WorldWideScience

Sample records for model reaction studies

  1. A computational study of pyrolysis reactions of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder

    2010-01-01

    Enthalpies of reaction for the initial steps in the pyrolysis of lignin have been evaluated at the CBS-4m level of theory using fully substituted b-O-4 dilignols. Values for competing unimolecular decomposition reactions are consistent with results previously published for phenethyl phenyl ether models, but with lowered selectivity. Chain propagating reactions of free...

  2. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  3. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis D Weise

    Full Text Available This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material. Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  4. Nuclear reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ''hot'' nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ''flow'' measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study 40 Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs

  5. The PLP cofactor: lessons from studies on model reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, John P; Amyes, Tina L; Crugeiras, Juan; Rios, Ana

    2011-11-01

    Experimental probes of the acidity of weak carbon acids have been developed and used to determine the carbon acid pK(a)s of glycine, glycine derivatives and iminium ion adducts of glycine to the carbonyl group, including 5'-deoxypyridoxal (DPL). The high reactivity of the DPL-stabilized glycyl carbanion towards nucleophilic addition to both DPL and the glycine-DPL iminium ion favors the formation of Claisen condensation products at enzyme active sites. The formation of the iminium ion between glycine and DPL is accompanied by a 12-unit decrease in the pK(a) of 29 for glycine. The complicated effects of formation of glycine iminium ions to DPL and other aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and ketones on carbon acid pK(a) are discussed. These data provide insight into the contribution of the individual pyridine ring substituents to the catalytic efficiency of DPL. It is suggested that the 5'-phosphodianion group of PLP may play an important role in enzymatic catalysis of carbon deprotonation by providing up to 12 kcal/mol of binding energy that is utilized to stabilize the transition state for the enzymatic reaction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phospate Enzymology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation.

  7. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy G Gordeev

    Full Text Available A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6 performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation.

  8. Study of nickel nuclei by (p,d) and (p,t) reactions. Shell model interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong-A-Siou, D.-H.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental techniques employed at the Nuclear Science Institute (Grenoble) and at Michigan State University are described. The development of the transition amplitude calculation of the one-or two-nucleon transfer reactions is described first, after which the principle of shell model calculations is outlined. The choices of configuration space and two-body interactions are discussed. The DWBA method of analysis is studied in more detail. The effects of different approximations and the influence of the parameters are examined. Special attention is paid to the j-dependence of the form of the angular distributions, on effect not explained in the standard DWBA framework. The results are analysed and a large section is devoted to a comparative study of the experimental results obtained and those from other nuclear reactions. The spectroscopic data obtained are compared with the results of shell model calculations [fr

  9. Modeling of Reaction Calorimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to model the reaction calorimeter in order to calculate the heat of absorption which is the most important parameter in this work. Reaction calorimeter is an apparatus which is used in measuring the heat of absorption of CO2 as well as the total pressure in vapor phase based on vapor-liquid equilibrium state. Mixture of monoethanolamine (MEA) and water was used as a solvent to absorb the CO2.Project was divided in to three parts in order to make the programming...

  10. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  11. Temperature effects on multiphase reactions of organic molecular markers: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Vikram; Chen, Ying; Yao, Guangming; Nakao, Shunsuke

    2018-04-01

    Various molecular markers are used in source apportionment studies. In early studies, molecular markers were assumed to be inert. However, recent studies suggest that molecular markers can decay rapidly through multiphase reactions, which makes interpretation of marker measurements challenging. This study presents a simplified model to account for the effects of temperature and relative humidity on the lifetime of molecular markers through a shift in gas-particle partitioning as well as a change in viscosity of the condensed phase. As a model case, this study examines the stability of levoglucosan, a key marker species of biomass burning, over a wide temperature range relevant to summertime and wintertime. Despite the importance of wood combustion for space heating in winter, the lifetime of levoglucosan in wintertime is not well understood. The model predicts that in low-temperature conditions, levoglucosan predominantly remains in the particle phase, and therefore its loss due to gas-phase oxidation reactions is significantly reduced. Furthermore, the movement of the levoglucosan from the bulk of the particle to the particle surface is reduced due to low diffusivity in the semi-solid state. The simplified model developed in this study reasonably reproduces upper and lower bounds of the lifetime of levoglucosan investigated in previous studies. The model results show that the levoglucosan depletion after seven days reduces significantly from ∼98% at 25 °C to 1 week) even at 60% relative humidity irrespective of the assumed fragility parameter D that controls estimated diffusivity. The model shows that lifetime of an organic molecular marker strongly depends on assumed D especially when a semi-volatile marker is in semi-solid organic aerosol.

  12. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  13. Mechanism for cyclization reaction by clavaminic acid synthase. Insights from modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Tomasz; de Marothy, Sven; Broclawik, Ewa; Schofield, Christopher J; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2007-03-27

    The mechanism of the oxidative cyclization reaction catalyzed by clavaminic acid synthase (CAS) was studied in silico. First, a classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to obtain a realistic structure of the CAS-Fe(IV)=O-succinate-substrate complex; then potential of mean force (PMF) was calculated to assess the feasibility of the beta-lactam ring, more specifically its C4' corner, approaching the oxo atom. Based on the MD structure, a relatively large model of the active site region was selected and used in the B3LYP investigation of the reaction mechanism. The computational results suggest that once the oxoferryl species is formed, the oxidative cyclization catalyzed by CAS most likely involves either a mechanism involving C4'(S)-H bond cleavage of the monocyclic beta-lactam ring, or a biosynthetically unprecedented mechanism comprising (1) oxidation of the hydroxyl group of PCA to an O-radical, (2) retro-aldol-like decomposition of the O-radical to an aldehyde and a C-centered radical, which is stabilized by the captodative effect, (3) abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the C4'(S) position of the C-centered radical by the Fe(III)-OH species yielding an azomethine ylide, and (4) 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition to the ylide with aldehyde acting as a dipolarophile. Precedent for the new proposed mechanism comes from the reported synthesis of oxapenams via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of aldehydes and ketones.

  14. Multiresponse modelling of the caramelisation reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Quintas, Mafalda; Guimarães, Carla; Baylina, João; Brandão, Teresa R. S.; Silva, Cristina L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Multiresponse modelling is a powerful tool for studying complex kinetics of reactions occurring in food products. This modelling technique uses information of reactants and products involved, allowing insightful kinetic parameters estimation and helping in clarifying reaction mechanisms. One example of a complex reaction that occurs in food processing is the caramelisation reaction. Caramelisation is the common name for a group of reactions observed when carbohydrates are exposed to high temp...

  15. Use of shell model calculations in R-matrix studies of neutron-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    R-matrix analyses of neutron-induced reactions for many of the lightest p-shell nuclei are difficult due to a lack of distinct resonance structure in the reaction cross sections. Initial values for the required R-matrix parameters, E,sub(lambda) and γsub(lambdac) for states in the compound system, can be obtained from shell model calculations. In the present work, the results of recent shell model calculations for the lithium isotopes have been used in R-matrix analyses of 6 Li+n and 7 Li+n reactions for E sub(n) 7 Li and 8 Li on the 6 Li+n and 7 Li+n reaction mechanisms and cross sections are discussed. (author)

  16. Study of the Deformation/Interaction Model: How Interactions Increase the Reaction Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions (including weak interactions between dienophiles and dienes play an important role in the Diels-Alder reaction. To elucidate the influence of these interactions on the reactivity, a popular DFT functional and a variational DFT functional corrected with dispersion terms are used to investigate different substituent groups incorporated on the dienophiles and dienes. The bond order is used to track the trajectory of the cycloaddition reaction. The deformation/interaction model is used to obtain the interaction energy from the reactant complex to the inflection point until reaching the saddle point. The interaction energy initially increases with a decrease in the interatomic distance, reaching a maximum value, but then decreases when the dienophiles and dienes come closer. Reduced density gradient and chemical energy component analysis are used to analyse the interaction. Traditional transition state theory and variational transition state theory are used to obtain the reaction rates. The influence of tunneling on the reaction rate is also discussed.

  17. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  18. Experimental study and numerical modelling of geochemical reactions occurring during uranium in situ recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Simon, R.

    2011-09-01

    The in situ Recovery (ISR) method consists of ore mining by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. ISR takes place underground and is therefore limited to the analysis of the pumped solutions, hence ISR mine management is still empirical. Numerical modelling has been considered to achieve more efficient management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account for numerical simulations of uranium ISR mining: (1) geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) hydrodynamic transport with respect to the reaction kinetics. Leaching tests have been conducted on ore samples from an uranium mine in Tortkuduk (Kazakhstan) where ISR is conducted by acid leaching. Two types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow through columns. The assumptions deduced from the leaching tests were tested and validated by modelling the laboratory experiments with the numerical codes CHESS and HYTEC, both developed at the Geosciences research center of Mines ParisTech. A well-constrained 1D hydrogeochemical transport model of the ISR process at laboratory-scale was proposed. It enables to translate the chemical release sequence that is observed during experiments into a geochemical reaction sequence. It was possible to highlight the controlling factors of uranium dissolution, and the precipitation of secondary mineral phase in the deposit, as well as the determination of the relative importance of these factors. (author)

  19. SOA formation from partitioning and heterogeneous reactions: model study in the presence of inorganic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myoseon; Czoschke, Nadine M; Northcross, Amanda L; Cao, Gang; Shaof, David

    2006-05-01

    A predictive model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by both partitioning and heterogeneous reactions was developed for SOA created from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence of preexisting inorganic seed aerosols. SOA was created in a 2 m3 polytetrafluoroethylene film indoor chamber under darkness. Extensive sets of SOA experiments were conducted varying humidity, inorganic seed compositions comprising of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid, and amounts of inorganic seed mass. SOA mass was decoupled into partitioning (OM(P)) and heterogeneous aerosol production (OM(H)). The reaction rate constant for OM(H) production was subdivided into three categories (fast, medium, and slow) to consider different reactivity of organic products for the particle phase heterogeneous reactions. The influence of particle acidity on reaction rates was treated in a previous semiempirical model. Model OM(H) was developed with medium and strong acidic seed aerosols, and then extrapolated to OM(H) in weak acidic conditions, which are more relevant to atmospheric aerosols. To demonstrate the effects of preexisting glyoxal derivatives (e.g., glyoxal hydrate and dimer) on OM(H), SOA was created with a seed mixture comprising of aqueous glyoxal and inorganic species. Our results show that heterogeneous SOA formation was also influenced by preexisting reactive glyoxal derivatives.

  20. Kinetic modelling of hydro-treatment reactions by study of different chemical groups; Modelisation cinetique des reactions d`hydrotraitement par regroupement en familles chimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnardot, J.

    1998-11-19

    Hydro-treatment of petroleum shortcuts permits elimination of unwanted components in order to increase combustion in engine and to decrease atmospheric pollution. Hydro-desulfurization (HDS), Hydro-denitrogenation (HDN) and Hydrogenation of aromatics (HDA) of a LCO (Light Cycle Oil)-Type gas oil have been studied using a new pilot at a fixed temperature with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A hydrodynamic study showed that reactions occurring in the up-flow fixed bed reactor that has been used during the experiments, were governed exclusively by chemical reaction rates and not by diffusion. Through detailed chemical analysis, height chemical groups have been considered: three aromatics groups, one sulfided group, one nitrogenized and NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}. Two Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type kinetic models with either one or two types of sites have been established. The model with two types of site - one site of hydrogenation and one site of hydrogenolysis - showed a better fit in the modeling of the experimental results. This model enables to forecast the influence of partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and partial pressure of H{sub 2} on hydro-treatment reactions of a LCO-type gas oil. (author) 119 refs.

  1. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions during hydrotreatment is desirable to reduce the formation of by-products such as char and gaseous components. This paper deals with the catalytic hydrotreatment of representative model components for t...

  2. Theoretical studies on thermal degradation reaction mechanism of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Li, Xinsheng; Pan, Guiying; Tong, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory methods (DFT) M062X have been used to investigate the thermal degradation processes of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate (MPC) and to identify the optimal reaction paths in the thermal decomposition of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC). The bond dissociation energies of main bonds in MPC were calculated, and it is found that the weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between the methylic carbon and carbon atom and the second weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between oxygen atom and the carbonyl carbon. On the basis of computational results of kinetic parameters, a mechanism is proposed where the hydrolysis (or alcoholysis) reaction is the main degradation pathways for the formation of the evolved products, and the homolytic cleavage and rearrangement reactions are the competitive reaction pathways in the thermal degradation of PC. The proposed mechanism is consistent with experimental observations of CO 2 , bisphenol A and 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethane as the main degradation products, together with a small amount of CO, alkyl phenol and diphenyl carbonate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An In Vitro Model for Studying Neutrophil Activation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass by Using a Polymerase Chain Reaction Thermocycler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Min; Zhao, Xiao-Gang; Gu, Y. John; Chen, Chang-Zhi

    The accurate temperature control of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) thermocycler was exploited in developing an in vitro model to study neutrophil activation during cardiopulmonary bypass. Neutrophils from 12 volunteers underwent temperature changes in a PCR thermocycler (37 degrees C for 30

  4. Modeling reaction histories to study chemical pathways in condensed phase detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Stewart, D.; Hernández, Alberto; Lee, Kibaek

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of pressure and temperature histories, which are required to understand chemical pathways in condensed phase explosives during detonation, is discussed. We argue that estimates made from continuum models, calibrated by macroscopic experiments, are essential to inform modern, atomistic-based reactive chemistry simulations at detonation pressures and temperatures. We present easy to implement methods for general equation of state and arbitrarily complex chemical reaction schemes that can be used to compute reactive flow histories for the constant volume, the energy process, and the expansion process on the Rayleigh line of a steady Chapman-Jouguet detonation. A brief review of state-of-the-art of two-component reactive flow models is given that highlights the Ignition and Growth model of Lee and Tarver [Phys. Fluids 23, 2362 (1980)] and the Wide-Ranging Equation of State model of Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. We discuss evidence from experiments and reactive molecular dynamic simulations that motivate models that have several components, instead of the two that have traditionally been used to describe the results of macroscopic detonation experiments. We present simplified examples of a formulation for a hypothetical explosive that uses simple (ideal) equation of state forms and detailed comparisons. Then, we estimate pathways computed from two-component models of real explosive materials that have been calibrated with macroscopic experiments.

  5. Modeling reaction histories to study chemical pathways in condensed phase detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott Stewart, D.; Hernández, Alberto; Lee, Kibaek

    2016-03-01

    The estimation of pressure and temperature histories, which are required to understand chemical pathways in condensed phase explosives during detonation, is discussed. We argue that estimates made from continuum models, calibrated by macroscopic experiments, are essential to inform modern, atomistic-based reactive chemistry simulations at detonation pressures and temperatures. We present easy to implement methods for general equation of state and arbitrarily complex chemical reaction schemes that can be used to compute reactive flow histories for the constant volume, the energy process, and the expansion process on the Rayleigh line of a steady Chapman-Jouguet detonation. A brief review of state-of-the-art of two-component reactive flow models is given that highlights the Ignition and Growth model of Lee and Tarver [Phys. Fluids 23, 2362 (1980)] and the Wide-Ranging Equation of State model of Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. We discuss evidence from experiments and reactive molecular dynamic simulations that motivate models that have several components, instead of the two that have traditionally been used to describe the results of macroscopic detonation experiments. We present simplified examples of a formulation for a hypothetical explosive that uses simple (ideal) equation of state forms and detailed comparisons. Then, we estimate pathways computed from two-component models of real explosive materials that have been calibrated with macroscopic experiments.

  6. Electrocatalysis in alkaline media: Mechanistic studies of fuel cell reactions on well-defined model catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spendelow, Jacob S.

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and electrochemical techniques have been used to study several electrocatalytic reactions occurring on Pt(111) and Pt(111)/Ru surfaces in alkaline media. The reactions chosen, CO oxidation, methanol oxidation, and oxygen reduction, are relevant to direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Each is relatively slow, and therefore requires high loading of precious metal catalysts to achieve sufficient fuel cell power density. The focus of these studies has been on determining mechanisms and limiting factors in each reaction. Special attention has been given to the role of adsorbed Ru and the role of Pt defects in enhancing catalytic activity. All defects were found to be more active than terraces for CO oxidation on Pt(111) in alkaline media at DMFC-relevant potentials. Step-typed defects enhance methanol dehydrogenation, but kink-type defects are inactive for this reaction. All defects are inactive for oxygen reduction. These observations can be explained in terms of the local geometric and electronic structure at defects. Adsorbate-adsorbate repulsions, with resultant effects on activation barriers, control the rates of CO oxidation, as well as methanol oxidation. In the case of CO, coverage-dependent CO-CO repulsions and OH-OH repulsions on defects both enhance kinetics. In the case of methanol, repulsive interactions with CO decrease the rate of methanol dehydrogenation, thus giving rise to the CO poisoning effect. Ru was found to promote both methanol dehydrogenation and CO oxidation on adjacent Pt sites. Ru enhances methanol dehydrogenation through two distinct ligand effects: it increases the intrinsic dehydrogenation activity of adjacent Pt sites, and it causes CO to diffuse away from these active sites, decreasing the CO poisoning effect. A Ru ligand effect also enhances CO oxidation by weakening the Pt-CO bond. Ru supplies adsorbed OH for bifunctional CO oxidation, but since Pt defects can also supply OH in alkaline media, the Ru

  7. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-28

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Bronsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa congruent with 1) as a model for excited-state HPTS( *) (pKa congruent with 1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  8. Identifiability of parameters and behaviour of MCMC chains: a case study using the reaction norm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, M M; Korsgaard, I R; Sorensen, D

    2009-04-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) enables fitting complex hierarchical models that may adequately reflect the process of data generation. Some of these models may contain more parameters than can be uniquely inferred from the distribution of the data, causing non-identifiability. The reaction norm model with unknown covariates (RNUC) is a model in which unknown environmental effects can be inferred jointly with the remaining parameters. The problem of identifiability of parameters at the level of the likelihood and the associated behaviour of MCMC chains were discussed using the RNUC as an example. It was shown theoretically that when environmental effects (covariates) are considered as random effects, estimable functions of the fixed effects, (co)variance components and genetic effects are identifiable as well as the environmental effects. When the environmental effects are treated as fixed and there are other fixed factors in the model, the contrasts involving environmental effects, the variance of environmental sensitivities (genetic slopes) and the residual variance are the only identifiable parameters. These different identifiability scenarios were generated by changing the formulation of the model and the structure of the data and the models were then implemented via MCMC. The output of MCMC sampling schemes was interpreted in the light of the theoretical findings. The erratic behaviour of the MCMC chains was shown to be associated with identifiability problems in the likelihood, despite propriety of posterior distributions, achieved by arbitrarily chosen uniform (bounded) priors. In some cases, very long chains were needed before the pattern of behaviour of the chain may signal the existence of problems. The paper serves as a warning concerning the implementation of complex models where identifiability problems can be difficult to detect a priori. We conclude that it would be good practice to experiment with a proposed model and to understand its features

  9. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  10. The effect of a number of selective points in modeling of polymerization reacting Monte Carlo method: studying the initiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sadi, M; Dabir, B

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo Method is one of the most powerful techniques to model different processes, such as polymerization reactions. By this method, without any need to solve moment equations, a very detailed information on the structure and properties of polymers are obtained. The number of algorithm repetitions (selected volumes of reactor for modelling which represent the number of initial molecules) is very important in this method. In Monte Carlo method calculations are based on the random number of generations and reaction probability determinations. so the number of algorithm repetition is very important. In this paper, the initiation reaction was considered alone and the importance of number of initiator molecules on the result were studied. It can be concluded that Monte Carlo method will not give accurate results if the number of molecules is not satisfied to be big enough, because in that case , selected volume would not be representative of the whole system.

  11. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  12. Kinetic Studies of Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reaction on Model Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Abdulaziz M.

    2016-04-26

    With the increasing production of natural gas as a result of the advancement in the technology, methane conversion to more valuable products has become a must. One of the most attractive processes which allow the utilization of the world’s most abundant hydrocarbon is the oxidative coupling. The main advantage of this process is the ability of converting methane into higher paraffins and olefins (primarily C2) in a direct way using a single reactor. Nevertheless, low C2+ yields have prevented the process to be commercialized despite the fact that great number of attempts to prepare catalysts were conducted so that it can be economically viable. Due to these limitations, understanding the mechanism and kinetics of the reaction can be utilized in improving the catalysts’ performance. The reaction involves the formation of methyl radicals that undergo gas-phase radical reactions. CH4 activation is believed to be done the surface oxygen species. However, recent studies showed that, in addition to the surface oxygen mediated pathway, an OH radical mediated pathway have a large contribution on the CH4 activation. The experiments of Li/MgO, Sr/La2O3 and NaWO4/SiO2 catalysts revealed variation of behavior in activity and selectivity. In addition, water effect analysis showed that Li/MgO deactivate at the presence of water due to sintering phenomena and the loss of active sites. On the other hand, negative effect on the C2 yield and CH4 conversion rate was observed with Sr/La2O3 with increasing the water partial pressure. Na2WO4/SiO2 showed a positive behavior with water in terms of CH4 conversion and C2 yield. In addition, the increment in CH4 conversion rate was found to be proportional with PO2 ¼ PH2O ½ which is consistent with the formation of OH radicals and the OH-mediated pathway. Experiments of using ring-dye laser, which is used to detect OH in combustion experiments, were tried in order to detect OH radicals in the gas-phase of the catalyst. Nevertheless

  13. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil : Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions

  14. A stochastic model of chemical equilibrium: case study of the reversible first-order reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Milan

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 136, 5-6 (1999), s. 647-661 ISSN 0001-5407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : chemical equilibrium * first-order reaction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.477, year: 1999

  15. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  16. Reaction path analysis of sodium-water reaction phenomena in support of chemical reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2011-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule to the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. The results are used as the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by JAEA toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  17. Review of statistical models for nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarasi, Sin-iti

    1991-01-01

    Statistical model calculations have been widely performed for nuclear data evaluations. These were based on the models of Hauser-Feshbach, Weisskopf-Ewing and their modifications. Since the 1940s, non-compound nuclear phenomena have been observed, and stimulated many nuclear physicists to study compound and non-compound nuclear reaction mechanisms. Concerning compound nuclear reactions, they investigated problems on the basis of fundamental properties of S-matrix, statistical distributions of resonance pole parameters, random matrix elements of the nuclear Hamiltonian, and so forth. They have presented many sophisticated results. But old statistical models have been still useful, because these models were simple and easily utilizable. In this report, these old and new models will be briefly reviewed with a purpose of application to nuclear data evaluation, and examine applicability of the new models. (author)

  18. An ab initio chemical reaction model for the direct simulation Monte Carlo study of non-equilibrium nitrogen flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, T K; Bhandarkar, U V; Puranik, B P

    2017-08-28

    A new ab initio based chemical model for a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) study suitable for simulating rarefied flows with a high degree of non-equilibrium is presented. To this end, Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) cross sections for N 2 +N 2 →N 2 +2N are calculated and published using a global complete active space self-consistent field-complete active space second order perturbation theory N 4 potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectory algorithm for high energy collisions (up to 30 eV). CID cross sections are calculated for only a selected set of ro-vibrational combinations of the two nitrogen molecules, and a fitting scheme based on spectroscopic weights is presented to interpolate the CID cross section for all possible ro-vibrational combinations. The new chemical model is validated by calculating equilibrium reaction rate coefficients that can be compared well with existing shock tube and computational results. High-enthalpy hypersonic nitrogen flows around a cylinder in the transition flow regime are simulated using DSMC to compare the predictions of the current ab initio based chemical model with the prevailing phenomenological model (the total collision energy model). The differences in the predictions are discussed.

  19. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Daniel; Llebot, Josep Enric; Fort, Joaquim

    2004-01-01

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations

  20. Trend to equilibrium for a reaction-diffusion system modelling reversible enzyme reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Jan

    2016-01-01

    20 pages; A spatio-temporal evolution of chemicals appearing in a reversible enzyme reaction and modelled by a four component reaction-diffusion system with the reaction terms obtained by the law of mass action is considered. The large time behaviour of the system is studied by means of entropy methods.

  1. Trend to Equilibrium for a Reaction-Diffusion System Modelling Reversible Enzyme Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaš, Ján

    2018-01-01

    A spatio-temporal evolution of chemicals appearing in a reversible enzyme reaction and modelled by a four-component reaction-diffusion system with the reaction terms obtained by the law of mass action is considered. The large time behaviour of the system is studied by means of entropy methods.

  2. Percolation-fission model study of the fragment mass distribution for the 1 GeV proton induced reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuma, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Tetsuo; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2005-01-01

    The 1 GeV proton induced reaction on 208 Pb targets is analyzed by using the percolation model combined with the Atchison fission model. The fragment mass distribution and the isotopic production cross sections obtained from our model are compared with the experimental data. The trends of the fragment mass distribution for the 1 GeV proton induced reaction can be reproduced by our calculation in some degree. The order of magnitude for the calculated isotopic production cross sections at the calculated peak positions is similar to that of the experimental peak values. The calculated peak positions of the isotopic production cross sections are shifted to the heavier region than those of the experimental data. (author)

  3. Influence of a dexamethasone-eluting covered stent on tissue reaction: an experimental study in a canine bronchial model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Choi, Gi Bok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Seo, Tae-Seok; Yuk, Soon Hong; Kim, Young-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Mee

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a dexamethasone (DXM)-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent to reduce tissue reaction following stent placement in a canine bronchial model. We placed a DXM-eluting, polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (drug stent, DS) and a polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (control stent, CS) alternately in each left main bronchus and left lower lobe bronchus in 12 dogs. The stents were 20 mm in diameter and length when fully expanded. The dose of DXM was approximately 36.7 mg in each DS, but was absent in the CS. The dogs were euthanased 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=4) or 4 weeks (n=4) after stent placement. Histologic findings, such as epithelial erosion/ulcer or granulation tissue thickness, were obtained from the mid-portion of the bronchus, where the stent had been placed, and evaluated between DS and CS. There were no procedure-related complications or malpositioning of any of the bronchial stents. Stent migration was detected in one dog just before euthanasia 1 week following stent placement. Stent patency was maintained until euthanasia in all dogs. Epithelial erosion/ulcer (%) was significantly less in the DS (mean±standard deviation, 46.88±23.75) than in the CS (73.75±14.08) (P=0.026) for all time-points. There was a decrease in epithelial erosion/ulcer as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. The granulation tissue thickness (mm) was less in DS (2.63±2.05) than in CS (3.49±2.95), although the difference was not significant (P=0.751) for all time-points. There was a tendency toward an increase in granulation tissue thickness and chronic lymphocytic infiltration as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. In conclusion, DXM-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent seems to be effective in reducing tissue reaction secondary to stent placement in a canine bronchial model. (orig.)

  4. Influence of a dexamethasone-eluting covered stent on tissue reaction: an experimental study in a canine bronchial model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Choi, Gi Bok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Suh, Ji-Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Tae-Seok [Gachon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Gil Medical Center, Inchon (Korea); Yuk, Soon Hong [Hannam University, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Daejeon (Korea); Kim, Young-Hwa [Soonchunhyang University Chonan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chonan (Korea); Cho, Yong-Mee [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a dexamethasone (DXM)-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent to reduce tissue reaction following stent placement in a canine bronchial model. We placed a DXM-eluting, polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (drug stent, DS) and a polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (control stent, CS) alternately in each left main bronchus and left lower lobe bronchus in 12 dogs. The stents were 20 mm in diameter and length when fully expanded. The dose of DXM was approximately 36.7 mg in each DS, but was absent in the CS. The dogs were euthanased 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=4) or 4 weeks (n=4) after stent placement. Histologic findings, such as epithelial erosion/ulcer or granulation tissue thickness, were obtained from the mid-portion of the bronchus, where the stent had been placed, and evaluated between DS and CS. There were no procedure-related complications or malpositioning of any of the bronchial stents. Stent migration was detected in one dog just before euthanasia 1 week following stent placement. Stent patency was maintained until euthanasia in all dogs. Epithelial erosion/ulcer (%) was significantly less in the DS (mean{+-}standard deviation, 46.88{+-}23.75) than in the CS (73.75{+-}14.08) (P=0.026) for all time-points. There was a decrease in epithelial erosion/ulcer as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. The granulation tissue thickness (mm) was less in DS (2.63{+-}2.05) than in CS (3.49{+-}2.95), although the difference was not significant (P=0.751) for all time-points. There was a tendency toward an increase in granulation tissue thickness and chronic lymphocytic infiltration as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. In conclusion, DXM-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent seems to be effective in reducing tissue reaction secondary to stent placement in a canine bronchial model. (orig.)

  5. Reactions of nitrogen oxides with heme models. Spectral and kinetic study of nitric oxide reactions with solid and solute Fe(III)(TPP)(NO3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Gulyan, Gurgen M; Martirosyan, Garik G; Lim, Mark D; Ford, Peter C

    2005-05-04

    The reaction(s) of nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) gas with sublimed layers containing the nitrato iron(III) complex Fe(III)(TPP)(eta(2)-O(2)NO) (1, TPP = meso-tetraphenyl porphyrinate(2)(-)) leads to formation of several iron porphyrin species that are ligated by various nitrogen oxides. The eventual products of these low-temperature solid-state reactions are the nitrosyl complex Fe(TPP)(NO), the nitro-nitrosyl complex Fe(TPP)(NO(2))(NO), and 1 itself, and the relative final quantities of these were functions of the NO partial pressure. It is particularly notable that isotope labeling experiments show that the nitrato product is not simply unreacted 1 but is the result of a series of transformations taking place in the layered material. Thus, the nitrato complex formed from solid Fe(TPP)(eta(2)-O(2)NO) maintained under a (15)NO atmosphere was found to be the labeled analogue Fe(TPP)(eta(2)-O(2)(15)NO). The reactivities of the layered solids are compared to the behaviors of the same species in ambient temperature solutions. To interpret the reactions of the labeled nitrogen oxides, the potential exchange reactions between N(2)O(3) and (15)NO were examined, and complete isotope scrambling was observed between these species under the reaction conditions (T = 140 K). Overall it was concluded from isotope labeling experiments that the sequence of reactions is initiated by reaction of 1 with NO to give the nitrato nitrosyl complex Fe(TPP)(eta(1)-ONO(2))(NO) (2) as an intermediate. This is followed by a reaction in the presence of excess NO that is equivalent to the loss of the nitrate radical NO(3)(*)( )()to give Fe(TPP)(NO) as another transient species. A plausible pathway involving NO attack on the coordinated nitrate of 2 resulting in the release of N(2)O(4) concerted with electron transfer to the metal center is proposed.

  6. Study of solid metal/ceramic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehan, R.L.; Jackson, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    In advanced energy systems, ceramics may allow higher operating temperatures for greater efficiency. However, compressive contacts at joints with metals are required by the poor tensile behavior of ceramics. Compression at these interfaces excludes oxygen, and oxides do not form. Reactions under inert or reducing conditions (as in metal matrix composites) have been studied, as have reactions of complex superalloys with SiC, Si/SiC and Si 3 N 4 . The reactions were complex, dictating a phenomenological study with no treatment of their basic nature or the phase equilibria. With a model alloy containing only Ni, Cr and Al, the present experiments and analyses are an attempt to gain a more basic understanding of metal/ceramic reactions

  7. Reaction Kinetics Model of Polymerization in the Absence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is on reaction kinetics models for approximating diffuse propagation reaction fronts in one-dimensional gasless combustion type models. This study is carried out in the context of free-radical frontal polymerization (FP) via a propagating, self sustaining reacting front in the absence of material diffusion. The model ...

  8. Entity models for trigger-reaction documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalid, M.A.; Marx, M.; Makkes, M.X.

    2008-01-01

    We define the notion of an entity model for a special kind of document popular on the web: an article followed by a list of reactions on that article, usually by many authors, usually inverse chronologically ordered. We call these documents trigger-reactions pairs. The entity model describes which

  9. Recovery Act: An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a Reaction Transport Model that Couples Chemical Reactions of Mineral Dissolution/Precipitation with Spatial and Temporal Flow Variations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saar, Martin O. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Seyfried, Jr., William E. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Longmire, Ellen K. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-06-24

    A total of 12 publications and 23 abstracts were produced as a result of this study. In particular, the compilation of a thermodynamic database utilizing consistent, current thermodynamic data is a major step toward accurately modeling multi-phase fluid interactions with solids. Existing databases designed for aqueous fluids did not mesh well with existing solid phase databases. Addition of a second liquid phase (CO2) magnifies the inconsistencies between aqueous and solid thermodynamic databases. Overall, the combination of high temperature and pressure lab studies (task 1), using a purpose built apparatus, and solid characterization (task 2), using XRCT and more developed technologies, allowed observation of dissolution and precipitation processes under CO2 reservoir conditions. These observations were combined with results from PIV experiments on multi-phase fluids (task 3) in typical flow path geometries. The results of the tasks 1, 2, and 3 were compiled and integrated into numerical models utilizing Lattice-Boltzmann simulations (task 4) to realistically model the physical processes and were ultimately folded into TOUGH2 code for reservoir scale modeling (task 5). Compilation of the thermodynamic database assisted comparisons to PIV experiments (Task 3) and greatly improved Lattice Boltzmann (Task 4) and TOUGH2 simulations (Task 5). PIV (Task 3) and experimental apparatus (Task 1) have identified problem areas in TOUGHREACT code. Additional lab experiments and coding work has been integrated into an improved numerical modeling code.

  10. Sodium-concrete reaction model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.H.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Postma, A.K.

    1982-07-01

    Major observations have been formulated after reviewing test results for over 100 sodium-concrete reaction tests. The observations form the basis for developing a mechanistic model to predict the transient behavior of sodium-concrete reactions. The major observations are listed. Mechanisms associated with sodium and water transport to the reaction zone are identified, and represented by appropriate mathematical expressions. The model attempts to explain large-scale, long-term (100 h) test results were sodium-concrete reactions terminated even in the presence of unreacted sodium and concrete

  11. Constraints on the α+nucleus optical-model potential via α-induced reaction studies on 108Cd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Scholz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A big part in understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei is a proper description of the effective interaction between an α-particle and a target nucleus. Information about the so-called α+nucleus optical-model potential is achieved by precise cross-section measurements at sub-Coulomb energies aiming to constrain the theoretical models for the nuclear physics input-parameters. The cross sections of the 108Cd(α,γ and 108Cd(α,n reaction have been measured for the first time close to the astrophysically relevant energy region via the in-beam method at the high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer HORUS and via the activation technique at the Cologne Clover Counting Setup at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne, Germany. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical predictions calculated in the scope of the Hauser–Feshbach statistical model confirm the need for a exponentially decreasing imaginary part of the potential. Moreover, it is shown that the results presented here together with already published data indicate that a systematic investigation of the real part of the potential could help to further improve the understanding of reactions involving α-particles.

  12. Constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion of constituent models and large transverse momentum reactions includes the structure of hard scattering models, dimensional counting rules for large transverse momentum reactions, dimensional counting and exclusive processes, the deuteron form factor, applications to inclusive reactions, predictions for meson and photon beams, the charge-cubed test for the e/sup +-/p → e/sup +-/γX asymmetry, the quasi-elastic peak in inclusive hadronic reactions, correlations, and the multiplicity bump at large transverse momentum. Also covered are the partition method for bound state calculations, proofs of dimensional counting, minimal neutralization and quark--quark scattering, the development of the constituent interchange model, and the A dependence of high transverse momentum reactions

  13. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  14. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  15. Kinetics interpretation model of isothermal martensite reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1976-01-01

    It was discussed details associated to the interpretation of kinetics of martencite heterogeneous nucleation in isothermal reactions. It was proposed a model which allows compute the variation of concentration of preferencial sites nucleation with a volumetric martencite fraction [pt

  16. Photochemical reactions of various model protocell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Models for the emergence of cellular life on the primitive Earth, and for physical environments of that era have been studied that embody these assumptions: (1) pregenetic cellular forms were phase-bounded systems primarily photosynthetic in nature, and (2) the early Earth environment was anoxic (lacking appreciable amounts of free hydrogen). It was found that organic structures can also be formed under anoxic conditions (N2, CO3=, H2O) by protracted longwavelength UV radiation. Apparently these structures form initially as organic layers upon CaCO3 crystalloids. The question remains as to whether the UV photosynthetic ability of such phase bounded structures is a curiosity, or a general property of phase bounded systems which is of direct interest to the emergence of cellular life. The question of the requirement and sailient features of a phase boundary for UV photosynthetic abilities was addressed by searching for similar general physical properties which might be manifest in a variety of other simple protocell-like structures. Since it has been shown that laboratory protocell models can effect the UV photosynthesis of low molecular weight compounds, this reaction is being used as an assay to survey other types of structures for similar UV photosynthetic reactions. Various kinds of structures surveyed are: (1) proteinoids; (2) liposomes; (3) reconstituted cell membrane spheroids; (4) coacervates; and (5) model protocells formed under anoxic conditions.

  17. DSMC Modeling of Flows with Recombination Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    Reactions S. Gimelshein, I. Wysong Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 Air Force Research...dimensional flows, modeling is usually con- ducted for Knudsen numbers Kn > 0.001, where the impact of recombination reactions is almost always minor, so...prac- tical applicability of the DSMC method. These methods have already been tested for reacting air flows.20 Today, modeling of gas flows at

  18. In vitro model to study the biomaterial-dependent reaction of macrophages in an inflammatory environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhuis, N; Vd Toom, H F E; Kops, N; Bayon, Y; Deerenberg, E B; Mulder, I M; van Osch, G J V M; Lange, J F; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y M

    2014-07-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the reaction to biomaterials, which sometimes have to be used in a surgical field at risk of contamination. The macrophage phenotype in reaction to biomaterials in an inflammatory environment was evaluated in both an in vivo and in vitro setting. In the in vivo setting, polypropylene (PP) biomaterial was implanted for 28 days in the contaminated abdominal wall of rats, and upon removal analysed by routine histology as well as immunohistochemistry for CD68 (marker for macrophages), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS - a marker for proinflammatory M1 macrophages) and CD206 (marker for anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages). For the in vitro model, human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured for 3 days on biomaterials made from PP, collagen (COL), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and PET coated with collagen (PET+COL). These experiments were performed both with and without lipopolysaccharide and interferon γ stimulation. Secretion of both M1- and M2-related proteins was measured, and a relative M1/M2 index was calculated. In vivo, iNOS- and CD206-positive cells were found around the fibres of the implanted PP biomaterial. In vitro, macrophages on both PP and COL biomaterial had a relatively low M1/M2 index. Macrophages on the PET biomaterial had a high M1/M2 index, with the highest increase of M1 cytokines in an inflammatory environment. Macrophages on the PET+COL biomaterial also had a high M1/M2 index. Macrophages in an inflammatory environment in vitro still react in a biomaterial-dependent manner. This model can help to select biomaterials that are tolerated best in a surgical environment at risk of contamination. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  20. A study of the predictive model on the user reaction time using the information amount and similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sungjin; Heo, Gyunyoung; Chang, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    Human operations through a user interface are divided into two types. The one is the single operation that is performed on a static interface. The other is the sequential operation that achieves a goal by handling several displays through operator's navigation in the crt-based console. Sequential operation has similar meaning with continuous task. Most operations in recently developed computer applications correspond to the sequential operation, and the single operation can be considered as a part of the sequential operation. In the area of HCI (human computer interaction) evaluation, the Hick-Hyman law counts as the most powerful theory. The most important factor in the equation of Hick-Hyman law about choice reaction time is the quantified amount of information conveyed by a statement, stimulus, or event. Generally, we can expect that if there are some similarities between a series of interfaces, human operator is able to use his attention resource effectively. That is the performance of human operator is increased by the similarity. The similarity may be able to affect the allocation of attention resource based on separate STSS (short-term sensory store) and long-term memory. There are theories related with this concept, which are task switching paradigm and the law of practice. However, it is not easy to explain the human operator performance with only the similarity or the information amount. There are few theories to explain the performance with the combination of the similarity and the information amount. The objective of this paper is to purpose and validate the quantitative and predictive model on the user reaction time in CRT-based displays. Another objective is to validate various theories related with human cognition and perception, which are Hick-Hyman law and the law of practice as representative theories. (author)

  1. Circumnutation modeled by reaction-diffusion equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubkin, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    In studies of biological oscillators, plants are only rarely examined. The authors study a common sub-diurnal oscillation of plants, called circumnutation. Based on experimental evidence that the oscillations consist of a turgor wave traveling around a growing plant part, circumnutation is modeled by a nonlinear reaction-diffusion system with cylindrical geometry. Because of its simplicity, and because biological oscillations are so common, an oscillatory [lambda]-[omega] reaction-diffusion system is chosen for the model. The authors study behavior of traveling waves in [lambda]-[omega] systems. The authors show the existence of Hopf bifurcations and the stability of the limit cycles born at the Hopf bifurcation for some parameter values. Using a Lindstedt-type perturbation scheme, the authors construct periodic solutions of the [lambda]-[omega] system near a Hopf bifurcation and show that the periodic solutions superimposed on the original traveling wave have the effect of altering its overall frequency and amplitude. Circumnutating plants generally display a strong directional preference to their oscillations, which is species-dependent. Circumnutation is modeled by a [lambda]-[omega] system on an annulus of variable width, which does not possess reflection symmetry about any axis. The annulus represents a region of high potassium concentration in the cross-section of the stem. The asymmetry of the annulus represents the anatomical asymmetry of the plant. Traveling waves are constructed on this variable-width annulus by a perturbation scheme, and perturbing the width of the annulus alters the amplitude and frequency of traveling waves on the domain by a small (order [epsilon][sup 2]) amount. The speed, frequency, and stability are unaffected by the direction of travel of the wave on the annulus. This indicates that the [lambda]-[omega] system on a variable-width domain cannot account for directional preferences of traveling waves in biological systems.

  2. Fundamental study on reaction of lead-bismuth eutectic and sodium. Identification of reaction products and examination of reaction behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Yasushi

    2003-09-01

    A simplified secondary sodium cooling system utilizing lead-bismuth eutectic as an intermediate coolant has been selected as one of candidate systems for the 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Reactor System'. In this study, fundamental reaction experiments have been performed to understand a reaction behavior between sodium and lead-bismuth. In order to identify the reaction products and to elucidate a reaction process, sampling and X-ray diffraction analysis of the reaction products are carried out. Following results are obtained. (1) The principal reaction products which formed in sodium and lead-bismuth ternary system are BiNa 3 and Pb 4 Na 15 intermetallic compounds. These two reaction products are identified irrespective of either primary sample content or sampling temperature. (2) Pb 3 Na intermetallic compound is identified in the reaction products for the first time. (3) The principal reaction product which formed in sodium and bismuth binary system is BiNa 3 intermetallic compound. (4) The reaction products which formed in sodium and lead binary system consist of various intermetallic compounds of sodium and lead system. Single phase of an intermetallic compound can not be obtained in this system. Based on these X-ray diffraction analyses, reaction process models of formation and dissolution are proposed. (author)

  3. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider different boundary conditions and transitions movements.We derive expressions that describe diffusion behaviors constrained to bulk restrictions and the dynamic of the particles.Finally it is important to mention that the theoretical results obtained from the models proposed in this work are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.We find, in general, excellent agreements between the theory and the simulations

  4. Combined crossed molecular beam and theoretical studies of the N(2D) + CH4 reaction and implications for atmospheric models of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Nadia; Bergeat, Astrid; Cartechini, Laura; Volpi, Gian Gualberto; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Skouteris, Dimitris; Rosi, Marzio

    2009-10-22

    The dynamics of the H-displacement channel in the reaction N((2)D) + CH(4) has been investigated by the crossed molecular beam (CMB) technique with mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight (TOF) analysis at five different collision energies (from 22.2 up to 65.1 kJ/mol). The CMB results have identified two distinct isomers as primary reaction products, methanimine and methylnitrene, the yield of which significantly varies with the total available energy. From the derived center-of-mass product angular and translational energy distributions the reaction micromechanisms, the product energy partitioning and the relative branching ratios of the competing reaction channels leading to the two isomers have been obtained. The interpretation of the scattering results is assisted by new ab initio electronic structure calculations of stationary points and product energetics for the CH(4)N ground state doublet potential energy surface. Differently from previous theoretical studies, both insertion and H-abstraction pathways have been found to be barrierless at all levels of theory employed in this work. A comparison between experimental results on the two isomer branching ratio and RRKM estimates, based on the new electronic structure calculations, confirms the highly nonstatistical nature of the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction, with the production of the CH(3)N isomer dominated by dynamical effects. The implications for the chemical models of the atmosphere of Titan are discussed.

