the proper functioning of complex components over the whole life on the plant. Particular concern for reliability is directed to the primary pressure boundary. This report focuses on the portion of the primary system exposed to and significantly affected by neutron radiation. Experimental evidence from research programmes and from reactor surveillance programmes has indicated radiation embrittlement of a magnitude sufficient to raise doubts about reactor pressure vessel integrity. The crucial nature of the primary vessel function heightens the need to be alert to this problem, to which, fortunately, there are positive aspects: for example, steels have been developed which are relatively immune to radiation embrittlement. Further, awareness of such embrittlement has led to designs which can accomodate this factor. The nature of nuclear reactors, of the steels used in their construction, and of the procedures for interpreting embrittlement and minimizing the effects are reviewed with reference to the reactors that are expected to play a major role in electric power production from now to about the turn of the century. The report is intended as a manual or guidebook; the aim has been to make each chapter or major sub-division sufficiently comprehensive and self-contained for it to be understood and read independently of the rest of the book. At the same time, it is hoped that the whole is unified enough to make a complete reading useful and interesting to the several classes of reader that are involved with only specific aspects of the topic

  14. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  15. Study on the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR including fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, K.; Ito, T.; Fujita, K.; Kurihara, C.; Sawada, Y.; Sakurai, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the seismic response of reactor vessel of pool type LMFBR with fluid-structure interaction. The reactor vessel has bottom support arrangement, the same core support system as Super-Phenix in France. Due to the bottom support arrangement, the level of core support is lower than that of the side support arrangement. So, in this reactor vessel, the displacement of the core top tends to increase because of the core's rocking. In this study, we investigated the vibration and seismic response characteristics of the reactor vessel. Therefore, the seismic experiments were carried out using one-eighth scale model and the seismic response including FSI and sloshing were investigated. From this study, the effect of liquid on the vibration characteristics and the seismic response characteristics of reactor vessel were clarified and sloshing characteristics were also clarified. It was confirmed that FEM analysis with FSI can reproduce the seismic behavior of the reactor vessel and is applicable to seismic design of the pool type LMFBR with bottom support arrangement. (author). 5 refs, 14 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Process and apparatus for adjusting a new upper reactor internals in a reactor vessel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizot, A.; Cadaureille, G.; Lalere, C.; Machuron, J.Y.

    1987-01-01

    On the new upper reactor internals is mounted devices for alignment and clearances, before introducing in the reactor vessel. After introducing alignment and clearances are measured. Adjustment pieces are provided for optimum clearances and alignment and fixed after removal from vessel. Decontamination is made by using water jets prior to fitting recess parts [fr

  17. Shear strength of end slabs of prestressed concrete nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reins, J.D.; Quiros, J.L. Jr.; Schnobrich, W.C.; Sozen, M.A.

    1976-07-01

    The report summarizes the experimental and part of the analytical work carried out in connection with an investigation of the structural strength of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The project is part of the Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel Program of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory sponsored by ERDA. The objective of the current phase of the work is to develop procedures to determine the shear strength of flat end slabs of reactor vessels with penetrations

  18. Reactor pressure vessel head vents and methods of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gels, John L; Keck, David J; Deaver, Gerald A

    2014-10-28

    Internal head vents are usable in nuclear reactors and include piping inside of the reactor pressure vessel with a vent in the reactor upper head. Piping extends downward from the upper head and passes outside of the reactor to permit the gas to escape or be forcibly vented outside of the reactor without external piping on the upper head. The piping may include upper and lowers section that removably mate where the upper head joins to the reactor pressure vessel. The removable mating may include a compressible bellows and corresponding funnel. The piping is fabricated of nuclear-reactor-safe materials, including carbon steel, stainless steel, and/or a Ni--Cr--Fe alloy. Methods install an internal head vent in a nuclear reactor by securing piping to an internal surface of an upper head of the nuclear reactor and/or securing piping to an internal surface of a reactor pressure vessel.

  19. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  20. Flux effect analysis in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A.; Blagoeva, D.; Debarberis, L.

    2013-11-01

    The results of long term research programme concerning the determination of irradiation embrittlement dependence on fast neutron flux for WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels before and after annealing are presented in this paper. The study of flux effect was carried out on commercial WWER-440 steels which differ significantly in phosphorous (0.013-0.036 wt%) and copper (0.08-0.20 wt%) contents. All specimens were irradiated in surveillance channel positions under similar conditions at high ˜4 × 1012 сm-2 s-1 and low ˜6 × 1011 сm-2 s-1 fluxes (E > 0.5 MeV) at a temperature of 270 °С. The radiation embrittlement was evaluated by transition temperature shift on the basis of Charpy specimens test results. In case of low flux, the measured Tk shifts could be 25-50 °C bigger than the Tk shifts obtained from high flux data. A significant flux effect is observed in WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels with higher copper content (>0.13 wt%).

  1. Microstructure and embrittlement of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennion, A.

    1999-03-01

    27 VVER 440 pressurised water reactors operate in former Soviet Union and in Eastern Europe. The pressure vessel, is made of Cr-Mo-V steel. It contains a circumferential arc weld in front of the nuclear core. This weld undergoes a high neutron flux and contains large amounts of copper and phosphorus, elements well known for their embrittlement potency under irradiation. The embrittlement kinetic of the steel is accelerated, reducing the lifetime of the reactor. In order to get informations on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these steels, base metals, HAZ, and weld metals have been characterized. The high amount of phosphorus in weld metals promotes the reverse temper embrittlement that occurs during post-weld heat treatment. The radiation damage structure has been identified by small angle neutron scattering, atomic probe, and transmission electron microscopy. Nanometer-sized clusters of solute atoms, rich in copper with almost the same characteristics as in western pressure vessels steels, and an evolution of the size distribution of vanadium carbides, which are present on dislocation structure, are observed. These defects disappear during post-irradiation tempering. As in western steels, the embrittlement is due to both hardening and reduction of interphase cohesion. The radiation damage specificity of VVER steels arises from their high amount of phosphorus and from their significant density of fine vanadium carbides. (author)

  2. Renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-400 reactors pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonicky, P.; Pilat, P.

    2007-01-01

    An article describes technical solution for renovation of the sealing planes of WWER-440 reactor's pressure vessel. Four nickel sealing rings placed in four concentric grooves are providing hermetic sealing between the vessel and the lid of this type of the reactor. Impeccable seal of the reactor's pressure vessel, where the fission reaction takes place, represents a basic security factor for safe electric energy production. Principle of renovation of the reactor's pressure vessel and lid sealing planes is based on mechanical enlargement of defective grooves and following cladding of the new material by TIG welding. Final step for renovation includes machining of new grooves according to geometrical and surface quality requirements (Authors)

  3. A review of formulas for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.

    1995-01-01

    Formulas developed in different countries for predicting irradiation embrittlement of reactors vessel materials are presented. Results of predictions were compared with different data sets, from surveillance programmes or studies in test reactors, with different residual elements contents. Figs

  4. Revisiting the reactor pressure vessel for long-time operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.; Diego, G. de; Hernandez Mayoral, M.

    2013-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is one of the key components of nuclear power plants, especially for long time operation. It is a non-replaceable component, at least with current technology. the structural integrity of the vessel is evaluated within called monitoring programs where the degradation of the mechanical properties due to neutron irradiation is determined. From the first designs of the RPVs and monitoring programs in the years 60-70 currently still in force, there have been major advances in the understanding of radiation damage and methods of evaluation. Thus, it is recommended the use of forgings instead of plates in the construction of the RPVs in order to reduce the number of welds, more sensitive to neutron irradiation, and using starting materials with less content of impurities, particularly copper. To evaluate the embrittlement of RPVs the Master Curve methodology is currently used, through the testing of the charpy specimens from the surveillance capsules, to determine the fracture toughness. This article summarizes the last activities of CIEMAT into the European research projects LONGIIFE and PERFORM60, about the knowledge of radiation damage in materials with low copper content, traditionally considered less sensitive to irradiation, and the use of the Master Curve in advanced surveillance programs. The activities related to the problems associated with the use of large forging, such as the appearance of hydrogen flakes in the vessel of Doel 3, and its implications, are also presented. (Author)

  5. Progress toward acoustic emission characterization for continuous monitoring reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in an operating reactor vessel using acoustic emission (AE) data. A preliminary AE-flaw growth relationship has been developed encompassing six variables. This model relates AE count and energy to fatigue crack driving force ΔK. Pattern recognition has been examined as a means of distinguishing crack growth AE from other acoustic signals with encouraging results. The program is moving into hardware implementation of relationships for testing and refinement by monitoring tests in heavy section specimens and subscale structures. The hardware system will become a reactor monitor prototype

  6. Behavior of a corium jet in high pressure melt ejection from a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides results from analytical and experimental investigations on the behavior of a gas supersaturated molten jet expelled from a pressurized vessel. Aero-hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in gas, stream degassing of molten metals and gas bubble nucleation in molten metals are relevant problems which are addressed in this work. Models are developed for jet expansion, primary breakup of the jet and secondary fragmentation of melt droplets resulting from violent effervescence of dissolved gas. The jet expansion model is based on a general relation for bubble growth which includes both inertia-controlled and diffusion-controlled growth phases. The jet expansion model is able to predict the jet void fraction, jet radius as a function of axial distance from the pressure vessel, bubble size and bubble pressure. The number density of gas bubbles in the melt, which is a basic parameter in the model, was determined experimentally and is about 10 8 per m 3 of liquid. The primary breakup of the jet produces a spray of droplets, about 2-3 mm in diameter. Parametric calculations for a TMLB' reactor accident sequence show that the corium jet is disrupted within a few initial jet diameters from the reactor vessel and that the radius of corium spray at the level of the reactor cavity floor is in the range of 0.8 to 2.6 m. (orig./HP)

  7. Numerical analysis of coolant mixing in the pressure vessel of WWER-440 type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boros, I.; Aszodi, A.

    2003-01-01

    The precise description of the coolant mixing processes taking place in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of pressurized water nuclear reactors has an essential importance during power operation, as well as in case of incidental or accidental conditions. In this paper the detailed CFD model of the pressure vessel of a WWER-440 type reactor and calculations performed with this RPV model are presented. The CFD model of the pressure vessel contains all the important internal structural elements of the RPV. Sensitivity study on the effect of these elements was also carried out. Both steady-state and transient calculation were performed using the CFD code CFX-5.5.1. The results of the steady-state calculations give the so called mixing factors, i.e. the effect of each single primary loop at the core inlet. The mixing factors can be given for nominal circumstances (i.e. all main coolant pumps are working) or in case of less than six working MCPs. In order to validate the model the calculated mixing factors are compared with the values measured in the Paks NPP (Authors)

  8. Numerical simulation of moderator flow and temperature distributions in a CANDU reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.

    1982-10-01

    This paper describes numerical predictions of the two-dimensional flow and temperature fields of an internally-heated liquid in a typical CANDU reactor vessel. Turbulence momentum and energy transport are simulated using the k-epsilon model. Both steady-state and transient results are discussed. The finite control volume analogues of the conservation equations are solved using a modified version of the TEACH code

  9. Reactor pressure vessel steels[1997 Scientific Report of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use.

  10. Positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering characterization of nanostructural features in high-nickel model reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glade, Stephen C.; Wirth, Brian D.; Odette, G. Robert; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels results from the hardening by a high number density of nanometer scale features. In steels with more than ∼0.10% Cu, the dominant features are often Cu-rich precipitates typically alloyed with Mn, Ni and Si. At low-Cu and low-to-intermediate Ni levels, so-called matrix hardening features are believed to be vacancy-solute cluster complexes, or their remnants. However, Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates, with Mn plus Ni contents greater than Cu, can form at high alloy Ni contents and are promoted at irradiation temperatures lower than the nominal 290 deg. C. Even at very low-Cu levels, late blooming Mn-Ni-Si rich precipitates are a significant concern due to their potential to form large volume fractions of hardening features. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and small angle neutron scattering neutron (SANS) measurements were used to characterize the fine-scale microstructure in split-melt A533B steels with varying Ni and Cu contents, irradiated at selected conditions from 270 to 310 deg. C between ∼0.04 and 1.6 x 10 23 n m -2 . The objective was to assess the character, composition and magnetic properties of Cu-rich precipitates, as well as to gain insight on the matrix features. The results suggest that the irradiated very low-Cu and intermediate Ni steel contains small vacancy-Mn-Ni-Si cluster complexes, but not large, well-formed and highly enriched Mn-Ni-Si phases. The hardening features in steels containing 0.2% and 0.4% Cu, and 0.8% and 1.6% Ni are consistent with well-formed, non-magnetic Cu-Ni-Mn precipitates. The precipitate number densities and volume fractions increase, while their sizes decrease, with increasing Ni and decreasing irradiation temperature. The precipitates evolve with fluence in stages of nucleation, growth and limited coarsening

  11. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprouster, D.J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.K.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G.R.; Ecker, L.E.

    2016-01-01

    Massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that grows with dose (fluence), as manifested by an increasing ductile-to-brittle fracture transition temperature. Extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with beyond 60 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize highly embrittling nm-scale Mn–Ni–Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. These precipitates lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementary techniques has, for the very first time, successfully identified the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  12. Radiation Dosimetry of the Pressure Vessel Internals of the High Flux Beam Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E.; Reciniello, Richard N.; Hu, Jih-Perng; Rorer, David C.

    2003-06-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex™ polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rates, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup.

  13. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.P.; RORER, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex(trademark) polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup

  14. Ductile fracture estimation of reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Sakai, Shinsuke; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions. First, it is shown that the bending moment applied to the cracked section can be evaluated by considering the plastic deformation of the cracked section and the thermal deformation of the shell. As the contribution of the local thermal stress to the J-value is negligible, the J-value under thermal shock can be easily evaluated by using fully plastic solutions for the cracked part. Next, the phenomena of ductile fracture under thermal shock are expressed on the load-versus-displacement diagram which enables us to grasp the transient phenomena visually. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed on the above diagram concerning the variation of (1) thermal shock conditions, (2) initial crack length, and (3) J-resistance curve (i.e. embrittlement by neutron irradiation). (author)

  15. Locking mechanism for in-vessel components of tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Shimizu, K.; Koizumi, K.; Tada, E.

    1992-01-01

    The locking and unlocking mechanism for in-vessel replaceable components such as blanket modules, is one of the most critical issues of the tokamak fusion reactor, since the sufficient stiffness against the enormous electromagnetic loads and the easy replaceability are required. In this paper, the authors decide that a caulking cotter joint is worth initiating the R and D from veiwpoints of an effective use of space, a replaceability, a removability of nuclear heating, and a reliability. In this approach, the cotter driving (thrusting and plucking) mechanism is a critical technology. A flexible tube concept has been developed as the driving mechanism, where the stroke and driving force are obtained by a fat shape by the hydraulic pressure. The original normal tube is subjected to the working percentage of more than several hundreds percentage (from thickness of 1.2 mm to 0.2 mm) for plastically forming the flexible tube

  16. Computer system for International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunjan, R.; Kabalevsky, S.; Kiselev, V.; Serov, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents description of the computer tools for support of International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database developed at IAEA. Work was focused on raw, qualified, processed materials data, search, retrieval, analysis, presentation and export possibilities of data. Developed software has the following main functions: provides software tools for querying and search of any type of data in the database; provides the capability to update the existing information in the database; provides the capability to present and print selected data; provides the possibility of export on yearly basis the run-time IRPVMDB with raw, qualified and processed materials data to Database members; provides the capability to export any selected sets of raw, qualified, processed materials data

  17. Integrated leak rate test results of JOYO reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.; Endo, J.

    1982-02-01

    Integrated leak rate tests of JOYO after the reactor coolant system had been filled with sodium have been performed two times since 1978 (February 1978 and December 1979). The tests were conducted with the in-containment sodium systems, primary argon cover gas system and air conditioning systems operating. Both the absolute pressure method and the reference chamber method were employed during the test. The results of both tests confirmed the functioning of the containment vessel, and leak rate limits were satisfied. In Addition, the adequancy of the test instrumentation system and the test method was demonstrated. Finally the plant conditions required to maintain reasonable accuracy for the leak rate testing of LMFBR were established. In this paper, the test conditions and the test results are described. (author)

  18. Evaluation of a permanent reactor vessel head shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.S.; Johnson, T.G.; Tipswork, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Virginia Power recently completed installing permanent reactor vessel head shields at all four of its nuclear units-Surry 1 and 2 (781-MWe Westinghouse PWRs) and North Anna 1 and 2 (893-MWe Westinghouse PWRs). Permanent shields were chosen over the use of temporary shielding based on a cost/benefit analysis. Factors that were taken into account in the analysis included the cost of the shields, the one-time dose commitment for installation of permanent shields, dose and manpower commitments for installation and removal of temporary shielding during each outage, decontamination and storage of temporary shielding between outages, and projected dose savings for both types of shields. Basically, permanent shields were found to be more cot-effective because each required only a one-time dose commitment for installation

  19. Preparation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yannitell, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project is the removal and shipment the Reactor Pressure Vessel (PRV) and its associated Neutron Shield Tank (NST) to the government owned Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. Engineering studies considered the alternatives for removal and shipment of the RPV/NST. These included segmentation for subsequent truck shipments, and one-piece removal with barge or rail shipment. Although the analysis indicated that current technology could be utilized to accomplish either alternative, one-piece removal of the RPV was selected as the safest, most cost effective method. When compared to segmentation, it was estimated that one-piece removal would reduce the duration of the Project by 1 year, reduce cost by $4 M, and result in a savings of radiation exposure of 150 man-Rem. Rail transportation of an integral RPV/NST package is not feasible due to the physical size of the package. 5 refs., 1 fig

  20. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  1. Reactor Pressure Vessel P-T Limit Curve Round Robin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, C.H.; Moon, H.R.; Jeong, I.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This report is the summary of the analysis results for the P-T Limit Curve construction which have been subjected to the round robin analysis. The purpose of the round robin is to compare the procedure and method used in various organizations to construct P-T limit curve to prevent brittle fracture of reactor pressure vessel of nuclear power plants. Each Participant used its own approach to construct the P-T limit curve and submitted the results, By analyzing the results, the reference procedure for the P-T limit curve could be established. This report include the results of the comparison of the procedure and method used by the participants, and sensitivity study of the key parameters. (author) 23 refs, 88 figs, 17 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel steels by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugeň, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Slugen@elf.stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 81219 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hein, H. [AREVA NP GmbH, Paul Gossen Strasse 100, 91 001 Erlangen (Germany); Sojak, S.; Simeg Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Sabelová, V.; Pavúk, M.; Hinca, R.; Stacho, M. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 81219 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-11-15

    This paper presents a comparison of commercially used German and Russian reactor pressure vessel steels from the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) point of view, having in mind knowledge obtained also from other techniques from the last decades. The second generation of Russian RPV steels seems to be fully comparable with German steels and their quality allows prolongation of NPP operating lifetime over projected 40 years. The embrittlement of CrMoV steels is relatively low due to effect of higher temperature which implies partial in situ annealing of primary microstructural point defects and therefore delays the degradation processes caused by neutron irradiation. PAS techniques can be effectively applied for evaluation of microstructural changes caused by extreme external loads (characterized by high dpa values) by proton implantation, with aim to simulate irradiation and for the evaluation of the effectiveness of post-irradiation thermal treatments. We used our actual and previous results, collected during last 20 years from measurements of different RPV-steels in “as received”, irradiated and post-irradiation annealed state and compare them with the aim to contribute to general knowledge based on experimental PAS data. Actual results from irradiated German and Russian steels confirmed that no large voids or vacancy clusters were formed at defined irradiation conditions stated according to the real operational conditions at nuclear power plants. This indicate the fact that vacancy type defects bear hardly any responsibility for radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels and does not affect significantly the long-term operation of nuclear power plants from safety point of view.

  3. CFD analysis of moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Anuj Kumar, E-mail: akansal@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Maheshwari, Naresh Kumar, E-mail: nmahesh@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu Krishnan, E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D CFD of vertical calandria vessel. • Spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. • Effect of Archimedes number. • Non-dimensional analysis. - Abstract: Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed for the moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor under normal operating condition using OpenFOAM CFD code. OpenFOAM is validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data available in literature. CFD model includes the calandria vessel, calandria tubes, inlet header and outlet header. Analysis has been performed for the cases of uniform and spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. Studies show that the maximum temperature in moderator is lower in the case of spatial distribution of heat generation as compared to that in the uniform heat generation in calandria. In addition, the effect of Archimedes number on maximum and average moderator temperature was investigated.

  4. Minimum weight design of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boes, R.

    1975-01-01

    A method of non-linear programming for the minimization of the volume of rotationally symmetric prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels is presented. It is assumed that the inner shape, the loads and the degree of prestressing are prescribed, whereas the outer shape is to be detemined. Prestressing includes rotational and vertical tension. The objective function minimizes the weight of the PCRV. The constrained minimization problem is converted into an unconstrained problem by the addition of interior penalty functions to the objective function. The minimum is determined by the variable metric method (Davidson-Fletcher-Powell), using both values and derivatives of the modified objective function. The one-dimensional search is approximated by a method of Kund. Optimization variables are scaled. The method is applied to a pressure vessel like for THTR. It is found that the thickness of the cylindrical wall may be reduced considerably for the load cases considered in the optimization. The thickness of the cover is reduced slightly. The largest reduction in wall thickness occurs at the junction of wall and cover. (Auth.)

  5. Surveillance specimen programmes for WWER reactor vessels in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, J.; Hogel, J.; Brumovsky, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present state of materials degradation in WWER reactor pressure vessels manufactured in the Czech Republic is highlighted. The standard surveillance program for WWER-440/V-213 type reactors is described and its deficiencies together with the main results obtained are discussed. A new supplementary surveillance program meeting all requirements for PWR type reactors has been developed and launched. An entirely new design was chosen for the surveillance programme for WWER-1000/V-320 type reactor pressure vessels. Materials selection, container design and location as well as the withdrawal plan connected with ex-vessel fluence monitoring are described

  6. New approaches for evaluation of brittle strength of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, B.; Karzov, G.; Kostylev, V.; Gulenko, A.; Rivkin, E.

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Master curve conception, condition of brittle strength is formulated for heterogeneous distribution of stress intensity factor along crack front and non-monotonic, non-isothermic loading. This formulation includes the elaborated procedure for taking into account the effects of shallow cracks and biaxial loading on fracture toughness. It is concluded as follows: (1) A condition of brittle strength is formulated for reactor pressure vessel with crack-like flaw in probabilistic statement. As the condition of brittle strength it is taken condition P f f (bar) where P f is fracture probability, and P f (bar) is a given level of fracture probability. Formulation of this condition is based on the weakest link model and takes into account a variation of the stress intensity factor K I and K IC along the crack front. (2) Dependencies are proposed which allow to take into account the shallow crack effect and the biaxial loading effect on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steels. (3) Using approaches presented in the present paper allows one to decrease conservatism and to increase adequacy of evaluations of brittle strength of reactor pressure vessels. Now these approaches have been included in Russian Standard on evaluation of brittle fracture of RPV of WWER type

  7. Use of Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Materials for Extended Life Evaluations Using Power and Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Nanstad, R.K.; Odette, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    The most important component in assuring safety of the nuclear power plant is the reactor pressure (RPV). Surveillance programs have been designed to cover the licensed life of operating nuclear RPVs. The original surveillance programs were designed when the licensed life was 40 years. More than one-half of the operating nuclear plants in the USA have an extended license out to 60 years, and there are plans to continue to operate many plants out to 80 years. Therefore, the surveillance programs have had to be adjusted or enhanced to generate key data for 60 years, and now consideration must be given for 80 or more years. To generate the necessary data to assure safe operation out to these extended license lives, test reactor irradiations have been initiated with key RPV and model alloy steels, which include several steels irradiated in the current power reactor surveillance programs out to relatively high fluence levels. These data are crucial in understanding the radiation embrittlement mechanisms and to enable extrapolation of the irradiation effects on mechanical properties for these extended time periods. This paper describes the potential radiation embrittlement mechanisms and effects when assessing much longer operating times and higher neutron fluence levels. Potential methods for adjusting higher neutron flux test reactor data for use in predicting power reactor vessel conditions are discussed. (author)

  8. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... operating plan must include: (i) A detailed description of the pressure vessel and all structures and... For those cases where materials are removed from the beltline of the pressure vessel, the stress...

  9. Geodetical survey concerning the reactor vessel of the Paks nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czellar, A.; Zergi, I.

    1982-01-01

    A geodetical survey concerning the reactor vessel of the Paks nuclear power plant is reported. The accuracy of the position of the joining parts of the vessel to the primary coolant circuit was inspected by photogrammetry and by geodesic measurements applying iteration and traversing. The resulting dimensions of the vessel proved to be within the tolerance of the specified values. (Sz.J.)