  5. Two-nucleon transfer reactions with form factor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1980-04-01

    The theory of two-nucleon transfer reactions is considered. Nuclear reactions are considered with triton or 3 He particles which are used as projectiles in stripping reactions and as detected particles in pick-up reactions. In each channel we have a four-particle problem, three of them are nucleons and the fourth is a heavy particle. These transfer reactions are studied on the basis of the generaled R-matrix method. Different channel functions of the sub-clusters in the triton and 3 He particles are included. Model form factors are obtained and are used in two-nucleon transfer reactions. Differential cross-sections of different two-nucleon transfer reactions are calculated and are found in good agreement with the experimental data. The correct normalization and spectroscopic factors are obtained. (author)

  6. Investigation and Modelling of Diesel Hydrotreating Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Rasmus Risum

    This project consists of a series of studies, that are related to hydrotreating of diesel. Hy- drotreating is an important refinery process, in which the oil stream is upgraded to meet the required environmental specifications and physical properties. Although hydrotreating is a ma- ture technology...... it has received increased attention within the last decade due to tightened legislations regarding the sulfur content, e.g. the demand for Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) with a maximum sulfur content of as low as 10 ppm S has increased. The process is complex, as the performance of a hydrotreating...... due to a stronger adsorption on hydrogenation sites. Since feeds used in the hydrotreating process, usually gas-oils, are complex mixtures with a large number of compounds, analysis of the reactions of individual compounds can be difficult. In this work a model-diesel feed consisting of 13 different...

  7. Thermodynamically Feasible Kinetic Models of Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ederer, Michael; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of biological reaction networks are strongly constrained by thermodynamics. An holistic understanding of their behavior and regulation requires mathematical models that observe these constraints. However, kinetic models may easily violate the constraints imposed by the principle of detailed balance, if no special care is taken. Detailed balance demands that in thermodynamic equilibrium all fluxes vanish. We introduce a thermodynamic-kinetic modeling (TKM) formalism that adapts th...

  8. Nonlinear control of the Salnikov model reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores different nonlinear control schemes, applied to a simple model reaction. The model is the Salnikov model, consisting of two ordinary differential equations. The control strategies investigated are I/O-linearisation, Exact linearisation, exact linearisation combined with LQR...... and Control Lyapunov Functions (CLF's). The results show that based on the lowest possible cost function and shortest settling time, the exact linearisation performs marginally better than the other methods....

  9. QGSM development for spallation reactions modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudima K.K.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in spallation neutron sources, accelerator-driven systems, R&D of rare isotope beams, and development of external beam radiation therapy necessitated the improvement of nuclear reaction models for both stand-alone codes for the analysis of nuclear reactions and event generators within the Monte Carlo transport systems for calculations of interactions of high-energy particles with matter in a wide range of energy and in arbitrary 3D geometry of multicomponent targets. The exclusive approach to the description of nuclear reactions is the most effective for detailed calculation of inelastic interactions with atomic nuclei. It provides the correct description of particle production, single- and double-differential spectra, recoil, and fission product yields. This approach has been realized in the Quark Gluon String Model (QGSM for nuclear reactions induced by photons, hadrons, and high energy heavy ions. In this article, improved versions of the QGSM model and a corresponding code have been developed tested and bench marked against experimental data for neutron production in spallation reactions on thin and thick targets in the energy range from a few MeV to several GeV/nucleon.

  10. QGSM development for spallation reactions modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baznat, M. I.; Chigrinov, S. E.; Gudima, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    The growing interest in spallation neutron sources, accelerator-driven systems, R&D of rare isotope beams, and development of external beam radiation therapy necessitated the improvement of nuclear reaction models for both stand-alone codes for the analysis of nuclear reactions and event generators within the Monte Carlo transport systems for calculations of interactions of high-energy particles with matter in a wide range of energy and in arbitrary 3D geometry of multicomponent targets. The exclusive approach to the description of nuclear reactions is the most effective for detailed calculation of inelastic interactions with atomic nuclei. It provides the correct description of particle production, single- and double-differential spectra, recoil, and fission product yields. This approach has been realized in the Quark Gluon String Model (QGSM) for nuclear reactions induced by photons, hadrons, and high energy heavy ions. In this article, improved versions of the QGSM model and a corresponding code have been developed tested and bench marked against experimental data for neutron production in spallation reactions on thin and thick targets in the energy range from a few MeV to several GeV/nucleon.

  11. Reading and a diffusion model analysis of reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed.

  12. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  13. Multicriterial evaluation of spallation reaction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, A.A.; Gritsyuk, S.V.; Korovin, Yu.A.; Kuptsov, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    Results of evaluation of predicting ability of spallation reaction models as applied to high-energy protons interaction based on methods of discrete decision analysis are presented. It is shown that results obtained using different methods are well consistent. Recommendations are given on the use of discrete decision analysis methods for providing constants to be employed in calculations of future nuclear power facility [ru

  14. Quantitative DFT modeling of product concentration in organometallic reactions: Cu-mediated pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jover, Jesús

    2017-11-08

    DFT calculations are widely used for computing properties, reaction mechanisms and energy profiles in organometallic reactions. A qualitative agreement between the experimental and the calculated results seems to usually be enough to validate a computational methodology but recent advances in computation indicate that a nearly quantitative agreement should be possible if an appropriate DFT study is carried out. Final percent product concentrations, often reported as yields, are by far the most commonly reported properties in experimental metal-mediated synthesis studies but reported DFT studies have not focused on predicting absolute product amounts. The recently reported stoichiometric pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chlorides (R-C 6 H 4 COCl) with [(phen)Cu(PPh 3 )C 2 F 5 ] (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, PPh 3 = triphenylphosphine) has been used as a case study to check whether the experimental product concentrations can be reproduced by any of the most popular DFT approaches with high enough accuracy. To this end, the Gibbs energy profile for the pentafluoroethylation of benzoic acid chloride has been computed using 14 different DFT methods. These computed Gibbs energy profiles have been employed to build kinetic models predicting the final product concentration in solution. The best results are obtained with the D3-dispersion corrected B3LYP functional, which has been successfully used afterwards to model the reaction outcomes of other simple (R = o-Me, p-Me, p-Cl, p-F, etc.) benzoic acid chlorides. The product concentrations of more complex reaction networks in which more than one position of the substrate may be activated by the copper catalyst (R = o-Br and p-I) are also predicted appropriately.

  15. Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol (aqSOA) Formation By Radical Reactions: Model Studies Comparing the Role of OH Versus Organic Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Reed Harris, A.; Vaida, V.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical reactions in the aqueous phase are thought to significantly contribute to ambient aerosol mass under specific conditions. Results from many laboratory studies suggest that these reactions are efficiently initiated by the OH radical and lead to high molecular weight compounds (oligomers). Recent laboratory experiments have shown that methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) can form oligomers in high yield in aqueous solutions similar to aerosol water. Additional experiments have shown that the direct photolysis of pyruvic acid can generate organic radicals that initiate similar oligomer products upon oxidation of MVK (Renard et al., submitted). Sources of the OH radical in the aerosol aqueous phase include the direct uptake from the gas phase, Fenton reactions and, to a smaller extent, direct photolyses of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate. Recent model studies imply that under many conditions, aqSOA formation might be oxidant-limited since these OH(aq) sources are not sufficient to provide a continuous OH supply. This limitation can be (partially) removed if additional radical sources in the multiphase system are considered. Exemplary, we include the direct photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid as a proxy for possible other radical sources. Model results will be shown and consequences for aqSOA formation and processing under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  16. A sistematical study of spallation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foshina, M.

    1982-01-01

    A four-parameter semi-empirical formulae is proposed to calculate photo-spallation cross sections. This formulae is deduced starting from a nuclear model considered as a particle mixture without differences among them and the spallation phenomenous is considered as sucessive nucleon emission ruled by determined probability law. The formulae parameters are obtained from photo-spallation yields experimentally determined and available in literature. A variation study of the values of different parameters with the mass number of the 'seed' nucleus and incident energy is made. A parallel study for the spallation reactions induced by protons of a sampling of 720 data is also presented. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Kinetic Study on Peptide-Bound Pyrraline Formation and Elimination in the Maillard Reaction Using Single- and Multiple-Response Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhili; Li, Lin; Qi, Haiping; Zhang, Zhenbo Xu Xia; Li, Bing

    2016-10-01

    Pyrraline, an advanced glycation end product (AGE), is related to some chronic diseases and can be employed as an indicator for heat damage in food processing. In this study, the impact of changing the reactant concentration and ratio on the kinetic parameters describing peptide-bound pyrraline (pep-pyr) formation and elimination was evaluated in the Lys-Gly/glucose model systems, with microwave heating treatment ranging from 120 to 200 °C. The maximum pep-pyr concentration increased as follows: 200 °C ˂ 180 °C ˂ 160 °C ˂ 120 °C ˂ 140 °C. First, the pep-pyr formation and elimination was modeled by using a single-response modelling. The formation rate constant (k F ) of pep-pyr was independent of the initial concentration of the reactants and ratios. However, the elimination rate constant of pep-pyr (k E ) increased with increasing reactant concentrations. Second, a multiresponse modelling was performed to illustrate the pathways of pep-pyr formation and elimination. Two adapted models can fit to the experimental data with the goodness-of-fit ranging from 0.663 to 0.920. Glucose-to-fructose isomerization rather than glucose-to-mannose epimerization was detected in an equimolar model system and the model system with an excess of any of the reactants. The caramelization reaction was negligible in the equimolar systems and the model systems with an excess of peptide. The reaction rate constant of glucose-to-fructose isomerization was independent of the initial reactant ratios. It was more difficult for pep-pyr elimination in the model system with an excess of peptide than that in the other 2 model systems (the equimolar system and the system with an excess of glucose), whereas a reverse result in pep-pyr formation was obtained. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software - RWDMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The RWDMES is a tool for modeling the disturbances imparted on spacecraft by spinning reaction wheels. Reaction wheels are usually the largest disturbance source on a precision pointing spacecraft, and can be the dominating source of pointing error. Accurate knowledge of the disturbance environment is critical to accurate prediction of the pointing performance. In the past, it has been difficult to extract an accurate wheel disturbance model since the forcing mechanisms are difficult to model physically, and the forcing amplitudes are filtered by the dynamics of the reaction wheel. RWDMES captures the wheel-induced disturbances using a hybrid physical/empirical model that is extracted directly from measured forcing data. The empirical models capture the tonal forces that occur at harmonics of the spin rate, and the broadband forces that arise from random effects. The empirical forcing functions are filtered by a physical model of the wheel structure that includes spin-rate-dependent moments (gyroscopic terms). The resulting hybrid model creates a highly accurate prediction of wheel-induced forces. It accounts for variation in disturbance frequency, as well as the shifts in structural amplification by the whirl modes, as the spin rate changes. This software provides a point-and-click environment for producing accurate models with minimal user effort. Where conventional approaches may take weeks to produce a model of variable quality, RWDMES can create a demonstrably high accuracy model in two hours. The software consists of a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to specify all analysis parameters, to evaluate analysis results and to iteratively refine the model. Underlying algorithms automatically extract disturbance harmonics, initialize and tune harmonic models, and initialize and tune broadband noise models. The component steps are described in the RWDMES user s guide and include: converting time domain data to waterfall PSDs (power spectral

  19. Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reactions--Insights into the Particle Model and the Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on an interview study of 18 Grade 10-12 students' model-based reasoning of a chemical reaction: the reaction of magnesium and oxygen at the submicro level. It has been proposed that chemical reactions can be conceptualised using two models: (i) the "particle model," in which a reaction is regarded as the simple…

  20. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Heum; Min, Byong Hun [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    A small sodium-concrete reaction facility was designed, manufactured and installed. this facility has been operated under inert gas(N{sub 2}) with different experimental variables such as sodium injection temperature, injection amount of sodium, aging period of concrete, sodium reservoir temperature. As a result, it was found that sodium injection temperature and injected amount of sodium has little effect on sodium-concrete reaction. However, sodium reservoir temperature and aging period of concrete has relatively high impact on sodium-concrete reaction. Sodium-concrete reaction model has also been developed and compared with experimental results. (Author) 51 refs., 16 tabs., 64 figs.

  1. Modeling study of the anti-knock tendency of substituted phenols as additives: an application of the reaction mechanism generator (RMG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yee, Nathan W; Filip, Sorin V; Hetrick, Casey E; Yang, Bin; Green, William H

    2018-01-10

    This work presents kinetic modeling efforts to evaluate the anti-knock tendency of several substituted phenols if used as gasoline additives. They are p-cresol, m-cresol, o-cresol, 2,4-xylenol, 2-ethylphenol, and guaiacol. A detailed kinetic model was constructed to predict the ignition of blends of the phenols in n-butane with the help of reaction mechanism generator (RMG), an open-source software package. The resulting model, which has 1465 species and 27 428 reactions, was validated against literature n-butane ignition data in the low-to-intermediate temperature range. To rank the anti-knock tendency of the additives, engine-like simulations were performed in a closed adiabatic homogenous batch reactor with a volume history derived from the pressure profile of a real research octane number (RON) engine test. The ignition timings of the additive blends were compared to that of primary reference fuels (PRFs) to quantitatively predict the anti-knock ability. The model predictions agree well with experimental determinations of the changes in RON induced by the additives. This study explains the chemical mechanism by which methyl-substituted phenols increase RON, and demonstrates how fundamental chemical kinetics can be used to evaluate practical fuel additive performance.

  2. Explore the reaction mechanism of the Maillard reaction: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge-Rui; Zhao, Li-Jiang; Sun, Qiang; Xie, Hu-Jun; Lei, Qun-Fang; Fang, Wen-Jun

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of Maillard reaction has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution. The Maillard reaction is a cascade of consecutive and parallel reaction. In the present model system study, glucose and glycine were taken as the initial reactants. On the basis of previous experimental results, the mechanisms of Maillard reaction have been proposed, and the possibility for the formation of different compounds have been evaluated through calculating the relative energy changes for different steps of reaction under different pH conditions. Our calculations reveal that the TS3 in Amadori rearrangement reaction is the rate-determining step of Maillard reaction with the activation barriers of about 66.7 and 68.8 kcal mol(-1) in the gaseous phase and aqueous solution, respectively. The calculation results are in good agreement with previous studies and could provide insights into the reaction mechanism of Maillard reaction, since experimental evaluation of the role of intermediates in the Maillard reaction is quite complicated.

  3. Physical organic studies of organometallic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, Robert G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of reactions of organotransition metal complexes have only begun to be understood in detail during the last ten years. The complementary interaction of techniques and concepts developed earlier in studies of organic reaction mechanisms, with those commonly used in inorganic chetnistry, has played a crucial role in helping to elucidate organor.1etall.ic reaction mechanisms. A few systems in which this interaction has proved especially fruitful are discussed in this article.

  4. Analytical Study of Thermonuclear Reaction Probability Integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry, M. A.; Haubold, H. J.; Mathai, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    An analytic study of the reaction probability integrals corresponding to the various forms of the slowly varying cross-section factor $S(E)$ is attempted. Exact expressions for reaction probability integrals are expressed in terms of the extended gamma functions.

  5. Spallation reactions studied with 4-detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in the study of spallation reactions in basic nuclear physics as well as in potential applications. Spallation reactions induced by light projectiles (protons, antiprotons, pions, etc.) in the GeV range allow the formation of hot nuclei which do not suffer the collective excitations ...

  6. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    applications of isotopic substitution for studying reaction mechanisms and dynamic structures. Suggested Reading. • B K Carpenter. Determination of Organic Reaction Mechanisms. John. Wiley. New York, 1984. • F A Carey and R J Sundberg. Advanced Organic Chemistry. Part A. 3rd. Ed. Plenum Press. New York, 1990.

  7. Semi-exclusive study of the reaction 40Ar + 197Au at 35 MeV/u. Comparison with a participant-spectator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harasse, J.M.

    1986-07-01

    The Ar+Au reaction has been studied at the GANIL accelerator at 35 MeV per nucleon. Target like nuclei and complete and incomplete fusion residues were detected by a time of flight telescope composed of solid detectors. Fission products were detected in coincidence, one of them by the time of flight telescope and the second one in a position sensitive parallel plate avalanche counter. Forward emitted light nuclei were detected (in the angular range 3 0 -30 0 ) in coincidence either with a heavy residue or with two fission products by a multidetector constituted of 96 thin scintillator sheets allowing charge identification. The main results are the following: the residue velocity spectrum increases monotonically toward small velocities: the incomplete fusion bump still present in the residue velocity spectrum of the same reaction at 27 MeV/A has desappeared; the fission products angular correlation exhibits two peaks of similar amplitudes: the first one is linked to peripheral interactions, the second one to incomplete fusion. The heavy residues characteristics (mass, angle, velocity) are compatible with the predictions of a participant spectator model including reabsorption in the target of some of the participant nucleons (Bondorf model). However, the comparison between the experimental and predicted light particle velocity spectra allows to exclude the existence of an autonous participant zone. 29 refs [fr

  8. Uncertainty quantification for quantum chemical models of complex reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, Jonny; Husch, Tamara; Simm, Gregor N; Reiher, Markus

    2016-12-22

    For the quantitative understanding of complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is, in general, necessary to accurately determine the corresponding free energy surface and to solve the resulting continuous-time reaction rate equations for a continuous state space. For a general (complex) reaction network, it is computationally hard to fulfill these two requirements. However, it is possible to approximately address these challenges in a physically consistent way. On the one hand, it may be sufficient to consider approximate free energies if a reliable uncertainty measure can be provided. On the other hand, a highly resolved time evolution may not be necessary to still determine quantitative fluxes in a reaction network if one is interested in specific time scales. In this paper, we present discrete-time kinetic simulations in discrete state space taking free energy uncertainties into account. The method builds upon thermo-chemical data obtained from electronic structure calculations in a condensed-phase model. Our kinetic approach supports the analysis of general reaction networks spanning multiple time scales, which is here demonstrated for the example of the formose reaction. An important application of our approach is the detection of regions in a reaction network which require further investigation, given the uncertainties introduced by both approximate electronic structure methods and kinetic models. Such cases can then be studied in greater detail with more sophisticated first-principles calculations and kinetic simulations.

  9. Experimental Studies of quasi-fission reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, B.B.

    1989-01-01

    A large number of recent experimental studies have shown that a substantial fraction of the total reaction cross section in heavy-ion reactions is found in fission-like processes, which do not result from the fission decay of a completely fused system. Following the suggestion of Swiatecki such processes, which represents a complete relaxation of the relative kinetic energy and a substantial amount of net mass transfer between the two fragments, are denoted quasi-fission reactions. They are distinct from compound fission reactions by bypassing the stage of a completely fused system. This typically means that they are associated with short reaction times, which results in several measurable characteristics such as broken forward-backward symmetries, large anisotropies of the angular distributions and increased widths of the fragment mass distributions. The distinction between quasi-fission and deep inelastic reactions is less stringent and has the character of a gradual evolution from one reaction type to the other, as found also as quasi-elastic reaction evolves into deeply inelastic processes as a function of the total kinetic energy loss. In the present paper some of the experimental data characterizing quasi-fission reactions are reviewed and discussed. (author)

  10. Identifiability of parameters and behaviour of the MCMC chains: a case study using the reaction norm model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shariati, M M; Korsgaard, I R; Sorensen, D

    2009-01-01

    as an example. It was shown theoretically that when environmental effects (covariates) are considered as random effects, estimable functions of the fixed effects, (co)variance components and genetic effects are identifiable as well as the environmental effects. When the environmental effects are treated...... model with unknown covariates (RNUC) is a model in which unknown environmental effects can be inferred jointly with the remaining parameters. The problem of identifiability of parameters at the level of the likelihood and the associated behaviour of MCMC chains were discussed using the RNUC...

  11. Reaction-diffusion models of decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    A contaminant, which also contains a polymer is in the form of droplets on a solid surface. It is to be removed by the action of a decontaminant, which is applied in aqueous solution. The contaminant is only sparingly soluble in water, so the reaction mechanism is that it slowly dissolves...... in the aqueous solution and then is oxidized by the decontaminant. The polymer is insoluble in water, and so builds up near the interface, where its presence can impede the transport of contaminant. In these circumstances, Dstl wish to have mathematical models that give an understanding of the process, and can...

  12. Modelling of simultaneous mass and heat transfer with chemical reaction using the Maxwell-Stefan theory II. Non-isothermal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Krishna, R.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    In Part I a general applicable model has been developed which calculates mass and heat transfer fluxes through a vapour/gas-liquid interface in case a reversible chemical reaction with associated heat effect takes place in the liquid phase. In this model the Maxwell-Stefan theory has been used to

  13. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparison of DSMC Reaction Models with QCT Reaction Rates for Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-17

    include area code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Comparison of DSMC Reaction Models with QCT Reaction Rates ...controls vibration coupling A is adjusted to match thermal reaction rate Simplest to implement, not tied to any other model Distribution A: Approved for...General trend: reaction rate increases with v • TCE, QK: lack of vibrational favoring results in much lower slope as compared to the benchmark QCT • VFD: φ

  15. Nuclear reaction studies using inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reaction studies with reversed kinematics refer to studies of nuclear reactions induced by a heavy projectile colliding with lighter target nuclei. The technique of using reversed kinematics is costly in terms of the available center-of-mass energy. Most of the projectile's energy goes into forward motion of the reaction products in the laboratory system. Examples are presented where the use of reversed kinematics techniques has provided new information on certain reaction processes. A list of kinematic properties and advantages they may afford is shown. Clearly the possible studies listed can be done without using reversed kinematics but because of the difficulty associated with some of these studies they were never performed until more energetic heavier beams have become available and the reversed kinematics technique was utilized

  16. Experimental and modeling study of high performance direct carbon solid oxide fuel cell with in situ catalytic steam-carbon gasification reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haoran; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Houcheng; Tan, Peng; Yang, Guangming; Irvine, John T. S.; Ni, Meng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, 2D models for direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (DC-SOFCs) with in situ catalytic steam-carbon gasification reaction are developed. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data. The performance of DC-SOFCs with and without catalyst are compared at different operating potential, anode inlet gas flow rate and operating temperature. It is found that adding suitable catalyst can significantly speed up the in situ steam-carbon gasification reaction and improve the performance of DC-SOFC with H2O as gasification agent. The potential of syngas and electricity co-generation from the fuel cell is also evaluated, where the composition of H2 and CO in syngas can be adjusted by controlling the anode inlet gas flow rate. In addition, the performance DC-SOFCs and the percentage of fuel in the outlet gas are both increased with increasing operating temperature. At a reduced temperature (below 800 °C), good performance of DC-SOFC can still be obtained with in-situ catalytic carbon gasification by steam. The results of this study form a solid foundation to understand the important effect of catalyst and related operating conditions on H2O-assisted DC-SOFCs.

  17. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  18. Challenges in modelling the reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, S T; Goumans, T P M; Herbst, E; Jones, A P; Slater, B

    2014-09-21

    Studies aiming to understand the physicochemical properties of interstellar dust and the chemical reactions that occur on and in it have traditionally been the preserve of astronomical observation and experimental attempts to mimic astronomically relevant conditions in the laboratory. Increasingly, computational modelling in its various guises is establishing a complementary third pillar of support to this endeavour by providing detailed insights into the complexities of interstellar dust chemistry. Inherently, the basis of computational modelling is to be found in the details (e.g. atomic structure/composition, reaction barriers) that are difficult to probe accurately from observation and experiment. This bottom-up atom-based theoretical approach, often itself based on deeper quantum mechanical principles, although extremely powerful, also has limitations when systems become too large or complex. In this Perspective, after first providing a general background to the current state of observational-based knowledge, we introduce a number of computational modelling methods with reference to recent state-of-the-art studies, in order to highlight the capabilities of such approaches in this field. Specifically, we first outline the use of computational chemistry methods for dust nucleation, structure, and individual reactions on bare and icy dust surfaces. Later, we review kinetic modelling of networks of reactions relevant to dust chemistry and how to take into account quantum tunnelling effects in the low temperature reactions in the interstellar medium. Finally, we point to the future challenges that need to be overcome for computational modelling to provide even more detailed and encompassing perspectives on the nature and reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

  19. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model: Chemisorption of CO2 into NaOH solution, numerical and experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Henket, R.L.B.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes simulations that were performed with an Euler–Lagrange model that takes into account mass transfer and chemical reaction reported by Darmana et al. (2005. Detailed modelling of hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model.

  20. [Improvement of municipal sewage sludge dewaterability by bioleaching: a pilot-scale study with a continuous plug flow reaction model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen-Wu; Zhou, Li-Xiang; Zhou, Jun; Jiang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    A plug-flow bio-reactor of 700 L working volume for sludge bioleaching was used in this study. The reactor was operationally divided into six sections along the direction of the sludge movement. Ten duration of continuous operation of sludge bioleaching with Acidibacillus spp. and 1.2 m3 x h(-1) aeration amount was conducted. In this system, sludge retention time was 2.5 d, and the added amount of microbial nutritional substance was 4 g x L(-1). During sludge bioleaching, the dynamic changes of pH, dewaterability (specific resistance to filtration, SRF) of sewage sludge in different sections, the moisture content and moisture evaporation rate of dewatered bioleached sludge cake obtained by chamber filter press were investigated. The results showed that the SRF of sludge significantly decreased from initial 1.50 x 10(13) m x kg(-1) to the final 0.34 x 10(13) m x kg(-1). The wasted bioleached sludge was collected and dewatered by chamber filter press under the following pressures as 0.3 MPa for 4 h (2 h for feeding sludge, 2 h for holding pressure), 3 h (1.5 h for feeding sludge, 1.5 h for holding pressure), 2 h (1 h for feeding sludge, 1 h for holding pressure), and 1 h (0.5 h for feeding sludge, 0.5 h for holding pressure). Correspondingly, the moisture of dewatered sludge was reduced to 57.9%, 59.2%, 59.6%, and 63.4% of initial moisture, respectively. Moreover, the moisture content of bioleached sludge cake was reduced to about 45% and less than 10% if the cake was placed at 25 degrees C for 15 h and 96 h, respectively. Obviously, sludge bioleaching followed by sludge dewatering using chamber filter press is a promising attractive approach for sludge half-dryness treatment in engineering application.

  1. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  2. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, G.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  3. Kinetic modelling of the Maillard reaction between proteins and sugars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Maillard reaction, sugar isomerisation, kinetics, multiresponse modelling, brown colour formation, lysine damage, mutagenicity, casein, monosaccharides, disaccharides, aldoses, ketoses

    The aim of this thesis was to determine the kinetics of the Maillard reaction between

  4. A Multiple Reaction Modelling Framework for Microbial Electrochemical Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolutola Oyetunde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the theoretical evaluation of microbial electrochemical technologies (METs is presented that incorporates a detailed physico-chemical framework, includes multiple reactions (both at the electrodes and in the bulk phase and involves a variety of microbial functional groups. The model is applied to two theoretical case studies: (i A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC for continuous anodic volatile fatty acids (VFA oxidation and cathodic VFA reduction to alcohols, for which the theoretical system response to changes in applied voltage and VFA feed ratio (anode-to-cathode as well as membrane type are investigated. This case involves multiple parallel electrode reactions in both anode and cathode compartments; (ii A microbial fuel cell (MFC for cathodic perchlorate reduction, in which the theoretical impact of feed flow rates and concentrations on the overall system performance are investigated. This case involves multiple electrode reactions in series in the cathode compartment. The model structure captures interactions between important system variables based on first principles and provides a platform for the dynamic description of METs involving electrode reactions both in parallel and in series and in both MFC and MEC configurations. Such a theoretical modelling approach, largely based on first principles, appears promising in the development and testing of MET control and optimization strategies.

  5. The study on the pH behavior of the HFSC leached solution. The development of model considering the pozzolanic reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yasushi; Mihara, Morihiro

    2005-09-01

    The development of low alkalinity cement (high fly-ash contained silica-fume cement, HFSC) has been carried out in JNC. Low alkalinity for this cement is achieved by adding pozzolan materials to ordinary portland cement and Ca ion attributed to high alkalinity is consumed by forming CHS gel. This report shows the calculation model to predict the composition for HFSC reacted solution which considers cement mineral dissolution/precipitation as equilibrium reactions and dissolution for pozzolan material as a kinetic reaction. The dissolution kinetic equation for pozzolan material is also derived from leaching experiment. This calculation model is applied to the leaching experiment where powdered HFSC was reacted with distilled water. As a result of comparison between calculation and experimental measurement at the early stage for leaching the tendency for pH, pH decrease from 12.5 to 11.5 drastically, could be interpreted by this calculation model, however, after this drastic pH decreasing pH predicted by calculation model also shows drastic decrease whereas pH for experiment decreased mildly around pH 11.5. It could be thought that this difference between experiment and calculation is caused by inappropriate modelling for CSH gel dissolution/precipitation of C/S value lower than 1.0. For this C/S range thermodynamic data for intermediate and end member for solid solution for CSH gel and in addition the reaction kinetic for CSH gel should be examined in detail. (author)

  6. Theoretical Study of Sodium-Water Surface Reaction Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR).

  7. Theoretical study of sodium-water surface reaction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Shin; Kurihara, Akikazu; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kenro

    2012-01-01

    Computational study of the sodium-water reaction at the gas (water) - liquid (sodium) interface has been carried out using the ab initio (first-principle) method. A possible reaction channel has been identified for the stepwise OH bond dissociations of a single water molecule. The energetics including the binding energy of a water molecule on the sodium surface, the activation energies of the bond cleavages, and the reaction energies, have been evaluated, and the rate constants of the first and second OH bond-breakings have been compared. It was found that the estimated rate constant of the former was much larger than the latter. The results are the basis for constructing the chemical reaction model used in a multi-dimensional sodium-water reaction code, SERAPHIM, being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) toward the safety assessment of the steam generator (SG) in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). (author)

  8. A study on sodium-concrete reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae, Jae Huem; Min, Byung Hoon; Lee, Joon Sik; Lee, Choong Hui; Chung, Ki Hong; Keum, Choong Ki [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Sodium is commonly used as a coolant in liquid metal reactor. A large amount of its leakage may be possible in hypothetical accidents, even though the possibility is very low. In case that the leaked hot sodium comes in direct contact with structural concrete of liquid metal reactor, the reactor`s integrity can be challenged by the rupture of structure materials, hydrogen generation and its explosion, and release of radioactive aerosols due to sodium-concrete reaction. The knowledge of sodium-concrete reaction is evaluated to be one of the important and indispensable technologies for the establishment of safety measure in liquid metal reactor. In this study, the experimental facility of sodium-concrete reaction is to be designed, constructed and operated. And the reaction phenomena of sodium-concrete reaction is also to be analyzed through the experimental results. The aim of this study is to establish the measure of safety and protection for sodium-related facilities and to secure one of the fundamental technologies of liquid metal reactor safety. 47 refs., 7 figs., 13 tab.

  9. Importance of the surface reaction OH + Cl− on sea salt aerosol for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of the hydroxyl radical with chloride on the surface of sea salt aerosol producing gas phase Cl2 and particulate OH− and its implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer under coastal, remote, and very remote conditions have been investigated with a numerical model. This reaction had been suggested by Laskin et al. (2003 to play a major role in the sulfur cycle in the marine boundary layer by increasing the sulfate production in sea salt by O3 oxidation due to the additional production of alkalinity in the particle. Based on literature data a new "best estimate" for the rate coefficient of the reaction was deduced and applied, showing that the additional initial sulfate production by this reaction is less than 1%, therefore having only a minor impact on sulfate production. Even though the gas phase concentration of Cl2 increased strongly in the model, the concentration of Cl radicals increased by less than 5% for the "best guess" case. Additional feedbacks between the cycles of chlorine and sulfur in the marine boundary layer are discussed as well as a two-stage acidification of large fresh sea salt aerosol.

  10. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero Huguet, J.

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  11. Testing and validation of numerical models of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions in fractured granites: A quantitative study of the hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero Huguet, J.

    2001-06-01

    This work deals with numerical modeling of groundwater flow, solute transport and chemical reactions through fractured media. These models have been developed within the framework of research activities founded by ENRESA , the Spanish Company for Nuclear Waste Management. This project is the result of a collaborative agreement between ENRESA and his equivalent Swedish Company (SKB) through the research project Task Force 5 of the Aspo Underground Laboratory. One of the objectives of this project is to assess quantitatively th hydrogeological and hydrochemical impact produced by the construction of a Deep Geological Repository in fractured granites. This is important because the new conditions altered construction impact will constitute the initial conditions for the repository closure stage. A second goo l of this work deals with testing the ability of current numerical tools to cope simultaneously with the complex hydrogeological and hydrochemical settlings, which are expected to take place in actual nuclear waste underground repositories constructed in crystalline fractured bed racks. This study has been undertaken through the performance of numerical models, which have subsequently been applied to simulate the hydrogeological and hydrochemical behavior of a granite massif, at a kilo metrical scale, during construction of the Aspo Hard Rock Underground Laboratory (Sweden). The Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory is a prototype, full-scale underground facility launched and operated by SKB. The main aim of the laboratory is to provide an opportunity for research, development and demonstration in a realistic rock environment down to the depth planned for the future deep repository. The framework of this underground facility provides a unique opportunity to attempt the objectives of the present dissertation. (Author)

  12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction. Mechanisms. 3. Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar are members of the Organic. Chemistry faculty in. Indian Institute of. Science at Bangalore. The previous articles of this series were: 1. Isotopes as markers, May. 1997. 2. Primary kinetic isotope effect.

  13. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Distinguishing between Single Minima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 29-37 ...

  14. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Isotopes as Markers. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 23-28. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms - Distinguishing between Single Mimima and Rapidly Equilibrating Structures. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1315-1323 ...

  16. Disturbances in reaction wheels; from measurement to modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M.P.; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria; Seiler, R; van Put, P.; Cottaar, E.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in reaction wheels have been long a crucial aspect for many scientific observation missions. An accurate and reliable disturbance model to understand and evaluate the influence of reaction wheel disturbances to the spacecraft is critically needed. Several reaction wheel disturbance

  17. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict and Invent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segler, Marwin H S; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-02

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows organic chemists to solve synthetic problems and invent novel transformations. Herein, we propose a model that mimics chemical reasoning, and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180 000 randomly selected binary reactions. The data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-)discovering novel transformations (even including transition metal-catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph and because each single reaction prediction is typically achieved in a sub-second time frame, the model can be used as a high-throughput generator of reaction hypotheses for reaction discovery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel mechanical noise is one of the largest sources of disturbance forcing on space-based observatories. Such noise arises from mass imbalance, bearing...

  19. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel disturbances are some of the largest sources of noise on sensitive telescopes. Such wheel-induced mechanical noises are not well characterized....

  20. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  1. Forced thermal cycling of catalytic reactions: experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of catalytic reactions subjected to fast forced temperature oscillations have revealed a rate enhancement increasing with temperature oscillation frequency. We present detailed studies of the rate enhancement up to frequencies of 2.5 Hz. A maximum in the rate enhancement is observed...... at about 1 Hz. A model for the rate enhancement that includes the surface kinetics and the dynamic partial pressure variations in the reactor is introduced. The model predicts a levelling off of the rate enhancement with frequency at about 1 Hz. The experimentally observed decrease above 1 Hz is explained...

  2. Is the Gas-phase OH+H2CO Reaction a Source of HCO in Interstellar Cold Dark Clouds? A Kinetic, Dynamic, and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, A. J.; Jiménez, E.; Ballesteros, B.; Canosa, A.; Antiñolo, M.; Albaladejo, J.; Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Zanchet, A.; del Mazo, P.; Roncero, O.; Aguado, A.

    2017-11-01

    The chemical kinetics of neutral-neutral gas-phase reactions at ultralow temperatures is a fascinating research subject with important implications on the chemistry of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium (T ˜ 10-100 K). Scarce kinetic information is currently available for these kinds of reactions at T values greatly increase from 2.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 at 107 K to 1.2 × 10-10 cm3 s-1 at 22 K. This is also confirmed by quasi-classical trajectories (QCT) at collision energies down to 0.1 meV performed using a new full dimension and ab initio potential energy surface that generates highly accurate potential and includes long-range dipole-dipole interactions. QCT calculations indicate that at low temperatures HCO is the exclusive product for the OH+H2CO reaction. In order to revisit the chemistry of HCO in cold dense clouds, k is reasonably extrapolated from the experimental results at 10 K (2.6 × 10-10 cm3 s-1). The modeled abundances of HCO are in agreement with the observations in cold dark clouds for an evolving time of 105-106 yr. The different sources of production of HCO are presented and the uncertainties in the chemical networks are discussed. The present reaction is shown to account for a few percent of the total HCO production rate. This reaction can be expected to be a competitive process in the chemistry of prestellar cores. Extensions to photodissociation regions and diffuse cloud environments are also addressed.

  3. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  4. What factors affect the regioselectivity of oxidation by cytochrome p450? A DFT study of allylic hydroxylation and double bond epoxidation in a model reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Sam P; Ogliaro, François; Sharma, Pankaz K; Shaik, Sason

    2002-10-02

    Epoxidation (C=C) vis-à-vis allylic hydroxylation (C-H) reactions of propene with a model compound I (Cpd I) of the enzyme cytochrome P450 were studied using B3LYP density functional theory. Potential energy profiles and kinetic isotope effects (KIE) were calculated. The interactions in the protein pocket were mimicked by adding two external NH- - -S hydrogen bonds to the thiolate ligand and by introducing a nonpolar medium (with a dielectric constant, epsilon = 5.7) that can exert a polarization effect on the reacting species. A two-state reactivity (TSR) with high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states were located for both processes (Ogliaro, F.; Harris, N.; Cohen, S.; Filatov, M.; de Visser, S. P.; Shaik, S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 8977-8989. de Visser, S. P.; Ogilaro, F.; Harris, N.; Shaik, S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3037-3047). The HS processes were found to be stepwise, whereas the LS processes were characterized as nonsynchronous but effectively concerted pathways. The computed KIE for C-H hydroxylation with and without tunneling corrections are large (>7), and they support the assignment of the corresponding transition states as hydrogen-abstraction species (Groves, J. T.; Han, Y.-Z. In Cytochrome P450: Structures, Mechanism and Biochemistry, 2nd ed.; Ortiz de Montellano, P. R., Ed.; Plenum Press: New York, 1995; Chapter 1; pp 3-48). In the gas phase, epoxidation is energetically favorable by 3.4 kcal mol(-1). Inclusion of zero-point energy reduces this difference but still predicts C=C/C-H > 1. Environmental effects were found to have major impact on the C=C/C-H ratio as well as on the stereoselectivity of the processes. Thus, two NH- - -S hydrogen bonds away from the reaction center reverse the regioselectivity and prefer hydroxylation, namely, C=C/C-H J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 12892-12893; Ogliaro, F.; de Visser, S. P.; Cohen, S.; Kaneti, J.; Shaik, S. Chembiochem. 2001, 2, 848-851; Ogliaro, F.; de Visser, S. P.; Groves, J. T.; Shaik, S. Angew

  5. Study of the fission process of 200Pb and 197Tl produced in fusion reactions with the modified statistical model and multidimensional dynamical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2015-09-01

    The fission probability, pre-scission neutron, proton and alpha multiplicities, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution and the fission time have been calculated for the compound nuclei 200Pb and 197Tl based on the modified statistical model and four-dimensional dynamical model. In dynamical calculations, dissipation was generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. The projection of the total spin of the compound nucleus to the symmetry axis, K, was considered as the fourth-dimension in Langevin dynamical calculations. In our dynamical calculations, we have used a constant dissipation coefficient of K, {γ }K=0.077{({{MeV}} {{zs}})}-{1/2}, and a non-constant dissipation coefficient to reproduce the above-mentioned experimental data. Comparison of the theoretical results of the fission probability and pre-scission particle multiplicities with the experimental data showed that the difference between the results of both dynamical models is small whereas, for the anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, it is slightly large. Furthermore, comparison of the results of the modified statistical model with the above-mentioned experimental data showed that with choosing appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential, λ , and the scaling factor of the fission-barrier height, {r}s, the experimental data were satisfactorily reproduced.

  6. Theoretical studies of the dynamics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, A.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Recent research effort has focussed on several reactions pertinent to combustion. The formation of the formyl radical from atomic hydrogen and carbon monoxide, recombination of alkyl radicals and halo-alkyl radicals with halogen atoms, and the thermal dissociation of hydrogen cyanide and acetylene have been studied by modeling. In addition, the inelastic collisions of NCO with helium have been investigated.

  7. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    would help us optimize reaction conditions to effect higher yields, minimize reaction times, etc. The transformation ... effect of the isotope on the reaction rate. In the following. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar .... to the reaction, the rate of isotope exchange was unaltered, but the rate of racemization (of the reactant) became ...

  8. Improvement on reaction model for sodium-water reaction jet code and application analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itooka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoshinori; Okabe, Ayao; Fujimata, Kazuhiro; Murata, Shuuichi

    2000-03-01

    In selecting the reasonable DBL on steam generator (SG), it is necessary to improve analytical method for estimating the sodium temperature on failure propagation due to overheating. Improvement on sodium-water reaction (SWR) jet code (LEAP-JET ver.1.30) and application analysis to the water injection tests for confirmation of code propriety were performed. On the improvement of the code, a gas-liquid interface area density model was introduced to develop a chemical reaction model with a little dependence on calculation mesh size. The test calculation using the improved code (LEAP-JET ver.1.40) were carried out with conditions of the SWAT-3·Run-19 test and an actual scale SG. It is confirmed that the SWR jet behavior on the results and the influence to analysis result of a model are reasonable. For the application analysis to the water injection tests, water injection behavior and SWR jet behavior analyses on the new SWAT-1 (SWAT-1R) and SWAT-3 (SWAT-3R) tests were performed using the LEAP-BLOW code and the LEAP-JET code. In the application analysis of the LEAP-BLOW code, parameter survey study was performed. As the results, the condition of the injection nozzle diameter needed to simulate the water leak rate was confirmed. In the application analysis of the LEAP-JET code, temperature behavior of the SWR jet was investigated. (author)

  9. Effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification with eddy dissipation concept - Sub-grid scale reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhui; Yin, Weijie; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Cheng; Li, Jiuru; Qin, Bai; Yu, Guangbin

    2016-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is used for gas turbulence, and eddy dissipation concept (EDC)-sub-grid scale (SGS) reaction model is employed for reactions in small eddies. The simulated gas molar fractions are in better agreement with experimental data with EDC-SGS reaction model. The effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification is emphatically analyzed with EDC-SGS reaction model. The distributions of the SGS reaction rates which represent the reactions in small eddies with particles concentration and temperature are analyzed. The distributions of SGS reaction rates have the similar trend with those of total reactions rates and the values account for about 15% of the total reactions rates. The heterogeneous reaction rates with EDC-SGS reaction model are also improved during the biomass gasification process in bubbling fluidized bed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Developed Hybrid Model for Propylene Polymerisation at Optimum Reaction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A statistical model combined with CFD (computational fluid dynamic method was used to explain the detailed phenomena of the process parameters, and a series of experiments were carried out for propylene polymerisation by varying the feed gas composition, reaction initiation temperature, and system pressure, in a fluidised bed catalytic reactor. The propylene polymerisation rate per pass was considered the response to the analysis. Response surface methodology (RSM, with a full factorial central composite experimental design, was applied to develop the model. In this study, analysis of variance (ANOVA indicated an acceptable value for the coefficient of determination and a suitable estimation of a second-order regression model. For better justification, results were also described through a three-dimensional (3D response surface and a related two-dimensional (2D contour plot. These 3D and 2D response analyses provided significant and easy to understand findings on the effect of all the considered process variables on expected findings. To diagnose the model adequacy, the mathematical relationship between the process variables and the extent of polymer conversion was established through the combination of CFD with statistical tools. All the tests showed that the model is an excellent fit with the experimental validation. The maximum extent of polymer conversion per pass was 5.98% at the set time period and with consistent catalyst and co-catalyst feed rates. The optimum conditions for maximum polymerisation was found at reaction temperature (RT 75 °C, system pressure (SP 25 bar, and 75% monomer concentration (MC. The hydrogen percentage was kept fixed at all times. The coefficient of correlation for reaction temperature, system pressure, and monomer concentration ratio, was found to be 0.932. Thus, the experimental results and model predicted values were a reliable fit at optimum process conditions. Detailed and adaptable CFD results were capable

  11. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  12. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  13. The 01+ et 21+ states of 42Ar and 42Ca in the pairing model studied with the (t,p) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warde, Elias.

    1975-01-01

    The differential cross sections of the 40 Ar(t,p) 42 Ar and 40 Ca(t,p) 42 Ca reactions have been measured at 3.3MeV for the ground state and the first 2 + state in 42 Ar and 42 Ca. The shapes of the angular distributions are in satisfactory agreement with the assumption of a direct transfer. The model of Bayman and Hintz for the even-even calcium isotopes is consistent with the relative intensities for the ground state transitions, suggesting similar configurations of the transferred pair in 42 Ar and 42 Ca. The cross sections for the corresponding 2 + states disagree with the model and therefore indicate a different structure of the 2 + states in 42 Ar and 42 Ca [fr

  14. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25 o C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases. (author)

  15. Reaction-diffusion modeling of hydrogen in beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Mirko; Matveev, Dmitry; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium will be used as first-wall material for the future fusion reactor ITER as well as in the breeding blanket of DEMO. In both cases it is important to understand the mechanisms of hydrogen retention in beryllium. In earlier experiments with beryllium low-energy binding states of hydrogen were observed by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) which are not yet well understood. Two candidates for these states are considered: beryllium-hydride phases within the bulk and surface effects. The retention of deuterium in beryllium is studied by a reaction rate approach using a coupled reaction diffusion system (CRDS)-model relying on ab initio data from density functional theory calculations (DFT). In this contribution we try to assess the influence of surface recombination.

  16. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobotka, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    The production of large fragments, fragments with mass between light particles and fission fragments, in intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions has fostered the proposal of a number of novel reaction mechanisms. These include liquid-vapor equilibrium and nuclear shattering. Temporarily left in the wake of these exciting proposed mechanisms was the old standard, statistical decay of compound nuclei. To be sure, the standard treatment of compound nucleus decay did not deal with large fragment production. However, this omission was not due to any fundamental deficiency of statistical models, but rather an uncertainty concerning exactly how to splice large fragment emission into statistical models. A large portion of our program deals with this problem. Specifically, by studying the yields of large fragments produced in sufficiently low energy reactions we are attempting to deduce the asymmetry and l-wave dependence of large fragment emission from compound nuclear intermediates. This, however, is only half of the problem. Since the novel mechanisms proposed for large fragment emission were spawned by intermediate and high energy reaction data, we must also realize the relevance of the compound nucleus mechanisms at high energies. It is not unreasonable to suspect that compound nucleus-like objects are formed with less than complete momentum transfer and perhaps less than complete mass transfer. Therefore the study of energy, mass, and angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion and non-compound reactions. This thread joins the apparently divergent subjects covered in this report

  17. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Catalytic Hydrogenation Reaction of Naringin-Chalcone. Study of the Electrochemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. López de Mishima

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic hydrogenation reaction of naringin derivated chalcone is studied. The reaction is carried out with different catalysts in order to compare with the classic catalytic hydrogenation.

  19. Modelling of chemical reactions in metallurgical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kinaci, M. Efe; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Iron-ore reduction has attracted much interest in the last three decades since it can be considered as a core process in steel industry. The iron-ore is reduced to iron with the use of blast furnace and fluidized bed technologies. To investigate the harsh conditions inside fluidized bed reactors, computational tools can be utilized. One such tool is the CFD-DEM method, in which the gas phase reactions and governing equations are calculated in the Eulerian (CFD) side, whereas the particle reac...

  20. Reaction pathways of the dissociation of methylal: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H.-M.; Beaud, P.; Gerber, T.; Mischler, B.; Radi, P.P.; Tzannis, A.-P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Schemata for modelling combustion processes do not yet include reaction rates for oxygenated fuels like methylal (DMM) which is considered as an additive or replacement for diesel due to its low sooting propensity. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of the possible reaction pathways for different dissociation steps of methylal are presented. Cleavage of a hydrogen bond to the methoxy group or the central carbon atom were simulated at the BLYP/6-311++G{sup **} level of theory. The results are compared to the experiment when dissociating and/or ionising DMM with femtosecond pulses. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  1. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Fierro, N.; Glodariu, T.; Grilj, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Martel, I.; Mazzocchi, C.; Molini, P.; Pakou, A.; Parascandolo, C.; Parkar, V. V.; Patronis, N.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Romoli, M.; Rusek, K.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Stroe, L.; Zerva, K.

    2015-04-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7Be on a 58Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3He and 4He. The 7Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ~3×105 pps. Results showed that the 4He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3He and 4He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3].

  2. Reaction dynamics studies for the system 7Be+58Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torresi, D; Mazzocco, M.; Fierro, N; Molini, P; Parascandolo, C; Acosta, L; Grilj, L; Martel, I; Parkar, V V; Boiano, A; La Commara, M; Pierroutsakou, D; Boiano, C; Guglielmetti, A; Diaz-Torres, A; Glodariu, T; Keeley, N; Mazzocchi, C; Pakou, A; Patronis, N

    2015-01-01

    The study of reactions induced by exotic weakly bound nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier had attracted a large interest in the last decade, since the features of these nuclei can deeply affect the reaction dynamics. The discrimination between different reaction mechanisms is, in general, a rather difficult task. It can be achieved by using detector arrays covering high solid angle and with high granularity that allow to measure the reaction products and, possibly, coincidences between them, as, for example, recently done for stable weakly bound nuclei [1, 2]. We investigated the collision of the weakly bound nucleus 7 Be on a 58 Ni target at the beam energy of 1.1 times the Coulomb barrier, measuring the elastic scattering angular distribution and the energy and angular distributions of 3 He and 4 He. The 7 Be radioactive ion beam was produced by the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL with an energy of 22 MeV and an intensity of ∼3×10 5 pps. Results showed that the 4 He yeld is about 4 times larger than 3 He yield, suggesting that reaction mechanisms other than the break-up mostly produce the He isotopes. Theoretical calculations for transfer channels and compound nucleus reactions suggest that complete fusion accounts for (41±5%) of the total reaction cross section extracted from optical model analysis of the elastic scattering data, and that 3 He and 4 He stripping are the most populated reaction channels among direct processes. Eventually estimation of incomplete fusion contributions to the 3,4 He production cross sections was performed through semi-classical calculations with the code PLATYPUS [3]. (paper)

  3. Analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemskov, E P; Kassner, K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    We consider a class of analytically solvable models of reaction-diffusion systems. An analytical treatment is possible because the nonlinear reaction term is approximated by a piecewise linear function. As particular examples we choose front and pulse solutions to illustrate the matching procedure in the one-dimensional case.

  4. Constituent rearrangement model and large transverse momentum reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yuji; Imachi, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Takeo; Otsuki, Shoichiro; Sawada, Shoji.

    1978-01-01

    In this chapter, two models based on the constituent rearrangement picture for large p sub( t) phenomena are summarized. One is the quark-junction model, and the other is the correlating quark rearrangement model. Counting rules of the models apply to both two-body reactions and hadron productions. (author)

  5. BlenX-based compositional modeling of complex reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Zámborszky

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions are wired in a fascinating way resulting in complex behavior of biological systems. Theoretical modeling provides a useful framework for understanding the dynamics and the function of such networks. The complexity of the biological networks calls for conceptual tools that manage the combinatorial explosion of the set of possible interactions. A suitable conceptual tool to attack complexity is compositionality, already successfully used in the process algebra field to model computer systems. We rely on the BlenX programming language, originated by the beta-binders process calculus, to specify and simulate high-level descriptions of biological circuits. The Gillespie's stochastic framework of BlenX requires the decomposition of phenomenological functions into basic elementary reactions. Systematic unpacking of complex reaction mechanisms into BlenX templates is shown in this study. The estimation/derivation of missing parameters and the challenges emerging from compositional model building in stochastic process algebras are discussed. A biological example on circadian clock is presented as a case study of BlenX compositionality.

  6. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose Ammonia Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2007-04-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate of formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  7. A mathematical model for the chemical reactions induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Frias, D.; Sanchez M, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Ferrous sulfate salt in acid solutions is one of the systems most extensively studied and most widely used. This dosimeter has received considerable attention because of its high sensitivity to X-rays and gamma radiation. With care this dosimetry is capable of a 0.1% precision for Co gamma rays. It is an easily available commercial product and can easily be prepared. However, our experimental results have shown that kinetics of the reaction mechanism initiated by radiolysis is strongly affected by changes in the temperature of irradiation. To evaluate energy deposited by gamma radiation on samples irradiated below room temperature is a truly difficult task. In fact, irradiating iron salts with gamma rays at different decreasing temperatures keeping constant the rest of irradiation conditions, we have observed a diminution of the rate of conversions of Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ . Several factors can contribute in order that the same absorbed dose will produce different amount of production of Fe 3+ . In the present paper, we present some experimental results of the response of ferrous sulfate in frozen solutions as a function of the irradiation temperature. The considered values were from 77 K, 198 K, 273 K, and 300 K. However this aim of e article concerns with the implementation of a theoretical model framework. This is a computational numerical simulation of the kinetics of reaction induced by radiation via radiolysis and the comparison with our experimental results which allowed the study of the effect of low temperature in such contexts. We also describe the mathematical model for the reaction kinetics as well as haw is obtained the temperature dependent yield by radiolysis tem. On the other hand it is detailed the computational approach. Finally a comparison between both experimental and theoretical results was compared in order to verify the reproducibility of our results from our theoretical model. (Author)

  8. Deuterium cluster model for low energy nuclear reactions (LENR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George; Hora, Heinrich

    2007-11-01

    For studying the possible reactions of high density deuterons on the background of a degenerate electron gas, a summary of experimental observations resulted in the possibility of reactions in pm distance and more than ksec duration similar to the K-shell electron capture [1]. The essential reason was the screening of the deuterons by a factor of 14 based on the observations. Using the bosonic properties for a cluster formation of the deuterons and a model of compound nuclear reactions [2], the measured distribution of the resulting nuclei may be explained as known from the Maruhn-Greiner theory for fission. The local maximum of the distribution at the main minimum indicates the excited states of the compound nuclei during their intermediary state. This measured local maximum may be an independent proof for the deuteron clusters at LENR. [1] H. Hora, G.H. Miley et al. Physics Letters A175, 138 (1993) [2] H. Hora and G.H. Miley, APS March Meeting 2007, Program p. 116

  9. Random incidence absorption coefficients of porous absorbers based on local and extended reaction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2011-01-01

    resistivity and the absorber thickness on the difference between the two surface reaction models are examined and discussed. For a porous absorber backed by a rigid surface, the local reaction models give errors of less than 10% if the thickness exceeds 120 mm for a flow resistivity of 5000 Nm-4s. As the flow......Room surfaces have been extensively modeled as locally reacting in room acoustic predictions although such modeling could yield significant errors under certain conditions. Therefore, this study aims to propose a guideline for adopting the local reaction assumption by comparing predicted random...... incidence acoustical characteristics of typical building elements made of porous materials assuming extended and local reaction. For each surface reaction, five well-established wave propagation models, the Delany-Bazley, Miki, Beranek, Allard-Champoux, and Biot model, are employed. Effects of the flow...

  10. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  11. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  12. A brief overview of models of nucleon-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The basic features of low to intermediate energy nucleon-induced reactions are discussed within the contexts of the optical model, the statistical model, preequilibrium and intranuclear cascade models. The calculation of cross sections and other scattering quantities are described. (author)

  13. Retrosynthetic Reaction Prediction Using Neural Sequence-to-Sequence Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bowen; Ramsundar, Bharath; Kawthekar, Prasad; Shi, Jade; Gomes, Joseph; Luu Nguyen, Quang; Ho, Stephen; Sloane, Jack; Wender, Paul; Pande, Vijay

    2017-10-25

    We describe a fully data driven model that learns to perform a retrosynthetic reaction prediction task, which is treated as a sequence-to-sequence mapping problem. The end-to-end trained model has an encoder-decoder architecture that consists of two recurrent neural networks, which has previously shown great success in solving other sequence-to-sequence prediction tasks such as machine translation. The model is trained on 50,000 experimental reaction examples from the United States patent literature, which span 10 broad reaction types that are commonly used by medicinal chemists. We find that our model performs comparably with a rule-based expert system baseline model, and also overcomes certain limitations associated with rule-based expert systems and with any machine learning approach that contains a rule-based expert system component. Our model provides an important first step toward solving the challenging problem of computational retrosynthetic analysis.

  14. Reaction between Chromium(III) and EDTA Ions: an Overlooked Mechanism of Case Study Reaction of Chemical Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerar, Janez

    2015-01-01

    Widely cited and accepted explanation of reaction mechanism of the case study reaction of chemical kinetics between Cr(III) ions and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) contradicts modern chromium(III) coordination chemistry data. Absorption UV and visible light spectra were recorded during the reaction between aqueous solution of Cr(NO(3))(3) and EDTA in order to obtain new information about this reaction. Analysis of the spectra showed that only very small fraction of intermediates may be present in solution during the course of the reaction. The reaction scheme was established and according to it calculations based on a simplified model were carried out. Literature data for constants were used if known, otherwise, adjusted values of their sound estimates were applied. Reasonable agreement of the model calculations with the experimental data was obtained for pH values 3.8 and 4.5 but the model failed to reproduce measured rate of reaction at pH 5.5, probably due to the use of the oversimplified model.

  15. Toluene pyrolysis studies and high temperature reactions of propargyl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Qin, Z. [Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The main focus of this program is to investigate the thermal decompositions of fuels that play an important role in the pre-particle soot formation process. It has been demonstrated that the condition of maximum soot yield is established when the reaction conditions of temperature and pressure are sufficient to establish a radical pool to support the production of polyaromatic hydrocarbon species and the subsequent formation of soot particles. However, elevated temperatures result in lower soot yields which are attributed to thermolyses of aromatic ring structures and result in the bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature. The authors have selected several acyclic hydrocarbons to evaluate the chemical thermodynamic and kinetic effects attendant to benzene formation. To assess the thermal stability of the aromatic ring, the authors have studied the pyrolyses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene and pyridine. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) is employed to analyze the reaction zone behind reflected shock waves. Reaction time histories of the reactants, products, and intermediates are constructed and mechanisms are formulated to model the experimental data. The TOF work is often performed with use of laser schlieren densitometry (LS) to measure density gradients resulting from the heats of various reactions involved in a particular pyrolytic system. The two techniques, TOF and LS, provide independent and complementary information about ring formation and ring rupture reactions.

  16. An interacting quantum atom study of model SN2 reactions (X-···CH3X, X = F, Cl, Br, and I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Thacker, Joseph C R; Popelier, Paul L A

    2018-04-15

    The quantum chemical topology method has been used to analyze the energetic profiles in the X -  + CH 3 X → XCH 3  + X - S N 2 reactions, with X = F, Cl, Br, and I. The evolution of the electron density properties at the BCPs along the reaction coordinate has been analysed. The interacting quantum atoms (IQA) method has been used to evaluate the intra-atomic and interatomic energy variations along the reaction path. The different energetic terms have been examined by the relative energy gradient method and the ANANKE program, which enables automatic and unbiased IQA analysis. Four of the six most important IQA energy contributions were needed to reproduce the reaction barrier common to all reactions. The four reactions considered share many common characteristics but when X = F a number of particularities occur. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cellular automaton model of coupled mass transport and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mass transport, coupled with chemical reactions, is modelled as a cellular automaton in which solute molecules perform a random walk on a lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔c and a + b →c, where we observe interesting macroscopic effects resulting from microscopic fluctuations and spatial correlations between molecules. We also simulate autocatalytic reaction schemes displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. Finally, we propose and discuss the limitations of a simple model for mineral-solute interaction. (author) 5 figs., 20 refs

  18. Combined crossed beam and theoretical studies of the N(2D) + C2H4 reaction and implications for atmospheric models of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Nadia; Skouteris, Dimitrios; Leonori, Francesca; Petrucci, Raffaele; Hamberg, Mathias; Geppert, Wolf D; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Rosi, Marzio

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of the H displacement channels in the reaction N((2)D) + C(2)H(4) have been investigated by the crossed molecular beam technique with mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at two different collision energies (17.2 and 28.2 kJ/mol). The interpretation of the scattering results is assisted by new electronic structure calculations of stationary points and product energetics for the C(2)H(4)N ground state doublet potential energy surface. RRKM statistical calculations have been performed to derive the product branching ratio under the conditions of the present experiments and of the atmosphere of Titan. Similarities and differences with respect to a recent study performed in crossed beam experiments coupled to ionization via tunable VUV synchrotron radiation are discussed (Lee, S.-H.; et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.2011, 13, 8515-8525). Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of Titan are presented.

  19. Unified studies of structure and reactions in light unstable nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM, which can treat covalent, ionic and atomic configurations in general systems with two inert cores plus valence nucleons, is formulated in the basis of the microscopic cluster model. In this model, the covalent configurations constructed by the molecular orbital (MO method and the atomic (or ionic configuration obtained by the valence bonding (VB method can be described in a consistent manner. GTCM is applied to the light neutron-rich system, 10,12Be = α + α + XN (X = 2,4, and the unified studies of the structural changes and the reaction problem are performed. In the structure study, the calculated energy levels are characterized in terms of the chemical bonding like structures, such as the covalent MO or ionic VB structures. The chemical bonding structures changes from level to level within a small energy interval. In the unbound region, the structure problem with the total system of α + α + XN and the reaction problem, induced by the collision of an asymptotic VB state of α+6,8He, are combined by GTCM. The properties of unbound resonant states are discussed in a close connection to the reaction mechanism, and some enhancement factors originated from the properties of the intrinsic states are predicted in the reaction observables. The unified calculation of the structures and the reactions is applied to the Coulomb shift problem in the mirror system, such the 10Be and 10C nuclei. The Coulomb displacement energy of the mirror systems are discussed.

  20. Pion-nucleus reactions in a microscopic transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.; Schaefer, M.; Wolf, G.

    1994-01-01

    We analyse pion-nucleus reactions in a microscopic transport model of the BUU type, which propagates nucleons, pions, deltas and N(1440) resonances explicitly in space and time. In particular we examine pion absorption and inelastic-scattering cross sections for pion kinetic energies T π =85-315 MeV and various target masses. In general, the mass dependence of the experimental data is well described for energies up to the Δ-resonance (∼160 MeV), while the absorption cross sections are somewhat overestimated for the higher energies. In addition we study the possible dynamical effects of delta and pion potentials in the medium on various observables as well as alternative models for the in-medium Δ-width. ((orig.))

  1. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-07-24

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  2. Redox models in chemistry :  A depiction of the conceptions held by secondary school students of redox reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Österlund, Lise-Lotte

    2010-01-01

    According to previous research, students show difficulties in learning redox reactions. By the historical development different redox models exist to explain redox reactions, the oxygen model, the hydrogen model, the electron model and the oxidation number model. This thesis reports about three studies concerning conceptions held by secondary school students of redox reactions. A textbook analysis is also included in the thesis. The first study was an investigation of the students’ use of red...

  3. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 2. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH ... Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH); heteropoly-tungstovanadophosphate; outer sphere electron transfer reactions.

  4. Coulomb dissociation studies for astrophysical thermonuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, T. [Dept. of Physics, Rikkyo Univ., Toshima, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    The Coulomb dissociation method was applied to several radiative capture processes of astrophysical interest. The method has an advantage of high experimental efficiency, which allow measurements with radioactive nuclear beams. The reactions {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O and {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B are mainly discussed. They are the key reaction in the hot CNO cycle in massive stars and the one closely related to the solar neutrino problem, respectively. (orig.)

  5. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.; Blankleider, B.

    1993-10-01

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  6. Recoil studies of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, H

    2002-01-01

    A review is given on the recoil studies of photonuclear reactions on complex nuclei at intermediate energies. Recoils of 167 radionuclides formed in the photonuclear reactions of sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup 9 sup 3 Nb, sup n sup a sup t Ag, sup n sup a sup t Ta, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au, induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E sub 0) from 600 to 1100 MeV, have been investigated by the thick-target thick-catcher method. The recoil velocity from the first step and the mean kinetic energy of the residual nuclei in the second step were deduced based on the two-step vector velocity model and discussed by comparing with the reported results on proton-induced reactions. Recoils of sup 2 sup 4 Na produced from sup 2 sup 7 Al, sup n sup a sup t V, sup n sup a sup t Cu, sup n sup a sup t Ag, and sup 1 sup 9 sup 7 Au are of special interest from a viewpoint of a change in the production mechanism with respect to target mass. Reaction yields of 58 and 63 radionuclides produce...

  7. Radiolytic oxidation of propane: Computer modeling of the reaction scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash K.; Hanrahan, Robert J.

    The oxidation of gaseous propane under gamma radiolysis was studied at 100 torr pressure and 25°C, at oxygen pressures from 1 to 15 torr. Major oxygen-containing products and their G-values with 10% added oxygen are as follows: acetone, 0.98; i-propyl alcohol, 0.86; propionaldehyde, 0.43; n-propyl alcohol, 0.11; acrolein, 0.14; and allyl alcohol, 0.038. Minor products include i-butyl alcohol, t-amyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol, n-amyl alcohol, and i-amyl alcohol. Small yields of i-hexyl alcohol and n-hexyl alcohol were also observed. There was no apparent difference in the G-values at pressures of 50, 100 and 150 torr. When the oxygen concentration was decreased below 5%, the yields of acetone, i-propyl alcohol, and n-propyl alcohol increased, the propionaldehyde yield decreased, and the yields of other products remained constant. The formation of major oxygen-containing products was explained on the basis that the alkyl radicals combine with molecular oxygen to give peroxyl radicals; the peroxyl radicals react with one another to give alkoxyl radicals, which in turn react with one another to form carbonyl compounds and alcohols. The reaction scheme for the formation of major products was examined using computer modeling based on a mechanism involving 28 reactions. Yields could be brought into agreement with the data within experimental error in nearly all cases.

  8. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  9. Mechanistic interpretation of glass reaction: Input to kinetic model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Ebert, W.L.; Bradley, J.P.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1991-05-01

    Actinide-doped SRL 165 type glass was reacted in J-13 groundwater at 90 degree C for times up to 278 days. The reaction was characterized by both solution and solid analyses. The glass was seen to react nonstoichiometrically with preferred leaching of alkali metals and boron. High resolution electron microscopy revealed the formation of a complex layer structure which became separated from the underlying glass as the reaction progressed. The formation of the layer and its effect on continued glass reaction are discussed with respect to the current model for glass reaction used in the EQ3/6 computer simulation. It is concluded that the layer formed after 278 days is not protective and may eventually become fractured and generate particulates that may be transported by liquid water. 5 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs

  10. Spallation reactions studied with 4 -detector arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spallation reactions induced on heavy nuclei allow the conversion of the incident GeV proton into several tens of evaporated ... wastes and/or for developing a new type of sub-critical nuclear reactor [15,16]. This has triggered new and .... With pulsed sources, time of flight techniques become pos- sible allowing the use of ...

  11. Kinetic modeling for thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs: a combined model for induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruka; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2014-04-03

    In this study, ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorph particles, α- and β-phases, with square bipyramidal and quadratic prismatic shapes, respectively, were synthesized. Thermal dehydration of the samples was subjected to kinetic study as a typical reaction that indicates a significant induction period and a sigmoidal mass-loss behavior. On the basis of the formal kinetic analysis of the mass-loss traces recorded under isothermal, nonisothermal, and constant transformation rate conditions and the morphological observations of the surface textures of the partially reacted sample particles, a combined kinetic model for the induction period-surface reaction-phase boundary reaction was developed. The sigmoidal mass-loss behavior after the significant induction period under isothermal conditions was satisfactorily simulated by the combined kinetic model. The kinetic parameters for the component processes of induction period, surface reaction, and phase boundary reaction were separately determined from the kinetic simulation. The differences in the kinetic behaviors of the induction period and the phase boundary reaction between α- and β-phase samples were well described by the kinetic parameters. The applicability of the combined kinetic model to practical systems was demonstrated through characterizing the physicogeometrical kinetics of the thermal dehydration of ferrous oxalate dihydrate polymorphs.

  12. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  13. Study of the sup 3 He( sup 4 He, gamma) sup 7 Be and sup 3 H( sup 4 He, gamma) sup 7 Li reactions in an extended two-cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Csoto, A

    2000-01-01

    The sup 3 He( sup 4 He, gamma) sup 7 Be and sup 3 H( sup 4 He, gamma) sup 7 Li reactions are studied in an extended two-cluster model which contains alpha + h/t and sup 6 Li + p/n clusterizations. We show that the inclusion of the sup 6 Li + p/n channels can significantly change the zero-energy reaction cross sections, S(0), and other properties of the sup 7 Be and sup 7 Li nuclei, like the quadrupole moments Q. However, the results agree with the known correlation trend between S(0) and Q. Moreover, we demonstrate that the value of the zero-energy derivatives of the astrophysical S-factors are more uncertain than currently believed. Refs. 24 (author)

  14. Traveling Wave Solutions in a Reaction-Diffusion Epidemic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Wenbin; Guo, Zhengguang; Wang, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the traveling wave solutions in a reaction-diffusion epidemic model. The existence of the wave solutions is derived through monotone iteration of a pair of classical upper and lower solutions. The traveling wave solutions are shown to be unique and strictly monotonic. Furthermore, we determine the critical minimal wave speed.

  15. Python framework for kinetic modeling of electronically excited reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboncoeur, John; Parsey, Guy; Guclu, Yaman; Christlieb, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The use of plasma energy to enhance and control the chemical reactions during combustion, a technology referred to as ``plasma assisted combustion'' (PAC), can result in a variety of beneficial effects: e.g. stable lean operation, pollution reduction, and wider range of p-T operating conditions. While experimental evidence abounds, theoretical understanding of PAC is at best incomplete, and numerical tools still lack in reliable predictive capabilities. In the context of a joint experimental-numerical effort at Michigan State University, we present here an open-source modular Python framework dedicated to the dynamic optimization of non-equilibrium PAC systems. Multiple sources of experimental reaction data, e.g. reaction rates, cross-sections and oscillator strengths, are used in order to quantify the effect of data uncertainty and limiting assumptions. A collisional-radiative model (CRM) is implemented to organize reactions by importance and as a potential means of measuring a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), when coupled to optical emission spectroscopy data. Finally, we explore scaling laws in PAC parameter space using a kinetic global model (KGM) accelerated with CRM optimized reaction sequences and sparse stiff integrators.

  16. Development of the Automatic Modeling System for Reaction Mechanisms Using REX+JGG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kawai, Kohei; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Ema, Yoshinori

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we developed an automatic modeling system that analyzes experimental data on the cross- sectional shapes of films deposited on substrates with nanometer- or micrometer-sized trenches. The system then identifies a suitable reaction model to describe the film deposition. The inference engine used by the system to model the reaction mechanism was designed using real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs): a generation alternation model named "just generation gap" (JGG) and a real-coded crossover named "real-coded ensemble crossover" (REX). We studied the effect of REX+JGG on the system's performance, and found that the system with REX+JGG was the most accurate and reliable at model identification among the algorithms that we studied.

  17. Cohabitation reaction-diffusion model for virus focal infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Daniel R.; Fort, Joaquim

    2014-12-01

    The propagation of virus infection fronts has been typically modeled using a set of classical (noncohabitation) reaction-diffusion equations for interacting species. However, for some single-species systems it has been recently shown that noncohabitation reaction-diffusion equations may lead to unrealistic descriptions. We argue that previous virus infection models also have this limitation, because they assume that a virion can simultaneously reproduce inside a cell and diffuse away from it. For this reason, we build a several-species cohabitation model that does not have this limitation. Furthermore, we perform a sensitivity analysis for the most relevant parameters of the model, and we compare the predicted infection speed with observed data for two different strains of the T7 virus.

  18. Study of single nucleon transfer in α + 12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, R.; Rana, T.K.; Dey, A.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Banerjee, K.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.K.; Meena, J.K.; Pai, H.; Gohil, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biswas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleon transfer reactions are of great significance for understanding the nuclear structure both for direct reaction studies as well as for production of nuclear states. Transfer reactions are simplest to interpret when either the initial and final state of the target nucleus has spin zero and when the conditions are such that the transition from the initial and final states occurs to a good approximation in a single step. In this paper, the measurement of angular momentum distribution and calculation of the spectroscopic factor for one nucleon transfer reaction in α + 12 C reaction have been reported

  19. Study of the (p,d3He) reaction as a quasi-free reaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, A.A.; Roos, P.G.; Chant, N.S.; Woody, R. III; Holmgren, H.D.; Goldberg, D.A.

    1976-11-01

    The (p,d 3 He) reaction on 6 Li, 7 Li, 9 Be, and 12 C has been investigated in conjunction with studies of the (p,pα) reaction on the same targets. Coincident data for all four targets were obtained at a bombarding energy of 100 MeV for numerous angle pairs in order to test the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of the (p,d 3 He) data to both (p,pα) data and distorted wave impulse approximation calculations (DWIA) indicate a dominance of the direct quasi-free reaction process (p + alpha yields d + 3 He). The absolute alpha-particle spectroscopic factors extracted using DWIA analysis are in agreement with the values obtained in the (p,pα) reaction

  20. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter’s L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R2) for their absorbance, Hunter’s L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter’s b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter’s b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine. PMID:28401086

  1. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R 2 ) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  2. Stochastic modeling and simulation of reaction-diffusion system with Hill function dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Fei; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Young

    2017-03-14

    Stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems presents great challenges for spatiotemporal biological modeling and simulation. One widely used framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems is reaction diffusion master equation (RDME). Previous studies have discovered that for the RDME, when discretization size approaches zero, reaction time for bimolecular reactions in high dimensional domains tends to infinity. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the 1D domain, highly nonlinear reaction dynamics given by Hill function may also have dramatic change when discretization size is smaller than a critical value. Moreover, we discuss methods to avoid this problem: smoothing over space, fixed length smoothing over space and a hybrid method. Our analysis reveals that the switch-like Hill dynamics reduces to a linear function of discretization size when the discretization size is small enough. The three proposed methods could correctly (under certain precision) simulate Hill function dynamics in the microscopic RDME system.

  3. Experimental animal model for late postradiation reaction of the colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental animal model worked out in Muenchen is discussed in which late postradiation reaction in Wistar rats following local irradiation of the colon manifests itself by appearance of colonic stenoses causing death of the animal. Clinical symptoms of this reaction together with results of histopathologic examination of the excised parts of the colon localized in the irradiated area are discussed. The relationships effect-dose obtained in this system for X radiation applying different regimen of dose fractionation and different total times of irradiation are presented. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  4. Contribution to the study of the influence of the Pauli principle and of its modelization in nuclear reactions between heavy ions: application to the reaction 7Li+α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strykowski, Ilan.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model based on the Hackenbroich approach of the R.G.M. theory which simulates the Pauli principle among clusters has been derived in the following way. The exact antisymmetrization between the nucleon belonging to a given cluster has been kept. The contribution of the exchange terms between two different clusters, which give rise to non-local potentials, has been simulated by the matrix elements of an effective local, l-dependent, energy-independent nucleon-nucleon potential. With these potentials (added to the regular n-n interaction) the low energy levels of 8 Be and 7 Li as well as the phase shifts l=0,2,4 for α-α scattering and l=0 to 4 for α-n and α-t scattering for energies below 10MeV (c.m.) have been calculated. Good agreement between exact antisymmetrized and modelized calculations is achieved. With this model elastic and inelastic scattering of α on 7 Li have been calculated. The 7 Li has been described in terms of α,t clusters. The coupling with the 8 Be + t channel has been taken into account. A good agreement between experimental data and modelized theoretical calculations is achieved when the projectile energy is less than 5MeV (lab. system). It appears that the coupling with the 8 Be + t channel is not negligible even below this channel threshold [fr

  5. Comparative Study Between Ethylbenzene Disproportionation Reaction and its Ethylation Reaction with Ethanol over ZSM-5

    KAUST Repository

    Tukur, N. M.

    2009-06-23

    Ethylation of ethylbenzene with ethanol has been studied over ZSM-5 catalyst in a riser simulator that mimics the operation of a fluidized-bed reactor. The feed molar ratio of ethylbenzene:ethanol is 1:1. The study was carried out at 350, 400, 450, and 500°C for reaction times of 3, 5, 7, 10, 13, and 15 s. Comparisons are made between the results of the ethylbenzene ethylation reaction with that of ethylbenzene disproportionation reaction earlier reported. The effect of reaction conditions on ethylbenzene reactivity, p-diethylbenzene selectivity, total diethylbenzene (DEB) isomers selectivity, p-DEB-to-m-DEB ratio, benzene-to-DEB molar ratio, and benzene selectivity, are reported. Benzene selectivity is about 10 times more in the EB disproportion reaction as compared to its ethylation reaction with ethanol at 350°C. In addition, the results showed a p-DEB/m-DEB ratio for the EB ethylation reaction varying between 1.2-1.7, which is greater than the equilibrium values. Increase in temperature shifts the alkylation/dealkylation equilibrium towards dealkylation, thereby decreasing conversion and selectivity to DEB. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

  6. Study of the Kinetics of an S[subscript N]1 Reaction by Conductivity Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzluff, Elaine M.; Crawford, Mary A.; Reynolds, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Substitution reactions, a central part of organic chemistry, provide a model system in physical chemistry to study reaction rates and mechanisms. Here, the use of inexpensive and readily available commercial conductivity probes coupled with computer data acquisition for the study of the temperature and solvent dependence of the solvolysis of…

  7. a Study on 4 Reactions Forming 46Ti*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerchia, M.; Marchi, T.; Gramegna, F.; Cinausero, M.; Fabris, D.; Mantovani, G.; Degerlier, M.; Morelli, L.; Bruno, M.; DAgostino, M.; Frosin, C.; Barlini, S.; Piantelli, S.; Valdrè, S.; Bini, M.; Pasquali, G.; Casini, G.; Pastore, G.; Gruyer, D.; Ottanelli, P.; Camaiani, A.; Gelli, N.; Olmi, A.; Poggi, G.; Lombardo, I.; Dell’Aquila, D.; Cieplicka-Orynczak, N.

    2018-02-01

    The NUCL-EX collaboration is carrying out an extensive research program on preequilibrium emission of light charged particles from hot nuclei. The ultimate goal is to study how cluster structures affect nuclear reactions [1,2,3,4]. Indeed, a strong correlation between nuclear structure and reaction dynamics emerges when some nucleons or clusters of nucleons are emitted or captured [5]. At this purpose, the four reactions 16O+30Si, 16O+30Si, 18O+28Si and 19F +27Al have been measured at about 120 MeV projectile energy. Experimental data were collected at Legnaro National Laboratories, using the GARFIELD+RCo array, fully equipped with digital electronics [6]. Following an initial identification of particles and the energy calibration procedures, the complete analysis is being performed on an event-by-event basis. Experimental data are then compared to the theoretical predictions where events are generated by numerical codes based on pre-equilibrium and statistical models and then filtered through a software replica of the setup. Differences between the experimental data and the predicted data put into evidence effects related to the entrance channel and to the cluster nature of the colliding ions. After a general introduction on the experimental campaign, this contribution will focus on the preliminary results obtained so far.

  8. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-07

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of Meldrum's Acid Cyclization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Cristina; Goya, Pilar; Rozas, Isabel

    2018-02-27

    On the basis of the cyclization reactions reported by Danishefsky et al. of Meldrum's acid hydroxylethyl and anilinoethyl derivatives, the cyclization of the sulfamidomethylene and ureidomethylene derivatives was attempted without success. To understand the lack of reactivity of these compounds versus the successful cyclization of the ethyl derivatives, the corresponding mechanisms of reaction for both processes have been explored by means of MP2/6-311+G(d,p) calculations in an aqueous environment. The conformational analysis of all of these structures revealed that, while for the ethyl derivatives the minimum energy conformation corresponds to that of the cyclization initiating structure, for the methylene analogues the entrance channel conformations are substantially less stable than the energy minimum. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds were found in all of the energy minima as well as in the cyclization initiating conformations as determined by analysis of their electron density. The potential energy surfaces for the successful and unsuccessful cyclization processes were obtained at room temperature and 100 °C. Comparison of both processes allows rationalization that the lack of reactivity of the methylene derivatives can be thermodynamically explained based not only on the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond formed in their energy minima but also by the energy penalty needed to reach the entrance channel conformation and by the calculated energy barriers.

  10. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  11. NASTRAN buckling study of a linear induction motor reaction rail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    NASTRAN was used to study problems associated with the installation of a linear induction motor reaction rail test track. Specific problems studied include determination of the critical axial compressive buckling stress and establishment of the lateral stiffness of the reaction rail under combined loads. NASTRAN results were compared with experimentally obtained values and satisfactory agreement was obtained. The reaction rail was found to buckle at an axial compressive stress of 11,400 pounds per square inch. The results of this investigation were used to select procedures for installation of the reaction rail.

  12. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The elastic scattering and the 6He angular distributions were measured in. 7Li + 7Li reaction at two energies, Elab = 20 and 25 MeV. FRDWBA calculations have been performed to explain the measured 6He data. The calculations were very sensitive to the choice of the optical model potentials in entrance and exit channels ...

  13. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li (7Li, 6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li reaction at two energies, lab = 20 and 25 MeV. FRDWBA calculations have been performed to explain the measured 6He data. The calculations were very sensitive to the choice of the optical model potentials in entrance and exit channels ...

  14. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1: 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one elec- tron reduced heteropoly ...

  15. Theoretical studies on proton transfer reaction of 3 (5)-substituted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 1. Theoretical studies on proton transfer reaction of 3(5)-substituted pyrazoles ... Abstract. The inter and intra molecular proton transfer reactions of a series of pyrazole derivatives have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) andMP2 methods ...

  16. Nuclear spin dependence of the reaction of H(3)+ with H2. I. Kinetics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Kyle N; Tom, Brian A; McCall, Benjamin J

    2011-05-21

    The chemical reaction H(3)(+) + H(2) → H(2) + H(3)(+) is the simplest bimolecular reaction involving a polyatomic, yet is complex enough that exact quantum mechanical calculations to adequately model its dynamics are still unfeasible. In particular, the branching fractions for the "identity," "proton hop," and "hydrogen exchange" reaction pathways are unknown, and to date, experimental measurements of this process have been limited. In this work, the nuclear-spin-dependent steady-state kinetics of the H(3)(+) + H(2) reaction is examined in detail, and employed to generate models of the ortho:para ratio of H(3)(+) formed in plasmas of varying ortho:para H(2) ratios. One model is based entirely on nuclear spin statistics, and is appropriate for temperatures high enough to populate a large number of H(3)(+) rotational states. Efforts are made to include the influence of three-body collisions in this model by deriving nuclear spin product branching fractions for the H(5)(+) + H(2) reaction. Another model, based on rate coefficients calculated using a microcanonical statistical approach, is appropriate for lower-temperature plasmas in which energetic considerations begin to compete with the nuclear spin branching fractions. These models serve as a theoretical framework for interpreting the results of laboratory studies on the reaction of H(3)(+) with H(2). © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.W.; Ortman, B.J.; Hauge, R.H.; Margrave, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques

  18. Dynamic Model of Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Process Based on Multizone Reaction Kinetics: Modeling of Decarburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Bapin Kumar; Brooks, Geoffrey; Akbar Rhamdhani, M.; Li, Zushu; Schrama, Frank N. H.; Overbosch, Aart

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study by the authors (Rout et al. in Metall Mater Trans B 49:537-557, 2018), a dynamic model for the BOF, employing the concept of multizone kinetics was developed. In the current study, the kinetics of decarburization reaction is investigated. The jet impact and slag-metal emulsion zones were identified to be primary zones for carbon oxidation. The dynamic parameters in the rate equation of decarburization such as residence time of metal drops in the emulsion, interfacial area evolution, initial size, and the effects of surface-active oxides have been included in the kinetic rate equation of the metal droplet. A modified mass-transfer coefficient based on the ideal Langmuir adsorption equilibrium has been proposed to take into account the surface blockage effects of SiO2 and P2O5 in slag on the decarburization kinetics of a metal droplet in the emulsion. Further, a size distribution function has been included in the rate equation to evaluate the effect of droplet size on reaction kinetics. The mathematical simulation indicates that decarburization of the droplet in the emulsion is a strong function of the initial size and residence time. A modified droplet generation rate proposed previously by the authors has been used to estimate the total decarburization rate by slag-metal emulsion. The model's prediction shows that about 76 pct of total carbon is removed by reactions in the emulsion, and the remaining is removed by reactions at the jet impact zone. The predicted bath carbon by the model has been found to be in good agreement with the industrially measured data.

  19. Studies on catalysis by molten metals. X. Hydrogen transfer reactions between alcohols and ketones on liquid indium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, A.; Ogino, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer reactions between alcohols and ketones were studied on liquid indium catalyst by using a pulse reaction technique, and a plausible reaction model is proposed to explain the experimental results including deuterium isotope effects. Further, the stereoselectivity observed in the transfer hydrogenation of methylcyclohexanones and the selectivities observed in the transfer hydrogenation of unsaturated ketones are discussed in terms of the proposed model

  20. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  1. Diabatic models with transferrable parameters for generalized chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; McKemmish, Laura K.; McKenzie, Ross H.; Hush, Noel S.