  10. Particle bed reactor modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  11. Effects of Nanofluid for In-Vessel Retention External Reactor Vessel Cooling on Critical Heat Flux using Pool Boiling Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Dae; Kang, Sarah; Lee, Seung Won; Bang, In Cheol

    2011-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management (SAM) strategies that are used in some nuclear power plants: AP600, AP1000, Loviisa and APR1400. One way of IVR is the method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC). When core melts and deposits on the bottom of reactor vessel, ERVC is starting to flood the reactor cavity to remove the decay heat through the wall of the reactor vessel. This process can improve the plant economics by reducing regulatory requirements. And increased safety margin leads to gain public acceptance. In this system, the heat removal is restricted by thermal limit called by critical heat flux (CHF). Besides, as advanced light water reactors such as South Korea's APR-1400, thermal safety margin is deceased. So, it is essential to get more safety margin. There are some approaches to enhance the ERVC: using the coating on the vessel outer surface, increasing the reactor cavity flood level, streamlining the gap between the vessel and the vessel insulation. Many investigations have been performed to evaluate the coolability of IVR In this paper, we firstly investigated the coating effects in the critical heat flux among the above mentioned approach methods. During the boiling phenomenon, a thin layer was formed on the heater surface in the nanofluid. This coating mechanism is well known theoretically. Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in traditional heat transfer fluids. One of the most interesting characteristics of nanofluids is their capability to enhance the critical heat flux (CHF) significantly. Nanofluid is made by typical particle materials. Materials of nanoparticles include metals (e.g., silver, copper, gold), metal oxides (e.g., titania, alumina, silica, zirconia), carbon allotrope (e.g., carbon nanotube, graphite). We selected the grapheneoxide nanofluid which is a kind of carbon allotrope. Graphene-oxide is attractive material with the high thermal conductivity and stable dispersion ability in

  12. Computational study of the mixed cooling effects on the in-vessel retention of a molten pool in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Seok; Sohn, Chang Hyun; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2004-01-01

    The retention of a molten pool vessel cooled by internal vessel reflooding and/or external vessel reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies. The present numerical study investigates the effect of both internal and external vessel mixed cooling on an internally heated molten pool. The molten pool is confined in a hemispherical vessel with reference to the thermal behavior of the vessel wall. In this study, our numerical model used a scaled-down reactor vessel of a KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power) reactor design of 1000 MWe (a pressurized water reactor with a large and dry containment). Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the internal and external vessel cooling boundaries. Radiative heat transfer has been considered in the case of dry internal vessel boundary condition. Computational results show that the external cooling vessel boundary conditions have better effectiveness than internal vessel cooling in the retention of the melt pool vessel failure

  13. The characteristics of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel of the HHT demonstration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1979-01-01

    The paper concentrates on the design studies of the HTGR prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) for the HHT Demonstration Plant. The multi-cavity reactor pressure vessel accommodates all components carrying primary gas, including heat exchangers and gas turbine. For reasons of economics and availability of the reactor plant, generic requirements are made for the PCRV. A short description of the power plant is also presented

  14. Friction coefficient and limiter load test analysis by flexibility coefficient model of Hold-Down Spring of nuclear reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Linjun

    2017-01-01

    The friction force between the contact surfaces of a reactor internal hold-down spring (HDS) and core barrel flanges can directly influence the axial stiffness of an HDS. However, friction coefficient cannot be obtained through theoretical analysis. This study performs a mathematical deduction of the physical model of an HDS. Moreover, a mathematical model of axial load P, displacement δ, and flexibility coefficient is established, and a set of test apparatuses is designed to simulate the preloading process of the HDS. According to the experimental research and theoretical analysis, P-δ curves and the flexibility coefficient λ are obtained in the loading processes of the HDS. The friction coefficient f of the M1000 HDS is further calculated as 0.224. The displacement limit load value (4,638 kN) can be obtained through a displacement limit experiment. With the friction coefficient considered, the theoretical load is 4,271 kN, which is relatively close to the experimental result. Thus, the friction coefficient exerts an influence on the displacement limit load P. The friction coefficient should be considered in the design analysis for HDS.

  15. Friction coefficient and limiter load test analysis by flexibility coefficient model of Hold-Down Spring of nuclear reactor vessel internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Linjun [Zhejiang Univ. of Technology, Hangzhou (China). College of Mechanical Engineering; Xue, Guohong; Zhang, Ming [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai (China)

    2017-11-15

    The friction force between the contact surfaces of a reactor internal hold-down spring (HDS) and core barrel flanges can directly influence the axial stiffness of an HDS. However, friction coefficient cannot be obtained through theoretical analysis. This study performs a mathematical deduction of the physical model of an HDS. Moreover, a mathematical model of axial load P, displacement δ, and flexibility coefficient is established, and a set of test apparatuses is designed to simulate the preloading process of the HDS. According to the experimental research and theoretical analysis, P-δ curves and the flexibility coefficient λ are obtained in the loading processes of the HDS. The friction coefficient f of the M1000 HDS is further calculated as 0.224. The displacement limit load value (4,638 kN) can be obtained through a displacement limit experiment. With the friction coefficient considered, the theoretical load is 4,271 kN, which is relatively close to the experimental result. Thus, the friction coefficient exerts an influence on the displacement limit load P. The friction coefficient should be considered in the design analysis for HDS.

  16. Transient temperature and stress distributions in the pressure vessel's wall of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, G.A. da

    1979-01-01

    In order to calculate the temperature distribution in a reactor vessel wall which is under the effect of gamma radiation originated in the reactor core, a numerical solution is proposed. This problem may arise from a reactor cooling pump failure .The thermal stresses are also calculated. (Author) [pt

  17. Investigation of a Coolant Mixing Phenomena within the Reactor Pressure Vessel of a VVER-1000 Reactor with Different Simulation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (INR is involved in the qualification of coupled codes for reactor safety evaluations, aiming to improve their prediction capability and acceptability. In the frame of the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark Phase 1, RELAP5/PARCS has been extensively assessed. Phase 2 of this benchmark was focused on both multidimensional thermal hydraulic phenomena and core physics. Plant data will be used to qualify the 3D models of TRACE and RELAP5/CFX, which were coupled for this purpose. The developed multidimensional models of the VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV as well as the performed calculations will be described in detail. The predicted results are in good agreement with experimental data. It was demonstrated that the chosen 3D nodalization of the RPV is adequate for the description of the coolant mixing phenomena in a VVER-1000 reactor. Even though only a 3D coarse nodalization is used in TRACE, the integral results are comparable to those obtained by RELAP5/CFX.

  18. The 1500 MW fast breeder reactor the double envelope-vessel anchored in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvin, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper givers an account of EDF investigations to reduce the investment costs of the 1500 MW Fast Reactor (RNR 1500) without prejudice to the safety requirements. It deals with the double envelope-vessel, designed to minimize radiation consequences in the event of accidental leakage in the main vessel. In the Fast Reactors in operation (PHOENIX), under construction (CRYS-MALVILLE), and under project (NR 1500), the double envelope-steel vessel hangs down from the upper part of the reactor block, its weight being approximately 300 t. In the new design, the vessel is fixed into the concrete which supports the main vessel, by means of steel anchors. A thermal insulation isolates it from the main vessel. The installation of coils in the concrete, next to the lining, allows for water circulation to cool the concrete. (orig./GL)

  19. Design and analysis of concrete reactor vessels: New developments, problems and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.

    1984-01-01

    This lecture reviews new developments in analysis and design of prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRV). After a brief assessment of the current status and experience, the advantages, disadvantages, and especially the safety features of PCRV, are discussed. Attention is then focused on the design of penetrations and openings, and on the design for high-temperature resistance - areas in which further developments are needed. Various possible designs for high-temperature exposure of concrete in a hypothetical accident are analyzed. Considered are not only PCRVs for gas-cooled reactors (GCR), but also guard vessels for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), for which designs mitigating the adverse effects of molten sodium, molten steel, and core melt are surveyed. Realistic analysis of the problems requires further development in the knowledge of material behavior and its mathematical modeling. Recent advances in the modeling of high-temperature response of concrete, including pore water transfer, pore pressure, creep and shrinkage are outlined. This is followed by a discussion of new developments in the analysis of cracking of concrete, where the need of switching from stress criteria to energy criteria for fracture is emphasized. The lecture concludes with a brief discussion of long-time behavior, the effect of aging, and probabilistic analysis of creep. (orig.)

  20. Analysis of toroidal vacuum vessels for use in demonstration sized tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbert, M.E.

    1978-07-01

    The vacuum vessel component of the tokamak fusion reactor is the subject of this study. The main objective of this paper was to provide guidance for the structural design of a thin wall externally pressurized toroidal vacuum vessel. The analyses are based on the available state-of-the-art analytical methods. The shortcomings of these analytical methods necessitated approximations and assumptions to be made throughout the study. A principal result of the study has been the identification of a viable vacuum vessel design for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) and The Next Step (TNS) Reactor

  1. Shallow-crack toughness results for reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Shum, D.K.M.; Rolfe, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. To complete this investigation, techniques were developed to determine the fracture toughness from shallow-crack specimens. A total of 38 deep and shallow-crack tests have been performed on beam specimens about 100 mm deep loaded in 3-point bending. Two crack depths (a ∼ 50 and 9 mm) and three beam thicknesses (B ∼ 50, 100, and 150 mm) have been tested. Techniques were developed to estimate the toughness in terms of both the J-integral and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). Analytical J-integral results were consistent with experimental J-integral results, confirming the validity of the J-estimation schemes used and the effect of flaw depth on fracture toughness. Test results indicate a significant increase in the fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens in the lower transition region compared to the deep-crack fracture toughness. There is, however, little or no difference in toughness on the lower shelf where linear-elastic conditions exist for specimens with either deep or shallow flaws. The increase in shallow-flaw toughness compared with deep-flaw results appears to be well characterized by a temperature shift of 35 degree C

  2. Development of automatic Ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kor R.; Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.

    1996-06-01

    The selected weld areas of a reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by the remote mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections are performed with this MUT equipment. However due to the old age of the equipment and frequent movements to plant sites, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly and it is very difficult to keep spare parts. In order to resolve these problems and to meet the strong request from plant sites, we intend to develop a new 3-axis control system including hardware and software. With this control system, we expect more efficient and reliable examination of the nozzle to shell weld areas, which is specified in ASME Code Section XI. The new 3-axis control system hardware and software were designed and development of our own control system, the advanced technologies of computer control mechanism were established and examination reliability of the nozzle to shell weld area was improved. With the development of our 3-axis control system for PaR ISI-2 computer control system, the reliability of nozzle to shell weld area examination has been improved. The established technologies from the development and detailed analysis of existing control system, are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plants. (author). 12 refs., 4 tabs., 33 figs

  3. Miniaturized Charpy test for reactor pressure vessel embrittlement characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, M.P. Sr. [MPM Research and Consulting, Lemont, PA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Modifications were made to a conventional Charpy machine to accommodate the miniaturized Charpy V-Notch (MCVN) specimens which were fabricated from an archived reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Over 100 dynamic MCVN tests were performed and compared to the results from conventional Charpy V-Notch (CVN) tests to demonstrate the efficacy of the miniature specimen test. The optimized sidegrooved MCVN specimens exhibit transitional fracture behavior over essentially the same temperature range as the CVN specimens which indicates that the stress fields in the MCVN specimens reasonably simulate those of the CVN specimens and this fact has been observed in finite element calculations. This result demonstrates a significant breakthrough since it is now possible to measure the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) using miniature specimens with only small correction factors, and for some materials as in the present study, without the need for any correction factor at all. This development simplifies data interpretation and will facilitate future regulatory acceptance. The non-sidegrooved specimens yield energy-temperature data which is significantly shifted downward in temperature (non-conservative) as a result of the loss of constraint which accompanies size reduction.

  4. Development of automatic ultrasonic testing equipment for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kee Ok; Park, Dae Yung; Park, Moon Hoh; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Kwang Heui; Kang, Sang Sin; Bang, Heui Song; Noh, Heui Choong; Kong, Woon Sik

    1994-08-01

    The selected weld areas of reactor pressure vessel and adjacent piping are examined by remote mechanized ultrasonic testing(MUT) equipment. Since the MUT equipment was purchased from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in April 1985, we have performed 15 inservice inspections and 5 preservice inspections. However, the reliability of examination was recently decreased rapidly as the problems which results from the old age of equipment and the frequent movement to plant site to site have occurred frequently. Therefore, the 3-axis control system hardware in occurring many problems among the equipments of mechanized ultrasonic testing (MUT) was designed and developed to cover the examination areas of nozzle-shell weld as specified in ASME Code Section XI and to improve the examination reliability. The new 3-axis control system hardware with the performance of this project was developed to be compatible with the old one and it was used as dual system or spare parts of the old system. Furthermore, the established technologies are expected to be applied to the similar control systems in nuclear power plant. 17 figs, 2 pix, 2 tabs, 10 refs. (Author)

  5. Regulatory aspects of radiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, P.N.

    1979-01-01

    One purpose of this conference, is to re-examine the conventional wisdom about neutron radiation embrittlement and the methods used to counteract embrittlement in reactor vessels. Perhaps, there have been sufficient advances in fracture mechanics, core physics, dosimetry, and physical metallurgy to permit a forward step in the quantitative treatment of the subject. Certainly this would be consistent with the position of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (the NRC) in general. ''There has been a continued evolution toward increased specificity.'' This statement appeared in the response prepared by the staff to a request from the Commission to explain how the staff decides to apply a new requirement and to whom, i.e., to back-fit or forward-fit-only or whatever. Pressure for increased specificity, i.e., for fleshing out general design criteria, comes from ''technical surprises'' in the form of operating experiences or from research information, and from attempts to improve our confidence in the safety of plants, especially new plants. Our goal is to have anticipated and evaluated all possible modes of failure with sufficient quantitativeness that the probability of failure can be estimated with some accuracy. Failing this, regulators demand large margins of safety to cover our ignorance

  6. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  7. Strain measurement in and analysis for hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dan; Zhuang Dongzhen

    2013-01-01

    The strain measurement in hydraulic test of CPR1000 reactor pressure vessel performed in Dongfang Heavy Machinery Co., Ltd. is introduced. The detail test scheme and method was introduced and the measurement results of strain and stress was given. Meanwhile the finite element analysis was performed for the pressure vessel, which was generally matched with the measurement results. The reliability of strain measurement was verified and the high strength margin of vessel was shown, which would give a good reference value for the follow-up hydraulic tests and strength analysis of reactor pressure vessel. (authors)

  8. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. State-of-the-art report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on the ex-vessel flooding accident management strategy for severe accidents in a NPP has been given. The feasibility has been discussed, as well as the in- and ex-vessel phenomena, which influence the structural integrity of the vessel. Finally, some computer codes with the ability to model the phenomena involved in ex-vessel flooding have been discussed. (orig./HP)

  9. In-vessel core debris retention through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel. State-of-the-art report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heel, A.M.J.M. van

    1995-07-01

    An overview of the state-of-the-art knowledge on the ex-vessel flooding accident management strategy for severe accidents in a NPP has been given. The feasibility has been discussed, as well as the in- and ex-vessel phenomena, which influence the structural integrity of the vessel. Finally, some computer codes with the ability to model the phenomena involved in ex-vessel flooding have been discussed. (orig./HP).

  10. Effects of Thermal Aging on Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Bong Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Type 316H stainless steel is a prime candidate for reactor vessel material of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) which has been developed as one of the Gen IV nuclear reactors in Korea. The reactor vessel steel will be exposed to higher temperature for an extended design life time. It is known that austenitic stainless steel such as Type 316H stainless steel shows excellent toughness and adequate strength at a moderate temperature. However, the previous researches reported the mechanical properties of Type 316H stainless weld would be deteriorated by the aging at the elevated temperature range.

  11. Development of heat transfer enhancement techniques for external cooling of an advanced reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun

    Nucleate boiling is a well-recognized means for passively removing high heat loads (up to ˜106 W/m2) generated by a molten reactor core under severe accident conditions while maintaining relatively low reactor vessel temperature (Critical Heat Flux (CHF), becomes the key to the success of external passive cooling of reactor vessel undergoing core disrupture accidents. In the present study, two boiling heat transfer enhancement methods have been proposed, experimentally investigated and theoretically modelled. The first method involves the use of a suitable surface coating to enhance downward-facing boiling rate and CHF limit so as to substantially increase the possibility of reactor vessel surviving high thermal load attack. The second method involves the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design to facilitate the process of steam venting through the annular channel formed between the reactor vessel and the insulation structure, which in turn would further enhance both the boiling rate and CHF limit. Among the various available surface coating techniques, metallic micro-porous layer surface coating has been identified as an appropriate coating material for use in External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) based on the overall consideration of enhanced performance, durability, the ease of manufacturing and application. Since no previous research work had explored the feasibility of applying such a metallic micro-porous layer surface coating on a large, downward facing and curved surface such as the bottom head of a reactor vessel, a series of characterization tests and experiments were performed in the present study to determine a suitable coating material composition and application method. Using the optimized metallic micro-porous surface coatings, quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were conducted in the Sub-scale Boundary Layer Boiling (SBLB) test facility at Penn State to investigate the nucleate boiling and CHF enhancement effects of the surface

  12. Parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.; Hernandez, J.; Huerta, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a relatively simple parametric model to estimate containment loads following an ex-vessel steam spike. The study was motivated because several PSAs have identified containment loads accompanying reactor vessel failures as a major contributor to early containment failure. The paper includes a detailed description of the simple but physically sound parametric model which was adopted to estimate containment loads following a steam spike into the reactor cavity. (author)

  13. Comparative study on two different seal surface structure for reactor pressure vessel sealing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    The seal surface structure is very important to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) sealing behavior. In this paper, two 3-D RPV sealing analysis finite models have been established with different seal surface structures, in order to study the influence of two structures. The separation of RPV upper and lower flanges, bolt loads and etc. are obtained, which are used to evaluate the sealing behavior of the RPV. Meanwhile, the comparative analysis of safety margin of two seal surface structural had been done, which provides the theoretical basis for RPV seal structure design optimization. (authors)

  14. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  15. Integrity evaluation of the pressure vessels of Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors by stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, E.

    1978-01-01

    The integrity of the reactor pressure vessel of the unit II/III of the Nuclear Power Station at 'Angras do Reis' is evaluated by stress analysis, through the dynamics relaxation method. For the solution of the problem an axisymmetric model is fixed. Initially, the data of the Oak Ridge Vessel V-7 is compared with those obtained by two computer programs used in this study. The methods used in the computer programs are FEM and DEM. A11 the results are compared with the ASME Code Section III 1974 edition. The range deviation is determined to 99% confidence limit, in order to minimize the error probabilities. Finally, the equivalent intensity stress obtained is calculated and compared with the acceptable values of the ASME Code Section III, 1974 edition [pt

  16. After-operating properties of nuclear reactor vessel materials of Lenin atomic ice breaker and prospective of reactor vessels radiation life prolongation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Amaev, A.D.; Krasikov, E.A.; Korolev, Yu.N.; Zabusov, O.O.; Glushakov, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    A post-operational state of the icebreaker Lenin reactor vessel metal is investigated. It is shown that a base metal of the icebreaker Lenin reactor vessel is of high quality as by an initial value of critical temperature of embrittlement, so by its radiation resistance. The weld metal possesses a sufficient radiation resistance but has an insufficient initial ductile-brittle transition temperature (approximately 63 Deg C). It is necessary to note that the final stage of operation for nuclear steam-generating plant should be carried out at the coolant temperature as high as possible [ru

  17. Short and long term maintenance strategy for reactor vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teissier, A.; Heuze, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents elements based on : surveys, operating inspection, theoretical studies, safety analysis, laboratory results, that enabled to determine maintenance options and short and long term strategies for processing on reactor vessel head leaks. (TEC). 1 tab

  18. EDF's (Electricite de France) in service control for GCR type reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douillet, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of the data acquisition and processing systems developed by the French EDF for controlling and testing the mechanical properties (thermal stress, deformations, cracks,...) of prestressed concrete vessels for GCR type reactors

  19. Evaluation of the role of Cr, Ni, Mn and Si in reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degmova, J.; Veternikova, J.; Sojak, S.; Slugen, V. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Krsjak, V.; Acosta, B. [JRC-IE, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, Petten 1755 ZG (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we report initial results from a study focused on investigation of the role of elements as Cr, Ni, Mn and Si in the radiation stability of reactor pressure vessel steels. Twelve model ferritic steels with basic composition derived from Russian WWER-1000 and Western PWR reactor pressure vessel materials were studied by Charpy-V impact, magnetic Barkhausen noise, Vickers hardness tests, Relative Seebeck Coefficient measurements and Positron annihilation spectroscopy. Higher Cr content in model steels was found generally to give increased root mean square values independent of Mn and Si contents. The ductile-brittle transition temperatures and hardness values of the model steels were found to be independent of composition. The correlation between ductile- brittle transition temperatures and hardness values has potential for prompt determination of the effect of composition and irradiation on the steel properties. The next stage of the assessment will study the effect of irradiation of the model steels to accumulated neutron fluences of 10{sup 19} n.cm{sup -2}. (authors)

  20. Cooling system for the connecting rings of a fast neutron reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.-P.; Malaval, Claude

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of a cooling system for the vessel connecting rings of a fast neutron nuclear reactor, particularly of a main vessel containing the core of the reactor and a volume of liquid metal coolant at high temperature and a safety vessel around the main vessel, both vessels being suspended to a rigid upper slab kept at a lower temperature. It is mounted in the annular space between the two vessels and includes a neutral gas circuit set up between the wall of the main vessel to be cooled and that of the safety vessel itself cooled from outer. The neutral gas system comprises a plurality of ventilators fitted in holes made through the thickness of the upper slab and opening on to the space between the two vessels. It also includes two envelopes lining the walls of these vessels, establishing with them small section channels for the circulation of the neutral gas cooled against the safety vessel and heated against the main vessel [fr

  1. Regulatory Experience on Structural Integrity Issues of The Oldest Reactor Pressure Vessel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Cho, Doo-Ho; Kim, Jin-Su; Kim, Yong-Beum; Chung, Hae-Dong; Kim, Se-Chang; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2015-01-01

    A reactor pressure vessel plays a crucial role of retaining reactor coolant and core assemblies. The RPV integrity should be evaluated in consideration with the design transient condition and the material deterioration of RPV belt-line region. Especially, the pressurized thermal shock has been considered as one of the most important issues regarding the RPV integrity since Rancho Seco nuclear power plant accident in 1978. In this paper, the structural integrity evaluation of the oldest RPV in Korea was performed by using finite element analysis. PTS conditions like small break loss of coolant accident and Turkey Point steam line break were applied as loading conditions. Neutron fluence data equivalent to 40 years was used to determine the fracture toughness of RPV material. The 3-dimensional finite element model including a circumferential surface flaw was considered for fracture mechanics analysis. The RPV integrity was evaluated according to Japan Electric Association Code. (authors)

  2. Research and development on in-service inspection system for reactor vessel of FBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindo, Hiroshi; Mitabe, Noriaki; Ara, Kuniaki; Nagai, Keiichi; Otaka, Masahiko

    1993-01-01

    In-Service Inspection (ISI) is required for main components and piping of FBRs. Visual test and volumetric examination of the reactor vessel (RV) from the outer surface are to be performed under severe conditions such as limited space, high temperature and high gamma dose rate during the reactor shutdown. Therefore, ISI should be performed by using a remote operation system, and the ISI system should be very compact. PNC has been developing the ISI system to apply to the RV inspection. Verification and performance tests of ISI system were carried out by use of the RV test model. This paper describes the system structure, system verification tests including operation and controlling the inspection robot, the functions of the visual test and the volumetric examination under the high temperature

  3. Remote controlled ultrasonic pre-service and in-service inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1990-01-01

    The first mechanised in-service inspection of the reactor pressure vessel on unit one of Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station has been carried out. Since 1968 a whole range of manipulators to carry out remote controlled ultrasonic inspections of nuclear power station equipment has been developed. The inspection of a reactor pressure vessel using a central mast manipulator is described. 3 figs., 1 ill

  4. Compensation of equipment housing elements of reactor units with heavy liquid metal coolant vessel temperature deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedevich, V.; Ahmetshin, M.; Mendes, D.; Kaveshnikov, S.; Vinogradov, A.

    2015-01-01

    In Russia a lot of different versions of fast reactors (FRs) are investigated and one of these is FR cooled by liquid lead and liquid lead-bismuth alloy. In this poster we are interested by FR with concrete vessel; its components are placed in cavities inside the vessel, and connected by a channel system. During the installation the equipment components are placed in several equipment housings. Between these housings there are cavities with coolant. The alignment of the housings should be provided. It can be broken by irregular concrete vessel heating during FR starting or other transition regimes. Our goal is to suggest a list of designing steps to compensate temperature deformations of equipment housing elements. A simplified model of equipment housing was suggested. It consists of two cylinders - tunnels in the concrete vessel, separated by a cavity filled by coolant and inert gas. The bottom part was considered as heated to 420 C. degrees while in the top part temperature decreased to 45 C. degrees (on the concrete surface). According to this data, results show that temperature gradient leads to a concrete layer dislocation of about 12.5 mm, which can lead to damage and breaking alignment. We propose the following solution to compensate for temperature deformation: -) to chisel out part of the upper top of the insulating concrete; -) to install an adequate misalignment of equipment housing elements preliminary; and -) to use a torsion system like a piston-type device for providing additional strength in order to compensate deformation and vibrations

  5. Relationship of yield strength and upper-shelf impact energy changes for irradiated reactor vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, S.T.; Pirek, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes on the strength and toughness properties of reactor pressure vessel steels are known to be dependent on the chemical content and, to a lesser extent, on the product form. The precise relationship between key variables, however, is yet to be established. Emphasis is currently being placed on the development of mechanistic models to provide coherence between the variety of empirical observations presented to date. Results are presented of an investigation of radiation damage trends exhibited by changes in the uniaxial tension and Charpy upper-shelf energy properties. Regression analysis techniques were used to determine trends based on chemistry and neutron fluence. These trends were evaluated in terms of proposed mechanistic models toward developing a broader understanding of radiation damage mechanisms. Radiation-induced transition temperature shift in reactor vessel steels is known to be dependent on the copper and nickel content of the material. In this investigation, Charpy upper-shelf impact energy and ultimate tensile strength changes were found to exhibit similar dependencies on the copper content and neutron irradiation exposure, but neither property change was significantly influenced by nickel content. Based on the apparent difference in radiation behavior trends between transition temperature shift and shelf energy/tensile property changes, a multiple defect radiation damage model was postulated

  6. An effective surveillance strategy for reactor pressure vessel assessment in the long term operation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.; Gerard, R.