    2017-05-01

    Diabatic models applied to adiabatic electron-transfer theory yield many equations involving just a few parameters that connect ground-state geometries and vibration frequencies to excited-state transition energies and vibration frequencies to the rate constants for electron-transfer reactions, utilizing properties of the conical-intersection seam linking the ground and excited states through the Pseudo Jahn-Teller effect. We review how such simplicity in basic understanding can also be obtained for general chemical reactions. The key feature that must be recognized is that electron-transfer (or hole transfer) processes typically involve one electron (hole) moving between two orbitals, whereas general reactions typically involve two electrons or even four electrons for processes in aromatic molecules. Each additional moving electron leads to new high-energy but interrelated conical-intersection seams that distort the shape of the critical lowest-energy seam. Recognizing this feature shows how conical-intersection descriptors can be transferred between systems, and how general chemical reactions can be compared using the same set of simple parameters. Mathematical relationships are presented depicting how different conical-intersection seams relate to each other, showing that complex problems can be reduced into an effective interaction between the ground-state and a critical excited state to provide the first semi-quantitative implementation of Shaik’s “twin state” concept. Applications are made (i) demonstrating why the chemistry of the first-row elements is qualitatively so different to that of the second and later rows, (ii) deducing the bond-length alternation in hypothetical cyclohexatriene from the observed UV spectroscopy of benzene, (iii) demonstrating that commonly used procedures for modelling surface hopping based on inclusion of only the first-derivative correction to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are valid in no region of the chemical

  2. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M.A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H.N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  3. Chemical Dynamics Studies of Reactions in Solids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Donald O

    1998-01-01

    ... the properties inherent in high-energy high-density materials. This research lays the groundwork for that by providing the theoretical and computational methods as well as accurate molecular and crystal models for important types of energetic systems...

  4. Variational Flooding Study of a SN2 Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; McCarty, James J; Valsson, Omar; Parrinello, Michele

    2017-02-02

    We have studied the reaction dynamics of a prototypical organic reaction using a variationally optimized truncated bias to accelerate transitions between educt and product reactant states. The asymmetric S N 2 nucleophilic substitution reaction of fluoromethane and chloromethane CH 3 F + Cl - ⇌ CH 3 Cl + F - is considered, and many independent biased molecular dynamics simulations have been performed at 600, 900, and 1200 K, collecting several hundred transitions at each temperature. The transition times and relative rate constants have been obtained for both reaction directions. The activation energies extracted from an Arrhenius plot compare well with standard static calculations.

  5. Transverse flow reactor studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, R.G. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Radical reactions are in important in combustion chemistry; however, little state-specific information is available for these reactions. A new apparatus has been constructed to measure the dynamics of radical reactions. The unique feature of this apparatus is a transverse flow reactor in which an atom or radical of known concentration will be produced by pulsed laser photolysis of an appropriate precursor molecule. The time dependence of individual quantum states or products and/or reactants will be followed by rapid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. The reaction H + O{sub 2} {yields} OH + O will be studied.

  6. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  7. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with a positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved, giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state, and a general framework is developed for constructing perturbations from a healthy state that exhibit blow-up, which are interpreted as corresponding to disease initiation. The analysis reveals key features that arterial geometry, antioxidant levels, and the source of inflammatory components (through coupled third-kind boundary conditions or through body sources) play in disease initiation. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Reactions of lactose during heat treatment of milk : a quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of the chemical reactions of lactose during heat treatment of milk were studied. Skim milk and model solutions resembling milk were heated. Reaction products were determined and the influence of varying lactose, casein and fat concentration on the formation of these products

  9. Theory and Design Tools For Studies of Reactions to Abrupt Changes in Noise Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, James M.; Ehrlich, Gary E.; Zador, Paul; Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Study plans, a pre-tested questionnaire, a sample design evaluation tool, a community publicity monitoring plan, and a theoretical framework have been developed to support combined social/acoustical surveys of residents' reactions to an abrupt change in environmental noise, Secondary analyses of more than 20 previous surveys provide estimates of three parameters of a study simulation model; within individual variability, between study wave variability, and between neighborhood variability in response to community noise. The simulation model predicts the precision of the results from social surveys of reactions to noise, including changes in noise. When the study simulation model analyzed the population distribution, noise exposure environments and feasible noise measurement program at a proposed noise change survey site, it was concluded that the site could not yield sufficient precise estimates of human reaction model to justify conducting a survey. Additional secondary analyses determined that noise reactions are affected by the season of the social survey.

  10. Genome-scale Metabolic Reaction Modeling: a New Approach to Geomicrobial Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, S. E.; Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Geomicrobial rates, rates of microbial metabolism in natural environments, are a key parameter of theoretical and practical problems in geobiology and biogeochemistry. Both laboratory- and field-based approaches have been applied to study rates of geomicrobial processes. Laboratory-based approaches analyze geomicrobial kinetics by incubating environmental samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Field methods quantify geomicrobial rates by observing the progress of geomicrobial processes. To take advantage of recent development in biogeochemical modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling, we suggest that geomicrobial rates can also be predicted by simulating metabolic reaction networks of microbes. To predict geomicrobial rates, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model that describes enzyme reaction networks of microbial metabolism, and simulated the network model by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of enzyme reactions. The model is simulated numerically to solve cellular enzyme abundance and hence metabolic rates under the constraints of cellular physiology. The new modeling approach differs from flux balance analysis of system biology in that it accounts for the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymatic reactions. It builds on subcellular metabolic reaction networks, and hence also differs from classical biogeochemical reaction modeling. We applied the new approach to Methanosarcina acetivorans, an anaerobic, marine methanogen capable of disproportionating acetate to carbon dioxide and methane. The input of the new model includes (1) enzyme reaction network of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and (2) representative geochemical conditions of freshwater sedimentary environments. The output of the simulation includes the proteomics, metabolomics, and energy and matter fluxes of M. acetivorans. Our simulation results demonstrate the predictive power of the new modeling approach. Specifically, the results illustrate how methanogenesis rates vary

  11. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations on the $^{192}Os (p, n)^{192}$Ir reaction Comparison of reactor and cyclotron production of the therapeutic radionuclide $^{192}$Ir

    CERN Document Server

    Hilgers, K; Sudar, S; 10.1016/j.apradiso.2004.12.010

    2005-01-01

    In a search for an alternative route of production of the important therapeutic radionuclide /sup 192/Ir (T/sub 1/2/=78.83 d), the excitation function of the reaction /sup 192/Os(p, n)/sup 192/Ir was investigated from its threshold up to 20MeV. Thin samples of enriched /sup 192/Os were obtained by electrodeposition on Ni, and the conventional stacked-foil technique was used for cross section measurements. The experimental data were compared with the results of theoretical calculations using the codes EMPIRE-II and ALICE-IPPE. Good agreement was found with EMPIRE-II, but slightly less with the ALICE-IPPE calculations. The theoretical thick target yield of /sup 192/Ir over the energy range E/sub p/=16 to 8MeV amounts to only 0.16MBq/ mu A.h. A comparison of the reactor and cyclotron production methods is given. In terms of yield and radionuclidic purity of /sup 192/Ir the reactor method appears to be superior; the only advantage of the cyclotron method could be the higher specific activity of the product.

  12. The hydration of slag, part 2: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2007-01-01

    The hydration of slag-blended cement is studied by considering the interaction between the hydrations of slag and Portland cement clinker. Three reaction models for the slag-blended cement are developed based on stoichiometric calculations. These models correlate the compositions of the unhydrated

  13. Toward a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Shock ignition of energetic molecular solids is driven by microstructural heterogeneities, at which even moderate stresses can result in sufficiently high temperatures to initiate material decomposition and chemical energy release. Mesoscale modeling of these ``hot spots'' requires a reaction rate model that describes the energy release with a sub-microsecond resolution and under a wide range of temperatures. No such model is available even for well-studied energetic materials such as RDX. In this presentation, I will describe an ongoing effort to develop a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures using first-principles molecular dynamics, transition-state theory, and reaction network analysis. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  14. Unexpected allergic reactions to food, a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michelsen-Huisman, A.D.; Os-Medendorp, H. van; Versluis, A.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Castenmiller, J.J.M.; Noteborn, H.P.J.M.; Houben, G.F.; Knulst, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Unexpected reactions occur in patients with food allergy, but frequency data are scare. This prospective study investigates the frequency, severity and causes of unexpected allergic reactions to food in adults with a doctor's diagnosed food allergy. Participants complete an online questionnaire

  15. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  16. An experimental and theoretical study of reaction steps relevant to the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svelle, Stian

    2004-07-01

    The primary objective of the present work is to obtain new insight into the reaction mechanism of the zeolite catalyzed methanol-to-hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction. It was decided to use both experimental and computational techniques to reach this goal. An investigation of the n-butene + methanol system was therefore initiated. Over time, it became apparent that it was possible to determine the rate for the methylation of n-butene by methanol. The ethene and propene systems were therefore reexamined in order to collect kinetic information also for those cases. With the development of user-friendly quantum chemistry programs such as the Gaussian suite of programs, the possibility of applying quantum chemical methods to many types of problems has become readily available even for non-experts. When performing mechanistic studies, there is quite often a considerable synergy effect when combining experimental and computational approaches. The methylation reactions mentioned above turned out to be an issue well suited for quantum chemical investigations. The incentive for examining the halomethane reactivity was the clear analogy to the MTH reaction system. Alkene dimerization was also a reaction readily examined with quantum chemistry. As discussed in the introduction of this thesis, polymethylbenzenes, or their cationic counterparts, are suspected to be key intermediates in the MTH reaction. It was therefore decided to investigate the intrinsic reactivity of these species in the gas-phase by employing sophisticated mass spectrometric (MS) techniques in collaboration with the MS group at the Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo The data thus obtained will also be compared with results from an ongoing computational study on gas phase polymethylbenzenium reactivity. 6 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) A Theoretical Investigation of the Methylation of Alkenes with Methanol over Acidic Zeolites. 2) A Theoretical Investigation of the

  17. Mathematical Modeling Applied Transesterification Reaction Product of Synthesis from Animal Fats and Vegetable Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Letícia Thaís Chendynski; Universidade Estadual de Londrina; Karina G. Angilelli; Universidade Estadual de Londrina; Bruna A. D. Ferreira; Unversidade Esadual de Londrina; Dionisio Borsato; Universidade Estadual de Londrina

    2009-01-01

    The high availability and low cost of animal fat have promoted industrial interest as a partial substitute for soybean oil for transesterification reaction product of synthesis, to reduce costs and maximize profits. This study aimed to apply experimental design for biodiesel production from a mixture of soybean oil, poultry fat, beef tallow and pork lard in order to obtain predictive equations to model the transesterification reaction yield, cloud point, pour point and oxidative stability, wi...

  18. Study of pp→ppη reaction at threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleb, A.

    1994-11-01

    The η production has been studied through the pp → ppη reaction at threshold. Data were taken at the Synchrotron of the ''Laboratoire National Saturne''. The detection in coincidence of the two protons scattered near 0 deg and analysed with the magnetic spectrometer SPES3 allows the reconstruction of missing mass spectra for the η signature. A simulation program which takes into account all the experimental set up characteristics has been realized and tested through the pp → dπ + reaction detected simultaneously with pp → ppη. The generated proton momentum spectra for pp → ppη show a pronounced η mass dependence. This characteristic, connected to the kinematical properties of pp → ppη at threshold, is used to extract the mass of the meson η. The obtained value, m η = 547.65 ± 0.18 MeV, is in good agreement with measurement done recently through the pd → H eη reaction. The total cross section σ t of pp → ppη measured at 1260, 1265 and 1300 MeV presents a strong energy dependence. This cross section increases less with energy than the phase-space. The influence of p-p and η-p final state interactions in our measurements is studied. Our results are compared with theoretical predictions and assess the dominant character of the baryonic resonance N * (1535) in the η mechanism production at threshold. These experimental results give an energy dependence which is not well reproduced by the theoretical predictions. This discrepancy could be an incorrect description of the η-p interaction in the models. (author). 48 refs., 60 figs., 15 tabs

  19. On quark model relations for hypercharge-exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluyver, J.C.; Blokzijl, R.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Wolters, G.F.; Grossmann, P.; Lamb, P.R.; Wells, J.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral two-body reactions of the type K - p → M 0 + Λ, Σ 0 or Σ 0 (1385) are considered. Predictions based on the additive quark model and SU(6) baryon wave functions are tested against data on cross sections and polarisations for given momentum transfer. Data obtained in a high statistics experiment at 4.2 GeV/c K - momentum, as well as data from a large variety of other experiments are used. Highly significant violations of these predictions are observed in the data. These violations are shown to occur in a systematic fashion, according to which SU(6) must be relaxed, but the amplitude structure implied by additivity would remain valid. As an application an amplitude analysis for natural parity exchange reactions with M 0 = π, phi and rho respectively is performed, which determines a relative phase, which cannot be obtained in model-independent analysis. Also reactions with M 0 = delta or B are considered, and some implications for coupling constants are discussed. (Auth.)

  20. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  1. Study of the sup 3 H( sup 3 H, 2n) sup 4 He and sup 3 He( sup 3 He, 2p) sup 4 He reactions in the framework of three-cluster microscopic model

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilevsky, V S; Arickx, F; Broeckhove, J

    2002-01-01

    The reactions sup 3 H( sup 3 H, 2n) sup 4 He and sup 3 He( sup 3 He, 2p) sup 4 He are investigated within a fully microscopic cluster model featuring a three-cluster exit channel. A Hyperspherical Harmonics basis is used to describe the three-cluster continuum. The resulting astrophysical s-factor of both reactions is in good agreement with experimental data. Analysis of the low-energy scattering parameters reveals no evidence for a hidden resonance state would increase the cross-section of the reactions, and would help to resolve the solar neutrino problem.

  2. Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2009-09-15

    Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

  3. Reply to the comment of S. Rayne on "QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: A case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Kovarich, Simona; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2013-07-30

    We appreciate the interest of Dr. Rayne on our article and we completely agree that the dataset of (benzo-)triazoles, which were screened by the hydroxyl radical reaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model, was not only composed of benzo-triazoles but also included some simpler triazoles (without the condensed benzene ring), such as the chemicals listed by Dr. Rayne, as well as some related heterocycles (also few not aromatic). We want to clarify that in this article (as well as in other articles in which the same dataset was screened), for conciseness, the abbreviations (B)TAZs and BTAZs were used as general (and certainly too simplified) notations meaning an extended dataset of benzo-triazoles, triazoles, and related compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Substrate dependent reaction channels of the Wolff–Kishner reduction reaction: A theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff–Kishner reduction reactions were investigated by DFT calculations for the first time. B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p SCRF=(PCM, solvent = 1,2-ethanediol optimizations were carried out. To investigate the role of the base catalyst, the base-free reaction was examined by the use of acetone, hydrazine (H2N–NH2 and (H2O8. A ready reaction channel of acetone → acetone hydrazine (Me2C=N–NH2 was obtained. The channel involves two likely proton-transfer routes. However, it was found that the base-free reaction was unlikely at the N2 extrusion step from the isopropyl diimine intermediate (Me2C(H–N=N–H. Two base-catalyzed reactions were investigated by models of the ketone, H2N–NH2 and OH−(H2O7. Here, ketones are acetone and acetophenone. While routes of the ketone → hydrazone → diimine are similar, those from the diimines are different. From the isopropyl diimine, the N2 extrusion and the C–H bond formation takes place concomitantly. The concomitance leads to the propane product concertedly. From the (1-phenylethyl substituted diimine, a carbanion intermediate is formed. The para carbon of the phenyl ring of the anion is subject to the protonation, which leads to a 3-ethylidene-1,4-cyclohexadiene intermediate. Its [1,5]-hydrogen migration gives the ethylbenzene product. For both ketone substrates, the diimines undergoing E2 reactions were found to be key intermediates.

  5. Disproportionation of rosin on an industrial Pd/C catalyst: reaction pathway and kinetic model discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Juan Carlos; Yustos, Pedro; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2011-02-01

    In this work, a phenomenological study of the isomerisation and disproportionation of rosin acids using an industrial 5% Pd on charcoal catalyst from 200 to 240°C is carried out. Medium composition is determined by elemental microanalysis, GC-MS and GC-FID. Dehydrogenated and hydrogenated acid species molar amounts in the final product show that dehydrogenation is the main reaction. Moreover, both hydrogen and non-hydrogen concentration considering kinetic models are fitted to experimental data using a multivariable non-linear technique. Statistical discrimination among the proposed kinetic models lead to the conclusion hydrogen considering models fit much better to experimental results. The final kinetic model involves first-order isomerisation reactions of neoabietic and palustric acids to abietic acid, first-order dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of this latter acid, and hydrogenation of pimaric acids. Hydrogenation reactions are partial first-order regarding the acid and hydrogen. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photodisintegration reactions for nuclear astrophysics studies at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, C.; Balabanski, D.; Filipescu, D. M.; Tesileanu, O.

    2018-01-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility will come online in Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, in 2018 and will deliver high intensity laser and brilliant gamma beams. We present the physics cases and instruments proposed at ELI-NP to measure capture reactions by means of the inverse photodisintegration reaction. We propose to study the 16O(γ, α)12C reaction using a Time Projection Chamber detector with electronic readout. Several other reactions, such as 24Mg(γ, α)20Ne and reactions on heavy nuclei relevant in the p-process, are central to stellar evolution and will be investigated with a proposed Silicon Strip Detector array and a 4π neutron detector. The status of the experimental facilities and first-day experiments will be presented in detail.

  7. Direct studies of neutron-induced reactions in inverse kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Shea; Couture, Aaron; Mosby, Michelle; Reifarth, Rene

    2017-09-01

    Some of the major questions in both nuclear astrophysics and nuclear technology depend on neutron-induced reaction rates which are largely unknown, on nuclei which are too short-lived to directly measure with existing experimental methods. Indirect methods have progressed, by either attempting to determine the reaction rate explicitly or by constraining nuclear structure for reaction models. Despite this progress, systematic uncertainties associated with the techniques remain a persistent issue. It has been shown that the combination of a radioactive beam facility, ion storage ring, and spallation neutron source could enable direct measurements of neutron-induced reaction rates for nuclei with half-lives as short as minutes or less. We have analyzed the feasibility of this technique using the LANSCE accelerator complex as a baseline. The technique and initial results from the feasibility analysis will be presented.

  8. Systematic development of reduced reaction mechanisms for dynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A method for systematically developing a reduced chemical reaction mechanism for dynamic modeling of chemically reactive flows is presented. The method is based on the postulate that if a reduced reaction mechanism faithfully describes the time evolution of both thermal and chain reaction processes characteristic of a more complete mechanism, then the reduced mechanism will describe the chemical processes in a chemically reacting flow with approximately the same degree of accuracy. Here this postulate is tested by producing a series of mechanisms of reduced accuracy, which are derived from a full detailed mechanism for methane-oxygen combustion. These mechanisms were then tested in a series of reactive flow calculations in which a large-amplitude sinusoidal perturbation is applied to a system that is initially quiescent and whose temperature is high enough to start ignition processes. Comparison of the results for systems with and without convective flow show that this approach produces reduced mechanisms that are useful for calculations of explosions and detonations. Extensions and applicability to flames are discussed.

  9. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quantitative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  10. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous articles of this series, we discussed the use of isotopes to trace the nature of reactive intermediates and also to obtain information about minima and transition states through quan- titative measurements of equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects. In this part, we describe an ingenious way of studying dynamic ...

  11. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Wesley D. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry; Schaefer, III, Henry F. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry

    2015-11-14

    This is the final report of the theoretical studies of elementary hydrocarbon species and their reactions. Part A has a bibliography of publications supported by DOE from 2010 to 2016 and Part B goes into recent research highlights.

  12. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  13. Models of direct reactions and quantum pre-equilibrium for nucleon scattering on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.

    2006-01-01

    When a nucleon collides with a target nucleus, several reactions may occur: elastic and inelastic scatterings, charge exchange... In order to describe these reactions, different models are involved: the direct reactions, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus models. Our goal is to study, within a quantum framework and without any adjustable parameter, the direct and pre-equilibrium reactions for nucleons scatterings off double closed-shell nuclei. We first consider direct reactions: we are studying nucleon scattering with the Melbourne G-matrix, which represents the interaction between the projectile and one target nucleon, and with random phase approximation (RPA) wave functions which describe all target states. This is a fully microscopic approach since no adjustable parameters are involved. A second part is dedicated to the study of nucleon inelastic scattering for large energy transfer which necessarily involves the pre-equilibrium mechanism. Several models have been developed in the past to deal with pre-equilibrium. They start from the Born expansion of the transition amplitude which is associated to the inelastic process and they use several approximations which have not yet been tested. We have achieved some comparisons between second order cross sections which have been calculated with and without these approximations. Our results allow us to criticize some of these approximations and give several directions to improve the quantum pre-equilibrium models. (author)

  14. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  15. Nuclear reaction matrix calculations with a shell-model Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, B.R.; McCarthy, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Das Barrett-Hewitt-McCarthy (BHM) method for calculating the nuclear reaction matrix G is used to compute shell-model matrix elements for A = 18 nuclei. The energy denominators in intermediate states containing one unoccupied single-particle (s.p.) state and one valence s.p. state are treated correctly, in contrast to previous calculations. These corrections are not important for valence-shell matrix elements but are found to lead to relatively large changes in cross-shell matrix elements involved in core-polarization diagrams. (orig.) [de

  16. An anisotropic three-fluid model for heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, I.; Zimanyi, J.; Csernai, L.P.; Greiner, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nucleons taking part in heavy ion reactions are considered as a three-fluid system. The first and second components correspond to the target and the projectile, while the thermalised nucleons produced in the course of the collision belong to the third component. Making use of the Boltzmann-equation, hydrodynamical equations are derived which yield also the anisotropy of the momentum distribution. The equation of state for anisotropic nuclear matter is derived from a field theoretical model in the mean field approximation. (Auth.)

  17. Parametric pattern selection in a reaction-diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stich

    Full Text Available We compare spot patterns generated by Turing mechanisms with those generated by replication cascades, in a model one-dimensional reaction-diffusion system. We determine the stability region of spot solutions in parameter space as a function of a natural control parameter (feed-rate where degenerate patterns with different numbers of spots coexist for a fixed feed-rate. While it is possible to generate identical patterns via both mechanisms, we show that replication cascades lead to a wider choice of pattern profiles that can be selected through a tuning of the feed-rate, exploiting hysteresis and directionality effects of the different pattern pathways.

  18. Study of ODE limit problems for reaction-diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacson Simsen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study ODE limit problems for reaction-diffusion equations for large diffusion and we study the sensitivity of nonlinear ODEs with respect to initial conditions and exponent parameters. Moreover, we prove continuity of the flow and weak upper semicontinuity of a family of global attractors for reaction-diffusion equations with spatially variable exponents when the exponents go to 2 in \\(L^{\\infty}(\\Omega\\ and the diffusion coefficients go to infinity.

  19. Phase transitions in a holographic s + p model with back-reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Zhang-Yu [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Cai, Rong-Gen [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Gao, Xin [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Li, Li [University of Crete, Department of Physics, Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Heraklion (Greece); Zeng, Hui [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-15

    In a previous paper (Nie et al. in JHEP 1311:087, arXiv:1309.2204 [hep-th], 2013), we presented a holographic s + p superconductor model with a scalar triplet charged under an SU(2) gauge field in the bulk. We also study the competition and coexistence of the s-wave and p-wave orders in the probe limit. In this work we continue to study the model by considering the full back-reaction. The model shows a rich phase structure and various condensate behaviors such as the ''n-type'' and ''u-type'' ones, which are also known as reentrant phase transitions in condensed matter physics. The phase transitions to the p-wave phase or s + p coexisting phase become first order in strong back-reaction cases. In these first order phase transitions, the free energy curve always forms a swallow tail shape, in which the unstable s + p solution can also play an important role. The phase diagrams of this model are given in terms of the dimension of the scalar order and the temperature in the cases of eight different values of the back-reaction parameter, which show that the region for the s + p coexisting phase is enlarged with a small or medium back-reaction parameter but is reduced in the strong back-reaction cases. (orig.)

  20. Trojan Horse Method for neutrons-induced reaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, M.; Asfin Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutron-induced reactions play an important role in nuclear astrophysics in several scenario, such as primordial Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Inhomogeneous Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, heavy-element production during the weak component of the s-process, explosive stellar nucleosynthesis. To overcome the experimental problems arising from the production of a neutron beam, the possibility to use the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron-induced reactions has been investigated. The application is of particular interest for reactions involving radioactive nuclei having short lifetime.

  1. Studies on the reaction of glutathione and formaldehyde using NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Richard J; Barlow, Philippa S; Schofield, Christopher J; Claridge, Timothy D W

    2010-11-07

    Within cells it is proposed that a major mechanism for the metabolism of formaldehyde is via its reaction with glutathione (GSH) to form S-hydroxymethylglutathione (HMG), which undergoes subsequent oxidation. In addition to HMG and the previously reported (5R,10S)-5-(carboxymethylcarbamoyl)-7-oxo-3-thia-1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.1]undecane-10-carboxylic acid (BiGF(2)), NMR studies on the reaction of GSH with formaldehyde reveal two previously unassigned monocyclic structures. The results imply that the biologically relevant reactions between aldehydes and peptides/proteins may be more complex than presently perceived.

  2. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  3. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  4. Granulomatous reaction to Belotero Balance: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Jessica; Bierman, Dina; Zachary, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    The most commonly used dermal fillers are hyaluronic acids (HAs), and in general, are well tolerated with mild to moderate risk of adverse events. The most frequently reported side effects are injection site erythema and bruising. We present the first case of a patient who developed a severe granulomatous foreign body reaction to the HA filler, Belotero Balance. In our review of the literature, a granulomatous reaction has never before been reported as a side effect of this particular HA filler (1). On exam, the patient had firm erythematous, granulomatous plaques on her bilateral cheeks, with a tender, fluctuant nodule on her right cheek. Complete resolution of this delayed reaction was achieved after several injections of intralesional Kenalog (IL-K) 2.5 mg/cc, and further fine-tuning was achieved through laser resurfacing. Granulomatous reactions can occur with any HAs, though such incidents are not commonly reported. These delayed reactions are generally localized immunological reactions, though biofilm infections should be excluded where appropriate. It is only with long-term (5-year) longitudinal studies that accurate numbers of such reactions will be known.

  5. The Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study) of perioperative allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thienthong, Somboon; Hintong, Thanoo; Pulnitiporn, Aksorn

    2005-11-01

    To determine the incidence, risk factors, signs, symptoms and management of perioperative allergic reactions in the Thai Anesthesia Incidents Study (THAI Study). Between February 1, 2003, and January 31, 2004, a descriptive, prospective, multicenter study was conducted in 20 hospitals across Thailand. All patients receiving anesthetic and medical agents were monitored for allergic reactions for the first 24 postoperative-hours. Signs and symptoms of suspected allergic reactions included skin reactions, wheezing and unexpected hypotension. The details of allergic reactions were reviewed and recorded. Allergic reactions occurred in 30 of the 163,403 patients included in this study. The reaction-incidence was approximately 1 in 5,500 cases of anesthesia. Forty-eight percent of the affected patients had a history of allergic reactions. The manifestations were skin reactions, hypotension and wheezing in 38, 22 and 19 percent of the overall symptoms, respectively. Reactions were mild, moderate and severe in 40, 23 and 37 percent of the patients, respectively. The three drugs most suspected of causing the reaction(s) were antibiotics (19%), muscle relaxants (17%) and propofol (15%). All of the affected patients recovered after treatment including the one who suffered cardiac arrest because of the allergic reaction. The incidence of perioperative allergic reactions was 1 in 5,500 cases of anesthesia. History of allergies was obtained from half of the patients and the most common sign was a skin reaction. The drugs most suspected of causing an allergic reaction were antibiotics. All of the patients responded well to rescue treatment.

  6. Influence of heat and chemical reactions on the Sisko fluid model for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present article studies the effects of heat and chemical reactions on the blood flow through tapered artery with a stenosis. The model incorporates Sisko fluid representation for the blood flow through an axially non-symmetrical but radially symmetric stenosis. Symmetry of the distribution of the wall shearing stress and ...

  7. Relating Derived Relations as a Model of Analogical Reasoning: Reaction Times and Event-Related Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Regan, Donal; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Commins, Sean; Walsh, Derek; Stewart, Ian; Smeets, Paul M.; Whelan, Robert; Dymond, Simon

    2005-01-01

    The current study aimed to test a Relational Frame Theory (RFT) model of analogical reasoning based on the relating of derived same and derived difference relations. Experiment 1 recorded reaction time measures of similar-similar (e.g., "apple is to orange as dog is to cat") versus different-different (e.g., "he is to his brother as…

  8. Systematic study of neutron induced reactions of the actinide nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M. [Akadehmiya Navuk Belarusi, Minsk (Belarus). Inst. Radyyatsyjnykh Fizika-Khimichnykh Prablem; Kikuchi, Yasuyuki

    1996-06-01

    A statistical theory is used for the calculation of the neutron-induced reaction cross sections of actinide nuclides from 10 keV up to 20 MeV. Available experimental data bases for major actinides were extensively used to develop theoretical tools for consistent evaluation of neutron data of minor actinides. The approach employed up to the second chance fission threshold is based on the full-scale Hauser-Feshbach theory, a phenomenological modelling of level densities, the giant dipole resonance model for gamma-ray emission, the double-humped fission barrier model and the coupled channel optical model calculations. The pairing, collective and shell effects are introduced into the level density model for equilibrium and saddle point deformations. Step-like structures observed in fission cross section of {sup 235}U around 1 MeV incident neutron energies are interpreted as due to pairing effects. Pairing correlation parameters are adjusted to fit the fission cross section slope in the first plateau region. The level density collective effect inclusion influences drastically the extracted experimental fission barrier parameters due to the inner saddle point asymmetry. The shell effects dumping is manifested as a consistent fit of fission data above the second chance fission threshold. In case of minor actinides, fission data fits are used as a constraint for capture and inelastic scattering cross section predictions. The capture cross sections were analyzed with the allowance for (n,{gamma}n`) and (n,{gamma}f) reactions. To fit the high-energy tails in the (n,2n) reaction, the pre-equilibrium processes in the neutron channel were included. All these effects were modelled, and the model parameters were obtained using major actinides neutron data. The resulted parameter systematics were applied for analysis of available data and prediction of capture, inelastic scattering, (n,2n), (n,3n) reaction and fission cross sections. (J.P.N.). 87 refs.

  9. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  10. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  11. A reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lansdell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs, whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability.

  12. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  13. Studies of nuclear reaction at very low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecil, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    The deuteron radiative capture reactions on 2 H, 6 Li and 10 B have been measured between center of mass energies of 20 and 140 keV. Of note is the observation that the gamma ray-to-charged particle branching ratio for the DD reaction appears independent of energy down to a center of mass energy of 20 keV, consistent with some and contrary to other theoretical models. We have investigated the ratio of the reactions D(d,p)T and D(d,n) 3 He down to c.m. energies of 3 keV and the ratio of the reactions 6Li(d,p) 7 Li and 6 LI(d,α) 4 He down to a c.m. energy of 19 keV. The DD reaction ratio is independent of energy while the (d,p) branch of the D- 6 Li evinces a significant enhancement at the lowest measured energies. We have continued our investigation of charged particle production from deuterium-metal systems at a modest level of activity. Noteworthy in this investigation is the observation of 3 MeV protons from deuteron beam loaded Ti and LiD targets subjected to extreme thermal disequilibria. Significant facility improvements were realized during the most recent contract period. Specifically the downstream magnetic analysis system proposed to eliminate beam induced contaminants has been installed and thoroughly tested. This improvement should allow the D(a,γ) 6 Li reaction to be measured in the coming contract period. A scattering chamber required for the measurement of the 7 Li( 3 He,p) 9 Be reaction has been designed, fabricated and installed on the accelerator. A CAMAC based charged particle identification system has been assembled also for use in our proposed measurement of the 7 Li( 3 He, p) 9 Be

  14. [Predictive analysis on Shenmai injection-induced adverse reactions with Logistic model and ROC curve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Shi, Qing-ping; Jiang, Xiao-dong; Liu, Yan; Sang, Ran; Zhu, Jin-xiu; Wei, Sheng-tong; Xin, Zhi-ming; Song, Ru

    2015-04-01

    To study relevant risk factors of Shenmai injection induced adverse reactions by using Logistic model and ROC curve, and made the prediction for the occurrence of relevant adverse reactions/events. Case data of patients treated with Shenmai injection were collected by using the prospective, multi-center, large-sample, nested-case control method, in order to analyze the risk factors of Shenmai injection-induced adverse reactions/events, establish the logistic model and draw the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for risk factors. During the study, 7632 patients (including 3 477 males and 4 155 females) were included, and eight of them suffered adverse reactions/events. Based on a multi-factor Logistic model analysis, the age (> or = 50 years) (OR = 5.061, 95% CI: 2.197-7.924; P = 0.001), the total number of medication days (OR = -1.020, 95% CI: -l.652 - 0.388; P = 0.002) and the single dose (OR = 0.245, 95% CI: 0.127-0.364; P = 0.000) were significant independent risk factors for Shenmai injection-induced adverse reactions/events. According to the results, ROC curves were drawn with age (> or = 50 years), the total number of days of inedication and single dose; The area under ROC curves the joint predictor (0.9753, 95% CI: 0.9443-1.000, P adverse reactions/events included the age (> or = 50 years), the total number of days of medication and single dose. In clinical practice, the age (> or = 50 years), the total number of days of medication and the medication dose can be substituted in the joint predictor calculation formula (P = 1 / [1 + e(-(-21.58 + 5.061 x Xage - 1.020 x Xd + 0.245 x X(mL)] to predict the potential adverse reactions of patients and adjust the dosage regimen.

  15. A product study of the isoprene+NO3 reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cohen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of isoprene through reaction with NO3 radicals is a significant sink for isoprene that persists after dark. The main products of the reaction are multifunctional nitrates. These nitrates constitute a significant NOx sink in the nocturnal boundary layer and they likely play an important role in formation of secondary organic aerosol. Products of the isoprene+NO3 reaction will, in many locations, be abundant enough to affect nighttime radical chemistry and to persist into daytime where they may represent a source of NOx. Product formation in the isoprene + NO3 reaction was studied in a smog chamber at Purdue University. Isoprene nitrates and other hydrocarbon products were observed using Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS and reactive nitrogen products were observed using Thermal Dissociation–Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF. The organic nitrate yield is found to be 65±12% of which the majority was nitrooxy carbonyls and the combined yield of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone (MACR+MVK is found to be ∼10%. PTR-MS measurements of nitrooxy carbonyls and TD-LIF measurements of total organic nitrates agreed well. The PTR-MS also observed a series of minor oxidation products which were tentatively identified and their yields quantified These other oxidation products are used as additional constraints on the reaction mechanism.

  16. Studies of complex fragment emission in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Our work involves the study of intermediate energy heavy-ion nuclear reactions. This work has two foci. On the one hand, we desire to learn about the properties of nuclear matter under abnormal conditions, in this energy domain, predominately low densities. This purpose runs abreast of the second, which is the study of the relevant reaction mechanisms. The two objectives are inexorably linked because our experimental laboratory for studying nuclear matter properties is a dynamic one. We are forced to ask how nuclear matter properties, such as phase transitions, are reflected in the dynamics of the reactions. It may be that irrefutable information about nuclear matter will not be extracted from the reaction work. Nevertheless, we are compelled to undertake this effort not only because it is the only game in town and as yet we do not know that information cannot be extracted, but also because of our second objective. The process leads to an understanding of the reaction mechanism themselves and therefore to the response characteristics of finite, perhaps non-equilibrium, strongly interacting systems. Our program has been: To study energy, mass, and angular momentum deposition by studying incomplete fusion reactions. To gain confidence that we understand how highly excited systems decompose by studying all emissions from the highly excited systems. To push these kinds of studies into the intermediate energy domain, with excitation function studies. And attempt to learn about the dynamics of the decays using particle-particle correlations. In the last effort, we have decided to focus on simple systems, where we believe, definitive statements are possible. These avenues of research share a common theme, large complex fragment production

  17. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-03-05

    Mar 5, 2013 ... define direct costs to include the out-of pocket (monetary) expenditures such as payments for ... elevated blood pressure is more of the late middle age and elderly group. It also suggests that at this age they ... definition, the study showed that about 53% of the household of the patients incurred catastrophic ...

  18. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  19. Influence of diffusive porosity architecture on kinetically-controlled reactions in mobile-immobile models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, T.; Ginn, T. R.; De Dreuzy, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Solute transport in porous media may be structured at various scales by geological features, from connectivity patterns of pores to fracture networks. This structure impacts solute repartition and consequently reactivity. Here we study numerically the influence of the organization of porous volumes within diffusive porosity zones on different reactions. We couple a mobile-immobile transport model where an advective zone exchanges with diffusive zones of variable structure to the geochemical modeling software PHREEQC. We focus on two kinetically-controlled reactions, a linear sorption and a nonlinear dissolution of a mineral. We show that in both cases the structure of the immobile zones has an important impact on the overall reaction rates. Through the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) framework, we show that this impact is very well captured by residence times-based models for the kinetic linear sorption, as it is mathematically equivalent to a modification of the initial diffusive structure; Consequently, the overall reaction rate could be easily extrapolated from a conservative tracer experiment. The MRMT models however struggle to reproduce the non-linearity and the threshold effects associated with the kinetic dissolution. A slower reaction, by allowing more time for diffusion to smooth out the concentration gradients, tends to increase their relevance. Figure: Left: Representation of a mobile-immobile model with a complex immobile architecture. The mobile zone is indicated by an arrow. Right: Total remaining mass of mineral in mobile-immobile models and in their equivalent MRMT models during a flush by a highly under-saturated solution. The models only differ by the organization of their immobile porous volumes.

  20. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reaction-diffusion model of hair-bundle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobo, Adrian; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-10-28

    The hair bundle, an apical specialization of the hair cell composed of several rows of regularly organized stereocilia and a kinocilium, is essential for mechanotransduction in the ear. Its precise organization allows the hair bundle to convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals; mutations that alter the bundle's morphology often cause deafness. However, little is known about the proteins involved in the process of morphogenesis and how the structure of the bundle arises through interactions between these molecules. We present a mathematical model based on simple reaction-diffusion mechanisms that can reproduce the shape and organization of the hair bundle. This model suggests that the boundary of the cell and the kinocilium act as signaling centers that establish the bundle's shape. The interaction of two proteins forms a hexagonal Turing pattern--a periodic modulation of the concentrations of the morphogens, sustained by local activation and long-range inhibition of the reactants--that sets a blueprint for the location of the stereocilia. Finally we use this model to predict how different alterations to the system might impact the shape and organization of the hair bundle.

  2. Theoretical intercomparison of multi-step direct reaction models and computational intercomparison of multi-step direct reaction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.

    1992-08-01

    In recent years several statistical theories have been developed concerning multistep direct (MSD) nuclear reactions. In addition, dominant in applications is a whole class of semiclassical models that may be subsumed under the heading of 'generalized exciton models'. These are basically MSD-type extensions on top of compound-like concepts. In this report the relationship between their underlying statistical MSD-postulates is highlighted. A command framework is outlined that enables to generate the various MSD theories through assigning statistical properties to different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Then it is shown that distinct forms of nuclear randomness are embodied in the mentioned theories. All these theories appear to be very similar at a qualitative level. In order to explain the high energy-tails and forward-peaked angular distribution typical for particles emitted in MSD reactions, it is imagined that the incident continuum particle stepwise looses its energy and direction in a sequence of collisions, thereby creating new particle-hole pairs in the target system. At each step emission may take place. The statistical aspect comes in because many continuum states are involved in the process. These are supposed to display chaotic behavior, the associated randomness assumption giving rise to important simplifications in the expression for MSD emission cross sections. This picture suggests that mentioned MSD models can be interpreted as a variant of essentially one and the same theory. However, this appears not to be the case. To show this usual MSD distinction within the composite reacting nucleus between the fast continuum particle and the residual interactions, the nucleons of the residual core are to be distinguished from those of the leading particle with the residual system. This distinction will turn out to be crucial to present analysis. 27 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Traveling Wave Solutions of Reaction-Diffusion Equations Arising in Atherosclerosis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Apreutesei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short review article, two atherosclerosis models are presented, one as a scalar equation and the other one as a system of two equations. They are given in terms of reaction-diffusion equations in an infinite strip with nonlinear boundary conditions. The existence of traveling wave solutions is studied for these models. The monostable and bistable cases are introduced and analyzed.

  4. Singlet oxygen reactions with flavonoids. A theoretical-experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Morales

    Full Text Available Detection of singlet oxygen emission, λ(max = 1270 nm, following laser excitation and steady-state methods were employed to measure the total reaction rate constant, k(T, and the reactive reaction rate constant, k(r, for the reaction between singlet oxygen and several flavonoids. Values of k(T determined in deuterated water, ranging from 2.4×10(7 M(-1 s(-1 to 13.4×10(7 M(-1 s(-1, for rutin and morin, respectively, and the values measured for k(r, ranging from 2.8×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 to 65.7×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 for kaempferol and morin, respectively, being epicatechin and catechin chemically unreactive. These results indicate that all the studied flavonoids are good quenchers of singlet oxygen and could be valuable antioxidants in systems under oxidative stress, in particular if a flavonoid-rich diet was previously consumed. Analysis of the dependence of rate constant values with molecular structure in terms of global descriptors and condensed Fukui functions, resulting from electronic structure calculations, supports the formation of a charge transfer exciplex in all studied reactions. The fraction of exciplex giving reaction products evolves through a hydroperoxide and/or an endoperoxide intermediate produced by singlet oxygen attack on the double bond of the ring C of the flavonoid.

  5. Singlet oxygen reactions with flavonoids. A theoretical-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Javier; Günther, Germán; Zanocco, Antonio L; Lemp, Else

    2012-01-01

    Detection of singlet oxygen emission, λ(max) = 1270 nm, following laser excitation and steady-state methods were employed to measure the total reaction rate constant, k(T), and the reactive reaction rate constant, k(r), for the reaction between singlet oxygen and several flavonoids. Values of k(T) determined in deuterated water, ranging from 2.4×10(7) M(-1) s(-1) to 13.4×10(7) M(-1) s(-1), for rutin and morin, respectively, and the values measured for k(r), ranging from 2.8×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) to 65.7×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for kaempferol and morin, respectively, being epicatechin and catechin chemically unreactive. These results indicate that all the studied flavonoids are good quenchers of singlet oxygen and could be valuable antioxidants in systems under oxidative stress, in particular if a flavonoid-rich diet was previously consumed. Analysis of the dependence of rate constant values with molecular structure in terms of global descriptors and condensed Fukui functions, resulting from electronic structure calculations, supports the formation of a charge transfer exciplex in all studied reactions. The fraction of exciplex giving reaction products evolves through a hydroperoxide and/or an endoperoxide intermediate produced by singlet oxygen attack on the double bond of the ring C of the flavonoid.

  6. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  7. Neural networks for modelling of chemical reaction systems with complex kinetics: oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molga, E.J.; van Woezik, B.A.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Application of neural networks to model the conversion rates of a heterogeneous oxidation reaction has been investigated — oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid has been considered as a case study. Due to a more complex and unknown kinetics of the investigated reaction the proposed approach based

  8. Attractor for a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Cancer Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A reaction-diffusion cancer network regulated by microRNA is considered in this paper. We study the asymptotic behavior of solution and show the existence of global uniformly bounded solution to the system in a bounded domain Ω⊂Rn. Some estimates and asymptotic compactness of the solutions are proved. As a result, we establish the existence of the global attractor in L2(Ω×L2(Ω and prove that the solution converges to stable steady states. These results can help to understand the dynamical character of cancer network and propose a new insight to study the mechanism of cancer. In the end, the numerical simulation shows that the analytical results agree with numerical simulation.

  9. Multiphasic Reaction Modeling for Polypropylene Production in a Pilot-Scale Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel multiphasic model for the calculation of the polypropylene production in a complicated hydrodynamic and the physiochemical environments has been formulated, confirmed and validated. This is a first research attempt that describes the development of the dual-phasic phenomena, the impact of the optimal process conditions on the production rate of polypropylene and the fluidized bed dynamic details which could be concurrently obtained after solving the model coupled with the CFD (computational fluid dynamics model, the basic mathematical model and the moment equations. Furthermore, we have established the quantitative relationship between the operational condition and the dynamic gas–solid behavior in actual reaction environments. Our results state that the proposed model could be applied for generalizing the production rate of the polymer from a chemical procedure to pilot-scale chemical reaction engineering. However, it was assumed that the solids present in the bubble phase and the reactant gas present in the emulsion phase improved the multiphasic model, thus taking into account that the polymerization took place mutually in the emulsion besides the bubble phase. It was observed that with respect to the experimental extent of the superficial gas velocity and the Ziegler-Natta feed rate, the ratio of the polymer produced as compared to the overall rate of production was approximately in the range of 9%–11%. This is a significant amount and it should not be ignored. We also carried out the simulation studies for comparing the data of the CFD-dependent dual-phasic model, the emulsion phase model, the dynamic bubble model and the experimental results. It was noted that the improved dual-phasic model and the CFD model were able to predict more constricted and safer windows at similar conditions as compared to the experimental results. Our work is unique, as the integrated developed model is able to offer clearer ideas

  10. Mathematical modelling of light-induced electric reaction of Cucurbita pepo L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stolarek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioelectRIc reactions of 14-16 day old plants of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and internodal cells of Nitellopsis obtusa to the action of visible and ultraviolet light (UV-C were studied. The possibility of analyzing the bioelectric reaction of pumpkin plants induced by visible light by means of mathematical modelling using a linear differential equation of the second order was considered. The solution of this equation (positive and negative functions can, in a sufficient way, reflect the participation of H+ and CI- ions in the generation of the photoelectric response in green plant cells.

  11. Modeling radical edge-site reactions of biochar in CO2/water solution under ultrasonic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatiuk, Tetiana; Sajjadi, Baharak; Hill, Glake; Leszczynska, Danuta; Chen, Wei-Yin; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    We report results of theoretical evaluation of the mechanisms of possible radical reactions on the edge-site of biochar with CO2,SUP>·-, OH ˙ , and H ˙ in irradiated aqueous solution. The computational studies were performed for model poly aromatic systems. Obtained mechanisms reflect one of the routes of the oxygen loss accompanied by increase of hydrogen content, as observed in photochemical experiment. The reaction of CO2·- with the edge site of biochar mainly leads to reduced rather than oxidized products. The mechanism of CO2 capturing is mapped by different routes of one-electron reduction and radical addition to the aromatic ring.

  12. Model reactions and natural occurrence of furans from hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krause

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds like furan and its derivatives are important for atmospheric properties and reactions. In this work the known abiotic formation of furan from catechol under Fenton-like conditions with Fe3+ sulfate was revised by the use of a bispidine Fe2+ complex as a model compound for iron with well-known characteristics. While total yields were comparable to those with the Fe3+ salt, the bispidine Fe2+ complex is a better catalyst as the turnover numbers of the active iron species were higher. Additionally, the role of iron and pH is discussed in relation to furan formation from model compounds and in natural sediment and water samples collected from the Dead Sea and several salt lakes in Western Australia. Various alkylated furans and even traces of halogenated furans (3-chlorofuran and 3-bromofuran were found in some Australian samples. 3-chlorofuran was found in three sediments and four water samples, whereas 3-bromofuran was detected in three water samples. Further, the emission of furans is compared to the abundance of several possible precursors such as isoprene and aromatic hydrocarbons as well as to the related thiophenes. It is deduced that the emissions of volatile organic compounds such as furans contribute to the formation of ultra-fine particles in the vicinity of salt lakes and are important for the local climate.

  13. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in 32 S + 118,124 Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction 197 Au+ 208 Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction 209 Bi+ 136 Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral 209 Bi+ 136 Xe Collisions at E lab /A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray μ - with a Muon Telescope

  14. Studying reaction products in a lithium thionyl chloride cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vol'fkovich, Yu.M.; Sosenkin, V.E.; Nikol'skaya, N.F.; Blinov, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    Change in the mass, volume and chemical composition of reaction insoluble products (RIP) formed in the course of discharge of thionyl chloride lithium cells under different conditions has been studied by the methods of gravimetry, volumetry and element analysis. It has been ascertained that the measured volume and mass of RIP essentially (by a factor of 1.1-1.8) exceed the calculated values, proceeding from the reaction stoichiometry. Besides lithium chloride and sulfur during discharge additional RIP is formed as LiAlCl 4 · SOCl 2 solvate, its share increasing with temperature decrease, increase in current density and electrolyte concentration [ru

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capellos, Christos

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the formal lectures and contributed papers presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on. the Advances in Chemical Reaction Dynamics. The meeting convened at the city of Iraklion, Crete, Greece on 25 August 1985 and continued to 7 September 1985. The material presented describes the fundamental and recent advances in experimental and theoretical aspects of, reaction dynamics. A large section is devoted to electronically excited states, ionic species, and free radicals, relevant to chemical sys­ tems. In addition recent advances in gas phase polymerization, formation of clusters, and energy release processes in energetic materials were presented. Selected papers deal with topics such as the dynamics of electric field effects in low polar solutions, high electric field perturbations and relaxation of dipole equilibria, correlation in picosecond/laser pulse scattering, and applications to fast reaction dynamics. Picosecond transient Raman spectroscopy which has been used for the elucidati...

  16. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krier, James M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  17. Experimental Study of Estimating the Subgrade Reaction Modulus on Jointed Rock Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehwan; Jeong, Sangseom

    2016-06-01

    The subgrade reaction modulus for rock foundations under axial loading is investigated by model footing tests. This study focuses on quantifying a new subgrade reaction modulus by considering rock discontinuities. A series of model-scale footing tests are performed to investigate the effects of the unconfined compressive strength, discontinuity spacing and inclination of the rock joint. Based on the experimental results, it is observed that the subgrade reaction modulus of the rock with discontinuities decreases by up to approximately 60 % of intact rock. In addition, it is found that the modulus of subgrade reaction is proportional to the discontinuity spacing, and it decreases gradually within the range of 0°-30° and tends to increase within the range of 30°-90°.

  18. Nonlinear electromechanical modelling and dynamical behavior analysis of a satellite reaction wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghalari, Alireza; Shahravi, Morteza

    2017-12-01

    The present research addresses the satellite reaction wheel (RW) nonlinear electromechanical coupling dynamics including dynamic eccentricity of brushless dc (BLDC) motor and gyroscopic effects, as well as dry friction of shaft-bearing joints (relative small slip) and bearing friction. In contrast to other studies, the rotational velocity of the flywheel is considered to be controllable, so it is possible to study the reaction wheel dynamical behavior in acceleration stages. The RW is modeled as a three-phases BLDC motor as well as flywheel with unbalances on a rigid shaft and flexible bearings. Improved Lagrangian dynamics for electromechanical systems is used to obtain the mathematical model of the system. The developed model can properly describe electromechanical nonlinear coupled dynamical behavior of the satellite RW. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  19. [The contamination under polymerase chain reaction studies: problems and solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, V N; Ameliushkina, V A; Rozhkova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine risk factors of false positive and false negative results under polymerase chain reaction-analysis of clinical material. The samples with high viral load can be the source of false positive results. The contamination with nucleic acids can occur at any section of polymerase chain reaction analysis. The study data permitted to establish that the most sensitive stage is isolation and purification of nucleic acids especially under manual mode of operation. The detection of positive signal in most samples of one setting indicates total contamination. The cases when only several samples are polluted are special challenge. The presence of sample with high concentration of viral nucleic acid and several samples with low concentration in one setting means necessity of repeated analysis beginning with stage of isolation of nucleic acid. The analysis of curves of accumulation of products of amplification, their forms and positioning on chart is the obligatory stage of polymerase chain reaction study in real time regimen. These actions permit to exclude the readouts of false negative testing results to departments. The study conclusions are equipotent for polymerase chain reaction testing of any nucleic acid targets.

  20. Spectrophotometric and Thermal Studies of the Reaction of Iodine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reaction of iodine (acceptor) and nickel(II) acetylacetonate (donor) was studied photometrically in different solvents such as chloroform, dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride at room temperature. The results indicate the formation of a 1: 1 charge-transfer complex in each solvent and the iodine complex is ...

  1. Study of the mechanism of hydroformylation at industrial reaction conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemdaroğlu, Naim H.; Penninger, Johannes M.L.; Oltay, Ernst

    1976-01-01

    With a newly developed analytical technique, i.e. high temperature/pressure IR cell coupled to the reactor, it was possible to study the mechanism of hydroformylation at reaction conditions. It has been conclusively found that the hydrogenolysis of the acyl cobalt complex is performed by HCo(CO)4

  2. Towards a unified model of neutrino-nucleus reactions for neutrino oscillation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S. X.; Kamano, H.; Hayato, Y.; Hirai, M.; Horiuchi, W.; Kumano, S.; Murata, T.; Saito, K.; Sakuda, M.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2017-05-01

    A precise description of neutrino-nucleus reactions will play a key role in addressing fundamental questions such as the leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy through analyzing data from next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The neutrino energy relevant to the neutrino-nucleus reactions spans a broad range and, accordingly, the dominant reaction mechanism varies across the energy region from quasi-elastic scattering through nucleon resonance excitations to deep inelastic scattering. This corresponds to transitions of the effective degree of freedom for theoretical description from nucleons through meson-baryon to quarks. The main purpose of this review is to report our recent efforts towards a unified description of the neutrino-nucleus reactions over the wide energy range; recent overall progress in the field is also sketched. Starting with an overview of the current status of neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments, we formulate the cross section to be commonly used for the reactions over all the energy regions. A description of the neutrino-nucleon reactions follows and, in particular, a dynamical coupled-channels model for meson productions in and beyond the Δ (1232) region is discussed in detail. We then discuss the neutrino-nucleus reactions, putting emphasis on our theoretical approaches. We start the discussion with electroweak processes in few-nucleon systems studied with the correlated Gaussian method. Then we describe quasi-elastic scattering with nuclear spectral functions, and meson productions with a Δ -hole model. Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions determined through a global analysis are also discussed. Finally, we discuss issues to be addressed for future developments.

  3. Interest of uranium complexes for the mechanism study of the McMurry reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, O.

    1997-01-01

    The reducing coupling reactions of ketones in diols and olefins are generally carried out with titanium or samarium compounds. In this work uranium complexes have been used. They have allowed to study the chemical reaction mechanism. This thesis is divided into three parts: 1) the reduction mechanism of uranium tetrachloride by cyclic voltametry has been studied at first. It has been shown that this reduction is followed by a transfer reaction of chlorides between the reduced specie of the higher electronic density and UCl . 2) In the second part is described: the synthesis, the crystal structure, the reactivity of the chemical agents, the stereochemistry of diols and alkenes formation and the pinacolisation reaction catalysis. 3) In the last part, the limits of the McMurry reaction are given by the study of the aromatic ketones pinacolisation reaction by-products. The obtained results show that the complexes of the metals which present a high reducing and oxo-philic (Ti, Sm, U..) character react in a similar way with the carbonyl compounds. If the uranium compounds are less used than those of the titanium in the field of the organic synthesis applications, they are precious auxiliaries and excellent models for reactions mechanisms study and for the synthesis methods optimization. (O.M.)

  4. The reaction between iodine and organic coatings under severe PWR accident conditions. An experimental parameter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmann, S.; Funke, F.; Greger, G.U.; Bleier, A.; Morell, W. [Siemens AG, Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    An extensive experimental parameter study was performed on the deposition and on the resuspension kinetics in the reaction system iodine/organically coated surfaces. Both reactions in the gas phase and in the liquid phase were investigated and kinetic rate constants suitable for modelling were derived. Previous experimental studies on the reaction of iodine with organic coated surfaces were mostly limited to temperatures below 100{sup o}C. Thus, this parameter study aims at filling a gap and providing kinetic data on heterogeneous reactions with organic surfaces in the accident-relevant temperature range of 100-160{sup o}C. Two types of laboratory experiments carried out at Siemens/KWU using coatings representative for German power plants (epoxy-tape paint), namely gas phase tests and liquid phase tests. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 5 refs.

  5. Modeling non-adiabatic photoexcited reaction dynamics in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions of photoexcited molecules, ions, and radicals in condensed phase environments involve non-adiabatic dynamics over coupled electronic surfaces. We focus on how local environmental symmetries can effect non-adiabatic coupling between excited electronic states and thus influence, in a possibly controllable way, the outcome of photo-excited reactions. Semi-classical and mixed quantum-classical non-adiabatic molecular dynamics methods, together with semi-empirical excited state potentials are used to probe the dynamical mixing of electronic states in different environments from molecular clusters, to simple liquids and solids, and photo-excited reactions in complex reaction environments such as zeolites

  6. [Studies of heavy-ion induced reactions]: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignerey, A.C.

    1986-10-01

    An experiment was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac, extending previous studies using inverse reactions to 50 MeV/u 139 La incident on targets of C and Al. Studies of excitation energy division in lower energy division in lower energy heavy-ion reactions were furthered using kinematic coincidences to measure the excitation energies of primary products in the Fe + Ho reaction at 12 MeV/u. These results will provide important systematics for comparisons with previous measurements at 9 MeV/u on the same system and at 15 MeV/u on the Fe + Fe and Fe + U systems. Also studied were different aspects of 15 MeV/u Fe-induced reactions, with experiments performed at the Oak Ridge HHIRF. The first three contributions of this report constitute a major portion of the results from this research. Finally, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac a large detector array for coincident detection of fragmentation products in heavy-ion collisions below 100 MeV/u is being built. A list of publications, personnel, and activities is provided

  7. A TGA study on the chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Min Ku, E-mail: minku@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong Taek; Kang, Kweon Ho; Park, Geun Il [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The chlorination reaction kinetics of Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls were investigated using a home-made thermogravimetric analysis for a hull chlorination (TGA-HC) system. The reproducibility of the TGA-HC system was verified by repeated measurements at an identical condition, which showed only 6.6% of maximum difference. The effect of total flow rate (Q) was investigated for Q of 120 and 240 mL/min, and it was revealed that the reaction rate is not influenced in this condition. Using the Sharp–Hancock plot, the volumetric contraction model was identified as the most suitable model for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction. The influence of chlorine partial pressure was studied at 9.21, 16.9, and 23.4 kPa of Cl{sub 2} partial pressure conditions, and it was identified that the reaction rate is proportional to the chlorine partial pressure on the order of (0.669). The effect of reaction temperature was investigated for 300–450 °C, and it was revealed that the chlorination reaction exhibits an activation energy of 26.2 kJ/mol. Using the experimental and fitting results, the reaction rate equation for the Zircaloy-4 chlorination reaction was achieved, but the equation was valid only until the conversion fraction (α) reaches up to (0.60). When α is higher than 0.60, the volumetric contraction model was not applicable. A second-order reaction rate equation was suggested for the 0.6 < α region, although it needs further investigation.

  8. Reentry blackout prediction for atmospheric reentry demonstrator mission considering uncertainty in chemical reaction rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    A numerical simulation model of plasma flows and electromagnetic waves around a vehicle was developed to predict a radio frequency blackout. Plasma flows in the shock layer and the wake region were calculated using a computational fluid dynamics technique with a three-dimensional model. A finite-catalytic wall condition known to affect plasma properties, such as the number density of electrons, was considered for accurate prediction. A parametric study was performed to investigate the effect of uncertainty in the chemical reaction rate model on evaluating a radio frequency blackout. The behavior of electromagnetic waves in plasma was investigated using a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method. Numerical simulations of reentry blackout were performed for the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator mission at various altitudes. The plasma flows and the complex movement of electromagnetic waves around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator vehicle were clarified. The predicted signal loss profile was then directly compared with the experimental flight data to validate the present models. The numerical results generally reproduced the trends over altitudes of the measured data. It is suggested that the present simulation model can be used to investigate the radio frequency blackout and signal loss of electromagnetic waves in the communication of a reentry vehicle. It was confirmed that high associative ionization reaction rates contribute to reducing the electron density in the wake region and radio frequency blackout. It is suggested that the accuracy of predicting the signal loss improved when considering the uncertainty in the chemical reaction model for associative ionizations.

  9. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer–monomer surface reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study the dimer–monomer surface reaction model. ► We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). ► Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. ► First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer–monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker–Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  10. A parametric duration model of the reaction times of drivers distracted by mobile phone conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Mazharul; Washington, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones while driving is more prevalent among young drivers-a less experienced cohort with elevated crash risk. The objective of this study was to examine and better understand the reaction times of young drivers to a traffic event originating in their peripheral vision whilst engaged in a mobile phone conversation. The CARRS-Q advanced driving simulator was used to test a sample of young drivers on various simulated driving tasks, including an event that originated within the driver's peripheral vision, whereby a pedestrian enters a zebra crossing from a sidewalk. Thirty-two licensed drivers drove the simulator in three phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. In addition to driving the simulator each participant completed questionnaires related to driver demographics, driving history, usage of mobile phones while driving, and general mobile phone usage history. The participants were 21-26 years old and split evenly by gender. Drivers' reaction times to a pedestrian in the zebra crossing were modelled using a parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model with a Weibull distribution. Also tested where two different model specifications to account for the structured heterogeneity arising from the repeated measures experimental design. The Weibull AFT model with gamma heterogeneity was found to be the best fitting model and identified four significant variables influencing the reaction times, including phone condition, driver's age, license type (provisional license holder or not), and self-reported frequency of usage of handheld phones while driving. The reaction times of drivers were more than 40% longer in the distracted condition compared to baseline (not distracted). Moreover, the impairment of reaction times due to mobile phone conversations was almost double for provisional compared to open license holders. A reduction in the ability to detect traffic events in the periphery whilst distracted

  11. Unravelling the Maillard reaction network by multiresponse kinetic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Maillard reaction is an important reaction in food industry. It is responsible for the formation of colour and aroma, as well as toxic compounds as the recent discovered acrylamide. The knowledge of kinetic parameters, such as rate constants and activation energy, is necessary to predict its

  12. Nonlinear variational models for reaction and diffusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanyi, G.E.

    1983-08-01

    There exists a natural metric w.r.t. which the density dependent diffusion operator is harmonic in the sense of Eells and Sampson. A physical corollary of this statement is the property that any two regular points on the orbit of a reaction or diffusion operator can be connected by a path along which the reaction rate is constant. (author)

  13. Analysis of Milk Production Traits in Early Lactation Using a Reaction Norm Model with Unknown Covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdi Shariati, Mohammad; Su, Guosheng; Madsen, Per

    2007-01-01

    The reaction norm model is becoming a popular approach to study genotype x environment interaction (GxE), especially when there is a continuum of environmental effects. These effects are typically unknown, and an approximation that is used in the literature is to replace them by the phenotypic...... means of each environment. It has been shown that this method results in poor inferences and that a more satisfactory alternative is to infer environmental effects jointly with the other parameters of the model. Such a reaction norm model with unknown covariates and heterogeneous residual variances...... across herds was fitted to milk, protein, and fat yield of first-lactation Danish Holstein cows to investigate the presence of GxE. Data included 188,502 first test-day records from 299 herds and 3,775 herd-years in a time period ranging from 1991 to 2003. Variance components and breeding values were...

  14. Modeling spallation reactions in tungsten and uranium targets with the Geant4 toolkit*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner Walter

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study primary and secondary reactions induced by 600 MeV proton beams in monolithic cylindrical targets made of natural tungsten and uranium by using Monte Carlo simulations with the Geant4 toolkit [1–3]. Bertini intranuclear cascade model, Binary cascade model and IntraNuclear Cascade Liège (INCL with ABLA model [4] were used as calculational options to describe nuclear reactions. Fission cross sections, neutron multiplicity and mass distributions of fragments for 238U fission induced by 25.6 and 62.9 MeV protons are calculated and compared to recent experimental data [5]. Time distributions of neutron leakage from the targets and heat depositions are calculated.

  15. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernovae: Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Eduardo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now.Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying the individual reactions rates that most strongly affect the isotopic products of these supernovae.Method: We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and have postprocessed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass shell with a nucleosynthetic code to obtain the chemical composition of the ejected matter. We have considered increases (decreases) by a factor of 10 on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions (simultaneously with their inverse reactions), repeating the nucleosynthesis calculations after modification of each reaction rate pair. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. From the calculations we have selected the reactions that have the largest impact on the supernova yields, and we have computed again the nucleosynthesis using two or three alternative prescriptions for their rates, taken from the JINA REACLIB database. For the three reactions with the largest sensitivity we have analyzed as well the temperature ranges where a modification of their rates has the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis.Results: The nucleosynthesis resulting from the type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of two 12C nuclei. The energy of the explosion changes by less than ˜4% when the rates of the reactions 12C+12C or 16O+16O are multiplied by a factor of ×10 or

  16. Contribution to the modelling of gas-solid reactions and reactors; Contribution a la modelisation des reactions et des reacteurs gaz-solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patisson, F

    2005-09-15

    Gas-solid reactions control a great number of major industrial processes involving matter transformation. This dissertation aims at showing that mathematical modelling is a useful tool for both understanding phenomena and optimising processes. First, the physical processes associated with a gas-solid reaction are presented in detail for a single particle, together with the corresponding available kinetic grain models. A second part is devoted to the modelling of multiparticle reactors. Different approaches, notably for coupling grain models and reactor models, are illustrated through various case studies: coal pyrolysis in a rotary kiln, production of uranium tetrafluoride in a moving bed furnace, on-grate incineration of municipal solid wastes, thermogravimetric apparatus, nuclear fuel making, steel-making electric arc furnace. (author)

  17. Study of kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O2, CO2 and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gan; Lu Guangda; Jing Wenyong; Qin Cheng

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of lithium deuteride powder with O 2 , CO 2 and water vapor is studied. The experimental results show that lithium deuteride reacts with O 2 and CO 2 at very small reaction rate but with water vapor at comparatively larger rate at room temperature (≅28 degree C). The reaction process with water vapor could be described using the unreacted shrinking core model. The second-order kinetics is appropriate for the chemical reaction on the surface of lithium deuteride and reaction rate constant is 0.281 kPa -1 ·min -1

  18. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li 2 O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li 2 O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li 2 O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive

  19. Choline acetyltransferase: further studies on the reverse reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, L.L.; Chao, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    In order to further characterize the reaction mechanism of brain ChAc in its purified form, we have investigated the reverse reaction of ChAc in terms of pH optimum, salt effects, and substrate kinetics using a radiochemical assay. We directly measured the reaction product acetylcoenzyme A which was separated from the substrate ACh by a cation exchange column. Dowex 50W-X8 (Na+ form). The reverse reaction of ChAc was linear with incubation time up to 40 minutes, and with enzyme protein concentration up to 5 micrograms. It had a pH optimum at 7.0. At 0.22 M the monovalent chloride and bromide salts activated the reverse ChAc activity by 23-47% but the fluoride and iodide salts inhibited the reverse enzyme activity by 10-30%. Kinetic studies in the absence of salt showed that KACh was 0.62 +/- 0.06 mM, KCoA . SH was 12.68 +/- 1.21 microM, and Vmax was 11.6 +/- 1.0 nmol AcCoA/mg protein/min. These data are in disagreement with the values reported on partially purified ChAc from bovine brain by Glover and Potter [1971] and Hersh [1980]. This indicates that further investigations are necessary to clarify or resolve these differences

  20. Experimental tests of recent nuclear models with the (n,γ) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The nonselectivity of the (n,γ) reaction provides a powerful tool for the study of those nuclear models of broad applicability whose characteristic excitations span a wide range of degrees of freedom. Several recent examples of this are discussed with particular emphasis on the recent discovery of the 0(6) limit of the interacting boson model and of a new interpretation of the Pt--0s transition region which consequently emerges. Other topics considered include recent extensions of the Nilsson model to new regions of nucleus, excitation energy and complexity of states. 43 references

  1. A coupled reaction and transport model for assessing the injection, migration and fate of waste fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Ortoleva, P.

    1996-01-01

    The use of reaction-transport modeling for reservoir assessment and management in the context of deep well waste injection is evaluated. The study is based on CIRF.A (Chemical Interaction of Rock and Fluid), a fully coupled multiphase flow, contaminant transport, and fluid and mineral reaction model. Although SWIFT (Sandia Waste-Isolation Flow and Transport Model) is often the numerical model of choice, it can not account for chemical reactions involving rock, wastes, and formation fluids and their effects on contaminant transport, rock permeability and porosity, and the integrity of the reservoir and confining units. CIRF.A can simulate all these processes. Two field cases of waste injection were simulated by CIRF.A. Both observation data and simulation results show mineral precipitation in one case and rock dissolution in another case. Precipitation and dissolution change rock porosity and permeability, and hence the pattern of fluid migration. The model is shown to be invaluable in analyzing near borehole and reservoir-scale effects during waste injection and predicting the 10,000 year fate of the waste plume. The benefits of using underpressured compartments as waste repositories were also demonstrated by CIRF.A simulations

  2. A reaction-diffusion model of CO2 influx into an oocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somersalo, Erkki; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.; Calvetti, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a novel mathematical model for simulating transients in surface pH (pHS) and intracellular pH (pHi) caused by the influx of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Xenopus oocyte. These transients are important tools for studying gas channels. We assume that the oocyte is a sphere surrounded by a thin layer of unstirred fluid, the extracellular unconvected fluid (EUF), which is in turn surrounded by the well-stirred bulk extracellular fluid (BECF) that represents an infinite reservoir for all solutes. Here, we assume that the oocyte plasma membrane is permeable only to CO2. In both the EUF and intracellular space, solute concentrations can change because of diffusion and reactions. The reactions are the slow equilibration of the CO2 hydration-dehydration reactions and competing equilibria among carbonic acid (H2CO3)/bicarbonate ( HCO3-) and a multitude of non-CO2/HCO3- buffers. Mathematically, the model is described by a coupled system of reaction-diffusion equations that—assuming spherical radial symmetry—we solved using the method of lines with appropriate stiff solvers. In agreement with experimental data (Musa-Aziz et al, PNAS 2009, 106:5406–5411), the model predicts that exposing the cell to extracellular 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3- (pH 7.50) causes pHi to fall and pHS to rise rapidly to a peak and then decay. Moreover, the model provides insights into the competition between diffusion and reaction processes when we change the width of the EUF, membrane permeability to CO2, native extra-and intracellular carbonic anhydrase-like activities, the non-CO2/HCO3- (intrinsic) intracellular buffering power, or mobility of intrinsic intracellular buffers. PMID:22728674

  3. Ares I Reaction Control System Propellant Feedline Decontamination Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to quantify the effects of purge gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate on Hydrazine (Hz) decontamination rates of the Ares I Roll Control System and Reaction Control System. A survey of experts in this field revealed the absence of any decontamination rate prediction models. Three basic decontamination methods were identified for analysis and modeling. These include low pressure eduction, high flow rate purge, and pulse purge. For each method, an approach to predict the Hz mass transfer rate, as a function of system pressure, temperature, and purge gas mass flow rate, is developed based on the applicable physics. The models show that low pressure eduction is two orders of magnitude more effective than the high velocity purge, which in turn is two orders of magnitude more effective than the pure diffusion component of pulse purging of deadheads. Eduction subjects the system to low pressure conditions that promote the extraction of Hz vapors. At 120 F, Hz is saturated at approximately 1 psia. At lower pressures and 120 F, Hz will boil, which is an extremely efficient means to remove liquid Hz. The Hz boiling rate is predicted by equating the rate at which energy is added to the saturated liquid Hz through heaters at the tube outer wall with the energy removed from the liquid through evaporation. Boil-off fluxes were predicted by iterating through the range of local pressures with limits set by the minimum allowed pressure of 0.2 psia and maximum allowed wall temperature of 120 F established by the heaters, which gives a saturation pressure of approximately 1.0 psia. Figure 1 shows the resulting boil-off fluxes as a function of local eduction pressure. As depicted in figure 1, the flux is a strong inverse function of eduction pressure, and that minimizing the eduction pressure maximizes the boil-off flux. Also, higher outer wall temperatures lead to higher boil-off fluxes and allow for boil-off over a greater range

  4. Characterization of Bismuth Germanate Detectors for Reaction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carls, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Hertz-Kintish, D.; Thompson, P.; Waddell, D.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear reactions utilizing radioactive ion beams emit particles and electromagnetic radiation that can provide useful information about reaction mechanisms, nuclear structure, and nuclear astrophysics. Owing to their high density and high Z, Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are used in γ-ray decay studies where high efficiency is required. An array of such detectors will be used for future γ-ray studies with the new gas jet target JENSA (Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics), and the properties of each detector must be well known to better understand the data collected with them. Using the γ-ray sources 137Cs and 60Co along with background radiation, several BGO detectors were characterized by measuring their resolutions and efficiencies as functions of distance between source and detector. A detailed description of the procedure and results will be presented. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  5. Continuing studies of alkali-aggregate reactions in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliot, J.E.; Beddoes, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are continuing into the nature of the different forms of the alkali-aggregate reaction. No general agreement exists as to the detailed nature of the expansive mechanisms. Alkali is known to react internally with opaline silica because of its microporous nature whereas reaction at the external surface is thought to be relatively more important in the case of quartz. A combination of Fourier shape and surface texture analysis, microscopy and osmotic studies is being used to obtain information on the relative importance of these two forms of alkaline attack on silica. Analytical methods are much more rapid than dimensional change tests and it is hoped that a better understanding of the expansion mechanism will lead to more certain recognition of potentially alkali expansive aggregates

  6. Crossed-beam studies of the dynamics of radical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of this program is to characterize the detailed dynamics of elementary radical reactions and to provide a better understanding of radical reactivity in general. The radical beam is typically generated by a laser photolysis method. After colliding with the reacting molecule in a crossed-beam apparatus, the reaction product state distribution is interrogated by laser spectroscopic techniques. Several radicals of combustion significance, such as O, CH, OH, CN and NCO have been successfully generated and their collisional behavior at the state-to-state integral cross section level of detail has been studied in this manner. During the past year, the detection system has been converted from LIF to REMPI schemes, and the emphasis of this program shifted to investigate the product angular distributions. Both inelastic and reactive processes have been studied.

  7. Chemical Dynamics Studies of Reactions in Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Donald O

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical/computational research program to develop methods, simulate complex reactions, and investigate the fundamental chemical dynamics of reactions of nitramine energetic materials occurring...

  8. Wide Temperature Range Kinetics of Elementary Combustion Reactions for Army Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this program are to provide accurate kinetic data on isolated elementary reactions at temperatures relevant to Army combustion models, particularly for propellant combustion dark zones...

  9. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel disturbances are some of the largest sources of noise on sensitive telescopes. Such wheel-induced mechanical noises are not well characterized....

  10. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel mechanical noise is one of the largest sources of disturbance forcing on space-based observatories. Such noise arises from mass imbalance, bearing...

  11. Study of Cold Fusion Reactions Using Collective Clusterization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-10-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), the 1n evaporation cross-sections ({σ }1n) of cold fusion reactions (Pb and Bi targets) are calculated for {Z}{CN}=104–113 superheavy nuclei. The calculations are carried out in the fixed range of excitation energy {E}{CN}* =15+/- 1 {MeV}, so that the comparative analysis of reaction dynamics can be worked out. First of all, the fission barriers (B f ) and neutron separation energies ({S}1n) are estimated to account the decreasing cross-sections of cold fusion reactions. In addition to this, the importance of hot optimum orientations of β 2i-deformed nuclei over cold one is explored at fixed angular momentum and neck-length parameters. The hot optimum orientations support all the target-projectile (t,p) combinations, which are explored experimentally in the cold fusion reactions. Some new target-projectile combinations are also predicted for future exploration. Further, the 1n cross-sections are addressed for {Z}{CN}=104–113 superheavy nuclei at comparable excitation energies which show the decent agrement with experimental data upto {Z}{CN}=109 nuclei. Finally, to understand the dynamics of higher-Z superheavy nuclei, the cross-sections are also calculated at maximum available energies around the Coulomb barrier and the effect of non-sticking moment of inertia ({I}{NS}) is also investigated at these energies. Supported by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in the Form of Research Project Grant No. 03(1341)/15/EMR-II, and to DST, New Delhi, for INSPIRE-Fellowship Grant No. DST/INSPIRE/03/2015/000199

  12. Prospects in the study of very inelastic electronuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Nuclear physics has reached a frontier where it is not possible to consider the classical constituents (mesons and nucleons) as inert objects: it is necessary to take also into account internal structure. After having shown how the study of nuclei, with the electromagnetic probe, has made it possible to solve and clarify some problems, it is shown under what conditions these internal degrees of freedom can show up in the study of electronuclear reactions, and to what extent the study of complex hadronic systems at short distance is an essential complement to the study of high momentum scattering between elementary hadrons

  13. Millimeter and Submillimeter Studies of O(^1D) Insertion Reactions to Form Molecules of Astrophysical Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Brian; Wehres, Nadine; Deprince, Bridget Alligood; Roy, Althea A. M.; Laas, Jacob; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2015-06-01

    While both the number of detected interstellar molecules and their chemical complexity continue to increase, understanding of the processes leading to their formation is lacking. Our research group combines laboratory spectroscopy, observational astronomy, and astrochemical modeling for an interdisciplinary examination of the chemistry of star and planet formation. This talk will focus on our laboratory studies of O(^1D) insertion reactions with organic molecules to produce molecules of astrophysical interest. By employing these reactions in a supersonic expansion, we are able to produce interstellar organic reaction intermediates that are unstable under terrestrial conditions; we then probe the products using millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy. We benchmarked this setup using the well-studied O(^1D) + methane reaction to form methanol. After optimizing methanol production, we moved on to study the O(^1D) + ethylene reaction to form vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH), and the O(^1D) + methyl amine reaction to form aminomethanol (NH_2CH_2OH). Vinyl alcohol measurements have now been extended up to 450 GHz, and the associated spectral analysis is complete. A possible detection of aminomethanol has also been made, and continued spectral studies and analysis are underway. We will present the results from these experiments and discuss future applications of these molecular and spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Study of reactions induced by the halo nucleus 11Li with the active target MAYA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, Th.

    2009-09-01

    Active targets are perfect tools for the study of nuclear reactions induced by very low intensity radioactive ion beams. They also enable the simultaneous study of direct and compound nuclear reactions. The active target MAYA, built at GANIL, has been used to study the reactions induced by a 4.3*A MeV 11 Li beam at the ISAC2 accelerator TRIUMF (Canada). The angular distributions for the elastic scattering and the one and two neutron transfer reaction have been reconstructed. The elastic scattering angular distribution indicates a strong enhancement of the flux absorption with respect to the neighbouring nuclei. From a coupled channel analysis of the two neutron transfer reaction for different three body models, the information on the structure of the halo of the Borromean nucleus 11 Li have been extracted. Meanwhile, the energy dependence of the elastic scattering reaction has been studied, using the active target MAYA as a thick target. The resulting spectrum shows a resonance around 3 MeV centre of mass. This resonance could be an isobaric analog state of 12 Li, observed in 12 Be. R matrix calculations have been performed in order to extract the parameters (spin and parity) of this state. (author)

  15. A Kinetic Study of the Gas-Phase Reaction of OH with Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukov, Mikhail G.; Dellinger, Barry; Knyazev, Vadim D.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental, temperature-dependent kinetic study of the gas-phase reaction of the hydroxyl radical with molecular bromine (reaction 1) has been performed using a pulsed laser photolysis/pulsed-laser-induced fluorescence technique over a wide temperature range of 297 – 766 K, and at pressures between 6.68 and 40.29 kPa of helium. The experimental rate coefficients for reaction 1 demonstrate no correlation with pressure and exhibit a negative temperature dependence with a slight negative curvature in the Arrhenius plot. A non-linear least-squares fit with two floating parameters of the temperature dependent k1(T) data set using an equation of the form k1(T) = ATn yields the recommended expression k1(T) = 1.85×10−9T − 0.66 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 for the temperature dependence of the reaction 1 rate coefficient. The potential energy surface (PES) of reaction 1 was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The reaction proceeds through formation of a weakly bound OH···Br2 complex and a PES saddle point with an energy below that of the reactants. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient was modeled using the RRKM method on the basis of the calculated PES. PMID:16854030

  16. Condensed Matter Deuterium Cluster Target for Study of Pycnonuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoling; George, Miley

    2009-11-01

    Fusion reactions have two main classes: thermonuclear and the pycnonuclear. Thermonuclear fusion occurs in low density high temperature plasmas, and is very sensitive to the ion temperature due to Columbic repulsion effects. As the density increases, the Columbic potential barrier is depressed by increased electron screening, allowing fusion at lower temperatures. This type of nuclear reaction is termed a pycnonuclear fusion and is the basis for astrophysical fusion. Ichimarua [1] proposed a laboratory study of this process using explosive mechanical compression of H/D to metallic densities, which would be extremely difficult to implement. Instead, our recent research suggests that metallic-like H/D ``clusters'' can be formed in dislocation loops of thin Palladium foils through electrochemical processes. [2] If this technique is used as a laser compression target, the compressed cluster density would allow study of pycnonuclear reactions. This provides a means of studying astrophysical fusion process, and could also lead to an important non-cryogenic ICF target. [2] [4pt] [1] S. Ichimaru, H. Kitamura. Phys. Plasmas, 6, 2649 (1999) [0pt] [2] G. Miley and X. Yang, Deuterium Cluster Target for Ultra-High Density, 18TH TOFE, San Francisco, CA Sep. 28 -- Oct. 2, 2008

  17. Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic for Mathematics Model Reduction of Cadmium Reaction Rate, Constant and Reaction Orde in to Electrochemical Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2007-01-01

    The experiment was reduction of cadmium rate with electrochemical influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. The aim of the experiment was to know the influence, mathematic model reduction of cadmium the reaction rate, reaction rate constant and reaction orde influenced by time process, concentration, current strength and type of electrode plate. Result of research indicate the time processing if using plate of copper electrode is during 30 minutes and using plate of aluminium electrode is during 20 minutes. Condition of strong current that used in process of electrochemical is only 0.8 ampere and concentration effective is 5.23 mg/l. The most effective type Al of electrode plate for reduction from waste and the efficiency of reduction is 98 %. (author)

  18. Study of charged current reactions induced by muon antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huss, D.

    1979-07-01

    We present in this work a study of antineutrino reactions on light targets. We have used the Gargamelle cloud chamber with a propane-freon mix. In the 2 first chapters we give a brief description of the experimental setting and we present the selection criteria of the events. In the third chapter we analyse the data for the reaction anti-ν + p → μ + + n that preserves strangeness. We have deduced the values of the axial (M A ) and vector (M V ) form factors: M A = (O.92 ± 0.08) GeV and M V = (0.86 ± 0.04) GeV. In the fourth chapter we study reactions in which strange particles appear (ΔS = 1) and we have determined their production cross-sections. The elastic reaction: anti-ν + p → μ + + Λ is studied in a more accurate manner thanks to a 3-constraint adjustment that enables the selection of events occurring on free protons. We have deduced from our data the longitudinal, orthogonal and transverse polarization of Λ, we have got respectively P l = -0.06 ± 0.44; P p = 0.29 ± 0.41; P t 1.05 ± 0.30. We have also deduced the values of the total cross-section as a function of the incident antineutrino energy E: σ (0.27 ± 0.02)*E*10 -38 cm -2 . E has been assessed from the energy deposited in the cloud chamber and we have adjusted the cross-section with a straight line as it is expected under the assumption of scale invariance. (A.C.)

  19. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces the multi-element isotope data observed in previous experimental studies. Furthermore, it precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways as well as their range of variation consistent with observed bulk isotope fractionation. It was also possible to directly validate the model capability to predict the evolution of position-specific isotope ratios with available experimental data. Therefore, the approach is useful both for a mechanism-based evaluation of experimental results and as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. - Highlights: • Mechanism-based, position-specific isotope modeling of micropollutants degradation. • Simultaneous description of concentration and primary and secondary isotope effects. • Key features of the model are demonstrated with three illustrative examples. • Model as a tool to explore reaction mechanisms and to design experiments. - We propose a modeling approach incorporating mechanistic information and

  20. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A study to design the emergency reaction plan for LPG tanks in 5 th ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to design the emergency reaction plan for LPG tanks in 5 th refinery, south pars gas-condensate by using phast software. ... LPG export pipeline requires more protection due to the radiation radius as a result of fire induced by fracture. Keywords: Outcome analysis; phast software; accident modeling; risk assessment; ...

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the reaction of water with formaldehyde in sulfuric acid solution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprik, M.; Meijer, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics methods have been used to study the reaction mechanism of acidcatalyzed addition of water to formaldehyde in a model system of an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid. Using the method of constraints we find that an H

  3. Study of the (p,px) reaction at 156 MeV on some light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelier, Daniel

    1971-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of four quasi-elastic diffusion reactions of (p,px) type at 156 MeV: 6 Li(p,pd ) 4 He, 6 Li(p,pr) 3 H, 7 Li(p,pt) 4 He and 12 C(p,pd) 10 B. The objectives were to check the quasi-elastic character of these reactions and to describe them by pulse approximations with plane waves, to study their selection rules and to understand their angular correlations with respect to momentum distribution in the target nucleus of ejected substructures (clusters), to compare the probabilities of different configurations corresponding to different models, and, in the case of carbon, to compare the experimental energy spectrum with theoretical predictions. After a discussion of the theoretical expression of the cross-section of a quasi-elastic reaction, and a presentation of the different nuclear models which have been used for this reaction type, the author reports the study of the kinematics of these reactions by defining the conditions under which the knock-out mechanism is promoted. The author describes the beam, targets, detectors and electronic devices used for this study. He addresses the methods used to identify events and to analyse results. Experimental results are presented and compared with theoretical results and with other published experimental results

  4. Elementary reaction modeling of reversible CO/CO2 electrochemical conversion on patterned nickel electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Shi, Yixiang; Li, Wenying; Cai, Ningsheng

    2018-03-01

    CO/CO2 are the major gas reactant/product in the fuel electrode of reversible solid oxide cells (RSOC). This study proposes a two-charge-transfer-step mechanism to describe the reaction and transfer processes of CO-CO2 electrochemical conversion on a patterned Ni electrode of RSOC. An elementary reaction model is developed to couple two charge transfer reactions, C(Ni)+O2-(YSZ) ↔ CO(Ni)+(YSZ) +2e- and CO(Ni)+O2-(YSZ) ↔ CO2(Ni)+(YSZ)+2e-, with adsorption/desorption, surface chemical reactions and surface diffusion. This model well validates in both solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modes by the experimental data from a patterned Ni electrode with 10 μm stripe width at different pCO (0-0.25 atm), pCO2 (0-0.35 atm) and operating temperature (600-700 °C). This model indicates SOEC mode is dominated by charge transfer step C(Ni)+O2-(YSZ)↔CO(Ni)+(YSZ) +2e-, while SOFC mode by CO(Ni)+ O2-(YSZ)↔CO2(Ni)+(YSZ)+2e- on the patterned Ni electrode. The sensitivity analysis shows charge transfer step is the major rate-determining step for RSOC, besides, surface diffusion of CO and CO2 as well as CO2 adsorption also plays a significant role in the electrochemical reaction of SOEC while surface diffusion of CO and CO2 desorption could be co-limiting in SOFC.