    2015-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) irradiation embrittlement is monitored by means of surveillance capsules containing the RPV belt-line materials, inserted inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) before the start of operation. These capsules are placed at location where they receive a higher neutron flux than the vessel wall, by a factor of the order of 2 to 3. They are regularly retrieved and tested to evaluate the RPV irradiation embrittlement according to specific regulatory procedures and standards, in order to guarantee the safe operation of the RPV throughout its lifetime. These procedures are often relying on empirical but conservative concepts. In parallel, material research reactor (MTR) irradiations are often used to support the surveillance data and to develop a better understanding of irradiation effects, not only qualitatively but also quantitatively. Taking advantage of the increased understanding of irradiation effects, analytical tools were developed to improve the evaluation embrittlement and quality assurance of the RPV embrittlement assessment. In this framework, an alternative but complementary surveillance program assessment was developed in Belgium, the so-called enhanced surveillance, in order to benefit from the latest developments in the area of materials science and irradiation effects. The neutron flux and fracture properties of the surveillance materials can be reliably characterized and correlated to each other using physically-based rather than empirical concepts. The enhanced surveillance approach is complementary to the mandatory regulatory procedure and allows quantifying the conservatism of the regulatory approach. The enhanced surveillance approach that uses the reconstitution technology to fabricate additional small size specimens, appropriate modeling tools and microstructural examination when required, makes it possible to rationalize all available information in a physically-based way

  7. Guiding device for a manipulator mast for internal inspection of a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.; Schlueter, H.

    1977-01-01

    A remote-controlled supporting device centering a manipulator mast is described which is mounted and operated above a reactor pressure vessel under water in such a way that rotations and vertical movements necessary for the internal inspection of the pressure vessel remain possible. (RW) [de

  8. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  9. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  10. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, St.

    2005-01-01

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  11. POST: a postprocessor computer code for producing three-dimensional movies of two-phase flow in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, K.A.; Liles, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    The development of the TRAC computer code for analysis of LOCAs in light-water reactors involves the use of a three-dimensional (r-theta-z), two-fluid hydrodynamics model to describe the two-phase flow of steam and water through the reactor vessel. One of the major problems involved in interpreting results from this code is the presentation of three-dimensional flow patterns. The purpose of the report is to present a partial solution to this data display problem. A first version of a code which produces three-dimensional movies of flow in the reactor vessel has been written and debugged. This code (POST) is used as a postprocessor in conjunction with a stand alone three-dimensional two-phase hydrodynamics code (CYLTF) which is a test bed for the three-dimensional algorithms to be used in TRAC

  12. A structure for the protection of nuclear-reactor pressurized-vessels against rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcellin, J.-P.; Aubert, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    Description is given of a structure for the protection of nuclear-reactor pressurized-vessels against rupture. Said structure comprises a pre-stressed concrete tank adapted to surround the tank side-wall and bottom, said tank being higher than said vessel, said tank being provided with ports for passing cooling fluid ducts therethrough, and a crown adapted to rest along the periphery of the reactor-cover and made integral therewith. This can be applied to reactors of the PWR type [fr

  13. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and weld filler/heat-affected zone materials was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) normal water (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions by periodical partial unloading, constant and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated or hydrogenated high-purity or sulphate/chloride containing water at temperatures from 150 to 288 deg. C. In good agreement with field experience, these investigations revealed a very low susceptibility to SCC crack growth and small crack growth rates (<0.6 mm/year) under most BWR/NWC and material conditions. Critical water chemistry, loading and material conditions, which can result in sustained and fast SCC well above the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines' were identified, but many of them generally appeared atypical for current optimized BWR power operation practice or modern RPVs. Application of HWC always resulted in a significant reduction of SCC crack growth rates by more than one order of magnitude under these critical system conditions and growth rates dropped well below the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines'

  15. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  16. Embrittlement of the nuclear icebreaker Lenin reactor pressure vessel materials reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E.A.; Nikolaenko, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Paper deals with the results of the efforts to examine the radiation damage of the Lenin nuclear-powered ice-breaker decommissioned reactor pressure vessel on the basis of which one has determined the peculiar features of the metal radiation embrittlement. Under 10 10 -10 11 s -1 cm -2 low density neutron flux irradiation one notes the most intensive embrittlement of the metal. Then, as the noxious element content in the metal matrix grows smaller the embrittlement reduces up to the change of sign as to the normal curve plotted at the neutron flux density exceeding 10 13 s -1 cm -2 . One assumes that as a result of the low density neutron flux irradiation the reactor pressure vessel edge spaces at some operation stages may be damaged more severely in contrast to these near the reactor core. The neutron irradiation density is the factor affecting the reactor vessel material embrittlement, that is why, it is important to study the damage mechanism of the materials of the power reactor vessels under design characterized by the low radiation load. The mentioned is important, as well, to evaluate the efficiency of the efforts undertaken to mitigate the effect of the neutron radiation on the reactor vessel [ru

  17. The MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebikock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models. It is found that for realistic parameters and coolable beds, concrete ablation is too slow a process to be important on the quenching time scale. Remelt in the dry zone, however, is found to be potentially important on this time scale, so quench and remelt are considered simultaneously

  18. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  19. Development of TPNCIRC code for Evaluation of Two-Phase Natural Circulation Flow Performance under External Reactor Vessel Cooling Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A-Reum; Song, Hyuk-Jin; Park, Jong-Woon

    2015-01-01

    During a severe accident, corium is relocated to the lower head of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Design concept of retaining the corium inside a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) through external cooling under hypothetical core melting accidents is called external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC). In this respect, validated two-phase natural circulation flow (TPNC) model is necessary to determine the adequacy of the ERVC design and operating conditions such as inlet area, form losses, gap distance, riser length and coolant conditions. The most important model generally characterizing the TPNC are void fraction and two-phase friction factors. Typical experimental and analytical studies to be referred to on two-phase circulation flow characteristics are those by Reyes, Gartia et al. based on Vijayan et al., Nayak et al. and Dubey et al. In the present paper, two-phase natural circulation (TPNC) flow characteristics under external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) conditions are studied using two existing TPNC flow models of Reyes and Gartia et al. incorporating more improved void fraction and two-phase friction models. These models and correlations are integrated into a computer program, TPNCIRC, which can handle candidate ERVC design parameters, such as inlet, riser and downcomer flow lengths and areas, gap size between reactor vessel and surrounding insulations, minor loss factors and operating parameters of decay power, pressure and subcooling. Accuracy of the TPNCIRC program is investigated with respect to the flow rate and void fractions for existing measured data from a general experiment and ULPU specifically designed for the AP1000 in-vessel retention. Also, the effect of some important design parameters are examined for the experimental and plant conditions. Using the flow models and correlations are integrated into a computer program, TPNCIRC, a number of correlations have been examined. This seems coming from the differences of void fractions

  20. Experimental evaluation of surveillance capsule assemblies for life assessment of CHASNUPP Unit-1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şahin, Sümer; Saeed, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Disassembling of dose and flux boxes in glove box. • Activity measurement of radiometric sensors using HPGE γ-spectrometer. • Decay corrected reaction rate calculation using measured activity data and plant power history. • Best estimation of fast neutron flux using LSL-M2 spectrum unfolding code. • Comparison with transport calculations performed using DOT3.5. - Abstract: Neutron flux and energy spectrum were determined at the surface of three in-vessel Surveillance Capsule Assemblies (SCAs) removed from CHASNUPP Unit-1 after 2nd, 4th, and 9th fuel cycles for the life assessment of reactor pressure vessel belt line region. Dosimetry data were measured from radiometric sensors irradiated in base material section of SCAs. Fast neutron flux (E > 1.0 MeV) was best estimated at the surface of three SCAs corresponding to the center of C-1 core using the least square method by employing LSL-M2 package. These results were compared with fast neutron flux calculated using DOT3.5 code and both results are within good agreement of ±20% acceptance criteria as described in Regulatory Guide 1.190. Therefore, calculational model was validated by dosimetry evaluation and these results can be used in the life assessment of CHASNUPP Unit-1 pressure vessel belt line region.

  1. Load bearing capacities and elastic-plastic behavior of reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Keita; Nagase, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    Radial Support Keys (RSKs) are installed at the bottom of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and fit into Core Support Lugs of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This structure provides reactor core horizontal support and transmits the loads between RVI and RPV. RSK is one of the critical parts of RVI from the view point of earthquake-proof safety. In order to assure the structural integrity of Nuclear Reactor in case of massive earthquake, load bearing capacities of RSK are confirmed by static loading tests with reduced-scale mockups. In addition, collapse loads of actual components calculated by Limit Analyses are conservative enough compared to the load bearing capacities confirmed by the test. Thus, the methodology to calculate collapse load by Limit Analysis is applicable to evaluation of structural integrity for RSK. (author)

  2. Adjustable guide for a testing system for reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.

    1980-01-01

    The device consisting of a guide rail and a manipulator is introduced into the gap between pressure vessel wall and biological shield by means of suspending wire drums and manipulator drums. For adjustment of the device an elbow telescope is used. The guide rail is fixed to the pressure vessel wall by means of electromagnets. The movements of the manipulator with respect to the guide rail are performed with the aid of a motor. (DG) [de

  3. A quantitative methodology for reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerson, D.S.; Balkey, K.R.; Meyer, T.A.; Ofstun, R.P.; Rupprecht, S.D.; Sharp, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The recent operating experience of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Industry has focused increasing attention on the issue of reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Previous reactor vessel integrity concerns have led to changes in vessel and plant system design and to operating procedures, and increased attention to the PTS issue is causing consideration of further modifications. Events such as excess feedwater, loss of normal feedwater, and steam generator tube rupture have led to significant primary system cooldowns. Each of these cooldown transients occurred concurrently with a relatively high primary system pressure. Considerations of these and other postulated cooldown events has drawn attention to the impact of operator action and control system effects on reactor vessel PTS. A methodology, which couples event sequence analysis with probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses, was developed to identify those events that are of primary concern for reactor vessel integrity. Operating experience is utilized to aid in defining the appropriate event sequences and event frequencies of occurrence for the evaluation. (orig./RW)

  4. Positioning means for circumferentially locating inspection apparatus in a nuclear reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    There is provided for a reactor vessel inspection device a support ring sized to accommodate the circular path defined by three or more guide studs extending upwardly from the vessel. The support ring has at least three movably mounted guide stud bushings which can be positionally adjusted to align each bushing with one of the studs. When engaged, the guide studs and bushings yield a coarse positioning of the inspection device relative to the reactor vessel. Also provided are three support legs which are clamped to the support ring and dimensioned to an appropriate length. Two of the support legs have shoes clamped thereto, configured to rest on an internal circumferential flange within the reactor vessel. The third support leg is provided with a specially adapted shoe configured to engage a locating element, the exact position of which is known, within the vessel to achieve fine positioning of the inspection device relative to the reactor vessel. The support ring is additionally provided with an annular key which runs longitudinally about its outer periphery. Clamping means utilized to secure the guide stud bushings and the support legs to the support ring are provided with keyways to insure automatic self-alignment when fully tightened. (auth)

  5. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  6. Modelling of in-vessel retention after relocation of corium into the lower plenum - Evaluation of the temperature field and of the viscoplastic deformation of the vessel wall. Reactor safety research, project No.:150 1254 - Final report; Beitrag zur Modellierung der Schmelzerueckhaltung im RDB nach Verlagerung von Corium in das untere Plenum - Berechnung des Temperaturfeldes und der viskoplastischen Verformung der Behaelterwand. Reaktorsicherheitsforschung, Vorhaben-Nr.: 150 1254 - Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altstadt, E.; Willschuetz, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be investigated for a determination of the loadings on the containment. Several experiments have been performed accompanied with material properties evaluation, theoretical, and numerical work. At the Institute Of Safety Research of the FZR a finite element model has been developed simulating the thermal processes and the viscoplastic behaviour of the vessel wall. An advanced model for creep and material damage has been established and has been validated using experimental data. The thermal hydraulic and the mechanical calculations are sequentially and recursively coupled. The model is capable of evaluating fracture time and fracture position of a vessel with an internally heated melt pool. The model was applied to pre- and post test calculations for the FOREVER test series representing the RPV of a PWR in the scale of 1:10. These experiments were performed at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. The results of the calculations can be summarised as follows: The creeping process is caused by the simultaneous presence of high temperature (>600 C) and pressure (>1 MPa). The hot focus region is the most endangered zone exhibiting the highest creep strain rates. The exact level of temperature and pressure has an influence on the vessel failure time but not on the failure position. The failure time can be predicted with an uncertainty of 20 to 25%. This uncertainty is caused by the large scatter and the high temperature sensitivity of the viscoplastic properties of the RPV steel. Contrary to the hot focus region, the lower centre of the vessel head exhibits a higher strength because of the lower temperatures in this zone. The lower part moves down without significant deformation. Therefore it can be assumed, that the vessel failure can be retarded or prevented by supporting this range. The

  7. Integrated surveillance specimen program for WWER-1000/V-320 reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kytka, M.; Novosad, P.; Zdarek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Surveillance specimen programs play an important role in reactor pressure vessel lifetime assessment as they should monitor changes in pressure vessel materials, mainly their irradiation embrittlement. Standard surveillance programs in WWER-1000/V-320 reactor pressure vessels have some deficiencies resulting from their design-nonuniformity of neutron field and even within individual specimen sets, large gradient in neutron flux between specimens and containers, lack of neutron monitors in most of containers and no suitable temperature monitors. Moreover, location of surveillance specimens does not assure similar conditions as the beltline region of reactor pressure vessels. Thus, Modified surveillance program for WWER-1000/V-320C type reactors was designed and realized in two units of NPP Temelin, Czech Republic. In this program, large flat type containers are located on inner wall of reactor pressure vessel in the beltline region that assures their practically identical irradiation conditions with critical vessel materials. These containers with inner dimensions of 210 x 300 mm have two layers of specimens; using inserts (10 x 10 x 14 mm) instead of fully Charpy size specimens allows irradiation of materials from several pressure vessels at once in one container. This design advantage has been used for the creation of the Integrated Surveillance Program for several WWER-1000 units-Temelin 1 + 2, Belene (Bulgaria), Rovno 3 + 4, Khmelnick 2, Zaporozhie 6 (Ukraine) and Kalinin 3 (Russia). Irradiation of these archive materials together with the IAEA reference steel JRQ (of ASTM A 533-B type) and reference steel VVER-1000 will allow to compare irradiation embrittlement of these materials and to obtain more reliable and objective results as no reliable predictive formulae exist up to no due to a higher content of nickel in welds. Irradiation of specimens from cladding region will help in the evaluation of resistance of pressure vessels against PTS regimes. (authors)

  8. Radiological characterization of the pressure vessel internals of the BNL High Flux Beam Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Norman E; Reciniello, Richard N; Hu, Jih-Perng

    2004-08-01

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose-rate were performed in the reactor pressure vessel and on vessel internal structures such as the upper and lower thermal shields, the Transition Plate, and the Control Rod blades. Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates were made using Red Perspex polymethyl methacrylate high-dose film, a Radcal "peanut" ion chamber, and Eberline's RO-7 high-range ion chamber. As a comparison, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and MicroShield code were used to model the gamma-ray transport and dose buildup. The gamma-ray dose rate at 8 cm above the center of the Transition Plate was measured to be 160 Gy h (using an RO-7) and 88 Gy h at 8 cm above and about 5 cm lateral to the Transition Plate (using Red Perspex film). This compares with a calculated dose rate of 172 Gy h using Micro-Shield. The gamma-ray dose rate was 16.2 Gy h measured at 76 cm from the reactor core (using the "peanut" ion chamber) and 16.3 Gy h at 87 cm from the core (using Red Perspex film). The similarity of dose rates measured with different instruments indicates that using different methods and instruments is acceptable if the measurement (and calculation) parameters are well defined. Different measurement techniques may be necessary due to constraints such as size restrictions.

  9. Exploratory Study of Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernobaeva, A.A., Kryukov, A.M., Nikolaev, Y.A., Korolev, Y.N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)], Sokolov, M.A., Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVS) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The working group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible), and test two materials of the other; so far, only charpy impact and tensile specimens have been included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ornl) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 AND VVER-1000 RPVS, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation,annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) program weld 73w. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. the ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 X 10 (exp 19) N/SQ CM ({gt}1 MeV).

  10. LWR (light water reactor) pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; McElroy, W.N.

    1980-12-01

    The report describes progress made in the Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Irradiation Surveillance Dosimetry Program during the reporting period. The primary objective of the multi-laboratory program is to prepare an updated and improved set of dosimetry, damage correlation, and associated reactor analysis ASTM Standards for LWR-PV irradiation surveillance programs. Supporting this objective are a series of analytical and experimental validation and calibration studies in 'Standard, Reference, and Controlled Environment Benchmark Fields', reactor 'Test Regions', and operating power reactor 'Surveillance Positions'

  11. Effects of Surface Roughness, Oxidation, and Temperature on the Emissivity of Reactor Pressure Vessel Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. L. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Jo, H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Tirawat, R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power Group, Golden, Colorado; Blomstrand, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin; Sridharan, K. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Department of Engineering Physics, Madison, Wisconsin

    2017-08-31

    Thermal radiation will be an important mode of heat transfer in future high-temperature reactors and in off-normal high-temperature scenarios in present reactors. In this work, spectral directional emissivities of two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) candidate materials were measured at room temperature after exposure to high-temperature air. In the case of SA508 steel, significant increases in emissivity were observed due to oxidation. In the case of Grade 91 steel, only very small increases were observed under the tested conditions. Effects of roughness were also investigated. To study the effects of roughening, unexposed samples of SA508 and Grade 91 steel were roughened via one of either grinding or shot-peening before being measured. Significant increases were observed only in samples having roughness exceeding the roughness expected of RPV surfaces. While the emissivity increases for SA508 from oxidation were indeed significant, the measured emissivity coefficients were below that of values commonly used in heat transfer models. Based on the observed experimental data, recommendations for emissivity inputs for heat transfer simulations are provided.

  12. Mechanical spectroscopy of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement: a progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ouytsel, K.

    1998-08-01

    An enhanced surveillance strategy for testing the fracture toughness of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement is described. Microstructural investigation in support of damage modelling is an essential element in this enhanced strategy. Temperature-dependent experiments are very sensitive to differences in chemical composition and to effects of neutron irradiation as well as thermal ageing. Amplitude-dependent experiments can be related to tensile test results and correspond to a model for the yield stress. A full range of experiments were carried out on base and weld metal from the Doel-I-II power plants. The results have indicated that internal friction yields information which cannot always be detected by means of standard testing techniques. An inverted torsion pendulum for measuring internal friction has been constructed

  13. Pre-stressed concrete reactor vessel with built-in planes of weakness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.; Paton, A.A.; Fleischer, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a study that has been carried out to extend previous work to investigate the feasibility of constructing regions of pre-stressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRV) and biological shields which become activated using easily removable blocks, separated by a suitable membrane. The previous study concluded that, from preliminary analyses, such a concept appeared feasible and recommended that further work should be done. The present study was therefore commissioned to carry out more detailed analytical work and to complement this with the design, construction and pressure testing of two small-scale, single-cavity PCRV models, one without planes of weakness and one with planes of weakness immediately behind the cavity liner. The report describes the analyses, the model design, construction and testing, and presents relevant results. It concludes that the planes of weakness concept could offer a means of facilitating the dismantling of activated regions of PCRV, biological shields and similar types of structure

  14. Warm pre-stress experiments on highly irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landron, C.; Ait-Bachir, M.; Moinereau, D.; Molinie, E.; Garbay, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the aim to justify in-service integrity of reactor pressure vessel beyond 40 years, experimental warm pre-stress (WPS) tests were performed on irradiated materials representative of RPV steels corresponding to 40 operating years. Different types of WPS loading path have been considered to cover typical postulated accidental transients. These results confirmed the beneficial effect of WPS on the cleavage fracture resistance of the irradiated materials. No fracture occurred during the cooling phase of the loading path and the fracture toughness values are higher than that measured with conventional isothermal tests. The analyses of the experiments, conducted using either simplified engineering models or more refined fracture models based on local approach to cleavage fracture, are in agreement with the experimental results. (authors)

  15. Mechanical spectroscopy of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement: a progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ouytsel, K

    1998-08-01

    An enhanced surveillance strategy for testing the fracture toughness of reactor-pressure-vessel steel embrittlement is described. Microstructural investigation in support of damage modelling is an essential element in this enhanced strategy. Temperature-dependent experiments are very sensitive to differences in chemical composition and to effects of neutron irradiation as well as thermal ageing. Amplitude-dependent experiments can be related to tensile test results and correspond to a model for the yield stress. A full range of experiments were carried out on base and weld metal from the Doel-I-II power plants. The results have indicated that internal friction yields information which cannot always be detected by means of standard testing techniques. An inverted torsion pendulum for measuring internal friction has been constructed.

  16. Measurement and flow visualization research of thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR reactor Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, J. E.; Kim, S. O.; Choi, H. L.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, the thermal hydraulic and flow visualization experiment was described for the KALIMER-600 water-scaled model. In order to investigate a thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR KALIMER-600, which has been conceptually designed in the KAERI, a water-scaled 1/10 reactor vessel model was designed and prepared through the scaling analysis during three-years research. In this research, SFR Photos system, which has inherently very complicated the internal structures, was fabricated with a transparent vessel. It was shown that a serious of thermal hydraulic test was conducted within a short period if modeled with water than sodium. Natural circulation test was successfully performed with the modeled heater assembly and heat exchanger system coupled with cooling system. The water-scaled RSV experimental facility made in this research could be used to study the USA development for the future SFR system and utilized to analyze the flow characteristics before changing a main internal part of Photos system. It could also be used to test a pool-inspection study and a sensor selection study before large scale sodium experiment. The PCV system prepared in this research could be utilized to test other TSH experiment and temperature field measurement

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of ferritic reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in oxygenated high-temperature water and its relevance to boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation, in particular its possible effect on both, RPV structural integrity and safety, has been a subject of controversial discussions for many years. The SCC crack growth behaviour of different RPV steels under simulated BWR/NWC conditions was therefore characterized by constant load and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. Modern high-temperature water loops, online crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by scanning electron microscopy were used to quantify the cracking response. It is concluded that there is no susceptibility to sustained SCC crack growth at temperatures around 288 C under purely static loading, as long as small-scale-yielding conditions prevail at the crack tip and the water chemistry is maintained within current BWR/NWC operational practice (EPRI water chemistry guidelines). However, sustained, fast SCC (with respect to operational time scales) cannot be excluded for faulted water chemistry conditions (EPRI Action Level 3) and/or for highly stressed specimens, either loaded near to K IJ or with a high degree of plasticity in the remaining ligament. The conservative character of the 'BWR VIP 60 Disposition Lines 1 and 2' for SCC crack growth in low-alloy steels has been confirmed by this study for 288 C and RPV base material. Preliminary results indicate, that these disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 - 250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to Dynamic Strain Ageing (DSA). (orig.)

  18. Studies of fragileness in steels of vessels of BWR reactors; Estudios de fragilizacion en aceros de vasija de reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, E.F.; Balcazar, M.; Alpizar, A.M.; Calderon, B.E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The structural materials with those that are manufactured the pressure vessels of the BWR reactors, suffer degradation in its mechanical properties mainly to the damage taken place by the fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV) coming from the reactor core. Its are experimentally studied those mechanisms of neutron damage in this material type, by means of the irradiation of steel vessel in experimental reactors to age them quickly. Alternatively it is simulated the neutron damage by means of irradiation of steel with heavy ions. In this work those are shown first results of the damage induced by irradiation from a similar steel to the vessel of a BWR reactor. The irradiation was carried out with fast neutrons (E > 1 MeV, fluence of 1.45 x 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}) in the TRIGA MARK lll reactor and separately with Ni{sup +3} ions in a Tandetrom accelerator, E = 4.8 MeV and range of the ionic flow of 0.1 to 53 iones/A{sup 2}. (Author)

  19. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects; Mecanismes de fragilisation sous irradiation aux neutrons d'alliages modeles ferritiques et d'un acier de cuve: amas de defauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E

    2007-11-15

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  20. Non-invasive liquid level and density gauge for nuclear power reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.; Jester, W.A.; Kenney, E.S.; Mc Master, I.B.; Schultz, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of non-invasively determining the liquid coolant level and density in a nuclear power reactor pressure vessel comprising the steps: positioning at least three neutron detector fission chambers externally of the reactor pressure vessel at multiple spaced positions along the side of the fuel core. One of the neutron detectors is positioned at the side near the bottom of the fuel core. The multiple spaced positions along the side remove any ambiguity as to whether the liquid level is decreasing or increasing: shielding the neutron detector fission chamber from thermal neutrons to avoid the noise associated therewith, and eliminating the effects of gamma radiation from the detected signals; monitoring the detected neutron level signals to determine to coolant liquid level and density in the nuclear power reactor pressure vessel

  1. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  2. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel containing the heat source, an outer shell enclosing the primary pressure vessel and acting as a secondary means of containment for this vessel against outside projectiles. Multiple auxiliary equipment points are arranged outside the outer shell which comprises a part of a lower wall around the primary pressure vessel, an annular part integrated in the lower wall and extending outwards as from this wall and an upper part integrated in the annular part and extending above this annular part and above the primary pressure vessel. The annular part and the primary pressure vessel are formed with vertical penetrations which can be closed communicating respectively with the auxiliary equipment points and with inside the pressure vessel whilst handling gear is provided in the upper part for vertically raising reactor components through these penetrations and for transporting them over the annular part and over the primary pressure vessel [fr

  3. The modeling of core melting and in-vessel corium relocation in the APRIL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim. S.W.; Podowski, M.Z.; Lahey, R.T. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of severe accident phenomena in boiling water reactors (BWR). New models of core melting and in-vessel corium debris relocation are presented, developed for implementation in the APRIL computer code. The results of model testing and validations are given, including comparisons against available experimental data and parametric/sensitivity studies. Also, the application of these models, as parts of the APRIL code, is presented to simulate accident progression in a typical BWR reactor.