  5. Direct Reaction Experimental Studies with Beams of Radioactive Tin Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ahn, S.H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allmond, James M [ORNL; Ayres, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Baugher, T. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bazin, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Beene, James R [ORNL; Berryman, J. S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bey, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cartegni, L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)/Sungkyunkwan University, Korea; Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Gade, A. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL); Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Garcia-Ruiz, R.F. [Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, B-3001, Leuven, Belgium; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Howard, Meredith E [ORNL; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University (TTU); Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Manning, Brett M [ORNL; Matos, M. [Louisiana State University; McDaniel, S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Miller, D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; O' Malley, Patrick [Rutgers University; Padgett, S [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Pittman, S. T. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Radford, David C [ORNL; Ratkiewicz, Andrew J [ORNL; Schmitt, Kyle [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Stroberg, S. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tostevin, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Varner Jr, Robert L [ORNL; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Wimmer, K. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL)/Central Michigan University; Winkler, R. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2015-01-01

    The tin chain of isotopes provides a unique region in which to investigate the evolution of single-particle structure, spreading from N = 50 at Sn-100, through 10 stable isotopes and the N = 82 shell closure at Sn-132 out into the r-process path. Direct reactions performed on radioactive ion beams are sensitive spectroscopic tools for studying exotic nuclei. Here we present one experiment knocking out neutrons from tin isotopes that are already neutron deficient and two reactions that add a neutron to neutron-rich Sn-130. Both techniques rely on selective particle identification and the measurement of gamma rays in coincidence with charged ions. We present the goals of the two experiments and the particle identification for the channels of interest. The final results will be presented in future publications.

  6. Subpicosecond pulse radiolysis studies on spur reactions and nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.

    2003-01-01

    Recently we developed a subpicosecond pulse radiolysis system, although the time resolution of pulse radiolysis had remained about 30 ps for these 30 years. Time resolution and S/N ratio have been improved dramatically. The subpicosecond pulse radiolysis is a very powerful method to detect and observe transient phenomena in radiation chemistry and physics within 30 ps. By using the subpicosecond pulse radiolysis, many researches have been carried out on ultrafast phenomena in radiation chemistry, physics, biology and applied fields such as material science.Especially the spur reaction, which is one of the most important reactions in radiation chemistry, physics and biology, has been studied in the very wide time range from subpicosecond to several hundred nanoseconds by very high S/N ratio. These experimental results were analyzed theoretically and applied to the basic data for nanofabrication, which are very important in both next generation lithography and nanotechnology

  7. A study of butyl acetate synthesis. 4-reaction kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Orjuela Londoño

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at studying liquid-phase acetic acid and butyl alcohol esterification reaction (P atm =0.76 Bar,using an ion exchange resin (Lewatit K-2431 as catalyst. The effect of the absence of internal and external mass transport on catalyst particles was established in the research conditions used here. A set of assays to determine the effect of catalyst load (0.5%, 1%, 2% w/w temperature (73°C, 80°C, 87°C and molar ratio (1:2, 1:1, 2:1 acid/alcohol on reaction rate was carried out and both LHHW and pseudo-homogeneous kinetic expressions were obtained, these being in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Study of charge transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique; National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.; Tartakovsky, B. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer reactions in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) were evaluated. The MFC was inoculated with anaerobic mesophilic sludge and operated with carbon felt, carbon cloth, and platinum (Pt) coated carbon cloth. The MFC was then fed with either acetate or glucose as a source of fuel and operated at a temperature of 25 degrees C and a pH of 7. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs demonstrated that the micro-organisms colonized the anodes. Cyclic voltammetry and polarization tests were conducted using different fractions of the anodophilic biofilm in order to determine charge transfer routes. The study characterized the electron transfer mechanisms used by the exoelectrogenic micro-organisms to produce electricity. It was concluded that further research is needed to characterize reaction transfer routes. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Quid-Induced Lichenoid Reactions: A Prevalence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Dang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available White lesions of the oral mucosa are of concern to the dental surgeon in view of the fact that some of these may be potentially malignant. Oral lichen plane: (OLP and oral lichenoid reactions (OLR share similar clinical appearances but need to be carefully distinguished because of their different etiologies and clinical behaviour. This study screened 5.017 population, in a house-to-house field survey, for tobacco use and investigated the prevalence of oral lichenoid reactions in the 98 quid users. Six subjects with clinical/clinical and histopathological criteria compatible with the diagnosis of OLR were identified. All these subjects were users of ′Gutka′, a unique chewable variant of tobacco quid containing areca nut and catechu. Statistical analysis revealed a significant association between quid habit and lesion occurrence (p < 0.005.

  10. Two-phase model of hydrogen transport to optimize nanoparticle catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Hansen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    With electrocatalysts it is important to be able to distinguish between the effects of mass transport and reaction kinetics on the performance of the catalyst. When the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is considered, an additional and often neglected detail of mass transport in liquid...... is the evolution and transport of gaseous H2, since HER leads to the continuous formation of H2 bubbles near the electrode. We present a numerical model that includes the transport of both gaseous and dissolved H2, as well as mass exchange between them, and combine it with a kinetic model of HER at platinum (Pt......) nanoparticle electrodes. We study the effect of the diffusion layer thickness and H2 dissolution rate constant on the importance of gaseous transport, and the effect of equilibrium hydrogen coverage and Pt loading on the kinetic and mass transport overpotentials. Gaseous transport becomes significant when...

  11. Modeling of a Reaction-Distillation-Recycle System to Produce Dimethyl Ether through Methanol Dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharam, Y.; Zulkarnain, L. M.; Wirya, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    The increase in the dimethyl ether yield through methanol dehydration due to a recycle integration to a reaction-distillation system was studied in this research. A one-dimensional phenomenological model of a methanol dehydration reactor and a shortcut model of distillation columns were used to achieve the aim. Simulation results show that 10.7 moles/s of dimethyl ether is produced in a reaction-distillation system with the reactor length being 4 m, the reactor inlet pressure being 18 atm, the reactor inlet temperature being 533 K, the reactor inlet velocity being 0.408 m/s, and the distillation pressure being 8 atm. The methanol conversion is 90% and the dimethyl ether yield is 48%. The integration of the recycle stream to the system increases the dimethyl ether yield by 8%.

  12. Papulo-Nodular Reactions in Black Tattoos as Markers of Sarcoidosis: Study of 92 Tattoo Reactions from a Hospital Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Hutton Carlsen, Katrina; Serup, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is, from historical data, suggested to be more prevalent among patients with tattoo reactions. We aimed to evaluate this association in a systematic study. This is a consecutive study of patients with tattoo complications, diagnosed in the "Tattoo Clinic" at Bispebjerg University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, from 2008 to 2015, based on clinical assessment and histology. From the overall group of 494 tattoo complications in 406 patients, 92 reactions in 72 patients showed a papulo-nodular pattern studied for local and systemic sarcoidosis, since sarcoidosis is expected to be nodular. Of the 92 reactions with a papulo-nodular pattern, 27 (29%) reactions in 19 patients were diagnosed as cutaneous or systemic sarcoidosis, supported by histology; 65 (71%) were diagnosed as non-sarcoidosis due to histology and no clinical sarcoid manifestations. "Rush phenomenon" with concomitant reaction in many other black tattoos, triggered by a recent tattoo with a papulo-nodular reaction, was observed in 70% in the sarcoidosis group and 28% in the non-sarcoidosis group, indicating a predisposing factor which may be autoimmune and linked with sarcoidosis. Agglomerates of black pigment forming foreign bodies may in the predisposed individual trigger widespread reaction in the skin and internal organs. Black tattoos with papulo-nodular reactions should be seen as markers of sarcoidosis. Papulo-nodular reactions may, as triggers, induce widespread reactions in other black tattoos - a "rush phenomenon" - depending on individual predisposition. Sarcoidosis is estimated to be 500-fold increased in papulo-nodular reactions compared to the prevalence in the general population, and the association with black tattoos is strong. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Study of (p-π) reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couvert, Pierre.

    1983-02-01

    This thesis presents all the A(p,π +- )A+1 experimental data measured at Saturne since 1974. A theoretical analysis of a few of them is made in the frame of a microscopic two-nucleon model, involving an intermediate δ(1232) resonance excitation. The spectrometer SPES I and the focal plane detection system are rapidly described. The data analysis method is presented in details. Calculations of the 10 B(p,π + ) 11 B (G.S.) excitation functions at constant transfer momentum lead to a good qualitative agreement in a wide range of incident energy and momentum transfer. This model also reproduces the 12 C(p,π - ) 13 O(G.S.) experimental cross sections at 613 MeV, pointing out the importance of the N(1520) resonance contribution to the (p,π - ) reaction mechanism above the (3,3) resonance [fr

  14. DL-ADR: a novel deep learning model for classifying genomic variants into adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaohui; Huang, Jimmy Xiangji; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Gang

    2016-08-10

    Genomic variations are associated with the metabolism and the occurrence of adverse reactions of many therapeutic agents. The polymorphisms on over 2000 locations of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) due to many factors such as ethnicity, mutations, and inheritance attribute to the diversity of response and side effects of various drugs. The associations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the internal pharmacokinetic patterns and the vulnerability of specific adverse reactions become one of the research interests of pharmacogenomics. The conventional genomewide association studies (GWAS) mainly focuses on the relation of single or multiple SNPs to a specific risk factors which are a one-to-many relation. However, there are no robust methods to establish a many-to-many network which can combine the direct and indirect associations between multiple SNPs and a serial of events (e.g. adverse reactions, metabolic patterns, prognostic factors etc.). In this paper, we present a novel deep learning model based on generative stochastic networks and hidden Markov chain to classify the observed samples with SNPs on five loci of two genes (CYP2D6 and CYP1A2) respectively to the vulnerable population of 14 types of adverse reactions. A supervised deep learning model is proposed in this study. The revised generative stochastic networks (GSN) model with transited by the hidden Markov chain is used. The data of the training set are collected from clinical observation. The training set is composed of 83 observations of blood samples with the genotypes respectively on CYP2D6*2, *10, *14 and CYP1A2*1C, *1 F. The samples are genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. A hidden Markov chain is used as the transition operator to simulate the probabilistic distribution. The model can perform learning at lower cost compared to the conventional maximal likelihood method because the transition distribution is conditional on the previous state of the hidden Markov

  15. Review on modeling development for multiscale chemical reactions coupled transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Martin; Yuan, Jinliang; Sunden, Bengt [Department of Energy Sciences, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    A literature study is performed to compile the state-of-the-art, as well as future potential, in SOFC modeling. Principles behind various transport processes such as mass, heat, momentum and charge as well as for electrochemical and internal reforming reactions are described. A deeper investigation is made to find out potentials and challenges using a multiscale approach to model solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and combine the accuracy at microscale with the calculation speed at macroscale to design SOFCs, based on a clear understanding of transport phenomena, chemical reactions and functional requirements. Suitable methods are studied to model SOFCs covering various length scales. Coupling methods between different approaches and length scales by multiscale models are outlined. Multiscale modeling increases the understanding for detailed transport phenomena, and can be used to make a correct decision on the specific design and control of operating conditions. It is expected that the development and production costs will be decreased and the energy efficiency be increased (reducing running cost) as the understanding of complex physical phenomena increases. It is concluded that the connection between numerical modeling and experiments is too rare and also that material parameters in most cases are valid only for standard materials and not for the actual SOFC component microstructures. (author)

  16. Potential energy surface of the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite: Density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogonea, Valentin

    This article presents a theoretical investigation of the reaction mechanism of imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite using density functional theory calculations. Understanding this reaction mechanism will help in elucidating the mechanism of guanine nitration by peroxynitrite, which is one of the assumed chemical pathways for damaging DNA in cells. This work focuses on the analysis of the potential energy surface (PES) for this reaction in the gas phase. Calculations were carried out using Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) Hamiltonians with double-zeta basis sets ranging from 6-31G(d) to 6-31++G(d,p), and the triple-zeta basis set 6-311G(d). The computational results reveal that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite in gas phase produces the following species: (i) hydroxide ion and 2-nitroimidazole, (ii) hydrogen superoxide ion and 2-nitrosoimidazole, and (iii) water and 2-nitroimidazolide. The rate-determining step is the formation of a short-lived intermediate in which the imidazole C2 carbon is covalently bonded to peroxynitrite nitrogen. Three short-lived intermediates were found in the reaction path. These intermediates are involved in a proton-hopping transport from C2 carbon to the terminal oxygen of the OO moiety of peroxynitrite via the nitroso (ON) oxygen. Both HF and DFT calculations (using the Becke3-Lee-Yang-Parr functional) lead to similar reaction paths for proton transport, but the landscape details of the PES for HF and DFT calculations differ. This investigation shows that the reaction of imidazole with peroxynitrite produces essentially the same types of products (nitro- and nitroso-) as observed experimentally in the reaction of guanine with peroxynitrite, which makes the former reaction a good model to study by computation the essential characteristics of the latter reaction. Nevertheless, the computationally determined activation energy for imidazole nitration by peroxynitrite in the gas phase is 84.1 kcal

  17. Nuclear reaction rate uncertainties and astrophysical modeling: Carbon yields from low-mass giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herwig, Falk; Austin, Sam M.; Lattanzio, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations that demonstrate the influence of three key nuclear reaction rates on the evolution of asymptotic giant branch stars have been carried out. We study the case of a star with an initial mass of 2 M · and a metallicity of Z=0.01, somewhat less than the solar metallicity. The dredge-up of nuclear processed material from the interior of the star and the yield predictions for carbon are sensitive to the rate of the 14 N(p,γ) 15 O and triple-α reactions. These reactions dominate the H- and He-burning shells of stars in this late evolutionary phase. Published uncertainty estimates for each of these two rates propagated through stellar evolution calculations cause uncertainties in carbon enrichment and yield predictions of about a factor of 2. The other important He-burning reaction, 12 C(α,γ) 16 O, although associated with the largest uncertainty in our study, does not have a significant influence on the abundance evolution compared with other modeling uncertainties. This finding remains valid when the entire evolution from the main sequence to the tip of the asymptotic giant branch is considered. We discuss the experimental sources of the rate uncertainties addressed here and give some outlooks for future work

  18. In situ infrared (FTIR) study of the borohydride oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha, B. Molina; Chatenet, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Physico-chimie, des Materiaux et des Interfaces (LEPMI), UMR 5631 CNRS/Grenoble-INP/UJF, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Coutanceau, C.; Hahn, F. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Av. du, Recteur Pineau, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2009-01-15

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is an interesting alternative for the electrochemical power generation at lower temperatures due to its high anode theoretical specific capacity (5 A h g{sup -1}). However, the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) is a very complex eight-electron reaction, influenced by the nature of the electrode material (catalytic or not with respect to BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis), the [BH{sub 4}{sup -}][OH{sup -}] ratio and the temperature. In order to understand the BOR mechanism, we performed in situ infrared reflectance spectroscopy measurements (SPAIRS technique) in 1 M NaOH/1 M NaBH{sub 4} with the aim to study intermediate reactions occurring on a gold electrode (a poor BH{sub 4}{sup -} hydrolysis catalyst). We monitored several bands in B-H (1184 cm{sup -1}) and B-O bond regions (1326 and 1415 cm{sup -1}), appearing sequentially with increasing electrode polarisation. Thanks to these experimental findings, we propose possible initial elementary steps for the BOR. (author)

  19. Theoretical studies of reactions at transition metal centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappe, A.K.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1981-01-01

    The considerations discussed for ab initio theoretical studies are the type of basis set and the levels of electron correlation or lack of correlation. The prototype systems described are C1 2 M=X, where M = Ti, Cr, and Mo, and X = CH 2 , NH, and O. These studies are utilized in examining metathesis by high-oxidation-state Cr and Mo complexes. Metathesis of olefins by the Cr complexes is unfavorable because of a competing reaction involving cyclopropane elimination. Metathesis by Mo complexes is more favorable, and it is concluded that the active catalyst is an oxo-carbene complex

  20. Theoretical study of cross sections of proton-induced reactions on cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yiğit

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion may be among the strongest sustainable ways to replace fossil fuels because it does not contribute to acid rain or global warming. In this context, activated cobalt materials in corrosion products for fusion energy are significant in determination of dose levels during maintenance after a coolant leak in a nuclear fusion reactor. Therefore, cross-section studies on cobalt material are very important for fusion reactor design. In this article, the excitation functions of some nuclear reaction channels induced by proton particles on 59Co structural material were predicted using different models. The nuclear level densities were calculated using different choices of available level density models in ALICE/ASH code. Finally, the newly calculated cross sections for the investigated nuclear reactions are compared with the experimental values and TENDL data based on TALYS nuclear code. Keywords: Cobalt, Nuclear Structural Materials, Reaction Cross Section, TENDL Database

  1. Esterification with ethanol to produce biodiesel from high acidity raw materials. Kinetic studies and analysis of secondary reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarello, M.L.; Dalla Costa, B.; Mendow, G.; Querini, C.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (INCAPE)-(FIQ-UNL, CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2654-Santa Fe, S3000AOJ (Argentina)

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the esterification reaction of free fatty acids (FFA) in sunflower oil, coconut oil and concentrated FFA, with ethanol, methanol and ethanol 96%, using homogeneous acid catalysts to produce biodiesel is studied. Kinetic parameters are estimated with a simplified model, and then used to predict the reaction behavior. Reactions other than the reversible esterification are considered to explain the behavior that this system displays. Such reactions are the triglycerides conversion by acid catalyzed transesterification and hydrolysis. In addition, we include kinetic studies of the reaction that occur between the sulphuric acid and methanol (or ethanol), forming mono and dialkylsulphates. This reaction produces water and consumes methanol (or ethanol), and consequently has a direct impact in the esterification reaction rate and equilibrium conversion. The concentration of sulphuric acid decreases to less than 50% of the initial value due to the reaction with the alcohol. A minimum in the acidity due to the free fatty acids as a function of time was clearly observed during the reaction, which has not been reported earlier. This behavior is related to the consecutive reactions that take place during the esterification of FFA in the presence of triglycerides. The phase separation due to the presence of water, which is generated during the reaction, is also studied. (author)

  2. Allergic reactions to milk appear sooner than reactions to hen's eggs: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Minoura, Takanori; Kitaoka, Setsuko

    2016-01-01

    Oral food challenge test doses are recommended to be performed at least 20 min apart; however, the times of symptom provocation from the start of the oral food challenge have never been compared between different foods. In this study, the durations from the start of the oral food challenge to symptom development in children with egg or milk allergy were compared. Thirty-eight and 74 children who had previously passed oral food challenges to 96 g of yogurt and pumpkin cake containing ¼ whole egg underwent oral food challenges with 200 mL raw cow's milk and 1 whole scrambled egg, respectively; of these, 15/38 and 33/74 children had a reaction. The median ages of patients with a positive challenge were 5.8 and 5.1 years for milk and eggs, respectively. The median times for the first symptom occurrence were 20 min (range, 5-55 min) and 50 min (5-480 min), respectively (p = 0.009). The first symptoms developed within 30, 60, and 90 min in 12/15 (80 %), 15/15 (100 %), and 15/15 (100 %) children with milk allergies, and in 10/33 (30.3 %), 20/33 (60.6 %), and 26/33 (78.8 %) children with egg allergies, respectively. The median times of peak symptoms were 50 min (10-210 min) and 120 min (30-560 min) (p = 0.001), and those of symptom disappearance were 90 min (30-240 min) and 180 min (80-700 min) for milk and eggs (p = 0.002), respectively. Based on the results of our study, symptoms developed within 30 min for only a subset of patients for eggs, and may even take upwards of 60 min to develop. The times of symptom disappearance were 90 min and 180 min for milk and eggs, respectively, indicating that egg-allergic patients should be observed for a longer period time than milk-allergic patients. Allergic reactions induced by milk appeared and disappeared sooner than those induced by eggs.

  3. On detonation initiation by a temperature gradient for a detailed chemical reaction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, M.A.; Kiverin, A.D.; Ivanov, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation is investigated for combustion mixture whose chemistry is governed by a detailed chemical kinetics. We show that a detailed chemical reaction model has a profound effect on the spontaneous wave concept for detonation initiation by a gradient of reactivity. The evolution to detonation due to a temperature gradient is considered for hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures at different initial pressures. It is shown that the minimal length of the temperature gradient for which a detonation can be ignited is much larger than that predicted from a one-step chemical model. - Highlights: → We study detonation initiation by temperature gradient for detailed chemical models. → Detailed chemical models have a profound effect on the spontaneous wave concept. → Initiating detonation by temperature gradient differs from one-step model. → In real fuels DDT can not be initiated by temperature gradient.

  4. Evolution of Autocatalytic Sets in Computational Models of Chemical Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim

    2016-06-01

    Several computational models of chemical reaction networks have been presented in the literature in the past, showing the appearance and (potential) evolution of autocatalytic sets. However, the notion of autocatalytic sets has been defined differently in different modeling contexts, each one having some shortcoming or limitation. Here, we review four such models and definitions, and then formally describe and analyze them in the context of a mathematical framework for studying autocatalytic sets known as RAF theory. The main results are that: (1) RAF theory can capture the various previous definitions of autocatalytic sets and is therefore more complete and general, (2) the formal framework can be used to efficiently detect and analyze autocatalytic sets in all of these different computational models, (3) autocatalytic (RAF) sets are indeed likely to appear and evolve in such models, and (4) this could have important implications for a possible metabolism-first scenario for the origin of life.

  5. C-13 isotopic studies of the surface catalysed reactions of methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, M.A.; He, S.J.X.; Adebajo, M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability of methane to methylate aromatic compounds, which are considered to be models for coal, is being studied. Related to this reaction, but at higher temperatures, is the direct formation of benzene from methane in the presence of these catalysts. Controversy exists in the literature on the former reaction, and 13 C isotope studies are being used to resolve the question. The interest in this reaction arises because the utilisation of methane, in the form of natural gas, in place of hydrogen for direct coal liquefaction would have major economic advantage. For this reason Isotope studies in this area have contributed significantly to an understanding of the methylation reactions. The paper describes experiments utilising methane 13 C, which show that methylation of aromatics such as naphthalene by the methane 13 C is catalysed by microporous, Cu-exchanged SAPO-5, at elevated pressures (6.8 MPa) and temperatures around 400 degree C. The mass spectrometric analysis and n.m.r. study of the isotopic composition of the products of the methylation reaction demonstrate unequivocally that methane provides the additional carbon atom for the methylated products. Thermodynamic calculations predict that the reaction is favourable at high methane pressures under these experimental conditions. The mechanism as suggested by the isotope study is discussed. The catalysts which show activity for the activation of methane for direct methylation of organic compounds, such as naphthalene, toluene, phenol and pyrene, are substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves, EIAPO-5 (where El=Pb, Cu, Ni and Si) and a number of metal substituted zeolites. Our earlier tritium studies had shown that these catalysts will activate alkanes, at least as far as isotope hydrogen exchange reactions are concerned

  6. Reaction of long-lived radicals and vitamin C in γ-irradiated mammalian cells and their model system at 295 K. Tunneling reaction in biological system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Yoshio; Kumada, Takayuki; Koyama, Sinji; Kodama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masami.

    1996-01-01

    When golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells or concentrated albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) that is a model system of cells is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced can be observed by ESR. The organic radicals survive at both 295 K and 310 K for such a long time as 20 hr. The long-lived radicals in GHE cells and the albumin solution react with vitamin C by the rate constants of 0.007 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 , respectively. The long-lived radicals in human cells cause gene mutation, which is suppressed by addition of vitamin C. The isotope effect on the rate constant (k) for the reaction of the long-lived radicals and vitamin C has been studied in the albumin solution by use of protonated vitamin C and deuterated vitamin C. The isotope effect (k H /k D ) was more than 20-50 and was interpreted in terms of tunneling reaction. When GHE cells or the aqueous albumin solution (0.1 kg dm -3 ) is irradiated with γ-rays at 295 K, organic radicals produced survive for more than 24 hr at room temperature. Very recently we have found that vitamin C reacts with the long-lived organic radicals in the γ-irradiated albumin solution at high concentration of 0.1 kg dm -3 by the rate constant of 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . Since most of reactions in biological systems including the reaction of vitamin C are a transfer of a hydrogen atom or a proton that has a large wave character, it is generally expected that the tunneling reaction may play an important role in biological systems at room temperature. The studies of isotope effects on reactions will give an information on the contribution of tunneling reaction. (J.P.N.)

  7. Joint ICTP-IAEA advanced workshop on model codes for spallation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Leray, S.; Yariv, Y.; Mengoni, A.; Stanculescu, A.; Mank, G.

    2008-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) organised an expert meeting at the ICTP from 4 to 8 February 2008 to discuss model codes for spallation reactions. These nuclear reactions play an important role in a wide domain of applications ranging from neutron sources for condensed matter and material studies, transmutation of nuclear waste and rare isotope production to astrophysics, simulation of detector set-ups in nuclear and particle physics experiments, and radiation protection near accelerators or in space. The simulation tools developed for these domains use nuclear model codes to compute the production yields and characteristics of all the particles and nuclei generated in these reactions. These codes are generally Monte-Carlo implementations of Intra-Nuclear Cascade (INC) or Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) models, followed by de-excitation (principally evaporation/fission) models. Experts have discussed in depth the physics contained within the different models in order to understand their strengths and weaknesses. Such codes need to be validated against experimental data in order to determine their accuracy and reliability with respect to all forms of application. Agreement was reached during the course of the workshop to organise an international benchmark of the different models developed by different groups around the world. The specifications of the benchmark, including the set of selected experimental data to be compared to the models, were also defined during the workshop. The benchmark will be organised under the auspices of the IAEA in 2008, and the first results will be discussed at the next Accelerator Applications Conference (AccApp'09) to be held in Vienna in May 2009. (author)

  8. Density Functional Study of Chemical Reaction Equilibrium for Dimerization Reactions in Slit and Cylindrical Nanopores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 16 (2009), 164713-1-24 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0725; GA AV ČR 1ET400720507; GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : density functional theory * reaction ensemble Monte Carlo * reaction equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.093, year: 2009

  9. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-04-01

    Kinetic modeling of quartz and carbon pellet at temperatures of 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) was investigated in this study. The carbon materials used were charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal. The overall SiC producing reaction can be described by the reaction SiO2 + 3C = SiC + 2CO. In the SiC-producing step, the reaction rate of quartz and carbon pellet can be expressed as {d{ pct}}/dt = ( {1 - 0.40 × X_{fix - C}^{ - 0.86} × FC × {pct}} ) × A × \\exp ( { - E/{{RT}}} ) The carbon factor F C was used to describe the influence of different carbon materials that effect the gas-solid interface reaction. For charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal, the F C values were 0.83, 0.80, 0.94, and 0.83, respectively. The pre-exponential factor A values for the preceding four carbon materials were 1.06 × 1016 min-1, 4.21 × 1015 min-1, 3.85 × 109 min-1, and 1.00 × 1025 min-1, respectively. The activation energies E for the SiC-producing step were 570, 563, 336, and 913 kJ/mole for charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal pellets, respectively.

  10. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-01-01

    Kinetic modeling of quartz and carbon pellet at temperatures of 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) was investigated in this study. The carbon materials used were charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal. The overall SiC producing reaction can be described by the reaction SiO2 + 3C = SiC + 2CO. In the SiC-producing step, the reaction rate of quartz and carbon pellet can be expressed as {d{ pct}}/dt = ( {1 - 0.40 × X_{fix - C}^{ - 0.86} × FC × {pct}} ) × A × \\exp ( { - E/{{RT}}} ) The carbon factor F C was used to describe the influence of different carbon materials that effect the gas-solid interface reaction. For charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal, the F C values were 0.83, 0.80, 0.94, and 0.83, respectively. The pre-exponential factor A values for the preceding four carbon materials were 1.06 × 1016 min-1, 4.21 × 1015 min-1, 3.85 × 109 min-1, and 1.00 × 1025 min-1, respectively. The activation energies E for the SiC-producing step were 570, 563, 336, and 913 kJ/mole for charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal pellets, respectively.

  11. A new setup for the underground study of capture reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, C.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A.; Limata, B.; Bemmerer, D.; Bonetti, R.; Broggini, C.; Campajola, L.; Cocconi, P.; Corvisiero, P.; Cruz, J.; D' Onofrio, A.; Formicola, A.; Fueloep, Z.; Gervino, G.; Gialanella, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyurky, G.; Loiano, A.; Imbriani, G.; Jesus, A.P.; Junker, M.; Musico, P.; Ordine, A.; Parodi, F.; Parolin, M.; Pinto, J.V.; Prati, P. E-mail: prati@ge.infn.it; Ribeiro, J.P.; Roca, V.; Rogalla, D.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Rottura, A.; Schuemann, F.; Somorjai, E.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Vomiero, A.; Zavatarelli, S

    2002-08-21

    For the study of astrophysically relevant capture reactions in the underground laboratory LUNA a new setup of high sensitivity has been implemented. The setup includes a windowless gas target, a 4{pi} BGO summing crystal, and beam calorimeters. The setup has been recently used to measure the d(p,{gamma}){sup 3}He cross-section for the first time within its solar Gamow peak, i.e. down to 2.5 keV c.m. energy. The features of the optimized setup are described.

  12. A new setup for the underground study of capture reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, C; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Campajola, L; Cocconi, P; Corvisiero, P; Cruz, J; D'Onofrio, A; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Gialanella, L; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Loiano, A; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Musico, P; Ordine, A; Parodi, F; Parolin, M; Pinto, J V; Prati, P; Ribeiro, J P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Rossi-Alvarez, C; Rottura, A; Schuemann, F; Somorjai, E; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Zavatarelli, S

    2002-01-01

    For the study of astrophysically relevant capture reactions in the underground laboratory LUNA a new setup of high sensitivity has been implemented. The setup includes a windowless gas target, a 4 pi BGO summing crystal, and beam calorimeters. The setup has been recently used to measure the d(p,gamma) sup 3 He cross-section for the first time within its solar Gamow peak, i.e. down to 2.5 keV c.m. energy. The features of the optimized setup are described.

  13. Delineating pMDI model reactions with loblolly pine via solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Part 1, Catalyzed reactions with wood models and wood polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    To better understand adhesive interactions with wood, reactions between model compounds of wood and a model compound of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) were characterized by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, finely ground loblolly pine sapwood, milled-wood lignin and holocellulose from the same wood were isolated and derivatized with...

  14. Modeling of Chemical Reactions in Afterburning for the Reduction of N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Glarborg, Peter; Leckner, Bo

    1996-01-01

    Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions.......Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions....

  15. Chemical reactions inside the plasma chamber of the SEAFP reactor plant models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.M.; Ebert, E.; Mazille, F.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of coolant or loss of vacuum accidents may lead to chemical reactions between the protecting materials of the plasma facing components and air or water. A production of energy, reaction products and hydrogen may be induced. The paper defines the operating conditions and chemical reactions and presents the main results from the underlying studies. (orig.)

  16. Condensed tannins: Reactions of model compounds with furfuryl alcohol and furfuraldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. Foo; Richard W. Hemingway

    1985-01-01

    Reaction products of phloroglucinol or catechin with furfuryl alcohol and furfuraldehyde were studied. In reactions of furfuryl alcohol with phloroglucinol, only 2-furyl-(11, 31, 51-trihydroxyphenyl) methane was obtained as product, and 53% of the phloroglucinol was recovered. Reactions of furfuryl...

  17. Studies of nuclear reactions at very low energies: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecil, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main thrust of the research program was directed at the acquisition, installation and initial operation of the General Ionex Model 1545 charged particle accelerator which will be used in the subsequent reaction cross section measurements. The initial operation of the accelerator has been quite successful, with all of the crucial characteristics meeting or exceeding design specifications. We have made preliminary measurements of the reactions 12C(rho,γ)13N 11 B(rho,γ) 12 C, and D(rho,γ) 3 He as tests of total system integrity and have carried out studies of the interaction of proton and alpha particle beams with deuterated-polyethylene targets. 11 refs

  18. Intolerance reaction after application of glucagon during double contrast studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainberger, F.; Fruehwald, F.; Schwaighofer, B.; Lindemayr, H.

    1986-01-01

    Whereas intolerance reactions against contrast media are a well-known hazard during radiologic procedures, intolerance reactions to other preparations used in radiology are rare. Glucagon, frequently used to induce gastrointestinal hypotonia, is said to have almost no side-effects. A case of anaphylactic reaction during double-contrast upper gastrointestinal examination is reported. Pseudoallergic reaction to propylparaben, a preservative agent in glucagon, is suspected. IgE-antibodies to glucagon could not be detected by RAST. (orig.) [de

  19. Geometrical Models of the Phase Space Structures Governing Reaction Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    of Mathematical Sciences . Springer, Berlin. [Child & Pollak(1980)] Child, M. S. & Pollak, E. (1980). Analytical reaction dynamics: Origin and implica...state region, i.e. the phase space point at which a trajectory enters the transition state region can be mapped analytically to the phase space point...Neishtadt, A. I. (1988). Mathematical aspects of classical and celestial mechanics. In V. I. Arnol’d, editor, Dynamical Systems III, volume 3 of Encyclopaedia

  20. Study of heavy ions elastic scattering and of friction phenomenon in transfer reactions induced by 28Si on 130Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Kwang-Souk.

    1978-01-01

    Elastic scattering of heavy-ions 16 O and 28 Si on 59 Co, 109 Ag and 130 Te have been studied at laboratory incident energies between 80 and 140MeV. The optical model was used to analyse elastic angular distributions and different methods for determining the total reaction cross section have been compared. Transfer reactions induced by 28 Si on 130 Te have been studied at incident energy superior to the Coulomb barrier in the ratio of 1.27. A study of these reactions shows the transition between the quasi-elastic reactions and deep inelastic reactions coresponding to the phenomenon of friction. The diffusion model is used for the analysis of these results [fr

  1. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second ...

  2. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ΔfG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than

  3. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration - Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO 2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO 2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO 2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO 2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO 2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO 2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO 2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO 2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO 2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO 2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO 2 and CH 4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of Δ f G 298 o and/or log K r,298 o are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log K r,T o or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist

  4. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces the multi-element isotope data observed in previous experimental studies. Furthermore, it precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways as well as their range of variation consistent with observed bulk isotope fractionation. It was also possible to directly validate the model capability to predict the evolution of position-specific isotope ratios with available experimental data. Therefore, the approach is useful both for a mechanism-based evaluation of experimental results and as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Travelling wave and convergence in stage-structured reaction-diffusion competitive models with nonlocal delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rui; Chaplain, M.A.J.; Davidson, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we first investigate a stage-structured competitive model with time delays, harvesting, and nonlocal spatial effect. By using an iterative technique recently developed by Wu and Zou (Wu J, Zou X. Travelling wave fronts of reaction-diffusion systems with delay. J Dynam Differen Equat 2001;13:651-87), sufficient conditions are established for the existence of travelling front solution connecting the two boundary equilibria in the case when there is no positive equilibrium. The travelling wave front corresponds to an invasion by a stronger species which drives the weaker species to extinction. Secondly, we consider a stage-structured competitive model with time delays and nonlocal spatial effect when the domain is finite. We prove the global stability of each of the nonnegative equilibria and demonstrate that the more complex model studied here admits three possible long term behaviors: coexistence, bistability and dominance as is the case for the standard Lotka-Voltera competitive model

  6. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most pote...

  7. Modelling of the spallation reaction: analysis and testing of nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toccoli, C.

    2000-01-01

    The spallation reaction is considered as a 2-step process. First a very quick stage (10 -22 , 10 -29 s) which corresponds to the individual interaction between the incident projectile and nucleons, this interaction is followed by a series of nucleon-nucleon collisions (intranuclear cascade) during which fast particles are emitted, the nucleus is left in a strongly excited level. Secondly a slower stage (10 -18 , 10 -19 s) during which the nucleus is expected to de-excite completely. This de-excitation is performed by evaporation of light particles (n, p, d, t, 3 He, 4 He) or/and fission or/and fragmentation. The HETC code has been designed to simulate spallation reactions, this simulation is based on the 2-steps process and on several models of intranuclear cascades (Bertini model, Cugnon model, Helder Duarte model), the evaporation model relies on the statistical theory of Weiskopf-Ewing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the ability of the HETC code to predict experimental results. A methodology about the comparison of relevant experimental data with results of calculation is presented and a preliminary estimation of the systematic error of the HETC code is proposed. The main problem of cascade models originates in the difficulty of simulating inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions, the emission of pions is over-estimated and corresponding differential spectra are badly reproduced. The inaccuracy of cascade models has a great impact to determine the excited level of the nucleus at the end of the first step and indirectly on the distribution of final residual nuclei. The test of the evaporation model has shown that the emission of high energy light particles is under-estimated. (A.C.)

  8. Polydioxanone biodegradable stent placement in a canine urethral model: analysis of inflammatory reaction and biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Jun, Eun Jung; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Soo Hwan; Park, Jihong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the inflammatory reaction and perform quantitative analysis of biodegradation after placement of a polydioxanone (PDO) biodegradable stent in a canine urethral model. PDO biodegradable stents were placed in the proximal and distal urethra of nine male mongrel dogs. The dogs were euthanized 4 weeks (group A; n = 3), 8 weeks (group B; n = 3), or 12 weeks (group C; n = 3) after stent placement. The luminal diameter of the stent-implanted urethra was assessed by follow-up retrograde urethrography, and histologic findings were obtained after the dogs were killed. Stents were removed after euthanasia, and their surface morphology and molecular weight were evaluated. Hematologic examination was performed to evaluate inflammatory reaction. Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs. The average luminal diameter gradually decreased. The average number of epithelial layers (2.93 vs 4.42; P stents were completely decomposed. An experimental study in a canine urethral model has demonstrated acceptable inflammatory reaction with gradually increasing granulation tissue but no luminal obstruction within 12 weeks. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Generating Converged Accurate Free Energy Surfaces for Chemical Reactions with a Force-Matched Semiempirical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P; Pietrucci, Fabio; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Goldman, Nir

    2018-03-22

    We demonstrate the capability of creating robust density functional tight binding (DFTB) models for chemical reactivity in prebiotic mixtures through force matching to short time scale quantum free energy estimates. Molecular dynamics using density functional theory (DFT) is a highly accurate approach to generate free energy surfaces for chemical reactions, but the extreme computational cost often limits the time scales and range of thermodynamic states that can feasibly be studied. In contrast, DFTB is a semiempirical quantum method that affords up to a thousandfold reduction in cost and can recover DFT-level accuracy. Here, we show that a force-matched DFTB model for aqueous glycine condensation reactions yields free energy surfaces that are consistent with experimental observations of reaction energetics. Convergence analysis reveals that multiple nanoseconds of combined trajectory are needed to reach a steady-fluctuating free energy estimate for glycine condensation. Predictive accuracy of force-matched DFTB is demonstrated by direct comparison to DFT, with the two approaches yielding surfaces with large regions that differ by only a few kcal mol -1 .

  10. Studies on the specificity of immunological reactions of synthetic and natural Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, W.

    1982-01-01

    A number of derivatives of disaccharide β-D-Gal-(1,3)-D-GalNAc, the carbohydrate component of T-antigen, and four different synthetic antigens having this disaccharide structure have been investigated. The immunological reactions with native human antibodies and rabbit immune antibodies have been studied in the haemagglutination inhibition test and in RIA. The findings are relevant to the use of synthetic carbohydrate antigens as model substances for immunological studies. (orig./MG) [de

  11. A GPU Reaction Diffusion Soil-Microbial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Ruth; Houston, Alasdair; Schmidt, Sonja; Otten, Wilfred

    2014-05-01

    Parallelised algorithms are frequent in bioinformatics as a consequence of the close link to informatics - however in the field of soil science and ecology they are less prevalent. A current challenge in soil ecology is to link habitat structure to microbial dynamics. Soil science is therefore entering the 'big data' paradigm as a consequence of integrating data pertinent to the physical soil environment obtained via imaging and theoretical models describing growth and development of microbial dynamics permitting accurate analyses of spatio-temporal properties of different soil microenvironments. The microenvironment is often captured by 3D imaging (CT tomography) which yields large datasets and when used in computational studies the physical sizes of the samples that are amenable to computation are less than 1 cm3. Today's commodity graphics cards are programmable and possess a data parallel architecture that in many cases is capable of out-performing the CPU in terms of computational rates. The programmable aspect is achieved via a low-level parallel programming language (CUDA, OpenCL and DirectX). We ported a Soil-Microbial Model onto the GPU using the DirectX Compute API. We noted a significant computational speed up as well as an increase in the physical size that can be simulated. Some of the drawbacks of such an approach were concerned with numerical precision and the steep learning curve associated with GPGPU technologies.

  12. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-12-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  13. Reactions of benzene oxide, a reactive metabolite of benzene, with model nucleophiles and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míčová, Kateřina; Linhart, Igor

    2012-10-01

    1. Reactivity of benzene oxide (BO), a reactive metabolite of benzene, was studied in model reactions with biologically relevant S- and N-nucleophiles by LC-ESI-MS. 2. Reaction with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in aqueous buffer solutions gave N-acetyl-S-(6-hydroxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-yl)cysteine (pre-phenylmercapturic acid, PPhMA), which was easily dehydrated in acidic solutions to phenylmercapturic acid (PhMA). The yield of PPhMA + PhMA increased exponentially with pH up to 11% in the pH range from 5.5 to 11.4. 3. Primary 6-hydroxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-yl (HC) adducts were detected also in reactions of purine nucleosides and nucleotides under physiological conditions. After a vigorous acidic hydrolysis, all HC adducts were converted to corresponding phenyl purines, which were identified as 7-phenylguanine (7-PhG), 3-phenyladenine (3-PhA) and N(6)-phenyladenine (6-PhA). The yield of 7-PhG amounted to 14 ± 5 and 16 ± 7 ppm for 2'-deoxyguanosine and 2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate, respectively, that of 6-PhA was 500 ± 70 and 455 ± 75 ppm with 2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-phosphate, respectively, with only traces of 3-PhA. 4. Reactions with the DNA followed by acidic hydrolysis yielded 26 ± 11 ppm (mean ± SD; n = 9) of 7-PhG as the sole adduct detected. 5. In contrast to the reactions with S-nucleophiles, the reactivity of BO with nucleophilic sites in the DNA is very low and can therefore hardly account for a significant DNA damage caused by benzene.

  14. Reaction mechanism study of 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction at above ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    production in 7Li(7Li,6He) reaction in detail, measurements have been performed at two energies, Elab = 20 and 25 MeV in the present work. 2. Experimental details. The experiment was performed using the 7Li beam at energies Elab = 20 and 25. MeV, from the 14UD BARC-TIFR Pelletron accelerator, Mumbai. The target.

  15. Reaction kinetics and modeling of photoinitiated cationic polymerization of an alicyclic based diglycidyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikrishna, R.; Ponrathnam, S.; Tambe, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Photocationic polymerization of alicyclic based diglycidyl ether was carried out. • Kinetic parameters were influenced by gelation and diffusional restrictions. • Applicability of autocatalytic model was established by nonlinear regression. • System showed higher activation energy than cycloaliphatic and aromatic diepoxides. -- Abstract: Photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cycloaliphatic diepoxides had received tremendous attention, while studies with lesser polymerizable diglycidyl ethers are comparatively less reported. The present work deals with the photoinitiated cationic polymerization of cyclohexane dimethanol diglycidyl ether followed by estimation of kinetic parameters. The effects of concentration of photoinitiator and temperature on curing performance were studied using photo differential scanning calorimeter or photo DSC with polychromatic radiation. It was observed that the rate of polymerization as well as ultimate conversion increased with increasing concentration of photoinitiator and temperature. The influences of gelation as well as diffusional restrictions have remarkable effect on cure performance. The kinetic parameters as per autocatalytic kinetic model were studied by Levenberg–Marquardt nonlinear regression method instead of conventional linear method for obtaining more accurate values of apparent rate constant. It was observed that the model fits with data from initial stages to almost towards the end of the reaction. The activation energy was found to be higher than the values reported for more reactive cycloaliphatic diepoxides. The value of pre-exponential factor increased with increase in activation energy showing influence of gelation at early stages of reaction

  16. Reaction studies of hot silicon and germanium radicals. Progress report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental approach to attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined and the progress made in the last year is reviewed in sections entitled: (a) primary steps in the reaction of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms and the identification of reactive intermediates in the recoil reactions; (b) thermally induced silylene and germylene reactions; (c) ion-molecule reaction studies

  17. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  18. Study on 9Be(#betta#, n) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, M.; Tabata, T.; Satoh, Y.; Furuta, J.; Okamoto, K.

    1982-01-01

    In chapter 1 are described measurements of cross sections σ(E sub(#betta#)) of the 9 Be(#betta#, n) reaction with six kinds of radioisotopes. The results were σ(1674.7) = 8.8 +- 1.6, σ(1705.2) = 13.3 +- 2.4, σ(1724.9) = 11.0 +- 2.0, σ(1778.9) = 7.3 +- 1.3, σ(1836.0) = 4.7 +- 0.9, and σ(2167.6) = 1.8 +- 0.4 in unit of 10 - 28 cm 2 . The cross sections measured show a cusp-like peak near the threshold, and its width is narrower than that observed by Jakobson with bremsstrahlung X-rays. Comparison of the present results with theories indicates that mutual agreement is yet qualitative. In chapter 2 is described a measurement of the intensity I(2009.8) of the crossover E4 transition in 46 Ti by applying the 9 Be(#betta#, n) reaction. The observed intensity per decay of 46 Sc was I(2009.8) = (1.2 +- 0.7) x 10 - 7 . From the present result the reduced transition probability B(E4) of the crossover E4 transition between the 2009.8 keV, 4 + excited state and the 0 + ground state of 46 Ti was estimated as B(E4) = (5.2 +- 3.7) x 10 - 99 e 2 .cm 8 . Discussion was given of the presently measured intensity and of nuclear models. (author)

  19. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-09-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst-Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants. PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  20. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean ~ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  1. Implementation of steady state approximation for modelling of reaction kinetic of UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Budiyati, Catarina Sri

    2015-12-01

    With regard to its low viscosity, high stability, clarity, film forming and binding properties, oxidised starch has been widely used in various applications specifically in the food, paper, textile, laundry finishing and binding materials industries. A number of methods have been used to produce oxidised starch through reactions with various oxidizing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, air oxygen, ozone, bromine, chromic acid, permanganate, nitrogen dioxide and hypochlorite. Unfortunately, most of previous works reported in the literatures were focused on the study of reaction mechanism and physicochemical properties characterization of the oxidised starches produced without investigation of the reaction kinetics of the oxidation process. This work aimed to develop a simple kinetic model for UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch through implementation of steady state approximation for the radical reaction rates. The model was then verified using experimental data available in the literature. The model verification revealed that the proposed model shows its good agreement with the experimental data as indicated by an average absolute relative error of only 2.45%. The model also confirmed that carboxyl groups are oxidised further by hydroxyl radical. The carbonyl production rate was found to follow first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. Similarly, carboxyl production rate also followed first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. The apparent reaction rate constant for carbonyl formation and oxidation were 6.24 × 104 s-1 and 1.01 × 104 M-1.s-1, respectively. While apparent reaction rate constant for carboxyl oxidation was 4.86 × 104 M-1.s-1.

  2. Optimised formation of blue Maillard reaction products of xylose and glycine model systems and associated antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zi; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Xi; Jing, Hao

    2014-05-01

    A blue colour can be formed in the xylose (Xyl) and glycine (Gly) Maillard reaction (MR) model system. However, there are fewer studies on the reaction conditions for the blue Maillard reaction products (MRPs). The objective of this study is to investigate characteristic colour formation and antioxidant activities in four different MR model systems and to determine the optimum reaction conditions for the blue colour formation in a Xyl-Gly MR model system, using the random centroid optimisation program. The blue colour with an absorbance peak at 630 nm appeared before browning in the Xyl-Gly MR model system, while no blue colour formation but only browning was observed in the xylose-alanine, xylose-aspartic acid and glucose-glycine MR model systems. The Xyl-Gly MR model system also showed higher antioxidant activity than the other three model systems. The optimum conditions for blue colour formation were as follows: xylose and glycine ratio 1:0.16 (M:M), 0.20 mol L⁻¹ NaHCO₃, 406.1 mL L⁻¹ ethanol, initial pH 8.63, 33.7°C for 22.06 h, which gave a much brighter blue colour and a higher peak at 630 nm. A characteristic blue colour could be formed in the Xyl-Gly MR model system and the optimum conditions for the blue colour formation were proposed and confirmed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Reaction Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Fumiya; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Yokomori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Reaction systems are a formal model that has been introduced to investigate the interactive behaviors of biochemical reactions. Based on the formal framework of reaction systems, we propose new computing models called reaction automata that feature (string) language acceptors with multiset manipulation as a computing mechanism, and show that reaction automata are computationally Turing universal. Further, some subclasses of reaction automata with space complexity are investigated and their la...

  4. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  5. Dynamic Modeling of LD Converter Steelmaking: Reaction Modeling Using Gibbs' Free Energy Minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rahul; Gupta, Pramod; Basu, Somnath; Ballal, Nidambur Bharath

    2015-04-01

    Slag-metal emulsion plays an important role in the oxidation kinetics of metalloids in oxygen steelmaking. The importance of droplet generation rate, droplet size, and its residence time in the slag-metal emulsion on the overall reaction kinetics has become evident in recent times. Residence times of the droplets are strongly dependent on the decarburization rate, the CO bubbles giving a buoyant force to the droplets. The present work aims at developing a mathematical model for predicting the composition evolutions of the slag and the metal phases as the blow proceeds in an LD converter. The process dynamics are modeled by dividing the LD convertor into three separate continuous stirred tank reactors. Oxidation reactions are assumed to be primarily taking place at the interface between the slag and the metal phases in the emulsion. Among the different mass transfer and reaction steps controlling the kinetics, the mass transfer of FeO in the slag phase and that of the metalloids within the metal droplet are assumed to be rate-controlling. For a Fe-C-X (X = Mn, Si etc.) droplet, simultaneous removal of elements have been modeled by Gibbs' free energy minimization at the slag-metal interface. Effects of droplet size, mass transfer coefficient, and initial carbon content on the mean residence time of metal droplets in the slag-metal emulsion have also been identified. Mixing in the metal phase is simulated in terms of metal exchange rate and the reactor weight ratio between the upper and the lower parts of the bath.

  6. Study of {sup 19}C by breakup reactions; Etude du {sup 19}C par reactions de cassure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liegard, Emmanuel [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 Caen (France)

    1998-01-07

    To date studies of halo nuclei have been principally focussed on the A 11 systems {sup 11}Li and {sup 11}Be. The evolution of the properties of the halo with the mass of the system and the binding energy and angular momentum of the halo nucleons is a question of fundamental importance. It was in this spirit that the present study of {sup 19}C (S{sub n} = 240 {+-} 100 keV) was undertaken. The experiment was performed at GANIL using a secondary {sup 19}C beam ({approx_equal} 15 pps at 36 MeV/nucleon) produced via fragmentation. The experimental setup which included the neutron array DEMON, provided for identification of the core-breakup and dissociation reaction channels. In the first case, a very narrow single neutron angular distribution (FWHM = 64 {+-} 17 MeV/c) was observed for {sup 19}C, in contrast to that found for three `reference` nuclei {sup 21}N, {sup 22}O and {sup 24}F (FWHM {approx_equal} 165 MeV/c). This result could be interpreted within the framework of the core-breakup reaction model of a one-neutron halo nucleus. The results obtained for dissociation, while supporting the existence of the halo, indicated that it is not well developed. In addition, a comparison between the present results, the parallel momentum distributions for the core ({sup 18}C) and theoretical predictions have allowed conclusions to be drawn regarding the configuration of the valence neutron. In particular, a purely 2s{sub 1/2} of 1d{sub 5/2} configuration is excluded and mixing, possible with core excited states, must be considered. A probable ground state spin-parity assignment of 3{sup +}/2 or 5{sup +}/2 is suggested. (author) 150 refs., 278 figs., 28 tabs.

  7. Comprehensive impedance model of cobalt deposition in sulfate solutions accounting for homogeneous reactions and adsorptive effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Pritzker, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive physicochemical model for cobalt deposition onto a cobalt rotating disk electrode in sulfate-borate (pH 3) solutions is derived and statistically fit to experimental EIS spectra obtained over a range of CoSO 4 concentrations, overpotentials and rotation speeds. The model accounts for H + and water reduction, homogeneous reactions and mass transport within the boundary layer. Based on a thermodynamic analysis, the species CoSO 4(aq) , B(OH) 3(aq) , B 3 O 3 (OH) 4 - , H + and OH - and two homogeneous reactions (B(OH) 3(aq) hydrolysis and water dissociation) are included in the model. Kinetic and transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the sum-of-squares error between the model and experimental measurements using a simplex method. The electrode response is affected most strongly by parameters associated with the first step of Co(II) reduction, reflecting its control of the rate of Co deposition, and is moderately sensitive to the parameters for H + reduction and the Co(II) diffusion coefficient. Water reduction is found not to occur to any significant extent under the conditions studied. These trends are consistent with that obtained by fitting equivalent electrical circuits to the experimental spectra. The simplest circuit that best fits the data consists of two RQ elements (resistor-constant phase element) in parallel or series with the solution resistance.

  8. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling of the symmetry factor of electrochemical proton discharge via the Volmer reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten E.; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Skúlason, Egill

    2013-01-01

    A scheme for evaluating symmetry factors of elementary electrode reactions using a density functional theory (DFT) based model of the electrochemical double layer is presented. As an illustration, the symmetry factor is determined for hydrogen adsorption via the electrochemical Volmer reaction...

  10. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mokhov, N. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gudima, K. K. [National Academy of Sciences, Cisineu (Moldova)

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  11. Testing an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Alessia De; Pancani, Luca; Steca, Patrizia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Tibaldi, Laura; Alvaro, Rosaria; Ausili, Davide; Vellone, Ercole

    2017-05-01

    To test an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings, based on the theory of planned behaviour. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions is an important problem among nurses. A cross-sectional design was used. Data were collected with the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire, and structural equation modelling was used to test the explanatory model. The convenience sample comprised 500 Italian hospital nurses (mean age = 43.52). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. The structural equation modelling showed a good fit with the data. Nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions was significantly predicted by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (R² = 0.16). The theory of planned behaviour effectively explained the mechanisms behind nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions, showing how several factors come into play. In a scenario of organisational empowerment towards adverse drug reaction reporting, the major predictors of the intention to report are support for the decision to report adverse drug reactions from other health care practitioners, perceptions about the value of adverse drug reaction reporting and nurses' favourable self-assessment of their adverse drug reaction reporting skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. New tools in modulating Maillard reaction from model systems to food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    New tools in modulating Maillard reaction from model systems to food
    The Maillard reaction (MR) supervises the final quality of foods and occupies a prominent place in food science. The first stable compounds, the Amadori rearrangement products

  13. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling thermal spike driven reactions at low temperature and application to zirconium carbide radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2017-11-01

    The development of TEM-visible damage in materials under irradiation at cryogenic temperatures cannot be explained using classical rate theory modeling with thermally activated reactions since at low temperatures thermal reaction rates are too low. Although point defect mobility approaches zero at low temperature, the thermal spikes induced by displacement cascades enable some atom mobility as it cools. In this work a model is developed to calculate "athermal" reaction rates from the atomic mobility within the irradiation-induced thermal spikes, including both displacement cascades and electronic stopping. The athermal reaction rates are added to a simple rate theory cluster dynamics model to allow for the simulation of microstructure evolution during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures. The rate theory model is applied to in-situ irradiation of ZrC and compares well at cryogenic temperatures. The results show that the addition of the thermal spike model makes it possible to rationalize microstructure evolution in the low temperature regime.

  15. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  16. On one model problem for the reaction-diffusion-advection equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, M. A.; Zakharova, S. A.; Levashova, N. T.

    2017-09-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the solution with boundary layers in the time-independent mathematical model of reaction-diffusion-advection arising when describing the distribution of greenhouse gases in the surface atmospheric layer is studied. On the basis of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities, the existence of a boundary-layer solution and its asymptotic Lyapunov stability as a steady-state solution of the corresponding parabolic problem is proven. One of the results of this work is the determination of the local domain of the attraction of a boundary-layer solution.

  17. Studies of nuclear structure in antinucleon charge-exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.

    1986-01-01

    The antinucleon-nucleus charge exchange reaction is discussed an its use as a probe of isovector excitations in nuclei is described. Attention is drawn to the fact that the (anti p,anti n) reaction will predominantly excite ''pionic'' (i.e., longitudinal spin) modes in nuclei. Comparison between (anti p,anti n) and (n,p) reactions is made. Plans for (anti p,anti n) experiments in the near future are mentioned. 21 refs., 3 figs

  18. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gribok, Andrei V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  19. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Cai, Guowei; Gribok, Andrei V.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  20. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose-Ammonia Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose-ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose-ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  1. Modeling the Electrochemical Hydrogen Oxidation and Evolution Reactions on the Basis of Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skulason, Egill; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed for the three elementary steps―Tafel, Heyrovsky, and Volmer―involved in the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and its reverse, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). For the Pt(111) surface a detailed model consisting of a negatively...... charged Pt(111) slab and solvated protons in up to three water bilayers is considered and reaction energies and activation barriers are determined by using a newly developed computational scheme where the potential can be kept constant during a charge transfer reaction. We determine the rate limiting...

  2. Development and validation of a risk model for predicting adverse drug reactions in older people during hospital stay: Brighton Adverse Drug Reactions Risk (BADRI model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan Tangiisuran

    Full Text Available Older patients are at an increased risk of developing adverse drug reactions (ADR. Of particular concern are the oldest old, which constitute an increasingly growing population. Having a validated clinical tool to identify those older patients at risk of developing an ADR during hospital stay would enable healthcare staff to put measures in place to reduce the risk of such an event developing. The current study aimed to (1 develop and (2 validate an ADR risk prediction model.We used a combination of univariate analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression to identify clinical risk factors for developing an ADR in a population of older people from a UK teaching hospital. The final ADR risk model was then validated in a European population (European dataset.Six-hundred-ninety patients (median age 85 years were enrolled in the development stage of the study. Ninety-five reports of ADR were confirmed by independent review in these patients. Five clinical variables were identified through multivariate analysis and included in our final model; each variable was attributed a score of 1. Internal validation produced an AUROC of 0.74, a sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 55%. During the external validation stage the AUROC was 0.73, with sensitivity and specificity values of 84% and 43% respectively.We have developed and successfully validated a simple model to use ADR risk score in a population of patients with a median age of 85, i.e. the oldest old. The model is based on 5 clinical variables (≥8 drugs, hyperlipidaemia, raised white cell count, use of anti-diabetic agents, length of stay ≥12 days, some of which have not been previously reported.

  3. A kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes in Aspen Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Jens F.; Banks, Scott W.; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Dufour, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Predictive kinetic reaction model applicable to any lignocellulosic feedstock. • Calculates pyrolysis yields and product composition as function of reactor conditions. • Detailed modelling of product composition (33 model compounds for the bio-oil). • Good agreement with literature regarding yield curves and product composition. • Successful validation with pyrolysis experiments in bench scale fast pyrolysis rig. - Abstract: This paper presents a novel kinetic reaction model for biomass pyrolysis processes. The model is based on the three main building blocks of lignocellulosic biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin and can be readily implemented in Aspen Plus and easily adapted to other process simulation software packages. It uses a set of 149 individual reactions that represent the volatilization, decomposition and recomposition processes of biomass pyrolysis. A linear regression algorithm accounts for the secondary pyrolysis reactions, thus allowing the calculation of slow and intermediate pyrolysis reactions. The bio-oil is modelled with a high level of detail, using up to 33 model compounds, which allows for a comprehensive estimation of the properties of the bio-oil and the prediction of further upgrading reactions. After showing good agreement with existing literature data, our own pyrolysis experiments are reported for validating the reaction model. A beech wood feedstock is subjected to pyrolysis under well-defined conditions at different temperatures and the product yields and compositions are determined. Reproducing the experimental pyrolysis runs with the simulation model, a high coincidence is found for the obtained fraction yields (bio-oil, char and gas), for the water content and for the elemental composition of the pyrolysis products. The kinetic reaction model is found to be suited for predicting pyrolysis yields and product composition for any lignocellulosic biomass feedstock under typical pyrolysis conditions

  4. Modeling the formation and reactions of benzene metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Bernard T; Barnes, Martine L; Bleasdale, Christine; Henderson, Alistair P; Jiang, Dong; Li, Xin; Mutlu, Esra; Petty, Hannah J; Sadeghi, Majid M

    2010-03-19

    One or more of the muconaldehyde isomers is a putative product of benzene metabolism. As muconaldehydes are highly reactive dienals and potentially mutagenic they might be relevant to the carcinogenicity of benzene. Muconaldehydes may be derived through the action of a cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase on benzene oxide-oxepin, which are established metabolites of benzene. Oxidation of benzene oxide-oxepin either by the one-electron oxidant cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) or by iron(III) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) hexafluorophosphate in acetone at -78 degrees C or acetonitrile at -40 degrees C gave (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, which was a single diastereoisomer according to analysis by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reaction of toluene-1,2-oxide/2-methyloxepin with CAN gave (2E,4Z)-6-oxo-hepta-2,4-dienal. Similarly, the action of CAN on 1,6-dimethylbenzene oxide-2,7-dimethyloxepin gave (3Z,5E)-octa-3,5-diene-2,7-dione. In vivo, benzene oxide-oxepin could suffer one-electron oxidation by cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase giving (E,Z)-muconaldehyde. The observations presented may be relevant to the toxicology of benzene oxide-oxepin and other arene oxide-oxepins as we have previously shown that (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, analogously to (Z,Z)-muconaldehyde, affords pyrrole adducts with the exocyclic amino groups of the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Independent of their possible toxicological significance, the experiments described provide preparatively useful routes to (E,Z)-muconaldehyde and its congeners. Methods are also described for the trapping and analysis of reactive benzene metabolites, e.g. using the Diels-Alder reaction with the dienophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to trap arene oxides and with the diene 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran to trap enals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploratory study of nuclear reaction data utility framework of Japan charged particle reaction data group (JCPRG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Akira; Kato, Kiyoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Graduate School of Science, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ohbayasi, Yosihide [Hokkaido Univ., Meme Media Lab., Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Aoyama, Shigeyoshi [Kitami Institute of Technology, Information Processing Center, Kitami, Hokkaido (Japan); Chiba, Masaki [Sapporo Gakuin Univ., Faculty of Social Information, Ebetsu, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    Compilation, evaluation and dissemination are essential pieces of work for the nuclear data activities. We, Japan charged particle data group, have researched the utility framework for the nuclear reaction data on the basis of recent progress of computer and network technologies. These technologies will be not only for the data dissemination but for the compilation and evaluation assistance among the many corresponding researchers of all over the world. In this paper, current progress of our research and development is shown. (author)

  6. Exploratory study of nuclear reaction data utility framework of Japan charged particle reaction data group (JCPRG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Akira; Kato, Kiyoshi; Ohbayasi, Yosihide; Aoyama, Shigeyoshi; Chiba, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    Compilation, evaluation and dissemination are essential pieces of work for the nuclear data activities. We, Japan charged particle data group, have researched the utility framework for the nuclear reaction data on the basis of recent progress of computer and network technologies. These technologies will be not only for the data dissemination but for the compilation and evaluation assistance among the many corresponding researchers of all over the world. In this paper, current progress of our research and development is shown. (author)

  7. Pulse propagation in a model for the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction with external noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, Valentina; Engel, Harald

    2003-05-01

    We study the dynamics of excitation pulses in a modified Oregonator model for the light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ)reaction assuming that the intensity of the applied illumination is a spatiotemporal stochastic field with finite correlation time and correlation length. For a two-component version of the model we discuss the dependence of the pulse speed on the characteristic parameters of the noise in the framework of a small noise approximation up to the first order in the correlation time. In the full three-component model we find enhancement of coherence resonance for suitable chosen correlation time. Based on this observation, we propose a mechanism for noise-enhanced propagation of pulse trains in excitable media subjected to external fluctuations.

  8. Laser induced chemical reaction: a study of the exchange reaction between deuterium and vibrationally excited hydrogen fluoride, HF* + D2 → HD + DF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.S.F.

    1976-01-01

    A direct experimental technique was developed to investigate a ''vibrational enhancement mechanism'' for the homogeneous exchange reaction: HF + D 2 = HD + DF. This mechanism is based on the assumption that the rate of exchange reactions of the type AB + CD = AC + BD can be enhanced by the vibrational excitation of one or both reactants. A pulsed HF chemical laser operated on multilines was employed to excite the vibrational mode of HF molecules. Purified HF molecules were excited to high vibrational levels by sequential photon absorption and fast vibration-vibration energy transfer processes. The extent of the exchange reaction between HF and D 2 after a specified number of laser pulses was determined by running quantitative mass spectrometer analyses on the irradiated and reference samples. A kinetic model was set up to calculate the interaction of the gas medium with the laser radiation. The model predictions were compared with experimental observations and were found satisfactory before being used to test various reaction mechanisms against the observed HD production. The resonant absorption of HF laser photons and fast V--V energy transfer in HF was able to create a large concentration of highly vibrationally excited HF molecules in a short time. Reasonable agreement with observed HD production was obtained using the rate constant for activation-in-many-degrees-of-freedom. This study led to the conclusion that there was no evidence of special preference of vibrational energy over other forms of energy in driving the exchange reaction between HF and D 2

  9. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P < 10 Torr with the high pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  10. The reaction between iodine and silver under severe PWR accident conditions. An experimental parameter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funke, F.; Greger, G.U.; Bleier, A.; Hellmann, S.; Morell, W. [Siemens AG, Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    An extensive experimental parameter study was performed on the kinetics in the reaction system I{sub 2}/Ag and I{sup -}/Ag in a laboratory-scale apparatus.Starting with I{sub 2} or I{sup -} solutions and silver powder suspensions, the decrease of soluted I{sub 2} or I{sup -}, respectively, due to fixation on the silver particles, was monitored as function of time using the radioactive tracer I-131. The measured data were analyzed using a model of first order kinetics with respect to the iodine concentration. However, the analysis using first order kinetics had to be performed separately in an early, fast reaction phase and in a late, slow reaction phase. The reason for this unexpected behaviour was not identified. Thus, rate constant, two for each test, were deduced from 14 I{sub 2}/Ag main tests and from 36 I{sup -}/Ag tests. No dependencies of the rate constants were found on the parameters temperature, initial iodine concentration, presence of boric acid, type of silver educt, and pretreatment of the silver educt prior to the tests. However, the stirring of the reaction solution generally enhanced the kinetics highlighting the importance of mass transfer. The I{sup -}/Ag reaction proceeded only if there was no inertization of the reaction solution by sparging with nitrogen. The temperature-independent rate constant for the early, fast I{sub 2}/Ag reaction phase is 2E-5 m/s. However, a smaller rate constant of 6E-6 m/s is recommended for use in source term calculations with IMPAIR, which already contains a first order model. Analogously, the temperature-independent I{sup -}/Ag reaction rate constant is 8E-6 m/s in an early, fast reaction phase. For use in source term calculations, a smaller rate constant of 2E-6 m/s is recommended. The lower bound of the I{sup -}/Ag rate constant was 3E-8 m/s which could be used in very conservative source term calculations. (author) 20 figs., 6 tabs., 15 refs.

  11. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo, Eduardo; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now. Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying ...

  12. A study of reactions of sulfur dioxide in the gaseous phase. Production and evolution of aerosols resulting from these reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaud, Denis

    1977-01-01

    The reactions of sulfur dioxide in the gaseous phase with atmospheric pollutants (NO x ; hydrocarbons) were studied. Experiments showed that NO 2 contribution was significant and suggested that SO 2 transformation into sulfuric acid and sulfates might occur through oxidising agents mainly hydroxyl (OH) and hydro-peroxyl (HO 2 ) radicals. The production and evolution of the resulting aerosols was also studied. It was demonstrated that the effect of water vapour on particle production was significant and that primary embryos were formed from the hetero-molecular homogeneous nucleation acting on water vapour and very likely on sulfuric acid. There was a semi-quantitative agreement between our experimental results and some theoretical investigations on nucleation rate of the system (H 2 O - H 2 SO 4 ). The subsequent growth of particles was studied in a simulation chamber. Finally a model of sulfuric acid vapour evolution in presence of atmospheric aerosols made it possible to extend the previous results as far as possible to the case of atmosphere and then to compare the importance of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of the vapours according to atmospheric conditions. (author) [fr

  13. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Elementary Hydrocarbon Species and Their Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Wesley D. [University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry and Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry; Schaefer, Henry F. [University of Georgia, Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry

    2018-04-08

    The research program supported by this DOE grant carried out both methodological development and computational applications of first-principles theoretical chemistry based on quantum mechanical wavefunctions, as directed toward understanding and harnessing the fundamental chemical physics of combustion. To build and refine the world’s database of thermochemistry, spectroscopy, and chemical kinetics, predictive and definitive computational methods are needed that push the envelope of modern electronic structure theory. The application of such methods has been made to gain comprehensive knowledge of the paradigmatic reaction networks by which the n- and i-propyl, t-butyl, and n-butyl radicals are oxidized by O2. Numerous ROO and QOOH intermediates in these R + O2 reaction systems have been characterized along with the interconnecting isomerization transition states and the barriers leading to fragmentation. Other combustion-related intermediates have also been studied, including methylsulfinyl radical, cyclobutylidene, and radicals derived from acetaldehyde and vinyl alcohol. Theoretical advances have been achieved and made available to the scientific community by implementation into PSI4, an open-source electronic structure computer package emphasizing automation, advanced libraries, and interoperability. We have pursued the development of universal explicitly correlated methods applicable to general electronic wavefunctions, as well as a framework that allows multideterminant reference functions to be expressed as a single determinant from quasiparticle operators. Finally, a rigorous analytical tool for correlated wavefunctions has been created to elucidate dispersion interactions, which play essential roles in many areas of chemistry, but whose effects are often masked and enigmatic. Our research decomposes and analyzes the coupled-cluster electron correlation energy in molecular systems as a function of interelectronic distance. Concepts

  15. Fragment emission studies of the 16O+12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, S.; Dey, A.; Banerjee, K.; Rana, T. K.; Muhkopadhayay, S.; Gupta, D.; Saha, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.

    2008-01-01

    The inclusive energy distributions of the fragments (3≤Z≤5) emitted in the reaction 16 O+ 12 C have been measured in the angular range 9 deg. to 29 deg., at the energies 117, 125, 145, and 160 MeV, respectively. The centroids of the fragments energy distributions follow Viola systematics, which suggest that the fragments are emitted from a fully energy relaxed composite--as expected for both FF and orbiting processes. The center of mass angular distributions of the fragments B, Be, and Li obtained at all the bombarding energies follow 1/sinθ c.m. like variation--which further corroborates the conjecture of emission from fully equilibrated composite. The average values for the fragments B, Be, and Li are found to be independent of the center of mass emission angles, which further suggest that at all angles, the fragments are emitted from completely equilibrated source at all incident energies considered here. The yields of the fragments Li and Be are in agreement with statistical-model predictions. The enhanced yields of entrance channel fragment B indicate the survival of orbiting-like process in 16 O+ 12 C system at these energies

  16. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction‐Activation Strain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. PMID:28447369

  17. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Houk, Kendall N

    2017-08-14

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  18. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  19. Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoriza, Silvia; Rufián-Henares, José Ángel; García-Villanova, Belén; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo

    2016-12-07

    Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o -phtaldialdehyde (OPA), 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF), furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula), and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas.

  20. Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pastoriza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA, 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF, furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula, and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas.

  1. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling

  2. Kinetic Studies of Some Free Radical Reactions Involved in Cloudwater Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waygood, Steven John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The SO_3^-, SO _4^- and SO_5^ - radicals have been proposed as key intermediates in the mechanisms proposed for the oxidation of dissolved SO_2 initiated by both the OH radical and transition metal ions. This study has investigated the reactivity of these radicals in solution using laser flash photolysis and steady-state photolysis techniques. Photolytic precursors for the radicals have been established. Gated diode array spectroscopy has been used to determine the absorption spectra of the radicals. Kinetic spectrophotometric techniques have been employed to investigate the decay of each radical in aqueous solution in the absence of other species. The reactions of the sulphate radical anion, SO_4^-, with other cloudwater constituents, such as ferrous iron, formaldehyde, formic acid and the hydrogen carbonate anion, have also been studied. Where possible, ion chromatography has been used to identify the aqueous-phase reaction products. In addition, it has been proposed that the reaction of OH radicals with hydrated formaldehyde is a major source of tropospheric formic acid, the major acidic component of precipitation at remote sites. This reaction has been studied and a mechanism proposed which accounts for the observed dependence of the rate of oxidation on the oxygen content of the solution. It was necessary to study this reaction before the reaction between the sulphate radical anion and formaldehyde could be rationalized. Using the results of this study, a better characterized mechanism is proposed for the OH-initiated oxidation of dissolved S(IV). When this scheme is used to predict the rate of formation of S(VI) adopting typical cloudwater concentrations, it is shown that the process could be an important route in the acidification of cloudwater. The study of the reaction between SO_4^ - and Fe(II) shows that current cloud chemistry models greatly overpredict the rate of production of Fe(III) by this

  3. Systematic study of the reaction kinetics for HMX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2015-05-07

    The reaction process of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) in wide temperature and pressure ranges is simulated by molecular dynamics. A set of postprocessing programs is written to evaluate the intermediate molecules and chemical reactions. On the basis of these evaluations, the reaction rates, reactive Hugoniot curves, and detonation wave profile are calculated. The detonation velocity and detonation pressure are determined as 9984 m/s and 38.3349 GPa, in agreement with the experimental results, 9110 m/s and 39.5 GPa. The width of the reaction zone is 10 μm, and the main products are N2, H2O, and CO2. We find some molecules play an important role in intermediate reactions but are not exhibited in final products, such as N2O2, N2O5, and C3H3N3.

  4. A coupled model of transport-reaction-mechanics with trapping. Part I - Small strain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, A.; McMeeking, R.; Grazioli, D.; Magri, M.

    2018-05-01

    A fully coupled model for mass and heat transport, mechanics, and chemical reactions with trapping is proposed. It is rooted in non-equilibrium rational thermodynamics and assumes that displacements and strains are small. Balance laws for mass, linear and angular momentum, energy, and entropy are stated. Thermodynamic restrictions are identified, based on an additive strain decomposition and on the definition of the Helmholtz free energy. Constitutive theory and chemical kinetics are studied in order to finally write the governing equations for the multi-physics problem. The field equations are solved numerically with the finite element method, stemming from a three-fields variational formulation. Three case-studies on vacancies redistribution in metals, hydrogen embrittlement, and the charge-discharge of active particles in Li-ion batteries demonstrate the features and the potential of the proposed model.

  5. Use of chemistry software to teach and assess model-based reaction and equation knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pyatt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the challenges students face when learning chemical reactions in a first-year chemistry course and the effectiveness of a curriculum and software implementation that was used to teach and assess student understanding of chemical reactions and equations. This study took place over a two year period in a public suburban high-school, in southwestern USA. Two advanced placement (AP chemistry classes participated, referred to here as study group A (year 1, N = 14; and study group B (year 2, N = 21. The curriculum for a first-year chemistry course (group A was revised to include instruction on reaction-types. The second year of the study involved the creation and implementation of a software solution which promoted mastery learning of reaction-types. Students in both groups benefited from the reaction-type curriculum and achieved proficiency in chemical reactions and equations.  The findings suggest there was an added learning benefit to using the reaction-type software solution. This study also found that reaction knowledge was a moderate to strong predictor of chemistry achievement. Based on regression analysis, reaction knowledge significantly predicted chemistry achievement for both groups.

  6. Vascular histopathologic reaction to pulmonary artery banding in an in vivo growing porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedorost, Lukáš; Uemura, Hideki; Furck, Anke; Saeed, Imran; Slavik, Zdenek; Kobr, Jiří; Tonar, Zbyněk

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is used as a surgical palliation to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow caused by congenital heart defects. Due to the lack of microscopic studies dealing with the tissue remodeling caused by contemporary PAB materials, this study aimed to assess histologic changes associated with PAB surgery by analyzing local tissue reaction to the presence of Gore-Tex strips fixed around the pulmonary artery. Gore-Tex strips were used for PAB in a growing porcine model. After 5 weeks, histologic samples with PAB (n = 5) were compared with healthy pulmonary arterial segments distal to the PAB or from a sham-treated animal (n = 1). Stereology was used to quantify the density of the vasa vasorum and the area fraction of elastin, smooth muscle actin, macrophages, and nervi vasorum within the pulmonary arterial wall. The null hypothesis stated that samples did not differ histopathologically from adjacent vascular segments or sham-treated samples. The PAB samples had a greater area fraction of macrophages, a lower amount of nervi vasorum, and a tendency toward decreased smooth muscle content compared with samples that had no PAB strips. There was no destruction of elastic membranes, no medionecrosis, no pronounced inflammatory infiltration or foreign body reaction, and no vasa vasorum deficiency after the PAB. All the histopathologic changes were limited to the banded vascular segment and did not affect distal parts of the pulmonary artery. The study results show the tissue reaction of palliative PAB and suggest that Gore-Tex strips used contemporarily for PAB do not cause severe local histologic damage to the banded segment of the pulmonary arterial wall after 5 weeks in a porcine PAB model.

  7. New model of chlorine-wall reaction for simulating chlorine concentration in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ian; Kastl, George; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2017-11-15

    Accurate modelling of chlorine concentrations throughout a drinking water system needs sound mathematical descriptions of decay mechanisms in bulk water and at pipe walls. Wall-reaction rates along pipelines in three different systems were calculated from differences between field chlorine profiles and accurately modelled bulk decay. Lined pipes with sufficiently large diameters (>500 mm) and higher chlorine concentrations (>0.5 mg/L) had negligible wall-decay rates, compared with bulk-decay rates. Further downstream, wall-reaction rate consistently increased (peaking around 0.15 mg/dm 2 /h) as chlorine concentration decreased, until mass-transport to the wall was controlling wall reaction. These results contradict wall-reaction models, including those incorporated in the EPANET software, which assume wall decay is of either zero-order (constant decay rate) or first-order (wall-decay rate reduces with chlorine concentration). Instead, results are consistent with facilitation of the wall reaction by biofilm activity, rather than surficial chemical reactions. A new model of wall reaction combines the effect of biofilm activity moderated by chlorine concentration and mass-transport limitation. This wall reaction model, with an accurate bulk chlorine decay model, is essential for sufficiently accurate prediction of chlorine residuals towards the end of distribution systems and therefore control of microbial contamination. Implementing this model in EPANET-MSX (or similar) software enables the accurate chlorine modelling required for improving disinfection strategies in drinking water networks. New insight into the effect of chlorine on biofilm can also assist in controlling biofilm to maintain chlorine residuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  9. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  10. A simple recipe for modeling reaction-rate in flows with turbulent-combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally viable scheme to account for chemical reaction in turbulent flows is presented. The multivariate beta-pdf model for multiple scalar mixing forms the basis of this scheme. Using the model scalar joint pdf and a general form of the instantaneous reaction-rate, the unclosed chemical reaction terms are expressed as simple functions of scalar means and the turbulent scalar energy. The calculation procedure requires that the mean scalar equations and only one other transport equation - for the turbulent scalar energy - be solved.

  11. The study of reactions influencing the biomass steam gasification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Franco; F. Pinto; I. Gulyurtlu; I. Cabrita [INETI-DEECA, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2003-05-01

    Steam gasification studies were carried out in an atmospheric fluidised bed. The gasifier was operated over a temperature range of 700 900{sup o}C whilst varying a steam/biomass ratio from 0.4 to 0.85 w/w. Three types of forestry biomass were studied: Pinus pinaster (softwood), Eucalyptus globulus and holm-oak (hardwood). The energy conversion, gas composition, higher heating value and gas yields were determined and correlated with temperature, steam/biomass ratio, and species of biomass used. The results obtained seemed to suggest that the operating conditions were optimised for a gasification temperature around 830{sup o}C and a steam/biomass ratio of 0.6 0.7 w/w, because a gas richer in hydrogen and poorer in hydrocarbons and tars was produced. These conditions also favoured greater energy and carbon conversions, as well the gas yield. The main objective of the present work was to determine what reactions were dominant within the operation limits of experimental parameters studied and what was the effect of biomass type on the gasification process. As biomass wastes usually have a problem of availability because of seasonal variations, this work analysed the possibility of replacing one biomass species by another, without altering the gas quality obtained. 19 refs., 8 figs. 2 tabs.

  12. Study of α-particle multiplicity in 16O+196Pt fusion-fission reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, K.; Kumar, A.; Bansal, N.

    2016-01-01

    Study of dynamics of fusion-fission reaction is one of the interesting parts of heavy-ion-induced nuclear reaction. Extraction of fission time scales using different probes is of central importance for understanding the dynamics of fusion-fission process. In the past, extensive theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to understand the various aspects of the heavy ion induced fusion-fission reactions. Compelling evidences have been obtained from the earlier studies that the fission decay of hot nuclei is protracted process i.e. slowed down relative to the expectations of the standard statistical model, and large dynamical delays are required due to this hindrance. Nuclear dissipation is assumed to be responsible for this delay and more light particles are expected to be emitted during the fission process. One of neutron multiplicity measurements have been performed for the 16,18 O+ 194,198 Pt populating the CN 210,212,214,216 Rn and observed fission delay due to nuclear viscosity. In order to have complete understanding for the dynamics of 212 Rn nucleus, we measured the charged particle multiplicity for 16 O+ 196 Pt system. Study of charged particles will give us more information about the emitter in comparison to neutrons as charged particles faces Coulomb barrier and are more sensitive probe for understanding the dynamics of fusion-fission reactions. In the present work, we are reporting some of the preliminary results of charged particle multiplicity

  13. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  15. A novel murine model of late-phase reaction of immediate hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Facincone

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a novel experimental model of late-phase reaction of immediate hypersensitivity developed in mice. It consists of introducing small fragments of heat-coagulated hen egg white into the subcutaneous tissue of mice. After 14 days, animals challenged with purified ovalbumin into the footpad presented an immediate swelling of the paw peaking at 30 min, followed by two peaks of swelling at 6 and 24 h. Histological examination of the paws showed a massive eosinophil infiltration (more than 800 cells/5 microscopic fields. This intense infiltration persisted for more than 14 days after the challenge. Furthermore, in mice immunized with coagulated egg white the delayed swelling of the paws and eosinophilic infiltration were significantly higher than in mice immunized with the classical protocol of ovalbumin in alumen adjuvant. Transfer of lymph node cells obtained from mice implanted with heat-coagulated hen egg white induced footpad swelling and eosinophil infiltration in response to ovalbumin. High levels of ovalbuminspecific IgG1 but not of IgE were detected in the serum of these animals. The advantages of this model for the experimental study of late-phase reaction per se and its relevance to the study of allergic diseases such as asthma are discussed.

  16. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  17. Survival behavior in the cyclic Lotka-Volterra model with a randomly switching reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert; Mobilia, Mauro; Rucklidge, Alastair M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of a randomly switching reproduction-predation rate on the survival behavior of the nonspatial cyclic Lotka-Volterra model, also known as the zero-sum rock-paper-scissors game, used to metaphorically describe the cyclic competition between three species. In large and finite populations, demographic fluctuations (internal noise) drive two species to extinction in a finite time, while the species with the smallest reproduction-predation rate is the most likely to be the surviving one (law of the weakest). Here we model environmental (external) noise by assuming that the reproduction-predation rate of the strongest species (the fastest to reproduce and predate) in a given static environment randomly switches between two values corresponding to more and less favorable external conditions. We study the joint effect of environmental and demographic noise on the species survival probabilities and on the mean extinction time. In particular, we investigate whether the survival probabilities follow the law of the weakest and analyze their dependence on the external noise intensity and switching rate. Remarkably, when, on average, there is a finite number of switches prior to extinction, the survival probability of the predator of the species whose reaction rate switches typically varies nonmonotonically with the external noise intensity (with optimal survival about a critical noise strength). We also outline the relationship with the case where all reaction rates switch on markedly different time scales.

  18. Turing pattern formation on the sphere for a morphochemical reaction-diffusion model for electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Bozzini, Benedetto; Frittelli, Massimo; Sgura, Ivonne

    2017-07-01

    The present paper deals with the pattern formation properties of a specific morpho-electrochemical reaction-diffusion model on a sphere. The physico-chemical background to this study is the morphological control of material electrodeposited onto spherical particles. The particular experimental case of interest refers to the optimization of novel metal-air flow batteries and addresses the electrodeposition of zinc onto inert spherical supports. Morphological control in this step of the high-energy battery operation is crucial to the energetic efficiency of the recharge process and to the durability of the whole energy-storage device. To rationalise this technological challenge within a mathematical modeling perspective, we consider the reaction-diffusion system for metal electrodeposition introduced in [Bozzini et al., J. Solid State Electr.17, 467-479 (2013)] and extend its study to spherical domains. Conditions are derived for the occurrence of the Turing instability phenomenon and the steady patterns emerging at the onset of Turing instability are investigated. The reaction-diffusion system on spherical domains is solved numerically by means of the Lumped Surface Finite Element Method (LSFEM) in space combined with the IMEX Euler method in time. The effect on pattern formation of variations in the domain size is investigated both qualitatively, by means of systematic numerical simulations, and quantitatively by introducing suitable indicators that allow to assign each pattern to a given morphological class. An experimental validation of the obtained results is finally presented for the case of zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions onto copper spheres.