  4. Effects of low upper shelf fracture toughness on reactor vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.; Heinecke, C.C.; Balkey, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    For the past decade, significant attention has been focused on the subject of nuclear rector vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events. The issue of low upper shelf fracture toughness at operating temperatures has been a consideration for some reactor vessel materials since the early 1970's. Deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity studies have been completed to evaluate the interaction between the PTS and lower upper shelf toughness issues that result from neutron embrittlement of the critical beltline region materials. This paper presents the results of these studies to show the interdependency of these fracture considerations in certain instances and to identify parameters that need to be carefully treated in reactor vessel integrity evaluations for these subjects. This issue is of great importance to those vessels which have low upper shelf toughness, both for demonstrating safety during the original design life and in life extension assessments

  5. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  6. Heating of reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations in a severe reactor accident; Reaktoripaineastian pohjan ja laepivientien kuumeneminen sydaemen sulamisonnettomuudessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-10-01

    The report describes the fundamentals of heat conductivity and convection and numerical methods like finite difference and control volume method for calculation of the thermal history of a reactor pressure vessel bottom head and penetrations. Phase changes from solids to liquids are considered. Time integration is performed by explicit or implicit method. Developed computer codes for thermal conductivity and convection analyses and codes for graphical visualization are described. The codes are applied to two practical cases. They deal with analyses of Swiss CORVIS-experiments and analyses of control rod and instrument penetrations in a BWR bottom head. A model for calculation of effective thermal conductivity of granular corium is developed. The work is also related to EU MVI-project (Core Melt-Pressure Vessel Interactions During a Light Water Reactor Severe Accident), whose coordinator is Prof. B. R. Sehgal at Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. (orig.) (11 refs.).

  7. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hoffman, William [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Sen, Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  8. LOFT reactor vessel 2900 downcomer stalk instrument penetration flange stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finicle, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    The LOFT Reactor Vessel 290 0 Downcomer Stalk Instrument Penetration Flange Stress Analysis has been completed using normal operational and blowdown loading. A linear elastic analysis was completed using simplified hand analysis techniques. The analysis was in accordance with the 1977 ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, for a Class 1 component. Loading included internal pressure, bolt preload, and thermal gradients due to normal operating and blowdown

  9. Influence of pre/in-service inspections and tests on the reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellein, R.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of the following actions on the probability of brittle failure of the reactor pressure vessels will be estimated by probabilistic fracture mechanics: ultrasonic inspection of the welds; hydro-test of the vessel; and crack growth by normal, upset and test conditions. Taking into account that the in-service inspections and tests are done at short intervals the reliability can be shown to be extremely high. (orig.)

  10. Support device in a pressure vessel, particularly a reactor pressure vessel, to support against horizontal forces. Abstuetzeinrichtung an einem Druckbehaelter, insbesondere einem Reaktordruckbehaelter, gegen Horizontalkraefte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, H.; Harand, E.; Scholz, M.; Scheler, R.

    1986-04-17

    In a support device on a reactor pressure vessel of a PWR, a guide leading downwards is provided in the vertical pellet cartridge on the floor side of the reactor pressure vessel, which is located in a fixed support pipe. The support pipe is supported on a concreted baseplate in the horizontal direction, and can be screwed to this. The support pipe has a plate-shaped support foot to support it on the baseplate. The reactor pressure vessel, normally resting on its main coolant duct in the plane normal to the axis, can be effectively supported against horizontal forces by this additional support, without preventing thermal movement in the longitudinal axis.

  11. Positron affinity for precipitates in reactor pressure vessel steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brauer, G.; Puska, M. J.; Šob, Mojmír; Korhonen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 158, - (1995), s. 149-156 ISSN 0029-5493. [Meeting of the International Group on Radiation Damage Mechanisms in Preassure Vessel Steels /5./. Santa Barbara, 02.05.1994-06.05.1994] Impact factor: 0.134, year: 1995

  12. Design system for in-vessel mainipulator of fusion reactor 'DESIM'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Junihci; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ise, Hideo; Sato, Keisuke; Matsuda, Hirotsugu

    1989-01-01

    A computer aided design system 'DESIM' for the in-vessel manipulators of nuclear fusion reactors has been developed to design the manipulators efficiently. The DESIM consists of the following subsystems: (1) the design system for arm mechanisms to realize optimum manipulation performance in the specified workspace; (2) the robot simulator to study manipulator movement, postures and interference problems; (3) the CAD system which is used to define the structure object data for robots, and the interface system for the data conversion from the CAD system to the robot simulator. The DESIM has been used to design the in-vessel manipulator for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) to confirm the effectiveness. (author)

  13. Mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel steels studied by static and dynamic torsion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, A.; Maamouri, M.; Schaller, R.; Mercier, O.

    1993-01-01

    Internal friction measurements and torsional plastic deformation tests have been performed in reactor pressure vessel steels (unirradiated, irradiated and irradiated/annealed specimens). The results of these experiments have been interpreted with help of transmission electron microscopy observations (conventional and in situ). It is shown how the interactions between screw dislocations and obstacles (Peierls valleys, impurities and precipitates) could explain the low temperature hardening and the irradiation embrittlement of ferritic steels. In addition, it appears that the nondestructive internal friction technique could be used advantageously to follow the evolution of the material properties under irradiation, as for instance the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel steels. (orig.)

  14. Modular annealing apparatus for in situ reactor vessel annealing and related method of assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bau, F.I.; Mavretish, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for annealing a nuclear reactor vessel in a containment building. It comprises pre-fabricating a plurality of heater segments at a location outside the containment building; transporting the plurality of heater segments to the containment building; removing the core and internals and storing same; installing temporary shielding for the stored internals; introducing each of the plurality of heater segments through an equipment hatch in the containment building; assembling the plurality of heater segments to form an annealing apparatus; and annealing the reactor vessel

  15. Coordinated U. S. PWR Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program: Surveillance Data to Support Long Term Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosler, Ryan; Troyer, Greg; Davidsaver, Sarah; Hardin, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is used as the basis for embrittlement trend correlations (ETCs) which predict decreases in RP fracture toughness due to irradiation embrittlement. A limited amount of data exists today at fluences that many U. S. PWR RPVs will reach in 60 or more years of operation. However, there is a significant amount of test reactor data available at high fluences, which shows higher embrittlement shifts than the power reactor data-based correlations. A coordinated plan for withdrawal and testing of the U. S. PWR RPV surveillance capsules has been developed, with the intent of filling high fluence gaps in existing PWR data. This paper summarizes the methodology, optimization strategy, and current results of this coordinated U. S. PWR reactor vessel surveillance program (CRVSP). The Coordinated RVSP has been optimized to maximize the quantity and quality of high fluence data while minimizing the burden on the industry

  16. Thermo-mechanical behaviour of FBTR reactor vessel due to natural convection in cover gas space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Varadarajan, S.; Kapoor, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor is a 40 MW(t), loop type sodium cooled reactor, similar in design to Rapsodie. The Reactor Assembly, which is the heart of FBTR, comprises the Reactor Vessel (RV) housed in a safety vessel within a concrete cell (A1 Cell). The RV which supports the core is shielded at the top by two rotatable plugs which are stacked with layers of borated graphite and steel. The smaller plug (SRP), is mounted excentric to the larger one (LRP). A nominal annular gap of 16 mm is provided between RV and LRP and between LRP and SRP to enable free rotation of the plugs. Stainless Steel insulation is fixed inside the steel vessel, to avoid overheating of the A1 Cell concrete. The core is supported by the Grid Plate (GP), bolted to the RV. During preheating, sodium charging and isothermal runs upto 350 0 C, temperature asymmetries were noticed in the reactor vessel wall in the cover gas space. This was attributable to convection currents in the annulus between RV and LRP. The asymmetries also resulted in a lateral shift of the grid plate. This paper discusses our experience in suppressing these convection currents, and minimising the grid plate shift

  17. An integrity evaluation method of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Masaaki; Okamura, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Present paper proposes a new algorithm of the integrity evaluation of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock, PTS. This method enables us to do an effective evaluation by superimposing proposed ''PTS state-transient curves'' and ''toughness transient curves'', and is superior to a conventional one in the following points; (1) easy to get an overall view of the result of PTS event for the variations of several parameters, (2) possible to evaluate a safety margin for irradiation embrittlement, and (3) enable to construct an Expert-friendly evaluation system. In addition, the paper shows that we can execute a safety assurance test by using a flat plate model with the same thickness as that of real plant. (author)

  18. Structural analysis of cellular blocks for a prestressed cast iron reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.; Head, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The cast segments from which the prestressed cast iron nuclear reactor pressure vessel may be constructed are not readily amenable to detailed three-dimensional finite element analysis because their complex internal web structure requires a very large number of elements if reasonable aspect ratios are to be retained. A technique has been developed of modelling these blocks using plate bending elements from the ASKA code. By this means it has been possible to study in detail several designs of casting and to identify favourable features. The results of these studies, and others in which assessments are made of the sensitivity of the structure to prestressing load changes and machining errors, are reported. (orig.)

  19. Integrity assessment of TAPS reactor pressure vessel at extended EOL using surveillance test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2008-05-01

    Integrity assessment of pressure vessels of nuclear reactors (RPV) primarily concentrates on the prevention of brittle failure and conditions are defined under which brittle failure can be excluded. Accordingly, two approaches based on Transition Temperature Concept and Fracture Mechanics Concept were adopted using the impact test results of three credible surveillance data sets obtained from the surveillance specimens of Tarapur Atomic Power Station. RT NDT data towards end of life (EOL) were estimated from the impact test results in accordance with the procedures of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2 and were used as primary input for assessment of the vessel integrity. SA302B (nickel modified) steel cladded with stainless steel is used as the pressure vessel material for the two 210 MWe boiling water reactors of the Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). The reactors were commissioned during the year 1969. The chemical compositions of SA302B (modified) steel used in fabricating the vessel and the specified tensile property and the Charpy impact property requirements of the steel broadly meet ASME specified requirements. Therefore, the pressure temperature limit curves prescribed by General Electric (G.E.) were compared with those as obtained using procedures of ASME Section XII, Appendix G. The tensile and the Charpy impact properties at 60 EFPY of vessel operation as derived from the surveillance specimens even fulfilled the specified requirements for the virgin material of ASME. Integrity assessment carried out using the two approaches indicated the safety of the vessel for continued operation up to 60 EFPY. (author)

  20. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Kori Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Hong, Joon Wha

    2007-02-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 1 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 22 of reactor operation, 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 1 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 23.

  1. Final report for the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installations and Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Yonggwang Unit 2 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 16 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Yonggwang Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 16.

  2. Final report of the 1st ex-vessel neutron dosimetry installation and evaluations for Yonggwang unit 2 reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Chang, Kee Ok; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chang, Jong Hwa; Lim, Nam Jin; Hong, Joon Wha; Cheon, Byeong Jin

    2006-09-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Yonggwang unit 2 pressure vessel beltline region based on the guidance specified in regulatory guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the beltline region of the pressure vessel. During cycle 15 of reactor operation, an ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program was instituted at Yonggwang unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the beltline region of the reactor vessel. The use of the ex-vessel neutron dosimetry program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-vessel neutron dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of cycle 15.

  3. Final report for the 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installations and Evaluations for Kori Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai (and others)

    2008-03-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 1 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. After Cycle 23 of reactor operation, 3rd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 1 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 24.

  4. Final Report of the 2nd Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Installation And Evaluations for Yonggwang Unit 1 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Chul; Yoo, Choon Sung; Lee, Sam Lai; Gong, Un Sik; Choi, Kwon Jae; Chung, Kyoung Ki; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Chang, Jong Hwa; Ha, Jea Ju

    2008-01-15

    This report describes a neutron fluence assessment performed for the Kori Unit 2 pressure vessel belt line region based on the guidance specified in Regulatory Guide 1.190. In this assessment, maximum fast neutron exposures expressed in terms of fast neutron fluence (E>1 MeV) and iron atom displacements (dpa) were established for the belt line region of the pressure vessel. During Cycle 21 of reactor operation, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program was instituted at Kori Unit 2 to provide continuous monitoring of the belt line region of the reactor vessel. The use of the Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry Program coupled with available surveillance capsule measurements provides a plant specific data base that enables the evaluation of the vessel exposure and the uncertainty associated with that exposure over the service life of the unit. Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry has been evaluated at the conclusion of Cycle 21.

  5. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Wear plates control rod guide tubes top internal reactor vessel C. N. VANDELLOS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The guide tubes for control rods forming part of the upper internals of the reactor vessel, its function is to guide the control rod to permit its insertion in the reactor core. These guide tubes are suspended from the upper support plate which are fixed by bolts and extending to the upper core plate which is fastened by clamping bolts (split pin) to prevent lateral displacement of the guide tubes, while allowing axial expansion.

  7. Sensitivity of the fracture probability in a reactor vessel to variations in data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Fred; Palm, S.

    1980-05-01

    The report discusses the sensitivity of the fracture probability of a reactor vessel. The main problem has been to find relevant input data to the statistical model. The model is based on the linear elastic fracture mechanics. The probability of fracture toughness, of non-detection and of the initial distribution of defects is taken into cinsideration. The loads and fatigue data are considered as deterministic. The probability of fracture for all welds was calculated to P 0 sub (b tot) (T) = 8.34 x 10 -8 , where T is the service life of the vessel. The study discusses relative deviations when varying input data. The value of P 0 sub (b tot) is found to increase fast during the first four years and it remains constant afterwards. The sensitivity analysis shows that P sub (b tot) is very sensitive to input data for fracture toughness and for the distribution in initial defects. In the case of detectability the probability of fracture is inversely proportional to the probability of detection of cracks in the interval 10 to 15 mm. (G.B.)

  8. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to the

  9. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to

  10. Nuclear reactor installation with outer shell enclosing a primary pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The high temperature nuclear reactor installation described includes a fluid cooled nuclear heat source, a primary pressure vessel and outer shell around the primary pressure vessel and acting as a protection for it against outside projectiles. A floor is provided internally dividing the outside shell into two upper and lower sections and an inside wall dividing the lower section into one part containing the primary pressure vessel and a second part, both made pressure tight with respect to each other and with the outside shell and forming with the latter a secondary means of containment [fr

  11. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  12. Thermal performances of an insulating structure for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranovitch, E.; Crutzen, S.; Le Det, M.; Denis, R.

    1974-12-01

    This report describes the thermal and technological tests performed on a multilayer thermal insulation system for high temperature gas reactors. It includes the description of test facilities, global tests, interpretation of data, and technological tests. Results obtained make it possible to predetermine with a satisfactory precision thermal performances under various nominal conditions

  13. Reactor pressure vessels safety and reliability - certainty and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, R.

    1977-01-01

    In the paper, it is suggested that the hazard to the population which would result from vessel failure rate of the order of 10 -6 to 10 -7 per vessel year could be acceptable to society on the basis of other natural and man-made risks. The paper considers the problems of demonstrating safety by calculation based on fracture mechanics, and indicates some of the uncertainties, and inconsistencies in the theory, particularly the effect of cracks in locally degraded volumes of material. The phenomenon of crack arrest is considered, and attention is drawn to the uncertainties as indicated at least by some tests. There is need for speedy resolution of this problem. The uncertainties in material properties, heat treatment and residual stresses are considered, and a proposed upper limit for residual defects ('original sin') is proposed. (orig.) [de

  14. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  15. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to reactor pressure vessel safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, V.; Pitner, P.

    1995-06-01

    Among all the components of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plant, the reactor vessel is of major importance for safety. The integrity of this structure must be guaranteed in all circumstances, even in the case of the most severe accidents, and its mechanical state can be decisive for the lifetime of the plant. The brittle rupture would be the most important of all potential hazards if the irradiation effects were not consistent with predictions. The interest of having a reliable and precise method of evaluating the available safety margins and the integrity of this component led Electricite de France (EDF) to carry out a probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. The probabilistic model developed by integration of the uncertainties in the usual fracture mechanics equations is presented. A special focus is made on the problem of coupling thermo-mechanical finite element calculations and reliability analysis. The use of a finite element code can be associated with prohibitive computation times when it is invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or complex iterative procedures. The response surface method is used. It provides an approximation of the response from a reduced number of original data. The global approach is illustrated on an example corresponding to a specific accidental transient. A validation of the obtained results is also carried out through the comparison with an equivalent model without coupling. (author)

  16. Device for the burst protection of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daublebsky, P.

    1976-01-01

    The burst protection device has a hood over top and bottom of the pressure vessel with superimposed hinged supports lying in their turn against supporting rings which are connected with each other by vertical bracing. It is proposed to place an intermediate layer between hoods and vertical bracing absorbing thermal stresses, i.e. deforming plastically with gradually increasing pressure, but behaving like a rigid body in the case of shock loads. As a material lead e.g. is proposed. (UWI) [de

  17. Cylindrical reinforced-concrete pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaessen, F.

    1975-01-01

    The cylindrical pressure vessel has got a wall and an isolating layer composed of blocks of heat-resistant concrete or of ceramic material. The side of the isolating layer facing the interior of the presssure vessel is coated by a liner made of metallic material. In cold state and without internal pressure, the radius of this liner is smaller by a differential amount than that of the isolating layer. By means of radially displaceable fixing elements consisting of an anchoring tube and a holding tube inserted in it, the liner can be made to rest against the isolating layer. This occurs if the pressure vessel is brought to operational temperature. The anchoring tube is attached to the isolating layer whereas the displaceable holding tube is connected with the liner. The possible relative travelling distance of these two elements is equal to the difference of length of the two radii. In addition, the liner may consist of single parts connected with each other through compensating flanges. There may also be additional springs arranged between the isolating layer and the liner. (DG/PB) [de

  18. Study of impact of the AP1000{sup Registered-Sign} reactor vessel upper internals design on fuel performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yiban; Conner, Michael; Yuan Kun; Dzodzo, Milorad B.; Karoutas, Zeses; Beltz, Steven A.; Ray, Sumit; Bissett, Teresa A. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Chieng, Ching-Chang, E-mail: cchieng@ess.nthu.edu.tw [National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Kao, Min-Tsung; Wu, Chung-Yun [National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-15

    One aspect of the AP1000{sup Registered-Sign} reactor design is the reduction in the number of major components and simplification in manufacturing. One design change relative to current Westinghouse reactors of similar size is the reduction in the number of reactor vessel outlet nozzles/hot legs leaving the upper plenum from three to two. With regard to fuel performance, this design difference creates a different flow field in the AP1000 reactor vessel upper plenum (the region above the core). The flow exiting core and entering the upper plenum must turn 90 Degree-Sign , flow laterally through the upper plenum around support structures, and exit through one of the two outlet nozzles. While the flow in the top of the core is mostly axial, there is some lateral flow component as the core flow reacts to the flow field and pressure distribution in the upper plenum. The pressure distribution in the upper plenum varies laterally depending upon various factors including the proximity to the outlet nozzles. To determine how the lateral flow in the top of the AP1000 core compares to current Westinghouse reactors, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the flow in the upper portion of the AP1000 reactor vessel including the top region of the core, the upper plenum, the reactor vessel outlet nozzles, and a portion of the hot legs was created. Due to geometric symmetry, the computational domain was reduced to a quarter (from the top view) that includes Vulgar-Fraction-One-Quarter of the top of the core, Vulgar-Fraction-One-Quarter of the upper plenum, and Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half of an outlet nozzle. Results from this model include predicted velocity fields and pressure distributions throughout the model domain. The flow patterns inside and around guide tubes clearly demonstrate the influence of lateral flow due to the presence of the outlet nozzles. From these results, comparisons of AP1000 flow versus current Westinghouse plants were performed. Field performance

  19. Time varying stress in ligaments of perforated plates with reference to prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    The work described herein relates to the prediction of stresses in materials which exhibit time varying strains with particular reference to the ligaments of perforated circular concrete slabs, subjected to long-term radial prestress and uniform elevated temperature. The perforations are reinforced with steel liners and arranged in a square central lattice symmetrical about two orthogonal axes. Special reference is made to the distribution of stress in the standpipe region of prestressed concrete cylindrical pressure or containment vessels for gas cooled reactors. In order to assess the stress distribution around the perforated zone of a circular slab, a method of analysis was developed by the author, based on the ''Equivalent Elastic Modulus'' of the perforated zone and the ''Effective Modulus Method'', utilizing experimental data obtained from tests performed on model specimens. The object of this paper is to extend the above method of analysis into the perforated region, and assess the long-term stresses in the ligaments. The proposed method is accomplished by an application of the Finite Element Method for the elastic plane stress case. Comparisons of experimental results and theoretical predictions by the proposed method, and other analytical methods are made for a series of perforated concrete slabs subjected to radial in-plane loading: 10,342 kN/m 2 (1,5000 psi), and uniform elevated temperature of 80 0 C. The investigation, though in general terms, could be applied to the perforated region of cylindrical pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. Finally the paper describes briefly in Appendix 3 a direct solution procedure for calculating time dependent stresses in concrete structures based on the principles of variational calculus. Analytical predictions obtained by the proposed method which is a step-by-step analysis, are compared with the variational principle method. (author)

  20. Methodological efficiency of reactor pressure vessel control samples programs and reliability of WWER vessels at the Ukraine NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovbasenko, S.N.; Brednev, V.I.; Zinchenko, O.Ya.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is made for the programs with the use of check specimens (CS) for reactor vessel (RV) control which is considered as the only method for estimating embrittlement in RV material and its operational capability. Advantages and disadvantages of the programs are noted. Other methods are developed and improved to estimate properties of RV metal and welded joints. It is shown that the most valid information about RV metal state can be obtained only by testing specimens prepared from templets cut directly from a RV wall in the region of reactor core. Ukrainian researchers designed the equipment and performed successful tests on templet cutting from the surface of the metal to study mechanical properties of critical pipelines [ru

  1. In-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels and steam generators. Results and evolution of the technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapin, Michel; Saglio, Robert.

    1978-01-01

    Methods and original technics have been developed by the CEA for inspection of the primary coolant circuit of PWR. Multifrequency Eddy currents for inspection of steam generators tubes gudgeons and bolts; focussed ultrasonics to test all the welds of the reactor vessel and its cover of mixed welds of tanks and steam generators, pressurizer welds and gudgeons from the inside; gamma radiography of vessel mixed welds, televisual examination of the stainless steel lining of the reactor vessel and its cover. Use of these technics is made with specific automatic machines designed either for inspection of steam generator tubes or for complete inspection of the vessel. Several reactors were inspected with these devices [fr

  2. Inspection and repair of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohmann, W.; Poetz, F.; Nicolai, M.

    1996-01-01

    The past 10 years of operation of light water reactors were characterized by intensive inspection- and repair work on vital components. For boiling water reactors (BWR) it was typical to totally replace the piping system and for pressurized water reactors (PWR) it was the step to complete steam generator (SG) replacement - besides the development of increasingly diligent inspection and repair methods for SG tubes. It can be expected that in the 10 years to come the development of inspection- and repair methods will be aimed mainly at the core internals of BWR's as well as PWR's. Our prediction is that before the end of this decade a first complete replacement of these components will be performed. Already to date a broad range of techniques are available which enable the utilities to carry out inspections and repair of components of core internals in a relatively short time and acceptable expenses. Using examples such as Fuel Alignment Pin Inspection and Replacement, Baffle Former Bolt Inspection and Replacement, Core Barrel Former Bolt Inspection which are typical for PWR's we will in the following describe the existing methods, their development and - last but not least - their successful utilization. What is going to happen in the future? Ageing of the operating plants will continue, thus requesting the plant operators as well as the service companies to work on advanced technologies to fulfill the needs of the industry. (author)

  3. Study of spray cooling of a pressure vessel head of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, Henryk; Alavyoon, Farid; Novarini, Remi

    2010-01-01

    The present paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the spray cooling of a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) head in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). To this end a detailed computational model has been developed. The model predicts the trajectories, diameters and temperatures of subcooled droplets moving in saturated vapor. The model has been validated through comparison with experimental data, in which droplet temperatures were measured as functions of the distance that they cover in saturated vapor from the moment they leave the sprinkler outlet to the moment they impact on the RPV head inner wall. The calculations are in very good agreement with measurements, confirming the model adequacy for the present study. The model has been used for a parametric study to investigate the influence of several parameters on the cooling efficiency of the spray system. Based on the study it has been shown that one of the main parameters that govern the temperature increase in a subcooled droplet is its initial diameter. Comparisons are also made between conclusions from the theoretical model and observations made through flow and temperature measurements in the plant (Forsmark 1 and 2). One of these observations is that the rate at which the RPV head temperature decreases on the way down from hot to cold standby is constant and independent of the sprinkling flow rate as long as the flow rate is above a certain minimum value. Accordingly, the theoretical model shows that if one assumes that the cooling of the RPV head is through a water film built on the inner wall due to sprinkling, the heat removal rate is only very weakly dependent on the sprinkling flow rate.