  19. Study of catalytic reactions under supercritical conditions: pressure impact; Etude des reactions catalytiques en milieu supercritique: influence de la pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montillet, M.; Guillaume, D. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP/ENS), 69 - Vernaison (France); Essayem, N. [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse, CNRS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-02-15

    The supercritical fluids can be characterised mainly by their high extraction properties: high density, high compressibility and diffusivity, and low viscosity index. These properties can be affected by the evolution of the pressure near the critical point. This work aims to study the influence of the pressure to the performances of the solid catalyst (Beta zeolite) during the reaction of isobutane/butene alkylation. Near the critical point ({approx} 140 deg C, {approx} 4 MPa), an increase of the pressure leads to a higher density and to a decrease of the diffusivity of the reaction medium. Experiments have shown a significant improvement of the catalyst life time under supercritical conditions (140 deg C, > 4 MPa) as regard to the liquid phase conditions (80 deg C, 3 M Pa). However, under supercritical conditions, the quality of the alkylate was poorer mainly due to the cracking reactions favoured under high temperatures. Our study demonstrates a positive effect of the pressure on the alkylation reaction catalysed by a solid acid under supercritical conditions. The increase of the pressure near the critical point favours the extraction of the alkylation products (trimethyl-pentane) and the coke precursors from the catalytic surface but also reduces the occurrence of secondary reactions. (authors)

  20. Modelling and simulation of a direct ethanol fuel cell considering multistep electrochemical reactions, transport processes and mixed potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Marco [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Melke, Julia, E-mail: julia.melke@gmail.co [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gerteisen, Dietmar [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: A DEFC model considering the mixed potential formation at cathode and anode. The low cell voltage at open circuit is due to the parasitic reaction of ethanol and oxygen. Under load, only the parasitic oxidation of ethanol is significant. Inhibiting the parasitic reactions can approximately double the current density. - Abstract: In this work a one-dimensional mathematical model of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is presented. The electrochemical oxidation of ethanol in the catalyst layers is described by several reaction steps leading to surface coverage with adsorbed intermediates (CH{sub 3}CO, CO, CH{sub 3} and OH) and to the final products acetaldehyde, acetic acid and CO{sub 2}. A bifunctional reaction mechanism is assumed for the activation of water on a binary catalyst favouring the further oxidation of adsorbates blocking active catalyst sites. The chemical reactions are highly coupled with the charge and reactant transport. The model accounts for crossover of the reactants through the membrane leading to the phenomenon of cathode and anode mixed potentials due to the parasitic oxidation and reduction of ethanol and oxygen, respectively. Polarisation curves of a DEFC were recorded for various ethanol feed concentrations and were used as reference data for the simulation. Based on one set of model parameters the characteristic of electronic and protonic potential, the relative surface coverage and the parasitic current densities in the catalyst layers were studied.

  1. Nuclear structure and reaction studies at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.W.; Ray, R.L.

    1990-10-01

    This document constitutes the (1988--1991) technical progress report for the ongoing medium energy physics research program supported by the US Department of Energy through special Research Grant FG05-88ER40444. The experiments discussed are conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The overall motivation for the work discussed in this document is driven by three main objectives: (1) provide hadron-nucleon and hadron-nucleus scattering data which serve to facilitate the study of effective two-body interactions, test (and possibly determine) nuclear structure, and help study reaction mechanisms and dynamics;(2) provide unique, first-of-a-kind ''exploratory'' hadron-nucleus scattering data in the hope that such data will lead to discovery of new phenomena and new physics; and (3) perform precision tests of fundamental interactions, such as rare decay searches, whose observation would imply fundamental new physics

  2. Predicting Complex Organic Mixture Atmospheric Chemistry Using Computer-Generated Reaction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. T.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Mazurek, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    New measurement and chemical characterization technologies now offer unprecedented capabilities for detecting and describing atmospheric organic matter at the molecular level. As a result, very detailed and extensive chemical inventories are produced routinely in atmospheric field measurements of organic compounds found in the vapor and condensed phases (particles, cloud and fog droplets). Hundreds of organic compounds can constitute the complex chemical mixtures observed for these types of samples, exhibiting a wide spectrum of physical properties such as molecular weight, polarity, pH, and chemical reactivity. The central challenge is describing chemically the complex organic aerosol mixture in a useable fashion that can be linked to predictive models. However, the great compositional complexity of organic aerosols engenders a need for the modeling of the reaction chemistry of these compounds in atmospheric chemical models. On a mechanistic level, atmospheric reactions of organic compounds can involve a network of a very large number of chemical species and reactions. Deriving such large molecular kinetic models by hand is a tedious and time-consuming process. However, such models are usually built upon a few basic chemical principles tempered with the model builder's observations, experience, and intuition that can be summarized as a set of rules. This suggests that given an algorithmic framework, computers (information technology) may be used to apply these chemical principles and rules, thereby building a kinetic model. The framework for this model building process has been developed by means of graph theory. A molecule, which is a set of atoms connected by bonds, may be conceptualized as a set of vertices connected by edges, or to be more precise, a graph. The bond breaking and forming for a reaction can be represented compactly in the form of a matrix operator formally called the "reaction matrix". The addition of the reaction matrix operator to the reduced

  3. Modelling, Design, Operability and Analysis of Reaction-Separation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, Edgar Ramirez

    2006-01-01

    Denne afhandling præsenterer en modelbaseret metode til design og analyse af kemiske processer som involverer en enhed for Reaktion-Separation med recycling (RSR). Det centrale i denne metode er at en modelbaseret analyse af (masse og energibalance) modeller af varierende kompleksitet identificer...

  4. Studies of isovector excitations in nuclei by neutron-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, L.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper isovector excitations in nuclei, in particular the giant isovector quadrupole resonance in spherical nuclei, will be discussed. Several methods to investigate this excitation have been used, e.g. inelastic electron scattering and charge-exchange reactions. An alternative method to study isovector E2 resonances in nuclei, based on the radiative capture of fast neutrons, will be presented. Results from such experiments performed at the tandem accelerator laboratories in Los Alamos and Uppsala will be presented and discussed in terms of the direct-semidirect capture model. As a separate issue, the preparations being undertaken at Uppsala for studies of isovector excitations in nuclei by means of the (n,p) reaction will be described. A schematic lay-out of the experiment will be presented together with some relevant neutron beam parameters. Among isovector excitations to be studied by this method are the isovector monopole resonance and the Gamow-Teller resonance. 54 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  5. Studies on the reaction of nitric acid and sugar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, C.S.; Bayne, C.K.; Roberson, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The design of vessels and off-gas systems for denitrating acidic radioactive process solutions by reacting nitric acid with sugar requires a fairly accurate determination of the rate of the controlling step. Therefore, the reaction of sugar with concentrated nitric acid was closely examined at temperatures of 100 and 110 0 C and in the presence of low levels of iron )0 to 0.2 M Fe(III)). Efficiencies of the sugar destruction by nitric acid ranged from 2.56 to 2.93 mol of acid consumed per mole of carbon added. Product off-gases were examined throughout the reaction. Release of CO was fairly constant throughout the reaction, but amounts of CO 2 increased as the nitric acid began to attack the terminal carboxylic acids produced from the consumption of sucrose. Voluminous quantities of NO 2 were released at the beginning of the reaction, but larger relative concentrations of NO were observed toward the end

  6. Fundamental studies of metal fluorination reactions. Third annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, R.A.; Reddy, S.N.S.; Chou, S.F.; Lee, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented of investigations of the solubility and diffusivity of fluorine in copper. Other research is reported on the electronic conductivity of CaF/sub 2/ electrolyte and mixed electrode reactions in solid electrolyte cells. (JRD)

  7. Dynamic Characteristics and Model for Centralization Reaction of Acidic Tailings From Heap Leaching of Uranium Ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Dexin; Liu Yulong; Li Guangyue; Wang Youtuan

    2010-01-01

    Centralization tests were carried out on acidic tailings from heap leaching of uranium ore by using CaO, NaOH and NH 4 OH. The variations of pH with time were measured for the three centralization systems and the dynamic models for the systems were set up by regressing the measured data. The centralization process consists of the fast reaction phase representing the reaction between the centralization agent and the acid on the surface of the tailing's particles and the slow diffusion-reaction phase representing the diffusion-reaction between the centralization agent and the acid within the tailing's particles. The non-linear coupling and feedback function model for the diffusion-reaction of the centralization agent can reflect the process and mode of the centralization reaction. There is a non-linear oscillation in the variation of pH within the centralization systems. The dynamic model for the tailing's centralization reaction can fit the pH variation within the centralization systems. (authors)

  8. Hopf bifurcation in a delayed reaction-diffusion-advection population model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Lou, Yuan; Wei, Junjie

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate a reaction-diffusion-advection model with time delay effect. The stability/instability of the spatially nonhomogeneous positive steady state and the associated Hopf bifurcation are investigated when the given parameter of the model is near the principle eigenvalue of an elliptic operator. Our results imply that time delay can make the spatially nonhomogeneous positive steady state unstable for a reaction-diffusion-advection model, and the model can exhibit oscillatory pattern through Hopf bifurcation. The effect of advection on Hopf bifurcation values is also considered, and our results suggest that Hopf bifurcation is more likely to occur when the advection rate increases.

  9. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  10. Detailed Molecular Dynamics of the Photochromic Reaction of Spiropyran: A Semiclassical Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaohong Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A realistic semiclassical dynamics simulation study is reported for the photoinduced ring-opening reaction of spiropyran. The main simulation results show that one pathway involves hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP torsion of phenyl ring nearby N atom in 254 fs on the excited state and the isomerization from cis- to trans-SP that is complete in about 10 ps on the ground state after the electron transition πσ*; the other dominate pathway corresponds to the ring-opening reaction of trans-SP to form the most stable merocyanine (MC product. Unlike the previous theoretical finding, one C−C bond cleavage on the real molecule rather than the C−N dissociation of the model one is more probable than the ring-opening reaction after the photoexcitation of SP. The simulation findings provide more important complementarity for interpreting experimental observations, confirming the previously theoretical studies of photochromic ring-opening process and even supplying other possible reaction mechanisms.

  11. Experimental study o the sodium-concrete reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.C.; Torres, A.R.; Brito Aghina, L.O. de; Messere e Castro, P.

    1986-01-01

    Effects and aspects of security are verified during a sodium leakage in high temperatures on liners of contention cells and directly on the concrete. As this kinetic process involves reactions between materials in solid state (such as oxides and carbonates) vapors and gases (such as water and CO 2 )) with liquid sodium, effects of each phase of the heterogeneous mixture are separately analysed. Are still analysed produced products and briefly discussed the kinetic of the sodium-concrete reaction. (Author) [pt

  12. Quantum dynamics study of H + DBr and D + HBr reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai Jie; Jia, JianFeng; Wu, Hai Shun; He, Guo Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Time-dependent quantum wave packet calculations have been performed for the H + DBr and D + HBr reaction using the recent diabatic potential energy surfaces. Reaction probabilities, integral cross sections, and rate constants are obtained. The results show that the isotopic effects have an influence on the nonadiabatic effect which is generally inversely proportional to the atom mass. The calculated rate constants are in good overall agreement with experimental values, indicating that the ab initio surfaces are accurate to describe the isotopic effects.

  13. CH 1 Introduction to Chemistry. Study Guide to Minicourse I - 13 Chemical Reaction Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard

    Provided is a study guide for an introductory minicourse to the principles of chemical reactions. This written text is designed to accompany a series of audio tapes and 35mm slides which the student studies at his own pace. The course presents chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, reaction rates, and equilibrium. (SL)

  14. Chemical reaction path modeling of hydrothermal processes on Mars: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Ridley, W. Ian

    1992-01-01

    Hydrothermal processes are thought to have had significant roles in the development of surficial mineralogies and morphological features on Mars. For example, a significant proportion of the Martian soil could consist of the erosional products of hydrothermally altered impact melt sheets. In this model, impact-driven, vapor-dominated hydrothermal systems hydrothermally altered the surrounding rocks and transported volatiles such as S and Cl to the surface. Further support for impact-driven hydrothermal alteration on Mars was provided by studies of the Ries crater, Germany, where suevite deposits were extensively altered to montmorillonite clays by inferred low-temperature (100-130 C) hydrothermal fluids. It was also suggested that surface outflow from both impact-driven and volcano-driven hydrothermal systems could generate the valley networks, thereby eliminating the need for an early warm wet climate. We use computer-driven chemical reaction path calculation to model chemical processes which were likely associated with postulated Martian hydrothermal systems.

  15. Modelling the intra-particle transport phenomena and chemical reactions of olive kernel fast pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabaniotou, A.; Damartzis, Th. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, University Box 455, 24154 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-08-15

    In the present study, the development of a mathematical model for the description of the pyrolysis of a single solid olive kernel particle and the prediction of the fast pyrolysis product yields, is presented. Kinetic model is coupled with heat transfer model. The global degradation of biomass is based on Koufopanos et al. mechanism and described by two parallel 1-order reactions. The analysis is focused on primary degradation for small particle and simulations have been carried out for a spherical particle, with radius of 175 {mu}m. The model has been validated against experiments carried out in a laboratory wire mesh reactor, for temperature range from 573 K to 873 K and a heating rate of 200 K/s. The results of the simulation are in good agreement with the experimental data, regarding temperature, conversion histories and product distribution of olive kernel fast pyrolysis. The numerical method applied was finite difference for the heat transfer model and Runge-Kutta 4th order method for chemical kinetics model equations. (author)

  16. A Comparative Study of Simple Auditory Reaction Time in Blind (Congenitally) and Sighted Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Pritesh Hariprasad; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Mehta, H. B.; Shah, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reaction time is the time interval between the application of a stimulus and the appearance of appropriate voluntary response by a subject. It involves stimulus processing, decision making, and response programming. Reaction time study has been popular due to their implication in sports physiology. Reaction time has been widely studied as its practical implications may be of great consequence e.g., a slower than normal reaction time while driving can have grave results. Objective:...

  17. The effect of inquiry-flipped classroom model toward students' achievement on chemical reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paristiowati, Maria; Fitriani, Ella; Aldi, Nurul Hanifah

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of Inquiry-Flipped Classroom Models toward Students' Achievement on Chemical Reaction Rate topic. This study was conducted at SMA Negeri 3 Tangerang in Eleventh Graders. The Quasi Experimental Method with Non-equivalent Control Group design was implemented in this study. 72 students as the sample was selected by purposive sampling. Students in experimental group were learned through inquiry-flipped classroom model. Meanwhile, in control group, students were learned through guided inquiry learning model. Based on the data analysis, it can be seen that there is significant difference in the result of the average achievement of the students. The average achievement of the students in inquiry-flipped classroom model was 83,44 and the average achievement of the students in guided inquiry learning model was 74,06. It can be concluded that the students' achievement with inquiry-flipped classroom better than guided inquiry. The difference of students' achievement were significant through t-test which is tobs 3.056 > ttable 1.994 (α = 0.005).

  18. Chaos and fractals in dynamical models of transport and reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, P; Claus, I

    2002-03-15

    This paper contains a discussion of dynamical randomness among the different methods of simulation of a fluid and its characterization by the concept of Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy per unit time. Moreover, a renormalization-group method is presented in order to construct the hydrodynamic and reactive modes of relaxation in chaotic models. The renormalization-group construction allows us to obtain the dispersion relation of these modes, i.e. their damping rate versus the wavenumber. Besides, these modes are characterized by a fractal dimension given in terms of a diffusion coefficient and a Lyapunov exponent.

  19. High temperature chemical kinetic study of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental study of the kinetics of the H2-CO-CO2-NO reaction system was made behind incident shock waves at temperatures of 2460 and 2950 K. The overall rate of the reaction was measured by monitoring radiation from the CO + O yields CO2 + h upoilon reaction. Correlation of these data with a detailed reaction mechanism showed that the high-temperature rate of the reaction N + OH yields NO + H can be described by the low-temperature (320 K) rate coefficient. Catalytic dissociation of molecular hydrogen was an important reaction under the tests conditions.

  20. Efficient computation of electrograms and ECGs in human whole heart simulations using a reaction-eikonal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neic, Aurel; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Bishop, Martin J.; Vigmond, Edward J.; Plank, Gernot

    2017-10-01

    Anatomically accurate and biophysically detailed bidomain models of the human heart have proven a powerful tool for gaining quantitative insight into the links between electrical sources in the myocardium and the concomitant current flow in the surrounding medium as they represent their relationship mechanistically based on first principles. Such models are increasingly considered as a clinical research tool with the perspective of being used, ultimately, as a complementary diagnostic modality. An important prerequisite in many clinical modeling applications is the ability of models to faithfully replicate potential maps and electrograms recorded from a given patient. However, while the personalization of electrophysiology models based on the gold standard bidomain formulation is in principle feasible, the associated computational expenses are significant, rendering their use incompatible with clinical time frames. In this study we report on the development of a novel computationally efficient reaction-eikonal (R-E) model for modeling extracellular potential maps and electrograms. Using a biventricular human electrophysiology model, which incorporates a topologically realistic His-Purkinje system (HPS), we demonstrate by comparing against a high-resolution reaction-diffusion (R-D) bidomain model that the R-E model predicts extracellular potential fields, electrograms as well as ECGs at the body surface with high fidelity and offers vast computational savings greater than three orders of magnitude. Due to their efficiency R-E models are ideally suitable for forward simulations in clinical modeling studies which attempt to personalize electrophysiological model features.

  1. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reaction kinetics and reactor modeling for fuel processing of liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen. Isooctane reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, Manuel [Department of Refining and Petrochemicals, Center for Research and Development of the Venezuelan Oil Industry (PDVSA-Intevep), Sector el Tambor, P.O. Box 76343, Los Teques, Edo Miranda (Venezuela); Sira, Jorge [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universidad de los Andes, Merida (Venezuela); Kopasz, John [US Department of Energy, Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2003-09-10

    A mathematical model was developed in the framework of the process simulator Aspen Plus in order to describe the reaction kinetics and performance of a fuel processor used for autothermal reforming of liquid hydrocarbons. Experimental results obtained in the facilities of Argonne National Laboratories (ANL) when reforming isooctane using a ceria-oxide catalyst impregnated with platinum were used in order to validate the reactor model. The reaction kinetics and reaction schemes were taken from published literature and most of the chemical reactions were modeled using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) formulation to account for the effect of adsorption of reactants and products on the active sites of the catalyst. The water-gas-shift (WGS) reactor used to reduce the concentration of CO in the reformate was also modeled. Both reactor models use a simplified formulation for estimating the effectiveness factor of each chemical reaction in order to account for the effect of intraparticle mass transfer limitations on the reactor performance. Since the data in the literature on kinetics of autothermal reforming of liquid hydrocarbons using CeO{sub 2}-Pt catalyst is scarce, the proposed kinetic model for the reaction network was coupled to the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithm implemented in Aspen Plus in order to regress the kinetic constants for the different reactions. The model describes the trend of the experimental data in terms of hydrogen yield and distribution of products with a relative deviation of {+-}15% for reforming temperatures between 600 and 800C and reactor space velocities between 15000 and 150000h{sup -1}.

  3. Study of Reaction Forces in a Single Sided Linear Induction Motor (SLIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    SLIM reaction forces were measured on a laboratory model having aluminum and aluminum-iron secondaries and the results were correlated with the theoretical forces derived for different idealized SLIM models. The first part of the report discusses wav...

  4. Tissue reactions to abutment shift: an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Ingemar; Berglundh, Tord; Sekino, Satoshi; Lindhe, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Standard protocols for the clinical use of dental implants often include the placement of healing abutments prior to standard or custom-made abutments. The tissue response to a single shift from a healing abutment to a permanent abutment has not been studied. The aim of the present experiment was to study tissue reactions that may occur following the removal of a healing abutment and the placement of a permanent abutment. In six beagle dogs, all mandibular premolars were extracted. Three months later three fixtures of the Astra Tech Implants Dental System (Astra Tech AB, Mölndal, Sweden) were installed in each edentulous premolar region. An additional 3 months later, the first abutment connection was performed. In two sites on each side of the mandible, healing abutments were placed; in the remaining site, a Uni-abutment (Astra Tech AB) was used. The two healing abutments were removed 2 weeks later, and one Uni-abutment and one prepable abutment were placed. A plaque-control period was initiated, and 6 months later block biopsies were obtained. The biopsies were prepared for histometric and morphometric examination. Radiographs were obtained at fixture placement, 2 weeks after the first abutment connection, and 6 months later. The length of the barrier epithelium, the height of the connective tissue attachment, and the level of the marginal bone did not differ between the three abutment groups. The major part of the radiographic bone loss during the experiment took place prior to or immediately after abutment connection; only small bone level alterations occurred during the subsequent 6-month period. The shift from a healing abutment to a permanent abutment resulted in the establishment of a transmucosal attachment, the dimension and quality of which did not differ from those of the mucosal barrier formed to a permanent abutment placed during a second-stage surgery.

  5. Study of the reaction of astrophysical interest 60Fe(n,γ)61Fe via (d,pγ) transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giron, S.

    2011-12-01

    60 Fe is of special interest in nuclear astrophysics. Indeed the recent observations of 60 Fe characteristic gamma-ray lines by the RHESSI and INTEGRAL spacecrafts allowed to measure the total flux of 60 Fe over the Galaxy. Moreover the observation in presolar grains of an excess of the daughter-nuclei of 60 Fe, 60 Ni, gives constraints on the conditions of formation of the early solar system. However, the cross-sections of some reactions involved in 60 Fe nucleosynthesis and included to stellar models are still uncertain. The destruction reaction of 60 Fe, 60 Fe(n, γ) 61 Fe, is one of them. The total cross-section can be separate into two contributions: the direct one, involving states below the neutron separation threshold of 61 Fe, and the resonant one.We improved 61 Fe spectroscopy in order to evaluate the direct capture part of the 60 Fe(n, γ) 61 Fe reaction cross-section. 60 Fe(n, γ) 61 Fe was thus studied via d( 60 Fe, pγ) 61 Fe transfer reaction with the CATS/MUST2/EXOGAM setup at LISE-GANIL. DWBA analysis of experimental proton differential cross-sections allowed to extract orbital angular momentum and spectroscopic factors of different populated states identified below the neutron threshold. A comparison of experimental results for 61 Fe with experimental results for similar nuclei and with shell-model calculations was also performed. (author) [fr

  6. Radiochemical study of the reactions of heavy ions with gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, I.

    1977-07-01

    Thick gold foils have been bombarded with heavy-ion projectiles at energies above the Coulomb barrier. The radioactive products were identified and their yields measured using gamma-ray spectrometry and an extensive series of computer programs developed for the data analysis. The total mass-yield distribution was extracted from the data using charge-dispersion curves inferred from the experimental results. One observes a change in the mass-yield distributions corresponding to primarily fusion-fission tractions occurring with the lighter projectiles Ne-20 and Ar-40 and deep-inelastic transfer reactions predominating with heavier Kr-84, Kr-86, and Xe-136 projectiles. For the deep-inelastic transfer reaction, more mass transfer is seen to occur for a higher incident projectile energy, and the Gaussian distribution of products shows exponential tailing. The preferred direction for mass transfer is from gold to the projectile nucleus. Sequential fission is a likely fate for nucludes beyond the lead shell closure. The ''gold finger'' is explained as a combination of mass transfer, nucleon evaporation and sequential fission. The yields of gold nuclides indicate a superposition of two reaction mechanisms, quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic. The angular momentum involved with each mechanism determines which of two isomeric states is the end product of the nuclear reaction. Suggestions are offered regarding the possibility of synthesizing super-heavy elements by use of heavy-ion nuclear reactions.

  7. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  8. Study of quark flavor-dependence in exclusive reactions at large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Appel, R.; Barton, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement of exclusive reactions at large momentum transfers provides an important testing ground for models of hard quark-quark scattering. We have measured cross sections or set upper limits for 12 meson-bryon (π/sup +-/p → pπ/sup +-/, p/rho//sup +-/, π + Δ/sup +-/, K + Σ/sup +-/, π/sup /minus//p → Λ 0 /Σ 0 K 0 , K/sup +-/p → pK/sup +-/) and 2 baryon-baryon (p/sup +-/p → pp/sup /plus minus/) reactions near 90/degree/ C.M. by studying the flavor-dependence of these 2 exclusive reactions at t = -9(GeV/c)/sup 2/, we have been able to demonstrate in a perturbative QCD picture that the quark-interchange mechanism is dominant over gluon exchange and quark-antiquark annihilation. We will also present preliminary results on many of these reactions at t = -5(GeV/c)/sup 2/ with better resolution and statistical precision. 145 refs., 3 figs

  9. Study on the dominant reaction path in nucleosynthesis during stellar evolution by means of the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Hashizume, K.; Wada, T.; Ohta, M.; Suda, T.; Nishimura, T.; Fujimoto, M. Y.; Kato, K.; Aikawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a Monte Carlo method to study the reaction paths in nucleosynthesis during stellar evolution. Determination of reaction paths is important to obtain the physical picture of stellar evolution. The combination of network calculation and our method gives us a better understanding of physical picture. We apply our method to the case of the helium shell flash model in the extremely metal poor star

  10. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Szecsody, J.E.; Zachara, J.M.; Streile, G.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength.

  11. Atmospheric pressure reaction cell for operando sum frequency generation spectroscopy of ultrahigh vacuum grown model catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiaz, Matteo; Pramhaas, Verena; Li, Xia; Rameshan, Christoph; Rupprechter, Günther

    2018-04-01

    A new custom-designed ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber coupled to a UHV and atmospheric-pressure-compatible spectroscopic and catalytic reaction cell is described, which allows us to perform IR-vis sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy during catalytic (kinetic) measurements. SFG spectroscopy is an exceptional tool to study vibrational properties of surface adsorbates under operando conditions, close to those of technical catalysis. This versatile setup allows performing surface science, SFG spectroscopy, catalysis, and electrochemical investigations on model systems, including single crystals, thin films, and deposited metal nanoparticles, under well-controlled conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and potential. The UHV chamber enables us to prepare the model catalysts and to analyze their surface structure and composition by low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy, respectively. Thereafter, a sample transfer mechanism moves samples under UHV to the spectroscopic cell, avoiding air exposure. In the catalytic cell, SFG spectroscopy and catalytic tests (reactant/product analysis by mass spectrometry or gas chromatography) are performed simultaneously. A dedicated sample manipulation stage allows the model catalysts to be examined from LN2 temperature to 1273 K, with gaseous reactants in a pressure range from UHV to atmospheric. For post-reaction analysis, the SFG cell is rapidly evacuated and samples are transferred back to the UHV chamber. The capabilities of this new setup are demonstrated by benchmark results of CO adsorption on Pt and Pd(111) single crystal surfaces and of CO adsorption and oxidation on a ZrO2 supported Pt nanoparticle model catalyst grown by atomic layer deposition.

  12. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinsong Liu

    2006-04-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10 5 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10 5 years

  13. Contrast reaction training in US radiology residencies: a COARDRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBedis, Christina A; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Otero, Hansel J; Decker, Summer J; Ward, Robert J

    To perform a survey-based assessment of current contrast reaction training in US diagnostic radiology residency programs. An electronic survey was distributed to radiology residency program directors from 9/2015-11/2015. 25.7% of programs responded. 95.7% of those who responded provide contrast reaction management training. 89.4% provide didactic lectures (occurring yearly in 71.4%). 37.8% provide hands-on simulation training (occurring yearly in 82.3%; attended by both faculty and trainees in 52.9%). Wide variability in contrast reaction education in US diagnostic radiology residency programs reveals an opportunity to develop and implement a national curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Mathematical Model for the Multiphase Transport and Reaction Kinetics in a Ladle with Bottom Powder Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-12-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-PBM-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to study the multiphase flow behavior and refining reaction kinetics in a ladle with bottom powder injection, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms are presented. For the multiphase flow behavior, the effects of bubbly plume flow, powder particle motion, particle-particle collision and growth, particle-bubble collision and adhesion, and powder particle removal into top slag are considered. For the reaction kinetics, the mechanisms of multicomponent simultaneous reactions, including Al, S, Si, Mn, Fe, and O, at the multi-interface, including top slag-liquid steel interface, air-liquid steel interface, powder droplet-liquid steel interface, and bubble-liquid steel interface, are presented, and the effect of sulfur solubility in the powder droplet on the desulfurization is also taken into account. Model validation is carried out using hot tests in a 2-t induction furnace with bottom powder injection. The result shows that the powder particles gradually disperse in the entire furnace; in the vicinity of the bottom slot plugs, the desulfurization product CaS is liquid phase, while in the upper region of the furnace, the desulfurization product CaS is solid phase. The predicted sulfur contents by the present model agree well with the measured data in the 2-t furnace with bottom powder injection.

  15. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion Rumor Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyong; Zhu, Linhe

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of the Internet, especially the emergence of the social networks, leads rumor propagation into a new media era. Rumor propagation in social networks has brought new challenges to network security and social stability. This paper, based on partial differential equations (PDEs), proposes a new SIS rumor propagation model by considering the effect of the communication between the different rumor infected users on rumor propagation. The stabilities of a nonrumor equilibrium point and a rumor-spreading equilibrium point are discussed by linearization technique and the upper and lower solutions method, and the existence of a traveling wave solution is established by the cross-iteration scheme accompanied by the technique of upper and lower solutions and Schauder’s fixed point theorem. Furthermore, we add the time delay to rumor propagation and deduce the conditions of Hopf bifurcation and stability switches for the rumor-spreading equilibrium point by taking the time delay as the bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results.

  17. Arrhenius And Absolute Reaction Rate Models for Thermodynamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermodynamic characterization of linamarase influenced by linamarin substrate purification, pH and temperature were investigated. In the study, recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells at the stationary phase of growth were recovered, homogenized and centrifuged to obtain crude extracts designated as GELIN0.

  18. Study of reaction of benzo-1.4-dioxane with formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashbaev, G.A.; Turdialiev, M.Z.; Amonova, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to study of reaction of benzo-1.4-dioxane with formaldehyde. The reaction of oxy methylation of benzo-1.4-dioxane with aldehydes under various conditions was considered. The reaction progress and the purity of obtained products was controlled by means of thin-layer chromatography.

  19. Application of the Trojan Horse Method to study neutron induced reactions: the 17O(n, α14C reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulino M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 17O(n, α14C was studied using virtual neutrons coming from the quasi-free deuteron break-up in the three body reaction 17O+d → α+14C+p. This technique, called virtual neutron method, extends the Trojan Horse method to neutron-induced reactions allowing to study the reaction cross section avoiding the suppression effects coming from the penetrability of the centrifugal barrier. For incident neutron energies from thermal up to a few hundred keV, direct experiments have shown the population of two out of three expected excited states at energies 8213 keV and 8282 keV and the influence of the sub-threshold level at 8038 keV. In the present experiment the 18O excited state at E* = 8.125 MeV, missing in the direct measurement, is observed. The angular distributions of the populated resonances have been measured for the first time. The results unambiguously indicate the ability of the method to overcome the centrifugal barrier suppression effect and to pick out the contribution of the bare nuclear interaction.

  20. Presenting a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Azarhoosh, Mohammad; Halladj, Rouein; Askari, Sima

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins (MTO) reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) mechanism was presented and the kinetic parameters was obtained using a genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP). Several kinetic models for the MTO reactions have been presented. However, due to the complexity of the reactions, most reactions are considered lumped and elementary, which cannot be deemed a completely accurate kinetic model of the process. Therefore, in this study, the LHHW mechanism is presented as kinetic models of MTO reactions. Because of the non-linearity of the kinetic models and existence of many local optimal points, evolutionary algorithms (GA and GP) are used in this study to estimate the kinetic parameters in the rate equations. Via the simultaneous connection of the code related to modelling the reactor and the GA and GP codes in the MATLAB R2013a software, optimization of the kinetic models parameters was performed such that the least difference between the results from the kinetic models and experiential results was obtained and the best kinetic parameters of MTO process reactions were achieved. A comparison of the results from the model with experiential results showed that the present model possesses good accuracy.

  1. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, R.K.; Halvorsen, B.M. [Telemark University College, Kjolnes ring 56, P.O. Box 203, 3901 Porsgrunn (Norway); Pfeifer, C. [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Gussing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2). The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  2. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W. Udo

    2016-01-01

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the ''boiling'' and ''vaporization'' of atomic nuclei, but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, ''head-on'' collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (''neck'') between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  3. Studies of Heavy-Ion Reactions and Transuranic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, W. Udo [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-28

    Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei performed by the University of Rochester Nuclear Science Research Group have been successful in furthering experimental systematics and theoretical understanding of the behavior of nuclear systems excited to their limits of stability. The theoretical results explain specifically the “boiling” and “vaporization” of atomic nuclei, but are more generally applicable to isolated, quantal many-particle systems which, under thermal or mechanical stresses, all disintegrate by evaporation, via surface cluster emission, or via fission-like processes. Accompanying experimental investigations by the group have demonstrated several new types of dynamical instability of nuclei: In central, “head-on” collisions, target nuclei exhibit limited ability to stop energetic projectile nuclei and to dissipate the imparted linear momentum. Substantial matter overlap (“neck”) between projectile and target nuclei, which is observed at elevated collision energies, can be stretched considerably and break at several places simultaneously. These results provide new testing grounds for microscopic theory of the cohesion of nuclear matter. This property has remained elusive, even though the elementary nucleon-nucleon forces are well known since some time. Technical R&D has resulted in a detailed characterization of a novel plastic material, which can now be used in the design of sensitive diagnostic systems for various types of radio-activity. Innovative application of powerful laser systems has produced intense, controllable sources of exotic particle radioactivity for nuclear investigations. Several students have received their Ph.D. degree in experimental nuclear science for their work on basic nuclear research or R&D projects.

  4. A simple model for chiral amplification in the aminoalcohol-catalyzed reaction of aldehydes with dialkylzinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVAN GUTMAN

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple explanation is offered for the recently discovered chiral amplification in the alkylation reaction of benzaldehyde by means of dialkylzinc, catalyzed by (dimethylaminoisoborneol. The model presentd is similar to, yet somewhat simpler than, the model put forward by Noyori et al.

  5. Bifurcation Analysis of Gene Propagation Model Governed by Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guichen Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical analysis of the attractor bifurcation for gene propagation model governed by reaction-diffusion equations. We investigate the dynamical transition problems of the model under the homogeneous boundary conditions. By using the dynamical transition theory, we give a complete characterization of the bifurcated objects in terms of the biological parameters of the problem.

  6. Models based on multichannel R-matrix theory for evaluating light element reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodder, D.C.; Hale, G.M.; Nisley, R.A.; Witte, K.; Young, P.G.

    1975-01-01

    Multichannel R-matrix theory has been used as a basis for models for analysis and evaluation of light nuclear systems. These models have the characteristic that data predictions can be made utilizing information derived from other reactions related to the one of primary interest. Several examples are given where such an approach is valid and appropriate. (auth.)

  7. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  8. High Performance Computer Cluster for Theoretical Studies of Roaming in Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    High-performance Computer Cluster for Theoretical Studies of Roaming in Chemical Reactions A dedicated high-performance computer cluster was...purchased in order to carry out extensive and state-of-the art computations of chemical reaction dynamics. The specific aim of this computational research...is the detailed elucidation of the recently reported “roaming” pathway in gas-phase chemical reactions . Several complex reaction systems

  9. Aromatic products from reaction of lignin model compounds with UV-alkaline peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.P.; Wallis, A.F.A.; Nguyen, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    A series of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin model compounds and their methylated analogues were reacted with alkaline hydrogen peroxide while irradiating with UV light at 254 nm. The aromatic products obtained were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Guaiacol, syringol and veratrol gave no detectable aromatic products. However, syringol methyl ether gave small amounts of aromatic products, resulting from ring substitution and methoxyl displacement by hydroxyl radicals. Reaction of vanillin and syringaldehyde gave the Dakin reaction products, methoxy-1,4-hydroquinones, while reaction of their methyl ethers yielded benzoic acids. Acetoguaiacone, acetosyringone and their methyl ethers afforded several hydroxylated aromatic products, but no aromatic products were identified in the reaction mixtures from guaiacylpropane and syringylpropane. In contrast, veratrylpropane gave a mixture from which 17 aromatic hydroxylated compounds were identified. It is concluded that for phenolic lignin model compounds, particularly those possessing electrondonating aromatic ring substituents, ring-cleavage reactions involving superoxide radical anions are dominant, whereas for non-phenolic lignin models, hydroxylation reactions through attack of hydroxyl radicals prevail

  10. Electron reactions in model liquids and biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakale, G.; Gregg, E.C.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following studies: (1) Field-dependent electron attachment; (2) Dependence of electron attachment rate on electron-acceptor dipole moment; (3) Electron attachment in i-octane/TMS mixtures; (4) Electron attachment/detachment equilibria; (5) Electron attachment to reversed micelles; (6) Electron attachment to chemical carcinogens; (7) Radiation-induced bacterial mutagenesis; and (8) Bacterial mutagenicity of nitrobenzene derivatives. 14 references

  11. Modelling of chalcopyrite oxidation reactions in the Outokumpu flash smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating oxidation reactions of chalcopyrite particles together with momentum, heat and mass transfer between particle and gas phase in a flash smelting furnace reaction shaft is presented. In simulation, the equations governing the gas flow are solved numerically with a commercial fluid flow package, Phoenics. The particle phase is introduced into the gas flow by a Particle Source In Cell (PSIC) - technique, where a number of discrete particles is tracked in a gas flow and the relevant source terms for momentum, mass, and heat transfer are added to the gas phase equations. The gas phase equations used are elliptic in nature and the fluid turbulence is described by the (k-{epsilon}) -model. Thermal gas phase radiation is simulated with a six-flux radiation model. The chemical reactions of concentrate particles are assumed to happen at two sharp interfaces, and a shrinking core model is applied to describe the mass transfer of chemical species through the reaction product layer. In a molten state, the oxygen consumption is controlled by a film penetration concept. The reacting concentrate particles are a mixture of chalcopyrite and silica. Also a certain amount of pure inert silica is fed to the process as flux. In the simulations the calculation domain includes the concentrate burner and a cylindrical reaction shaft of an industrial scale flash smelting furnace. Some examples about the simulations carried out by the combustion model are presented. (author)

  12. Modeling chemical reactions in the indoor environment by CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    with an emission pattern similar to an air freshener; this was in contrast to an otherwise identical earlier study in which the terpene was introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor care product (Sørensen and Weschler, 2002). The results show that there are large concentration......The concentrations of ozone and a terpene that react in the gas-phase to produce a hypothetical product were investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for two different air exchange rates. Ozone entered the room with the ventilation air. The terpenes were introduced as a localized source...

  13. Self-reported adverse tattoo reactions: a New York City Central Park study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Bobbi G; Gold, Heidi; Leger, Elizabeth A; Leger, Marie C

    2015-08-01

    Although permanent tattoos are becoming increasingly commonplace, there is a paucity of epidemiological data on adverse tattoo reactions. Several European studies have indicated that tattoo reactions may be relatively common, although the extent of this phenomenon in the United States is largely unknown. To provide insights into the prevalence and nature of adverse tattoo reactions. We administered a survey about adverse tattoo reactions to 300 randomly selected tattooed people in Central Park, New York City. Of 300 participants, 31 (10.3%) reported experiencing an adverse tattoo reaction, 13 (4.3%) reported acute reactions, and 18 (6.0%) suffered from a chronic reaction involving a specific colour lasting for >4 months. Forty-four per cent of colour-specific reactions were to red ink, which was only slightly higher than the frequency of red ink in the sampled population (36%). Twenty-five per cent of chronic reactions were to black ink, which was less than expected based on the number of respondents with black tattoos (90.3%). Study participants with chronic, colour-specific reactions had more tattoo colours than those without reactions. This study shows that tattoo reactions are relatively common, and that further investigation into the underlying causes is merited. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. A comparative study of visual reaction time in table tennis players and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhabhor, Mahesh K; Vidja, Kalpesh; Bhanderi, Priti; Dodhia, Shital; Kathrotia, Rajesh; Joshi, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    Visual reaction time is time required to response to visual stimuli. The present study was conducted to measure visual reaction time in 209 subjects, 50 table tennis (TT) players and 159 healthy controls. The visual reaction time was measured by the direct RT computerized software in healthy controls and table tennis players. Simple visual reaction time was measured. During the reaction time testing, visual stimuli were given for eighteen times and average reaction time was taken as the final reaction time. The study shows that table tennis players had faster reaction time than healthy controls. On multivariate analysis, it was found that TT players had 74.121 sec (95% CI 98.8 and 49.4 sec) faster reaction time compared to non-TT players of same age and BMI. Also playing TT has a profound influence on visual reaction time than BMI. Our study concluded that persons involved in sports are having good reaction time as compared to controls. These results support the view that playing of table tennis is beneficial to eye-hand reaction time, improve the concentration and alertness.

  15. Some studies on the reaction between fly ash and lime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Introduction. In the presence of moisture, fly ash reacts with lime at ordinary temperature and forms a compound possessing cementitious properties. The reaction between lime and fly ash produces calcium silicate hydrates, which are respon- sible for development of strength in fly ash–lime in the form of bricks and blocks.

  16. Study towards benzoin condensation and Baylis-Hillman reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. New heterocyclic ring systems consisting of (±) methanodibenzodiazocine and imidazolium/ benzimidazolium salts were synthesized in very good yield. Subsequently, these halide salts were subjected to the anion exchange reaction with KPF6 to yield the corresponding azolium salts in excellent yield.

  17. Orofacial manifestations of adverse drug reactions: a review study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Sehatpour, Marziye; Mortazavi, Hamed; Bakhshi, Mahin

    2018-01-01

    Adverse reaction to medication is common and may have a variety of clinical manifestations in the oral cavity. The present review paper aimed to describe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) which might be encountered by dental practitioners in every discipline. In this narrative review article, the specialized databases such as PubMed, PubMed Central, MEDLINE, EBSCO, Science Direct, Scopus, and reference books from the years 2000-2016 were used to find relevant documents by using MeSH terms: Adverse Drug Reaction, Drug induced, Medication Related, Mouth, Oral Manifestation, Tooth, Hard Tissue, Soft Tissue. The data were categorized in 4 groups as follows: saliva and salivary glands involvement, soft tissue (mucosal) involvement, hard tissue involvement, and non specific conditions (taste disorders, halitosis, neuropathies, movement disturbances, and infection). Most articles were about the adverse effect of drugs on the function of salivary glands, which often cause a decrease in saliva secretion. Other reactions were less common; meanwhile, the side effect of bisphosphonate was increasing in the alveolar bone, because of its unlimited prescription. Oral health care providers should be familiar with such events, as they will be confronted with them in their practice.

  18. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggin- type heteropolyanion, [PV ... By applying Rehm–Weller relationship, self exchange rate constant for the. –. SCH2COO. –. /S. •. CH2COO. – .... is much more higher than that of mono-anion. HSCH2COO–. 3.4 Marcus theory.

  19. Study on the γ multiplicity in the heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamanin, V.V.; Kugler, A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Ryudiger, Yu.

    1984-01-01

    Medium values of inlet angular momentum (IAM) lsub(bx) for emission channels of α-particles and Li nuclei in the 181 Ta+ 22 Ne reaction in respect to energy of particles as well as for emission channel of α-particles in the Ir+ 12 C, which in the case of incomplete coalescence results in the same residual Tl nuclei as the channel of incomplete coalescence of the 181 Ta( 22 Ne, dxn) reaction have been determined for understanding mechanism of fast particle formation in reactions with heavy ions. Values lsub(bx) have been calculated on the base of measuring mean values of γ-ray multiplicizy in correlation with charged particles, X-radiation and fission fragments of residual nuclei. The experiment has been conducted at ion energies: 22 Ne-145, 155, 165 MeV; 12 C-100 MeV. Dependences lsub(bx) on the energy of emitted particles are obtained. It is concluded that values of IAM corresponding to the channel of incomplete coalescence are determined mainly by properties of the system of the inlet channel. It is also concluded that a possibility of existing two mechanisms of α-particle emission cannot be completely neglected: one of them-with relatively large IAM increasing with Esub(α) growth resulting in residual nucleus fission; the other one - with smaller IAM corresponding to the dxn-reaction channels

  20. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms -RE ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    qualitative considerations. For a highly exothermic reaction, the transition state resembles the reactants. SERIES I ARTICLE are they. It is clear from our discussion that if the H or the D atom is completely transferred to the X (halogen) atom the zero point energy difference at the transition state will be maximum. This will lead ...