  4. Test of safety injection supply by diesel generator under reactor vessel closed condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hao; Bi Fengchuan; Che Junxia; Zhang Jianwen; Yang Bo

    2014-01-01

    The paper studied that the test of diesel generator full load take-up under the condition of actual safety injection and reactor vessel closed in Ningde nuclear project unit l. It is proved that test result accorded with design criteria, meanwhile, the test was removed from the key path of project schedule, which cut a huge cost. (authors)

  5. Development of advanced ultrasonic inspection system for nuclear power plant reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawaragi, Kazuo; Miyake, Yoshio; Nakayama, Junji; Tachibana, Kiyoshi; Oomichi, Takao; Fukagawa, Yukio; Fujiwara, Masahiro; Honmura, Shiro

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection machine consisting of large and stiff columns and guide rails has been usually used in the pre-service inspection (PSI) and in-service inspection (ISI) of the nuclear power plant reactor vessels. However, the machine is so large-sized and heavy that maintenance and handling are degraded. To solve these problems, our robotics technology and idea obtained from experience of reactor vessel ISI have been applied to develop a new second generation machine that can dramatically reduce critical path time of reactor vessel ISI. This system is characterized by the following features. (1) It can move automatically and can set the position accurately by underwater positioning system. (2) Inspection is made by the articulated manipulator of high rigidity and high path accuracy. (3) The total weight is approx 300 kg in air (0 kg underwater). So the plant's polar crane is not required during inspection. Realization of this system, we have studied and designed all of the systems. We have also fabricated prototype machine to make the functional test using full scale mock up of reactor vessel. (author)

  6. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  7. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  8. Lumped thermal capacitance analysis of transient heat conduction and induced stresses in Ghana Research Reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annor-Nyarko, M.; Ayensu Gyeabour, I.; Akaho, E. H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Lumped thermal capacitance analysis has been undertaken to investigate the transient temperature variations, associated induced thermal stress distributions, and the structural integrity of Ghana Research Reactor-I (GHAR R-I) vessel after 15 years of operation. The beltline configuration of the cylindrical vessel of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) was based on thin-shell and axi-symmetric assumptions with small temperature gradient and low Biot number. The thermal energy transferred by unsteady flow of the coolant to the vessel was determined as internal energy change. Numerical algorithms for Matlab Code were implemented to generate data for transient analysis and simulation. The simulations indicated that the temperature variations and the thermal stresses were below the limits imposed by the vessel material (Aluminium alloy LT 21) specifications of 933 K melting point and allowable yield stress of 480 MPa. The low level of induced thermal stresses indicated that the structural integrity of the reactor vessel has been maintained to forestall any incidence of crack propagation and fatigue failure over the operation period. (au)

  9. Evaluation of the integrity of reactor vessels designed to ASME Code, Sections I and/or VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoge, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    A documented review of nuclear reactor pressure vessels designed to ASME Code, Sections I and/or VIII is made. The review is primarily concerned with the design specifications and quality assurance programs utilized for the reactor vessel construction and the status of power plant material surveillance programs, pressure-temperature operating limits, and inservice inspection programs. The following ten reactor vessels for light-water power reactors are covered in the report: Indian Point Unit No. 1, Dresden Unit No. 1, Yankee Rowe, Humboldt Bay Unit No. 3, Big Rock Point, San Onofre Unit No. 1, Connecticut Yankee, Oyster Creek, Nine Mile Point Unit No. 1, and La Crosse

  10. Dynamic modeling of the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March-Leuba, J.; Ibn-Khayat, M.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary description and some applications of a computer model that has been developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor. The ANS dynamic model is coded in the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL), and it represents the reactor core, vessel, primary cooling system, and secondary cooling systems. The use of a simple dynamic model in the early stages of the reactor design has proven very valuable not only in the development of the control and plant protection system but also of components such as pumps and heat exchangers that are usually sized based on steady-state calculations

  11. On the prediction of the reactor vessel integrity under severe accident loadings (RPVSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, R. E-mail: maeule@irs.fzk.de; Devos, J.; Caroli, C.; Solomos, G.; Ennis, P.J.; Kalkhof, D

    2001-11-01

    In order to allow more reliable predictions on the lower head response under core melt-down conditions, the temperature distribution has been analysed including the natural convection in the corium pool. Furthermore, the mechanical models and the failure criteria have been improved based on the RUPTHER and FASTHER experiments where typical temperature gradients are simulated. Lower head local melting as well as corium crust development has been addressed in the CORVIS experiments studying the contact between an alumina/iron thermite and a thick steel plate. The upper head loading by corium impact due to a postulated in-vessel steam explosion has been investigated by the BERDA experiments. Similarity rules were considered such that the results can be directly converted to reactor conditions. Based on these investigations admissible steam explosion energy releases are determined which the upper head can carry. If these limits are not exceeded the reactor containment cannot be endangered by broken head fragments. To provide the necessary basic data, mechanical material tests have been performed.

  12. Evaluation of heat-flux distribution at the inner and outer reactor vessel walls under the in-vessel retention through external reactor vessel cooling condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon Jung

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: The results show that a higher thermal margin for the IVR-ERVC strategy can be achieved in the focusing region. In addition, sensitivity studies revealed that the heat flux and reactor vessel thickness are dominantly affected by the molten corium pool formation according to the accident scenario.

  13. Furfurol-based polymers for the sealing of reactor vessels dumped in the Arctic Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.; Cowgill, M.G.; Alexandrov, V.P.; Dyer, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1965 and 1988, 16 naval reactor vessels were dumped in the Arctic Kara Sea. Six of the vessels contained spent nuclear fuel that had been damaged during accidents. In addition, a container holding ∼ 60% of the damaged fuel from the No. 2 reactor of the atomic icebreaker 'Lenin' was dumped in 1967. Before dumping, the vessels were filled with a solidification agent, Conservant F, in order to prevent direct contact between the seawater and the fuel and other activated components, thereby reducing the potential for release of radionuclides into the environment. The key ingredient in Conservant F is furfurol (furfuraldehyde). Other constituents vary, depending on specific property requirements, but include epoxy resin, mineral fillers, and hardening agents. The properties of Conservant F in both its cured and uncured states are discussed, and the potential performance of the waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel in the Arctic Kara Sea is evaluated. (author)

  14. Cast iron as structural material for hot-working reactor vessels (PCIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostendorf, H.; Schmidt, G.; Pittack, W.

    1977-01-01

    Cast iron with lamellar graphite is best suited for prestressed structures, because its compressive strength is nearly 4 times its tensile strength. In comparison to room temperature, cast iron with lamellar graphite shows essentially no loss of strength up to temperatures of 400 0 C. Under the particular aspect to use cast iron for hot-working prestressed reactor pressure vessels (PCIV) (Prestressed cast iron vessel=PCIV) a materials testing program is carried out, which meets the strict certification requirements for materials in the construction of reactor pressure vessels and which completes the presently available knowledge of cast iron. Especially in the following fields an extension and supplement of the present level of knowledge is necessary. - Mechanical properties under compressive stresses. - Material properties at elevated temperatures. - Influence of irradiation on mechanical and physical properties. - Production standards and quality control. The state of the research and the available data of the material testing program are reported. (Auth.)

  15. New paradigm for prediction of radiation life-time of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrechko, S.A.; Meshkov, Yu.Ya.; Neklyudov, I.M.; Revka, V.N.

    2011-01-01

    New paradigm for prediction of radiation life-time of reactor pressure vessel is presented. Equation for limiting state of reactor pressure vessel wall with crack-like defect is obtained. It is exhibited that the value of critical fluence Φ c may be determined not by shift of critical temperature of fracture of surveillance specimen, which is indirect characteristic, but by direct method, namely, by the condition of initiation of brittle fracture of irradiated metal ahead of a crack in RPV wall. Within the framework of engineering version of LA to fracture the technique for Φ c ascertainment is developed. Prediction of Φ c for WWER pressure vessels demonstrates potentialities of this technique.

  16. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission HSST and HSSI Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses development on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on reactor pressure vessel steel have shown that local brittle zones do not significantly degrade the material fracture toughness, constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallow surface flaws results in increased fracture toughness, and biaxial loading reduces but does not eliminate the shallow-flaw fracture toughness elevation. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch versus temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement and the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties

  17. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  18. Dust processing device for inside of vacuum vessel of thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Atsushi; Tsujimura, Seiichi; Takahashi, Kenji; Ueda, Yasutoshi; Kuwata, Masayasu; Onozuka, Masaki.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention can occasionally recover dusts in a vacuum vessel of a thermonuclear reactor. In addition, fine powdery dusts are never scattered to the vacuum vessel. Namely, a processing device main body comprises a locally sealed space in the vacuum vessel. A blow-up device blows up and floats dusts accumulated in the vacuum vessel to the processing device main body. A discharge plate electrically charges the floating dusts by discharge. An electrode collects the charged dusts. Collected dusts are recovered together with a pressurized gas through a dust recovering port to the outside of the processing device. With such a constitution, it is not necessary to release the vacuum vessel to the atmosphere and evacuate after the completion of the collection of the dusts on every time when the dusts are generated as in the prior art. It is no more necessary for an operator to enter into the vacuum vessel and recover the dusts. Since fine powdery dusts are never scattered in the vacuum vessel, no undesired effects are given to exhaustion facilities and instruments of the vacuum vessel. (I.S.)

  19. Preventive protection device and method for bottom of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Eisaku; Kurosawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Morinaka, Ren; Enomoto, Kunio; Otaka, Masahiro; Yoshikubo, Fujio; Chiba, Noboru; Sato, Kazunori.

    1995-01-01

    In a preventive protection device for improving stresses in reactor structural components by jetting highly pressurized water with cavitation bubbles from a jetting nozzle toward structural components in a reactor pressure vessel, a fixed structure to a CRD housing is provided with a rotational body attached to the structure, a multi joint arm and a jetting nozzle supported to the multi joint arm. The jetting nozzle is disposed at a position where the center of the jetting deviates from the center of the CRD housing. In addition, a monitoring camera is disposed for displaying the target for preventive protection. The state of stresses on a plurality of targets for preventive protection can be improved by the preventive protection device at a fixed position in the bottom of a reactor pressure vessel where housings stand densely, thereby enabling to attain the preventive protection operation easily and rapidly. (N.H.)

  20. Standard Guide for Conducting Supplemental Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels, E 706 (IH)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide discusses test procedures that can be used in conjunction with, but not as alternatives to, those required by Practices E185 and E2215 for the surveillance of nuclear reactor vessels. The supplemental mechanical property tests outlined permit the acquisition of additional information on radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness, notch ductility, and yield strength properties of the reactor vessel steels. 1.2 This guide provides recommendations for the preparation of test specimens for irradiation, and identifies special precautions and requirements for reactor surveillance operations and postirradiation test planning. Guidance on data reduction and computational procedures is also given. Reference is made to other ASTM test methods for the physical conduct of specimen tests and for raw data acquisition.

  1. Fatigue monitoring program for the Susquehanna Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Deardorff, A.

    1990-01-01

    A project was initiated to perform ongoing fatigue evaluation of key reactor vessel components at the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station. This effort has resulted in a program of data collection and evaluation which will assist in assessing the continued safe operation and extending the operating life of this boiling water reactor plant. Initial efforts centered on identification of the key design transient cycles and fatigue sensitive locations in the vessel. Based on these studies a manual system of cycle counting and fatigue usage evaluation was developed. A computer-based fatigue monitoring system (FMS) was chosen for tracking fatigue usage at the most critical locations at the reactor feedwater nozzles and the bottom head control rod drive (CRD) penetrations. With this system, fatigue usage is based on the actual plant operational cycles rather than design basis transient cycles. In this paper lessons learned from the project and key results from the fatigue history evaluation are discussed

  2. Analysis of dpa Rates in the HFIR Reactor Vessel using a Hybrid Monte Carlo/Deterministic Method*

    OpenAIRE

    Risner J.M.; Blakeman E.D.

    2016-01-01

    The Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which began full-power operation in 1966, provides one of the highest steady-state neutron flux levels of any research reactor in the world. An ongoing vessel integrity analysis program to assess radiation-induced embrittlement of the HFIR reactor vessel requires the calculation of neutron and gamma displacements per atom (dpa), particularly at locations near the beam tube nozzles, where radiation streaming effects are most pronounced. In this s...

  3. The influence of selected containment structures on debris dispersal and transport following high pressure melt ejection from the reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, M.; Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1988-09-01

    High pressure expulsion of molten core debris from the reactor pressure vessel may result in dispersal of the debris from the reactor cavity. In most plants, the cavity exits into the containment such that the debris impinges on structures. Retention of the debris on the structures may affect the further transport of the debris throughout the containment. Two tests were done with scaled structural shapes placed at the exit of 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion cavity. The results show that the debris does not adhere significantly to structures. The lack of retention is attributed to splashing from the surface and reentrainment in the gas flowing over the surface. These processes are shown to be applicable to reactor scale. A third experiment was done to simulate the annular gap between the reactor vessel and cavity wall. Debris collection showed that the fraction of debris exiting through the gap was greater than the gap-to-total flow area ratio. Film records indicate that dispersal was primarily by entrainment of the molten debris in the cavity. 29 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs

  4. Development of a supplemental surveillance program for reactor pressure vessel thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1997-01-01

    The technical decision to thermally anneal a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) depends upon the level of embrittlement in the RPV steels, the amount of recovery of fracture toughness properties expected from the anneal, and the rate of re-embrittlement after the vessel is placed back into service. The recovery of Charpy impact toughness properties after annealing can be estimated initially by using a recovery model developed using experimental measurements of recovery (such as that developed by Eason et al. for U.S. vessel materials). However, actual validation measurements on plant-specific archived vessel materials (hopefully in the existing surveillance program) are needed; otherwise, irradiated surrogate materials, essentially the same as the RPV steels or bounding in expected behavior, must be utilized. The efficient use of any of these materials requires a supplemental surveillance program focused at both recovery and reirradiation embrittlement. Reconstituted Charpy specimens and new surveillance capsules will most likely be needed as part of this supplemental surveillance program. A new version of ASTM E 509 has recently been approved which provides guidance on thermal annealing in general and specifically for the development of an annealing supplemental surveillance program. The post-anneal re-embrittlement properties are crucial for continued plant operation, and the use of a re-embrittlement model, such as the lateral shift approach, may be overly conservative. This paper illustrates the new ASTM E 509 Standard Guide methodology for an annealing supplemental surveillance program. As an example, the proposed program for the Palisades RPV beltline steels is presented which covers the time from annealing to the end of operating license and beyond, if license renewal is pursued. The Palisades nuclear power plant RPV was planned to be annealed in 1998, but that plant is currently being re-evaluated. The proposed anneal was planned to be conducted at a

  5. In-vessel tritium measurements using beta decay in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.; Gentile, C.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Pearson, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Walsh, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Tritium on the inside walls of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor was detected by configuring the vacuum vessel as an ionization chamber and measuring the secondary electron current from the tritium beta decay. The vessel was typically filled with {approx}5 Torr of dry nitrogen and the secondary electron current was collected by an internal electrode biased to about +15 V with respect to the vessel wall. The measured variations of the collected current with gas pressure, bias voltage, and applied magnetic fields are described, as well as an {ital in situ} calibration made by injecting a known amount of tritium gas. Improved versions of this diagnostic may be useful to track the in-vessel content of surface tritium in future fusion devices. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  7. Razpoke odkrite pri medobratovalnem pregledu reaktorske posode in ocena njihove sprejemljivosti: The flaws detected by in-service inspection in reactor pressure vessel and assessment of their acceptability:

    OpenAIRE

    Korošec, Darko; Vojvodič-Tuma, Jelena

    1998-01-01

    By the ASME-Pressure Vessel and Boilers Code, Sec. XI and its specific requirements periodic nondestructive examination of the reactor pressure vessel is required. Reactor pressure vessel is one of the most important pressure boundaries in the pressurized water reactor type. In the present paper the ASME XI code requirements about proper flow determination regarding their size are described. The nondestructive examination on reactor pressure vessel is performed mainly using ultrasonic techniq...

  8. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10 19 n/cm 2 (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at ∼290 C and annealing treatments were conducted at ∼454 C. The ORNL and RRC

  9. Irradiation, Annealing, and Reirradiation Effects on American and Russian Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Korolev, Y.N.; Nanstad, R.K.; Nikolaev, Y.A.; Sokolov, M.A.

    1998-06-16

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. Even though a postirradiation anneal may be deemed successful, a critical aspect of continued RPV operation is the rate of embrittlement upon reirradiation. There are insufficient data available to allow for verification of available models of reirradiation embrittlement or for the development of a reliable predictive methodology. This is especially true in the case of fracture toughness data. Under the U.S.-Russia Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS), Working Group 3 on Radiation Embrittlement, Structural Integrity, and Life Extension of Reactor Vessels and Supports agreed to conduct a comparative study of annealing and reirradiation effects on RPV steels. The Working Group agreed that each side would irradiate, anneal, reirradiate (if feasible ), and test two materials of the other. Charpy V-notch (CVN) and tensile specimens were included. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted such a program (irradiation and annealing, including static fracture toughness) with two weld metals representative of VVER-440 and VVER-1000 RPVs, while the Russian Research Center-Kurchatov Institute (RRC-KI) conducted a program (irradiation, annealing, reirradiation, and reannealing) with Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program Plate 02 and Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program Weld 73W. The results for each material from each laboratory are compared with those from the other laboratory. The ORNL experiments with the VVER welds included irradiation to about 1 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV), while the RRC-KI experiments with the U.S. materials included irradiations from about 2 to 18 x 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} (>l MeV). In both cases, irradiations were conducted at {approximately}290 C and annealing treatments were conducted

  10. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE's Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute's Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454 degrees C [850'F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about ±5% (23.6 degrees C [42.5 degrees F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes

  11. Inspection device for external examination of pressure vessels, preferably for ultrasonic testing of reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figlhuber, D.; Gallwas, J.; Weber, R.; Weber, J.

    1978-01-01

    The inspection device is placed in the annular gap between pressure vessel and biological shield of the BWR. In the annulus there is arranged at least one longitudinal rail which has got vertical guideways. Along it there can be moved on testing paths a manipulator with the ultrasonic search unit. The manipulator drive is outside of the inspection annulus. It is coupled to the manipulator by means of a tension member being guided over a reversing unit mounted at the upper end of the longitudinal rail. As a tension member there may be used a drag chain; the drive and the reversing unit are provided with corresponding chain wheels. (DG) [de

  12. Analysis and application of prestressed concrete reactor vessels for LMFBR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.; Fistedis, S.H.; Bazant, Z.P.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) for LMFBR and the associated finite element computer code, involving an explicit time integration procedure, is described. The model is axisymmetric and includes simulations of the tensile cracking of concrete, the reinforcement, and a prestressing capability. The tensile cracking of concrete and the steel reinforcement are both modeled as continuously distributed within the finite element. The stresses in the reinforcement and concrete are computed separately and combined to give an overall stress state of the composite material. Attention is given to the fact that cracks do not form instantaneously, but develop gradually. Thus, after crack initiation the normal stress is reduced to zero gradually as a function of time. Residual shear resistance of cracks due to aggregate interlock is also taken into account. Prestressing of the PCRV is modeled by special structural members which represent an averaged prestressing layer equivalent to an axisymmetric shell. The internal prestressing members are superimposed over the reinforced concrete body of the PCRV; they are permitted to stretch and slide in a predetermined path, simulating the actual tendons. The validity of the code is examined by comparison with experimental data. (Auth.)

  13. MAGNESIUM MONO POTASSIUM PHOSPHATE GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-01-05

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of magnesium mono potassium phosphate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Magnesium mono potassium phosphate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout (pH of about 12.4). A less alkaline material ({<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere. Fresh and cured properties were measured for: (1) commercially blended magnesium mono potassium phosphate packaged grouts, (2) commercially available binders blended with inert fillers at SRNL, (3) grouts prepared from technical grade MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and inert fillers (quartz sands, Class F fly ash), and (4) Ceramicrete{reg_sign} magnesium mono potassium phosphate-based grouts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory. Boric acid was evaluated as a set retarder in the magnesium mono potassium phosphate mixes.

  14. An analysis of critical heat flux on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Soo Hyung; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung

    1999-01-01

    CHF (Critical heat flux) on the external surface of the reactor vessel lower head is major key in the evaluation on the feasibility of IVR-EVC (In-Vessel Retention through External Vessel Cooling) concept. To identify the CHF on the external surface, considerable works have been performed. Through the review on the previous works related to the CHF on the external surface, liquid subcooling, induced flow along the external surface, ICI (In-Core Instrument) nozzle and minimum gap are identified as major parameters. According to the present analysis, the effects of the ICI nozzle and minimum gap on CHF are pronounced at the upstream of test vessel: on the other hand, the induced flow considerably affects the CHF at downstream of test vessel. In addition, the subcooling effect is shown at all of test vessel, and decreases with the increase in the elevation of test vessel. In the real application of the IVR-EVC concept, vertical position is known as a limiting position, at which thermal margin is the minimum. So, it is very important to precisely predict the CHF at vertical position in a viewpoint of gaining more thermal margins. However, the effects of the liquid subcooling and induced flow do not seem to be adequately included in the CHF correlations suggested by previous works, especially at the downstream positions

  15. Correlation between radiation damage and magnetic properties in reactor vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, R.A., E-mail: kempf@cnea.gov.ar [División Caracterización, GCCN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina); Sacanell, J. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Milano, J. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Guerra Méndez, N. [Departamento Física de la Materia Condensada, GIyA, CAC-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Winkler, E.; Butera, A. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Troiani, H. [División Física de Metales, CAB-CNEA and Instituto Balseiro (UNCU), CONICET (Argentina); Saleta, M.E. [División Resonancias Magnéticas, CAB-CNEA, CONICET (Argentina); Fortis, A.M. [Departamento Estructura y Comportamiento. Gerencia Materiales-GAEN, CAC-CNEA (Argentina)

    2014-02-01

    Since reactor pressure vessel steels are ferromagnetic, provide a convenient means to monitor changes in the mechanical properties of the material upon irradiation with high energy particles, by measuring their magnetic properties. Here, we discuss the correlation between mechanical and magnetic properties and microstructure, by studying the flux effect on the nuclear pressure vessel steel used in reactors currently under construction in Argentina. Charpy-V notched specimens of this steel were irradiated in the RA1 experimental reactor at 275 °C with two lead factors (LFs), 93 and 183. The magnetic properties were studied by means of DC magnetometry and ferromagnetic resonance. The results show that the coercive field and magnetic anisotropy spatial distribution are sensitive to the LF and can be explained by taking into account the evolution of the microstructure with this parameter. The saturation magnetization shows a dominant dependence on the accumulated damage. Consequently, the mentioned techniques are suitable to estimate the degradation of the reactor vessel steel.

  16. Stress analysis of the reactor pressure vessel of the high performance light water reactors (HPLWR); Festigkeitsanalyse fuer den Reaktordruckbehaelter des High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelton, E.; Fischer, K.

    2006-12-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the concepts of the Generation IV program. The main difference compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWR) results from the supercritical steam condition of the coolant. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and coolant, flows as a single phase through the core. The temperatures at the outlet are above 500 C. These conditions have a major impact on the design of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). For the modelling a RPV concept is proposed, which resembles the design of current LWR and allows the use of approved materials on one side and also meets the additional demands on the other side. A first dimensioning of the RPV wall thicknesses and the geometrical proportions has been performed using the german KTA-guidelines. To verify these results, a stress analysis using the finite element method has been performed with the program ANSYS. The combined mechanical and thermal calculations provide the primary, secondary and peak stresses which are evaluated using the KTA-guidelines design loading (Level 0) and service loading level A for the different components. The results confirm the wall thicknesses estimated by Fischer et al. (2006), but there are peak stresses in the vicinity of the inlet and outlet flanges, which are very close to the allowed design limit. For larger diameters of the RPV those regions will become critical and the stresses might exceed the design limits. Design optimizations for those regions are proposed and evaluated. A readjusted geometry of the inlet flange reduces those stresses by 65%. (orig.)

  17. The 4th surveillance testing for Kori unit 3 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-10-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 4th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 3 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules U, V, X and W are 4.983E+18, 1.641E+19, 3.158E+19, and 4.469E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.840 for the 1st through 4th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 12% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.362E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 12th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 3.481E+19, 4.209E+19, 5.144E+19 and 5.974E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 3 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 48 refs., 35 figs., 41 tabs. (Author)

  18. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 2 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwon Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed completely by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute at Taejeon after the capsule was transported from Kori site including its removal from reactor. Fast neutron fluences for capsules were calculated and various testing including mechanical and chemistry analysis were performed in order to evaluate the integrity of Kori unit 2 reactor vessel during the operation until life time. The evaluation results are as follows; Fast neutron fluences for capsules V, R, P, T and N are 2.837E+18, 1.105E+19, 2.110E+19, 3.705E+19 and 4.831E+19n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of measurement/calculation, was 0.918 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 11.6% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.898E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 15th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 32, 40, 48 and 56EFPY would reach 4.203E+19, 5.232E+19, 6.262E+19 and 7.291E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. The result through this analysis for Kori unit 2 showed that there would be no problem for the pressurized thermal shock(PTS) during the operation until design life. 49 refs., 35 figs., 48 tabs. (Author)

  19. Development of advanced design features for KNGR reactor vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Kyun; Ru, Bong; Lee, Jae Han; Lee, Hyung Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Ku, Kyung Heoy; Lee, Ki Young; Lee, Jun; Kim, Young In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    Developments of KNGR design require to enhance the design to implement the design requirements, such as plant life time from 40 years to 60 years, safety, performance and structure and components design. The designs used for existing nuclear power plants should be modified or improved to meet the requirements in KNGR design. The purpose of the task is to develop the Advanced Design Features (ADF) related to mechanical and structural design for KNGR reactor vessel and reactor internals. The structural integrity for the System 80+ reactor vessel, of which design life is 60 years, was reviewed. EPRI-URD, CESSAR-DC, and the present design status and characteristics of System 80+ reactor vessel were comparatively studied and the improvement of reactor vessel surveillance program was investigated. The performance and aseismic characteristics of the CE-type CEDM, which will be used in System 80+, are investigated. The driving cycles of CEDM are evaluated for the load follow operation(LFO), of which Mode K is being developed by KAERI. The position of the USNRC, EPRI, ABB-CE, and industries on the elimination of OBE are reviewed, and especially ABB-CE System 80+ FSER is reviewed in detail. For the pre-stage of the verification of the OBE elimination from the design, the review of the seismic responses, i.e.. shear forces and moments, of YGN 3/4 RI was performed and the ratio of OBE response to SSE response was analysed. The screening criteria were reviewed to evaluate the integrity against pressurized thermal shock (PTS) for RV belt-line of System 80+. The evaluation methods for fracture integrity when screening criteria are not met were reviewed. The structural characteristics of IRWST spargers of System 80+ were investigated and the effect of hydrodynamic loads on NSSS was reviewed. 18 figs., 9 tabs., 40 refs. (Author) .new.

  20. Measuring method and device for thickness of pad welded joint of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, Katsuyuki; Nakajima, Nobuya; Ebine, Noriya.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic yoke having an optional magnetic path length and a magnetic path cross section is disposed in close contact with or adjacent to the surface of the pad welded joint of a reactor pressure vessel, to form a magnetic path by the magnetic yoke and the reactor pressure vessel. Then, the magnetic path yoke is magnetized to measure a distribution of a magnetic field generated on the surface of the pad welded joint or its vicinity to which the magnetic yoke is adapted to be in close contact or come close. Since the geometrical dimensions and the magnetic performances of a material of the magnetic yoke and the pressure vessel are previously determined and, the measured magnetic distribution changes only by the thickness of the pad welded joint, the thickness of the pad welded joint of the pressure vessel can be determined. Accordingly, the measuring method of the present invention can measure the thickness of the pad welded joint of the pressure vessel at a desired practical accuracy and at a resolution power of, for example, 0.1mm relative to the thickness of the seat welded joint of 5 to 10mm. (N.H.)

  1. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel outside the astm specification A508 CL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachur, D.; Krawczynski, S. J.; Derz, H.; Pott, G.

    1990-04-01

    Radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels is of considerable significance for safety engineering. Steel manufacturers must therefore comply with specifications defined by national design codes. The extent to which a steel deviating from the specification is influenced by irradiation is being examined under the German Research Programme on the Integrity of Reactor Components. Charpy-V specimens were taken from a forged steel block longitudinally and vertically to the direction of main deformation and irradiated in the FRJ-1 research reactor at a temperature of 288 °C corresponding to the operating temperature of power reactors. The neutron fluences obtained ranged between 0.8 × 10 19 and 8 × 10 19n/ cm2. Instrumented pendulum impact tests have been evaluated and the load signals measured were analysed, fitting and calculating transition temperature curves and trend curves.

  2. TU electric reactor model verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles include gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets, and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both low-power physics tests (boron end points, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full-power operation (power distributions and boron letdown) are compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important physics parameters for power reactors

  3. Quality assurance experience in the manufacture of PFBR reactor vessel during technology development work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, K.; Chandramohan, R.; Ramamurthy, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    An efficient and proper implementation of quality assurance in the technology development works of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) main vessel was undertaken to achieve the desired quality and dimensional accuracy of main vessel. In this paper an attempt has been made to bring out the methods and procedures adopted to implement the quality assurance programme on important activities including approval of documents, material, general requirements for manufacture of SS components, inspection procedures, forming and welding of petals, non-destructive testing etc. (author)

  4. Programmable - logic equipment for ultrasound periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two alternatives are presented of programmable logic corresponding to the 2nd generation of the apparatus for performing periodic ultrasonic inspections of power reactor pressure vessels and a solution is outlined of inspecting the circumferential weld on the pressure vessel head. The apparatus will allow using any measuring head taken into consideration for operational inspection. Command words are taken from a punched type reader. Czechoslovak made RAM memories are used. The algorithm of instrument function is supposed to be controlled by a microprocessor as soon as necessary preconditions for this technology are created in Czechoslovakia

  5. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilch, M.M.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Chu, T.Y. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashid, Y.R. [Anatech, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication.

  6. The role of point defect clusters in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-induced point defect clusters (PDC) are a plausible source of matrix hardening in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in addition to copper-rich precipitates. These PDCs can be of either interstitial or vacancy type, and could exist in either 2 or 3-D shapes, e.g. small loops, voids, or stacking fault tetrahedra. Formation and evolution of PDCs are primarily determined by displacement damage rate and irradiation temperature. There is experimental evidence that size distributions of these clusters are also influenced by impurities such as copper. A theoretical model has been developed to investigate potential role of PDCs in RPV embrittlement. The model includes a detailed description of interstitial cluster population; vacancy clusters are treated in a more approximate fashion. The model has been used to examine a broad range of irradiation and material parameters. Results indicate that magnitude of hardening increment due to these clusters can be comparable to that attributed to copper precipitates. Both interstitial and vacancy type defects contribute to this hardening, with their relative importance determined by the specific irradiation conditions

  7. Preventive maintenance technique by temper bead welding for reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Ryuichi; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Nishimura, Moritatsu; Nakamura, Yasuo; Hirano, Shinro

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant has some dissimilar weld joint between main components which are made of Low Alloy Steel and piping which is made of Stainless Steel. Previous plants' dissimilar weld joints are made of Alloy 600 which is low resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). It is reported that PWSCC is occurred in some plants. The preventive maintenance technique against PWSCC is needed immediately. One solution is the improvement of the material, for example, the inner surface of Alloy 600 is replaced by welding Alloy 690 which is high resistance to PWSCC. Generally, Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of low alloy steel after welding is required Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT), but it is so hard that this operation has to be accomplished in site. So it is necessary to attempt the improvement of HAZ by temper bead welding which isn't needed PWHT. Temper bead welding is that HAZ of 1st weld layer is appropriately covered with heat of after 2nd weld layer, then the mechanical performance of HAZ is improved as well as PWHT. Conventional temper bead welding is required pre-heat and post-heat treatment. However it is impossible to set up the heater due to environment around the dissimilar weld joint in some plants, the development of ambient temperature temper bead welding technique which isn't needed pre-heat and post-heat treatment is expected. It is confirmed that the mechanical performance and the material texture are improved by setting the appropriate welding condition with many welding test pieces. Then, the preventive maintenances called INLAY method are completed in some actual plants. (author)

  8. A seismic performance and cost comparison of top and bottom supported liquid metal reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.M.; Kiciman, O.K.; Petrozelli, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is the premise of this paper that the revision of a pool LMR from a TSRV configuration to a specific bottom supported reactor vessel (BSRV) configuration can resolve the above TSRV disadvantages related to load path length and diversity, thereby improving seismic performance and simultaneously reducing RV block costs by reducing weights. This paper demonstrates this premise by comparing a reference TSRV block with a specific BSRV block design. Recent capital cost estimates ($/kWe) for U.S. liquid metal reactor (LMR) plant designs reveal that the balance of plant costs could be reduced below that of the balance of plant costs for a comparable light water reactor plant. However, in regions of high seismicity, non-seismically isolated LMR nuclear steam supply system weights are costs per kWe are two to three times the weights and costs of light water reactor nuclear steam supply systems. While all portions of the LMR nuclear steam supply system require examination for potential cost reductions, the focus of this paper is the reactor vessel (RV) block for a large pool plant

  9. Summary of the NEA/CSNI Workshop on the safety assessment of reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toerroenen, K. (VTT (Finland)); English, C.A. (AEA Tehnology (United Kingdom)); Crutzen, S. (CEC/TRC (Italy)); Hemsworth, B. (Health and Safety Executive (United Kingdom)); Noel, R.C. (EDF (France))

    1990-12-01

    The workshop was initiated by the CSNI Principal Working Group No 3, Reactor Component Integrity as part of its programme concerned with the long term degradation and service life management of reactor components. A central issue in this context and in consideration of reactor plant license extension is the capability to provide reliable safety assessments of component integrity using available data and assessment methods. In this regard, The Principal Working Group plans a systematic survey of reactor structural components critical to safety, commencing with pressure vessels. Existing knowledge and recent achievements in research on the behaviour of neutron irradiated materials, applications of fracture mechanics and probabilistic safety assessment methods provide comprehensive information to the regulatory bodies and plant operators. The Group considered that a workshop penetrating the problems met by authorities, utilities and researchers assessing the safety of reactor pressure vessels would clarify the current state of knowledge and the need and direction for further research. This report is a summary of the NEA/CSNI workshop. (au).

  10. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  11. The role of gamma rays and freely-migrating defects in reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Rehn, L.E.

    1996-09-01

    Gamma ray effects are often neglected when evaluating reactor pressure vessel (RPV) embrittlement. However, recent analyses indicate that in newer style light water reactors, gamma damage can be a substantial fraction of the total displacement damage experienced by the (RPV); ignoring this damage will lead to errors in embrittlement predictions. Furthermore, gamma rays may be more efficient than fast neutrons at producing freely-migrating defects and as such can impact certain embrittlement mechanisms more effectively than fast neutrons. Consideration of these gamma effects are therefore essential for a more complete understanding of radiation embrittlement

  12. Control Rod Driveline Reactivity Feedback Model for Liquid Metal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Chang, Won-Pyo; Cho, Chung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Bum

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion of the control rod drivelines (CRDL) is one important passive mitigator under all unprotected accident conditions in the metal and oxide cores. When the CRDL are washed by hot sodium in the coolant outlet plenum, the CRDL thermally expands and causes the control rods to be inserted further down into the active core region, providing a negative reactivity feedback. Since the control rods are attached to the top of the vessel head and the core attaches to the bottom of the reactor vessel (RV), the expansion of the vessel wall as it heats will either lower the core or raise the control rods supports. This contrary thermal expansion of the reactor vessel wall pulls the control rods out of the core somewhat, providing a positive reactivity feedback. However this is not a safety factor early in a transient because its time constant is relatively large. The total elongated length is calculated by subtracting the vessel expansion from the CRDL expansion to determine the net control rod expansion into the core. The system-wide safety analysis code SSC-K includes the CRDL/RV reactivity feedback model in which control rod and vessel expansions are calculated using single-nod temperatures for the vessel and CRDL masses. The KALIMER design has the upper internal structures (UIS) in which the CRDLs are positioned outside the structure where they are exposed to the mixed sodium temperature exiting the core. A new method to determine the CRDL expansion is suggested. Two dimensional hot pool thermal hydraulic model (HP2D) originally developed for the analysis of the stratification phenomena in the hot pool is utilized for a detailed heat transfer between the CRDL mass and the hot pool coolant. However, the reactor vessel wall temperature is still calculated by a simple lumped model

  13. System for bearing a nuclear reactor vessel cooled by liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahe, A.; Jullien, G.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a bearing system for supporting a nuclear reactor vessel of the kind which is suspended from the reactor closure slab. The bearing system comprises a ring connected at one end to a collar and at the other end to two collars. The collar connected to the bottom end of the ring forms the top part of the vessel to be supported while the other two collars fit into the slab at two separate places. The ring and collars are disposed in an annular space formed in the slab and dividing it into two parts, i.e., a central part and a peripheral part surrounding the central part of the slab

  14. Creep crack growth in a reactor pressure vessel steel at 360 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Wu; Seitisleam, F.; Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Plain creep (PC) and creep crack growth (CCG) tests at 360 deg C and post metallography were carried out on a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2) with different microstructures. Lives for the CCG tests were shorter than those for the PC tests and this is more pronounced for simulated heat affected zone microstructure than for the parent metal at longer lives. For the CCG tests, after initiation, the cracks grew constantly and intergranularly before they accelerated to approach rupture. The creep crack growth rate is well described by C*. The relations between reference stress, failure time and steady crack growth rate are presented for the CCG tests. It is demonstrated that the failure stress due to CCG is considerably lower than the yield stress at 360 deg C. Consequently, the CCG will control the static strength of a reactor vessel. (orig.) 17 refs.

  15. TMI-2 [Three Mile Island Unit 2] reactor vessel head and plenum removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultman, C.W.; Jackson, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of the damage to the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) core during the accident in March 1979, removal of the reactor vessel head and plenum in the normal manner was judged to be impossible. In June 1982, a task force was formed to develop a plan for removing the TMI-2 reactor vessel head. The plan proposed removing the head using the standard head removal procedure in conjunction with the necessary precautions, changes, and preparations required for potential problems. This included the potential for both higher than normal radiation levels and airborne radioactive contamination. In addition, the plan specified that the plant be left either in a condition to proceed with plenum and fuel removal immediately after head removal or in a safe long-term lay-up condition. The basic plan consisting of the described major steps is discussed

  16. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  17. Ageing Management Review of the reactor pressure vessels in Laguna Verde NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gris Cruz, Magdalena; Arganis, Carlos R.J.; Medina Almazan, A. Liliana

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, for both units of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP), the Ageing Management Review of the reactor pressure Vessel was carried out, including the identification of the intended functions, the materials and the environments. The evaluation of the ageing effect/mechanism and the Aging management programs currently implemented were prepared. The most important aging effects/ mechanisms are: loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation embrittlement, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), general corrosion and erosion-corrosion. The neutron irradiation embrittlement is managed by the reactor vessel materials surveillance program. The fatigue is a Time Limited Aging Analysis (TLAA), for which is necessary to calculate some fatigue usage factors. SCC is managed by, the In service inspections (ISI) program, but also by the Water Chemistry program, including, currently, On Line Noble Chem. The water chemistry program also manages General Corrosion and erosion-corrosion. The results were compared with the GALL report. (author)

  18. INETEC new system for inspection of PWR reactor pressure vessel head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadinic, B.; Postruzin, Z.

    2004-01-01

    INETEC Institute for Nuclear Technology developed new equipment for inspection of PWR and VVER reactor pressure vessel head. The new advances in inspection technology are presented in this article, as the following: New advance manipulator for inspection of RPVH with high speed of inspection possibilities and total automated work; New sophisticated software for manipulator driving which includes 3D virtual presentation of manipulator movement and collision detection possibilities; New multi axis controller MAC-8; New end effector system for inspection of penetration tube and G weld; New eddy current and ultrasonic probes for inspection of G weld and penetration tube; New Eddy One Raster scan software for analysis of eddy current data with mant advanced features which allows easy and quick data analysis. Also the results of laboratory testing and laboratory qualification are presented on reactor pressure vessel head mock, as well as obtained speed of inspection and quality of collected data.(author)

  19. Influence of reactor vessel nodalization in the coupled code analysis of Asymmetric Main Feedwater Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Feretic, D.; Grgic, D.

    2001-01-01

    Asymmetric Main Feedwater Isolation (AMFWI) transient in one Steam Generator (SG) for NPP Krsko using RELAP5 standalone code and coupled code RELAP5- QUABOX/CUBBOX (R5QC) was analyzed. In the RELAP5 standalone calculation, a point kinetics model was used, while in the coupled code a three-dimensional (3D) neutronics model of QUABOX with different RELAP5 nodalization schemes of reactor vessel was used. Both code versions use best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code for all components in the plant and include realistic description of plant protection and control systems. Two different types of calculations were performed: with and without automatic control rod system available. The AMFWI transient causes the great asymmetry of the transferred heat in the SGs and subsequently the asymmetry of the power produced across the core due to different reactivity feedback resulting from the thermal-hydraulic channels assigned to different loops. The work presented in the paper is a part of validation of the 3D coupled code R5QC in the analysis of asymmetric transients.(author)

  20. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  2. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. 2. Replacement of upper core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushiki, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiromichi; Okuda, Eiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Jun; Oota, Katsu; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Takamatsu, Misao; Nagai, Akinori; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, it was confirmed that the top of the irradiation test sub-assembly of MARICO-2 (material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the in-vessel storage rack as an obstacle and had damaged the upper core structure (UCS) in 2007. As a part of the restoration work, UCS replacement was begun at March 24, 2014 and was completed at December 17. In-vessel repair (including observation) for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) is distinct from that for light water reactors and necessitates independent development. Application of developed in-vessel repair techniques to operation and maintenance of SFRs enhanced their safety and integrity. There is little UCS replacement experience in the world and this experience and insights, which were accumulated in the replacement work of in-vessel large structure (UCS) used for more than 30 years, are expected to improve the in-vessel repair techniques in SFRs. (author)

  3. Improving the procedure of manufacturing the reactor pressure vessel head for WWER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shutkov, G.A.; Zorin, V.G.; Kryuger, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for manufacturing the reactor pressure vessel heat for the WWER-1000 by means of stamping seamless - forged blakds of he 15Kh2NMFA steel. As a result of the new manufacturing procedure the time adn labour input for the manufacturing, metal consumption are reduced, the product durability is increased due to elimination of welded joints. Mechanical properties of the items completely meet the requirements

  4. Lateral expansion and impact toughness correlation of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Trygubenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Impact toughness and lateral expansion of the irradiated surveillance specimens for VVER-1000 reactor pres-sure vessel have been defined using Charpy impact test. The analysis of experimental data has revealed a linear correlation of these characteristics. It was shown that a slope of the regression line is practically unchanged due to irradiation. Using the upper shelf energy test data it was also demonstrated the lateral expansion and impact toughness decrease simultaneously under the neutron irradiation.

  5. Latest developments in prestressed concrete vessels for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ople, F.S. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is an update of the design development of prestressed concrete vessels, commonly referred to as 'PCRVs' starting with the first single-cavity PCRV for the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station to the latest multi-cavity PCRV configurations being utilized as the primary reactor vessels for both the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) in the U.S.A. The complexity of PCRV design varies not only due to the type of vessel configuration (single versus multi-cavity) but also on the application to the specific type of reactor concept. PCRV technology as applied to the Steam Cycle HTGR is fairly well established; however, some significant technical complexities are associated with PCRV design for the Gas Turbine HTGR and the GCFR. For the Gas Turbine HTGR, for instance, the fluid dynamics of the turbo-machinery cause multi-pressure conditions to exist in various portions of the power conversion loops during operation. This condition complicates the design approach and the proof test specification for the PCRV. The geometric configuration of the multi-cavity PCRV is also more complex due to the introduction of large horizontal cylindrical cavities (housing the turbo/machines for the Gas Turbine HTGR and circulators for the GCFR) in addition to the vertical cylindrical cavities for the core and heat exchangers. Because of this complex geometry, it becomes difficult to achieve an optimum prestressing arrangement for the PCRV. Other novel features of the multi-cavity PCRV resulting from the continuing design optimization effort are the incorporation of an asymmetric (offset core) configuration and the use of large vessel cavity/penetration concrete closures directly held down by prestressing tendons for both economic and safety reasons. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of J-groove weld residual stress and crack growth rate of PWSCC in reactor pressure vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Hyuk; Ryu, Tae Young; Park, Seung Hyun; Won, Min Gu; Kang, Seok Jun; Kim, Moon Ki; Choi, Jae Boong; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) has been frequently found in pressurized water reactor (PWR) applications. Especially, PWSCC has occurred in long-term operated PWRs. As this phenomenon leads to serious accidents, we must be beforehand with the anticipated problems. A typical PWR consists of J-groove welded components such as reactor pressure vessel closure head and nozzles. Reactor pressure vessel closure head is made of SA508 and it is covered by cladding. Alloy 600 is used for nozzles. And J-groove weld is conducted with alloy 82/182. Different material properties of these metals lead to residual stress and PWSCC consequentially. In this study, J-groove weld residual stress was investigated by a three-dimensional finite element analysis with an actual asymmetric J-groove weld model and process of construction. Also crack growth rate of PWSCC was evaluated from cracks applied on the penetration nozzles. Based on these two values, one cannot only improve the structural integrity of PWR, but also explain PWSCC behavior such that high residual stress at the J-groove weld area causes crack initiation and propagation through the surface of nozzles. In addition, crack behavior was predicted at the various points around the nozzle.

  7. Proof, interpretation and evaluation of radiation-induced microstructural changes in WWER reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmert, J.; Gokhman, A.; Grosse, M.; Ulbricht, A.

    2003-06-01

    Neutron embrittlement is a special issue for the VVER-type reactors. One of the fundamentals for a reliable assessment of the current material state is knowledge of the causes and mechanisms of neutron embrittlement. The aim of the project is to understand and to quantify the microstructural appearances due to neutron radiation in VVER-type reactor pressure vessel steels. The material base is a broad variation of irradiation probes taken from the irradiation programme Rheinsberg, surveillance programmes of Russian, Ukrainian or Hungarian NPPs or irradiation experiments with mockup-alloys. The microstructure was investigated by different methods. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) proved to be the most suitable method. A procedure was developed to determine mean diameter, size distribution and volume fraction of irradiation-induced microstructure from SANS experiments in a reliable and comparable manner. With this method microstructural parameters were systematically determined and the main factors of influence were identified. Apart from the neutron fluence the volume fraction of radiation defects mainly changes with the copper or nickel content whereas phosphorus is hardly relevant. Annealing remedies the radiation-induced microstructural appearances. The ratio between nuclear and magnetic neutron scattering provides information on the type of radiation defects. This leads to the conclusion that the material composition changes the radiation defects. The change occurs gradually rather than abruptly. The radiation defects detected by SANS correlate with the radiation hardening and embrittlement. Generally, the results suggest a bimodal mechanism due to radiation-enhanced and radiation-induced defect evolution. A kinetic model on base of the rate theory approach was established. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the effect of implemented low temperature overpressure regimes on the reactor pressure vessel resistance to damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistora, V.

    1995-12-01

    The temperature and stress fields of the Dukovany WWER-440 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) were calculated based on a two-dimensional model using the finite element method. Two pressurized thermal shock events occurred at Dukovany in 1992: the temperature in 3 loops dropped rapidly while the primary circuit was fully pressurized. The calculation revealed that the first event was intolerable with respect to the RPV resistance to brittle fracture; had the two events occurred towards the end of the RPV lifetime, both would have been intolerable. (M.D.). 6 tabs., 15 figs., 6 refs

  9. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement of NPP borssele: Design lifetime and lifetime extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    Embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel of the Borssele nuclear power plant has been investigated taking account of the design lifetime of 40 years and considering 20 years subsequent lifetime extension. The paper presents the current licensing status based on considerations of material test data and of US nuclear regulatory standards. Embrittlement status is also evaluated against German and French nuclear safety standards. Results from previous fracture toughness and Charpy tests are investigated by means of the Master curve toughness transition approach. Finally, state of the art insights are investigated by means of literature research. Regarding the embrittlement status of the reactor pressure vessel of Borssele nuclear power plant it is concluded that there is a profound basis for the current license up to the original end of the design life in 2013. The embrittlement temperature changes only slightly with respect to the acceptance criterion adopted postulating further operation up to 2033. Continued safe operation and further lifetime extension are therefore not restricted by reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

  10. Control method for pool water of pressure suppression chamber in reactor container vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Konomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor container having a pressure suppression chamber in adjacent with the outer circumference of a pedestal of a reactor pressure vessel, at least a portion of pool water is provisionally transported from the pressure suppression chamber to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel, and stored therein. In addition, an opening of the side wall of the pedestal is closed to raise the water level of the provisionally stored water thereby increasing the amount of provisionally stored pool water. Predetermined operations are performed in the pressure suppression chamber after transporting the pool water to the inner side surrounded by the pedestal of the pressure vessel. Namely, a portion of the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber is transported to the inner space surrounded by the pedestal to provisionally store it thereby forming a circumstance for enabling predetermined operations such as inspection and re-coating in the pressure suppression chamber. Then, radiation contamination prevailing to the outer side of the reactor container can be reduced thereby enabling to obtain various effects, namely, reduction in the amount of equipments for provisional installment, shortening for construction term and decrease in the amount of waste materials. (I.S.)

  11. The Bottom supported fast breeder reactor vessel - an alternative approach to seismic accommodation and reduced cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Golan, S.; Petrozelli, J.; Kumaoka, Y.; Kawamura, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Most FBR vessels are supported by hanging from their top portions. A disadvantage of such a top supported reactor vessel (TSRV) structural configuration is that it may generate high reactor core accelerations. This is due to the long path the seismic vibrations must travel from the basemat up through the building and then down through the RV block to the core. To compensate for this disadvantage, TSRV blocks are often strengthened beyond what is required for other considerations, such as pressure, to satisfy seismic response criteria, thus increasing weights and costs. In addition to long load paths, TSRVs also have common load paths. For example, in a TSRV (with the core supported from the bottom of the RV) the sodium and core loads both travel along the RV pressure boundary. Therefore, one of these loads will likely control the RV thickness leaving excess margin for the other loads. It is the premise of this paper that the revision of a large pool FBR from a TSRV configuration to a specific bottom supported reactor vessel (BSRV) configuration can resolve the above TSRV disadvantages related to load path length and diversity, thereby improving seismic performance and simultaneously reducing RV block costs by reducing weights. This paper demonstrates this premise by comparing a reference TSRV block with a specific BSRV block design

  12. Standard Practice for Determining NeutronExposures for Nuclear Reactor Vessel Support Structures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for monitoring the neutron radiation exposures experienced by ferritic materials in nuclear reactor vessel support structures located in the vicinity of the active core. This practice includes guidelines for: 1.1.1 Selecting appropriate dosimetric sensor sets and their proper installation in reactor cavities. 1.1.2 Making appropriate neutronics calculations to predict neutron radiation exposures. 1.2 This practice is applicable to all pressurized water reactors whose vessel supports will experience a lifetime neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) that exceeds 1 × 1017 neutrons/cm2 or 3.0 × 10−4 dpa. (See Terminology E 170.) 1.3 Exposure of vessel support structures by gamma radiation is not included in the scope of this practice, but see the brief discussion of this issue in 3.2. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and h...

  13. The 5th surveillance testing for Kori unit 1 reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Kwun Jae; Gong, Un Sik; Chang, Jong Hwa; Joo, Yong Sun; Ahn, Sang Bok; Hong, Joon Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-08-01

    Surveillance testing for reactor vessel materials is performed in order to evaluate the irradiation embrittlement due to neutrons during operation and set the condition of safe operation of nuclear reactor. The 5th surveillance testing was performed primarily by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute and Westinhouse corporation partially involved in testing and calculation data evaluation in order to obtain reliable test result. Fast neutron fluences for capsule V, T, S, R and P were 5.087E+18, 1.115E+19, 1.228E+19, 2.988E+19, and 3.938E+19n/cm2, respectively. The bias factor, the ratio of calculation/measurement, was 0.940 for the 1st through 5th testing and the calculational uncertainty, 7% satisfied the requirement of USNRC Reg.Guide DG-1053, 20%. The best estimated neutron fluence for reactor vessel inside surface was 1.9846E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the end of 17th fuel cycle and it was predicted that the fluences of vessel inside surface at 24, 32, 40 and 48EFPY would reach 3.0593E+19, 4.0695E+19, 5.0797E+19 and 6.0900E+19n/cm{sup 2} based on the current calculation. PTS analysis for Kori unit 1 showed that 27.93EFPY was the threshold value for 300 deg F requirement. 71 refs., 33 figs., 52 tabs. (Author)

  14. The inclusion of weld residual stress in fracture margin assessments of embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses were performed to determine the impact of weld residual stresses in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) on (1) the generation of pressure temperature (P-T) curves required for maintaining specified fracture prevention margins during nuclear plant startup and shutdown, and (2) the conditional probability of vessel failure due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading. The through wall residual stress distribution in an axially oriented weld was derived using measurements taken from a shell segment of a canceled RPV and finite element thermal stress analyses. The P-T curve derived from the best estimate load analysis and a t / 8 deep flaw, based on K Ic , was less limiting than the one derived from the current methodology prescribed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The inclusion of the weld residual stresses increased the conditional probability of cleavage fracture due to PTS loading by a factor ranging from 2 to 4

  15. Neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel in Borssele as determined from Charpy specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.; Dufour, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    Two sets of Charpy specimens have been retrieved from the reactor in the nuclear power plant at Borssele after two and four cycles of operation, respectively. The neutron fluxes at the sample positions and at the vessel wall have been calculated with a point-kernel method and S 2 calculations. The calculated fluxes at the two specimen positions are in fair agreement with fluences measured by threshold detectors. The Reference Temperature of Nil Ductility has been determined from the Charpy tests by a tan-h fit procedure. An extrapolation to a 40-year vessel life has been made on the basis of a square-root dependence of the change in the reference temperature with effective full-power years. Under these assumptions the heat-affected zone material will reach 296 K. The other materials will remain below 280 K. The vessel life therefore is not limited by embrittlement. (orig.)

  16. An experimental study of hypervapotron structure in external reactor vessel cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Zhang, Ming [State Nuclear Power Technology R& D Center (Beijing), Beijing (China); Hou, Fangxin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Gao, Tianfang [State Nuclear Power Technology R& D Center (Beijing), Beijing (China); Chen, Peipei, E-mail: chenpeipei@snptc.com.cn [State Power Investment Group Corporation, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Experiments are performed to study the application of hypervapotron in ERVC design. • CHF experiments on two surfaces are conducted under different flow conditions. • Hypervapotron improves CHF performance by 40–60% compared with smooth surface. • Visualization shows fin structure removes vapor mushroom for better liquid supply. - Abstract: In vessel retention (IVR) is one of the key strategies for many advanced LWR designs to mitigate postulated severe accidents. The success of IVR substantially relies on external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) by which the decay heat is removed from the melt core in the reactor vessel lower head. The main challenge of IVR is to provide an adequate safety margin of ERVC against critical heat flux (CHF) of subcooled flow boiling in the reactor lower head flow channel. Due to uncertainties in corium melt pool configuration, large CHF margin of ERVC is usually required by regulatory authorities to demonstrate reliability of severe accident mitigation methods. Various CHF enhancement designs have been proposed and studied in literature. In this paper, an experimental study of hypervapotron structure as a novel design to improve CHF performance of ERVC is conducted. Hypervapotron is chosen as one of the potential engineering options for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program as a divertor structure to remove highly intense heat from fusion chamber. This study is to conduct CHF experiments at typical PWR ERVC working conditions. The CHF experiments are performed in a 30 mm by 61 mm rectangular flow channel with a 200 mm long heated surface along the flow direction. Both smooth and hypervapotron surface are tested at various inclination angles of the test section to simulate various positions of the reactor lower head. The hypervapotron is found to have a 40–60% CHF improvement compared with the smooth surface. The high speed visualization indicates that hypervapotron is able to

  17. Safety assessment of a multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel with hot liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafitte, R.; Marchand, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The prestressed concrete reactor vessel of the high temperature reactor with helium turbine project differs from those realized up to this day by the important number of cavities, by the different cavity pressures and by a liner in contact with hot gas. For the cases of operating conditions, the computations can be based on an identical pressure in all the cavities. The overdimensioning of the vessel which results is not a determining factor at this stage of the project. The possible loss of leaktightness of the liner can introduce gas pressure into the walls of the vessel. The great thickness of the walls makes it impossible to withstand the resulting forces with prestressing in offering sufficient safety factor against collapse. It is thus important to design a drainage network largely dimensioned. The warm liner appears at this stage of the project too highly stressed by fatigue at the singularity points (ducts between cavities, angles). A solution is proposed which limits the variations of thermal stresses by using a steel with low coefficient of thermal expansion. The cavity closures, which are numerous and some with large dimensions are an important aspect of the vessel safety. A solution of reinforced concrete shell with independent liner is proposed

  18. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa; Nishimura, Hajime; Tokunaga, Sango

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  19. Embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels: comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, T.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rossinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G.

    1996-07-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Rowe Yankee PWR plants were operated at a lower-than-usual temperature (260 degrees Celsius) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature (970 degrees Celsius). A heat tratemement leading to a coarser microstructure than typical for the fine grain plates that are considered in development of USNRC Regulatory guide 1.99. This material displayed outlier behaviour charackterized by a 41J CVN-shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower radiation temperature and nickell alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements enbodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: 1) the accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively, 2) the BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program: this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, ANCL was trepanned in early 1995, 3) the accelerated irradiations in the Belgian BR2 test reactor of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is shown that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the BR3 vessel anneal was neither necessary nor sufficient. Finally, the sensitivity of embrittlement, annealing and post-annealing reembrittlement to irradiation

  20. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel surveillance capsule examinations. Application of American Society for Testing and Materials Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A series of pressure vessel surveillance capsules is installed in each commercial nuclear power plant in the United States. A capsule typically contains neutron dose meters, thermal monitors, tensile specimens, and Charpy V-notch impact specimens. In order to determine property changes of the pressure vessel resulting from irradiation, surveillance capsules are periodically removed during the life of a reactor and examined. There are numerous standards, regulations, and codes governing US pressure vessel surveillance capsule programmes. These are put out by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). A majority of the pertinent ASTM standards are under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee E-10 on Nuclear Applications and Measurements of Radiation Effects. The standards, regulations, and codes pertaining to pressure vessel surveillance play an important role in ensuring reliability of the nuclear pressure vessels. ASTM E 185-73 is the Standard Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactors. This standard recommends procedures for both the irradiation and subsequent testing of surveillance capsules. ASTM E 185-73 references many additional specialized ASTM standards to be followed in specific areas of a surveillance capsule examination. A key element of surveillance capsule programmes is the Charpy V-notch impact test, used to define curves of fracture behaviour over a range of temperatures. The data from these tests are used to define the adjusted reference temperature used in determining pressure-temperature operating curves for a nuclear power plant. (author)

  1. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grounes, M.

    1966-03-01

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO 345 and Fortiweld

  2. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M.

    1966-03-15

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO

  3. General Description of the Mechanic Design of the Pressure Vessel and the Internal Mechanical Component of the CAREM Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, F.; Horro, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the CAREM reactor pressure vessel and its main internal mechanical components and summarizes the functional requirements and approaches applied for their design, together with a review of the normative applicable in each case

  4. Consequence evaluation of radiation embrittlement of Trojan reactor pressure vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Sommer, S.C.; Johnson, G.L.; Lambert, H.E.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a consequence evaluation to address safety concerns raised by the radiation embrittlement of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports for the Trojan nuclear power plant. The study comprises a structural evaluation and an effects evaluation and assumes that all four reactor vessel supports have completely lost the load carrying capability. By demonstrating that the ASME code requirements governing Level D service limits are satisfied, the structural evaluation concludes that the Trojan reactor coolant loop (RCL) piping is capable of transferring loads to the steam generator (SG) supports and the reactor coolant pump (RCP) supports. A subsequent design margins to accommodate additional loads transferred to them through the RCL piping. The effects evaluation, employing a systems analysis approach, investigates initiating events and the reliability of the engineered safeguard systems as the RPV is subject to movements caused by the RPV support failure. The evaluation identifies a number of areas of additional safety concerns, but further investigation of the above safety concerns, however, concludes that a hypothetical failure of the Trojan RPV supports due to radiation embrittlement will not result in consequences of significant safety concerns

  5. Direct vessel inclined injection system for reduction of emergency core coolant direct bypass in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang H.; Lee, Jong G.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional thermal hydraulics in the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) downcomer during a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) plays a pivotal role in determining the capability of the safety injection system. APR1400 adopts the direct vessel injection (DVI) method for more effective core penetration of the emergency core cooling (ECC) water than the cold leg injection (CLI) method in the OPR1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe). The DVI method turned out to be prone to occasionally lack in efficacious delivery of ECC to the reactor core during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA, however. This study intends to demonstrate a direct vessel inclined injection (DVII) method, one of various ideas with which to maximize the ECC core penetration and to minimize the direct bypass through the break during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA. The 1/7 scaled down THETA (Transient Hydrodynamics Engineering Test Apparatus) tests show that a vertical inclined nozzle angle of the DVII system increases the downward momentum of the injected ECC water by reducing the degree of impingement on the reactor downcomer, whereby lessening the extent of the direct bypass through the break. The proposed method may be combined with other innovative measures with which to ensure an enough thermal margin in the core during the course of a LBLOCA in APR1400

  6. Inspection and replacement of baffle assembly screws inside American reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, K.; Chaumont, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The baffle assembly inside the vessel of a 900 MWe reactor designed by Framatome, is made up of 44 plates fixed on 8 horizontal supports by a system of about 1000 screws. These plates undergo high neutron flux and the problem of screw cracking appeared at the end of the eighties in the first-generation reactors. The first operation on a large scale concerning the screws of a Westinghouse type reactor, was performed on the Tihange-1 power plant where Framatome controlled 960 screws and replaced 91. In 1997 as a consequence of the Belgian and French feedback experience, American plant operators launched a vast program of preventive actions: material analysis, inspection of baffle plate screws and replacement of defective screws. This program was held in cooperation with EPRI (electric power research institute) and under the control of NRC (nuclear regulatory commission). Framatome Technologies Inc (FTI) was in charge of the in-situ inspection and replacement of the screws. FTI designed special tools and equipment adapted to the 2-loop American reactors but the basis ideas were those applied on the Tihange reactor. The successful experience of FTI has allowed the firm to be commissioned for 6 2-loops American reactors. (A.C.)

  7. Westinghouse PWR and BWR reactor vessel segmentation experience in using mechanical cutting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segerud, Per; Fallstroem, Stefan; Boucau, Joseph; Kreitman, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Some commercial nuclear power plants have been permanently shut down to date and decommissioned using dismantling methods. Other operating plants have decided to undergo an upgrade process that includes replacement of reactor internals. In both cases, there is a need to perform a segmentation of the reactor vessel internals with proven methods for long term waste disposal. Westinghouse has developed several concepts to dismantle reactor internals based on safe and reliable techniques, including plasma arc cutting (PAC), abrasive waterjet cutting (AWJC), metal disintegration machining (MDM), or mechanical cutting. Mechanical cutting has been used by Westinghouse since 1999 for both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's) and its process has been continuously improved over the years. The complexity of the work requires well designed and reliable tools. Different band saws, disc saws, tube cutters and shearing tools have been developed to cut the reactor internals. All of those equipments are hydraulically driven which is very suitable for submerged applications. Westinghouse experience in mechanical cutting has demonstrated that it is an excellent technique for segmentation of internals. In summary, the purpose of this paper will be to provide an overview of the Westinghouse mechanical segmentation process, based on actual experience from the work that has been completed to date. (author)

  8. Design criteria for prestressed concrete pressure vessels for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmelpfennig, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work on design criteria for concrete structures of Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessels (PCRVs), which has been carried out since 1984 by a couple of competent institutions. After some basic considerations on the safety demands on PCRVs, especially their Prestressed Concrete Structure (PCS), and the consequences for an elevated level of quality to be ensured by the design criteria, an impression is given, first, by what means a higher quality standard is gained with respect to selection of materials and specification of material data in comparison to the usual building industry and what kind of criteria on this behalf should be fixed in a PCRV code. As a further quality increasing feature, the specific demands on design analysis as practised according to the present state of science and as to be treated within a code are discussed. This concerns analyses for steady state and transient temperatures as well as stress and strain analyses for service and ultimate load conditions. It is outlined to what degree calculation models should be detailed, which includes statements about admissible idealizations. As a central topic the question is discussed in what way the ultimate load capacity has to be evaluated, thereby presenting results of some investigations pointing out the conditions under which the design is determined by the different kinds of ultimate load conditions. Finally, some reflections on the demands on monitoring the PCS behaviour during its lifetime and on several questions still to be answered in this field are expressed. (orig.)

  9. Pressurized thermal shock. Thermo-hydraulic conditions in the CNA-I reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, Mirta A.; Rosso, Ricardo D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we analyze several reports issued by the Utility (Nucleo Electrica S.A.) and related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) phenomena in the CNA-I Nuclear Power Plant. These analyses are aimed at obtaining conclusions and establishing criteria ensuring the RPV integrity. Special attention was given to the effects ECCS cold-water injection at the RPV down-comer leading to pressurized thermal shock scenarios. The results deal with hypothetical primary system pipe breaks of different sizes, the inadvertent opening of the pressurizer safety valve, the double guillotine break of a live steam line in the containment and the inadvertent actuation pressurizer heaters. Modeling conditions were setup to represent experiments performed at the UPTF, under the hypothesis that they are representative of those that, hypothetically, may occur at the CNA-I. No system scaling analysis was performed, so this assertion and the inferred conclusions are no fully justified, at least in principle. The above mentioned studies, indicate that the RPV internal wall surface temperature will be nearly 40 degree. It was concluded that they allowed a better approximation of PTS phenomena in the RPV of the CNA-I. Special emphasis was made on the influence of the ECCS systems on the attained RPV wall temperature, particularly the low-pressure TJ water injection system. Some conservative hypothesis made, are discussed in this report. (author)

  10. Postirradiation recovery of a reactor pressure vessel steel investigated by positron annihilation and microhardness measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; Diego, N. De; Cruz, R.M. de la; Del Rio, J.

    1993-01-01

    Positron lifetime and microhardness measurements have been performed on untreated, thermal-aged, neutron-irradiated, and postirradiation-annealed samples of reactor pressure vessel steels with the purpose of investigating the mechanisms of irradiation-induced hardening and recovery of the mechanical properties in these materials. The positron lifetime experiments have not revealed any evidence of the formation of a significant concentration of voids or vacancy clusters in samples irradiated at ∼290 C with fluences ≤2.71 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV), but they suggest a dislocation annealing induced by the irradiation. Isochronal annealing experiments with neutron-irradiated samples show a simultaneous recovery in their positron lifetime and microhardness at ∼340 C. From the microhardness measurements, the yield strength of the irradiated material has been estimated. The results appear to be consistent with a model of hardening due to irradiation-induced dissolution of precipitates with formation of small metastable precipitates after postirradiation aging and recovery induced by the disappearance of these metastable precipitates

  11. Thermal effects, creep and nonlinear responde of concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.

    1978-01-01

    A new mathematical model for prediction of pore pressure and moisture transfer in concrete heated well beyond 100 0 C is outlined. The salient features of the model are:(1) the hypothesis taht the pore space available to capillary water grows with increasing temperature as well as increasing pressure in excess of saturation pressure, and (2) the hypothesis that moisture permeability increases by two orders of magnitude when passing 100 0 C. Permaability below 100 0 C is controlled by migration of adsorbed water through gel-pore sized necks on passages through the material; these necks are lost above 100 0 C and viscosity then governs. The driving force of moisture transfer may be considered as the gradient of pore pressure, which is defined as pressure of vapor rather than liquid water if concrete is not saturated. Thermodynamic properties of water may be used to determine sorption isotherms in saturated concrete. The theory is the necessary first step in rationally predicting thermal stresses and deformations, and assessing the danger of explosive spalling. However, analysis of creep and nonlinear triaxial behavior is also needed for this purpose. A brief review of recent achievements in these subjects is also given. (Author)

  12. The metrological problems of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodenicharov, S.; Kamenova, Ts.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels increases the T k -values of transition temperature from ductile to brittle fracture. This effect is very important in emergency situations, when the water cooling injection in the reactor results in high thermal gradients. In such cases there is a risk from the appearance of a brittle fracture with catastrophic crack propagation speed at relatively low stresses. That is why the T k -value determination is very important for the safe operation of the reactor systems. Some advanced experimental methods for T k -testing and control have been discussed in the present article and the standards of different countries have been compared. The methods applying subsize specimens and welding-restored specimens have been reviewed. (author)

  13. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  14. Guidelines for Application of the Master Curve Approach to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyssakov, V.N.; Kang, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed under an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) titled ''Surveillance Programme Results Application to Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity Assessment.'' The IAEA has sponsored a series of five CRPs that have led to a focus on measuring the best irradiation fracture parameters using relatively small test specimens for assuring structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)

  15. Design analysis of the molten core confinement within the reactor vessel in the case of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with a reactor of the VVER type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvonaryov, Yu. A.; Budaev, M. A.; Volchek, A. M.; Gorbaev, V. A.; Zagryazkin, V. N.; Kiselyov, N. P.; Kobzar', V. L.; Konobeev, A. V.; Tsurikov, D. F.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary design estimate of the behavior of the core melt in vessels of reactors of the VVER-600 and VVER-1300 types (a standard optimized and informative nuclear power unit based on VVER technology—VVER TOI) in the case of beyond-design-basis severe accidents. The basic processes determining the state of the core melt in the reactor vessel are analyzed. The concept of molten core confinement within the vessel based on the idea of outside cooling is discussed. Basic assumptions and models, as well as the results of calculation of the interaction between molten materials of the core and the wall of the reactor vessel performed by means of the SOCRAT severe accident code, are presented and discussed. On the basis of the data obtained, the requirements on the operation of the safety systems are determined, upon the fulfillment of which there will appear potential prerequisites for implementing the concept of the confinement of the core melt within the reactor in cases of severe accidents at nuclear power plants equipped with VVER reactors.

  16. Experimental verification of creep analyses for prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Y.; Abe, H.; Ohnuma, H.

    1977-01-01

    The authors proposed a new method of creep analysis based on the theory of strain hardening, which assumes that accumulated creep at a given time influences the creep after that. This method was applied to calculate step-by-step the behaviors of uniaxial creep of concrete under variable temperatures and stresses, creep in reinforced concrete specimens and the behaviors of prestressed concrete beams under themal gradients. The experimental and calculated results agreed fairly well. Further, this method was incorporated in the finite element creep analysis for the prestressed concrete hollow cylinder and the full scale model. The calculated strain changes with time pursued closely those obtained by experiments. The above led to the conclusion that from the viewpoint of both accuracy and computation time the strain hardening method proposed by the authors may be judged advantageous for practical usages

  17. Research towards ultrasonic systems to assist in-vessel manipulations in liquid metal cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Marc; Van-Dyck, Dries

    2013-06-01

    We describe the state of the art of the research towards ultrasonic measurement methods for use in lead-bismuth cooled liquid metal reactors. Our current research activities are highly focused on specific tasks in the MYRRHA system, which is a fast spectrum research reactor cooled with the eutectic mixture of lead and bismuth (LBE) and is conceived as an accelerator driven system capable of operating in both sub-critical and critical mode. As liquid metal is opaque to light, normal visual feedback during fuel manipulations in the reactor vessel is not available and must therefore be replaced by a system that is not hindered by the opacity of the coolant. In this respect ultrasonic measurement techniques have been proposed and even developed in the past for operation in sodium cooled reactors. To our knowledge, no such systems have ever been deployed in lead based reactors and we are the first to have a research program in this direction as will be detailed in this paper. We give an overview of the acoustic properties of LBE and compare them with the properties of sodium and water to theoretically show the feasibility of ultrasonic systems operating in LBE. In the second part of the paper we discuss the results of the validation experiments in water and LBE. A typical scene is ultrasonically probed by a mechanical scanning system while the signals are processed to render a 3D visualization on a computer screen. It will become clear that mechanical scanning is capable of producing acceptable images but that it is a time consuming process that is not fit to solve the initial task to providing feedback during manipulations in the reactor vessel. That is why we propose to use several dedicated ultrasonic systems each adapted to a specific task and capable to provide real-time feedback of the ongoing manipulations, as is detailed in the third and final part of the paper. (authors)

  18. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  19. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  20. Correlations of Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Yang; F. B. Cheung; J. L. Rempe; K. Y. Suh; S. B. Kim

    2005-01-01

    Four types of steady-state boiling experiments were conducted to investigate the efficacy of two distinctly different heat transfer enhancement methods for external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions. One method involved the use of a thin vessel coating and the other involved the use of an enhanced insulation structure. By comparing the results obtained in the four types of experiments, the separate and integral effect of vessel coating and insulation structure were determined. Correlation equations were obtained for the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux. It was found that both enhancement methods were quite effective. Depending on the angular location, the local critical heat flux could be enhanced by 1.4 to 2.5 times using vessel coating alone whereas it could be enhanced by 1.8 to 3.0 times using an enhanced insulation structure alone. When both vessel coating and insulation structure were used simultaneously, the integral effect on the enhancement was found much less than the product of the two separate effects, indicating possible competing mechanisms (i.e., interference) between the two enhancement methods

  1. Instrumentation of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Rightley, M.J.; Matsumoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. At present, two tests are being planned: a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) that is representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design; and a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper discusses plans and the results of a preliminary investigation of the instrumentation of the PCCV model. The instrumentation suite for this model will consist of approximately 2000 channels of data to record displacements, strains in the reinforcing steel, prestressing tendons, concrete, steel liner and liner anchors, as well as pressure and temperature. The instrumentation is being designed to monitor the response of the model during prestressing operations, during Structural Integrity and Integrated Leak Rate testing, and during test to failure of the model. Particular emphasis has been placed on instrumentation of the prestressing system in order to understand the behavior of the prestressing strands at design and beyond design pressure levels. Current plans are to place load cells at both ends of one third of the tendons in addition to placing strain measurement devices along the length of selected tendons. Strain measurements will be made using conventional bonded foil resistance gages and a wire resistance gage, known as a open-quotes Tensmegclose quotes reg-sign gage, specifically designed for use with seven-wire strand. The results of preliminary tests of both types of gages, in the laboratory and in a simulated model configuration, are reported and plans for instrumentation of the model are discussed

  2. Positioning means for circumferentially locating inspection apparatus in a nuclear reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    Positioning means for locating inspection apparatus used to volumetrically examine a nuclear reactor vessel is disclosed. The positioning means is provided with a support ring having an annular key positioned longitudinally about its periphery. Three support legs are attached to the support ring by brackets adapted to fit the annular key. The support ring also carries three guide stud bushings which are movably mounted by clamps adapted to engage the support ring key. Prior to lowering the inspection apparatus into the vessel, the guide stud bushings are each moved to a point of alignment with one of three guide studs extending upwardly from the vessel. After alignment has been verified, the guide stud bushings are clamped in position. The inspection apparatus is lowered towards its fully seated position within the vessel and is coarsely circumferentially positioned with by the engagement of the guide studs within the guide stud bushings. A fine degree of circumferential positioning is achieved by providing a specially configured shoe for one of the support legs. With the core barrel internals in, the special shoe is adapted to key onto a core barrel pin the exact location of which is known. With the core barrel internals removed, the special shoe is adapted to place a locating key into a notch in a vessel flange, the location of which is known. As the inspection apparatus is lowered into its fully seated position, exact circumferential positioning with respect to the vessel is achieved. The other support legs rest on an inner circumferential flange so that no portion of the inspection apparatus touches or threatens the vessel's top flange. 19 claims

  3. Analysis of AP1000TM reactor vessel cavity and support cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, K.J.; Harkness, A.W.; Kritzinger, H.P.; Hoffmann, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis of the air cooling of the Reactor Vessel (RV) cavity and RV supports. All the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) flow of the RV cavity has to pass through the four RV supports supporting the four cold legs (cold inlets from the two steam generators) of the AP1000 TM reactor. The RV support has a complex flow path leading to significant pressure drops to provide the necessary cooling. The insulation surrounding the RV has a specification on the amount of heat that may be transferred (lost) from the RV in order to maximize the heat transfer to the coolant driving the steam generators. This heat loss is applied as a boundary condition to the solution domain. Another heat source that is considered is that due to nuclear heating. Due to the fact that the heat source is nuclear in nature, gamma and neutron heating have to be considered for the surrounding structures. These include the carbon steel structural module that encapsulates the RV cavity, as well as the concrete poured around this module. The space in the gap between the RV insulation and the structural module steel shell is not only obstructed by the insulation supports, but also by wells or tubes within which power and intermediate ex-core detectors are located. Source-range ex-core detectors are embedded in the concrete surrounding the structural module. All these detectors have a limited operating temperature range, and together with limits on concrete temperatures for safety considerations, necessitate the need for CFD simulations to determine the range of operational temperatures seen by these components. The CFD simulations also provide an estimate of the pressure drop through the cavity between the RV insulation and structural module, as well as that through the four RV supports. Results presented include ANSYS R FLUENT R simulations describing the modelling procedure that was followed, namely to combine detail and system

  4. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, Stephen; Campbell, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 982 o C (1800 o F)) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 871 o C (1600 o F)). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (University of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used before for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (versus 1/4 T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, are maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (260 o C and 288 o C) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. (Author)

  5. Preliminary irradiation test results from the Yankee Atomic Electric Company reactor vessel test irradiation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biemiller, E.C.; Fyfitch, S.; Campbell, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee Atomic Electric Company test irradiation program was implemented to characterize the irradiation response of representative Yankee Rowe reactor vessel beltline plate materials and to remove uncertainties in the analysis of existing irradiation data on the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel steel. Plate materials each containing 0.24 w/o copper, but different nickel contents at 0.63 w/o and 0.19 w/o, were heat treated to simulate the Yankee vessel heat treatment (austenitized at 1800 deg F) and to simulate Regulatory Guide 1.99 database materials (austenitized at 1600 deg. F). These heat treatments produced different microstructures so the effect of microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity could be tested. Because the nickel content of the test plates varied and the copper level was constant, the effect of nickel on irradiation embrittlement was also tested. Correlation monitor material, HSST-02, was included in the program to benchmark the Ford Nuclear Reactor (U. of Michigan Test Reactor) which had never been used for this type of irradiation program. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs. 1/4T) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from the rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. If the improved properties are maintained, pressurized thermal shock calculations could utilize this margin. Finally, for one experiment, irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures (500 deg. F and 550 deg. F) to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The preliminary results of the irradiation program show an increase in T 30 shift of 69 deg. F for a decrease in irradiation temperature of 50 deg. F. The results suggest that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained after irradiation and for the copper content tested, nickel had no apparent effect on irradiation response. No apparent microstructure

  6. DESIGN OF A VIBRATION AND STRESS MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR AN ADVANCED POWER REACTOR 1400 REACTOR VESSEL INTERNALS COMPREHENSIVE VIBRATION ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    KO, DO-YOUNG; KIM, KYU-HYUNG

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), Regulatory Guide 1.20, the reactor vessel internals comprehensive vibration assessment program (RVI CVAP) has been developed for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400). The purpose of the RVI CVAP is to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals to flow-induced loads prior to commercial operation. The APR1400 RVI CVAP consists of four programs (analysis, measurement, inspection, and assessment). Thoughtful prepa...

  7. Detailed evaluation of melt pool configuration in the lower plenum of the APR1400 reactor vessel during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Hwan-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Melt pool condition in the lower plenum was determined using SCDAP/RELAP5. • GEMINI analyses were performed to examine the final melt pool composition. • A density evaluation graph was developed for the melt pool layer inversion. • The final melt pool configurations were determined for five accident scenarios. • The thermodynamic results address the possibility of the layer inversion. - Abstract: For a detailed evaluation of the IVR (In-Vessel corium Retention) through the ERVC (External Reactor Vessel Cooling) during a severe accident, the melt pool configuration should be accurately determined in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. It affects the thermal load to the vessel wall and plays a key role in determining the integrity of the reactor vessel under the IVR-ERVC. SCDAP/RELAP5 and GEMINI analyses have been performed to determine the final corium condition and examine the final melt pool composition at a reactor vessel failure during a severe accident in an APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400, respectively. As the representative accident scenarios, five dominant sequences of the TLFW (Total Loss of Feed Water), the SBO (Station BlackOut), the SBLOCA (Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident) without SI (Safety Injection), the MBLOCA without SI, and the LBLOCA without SI were selected from the level I PSA (Probabilistic Safe Assessment) results. A density evaluation graph was developed for the precise examination of the melt pool layer inversion. The final melt pool configurations at the reactor vessel failure have been determined for five dominant accident scenarios of the APR1400 using the GEMINI results and the density evaluation graph. The thermodynamic analysis results in three sequences of the APR1400 accident address the possibility of a melt pool layer inversion in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. The layer inversion led to corium pool stratification with a heavy metallic layer below the oxidic pool, which leads to a three

  8. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels (Report on analysis of the behaviour of advanced reactor pressure vessel steel under neutron irradiation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, K.S.; Chatterjee, S.; Anantharaman, S.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Viswanathan, U.K.

    1984-01-01

    The International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components (IWG-RRPC) sponsored by IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Programme in 1977 to investigate the behaviour of Advanced Pressure Vessel Steels under neutron irradiation. IWG-RRPC included provision of various materials produced by organisation in Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan and a reference Steel from United States of America to those countries participating in the programme. India joined the International Programme in 1977. The scope of study was mainly to evaluate the neutron irradiation induced change in nil ductility transition temperature and tensile properties on some selected materials. The required quantity of these materials was received from Japan, France, Federal Republic of Germany and United States of America. The paper reports the results obtained from the investigations carried out in the Radiometallurgy Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Bombay, India, on Japanese plate, Japanese forging, French plate, French forging and French weld. Due to other important commitments of the CIRUS reactor, in which the irradiation was carried out, it was not possible to complete the entire programme at this time. (author)

  9. Application of an ultrasonic data recording and processing system to reactor pressure vessel examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxbaum, S.R.; Pond, R.B. Jr; Willetts, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Pre-service and periodic in-service nondestructive examinations of nuclear reactor pressure vessels in the USA are mandated by law and are performed in accordance with Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. Although acceptable to Code and regulatory requirements, conventional examination procedures and techniques may not meet utility needs, such as providing an adequate technical basis for plant license extension arguments and responding to concerns for nuclear plant safety. A multichannel Ultrasonic Data Recording and Processing System (UDRPS) was developed to address these concerns and was applied to the inspection of reactor pressure vessels in parallel with the Code-required inspection. The inspection requirements and the UDRPS and Code-required conventional NDE data acquisition and analysis are described. Results from the Calvert Cliffs RPV inspections demonstrated that the UDRPS examination was more sensitive than the Code-required examination, and caused only minimal impact on the Code-required examination and overall inspection schedule. (author)

  10. Influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiss, T.J.; Bryson, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the influence of flaw depth on the fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel. Recently, it has been shown that, in notched beam testing, shallow cracks tend to exhibit an elevated toughness as a result of a loss of constraint at the crack tip. The loss of constraint takes place when interaction occurs between the elastic-plastic crack-tip stress field and the specimen surface nearest the crack tip. An increased shallow-crack fracture toughness is of interest to the nuclear industry because probabilistic fracture-mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the probability of vessel failure during postulated pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) events. Tests have been performed on beam specimens loaded in 3-point bending using unirradiated reactor pressure vessel material (A533 B). Testing has been conducted using specimens with a constant beam depth (W = 94 mm) and within the lower transition region of the toughness curve for A533 B. Test results indicate a significantly higher fracture toughness associated with the shallow flaw specimens compared to the fracture toughness determined using deep-crack (a/W = 0.5) specimens. Test data also show little influence of thickness on the fracture toughness for the current test temperature (-60 degree C). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  12. PWR reactor pressure vessel internals license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirian, R.; Robison, G.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components, in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications, as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). Pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals designed by all three U.S. PWR nuclear steam supply system vendors have been evaluated relative to the effects of age-related degradation mechanisms; the capability of current design limits; inservice examination, testing, repair, refurbishment, and other programs to manage these effects; and the assurance that these internals can continue to perform their intended safety functions in the license renewal term. This industry report (IR), one of a series of ten, provides a generic technical basis for evaluation of PWR reactor pressure vessel internals for license renewal

  13. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysochoides, N.G.; Cundy, M.R.; Von der Hardt, P.; Husmann, K.; Swanenburg de Veye, R.J.; Tas, A.

    1985-01-01

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  14. Effects of irradiation at lower temperature on the microstructure of Cr-Mo-V-alloyed reactor pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, M.; Boehmert, J.; Gilles, R. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The microstructural damage process due to neutron irradiation [1] proceeds in two stages: - formation of displacement cascades - evolution of the microstructure by defect reactions. Continuing our systematic investigation about the microstructural changes of Russian reactor pressure vessel steel due to neutron irradiation the microstructure of two laboratory heats of the VVER 440-type reactor pressure vessel steel after irradiation at 60 C was studied by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). 60 C-irradiation differently changes the irradiation-induced microstructure in comparison with irradiation at reactor operation temperature and can, thus, provide new insights into the mechanisms of the irradiation damage. (orig.)

  15. Technical basis for reexamination interval for alloy 690 PWR reactor vessel top head penetration nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olender, A.; White, G.; Fuhr, K.; Schmitt, K.; Crooker, P.

    2015-01-01

    Of the 65 currently operating PWRs in the U.S., reactor vessel (RV) heads at 40 of these units have been replaced with heads having Alloy 690 nozzles. This study combines Alloy 600/82/182 and Alloy 690/52/152 plant experience and laboratory data for the development and application of deterministic and probabilistic models used in predicting risks associated with PWSCC degradation in RV heads having Alloy 600 or Alloy 690 nozzles. The objective is to propose an inspection regime for RV heads with Alloy 690 nozzles based on absolute and relative risk assessment, the latter in comparison to risks in RV heads having Alloy 600 nozzles with inspection internals simulated in accordance with current requirements in the U.S. Because of its chromium content of approximately 30%, Alloy 690 has greatly improved resistance to PWSCC in comparison to that for Alloy 600. The PWSCC resistance of Alloy 690 has been demonstrated through no observed plant PWSCC despite over 24 calendar years of service in steam generator tube and thick-walled component applications. To incorporate this resistance, the model for RV heads with Alloy 690 nozzles is founded on a factor of improvement approximation, which relates well-established initiation and growth prediction for Alloy 600 materials to Alloy 690 materials through a simple scaling transformation. To support this approximation, the authors applied existing laboratory data and operating experience with Alloy 690 and its weld metals Alloys 52 and 152, and compared them to that of Alloy 600 and Alloys 82 and 182. Application of factors of improvement on a conservative basis shows that it is appropriate that the current interval for volumetric or surface examination of the Alloy 690 RV head nozzles in U.S. PWRs be extended to a nominal 20 calendar years. (authors)

  16. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution in the Repairs of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2006-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a generalized flaw size and density distribution for the population of U.S. reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict vessel specific flaw rates for use in probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that estimate vessel failure probability. Considerable progress has been made on the construction of an engineering data base of fabrication flaws in U.S. nuclear RPVs. The fabrication processes and product forms used to construct U.S. RPVs are represented in the data base. A validation methodology has been developed for characterizing the flaws for size, shape, orientation, and composition. The relevance of construction records has been established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, and validated by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in weld repairs. Recent research results confirm that repair flaws are complex in composition and may include cracks on the repair ends. Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. PNNL has previously obtained the complete construction records for two RPVs. Analysis of these records show a significant change in repair frequency.

  18. Emergency disconnect means for the manipulator arm of a nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, F.; Morris, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    An emergency disconnect means is disclosed for uncoupling a portion of the linkage means which connects the several segments of an articulating manipulator arm employed in a nuclear reactor vessel inspection device. One of the motor housings included in the manipulator arm's segmented drive train is pivotably coupled between two segments thereof. In the event of power failure or the necessity of manual retraction of the manipulator arm from within the vessel, a lever is manually operated and moved from its normally locked position wherein the motor housing is positionally fixed to a release position wherein the motor housing and the remainder of the manipulator arm segments connected forwardly thereof are pivotally released to shorten the normal arm reach and alter the normal orientation of the manipulator arm to expedite removal without danger of collision. (auth)

  19. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. A service laboratory's view of the status and direction of reactor vessel surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in testing techniques and analysis procedures have had a minor impact to date on the conduct of reactor vessel material surveillance programs. However, major thrusts in the near future will be associated with the development of elastic-plastic fracture toughness data on irradiated materials and improvements in analysis techniques for projecting surveillance results to the pressure vessel wall. In this regard, increased emphasis will be placed on the development of R-curves from the results of J-integral tests. Also, efforts will be increased to develop a better understanding of neutron irradiation embrittlement mechanisms, to determine if a time dependency of damage can lead to saturation and to evaluate the significance of small variations in irradiation temperature on the embrittlement response

  1. Reactor pressure vessel behaviour with a small crack in the cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Churier-Bossennec, H.; Faidy, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on fracture mechanic analysis of a PWR reactor pressure vessel with a 3.5 mm embedded circumferential crack in the cladding under a small lost of cooling accident transient. Different RTNDT level and effect of irradiation on material properties are considered. The study compares simplified one-dimensional and two-dimensional elastic approach and complete elastoplastic approach using J-parameter. The results show: good correlation between the different elastic approaches, important conservatism of the elastic approach compared to elastoplastic approach, no influence of irradiated material properties. The behavior of a vessel with this type of crack is acceptable for RTNDT less than 135 deg and safety injection temperature of 60 deg

  2. Parametric study of the WWER reactor containment vessel sprinkling system efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishak, J.; Liptakova, M.

    1982-01-01

    To obtain the time dependency of pressure and temperature within the WWER-1000 reactor containment vessel or in the WWER-440 bubbling system after a LOCA, the sprinkling system efficiency data of heat removal from the space within the containment vessel is needed. With this purpose SPRAY C.C. computer code has been used which allows to calculatethe process of spherical water droplets heating and vapor condensation on their surface during free and independent falling in the post-accident containment atmosphere. The droplet diameter, the falling height, the initial droplet temperature and post-accident atmosphere state have been considered as independent variables. The calculation results showe the sprinkling system efficiency to be strongly dependent on the droplet radius and tne falling height in the atmosphere. At a constant vapor mass content in the mixture the effeciency is considerably reduced with the cooled atmosphere temperature decrease [ru

  3. TU Electric reactor physics model verification: Power reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingham, C.E.; Killgore, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Power reactor benchmark calculations using the advanced code package CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 have been performed for six cycles of Prairie Island Unit 1. The reload fuel designs for the selected cycles included gadolinia as a burnable absorber, natural uranium axial blankets and increased water-to-fuel ratio. The calculated results for both startup reactor physics tests (boron endpoints, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients) and full power depletion results were compared to measured plant data. These comparisons show that the TU Electric reactor physics models accurately predict important measured parameters for power reactors

  4. Irradiation surveillant test of High Flux Engineering Test Reactor (HFETR) pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Weisen; Cui Yonghai

    1991-08-01

    The result of irradiation surveillant test of HFETR pressure vessel is presented. It shows that after 3.3 x 10 20 n/cm 2 irradiation the irradiation brittleness effect in welding seam (ws) is smaller than in heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the irradiation brittleness effect in HAZ is smaller than in base material (BM). From the view point of irradiation brittleness, under present operation conditions of the HFETR, the safety margin of plasticity and toughness in the WS, BM and HAZ is sufficient within the design life of the reactor

  5. Positioning calibration apparatus for transducers employed in nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a calibration apparatus suitable for verifying the position and orientation of transducers used in reactor vessel ultrasonic inspection. The apparatus includes moveable mounting means which secures a transducer within the tank in its normal inspection orientation. A drive is also provided for moving the transducer in the tank relative to a target. The target is slidably positioned in the tank at a distance from the transducer which is selected to avoid the distortion effects in the near field of the transducer. The drive mechanism may be provided with graduated indicia of travel, or a scale may be affixed to the side of the tank. (L.L.)

  6. Improvement of remote control system of automatic ultrasonic equipment for inspection of reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H. K.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, K. M.; Hyung, H.; Sim, C. M.; Gong, U. S.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, J. P.; Rhoo, H. C.; Kim, M. S.; Ryoo, S. K.; Choi, C. H.; Oh, K. I

    1999-12-01

    One of the important issues related to the nuclear safety is in-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel (RPV). A remote controlled automatic ultrasonic method is applied to the inspection. At present the automatic ultrasonic inspection system owned by KAERI is interrupted due to degradation of parts. In order to resume field inspection new remote control system for the equipment was designed and installed to the existing equipment. New ultrasonic sensors and their modules for RPV inspection were designed and fabricated in accordance with the new requirements of the inspection codes. Ultrasonic sensors were verified for the use in the RPV inspection. (autho0008.

  7. Advanced nondestructive examination of the reactor vessel head penetration tube welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanovic, M.; Zado, V.

    1996-01-01

    Beside a referent code examination requirements, appearance of the service induced flaws on the Reactor Vessel Head (RVH) penetration tube welds forced development of remotely operated examination tools and techniques. Several systems were developed for examination of RVH PWR type while only one system for examination of VVER - 440 type RVH has been developed by Inetec. In this article the most advanced RVH VVER - 440 type examination techniques such as ultrasonic, eddy current and visual testing techniques as well as remotely operated tool are described. (author)

  8. Light water reactor - pressure-vessel neutron spectrometry with solid state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorders have been used to measure absolute fission rates in the Light Water Reactor - Pressure Vessel Simulator at the Oak Ridge Pool Critical Assembly. Measurements were made in the 12/13 configuration with 237 Np, 238 U, and 235 U at the TSF, TSB, PVF, 1/4 T, 1/2 T, and 3/4 T locations. To avoid relative power normalization uncertainties, all locations were measured simultaneously in a single run for each isotope. Comparison of SSTR results are made with the results of measurements performed by NBS and CEN/SCK using benchmark referenced fission chambers and with the trends of theoretical calculations

  9. Users manual data base MATSURV. Reactor pressure vessel material surveillance data management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-02-01

    This Users Guide to the data management system MATSURV has been prepared to assist the user in all facets of the task of processing data related to reactor pressure vessel materials surveillance; preparation of raw data for input, input of data, modification of existing data, retrieval and display of data, and the creation of data reports. MATSURV is structured upon the System 2000 data base management system which is maintained on the IBM 370/168 computer at National Institutes of Health. An overview of System 2000 is provided

  10. Analysis of the integrity of the pressure vessel of the BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Luna, O.

    1982-01-01

    The presssure vessel of a BWR type reactor was monitored for cracking during alternating events of its in-service life. The monitoring was to determine criticality of fractures catastrophic fractures and the velocity of fracture propagation. Detected cracks were evaluated as specified in ASME code section XI, of a minimum wall thickness of 2.5% crack growths were compared a) of 1/10 of the critical maximum size and b) at in-service inspection intervals according to ASME recommendations to be established at the Laguna Verde nuclear plant. Finally conclusions are made and discussed. (author)

  11. Remote through-wall sampling of the Trawsfynydd reactor pressure vessel: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, A.; Clayton, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarises the application of robotic equipment for gaining access to and removing through-wall samples from welds of the reactor pressure vessel at Trawsfynydd power station. The environment, which presents hazards due to ionising radiation, radioactive contamination and asbestos bearing materials is described. The means of access, by use of remote vehicles complete with robotic manipulators supported by additional vehicles, is reviewed. The use of Abrasive Water Jet Cutting for sample removal is introduced. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this technique are discussed. (Author)

  12. Application of directional solidification ingot (LSD) in forging of PWR reactor vessel heads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhamou, C.; Poitrault, I.

    1985-09-01

    Creusot-Loire Industrie uses this type of ingot for manufacture of Framatome 1300 and 1450 MW 4-loop PWR reactor vessel heads. This type of ingot offers a number advantages: improved internal soundness; greater chemical, structural and mechanical homogeneity of the finished part; simplified forging process. After a brief description of the pouring and solidification processes, this paper presents an analysis of the results of examinations performed on the prototype forging, as well as review of results obtained during industrial fabrication of dished heads from LSD ingots. The advantages of the LSD ingot over conventional ingots are discussed in conclusion

  13. Magnetic non-destructive evaluation of hardening of cold rolled reactor pressure vessel steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejiao; Qiang, Wenjiang; Shu, Guogang

    2017-08-01

    Non-destructive test (NDT) of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel is urgently required due to the life extension program of nuclear power plant. Here magnetic NDT of cold rolled RPV steel is studied. The strength, hardness and coercivity increase with the increasing deformation, and a good linear correlation between the increment of coercivity, hardness and yield strength is found, which may be helpful to develop magnetic NDT of degradation of RPV steel. It is also found that besides dislocation density, the distribution of dislocations may affect coercivity as well.

  14. Special servicing equipment for reactor pressurized vessel stud hole and stud accessories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianglian

    1999-01-01

    The author briefly introduces the design and manufacture of nuclear island special servicing equipment of Nuclear Power Institute of China. Maintenance process of reactor pressurized vessel (RPV) stud hold and stud accessories the special servicing equipment include RPV flange dummy, closed-circuit television (CCTV) inspection equipment, RPV stud hole expandable comb, RPV stud hole polisher, RPV stud hold thread lubricating equipment, RPV stud hole thread miller and RPV stud hole camera. It is presented how eight kinds of special servicing equipment perform the maintenance process concerning their function, structure, and characteristics, their practical use on site is also introduced

  15. Cutting Technology for Decommissioning of the Reactor Pressure Vessels in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Kim, Geun Ho; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Byung Seon

    2012-01-01

    Lots of nuclear power plants have been decommissioned during the last 2 decades. An essential part of this work is the dismantling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel and its Internals. For this purpose a wide variety of different cutting technologies have been developed, adapted and applied. A detailed introduction to Plasma Arc cutting, Contact Arc Metal cutting and Abrasive Water Suspension Jet cutting is given, as it turned out that these cutting technologies are particularly suitable for these type of segmentation work. A comparison of these technologies including gaseous emissions, cutting power, manipulator requirements as well as selected design approaches are given. Process limits as well as actual limits of application are presented

  16. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness for Yong Gwang unit 5 reactor pressure vessel materials (Baseline Tests)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Se Hwan; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Sun Chil; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    The dynamic fracture toughness (K{sub d}) of intermediate shell and its weld in SA 508 CI. 3 Yong Gwang 5 reactor pressure vessel was determined and evaluated. Precracked thirty six Charpy specimens were tested by using an instrumented impact tester. The purpose of present work is to evaluate and confirm the un-irradiated dynamic fracture toughness and to provide pre-irradiation baseline data for future evaluation on dynamic fracture toughness change during operation. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  17. Nondestructive Magnetic Adaptive Testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.; Gillemot, F.; Székely, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 432, 1-3 (2012), s. 371-377 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : neutron irradiation * steel degradation * nuclear reactor pressure vessel * magnetic NDT * magnetic minor hysteresis loops * Magnetic Adaptive Testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2012.09.006

  18. A structural evaluation of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel for transport impact conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witte, M.C.; Chou, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, is being decommissioned and dismantled. This government-leased property will be returned, in a radiologically safe condition, to its owner. All radioactive material is being removed from the Shippingport Station and transported for burial to the DOE Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) will be transported by barge to Hanford. This paper describes an evaluation of the structural response of the RPV to the normal and accident impact test conditions as required by the Code of Federal Regulations. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Standard Guide for Use of Melt Wire Temperature Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E 706 (IIIE)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes the application of melt wire temperature monitors and their use for reactor vessel surveillance of light-water power reactors as called for in Practice E 185. 1.2 The purpose of this guide is to recommend the selection and use of the common melt wire technique where the correspondence between melting temperature and composition of different alloys is used as a passive temperature monitor. Guidelines are provided for the selection and calibration of monitor materials; design, fabrication, and assembly of monitor and container; post-irradiation examinations; interpretation of the results; and estimation of uncertainties. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (See Note 1.)

  20. Review of pressurized thermal shock studies of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, four nuclear power units were constructed more than 30 years ago; they are operating to this day. In every unit, VVER-440 V213-type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, ressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, numerous researches in the field of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs have been conducted in Hungary; in all of them, the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. During this time, four large PTS studies with industrial relevance have been completed in Hungary. Each used different objectives and guides, and the analysis methodology was also changing. This paper gives a comparative review of the methodologies used in these large PTS Structural Integrity Analysis projects, presenting the latest results as well